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Sample records for provoke seizure discharge

  1. Management of provoked seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misra Usha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A provoked seizure may be due to structural damage (resulting from traumatic brain injury, brain tumor, stroke, tuberculosis, or neurocysticercosis or due to metabolic abnormalities (such as alcohol withdrawal and renal or hepatic failure. This article is a part of the Guidelines for Epilepsy in India. This article reviews the problem of provoked seizure and its management and also provides recommendations based on currently available information. Seizure provoked by metabolic disturbances requires correction of the triggering factors. Benzodiazepines are recommended for treatment of seizure due to alcohol withdrawal; gabapentin for seizure seen in porphyria; and antiepileptic drugs (AED, that are not inducer of hepatic enzymes, in the seizures seen in hepatic dysfunction. In severe traumatic brain injury, with or without seizure, phenytoin (PHT may be given for 7 days. In ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke one may individualize the AED therapy. In cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST, AED may be prescribed if there is seizure or computed tomographic (CT abnormalities or focal weakness; the treatment, in these cases, has to be continued for 1 year. Prophylactic AED is not recommended in cases of brain tumor and neurosurgical procedures and if patient is on an AED it can be stopped after 1 week.

  2. Management of provoked seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Usha Kant; Kalita, Jayantee

    2011-01-01

    A provoked seizure may be due to structural damage (resulting from traumatic brain injury, brain tumor, stroke, tuberculosis, or neurocysticercosis) or due to metabolic abnormalities (such as alcohol withdrawal and renal or hepatic failure). This article is a part of the Guidelines for Epilepsy in India. This article reviews the problem of provoked seizure and its management and also provides recommendations based on currently available information. Seizure provoked by metabolic disturbances requires correction of the triggering factors. Benzodiazepines are recommended for treatment of seizure due to alcohol withdrawal; gabapentin for seizure seen in porphyria; and antiepileptic drugs (AED), that are not inducer of hepatic enzymes, in the seizures seen in hepatic dysfunction. In severe traumatic brain injury, with or without seizure, phenytoin (PHT) may be given for 7 days. In ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke one may individualize the AED therapy. In cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST), AED may be prescribed if there is seizure or computed tomographic (CT) abnormalities or focal weakness; the treatment, in these cases, has to be continued for 1 year. Prophylactic AED is not recommended in cases of brain tumor and neurosurgical procedures and if patient is on an AED it can be stopped after 1 week.

  3. Epilepsy or seizures - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000128.htm Epilepsy or seizures - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You have epilepsy . People with epilepsy have seizures. A seizure is ...

  4. Are seizures in the setting of sleep deprivation provoked?

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    Lawn, Nicholas; Lieblich, Sam; Lee, Judy; Dunne, John

    2014-04-01

    It is generally accepted that sleep deprivation contributes to seizures. However, it is unclear whether a seizure occurring in the setting of sleep deprivation should be considered as provoked or not and whether this is influenced by seizure type and etiology. This information may have an important impact on epilepsy diagnosis and management. We prospectively analyzed the influence of sleep deprivation on the risk of seizure recurrence in patients with first-ever unprovoked seizures and compared the findings with patients with first-ever provoked seizures. Of 1026 patients with first-ever unprovoked seizures, 204 (20%) were associated with sleep deprivation. While the overall likelihood of seizure recurrence was slightly lower in sleep-deprived patients with first-ever seizures (log-rank p=0.03), sleep deprivation was not an independent predictor of seizure recurrence on multivariate analysis. Seizure recurrence following a first-ever unprovoked seizure associated with sleep deprivation was far more likely than for 174 patients with a provoked first-ever seizure (log-rank psleep deprivation should not be regarded as provoked. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ictal brain SPET during seizures pharmacologically provoked with pentylenetetrazol: a new diagnostic procedure in drug-resistant epileptic patients

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    Calcagni, Maria Lucia; Giordano, Alessandro; Bruno, Isabella; Di Giuda, Daniela; De Rossi, Giuseppe; Troncone, Luigi [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Largo A. Gemelli, 8, 00168 Roma (Italy); Parbonetti, Giovanni; Colicchio, Gabriella [Department of Neurosurgery, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma (Italy)

    2002-10-01

    Functional brain imaging plays an important role in seizure focus localisation. However, truly ictal single-photon emission tomography (SPET) studies are not routinely performed owing to technical problems associated with the use of tracers and methodological and logistical difficulties. In this study we tried to resolve both of these issues by means of a new procedure: technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) brain SPET performed during seizures pharmacologically provoked with pentylenetetrazol, a well-known central and respiratory stimulant. We studied 33 drug-resistant epileptic patients. All patients underwent anamnestic evaluation, neuropsychological and psychodynamic assessment, magnetic resonance imaging, interictal and ictal video-EEG monitoring, and interictal and ictal SPET with {sup 99m}Tc-ECD. In order to obtain truly ictal SPET, 65 mg of pentylenetetrazol was injected every 2 minutes and, immediately the seizure began, 740 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-ECD was injected. The scintigraphic findings were considered abnormal if a single area of hyperperfusion was present and corresponded to the site of a single area of hypoperfusion at interictal SPET: the ''hypo-hyperperfusion'' SPET pattern. In 27 of the 33 patients (82%), interictal-ictal SPET showed the hypo-hyperperfusion SPET pattern. Video-EEG showed a single epileptogenic zone in 21/33 patients (64%), and MRI showed anatomical lesions in 19/33 patients (57%). Twenty-two of the 27 patients with hypo-hyperperfusion SPET pattern underwent ablative or palliative surgery and were seizure-free at 3 years of follow-up. No adverse effects were noted during pharmacologically provoked seizure. It is concluded that ictal brain SPET performed during pharmacologically provoked seizure provides truly ictal images because {sup 99m}Tc-ECD is injected immediately upon seizure onset. Using this feasible procedure it is possible to localise the focus, to avoid the limitations due to the unpredictability

  6. Autism: epileptiform discharge in EEG with and without seizure disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobby Hmar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Autism, also known as autistic spectrum disorder, is a neurodevelopmental disorder, characterised by social and communication deficit with repetitive behaviour and restrictive interest. Epilepsy has been found to be highly comorbid disorder though range varies. But epileptiform discharge in autism without history of epilepsy has been reported by various studies. There is no treatment recommendation for abnormal EEG without history of clinical seizure with anticonvulsant in these populations due to the lack of controlled trials. These abnormal EEG may have an important role to explore its association with autism.

  7. Can an exercise bicycle be safely used in the epilepsy monitoring unit?: An exercise method to provoke epileptic seizures and the related safety issues.

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    Kim, Jiyoung; Jung, Dae Soo; Hwang, Kyoung Jin; Seo, Ji-Hye; Na, Geon-Youb; Hong, Seung Bong; Joo, Eun Yeon; Seo, Dae-Won

    2015-05-01

    Long-term videoelectroencephalogram (video-EEG) monitoring is performed to diagnose an epileptic seizure and to investigate the differential diagnosis of paroxysmal events. To provoke an epileptic seizure, an exercise method is performed in some cases during long-term video-EEG recording in the epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU). The purpose of this study was two-fold: to assess the frequency and severity of adverse events associated with the use of an exercise bicycle and to find a way to safely use it in the EMU. A retrospective survey was performed on all epileptic seizure videos recorded in the EMU from January 2012 to December 2013. Three hundred and fifty patients were included in this study. Eleven patients experienced an epileptic seizure while riding the exercise bicycle in the EMU. One patient's foot got stuck between the cycling pedal and its strap, and one patient fell off the exercise bicycle during the epileptic seizure. However, there were no serious adverse events over two years. Epileptic seizures were not frequent while riding the exercise bicycle, and serious injuries did not occur. But, there is a need to improve the safety in the EMU to control the potentially dangerous factors associated with the use of the exercise bicycle and to continuously monitor the patients with help from the staff. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Mozart K.448 listening decreased seizure recurrence and epileptiform discharges in children with first unprovoked seizures: a randomized controlled study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing numbers of reports show the beneficial effects of listening to Mozart music in decreasing epileptiform discharges as well as seizure frequency in epileptic children. There has been no effective method to reduce seizure recurrence after the first unprovoked seizure until now. In this study, we investigated the effect of listening to Mozart K.448 in reducing the seizure recurrence rate in children with first unprovoked seizures. Methods Forty-eight children who experienced their first unprovoked seizure with epileptiform discharges were included in the study. They were randomly placed into treatment (n = 24) and control (n = 24) groups. Children in the treatment group listened to Mozart K.448 daily before bedtime for at least six months. Two patients in the treatment group were excluded from analysis due to discontinuation intervention. Finally, forty-six patients were analyzed. Most of these patients (89.1%) were idiopathic in etiology. Seizure recurrence rates and reduction of epileptiform discharges were compared. Results The average follow-up durations in the treatment and control groups were 18.6 ± 6.6 and 20.1 ± 5.1 months, respectively. The seizure recurrence rate was estimated to be significantly lower in the treatment group than the control group over 24 months (37.2% vs. 76.8%, p = 0.0109). Significant decreases in epileptiform discharges were also observed after 1, 2, and 6 months of listening to Mozart K.448 when compared with EEGs before listening to music. There were no significant differences in gender, mentality, seizure type, and etiology between the recurrence and non-recurrence groups. Conclusions Although the case number was limited and control music was not performed in this study, the study revealed that listening to Mozart K.448 reduced the seizure recurrence rate and epileptiform discharges in children with first unprovoked seizures, especially of idiopathic etiology. We believe that Mozart K.448

  9. Mozart K.448 listening decreased seizure recurrence and epileptiform discharges in children with first unprovoked seizures: a randomized controlled study.

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    Lin, Lung-Chang; Lee, Mei-Wen; Wei, Ruey-Chang; Mok, Hin-Kiu; Yang, Rei-Cheng

    2014-01-13

    Increasing numbers of reports show the beneficial effects of listening to Mozart music in decreasing epileptiform discharges as well as seizure frequency in epileptic children. There has been no effective method to reduce seizure recurrence after the first unprovoked seizure until now. In this study, we investigated the effect of listening to Mozart K.448 in reducing the seizure recurrence rate in children with first unprovoked seizures. Forty-eight children who experienced their first unprovoked seizure with epileptiform discharges were included in the study. They were randomly placed into treatment (n = 24) and control (n = 24) groups. Children in the treatment group listened to Mozart K.448 daily before bedtime for at least six months. Two patients in the treatment group were excluded from analysis due to discontinuation intervention. Finally, forty-six patients were analyzed. Most of these patients (89.1%) were idiopathic in etiology. Seizure recurrence rates and reduction of epileptiform discharges were compared. The average follow-up durations in the treatment and control groups were 18.6 ± 6.6 and 20.1 ± 5.1 months, respectively. The seizure recurrence rate was estimated to be significantly lower in the treatment group than the control group over 24 months (37.2% vs. 76.8%, p = 0.0109). Significant decreases in epileptiform discharges were also observed after 1, 2, and 6 months of listening to Mozart K.448 when compared with EEGs before listening to music. There were no significant differences in gender, mentality, seizure type, and etiology between the recurrence and non-recurrence groups. Although the case number was limited and control music was not performed in this study, the study revealed that listening to Mozart K.448 reduced the seizure recurrence rate and epileptiform discharges in children with first unprovoked seizures, especially of idiopathic etiology. We believe that Mozart K.448 could be a promising alternative treatment in patients with

  10. Acute Renal Failure with Severe Loin Pain and Patchy Renal Vasoconstriction in a Patient without Hypouricemia, Provoked by Epileptic Seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Michitaka; Imaizumi, Takahiro; Yamakawa, Taishi; Ito, Yasuhiko

    2017-01-01

    A 26-year-old Japanese man without hypouricemia and with 3 previous episodes of seizures concurrent with acute kidney injury (AKI) was admitted due to an epileptic seizure, lower back pain and AKI. His creatinine kinase levels were slightly elevated. Patchy renal ischemia on contrast-enhanced computed tomography and persistent residual contrast medium was observed, consistent with acute renal failure with severe loin pain and patchy renal ischemia after anaerobic exercise (ALPE). Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) demonstrated signal changes in the corresponding area. ALPE should be considered a cause of AKI following seizures. We recommend DWI as an alternative diagnostic modality.

  11. Prediction of rhythmic and periodic EEG patterns and seizures on continuous EEG with early epileptiform discharges.

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    Koren, J; Herta, J; Draschtak, S; Pötzl, G; Pirker, S; Fürbass, F; Hartmann, M; Kluge, T; Baumgartner, C

    2015-08-01

    Continuous EEG (cEEG) is necessary to document nonconvulsive seizures (NCS), nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE), as well as rhythmic and periodic EEG patterns of 'ictal-interictal uncertainty' (RPPIIU) including periodic discharges, rhythmic delta activity, and spike-and-wave complexes in neurological intensive care patients. However, cEEG is associated with significant recording and analysis efforts. Therefore, predictors from short-term routine EEG with a reasonably high yield are urgently needed in order to select patients for evaluation with cEEG. The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic significance of early epileptiform discharges (i.e., within the first 30 min of EEG recording) on the following: (1) incidence of ictal EEG patterns and RPPIIU on subsequent cEEG, (2) occurrence of acute convulsive seizures during the ICU stay, and (3) functional outcome after 6 months of follow-up. We conducted a separate analysis of the first 30 min and the remaining segments of prospective cEEG recordings according to the ACNS Standardized Critical Care EEG Terminology as well as NCS criteria and review of clinical data of 32 neurological critical care patients. In 17 patients with epileptiform discharges within the first 30 min of EEG (group 1), electrographic seizures were observed in 23.5% (n = 4), rhythmic or periodic EEG patterns of 'ictal-interictal uncertainty' in 64.7% (n = 11), and neither electrographic seizures nor RPPIIU in 11.8% (n = 2). In 15 patients with no epileptiform discharges in the first 30 min of EEG (group 2), no electrographic seizures were recorded on subsequent cEEG, RPPIIU were seen in 26.7% (n = 4), and neither electrographic seizures nor RPPIIU in 73.3% (n = 11). The incidence of EEG patterns on cEEG was significantly different between the two groups (p = 0.008). Patients with early epileptiform discharges developed acute seizures more frequently than patients without early epileptiform discharges (p = 0.009). Finally, functional

  12. EpiDEA: extracting structured epilepsy and seizure information from patient discharge summaries for cohort identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Licong; Bozorgi, Alireza; Lhatoo, Samden D; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Sahoo, Satya S

    2012-01-01

    Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP) is a poorly understood phenomenon. Patient cohorts to power statistical studies in SUDEP need to be drawn from multiple centers due to the low rate of reported SUDEP incidences. But the current practice of manual chart review of Epilepsy Monitoring Units (EMU) patient discharge summaries is time-consuming, tedious, and not scalable for large studies. To address this challenge in the multi-center NIH-funded Prevention and Risk Identification of SUDEP Mortality (PRISM) Project, we have developed the Epilepsy Data Extraction and Annotation (EpiDEA) system for effective processing of discharge summaries. EpiDEA uses a novel Epilepsy and Seizure Ontology (EpSO), which has been developed based on the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification system, as the core knowledge resource. By extending the cTAKES natural language processing tool developed at the Mayo Clinic, EpiDEA implements specialized functions to address the unique challenges of processing epilepsy and seizure-related clinical free text in discharge summaries. The EpiDEA system was evaluated on a corpus of 104 discharge summaries from the University Hospitals Case Medical Center EMU and achieved an overall precision of 93.59% and recall of 84.01% with an F-measure of 88.53%. The results were compared against a gold standard created by two epileptologists. We demonstrate the use of EpiDEA for cohort identification through use of an intuitive visual query interface that can be directly used by clinical researchers.

  13. Rhythmic 3–4 Hz discharge is insufficient to produce cortical BOLD fMRI decreases in generalized seizures

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    Youngblood, Mark W.; Chen, William C.; Mishra, Asht M.; Enamandram, Sheila; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Motelow, Joshua E.; Bai, Harrison X.; Frohlich, Flavio; Gribizis, Alexandra; Lighten, Alexis; Hyder, Fahmeed; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2015-01-01

    Absence seizures are transient episodes of impaired consciousness accompanied by 3–4 Hz spike-wave discharge on electroencephalography (EEG). Human functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have demonstrated widespread cortical decreases in the blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal that may play an important role in the pathophysiology of these seizures. Animal models could provide an opportunity to investigate the fundamental mechanisms of these changes, however they have so far failed to consistently replicate the cortical fMRI decreases observed in human patients. This may be due to important differences between human seizures and animal models, including a lack of cortical development in rodents or differences in the frequency of rodent (7–8 Hz) and human (3–4 Hz) spike-wave discharge. To examine the possible contributions of these differences, we developed a ferret model that exhibits 3–4 Hz spike-wave seizures in the presence of a sulcated cortex. Measurements of BOLD fMRI and simultaneous EEG demonstrated cortical fMRI increases during and following spike-wave seizures in ferrets. However unlike human patients, significant fMRI decreases were not observed. The lack of fMRI decreases was consistent across seizures of different durations, discharge frequencies, and anesthetic regimes, and using fMRI analysis models similar to human patients. In contrast, generalized tonic-clonic seizures under the same conditions elicited sustained postictal fMRI decreases, verifying that the lack of fMRI decreases with spike-wave was not due to technical factors. These findings demonstrate that 3–4 Hz spike-wave discharge in a sulcated animal model does not necessarily produce fMRI decreases, leaving the mechanism for this phenomenon open for further investigation. PMID:25562830

  14. Epilepsy provoked by television and video games: safety of 100-Hz screens.

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    Ricci, S; Vigevano, F; Manfredi, M; Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, D G

    1998-03-01

    Television (TV) and video games (VG) can provoke seizures in patients with photosensitive epilepsies. Flicker frequency is the most important factor in screen activation. We tested conventional 50-Hz versus 100-Hz monitors during TV viewing and VG playing in 30 photosensitive subjects, 23 of whom had a history of TV or VG seizures or both. Fifteen subjects' discharges were activated by 50-Hz TV; 17 by 50-Hz VG; and one by a 100-Hz screen. Thus, 100-Hz screens protect against screen activation.

  15. Detecting interictal discharges in first seizure patients: ambulatory EEG or EEG after sleep deprivation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geut, I.; Weenink, S.; Knottnerus, I.L.H.; van Putten, Michel J.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Uncertainty about recurrence after a first unprovoked seizure is a significant psychological burden for patients, and motivates the need for diagnostic tools with high sensitivity and specificity to assess recurrence risk. As the sensitivity of a routine EEG after a first unprovoked seizure

  16. Implementation of a Neurocritical Care Program: Improved Seizure Detection and Decreased Antiseizure Medication at Discharge in Neonates With Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Rani Ameena; Espinoza, Liza; Vayalthrikkovil, Sakeer; Buchhalter, Jeffrey; Irvine, Leigh; Bello-Espinosa, Luis; Mohammad, Khorshid

    2016-11-01

    We report the impact of implementing continuous video electroencephalography monitoring for neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy via a protocol in the context of neonatal neuro-critical care program. Neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy were studied retrospectively two years before and after implementing continuous video electroencephalography for 72 hours as a care protocol. Before continuous video electroencephalography, a 60-minute routine electroencephalography was performed at the discretion of the provider. electrographic seizure detection; secondary outcome: use of maintenance antiseizure medications, discharge antiseizure medications, and cumulative burden for each antiseizure medication defined as total mg/kg during hospital stay. A total of 157 patients with a median gestation of 40 weeks were analyzed; 103 (66%) underwent therapeutic hypothermia. Baseline and clinical characteristics including disease severity and cooling were similar. Before continuous video-electroencephalography (n = 86), 44 (51.2%) had clinical seizures, of those 35 had available routine electroencephalography; 12 of 35 (34%) had electrographic seizures. None of the infants without clinical seizures showed electrographic seizures. After continuous video-electroencephalography (n = 71), 34 (47.9%) had clinical seizures, of those 18 (53%) had electrographic seizures; five of 37 (14%) of infants with no clinical seizures had electrographic seizures. The introduction of continuous video-electroencephalography significantly increased electrographic seizure detection (P = 0.016). Although there was no significant difference in the initiation and maintenance use of antiseizure medications after continuous video-electroencephalography, fewer infants were discharged on any antiseizure medication (P = 0.008). Also, the mean phenobarbital burden reduced (P = 0.04), without increase in other antiseizure medications use or burden. Use of continuous video

  17. Mozart K.448 attenuates spontaneous absence seizure and related high-voltage rhythmic spike discharges in Long Evans rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lung-Chang; Juan, Chun-Ting; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Chiang, Ching-Tai; Wei, Ruey-Chang; Lee, Mei-Wen; Mok, Hin-Kiu; Yang, Rei-Cheng

    2013-05-01

    Recent research has revealed more evidence supporting the positive effects of music on humans and animals. However, evidence of music's effects on improving epilepsy in animals is sparse. This study aimed to clarify the influence of Mozart's music in Long Evans rats, which are characterized by spontaneous absence epilepsy (SAE) and high-voltage rhythmic spike (HVRS) discharges. Continuous electroencephalograms comprised of HVRS discharges, and behavioral performance were recorded in Long Evans rats (n=5) before, during, and after exposure to the Mozart's Sonata for Two Pianos in D Major, K.448 (Mozart K.448). The same evaluation was repeated after they had been subjected to daily exposure of the music for 20 days. Seizure frequencies and spontaneous HVRS discharges were reduced in all of the SAE rats during and after music exposure compared with the pre-music stage. The average seizure frequencies were 79.8±24.6, 48±15.2, and 33±12.1/h before, during, and after music exposure, respectively. The average run of spike episodes were 84.6±18.4, 52±17.8, and 36.8±16.9/h before, during, and after music exposure, respectively. The seizure frequencies and related run of spike episodes decreased by 39.8% and 38.5% during, and 58.6% and 56.6% post music exposure, respectively. The average run of spike durations and spike numbers also showed significant decreases (reduction by 47.1%, 47.8% during music and 60.8%, 61.3% post music). After daily music exposure for 20 days, the number of HVRS discharges and seizure frequencies during and after music exposure, however, showed no further accumulative reduction or adaptation effect. These results suggest that Mozart K.448 had a positive short-term effect in attenuating the spontaneous HVRS discharges in Long Evans rats. However, the mechanism needs further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of medication withdrawal on the interictal epileptiform EEG discharges in presurgical evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, N.B.; Alving, J.; Beniczky, S.

    2010-01-01

    Medication withdrawal (MW) is an important method of provoking seizures and activating epileptiform EEG activity during the diagnostic work-up of patients evaluated for epilepsy surgery. Previously it was suggested that MW might influence the seizure-type and activate cortical areas otherwise...... not producing epileptiform discharges, leading to a false localization of the irritative zone. In order to investigate this we reviewed 42 consecutive cases of MW, of 36 patients, during a 3-year period. We compared seizure frequency, seizure-types and the localization of interictal epileptiform discharges...... is an effective and reliable seizure provoking method, and it does not lead to false localization of the irritative zone. (C) 2010 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved...

  19. Etiology and Short-term Outcome of First Seizure in Hospitalized Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikunj, Niraj Kumar; Mishra, Devendra; Juneja, Monica; Talukdar, Bibek

    2016-10-08

    We enrolled 75 consecutive infants presenting with history of first seizure at a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. Clinical and biochemical work-up for etiology, and electroencephalography were performed in all infants. Developmental assessment was done 3-month after discharge. 72% had generalized seizures, and fever was the commonest co-morbidity (57.3%). 68% had provoked seizures, mainly due to hypocalcemia (34.3%) or neuro-infections (29.3%). Seven (9.3%) infants died during hospital stay; mostly those with neuro-infections. 13 (20.3%) infants had developmental delay.

  20. Multichannel continuous electroencephalography-functional near-infrared spectroscopy recording of focal seizures and interictal epileptiform discharges in human epilepsy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ke; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frédéric; Nguyen, Dang Khoa

    2016-07-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) has emerged as a promising neuroimaging technique as it allows noninvasive and long-term monitoring of cortical hemodynamics. Recent work by our group and others has revealed the potential of fNIRS, combined with electroencephalography (EEG), in the context of human epilepsy. Hemodynamic brain responses attributed to epileptic events, such as seizures and interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs), are routinely observed with a good degree of statistical significance and in concordance with clinical presentation. Recording done with over 100 channels allows sufficiently large coverage of the epileptic focus and other areas. Three types of seizures have been documented: frontal lobe seizures, temporal lobe seizures, and posterior seizures. Increased oxygenation was observed in the epileptic focus in most cases, while rapid but similar hemodynamic variations were identified in the contralateral homologous region. While investigating IEDs, it was shown that their hemodynamic effect is observable with fNIRS, that their response is associated with significant (inhibitive) nonlinearities, and that the sensitivity and specificity of fNIRS to localize the epileptic focus can be estimated in a sample of 40 patients. This paper first reviews recent EEG-fNIRS developments in epilepsy research and then describes applications to the study of focal seizures and IEDs.

  1. Provoked vestibulodynia: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Henzell,Helen; Berzins,Karen; Langford,Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Helen Henzell,1,2 Karen Berzins,1,3 Jennifer P Langford4 1Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Carlton, 2Action Centre, Family Planning Victoria, Melbourne, 3Dermatology/Vulval Conditions Clinic, Mercy Hospital for Women, Heidelberg, 4Clifton Hill Physiotherapy, Clifton Hill, VIC, Australia Abstract: Provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) refers to vulvar pain of at least 3 months duration, localized to the vestibule, provoked by touch and sexual activity and occurring in the absence of a clear identifia...

  2. Seizure disorders and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuna, J

    2000-01-01

    Seizures are uncontrolled hypersynchronous electrical discharges of neurons in the brain that interfere with normal function. They are a symptom of an underlying disorder. Epilepsy is a condition of recurring seizures that do not have a reversible metabolic cause. Seizures can be confused with a variety of other conditions, so an understanding of seizure manifestations is crucial in making an accurate diagnosis. Drug therapy is the mainstay of epilepsy treatment, but surgery and vagal nerve stimulation are options for selected refractory cases. Psychosocial consequences of recurring seizures are often more significant to patients than the seizures themselves.

  3. Effect of medication withdrawal on the interictal epileptiform EEG discharges in presurgical evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, N.B.; Alving, J.; Beniczky, S.

    2010-01-01

    Medication withdrawal (MW) is an important method of provoking seizures and activating epileptiform EEG activity during the diagnostic work-up of patients evaluated for epilepsy surgery. Previously it was suggested that MW might influence the seizure-type and activate cortical areas otherwise...... not producing epileptiform discharges, leading to a false localization of the irritative zone. In order to investigate this we reviewed 42 consecutive cases of MW, of 36 patients, during a 3-year period. We compared seizure frequency, seizure-types and the localization of interictal epileptiform discharges...... MW. In one-third of the patients the interictal EEGs after the MW were different from those recorded before the MW. However, in these discordant cases the EEG findings after the MW (and not before the MW) were concordant with the seizure onset zone and the lesional zone. We conclude that MW...

  4. Reliability of seizure semiology in patients with 2 seizure foci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathke, Kevin M; Schäuble, Barbara; Fessler, A James; So, Elson L

    2011-06-01

    To determine whether seizure semiology is reliable in localizing and distinguishing seizures at 2 independent brain foci in the same patient. Two masked reviewers localized seizures from 2 foci by their clinical semiology and intracranial electroencephalograms (EEGs). Epilepsy monitoring unit of referral comprehensive epilepsy program. Seventeen consecutive patients (51 seizures) with sufficient video and intracranial EEG data were identified by reviewing medical records of 366 patients older than 10 years. The primary outcome measures were interobserver agreement between the 2 masked reviewers; the proportion of seizures localized by semiology; the proportion of localized seizures concordant with intracranial EEG localization; and comparison between concordant and nonconcordant seizures in latency of intracranial EEG seizure spread. Interobserver agreement was 41% (κ score, 0.16). Only 30 of 51 seizures (59%) were localized by seizure semiology. The focus localized by semiology was concordant with the location of intracranial EEG seizure onset in 16 of 30 seizures (53%). No significant difference was observed between concordant and nonconcordant seizures in relation to the speed with which the EEG discharge spread from the location of seizure onset to another lobar region (P = .09, Wilcoxon rank sum test). Clinical seizure semiology is not as useful as intracranial EEG in localizing seizure onset in patients with dual seizure foci.

  5. Provoked vestibulodynia: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henzell, Helen; Berzins, Karen; Langford, Jennifer P

    2017-01-01

    Provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) refers to vulvar pain of at least 3 months duration, localized to the vestibule, provoked by touch and sexual activity and occurring in the absence of a clear identifiable cause. The clinical spectrum ranges from mild with distressing discomfort through to severe and disabling pain. Current understanding is that PVD is one of many chronic pain conditions characterized by sensitization of peripheral and central nociceptive pathways, with pain arising due to dysfunctional neuronal activity in the absence of painful stimuli. Pathophysiology is not well understood but is likely a complex interplay of environmental, genetic, psychological and immune factors. Care is multidisciplinary and follows general principles of chronic pain management with the addition of specific therapy tailored to address pelvic floor overactivity, and sexual and relationship difficulties. More recently, the therapeutic use of placebo is gaining traction in chronic pain research and is a very promising adjunctive therapy. The majority of women with PVD are managed outside of tertiary clinic settings, and care depends on availability and affordability of specialized services; however, much can be done by the primary health provider. PVD is common, and highly treatable, especially with early intervention, but unfortunately, many clinicians are unaware of this condition, and the biggest hurdle for women accessing treatment is obtaining a diagnosis. With treatment, most women can expect significant improvement, often with fairly simple interventions, although some women will benefit from referral to specialized centers. The aims of this article are twofold: firstly, to summarize current literature concerning PVD pathophysiology and management; secondly, to provide a framework for clinicians unfamiliar with vulvar medicine to understand and manage PVD.

  6. Provoked vestibulodynia: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henzell H

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Helen Henzell,1,2 Karen Berzins,1,3 Jennifer P Langford4 1Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Carlton, 2Action Centre, Family Planning Victoria, Melbourne, 3Dermatology/Vulval Conditions Clinic, Mercy Hospital for Women, Heidelberg, 4Clifton Hill Physiotherapy, Clifton Hill, VIC, Australia Abstract: Provoked vestibulodynia (PVD refers to vulvar pain of at least 3 months duration, localized to the vestibule, provoked by touch and sexual activity and occurring in the absence of a clear identifiable cause. The clinical spectrum ranges from mild with distressing discomfort through to severe and disabling pain. Current understanding is that PVD is one of many chronic pain conditions characterized by sensitization of peripheral and central nociceptive pathways, with pain arising due to dysfunctional neuronal activity in the absence of painful stimuli. Pathophysiology is not well understood but is likely a complex interplay of environmental, genetic, psychological and immune factors. Care is multidisciplinary and follows general principles of chronic pain management with the addition of specific therapy tailored to address pelvic floor overactivity, and sexual and relationship difficulties. More recently, the therapeutic use of placebo is gaining traction in chronic pain research and is a very promising adjunctive therapy. The majority of women with PVD are managed outside of tertiary clinic settings, and care depends on availability and affordability of specialized services; however, much can be done by the primary health provider. PVD is common, and highly treatable, especially with early intervention, but unfortunately, many clinicians are unaware of this condition, and the biggest hurdle for women accessing treatment is obtaining a diagnosis. With treatment, most women can expect significant improvement, often with fairly simple interventions, although some women will benefit from referral to specialized centers. The aims of this article are twofold

  7. Provoked vestibulodynia: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henzell, Helen; Berzins, Karen; Langford, Jennifer P

    2017-01-01

    Provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) refers to vulvar pain of at least 3 months duration, localized to the vestibule, provoked by touch and sexual activity and occurring in the absence of a clear identifiable cause. The clinical spectrum ranges from mild with distressing discomfort through to severe and disabling pain. Current understanding is that PVD is one of many chronic pain conditions characterized by sensitization of peripheral and central nociceptive pathways, with pain arising due to dysfunctional neuronal activity in the absence of painful stimuli. Pathophysiology is not well understood but is likely a complex interplay of environmental, genetic, psychological and immune factors. Care is multidisciplinary and follows general principles of chronic pain management with the addition of specific therapy tailored to address pelvic floor overactivity, and sexual and relationship difficulties. More recently, the therapeutic use of placebo is gaining traction in chronic pain research and is a very promising adjunctive therapy. The majority of women with PVD are managed outside of tertiary clinic settings, and care depends on availability and affordability of specialized services; however, much can be done by the primary health provider. PVD is common, and highly treatable, especially with early intervention, but unfortunately, many clinicians are unaware of this condition, and the biggest hurdle for women accessing treatment is obtaining a diagnosis. With treatment, most women can expect significant improvement, often with fairly simple interventions, although some women will benefit from referral to specialized centers. The aims of this article are twofold: firstly, to summarize current literature concerning PVD pathophysiology and management; secondly, to provide a framework for clinicians unfamiliar with vulvar medicine to understand and manage PVD. PMID:28979166

  8. Somatosensory reflex seizures in a child with epilepsy related to novel SCN1A mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arican, Pinar; Dundar, Nihal Olgac; Cavusoglu, Dilek; Ozdemır, Taha Resid; Gencpinar, Pinar

    2017-04-01

    Mutations in SCN1A have been reported in patients with different types of epilepsy, including generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus, severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy, malignant migrating partial seizures in infancy, and other infantile epileptic encephalopathies. We report a case of a 10-month-old girl presented with reflex epileptic seizures provoked by somatosensory stimuli with a novel de novo mutation of SCN1A gene. She was observed to have seizures with eye deviation, unresponsiveness provoked by somatosensory stimuli of the face. Video-electroencephalography (EEG) revealed generalized spike-and-wave patterns. She experienced one or two focal clonic seizures per month over the 6 months while taking valproate and carbamazepine. At 22 months old, she was hospitalized with an episode of generalized tonic clonic febrile status epilepticus lasting for 45 min. Interictal sleep video-EEG showed sharp-and-slow wave discharges in the left occipital lobe with normal background activity. We found a de novo heterozygote mutation in SCN1A gene, c.1337A>C (p. Q422P). To our knowledge, this mutation has not been previously described in the SCN1A gene and this is the first report of epilepsy related to SCN1A mutation as a presenting with reflex epilepsy of somatosensory stimuli. This case report contributes to an expanding clinical spectrum of patients with SCN1A mutations.

  9. [Another seizure classification--Semiological Seizure Classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ji-Ho; Kwan, Shang-Yeong; Wu, Dean; Su, Min-Shin; Yiu, Chun-Hing

    2004-09-01

    The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) introduced in 1981 a seizure classification based on clinical semiology, interictal EEG findings, and ictal EEG patterns. Such classification depends heavily on detailed electroclinical correlation. After 20 years' progress in epileptology, many clinicians have found it difficult to make a "definite" seizure diagnosis clinically without a series of electrophysiological examinations, particularly in the infants, and further advancement in epileptology has findings have made the previous classification inefficient. Lüders and colleagues have proposed a classification, Semiological Seizure Classification (SSC), based exclusively on ictal semiology, which was published in the official journal of ILAE-EPILEPSIA in 1998. The EEG, neuroimaging and other laboratory results should be analyzed separately and then integrated to define the epileptic syndromes. The seizure diagnosis is thus made through a "what-you-see-is-what-you-get" way. It has also provoked an extensive discussion about the necessity of this new classification. In this review, we present the original guideline, which has been used at The Cleveland Clinic Foundation for years, to introduce another method of epileptic seizure classification.

  10. Seizure precipitants in a community-based epilepsy cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassenaar, Merel; Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, Dorothée G A; de Haan, Gerrit-Jan; Carpay, Johannes A; Leijten, Frans S S

    2014-04-01

    Epileptic seizures can be provoked by several factors. Better understanding of these factors may improve a patient's sense of control and could reduce seizures. In daily practice, the recognition of seizure precipitants relies heavily on clinical or video-EEG evidence, which can be difficult to obtain. Studies of seizure provocation are largely based on selected hospital-based patient populations, which may lead to biased occurrence estimates. Self-reported seizure precipitants are rarely studied, yet are necessary to understand the experiences of patients and improve epilepsy management. We performed a cross-sectional community-based study of 248 epilepsy patients, selected by pharmacy records of anti-epileptic drug use. Self-reported seizure precipitants and potential associated characteristics were assessed using questionnaires. Almost half of all patients (47 %) reported one or more seizure precipitants, of which stress, sleep deprivation, and flickering lights were the most common. In this community-based setting, light-provoked seizures were especially frequent compared to the literature. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), a lower age at seizure onset, and having auras or prodromes were found to be important independent prognostic factors associated with provoked seizures. IGE and a younger age at seizure onset have been linked to provoked seizures in earlier reports. The finding of auras or prodromes as a prognostic factor was unexpected, though case reports have described provoked seizures in patients having auras. Assessment of these factors may facilitate the early recognition of seizure precipitants in daily clinical practice. This is important for the optimization of epilepsy management for a large group of patients, as provoked seizures are expected to occur frequently.

  11. [First generalized tonic-clonic seizure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realfsen, Martha Seim; Bø, Siri M Hylleraas; Lossius, Morten I; Nakken, Karl O

    2015-08-11

    First onset of a generalized tonic-clonic seizure is a frequent reason for hospital admissions. This article aims to provide a brief overview of the epidemiology, etiology, investigation and treatment of a first generalized tonic-clonic seizure. The review is based on a discretionary sample of English-language articles found through a search in PubMed, and the authors' own clinical experience. A first generalized tonic-clonic seizure is traditionally divided into either a provoked or an unprovoked seizure. Provoked seizures occur in close temporal relationship to a systemic disorder or to a brain insult, for example a stroke or a head trauma. Unprovoked seizures occur in the absence of such factors. The incidence of provoked and unprovoked seizures is 35/100.000 person years and 50/100,000 person years, respectively. The occurrence is influenced by genetic and lifestyle factors. The hospital assessment includes a thorough case history, a somatic and neurological examination, ECG, standard EEG, and cerebral MRI. An immediate cerebral CT is often carried out. In case of provoked seizures, both treatment and estimation of the recurrence risk depends on the underlying cause. Antiepileptic drug treatment initiated after a first unprovoked seizure may reduce the risk of seizure recurrence. However, no long term risk reduction has been shown compared to delaying treatment until after a second seizure. Patients who experience a first generalized tonic-clonic seizure are a heterogenous group, and a thorough diagnostic assessment is necessary in order to provide tailored treatment and a reliable prognosis.

  12. Mapping brain activity on the verge of a photically induced generalized tonic-clonic seizure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeller, Friederike; Siebner, Hartwig R; Wolff, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    In a photosensitive patient intermittent photic stimulation (IPS) accidentally provoked a generalized tonic-clonic seizure during simultaneous recordings of electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Before seizure onset, IPS consistently induced generalized ph...

  13. Relation between stress-precipitated seizures and the stress response in childhood epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Campen, Jolien S.; Jansen, Floor E.; Pet, Milou A.; Otte, Willem M.; Hillegers, Manon H J; Joëls, Marian; Braun, Kees P J

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with epilepsy report that seizures are sometimes triggered or provoked. Stress is the most frequently self-reported seizure-precipitant. The mechanisms underlying stress-sensitivity of seizures are currently unresolved. We hypothesized that stress-sensitivity of seizures

  14. [Ecstatic seizures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhachev, S A; Astapenko, A V; Osos, E L; Zmachynskaya, O L; Gvishch, T G

    2015-01-01

    Ecstatic seizures is a rare manifestation of epilepsy. They were described for the first time by F.M. Dostoevsky. Currently, the description of ecstatic seizures is possible to find in the scientific literature. The description of the own observation of a patient with emotional-affective seizures is presented. A role of the anterior insular cortex in the ecstatic seizures origin is discussed. The similarities between the feelings reported during ecstatic seizures and the feelings experienced under the effect of stimulant addictive drugs are described. The possible reasons of the low frequency of emotional-affective seizures are considered.

  15. Effect of prophylactic phenobarbital on seizures, encephalopathy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Seizures after an asphyxial insult may result in brain damage in neonates. Prophylactic phenobarbital may reduce seizures. Objective. To determine the e€ect of prophylactic phenobarbital on seizures, death and neurological outcome at hospital discharge. Methods. Neonates with base de.cit >16 mmol/l and ...

  16. An Emergency Medicine-Focused Review of Seizure Mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, James; Long, Brit; Koyfman, Alex

    2017-05-01

    Seizures result in a change in motor, sensory, and behavioral symptoms caused by abnormal neurologic electrical activity. The symptoms share similar presentations of several other conditions, leading to difficulties in diagnosis and frequent improper management. This review evaluates adult patients with suspected seizure, signs and symptoms of seizure, mimics of seizure, and an approach to management of seizure mimics. A seizure is caused by abnormal neurologic electrical activity resulting in altered motor, sensory, and behavioral symptoms. Other conditions may present similarly, causing a challenge in diagnosis. These conditions include syncope, psychogenic nonepileptic seizures, stroke or transient ischemic attack, sleep disorders, movement disorders, and migraines. Diagnosis of seizures in the emergency department (ED) is often clinical. Differentiation between seizures and other conditions can be difficult. Laboratories and imaging provide little benefit in definitive diagnosis in the emergency setting. For patients that have an apparent seizure, resuscitation and management is precedent while identifying any provoking factors and treatment of those factors. For adults recovering from suspected seizure, the combination of a focused history, physical examination, and additional studies can provide assistance in diagnosis. Patients with an apparent seizure should be resuscitated with identification of provoking factors. Many conditions can mimic seizures. A focused history, physical examination, and additional studies will assist in differentiating seizures from mimics. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Imaging seizure activity: a combined EEG/EMG-fMRI study in reading epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salek-Haddadi, Afraim; Mayer, Thomas; Hamandi, Khalid; Symms, Mark; Josephs, Oliver; Fluegel, Dominique; Woermann, Friedrich; Richardson, Mark P; Noppeney, Uta; Wolf, Peter; Koepp, Matthias J

    2009-02-01

    To characterize the spatial relationship between activations related to language-induced seizure activity, language processing, and motor control in patients with reading epilepsy. We recorded and simultaneously monitored several physiological parameters [voice-recording, electromyography (EMG), electrocardiography (ECG), electroencephalography (EEG)] during blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in nine patients with reading epilepsy. Individually tailored language paradigms were used to induce and record habitual seizures inside the MRI scanner. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was used for structural brain analysis. Reading-induced seizures occurred in six out of nine patients. One patient experienced abundant orofacial reflex myocloni during silent reading in association with bilateral frontal or generalized epileptiform discharges. In a further five patients, symptoms were only elicited while reading aloud with self-indicated events. Consistent activation patterns in response to reading-induced myoclonic seizures were observed within left motor and premotor areas in five of these six patients, in the left striatum (n = 4), in mesiotemporal/limbic areas (n = 4), in Brodmann area 47 (n = 3), and thalamus (n = 2). These BOLD activations were overlapping or adjacent to areas physiologically activated during language and facial motor tasks. No subtle structural abnormalities common to all patients were identified using VBM, but one patient had a left temporal ischemic lesion. Based on the findings, we hypothesize that reflex seizures occur in reading epilepsy when a critical mass of neurons are activated through a provoking stimulus within corticoreticular and corticocortical circuitry subserving normal functions.

  18. Absence Seizure (Petit Mal Seizure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the seizures continue to occur despite taking anti-seizure medication Contact 911 or emergency services in your area: If you observe prolonged automatic behaviors lasting minutes to hours — activities such as eating or moving ... any seizure lasting more than five minutes Causes Many children ...

  19. We want to be provoked

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgren, Steen

    2001-01-01

    are often considered negative. But new views or knowledge are often provocative. To my opinion this is a good and needed provocation. For-given-taken professional values need to be questioned: as well as the usual roles of residents and professionals in the ongoing regeneration projects. My contribution......The title is a quotation from one of the meetings between residents and professionals during the Holmbladsgade regeneration process. During a discussion of future projects somebody asked what the residents expected from the professionals. We want to be provoked a resident answered. Provocations...

  20. Ambroxol-induced focal epileptic seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenta, Leonardo; Morano, Alessandra; Fattouch, Jinane; Casciato, Sara; Fanella, Martina; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that in epileptic patients some compounds and different drugs used for the treatment of comorbidities can facilitate or provoke seizures, this evidence regarding a wide spectrum of pharmacological categories. The potential facilitating factors usually include direct toxic effects or pharmacological interactions of either active ingredients or excipients. We report the case of a patient with drug-resistant epilepsy who experienced focal epileptic seizures, easily and constantly reproducible, after each administration of a cough syrup. This is, to our knowledge, the first electroencephalogram-documented case of focal epileptic seizures induced by cough syrup containing ambroxol as active ingredient.

  1. Dissociation of spontaneous seizures and brainstem seizure thresholds in mice exposed to eight flurothyl-induced generalized seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiyala, Sridhar B; Ferland, Russell J

    2017-03-01

    epileptogenesis. Moreover, these findings indicated that the transition of forebrain ictal discharge into the brainstem seizure network occurs due to changes in brainstem seizure thresholds that are independent of spontaneous seizure expression.

  2. Classification of clinical semiology in epileptic seizures in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Lakshmi; Palumbo, Linda; Ghosh, Soumya

    2012-03-01

    The clinical semiology of 61 neonatal seizures with EEG correlates, in 24 babies was analysed. Most seizures (89%) had multiple features during the EEG discharge. The seizures were classified using the prominent clinical feature at onset, and all features seen during the seizure, using an extended classification scheme. Orolingual features occurred most frequently at onset (30%), whereas ocular phenomena occurred most often during the seizure (70%). Orolingual, ocular and autonomic features were seen at onset in 55% of the seizures. Seizure onsets with clonic, tonic and hypomotor features were seen in 20%, 8% and 18% respectively. Clinico-electrical correlations were as follows. The EEG discharge involved both hemispheres in 54% of all seizures, in clonic seizures this was 93%. Focal clonic seizures were associated with EEG seizure onset from the contralateral hemisphere. Majority of the clonic and hypomotor seizures had a left hemisphere ictal EEG onset. Orolingual seizures frequently started from the right hemisphere, whereas ocular and autonomic seizures arose from either hemisphere. There was no significant difference in mortality, morbidity, abnormal neuroimaging and EEG background abnormalities in babies with or without clonic seizures. This study provides insights into neuronal networks that underpin electroclinical seizures, by analysing and classifying the obvious initial clinical features and those during the seizure. Copyright © 2011 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Risk factors associated with provoked pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjonbrataj, Endri; Kim, Ji Na; Gjonbrataj, Juarda; Jung, Hye In; Kim, Hyun Jung; Choi, Won-Il

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the risk factors associated with provoked pulmonary embolism (PE). This retrospective cohort study included 237 patients with PE. Patients that had transient risk factors at diagnosis were classified as having provoked PE, with the remaining patients being classified as having unprovoked PE. The baseline clinical characteristics and factors associated with coagulation were compared. We evaluated the risk factors associated with provoked PE. Of the 237 PE patients, 73 (30.8%) had provoked PE. The rate of respiratory failure and infection, as well as the disseminated intravascular coagulation score and ratio of right ventricular diameter to left ventricular diameter were significantly higher in patients with provoked PE than in those with unprovoked PE. The protein and activity levels associated with coagulation, including protein C antigen, protein S antigen, protein S activity, anti-thrombin III antigen, and factor VIII, were significantly lower in patients with provoked PE than in those with unprovoked PE. Multivariate analysis showed that infection (odds ratio [OR], 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4 to 7.4) and protein S activity (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.95 to 0.99) were significantly associated with provoked PE. Protein S activity and presence of infection were important factors associated with provoked PE. We should pay attention to the presence of infection in patients with provoked PE.

  4. Treatment of refractory neonatal seizures with topiramate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesgo, Rudimar; Winckler, Maria Isabel; Ohlweiler, Lygia; Ranzan, Josiane; Becker, Michele; Salvador, Socrates; Magalhaes, Luiza; Ribeiro, Ricardo

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the usefulness of topiramate in refractory neonatal seizures. We reported the clinical off-label use of topiramate in three cases of refractory neonatal seizures of unclear origin with no response to conventional antiepileptic drugs. In all cases, the seizures were completely controlled with adding topiramate. All patients became seizure free during hospitalization and were followed by approximately 1 year after hospital discharge, with monotherapy with topiramate. The clinical off-label use of topiramate in neonatal seizures is still incipient. When searching publications in this matter, only one report was identified. Because of its efficacy for both seizures and neuroprotection, topiramate could be a useful choice in refractory neonatal seizures. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. Mental Retardation, Mental Illness, and Seizure Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pary, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Review of psychiatric hospital discharge summaries for 247 individuals with mental retardation and psychiatric disorders found that 39 had a seizure diagnosis. The only difference between the groups with and without seizures was level of mental retardation. No differences existed concerning length of stay, transfer to state hospital, psychiatric…

  6. Diagnosing Functional Seizures in Children and Adolescent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wichaidit, Bianca Taaning; Rask, Charlotte Ulrikka; Ostergaard, John R

    2014-01-01

    Functional seizures (FS) is a condition where the child experiences seizure-like events, without abnormal electrical discharge as measured by EEG, and with high risk of misdiagnosis. Diagnosing FS contains: 1) video-EEG, 2) anamnestic evaluation, focusing on the presence of psychosocial stressors......, psychiatric co-morbidity and functional symptoms other than FS, and 3) evaluation of seizure characteristics such as long duration, seizure initiation during wakefulness and in the presence of witnesses asynchronous movements, and no incontinence, tongue bite and injury related to the event....

  7. Seizures after intravenous tramadol given as premedication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit Kumar Raiger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old, 50-kg female with a history of epilepsy was scheduled for elective breast surgery (fibroadenoma under general anaesthesia. She was given glycopyrrolate 0.2 mg, ondansetron 4 mg and tramadol 100 mg i.v. as premedication. Within 5 min, she had an acute episode of generalised tonic-clonic seizure that was successfully treated with 75 mg thiopentone i.v. and after 30 min, she was given general anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Surgery, intra-operative period, extubation and post-operative period were uneventful. We conclude that tramadol may provoke seizures in patients with epilepsy even within the recommended dose range.

  8. Seizure Freedom After Limited Hippocampal Radiofrequency Thermocoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Han-Tao; Lee, Ching-Yi; Lim, Siew-Na; Chang, Chun-Wei; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Wu, Tony

    2016-12-01

    Surgical interventions are often used for freedom from seizure in patients with drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. A patient with seizure foci in the left mesiotemporal region underwent limited-size stereotactic radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RF-TC) over the left hippocampus. A 37-year-old woman with febrile convulsion in her childhood was admitted to our neurologic department with complex partial seizure with secondary generalization. Electroencephalography showed epileptogenic focus mainly from the left mesiotemporal region, and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed a left hippocampal atrophy. Because of failure to control seizure after use of several antiepileptic drugs, drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy was diagnosed. RF-TC was done in the left hippocampus. Unique features of our technique include intraoperative electroencephalography recordings directly from electrodes on the left hippocampus, an aura sensation provoked during the low-temperature test thermocoagulation, and therapeutic thermocoagulation performed via a Radionics radiofrequency lead. In the 16-week period following the surgery, the patient experienced no seizure attacks and no significant postoperative adverse effects or memory impairments. Compared with other reports using RF-TC, our case demonstrates a 1-step minimally invasive surgery that reduces hippocampal volume loss, shortens the length of hospital stay, decreases the occurrence of postoperative infection, and achieves good outcomes for epilepsy control. Favorable seizure control was achieved with minimally invasive RF-TC. Further use of this technique is warranted in cases of drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. CSF and plasma adipokines after tonic-clonic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmio, Johanna; Vuolteenaho, Katriina; Lehtimäki, Kai; Nieminen, Riina; Peltola, Jukka; Moilanen, Eeva

    2016-07-01

    Adipokines, especially leptin and adiponectin, have gained increasing importance in pathophysiology of various neurological diseases including epilepsy. There are experimental data suggesting a role for leptin in the genesis of seizures and neuroprotection related to seizures. However there are no clinical studies on the effects of epileptic seizures on adipokines. We measured cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma levels of leptin, adiponectin and adipsin after provoked or unprovoked primary or secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizures in 13 female patients and seven controls. The samples were taken within 24h after the seizure onset. Leptin plasma levels correlated negatively with the time to sample withdrawal, i.e. the longer the time interval between the seizure and the sample the lower the leptin levels in the patients. Interestingly, plasma adiponectin levels were significantly increased after the seizure episode. This study provides further evidence that there are seizure-induced acute changes in adipokine metabolism. Leptin concentrations seem to decrease during the first 24h after the seizure whereas adiponectin levels increase. The meaning of this response is far from clear, but it might be an endogenous attempt to prevent harmful effects of epileptic seizures in the central nervous system. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The relationship between epileptiform discharges and background activity in the visual analysis of electroencephalographic examinations in dogs with seizures of different etiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzosek, M; Ives, J R; Karczewski, M; Dziadkowiak, E; Gruszka, E

    2017-04-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings in 125 outpatient dogs with various epileptiform encephalopathies were acquired under medetomidine sedation using subdermal wire electrodes. The features of canine EEG (background activity [BGA] and epileptiform discharges [EDs]) were assessed, described and compared. The dogs included neurologically healthy controls (N, n = 19), dogs with portosystemic shunt (PSS, n = 9), dogs with intracranial pathologies (IP, n = 27) and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IE, n = 70). A visual EEG analysis revealed significantly more pronounced high voltage, low-frequency BGA in the PSS and IP groups in comparison to the N and IE groups (PSS vs. N, PSS vs. IE P dogs in the PSS group, 77.78% (n = 21/27) of the dogs in the IP group and 61.43% (n = 43/70) of the dogs in the IE group. The presence of bilateral symmetric triphasic (BST) waves was significantly higher in the PSS group than in the remaining groups. There was a strong prevalence of spike-waves in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy and of BST waves in dogs with portosystemic shunt. None of the dogs in group N had spike-waves or BST activity. EDs were observed more frequently in high and very high voltage, low frequency BGA than in low voltage, high frequency BGA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Seizures and Teens: Stress, Sleep, & Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne

    2007-01-01

    Most parents are used to erratic sleep patterns and mood swings in their teenagers. When these occur in an adolescent with seizures, however, the parent may wonder if sleep and mood problems are related to seizures. Sorting out the cause and effects of sleep in an adolescent with seizures can be confusing. Since stress can be a contributor to both…

  12. On the nature of seizure dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, William C.; Quilichini, Pascale P.; Ivanov, Anton I.

    2014-01-01

    Seizures can occur spontaneously and in a recurrent manner, which defines epilepsy; or they can be induced in a normal brain under a variety of conditions in most neuronal networks and species from flies to humans. Such universality raises the possibility that invariant properties exist that characterize seizures under different physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we analysed seizure dynamics mathematically and established a taxonomy of seizures based on first principles. For the predominant seizure class we developed a generic model called Epileptor. As an experimental model system, we used ictal-like discharges induced in vitro in mouse hippocampi. We show that only five state variables linked by integral-differential equations are sufficient to describe the onset, time course and offset of ictal-like discharges as well as their recurrence. Two state variables are responsible for generating rapid discharges (fast time scale), two for spike and wave events (intermediate time scale) and one for the control of time course, including the alternation between ‘normal’ and ictal periods (slow time scale). We propose that normal and ictal activities coexist: a separatrix acts as a barrier (or seizure threshold) between these states. Seizure onset is reached upon the collision of normal brain trajectories with the separatrix. We show theoretically and experimentally how a system can be pushed toward seizure under a wide variety of conditions. Within our experimental model, the onset and offset of ictal-like discharges are well-defined mathematical events: a saddle-node and homoclinic bifurcation, respectively. These bifurcations necessitate a baseline shift at onset and a logarithmic scaling of interspike intervals at offset. These predictions were not only confirmed in our in vitro experiments, but also for focal seizures recorded in different syndromes, brain regions and species (humans and zebrafish). Finally, we identified several possible biophysical

  13. Alcohol withdrawal seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, John R

    2009-06-01

    The topic of alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS), including delirium tremens and especially seizures, is reviewed. From mice and rat studies, it is known that both N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors are involved in AWS. During alcohol intoxication chronic adaptations of NMDA and GABA receptors occur, and during alcohol withdrawal a hyperexcitable state develops. In studies on humans, during intoxication the NMDA receptors are activated and mediate tonic inhibition. In withdrawal, a rebound activation of these receptors occurs. Both GABA-A and GABA-B receptors, especially the alpha2 subunit of GABA-A receptors, are also likely involved. Homocysteine increases with active drinking, and in withdrawal, excitotoxicity likely is induced by a further increase in homocysteine, viewed as a risk factor for AWS and also as a screening tool. The dopamine transporter gene is also associated with AWS. Characteristics involves changes in the ECG, especially an increase in QT interval, and EEG changes, including abnormal quantified EEG, at times periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges, and especially seizures, usually occurring 6-48h after the cessation of drinking. Therapy has emphasized benzodiazepines, mainly diazepam and lorazepam, but more standard antiepileptic drugs, like carbamazepine and topiramate, are also effective and safe.

  14. Mastectomy - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast removal surgery - discharge; Nipple-sparing mastectomy - discharge; Total mastectomy - discharge; Simple mastectomy - discharge; Modified radical mastectomy - discharge; Breast cancer - mastectomy -discharge

  15. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: our video-EEG experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nežádal, Tomáš; Hovorka, Jiří; Herman, Erik; Němcová, Iveta; Bajaček, Michal; Stichová, Eva

    2011-09-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the number of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) in our patients with a refractory seizure disorder, to determine the 'typical' PNES semiology using video-EEG monitoring and describe other PNES parameters. We evaluated prospectively 596 patients with pharmacoresistant seizures. All these patients underwent continuous video-EEG monitoring. In consenting patients, we used suggestive seizure provocation. We assessed seizure semiology, interictal EEG, brain MRI, psychiatric co-morbidities, personality profiles, and seizure outcome. In the sample of 596 monitored patients, we detected 111 (19.3%) patients with PNES. Of the 111 patients with PNES, 86.5% had spontaneous and 76.5% had provoked seizures. The five most typical symptoms were: initially closed eyelids (67.6%), rapid tremor (47.7%), asynchronous limb movement (37.8%), preictal pseudosleep (33.3%), and side-to-side head movement (32.4%). Interictal EEG was rated as abnormal in 46.2% and with epileptiform abnormality in 9%. Brain MRI was abnormal in 32 (28.8%) patients. Personality disorders (46.8%), anxiety (39.6%), and depression (12.6%) were the most frequent additional psychiatric co-morbidities. PNES outcome after at least 2 years is reported; 22.5% patients was seizure-free; one-third had markedly reduced seizure frequency. We have not seen any negative impact of the provocative testing on the seizure outcome. Video-EEG monitoring with suggestive seizure provocation supported by clinical psychiatric and psychological evaluation significantly contributes to the correct PNES diagnosis, while interictal EEG and brain MRI are frequently abnormal. Symptoms typical for PNES, as opposed to epileptic seizures, could be distinguished.

  16. Febrile Seizure Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Cisneros

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This simulation session is appropriate for medical students, community physicians, or residents in emergency medicine, neurology, pediatrics, or family medicine. Introduction: Febrile seizures are the most common form of seizures in childhood; they are thought to occur in 2-5% of all children.1-3 Febrile seizures are defined as a seizure in association with a febrile illness in children without a central nervous system infection, previous afebrile seizure, known brain disorder, or electrolyte abnormalities. 1,2 They typically occur between 6 months and 18 months of age though they can occur up to 5 years of age.3 Febrile seizures are categorized as: simple (generalized seizure lasting less than 15 minutes in a child aged 6 months to 5 years, and less than 1 in a 24 hour period or complex (a focal seizure or generalized seizure lasting greater than 15 minutes, or multiple seizures in a 24 hour period. 1,3 Treatment for febrile seizures is based on treating the underlying cause of the fever and giving reassurance and education to the parents.2 Mortality is extremely rare, and there is no difference in the patient’s cognitive abilities after a febrile seizure, even when the seizure is prolonged.1 Objectives: At the end of this simulation session, the learner will be able to: 1 discuss the management of febrile seizures 2 discuss when placement of an advanced airway is indicated in the management of a febrile seizure 3 list the risk factors for febrile seizures 4 prepare a differential diagnosis for the causes of febrile seizures 5 educate family members on febrile seizures. Methods: This educational session is a high-fidelity simulation.

  17. Newly-diagnosed epileptic seizures in three populations: Geneva (EPIGEN), Martinique (EPIMART), and the Reunion Island (EPIREUN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Devender; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Mignard, Claude; Smadja, Didier; Tchalla, Achille Edem; Marin, Benoît; Jallon, Pierre

    2013-09-01

    The objective was to analyse and discuss data from three studies of newly-diagnosed epileptic seizures (provoked and unprovoked) conducted in Geneva, Martinique, and the Reunion Island, in which the same methodology was used. We extracted data from three studies in which the incidence of seizures was estimated and aetiologies identified. Data was extracted and analysed using STATA. Group comparison was performed firstly for each study as a single group, and secondly by considering Martinique and the Reunion Island as an overseas group, in comparison with Geneva, considered as a mainland group. Uncorrected χ(2)was used and statistical significance (two-sided, p=0.05) was determined for each aetiology per cohort. RESULTSThe incidence of newly-diagnosed epileptic seizures per 100,000 was 71.0, 80.6, and 100.4 in Geneva, Martinique, and the Reunion Island, respectively. A bimodal distribution and predominance of generalised seizures was noted. The male to female ratio was higher in Martinique (∼2.0) than other populations (∼1.5). Status epilepticus was noted in Geneva and more so in the Reunion Island. The incidence of provoked seizures per 100,000 was 25.2, 16.4, and 17.7, and for unprovoked seizures was 45.6, 64.1, and 81.2 in Geneva, Martinique, and the Reunion Island, respectively. There was a greater risk of provoked seizures in Geneva relative to the overseas group, which was due to tumours, use of toxic substances, and drug abuse. The risk of unprovoked seizures in Geneva was due to trauma and infections. In Martinique, alcoholism and HIV were foremost factors for provoked and unprovoked seizures, and stroke was an important aetiology in both Martinique (provoked seizures) and the Reunion Island (unprovoked seizures). The risk of provoked seizures was greatest in Geneva and risk of unprovoked seizures was greatest in the Reunion Island. Toxic substances, alcohol, infection, and trauma constituted major factors for epileptic seizures in Geneva, while

  18. Emergency department seizure epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, Jennifer L; Goldstein, Joshua N; Pallin, Daniel J

    2011-02-01

    Although only 3% of people in the United States are diagnosed with epilepsy, 11% will have at least one seizure during their lifetime. Seizures account for about 1% of all emergency department (ED) visits, and about 2% of visits to children's hospital EDs. Seizure accounts for about 3% of prehospital transports. In adult ED patients, common causes of seizure are alcoholism, stroke, tumor, trauma, and central nervous system infection. In children, febrile seizures are most common. In infants younger than 6 months, hyponatremia and infection are important considerations. Epilepsy is an uncommon cause of seizures in the ED, accounting for a minority of seizure-related visits. Of ED patients with seizure, about 7% have status epilepticus, which has an age-dependent mortality averaging 22%. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Seizure Disorders in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... abnormal. A seizure can cause a change in mood, emotions, consciousness, or movement. What is epilepsy? Epilepsy is ... lead to seizures, which are temporary changes in mood, emotions, consciousness, or movement. Epilepsy is diagnosed if a ...

  20. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis provoked by furosemide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andżelika Schwann-Majewska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP is a skin disease characterized by the sudden appearance of generalized pustules, accompanied by elevated body temperature and neutrophilia. Objective. Presentation of a patient with AGEP provoked by furosemide. Case report. We present a case of a 65-year-old patient diagnosed with and treated for generalized pustular eruption, with fever and changes in laboratory tests. Numerous coexisting medical conditions and a great number of frequently changed drugs (ciprofloxacin, allopurinol, folic acid, calcium carbonate, cyclophosphamide, atorvastatin, betaxolol and furosemide hindered identification of the causative factor. Conclusions. On the basis of the medical history and clinical picture, the patient was diagnosed with generalized exanthematous pustulosis induced by furosemide.

  1. Closed-loop seizure control on epileptic rat models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Sheng-Fu; Liao, Yi-Cheng; Shaw, Fu-Zen; Chang, Da-Wei; Young, Chung-Ping; Chiueh, Herming

    2011-08-01

    In this paper numerous alternative treatments in addition to pharmacological therapy are proposed for their use in epileptic patients. Epileptic animal models can play a crucial role in the performance evaluation of new therapeutic techniques. The objective of this research is to first develop various epileptic rat models; second, develop a portable wireless closed-loop seizure controller including on-line seizure detection and real-time electrical stimulation for seizure elimination; and third, apply the developed seizure controller to the animal models to perform on-line seizure elimination. The closed-loop seizure controller was applied to three Long-Evans rats with spontaneous spike-wave discharges (non-convulsive) and three Long-Evans rats with epileptiform activities induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) injection (convulsive) for evaluation. The seizure detection accuracy is greater than 92% (up to 99%), and averaged seizure detection latency is less than 0.6 s for both spontaneous non-convulsive and PTZ-induced convulsive seizures. The average false stimulation rate is 3.1%. Near 30% of PTZ-induced convulsive seizures need more than two times of 0.5 s electrical stimulation for suppression and 90% of the non-convulsive seizures can be suppressed by only one 0.5 s electrical stimulation.

  2. Frontal Lobe Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you're having signs or symptoms of a seizure. Call 911 or call for emergency medical help if you observe someone having a ... which seizure activity lasts much longer than usual. Seizures that last longer than ... emergency. Injury. The motions that occur during frontal lobe ...

  3. Rescue therapies for seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poukas, Valeriya S; Pollard, John R; Anderson, Christopher Todd

    2011-08-01

    Most medical therapies for epilepsy consist of daily (or multiple-daily) dose, fixed-schedule, pharmacologic oral agents. Despite adherence, many patients continue to experience seizures. Various products have been discovered, designed, and marketed to serve as seizure-abortant therapies. These agents can be administered rapidly, as a "rescue" therapy, once a clinical seizure or cluster of seizures starts. Rescue medications are given as needed in an attempt to disrupt progression of a given seizure, and forestall what would otherwise be a more prolonged or more severe clinical event. Seizure-abortants also serve to aid in the management of seizure emergencies, such as prolonged, repetitive seizures, or status epilepticus. These compounds are not appropriate for all patients. Nevertheless, they do provide therapeutic benefit to several groups of patients: 1) those who perceive the onset of their seizures and have time to perform a self-intervention, 2) patients' caregivers who administer the therapy when they witness the onset of an ictal event, and 3) patients who are in the midst of an out-of-the-hospital seizure emergency (a seizure cluster or status epilepticus). In this article we will review currently available and future rescue therapies for seizures: US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved and FDA nonapproved drugs, nonpharmacologic behavioral treatments, the vagus nerve stimulator and the NeuroPace RNS® System (Mountain View, CA).

  4. Emergence of semiology in epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvel, Patrick; McGonigal, Aileen

    2014-09-01

    Semiology, the manifestation of epilepsy, is dependent upon electrical activity produced by epileptic seizures that are organized within existing neural pathways. Clinical signs evolve as the epileptic discharge spreads in both time and space. Studying the relation between these, of which the temporal component is at least as important as the spatial one, is possible using anatomo-electro-clinical correlations of stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) data. The period of semiology production occurs with variable time lag after seizure onset and signs then emerge more or less rapidly depending on seizure type (temporal seizures generally propagating more slowly and frontal seizures more quickly). The subset of structures involved in semiological production, the "early spread network", is tightly linked to those constituting the epileptogenic zone. The level of complexity of semiological features varies according to the degree of involvement of the primary or associative cortex, with the former having a direct relation to peripheral sensory and motor systems with production of hallucinations (visual and auditory) or elementary sensorimotor signs. Depending on propagation pattern, these signs can occur in a "march" fashion as described by Jackson. On the other hand, seizures involving the associative cortex, having a less direct relation with the peripheral nervous system, and necessarily involving more widely distributed networks manifest with altered cognitive and/or behavioral signs whose neural substrate involves a network of cortical structures, as has been observed for normal cognitive processes. Other than the anatomical localization of these structures, the frequency of the discharge is a crucial determinant of semiological effect since a fast (gamma) discharge will tend to deactivate normal function, whereas a slower theta discharge can mimic physiological function. In terms of interaction between structures, the degree of synchronization plays a key role in

  5. Seizure-induced miosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Ahmed-Ramadan; Kirkham, Fenella; Barker, Simon; Gray, William P; Allen, David

    2011-12-01

    Ictal autonomic pupillary dilation is common; however, miosis is rare. We describe a case of focal seizures secondary to cortical dysplasia presenting with bilateral pupillary miosis, rendered seizure free by resective surgery. The seizure-onset zone was localized within the left middle parietal gyrus by intracranial electrographic recording. Seizure onset was coincident with focal left centroparietal fast spike activity on electroencephalography (EEG). A large region of the left frontocentral cortical dysplasia was demonstrated on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Complete resection of the area of cortical dysplasia and additional cortical regions of ictal activity, identified using intracranial EEG, rendered the patient seizure free. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2011 International League Against Epilepsy.

  6. Positron emission tomography in generalized seizures

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    Theodore, W.H.; Brooks, R.; Margolin, R.; Patronas, N.; Sato, S.; Porter, R.J.; Mansi, L.; Bairamian, D.; DiChiro, G.

    1985-05-01

    The authors used /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to study nine patients with clinical absence or generalized seizures. One patient had only absence seizures, two had only generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and six had both seizure types. Interictal scans in eight failed to reveal focal or lateralized hypometabolism. No apparent abnormalities were noted. Two patients had PET scans after isotope injection during hyperventilation-induced generalized spike-wave discharges. Diffusely increased metabolic rates were found in one compared with an interictal scan, and in another compared with control values. Another patient had FDG injected during absence status: EEG showed generalized spike-wave discharges (during which she was unresponsive) intermixed with slow activity accompanied by confusion. Metabolic rates were decreased, compared with the interictal scan, throughout both cortical and subcortical structures. Interictal PET did not detect specific anatomic regions responsible for absence seizure onset in any patient, but the results of the ictal scans did suggest that pathophysiologic differences exist between absence status and single absence attacks.

  7. Hyperventilation provokes symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, U; Afzal, S; Syed, Shakir

    2012-01-01

    Hyperventilation causes respiratory alkalosis. The nervous system is more excitable in alkalosis. This phenomenon can be observed as paraesthesia in fingers and toes as well as around the lips in anxious patients breathing rapidly. We wanted to test this phenomenon on already irritable nerves like the median nerve in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). We deployed 50 patients who came in to the day case unit for carpal tunnel decompression with electro-physiologically proven diagnosis. We devised a test whereby patients were made to hyperventilate under prescribed conditions and repeated Phalen's test and Tinel's sign for comparison. These were compared with a control group chosen randomly among hospital staff. 86% patients had a positive result which was just behind Phalen's test in sensitivity. It was also 100% specific as there were no false positives. Hyperventilation is a phenomenon which provokes carpal tunnel syndrome. Its clinical value remains to be seen due to cumbersome method and probable patient non-compliance but it is a new discovery. It may be useful in other irritable-nerve-syndromes as a test to add to our available armament. It may be an additional factor or a primary reason for nocturnal paraesthesias in CTS patients.

  8. Current approach to differential diagnosis of epileptic seizures and pseudo-seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalet Arıkanoğlu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Epileptic seizure is the emergence of various transient signs and symptoms resulting from abnormal excessive electrical discharges and synchronous activity. Pseudoseizure can be defined as clinical events that resemble epileptic attacks which are not associated with central nervous system dysfunction. It is difficult to differentiate between pseudoseizures and epileptic seizures. Treatment of pseudoseizures like epileptic seizures causes the use of unnecessary and inappropriate antiepileptic medications. Patients refer to emergency polyclinics again and again, and examinations are repeated needlessly. Therefore, their life quality deteriorates and this situation causes economic burden at the same time. In this article, we investigate the clinical features, EEG findings, biological parameters and autonomic neural system tests that should be looked out for in order to differentiate between epileptic seizures and pseudoseizures in conjunction with the latest literature studies. J Clin Exp Invest 2011; 2 (3: 330-334.

  9. Seizures induced by music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunyemi, A O; Breen, H

    1993-01-01

    Musicogenic epilepsy is a rare disorder. Much remains to be learned about the electroclinical features. This report describes a patient who has been followed at our institution for 17 years, and was investigated with long-term telemetered simultaneous video-EEG recordings. She began to have seizures at the age of 10 years. She experienced complex partial seizures, often preceded by elementary auditory hallucination and complex auditory illusion. The seizures occurred in relation to singing, listening to music or thinking about music. She also had occasional generalized tonic clonic seizures during sleep. There was no significant antecedent history. The family history was negative for epilepsy. The physical examination was unremarkable. CT and MRI scans of the brain were normal. During long-term simultaneous video-EEG recordings, clinical and electrographic seizure activities were recorded in association with singing and listening to music. Mathematical calculation, copying or viewing geometric patterns and playing the game of chess failed to evoke seizures.

  10. Seizure semiology and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Diosely C; Jehi, Lara; Chapin, Jessica; Krishnaiengar, Suparna; Novak, Eric; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy; Najm, Imad

    2011-02-01

    The incidence of epilepsy is high in older individuals. However, epilepsy in the elderly may be underdiagnosed and undertreated because of diagnostic difficulties. The main goal of this study was to determine whether seizure semiology differs between older and younger adults with epilepsy in the outpatient setting. Fifty patients with focal epilepsy aged 55 years and older and 50 patients aged between 18 and 45 years were included. Review of medical records contained detailed seizure description. There were no differences in seizure semiology between groups, except that subtle perceptions of transient confusion were seen in older patients but not in younger patients (P=0.0028). Older patients had less generalized motor seizures, but the differences between groups did not reach significance (P=0.01). Older patients may present with subtle symptoms of seizures characterized by brief periods of confusion, which may contribute to greater difficulty diagnosing seizures in the elderly. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Characteristics of seizure-induced signal changes on MRI in patients with first seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Si Eun; Lee, Byung In; Shin, Kyong Jin; Ha, Sam Yeol; Park, JinSe; Park, Kang Min; Kim, Hyung Chan; Lee, Joonwon; Bae, Soo-Young; Lee, Dongah; Kim, Sung Eun

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive factors and identify the characteristics of the seizure-induced signal changes on MRI (SCM) in patients with first seizures. We conducted a retrospective study of patients with first seizures from March 2010 to August 2014. The inclusion criteria for this study were patients with 1) first seizures, and 2) MRI and EEG performed within 24h of the first seizures. The definition of SCM was hyper-intensities in the brain not applying to cerebral arterial territories. Multivariate logistic regression was performed with or without SCM as a dependent variable. Of 431 patients with seizures visiting the ER, 69 patients met the inclusion criteria. Of 69 patients, 11 patients (15.9%) had SCM. Epileptiform discharge on EEG (OR 29.7, 95% CI 1.79-493.37, p=0.018) was an independently significant variable predicting the presence of SCM in patients with first seizures. In addition, the topography of SCM was as follows; i) ipsilateral hippocampus, thalamus and cerebral cortex (5/11), ii) unilateral cortex (4/11), iii) ipsilateral thalamus and cerebral cortex (1/11), iv) bilateral hippocampus (1/11). Moreover, 6 out of 7 patients who underwent both perfusion CT and MRI exhibited unilateral cortical hyperperfusion with ipsilateral thalamic involvement reflecting unrestricted vascular territories. There is an association between epileptiform discharges and SCM. Additionally, the involvement of the unilateral cortex and ipsilateral thalamus in SCM and its hyperperfusion state could be helpful in differentiating the consequences of epileptic seizures from other pathologies. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Value and limitations of seizure semiology in localizing seizure onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Elson L

    2006-08-01

    Seizure semiology has been the foundation of clinical diagnosis of seizure disorders. This article discusses the value and the limitations of behavioral features of seizure episodes in localizing seizure onset. Studies have shown that some semiologic features of seizures are highly accurate in the hemispheric lateralization and lobar localization of seizures. There is good agreement between blinded reviewers in lateralizing video-recorded seizures in temporal lobe and extratemporal lobe epilepsies. However, seizure semiology alone should not be used to determine the site of seizure onset. Each semiologic feature may falsely localize seizure onset. Seizure semiology in some patients may signify the site of seizure propagation rather than origination. Moreover, seizure semiology may not be as reliable in multifocal epilepsies as it is in unifocal epilepsies. Many semiologic features of seizures of adults are often missing in seizures of children. Seizure semiology should be analyzed and integrated with EEG and neuroimaging data to localize the seizure focus. A sample of the recorded seizures should be shown to the patient's relatives or friends to verify that it is representative of habitual seizures.

  13. Seizure semiology and EEG findings in mitochondrial diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevallier, Justyna A; Von Allmen, Gretchen K; Koenig, Mary Kay

    2014-05-01

    Seizures constitute a frequent yet under-described manifestation of mitochondrial disorders (MDs). The aim of this study was to describe electroencephalography (EEG) findings and clinical seizure types in a population of children and adults with mitochondrial disease. Retrospective chart review of 165 records of children and adults with mitochondrial disease seen in the University of Texas Houston Mitochondrial Center between 2007 and 2012 was performed; all subjects were diagnosed with confirmed mitochondrial disease. EEG findings and clinical data, including seizure semiology and response to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), were analyzed and categorized. Sixty-six percent (109/165) of subjects had a routine EEG performed. Sixty-one percent (67/109) of EEG studies were abnormal and 85% (56/67) had epileptiform discharges. The most common EEG finding was generalized slowing (40/67, 60%). The most frequent category of epileptiform activity seen was multifocal discharges (41%), followed by focal (39%) and generalized (39%) discharges. Clinical seizures were seen in 55% of subjects and the most common types of seizures observed were complex partial (37%) and generalized tonic-clonic (GTC; 37%). The most common seizure type in patients with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) was GTC (33%), with generalized or focal discharges seen on EEG. In Leigh syndrome GTC (11%) and complex partial (11%) seizures were the most frequent types. Of 60 subjects with clinical seizures, 28% were intractable to medical treatment. Mitochondrial disorder should be included in the list of differential diagnosis in any child that presents with encephalopathy, seizures, and a fluctuating clinical course. Given the relatively high prevalence of EEG abnormalities in patients with MD, EEG should be performed during initial evaluation in all patients with MD, not only upon clinical suspicion of epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International

  14. Generalized onset seizures with focal evolution (GOFE) - A unique seizure type in the setting of generalized epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linane, Avriel; Lagrange, Andre H; Fu, Cary; Abou-Khalil, Bassel

    2016-01-01

    We report clinical and electrographic features of generalized onset seizures with focal evolution (GOFE) and present arguments for the inclusion of this seizure type in the seizure classification. The adult and pediatric Epilepsy Monitoring Unit databases at Vanderbilt Medical Center and Children's Hospital were screened to identify generalized onset seizures with focal evolution. We reviewed medical records for epilepsy characteristics, epilepsy risk factors, MRI abnormalities, neurologic examination, antiepileptic medications before and after diagnosis, and response to medications. We also reviewed ictal and interictal EEG tracings, as well as video-recorded semiology. Ten patients were identified, 7 males and 3 females. All of the patients developed generalized epilepsy in childhood or adolescence (ages 3-15years). Generalized onset seizures with focal evolution developed years after onset in 9 patients, with a semiology concerning for focal seizures or nonepileptic events. Ictal discharges had a generalized onset on EEG, described as either generalized spike-and-wave and/or polyspike-and-wave discharges, or generalized fast activity. This electrographic activity then evolved to focal rhythmic activity most commonly localized to one temporal or frontal region; five patients had multiple seizures evolving to focal activity in different regions of both hemispheres. The predominant interictal epileptiform activity included generalized spike-and-wave and/or polyspike-and-wave discharges in all patients. Taking into consideration all clinical and EEG data, six patients were classified with genetic (idiopathic) generalized epilepsy, and four were classified with structural/metabolic (symptomatic) generalized epilepsy. All of the patients had modifications to their medications following discharge, with three becoming seizure-free and five responding with >50% reduction in seizure frequency. Generalized onset seizures may occasionally have focal evolution with semiology

  15. Why Are Seizures Rare in Rapid Eye Movement Sleep? Review of the Frequency of Seizures in Different Sleep Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Ng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the formal characterization of sleep stages, there have been reports that seizures may preferentially occur in certain phases of sleep. Through ascending cholinergic connections from the brainstem, rapid eye movement (REM sleep is physiologically characterized by low voltage fast activity on the electroencephalogram, REMs, and muscle atonia. Multiple independent studies confirm that, in REM sleep, there is a strikingly low proportion of seizures (~1% or less. We review a total of 42 distinct conventional and intracranial studies in the literature which comprised a net of 1458 patients. Indexed to duration, we found that REM sleep was the most protective stage of sleep against focal seizures, generalized seizures, focal interictal discharges, and two particular epilepsy syndromes. REM sleep had an additional protective effect compared to wakefulness with an average 7.83 times fewer focal seizures, 3.25 times fewer generalized seizures, and 1.11 times fewer focal interictal discharges. In further studies REM sleep has also demonstrated utility in localizing epileptogenic foci with potential translation into postsurgical seizure freedom. Based on emerging connectivity data in sleep, we hypothesize that the influence of REM sleep on seizures is due to a desynchronized EEG pattern which reflects important connectivity differences unique to this sleep stage.

  16. Neonatal seizures with tonic clonic sequences and poor developmental outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Bernhard; Wohlrab, Gabriele; Sander, Thomas; Steinlein, Ortrud K; Hajnal, Beatrice Latal

    2005-07-01

    Seizures consisting of a tonic followed by a clonic phase have rarely been described in neonates and are not included in the current classifications of neonatal seizures. Our video archive of 105 neonates with seizures or suspected seizures revealed six neonates with such tonic clonic or tonic myoclonic sequences. Two of those neonates had pyridoxine dependent seizures. The other four neonates had drug refractory seizures and demonstrated similarities in electro-clinical pattern, clinical course and outcome. Their seizures started with tonic posturing and after 10-20s tonic posturing was superimposed by focal or multifocal cloni or myocloni. Ictal EEG started with voltage attenuation followed by bilateral or alternating focal epileptic discharges. The interictal EEG was abnormal. One child died, while the other three children became seizure free but had severe motor delay and mental retardation. In one of those three children, a de novo missense mutation was detected in the voltage gated potassium channel gene KCNQ2, indicating a genetic relationship between drug refractory neonatal seizures of unknown etiology with tonic clonic or myoclonic sequences and the well-known syndrome of benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNC).

  17. Utility of hospitalization following a first unprovoked seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, I; Neufeld, M Y; Auriel, E; Gandelman-Marton, R

    2013-07-01

    Hospital admission in otherwise healthy patients following a first unprovoked seizure is controversial. We aimed to evaluate the influence of admission in a neurology department on the identification of risk factors for seizure recurrence in patients with a first unprovoked seizure. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with a first unprovoked seizure, who were admitted to the neurology departments at two medical centers between 2007 and 2009. Risk factors for seizure recurrence included the following: abnormal neurological examination, abnormal brain CT scan, and epileptiform discharges on the EEG. The study group included 97 patients (52 men) aged 18-85 years (mean 42). Eighty-seven (90%) patients were admitted following a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Risk factors were identified in the emergency room (ER) in 36 (37%) patients, mainly including abnormalities of the neurological examination and brain CT scan. Nineteen (20%) patients had a risk factor which was not apparent during ER evaluation, consisting of epileptiform activity on the EEG. Five (5%) patients had recurrent seizures during admission, three of them without risk factors during the ER evaluation. Risk factors for seizure recurrence were detected during admission in nearly a quarter of the patients who presented to the emergency room with a first unprovoked seizure. Because the main advantage of admission is the EEG recording, we suggest that an early EEG should be obtained in these patients either during admission or through a special accelerated outpatient arrangement. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Genes, Seizures & Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Alica M.

    2006-01-01

    The chance that someone will develop any disease is influenced by heredity and environment. Epilepsy is not an exception. Everybody inherits a unique degree of susceptibility to seizures. About 3 percent of the United States population is prone to seizures and will get epilepsy at some point of their lives (1). Two thirds of the people with…

  19. Code blue: seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerth, Matthew T; Drazkowski, Joseph F; Noe, Katherine H; Sirven, Joseph I

    2011-06-01

    Eyewitnesses frequently perceive seizures as life threatening. If an event occurs on the hospital premises, a "code blue" can be called which consumes considerable resources. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency and characteristics of code blue calls for seizures and seizure mimickers. A retrospective review of a code blue log from 2001 through 2008 identified 50 seizure-like events, representing 5.3% of all codes. Twenty-eight (54%) occurred in inpatients; the other 22 (44%) events involved visitors or employees on the hospital premises. Eighty-six percent of the events were epileptic seizures. Seizure mimickers, particularly psychogenic nonepileptic seizures, were more common in the nonhospitalized group. Only five (17.9%) inpatients had a known diagnosis of epilepsy, compared with 17 (77.3%) of the nonhospitalized patients. This retrospective survey provides insights into how code blues are called on hospitalized versus nonhospitalized patients for seizure-like events. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Grand Mal Seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Withdrawal syndromes Using or withdrawing from drugs, including alcohol Risk factors Risk factors for grand mal seizures include: ... that affect electrolyte balance Illicit drug use Heavy alcohol use ... or others. You might be at risk of: Falling. If you fall during a seizure, ...

  1. Seizures: emergency neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Christopher P; Barkovich, A James

    2010-11-01

    The various findings observed on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examinations in patients with seizures reflect the variety of different causes that give rise to this common neurologic symptom. In the emergency setting, CT is most valuable in its ability to accurately identify acute abnormalities that require emergent medical or surgical treatment. MR imaging, by contrast, is usually reserved for patients with recurrent or refractory seizures. The accurate interpretation of either modality requires familiarity with how seizures are classified clinically, the most common presenting features of different causes for seizures, the relevant neuroanatomy, and the imaging manifestations of both common and uncommon causes of seizures and epilepsy. Of particular practical importance to the radiologist is the ability to recognize (1) the most common findings in patients with recurrent seizures and (2) potentially reversible causes for seizures that require prompt intervention to avoid or minimize permanent brain injury. This article surveys a variety of different causes for seizures and epilepsy, focusing on specific clinical features that can help to refine differential diagnosis, and on imaging findings characteristic of different disorders. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Seizures in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Marcus; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Polman, Susan; De Keyser, Jacques

    Seizures have long been recognized to be part of the disease spectrum of multiple sclerosis (MS). While they occur in only a minority of patients with MS, epileptic seizures can have serious consequences. The treatment of MS can be epileptogenic, and antiepileptic treatment can conversely worsen the

  3. Early childhood myoclonic epilepsy: An independent genetic generalized epilepsy with myoclonic seizures as the main seizure type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhixian; Xue, Jiao; Li, Hui; Qian, Ping; Liu, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Yuwu; Zhang, Yuehua

    2017-09-01

    To elucidate the characteristics of the myoclonic seizures alone, or predominant myoclonus combined with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) and/or absences, in early childhood, and discuss its classification. Forty-two children were retrospectively recruited between January 2006 and June 2015. The mean age of seizure onset was 40.5months. They were divided into 4 groups: myoclonic seizures alone; predominant myoclonus combined with GTCS; predominant myoclonus combined with absences; predominant myoclonus combined with both GTCS and absences. Interictal EEG showed generalized spike- or polyspike-wave discharges at 2-4Hz. Seizures were controlled in 22 patients at a mean age of 60.5months. The psychomotor development was normal (30/37) or mildly delayed (7/37). We reported a cohort of patients with early childhood myoclonic epilepsy (ECME), with the following characteristics: Seizures started below 5years old in otherwise normal children; Seizure types included myoclonic seizures alone or combined with GTCS and/or absences; Febrile or afebrile GTCS might appear firstly; Interictal EEG showed generalized spike- or polyspike-wave; Seizures usually were in remission before adolescence with normal development or mild cognitive or behavioral deficits in most. ECME might be an independent epileptic syndrome not established by International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) previously. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Epilepsy after Febrile Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seinfeld, S. A.; Pellock, J M; Kjeldsen, Lone Marianne Juel

    2016-01-01

    Background A history of complex febrile seizures can increase the risk of epilepsy, but the role of genetic factors is unclear. This analysis evaluated the relationship between febrile seizures and epilepsy. Methods Information on the history of seizures was obtained by a questionnaire from twin...... epilepticus. There were 78 twins who developed epilepsy. The highest rate of epilepsy (22.2%) occurred in the febrile status epilepticus group. Concordance was highest in simple group. Conclusion A twin with febrile status epilepticus is at the highest risk of developing epilepsy, but simple febrile seizures...... and emotional burden. It is currently not possible to accurately identify which children will develop recurrent febrile seizures, epilepsy, or neuropsychological comorbidities. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  5. Speech preservation during language-dominant, left temporal lobe seizures: report of a rare, potentially misleading finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiboriboon, Kitti; Parent, Jack M; Barbaro, Nicholas M; Walker, John A; Garcia, Paul A

    2006-08-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and mechanism of ictal speech in patients with language-dominant, left temporal lobe seizures. We retrospectively reviewed the video-EEG telemetry records for the presence of ictal speech in 96 patients with surgically proven left temporal lobe epilepsy and studied the seizure-propagation patterns in three patients who required intracranial EEG recordings for seizure localization. Ictal speech preservation was observed in five patients. One patient's seizures demonstrated rapid propagation of the ictal discharges to the contralateral temporal area where the seizure evolved, resembling a nondominant temporal lobe seizure. The other two patients had ictal discharges that remained confined to the inferomesial temporal areas, sparing language cortex. Preservation of speech in complex partial seizures of language-dominant, left temporal lobe origin is rare. Based on intracranial EEG recordings, the likely mechanism underlying this potentially misleading clinical finding is the preservation of language areas due to limited seizure-propagation patterns.

  6. Prevalence of Brain Injuries and Recurrence of Seizures in Children With Posttraumatic Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Mohamed K; Dayan, Peter S; Tunik, Michael G; Nadel, Frances M; Lillis, Kathleen A; Miskin, Michelle; Borgialli, Dominic A; Bachman, Michael C; Atabaki, Shireen M; Hoyle, John D; Holmes, James F; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2017-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is often used in the emergency department (ED) evaluation of children with posttraumatic seizures (PTS); however, the frequency of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) and short-term seizure recurrence is lacking. Our main objective was to evaluate the frequency of TBIs on CT and short-term seizure recurrence in children with PTS. We also aimed to determine the associations between the likelihood of TBI on CT with the timing of onset of PTS after the traumatic event and duration of PTS. Finally, we aimed to determine whether patients with normal CT scans and normal neurological examinations are safe for discharge from the ED. This was a planned secondary analysis from a prospective observational cohort study to derive and validate a neuroimaging decision rule for children after blunt head trauma at 25 EDs in the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network. We evaluated children seizures within 1 week. Patients discharged from the ED were contacted by telephone 1 week to 3 months later. Of 42,424 children enrolled, 536 (1.3%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2%-1.4%) had PTS. A total of 466 of 536 (86.9%, 95% CI = 83.8%-89.7%) underwent CT in the ED. TBIs on CT were identified in 72 (15.5%, 95% CI = 12.3%-19.1%), of whom 20 (27.8%, 95% CI = 17.9%-39.6%) underwent neurosurgical intervention and 15 (20.8%, 95% CI = 12.2%-32.0%) had recurrent seizures. Of the 464 without TBIs on CT (or no CTs performed), 457 had recurrent seizure status known, and five (1.1%, 95 CI = 0.4%-2.5%) had recurrent seizures; four of five presented with Glasgow Coma Scale scores seizures. Those without TBIs on CT, however, are at low risk of short-term recurrent seizures, and none required neurosurgical interventions. Therefore, if CT-negative and neurologically normal, patients with PTS may be safely considered for discharge from the ED. © 2017 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  7. Epileptic seizures precipited by eating: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Carlos Aleixo Sepulveda

    1981-03-01

    Full Text Available The case of one 23 year-old girl who had epileptic manifestations is reported. At first, generalized tonic seizures; afterwards, epileptic seizures precipited by eating. The electroencephalograms showed left temporal lobe disfunctions. Different types of drugs were used with no sucess. The best results were obtained by association of sodium valproate, clonazepan and phenobarbital. Comments are made about clinic and etiopathogenesis, believing the authors in the hipothesis of nervous structures chronic hiperactivity. To Walker8 the hiperactivity was reached by hormones production under neural control of specific cerebral centers. The continuous bombardment of epileptic discharges to hypothalamic centers is the probably responsible by epileptic seizures precipited by eating.

  8. Electrographic seizures in pediatric ICU patients: cohort study of risk factors and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abend, Nicholas S; Arndt, Daniel H; Carpenter, Jessica L; Chapman, Kevin E; Cornett, Karen M; Gallentine, William B; Giza, Christopher C; Goldstein, Joshua L; Hahn, Cecil D; Lerner, Jason T; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Matsumoto, Joyce H; McBain, Kristin; Nash, Kendall B; Payne, Eric; Sánchez, Sarah M; Fernández, Iván Sánchez; Shults, Justine; Williams, Korwyn; Yang, Amy; Dlugos, Dennis J

    2013-07-23

    We aimed to determine the incidence of electrographic seizures in children in the pediatric intensive care unit who underwent EEG monitoring, risk factors for electrographic seizures, and whether electrographic seizures were associated with increased odds of mortality. Eleven sites in North America retrospectively reviewed a total of 550 consecutive children in pediatric intensive care units who underwent EEG monitoring. We collected data on demographics, diagnoses, clinical seizures, mental status at EEG onset, EEG background, interictal epileptiform discharges, electrographic seizures, intensive care unit length of stay, and in-hospital mortality. Electrographic seizures occurred in 162 of 550 subjects (30%), of which 61 subjects (38%) had electrographic status epilepticus. Electrographic seizures were exclusively subclinical in 59 of 162 subjects (36%). A multivariable logistic regression model showed that independent risk factors for electrographic seizures included younger age, clinical seizures prior to EEG monitoring, an abnormal initial EEG background, interictal epileptiform discharges, and a diagnosis of epilepsy. Subjects with electrographic status epilepticus had greater odds of in-hospital death, even after adjusting for EEG background and neurologic diagnosis category. Electrographic seizures are common among children in the pediatric intensive care unit, particularly those with specific risk factors. Electrographic status epilepticus occurs in more than one-third of children with electrographic seizures and is associated with higher in-hospital mortality.

  9. Hyperventilation and photic stimulation are useful additions to a placebo-based suggestive seizure induction protocol in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkirov, Stoyan; Grönheit, Wenke; Wellmer, Jörg

    2015-05-01

    The early and definitive diagnosis of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures is a common challenge in epileptology practice. Suggestive seizure induction is a valuable tool to aid the differentiation between epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures, especially when long-term video-EEG monitoring is inconclusive or unavailable. In this retrospective analysis, we compared the diagnostic yield of a classical, placebo-based induction protocol with that of an extended protocol that includes hyperventilation and photic stimulation as means of suggestion while also implementing more open, standardized patient information. We investigated whether the diversification of suggestive seizure induction has an effect on diagnostic yield and whether it preempts the administration of placebo. Data from 52 patients with confirmed psychogenic nonepileptic seizures were analyzed. While suggestive seizure induction using only placebo-based suggestion provoked a typical event in 13 of 20 patients (65%), the extended protocol was positive in 27 of 34 cases (84%); this improvement was not significant (p=0.11). Noninvasive suggestion techniques accounted for 78% of inductions, avoiding placebo administration in a majority of patients. Still, placebo remains an important part of suggestive seizure induction, responsible for 22% (6 out of 27) of successful inductions using our extended protocol. Our study demonstrates that the diversification of suggestive seizure induction is feasible and beneficial for both patients and diagnosticians. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Lorazepam for the prevention of recurrent seizures related to alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Onofrio, G; Rathlev, N K; Ulrich, A S; Fish, S S; Freedland, E S

    1999-03-25

    Alcohol abuse is one of the most common causes of seizures in adults. In a randomized, double-blind study, we compared lorazepam with placebo for the prevention of recurrent seizures related to alcohol. Over a 21-month period, we studied consecutive patients with chronic alcohol abuse who were at least 21 years of age and who presented to the emergency departments of two hospitals in Boston after a witnessed, generalized seizure. The patients were randomly assigned to receive either 2 mg of lorazepam in 2 ml of normal saline or 4 ml of normal saline intravenously and then observed for six hours. The primary end point was the occurrence of a second seizure during the observation period. Of the 229 patients who were initially evaluated, 186 met the entry criteria. In the lorazepam group, 3 of 100 patients (3 percent) had a second seizure, as compared with 21 of 86 patients (24 percent) in the placebo group (odds ratio for seizure with the use of placebo, 10.4; 95 percent confidence interval, 3.6 to 30.2; Plorazepam group (odds ratio for admission, 2.1; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.1 to 4.0; P=0.02). Seven patients in the placebo group and one in the lorazepam group were transported to an emergency department in Boston with a second seizure within 48 hours after hospital discharge. Treatment with intravenous lorazepam is associated with a significant reduction in the risk of recurrent seizures related to alcohol.

  11. Spatiotemporal differences in the c-fos pathway between C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice following flurothyl-induced seizures: A dissociation of hippocampal Fos from seizure activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiyala, Sridhar B; Papandrea, Dominick; Tuz, Karina; Anderson, Tara M; Jayakumar, Sachidhanand; Herron, Bruce J; Ferland, Russell J

    2015-01-01

    Significant differences in seizure characteristics between inbred mouse strains highlight the importance of genetic predisposition to epilepsy. Here, we examined the genetic differences between the seizure-resistant C57BL/6J (B6) mouse strain and the seizure-susceptible DBA/2J (D2) strain in the phospho-Erk and Fos pathways to examine seizure-induced neuronal activity to uncover potential mechanistic correlates to these disparate seizure responsivities. Expression of neural activity markers was examined following 1, 5, or 8 seizures, or after 8 seizures, a 28 day rest period, and a final flurothyl rechallenge. Two brain regions, the hippocampus and ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH), had significantly different Fos expression profiles following seizures. Fos expression was highly robust in B6 hippocampus following one seizure and remained elevated following multiple seizures. Conversely, there was an absence of Fos (and phospho-Erk) expression in D2 hippocampus following one generalized seizure that increased with multiple seizures. This lack of Fos expression occurred despite intracranial electroencephalographic recordings indicating that the D2 hippocampus propagated ictal discharge during the first flurothyl seizure suggesting a dissociation of seizure discharge from Fos and phospho-Erk expression. Global transcriptional analysis confirmed a dysregulation of the c-fos pathway in D2 mice following 1 seizure. Moreover, global analysis of RNA expression differences between B6 and D2 hippocampus revealed a unique pattern of transcripts that were co-regulated with Fos in D2 hippocampus following 1 seizure. These expression differences could, in part, account for D2's seizure susceptibility phenotype. Following 8 seizures, a 28 day rest period, and a final flurothyl rechallenge, ∼85% of B6 mice develop a more complex seizure phenotype consisting of a clonic-forebrain seizure that uninterruptedly progresses into a brainstem seizure. This seizure phenotype

  12. Frontal Lobe Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tumors, stroke, infection or traumatic injuries — in the brain's frontal lobes. Frontal lobe seizures are also associated with a rare inherited disorder called autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy. If one of your ...

  13. Temporal Lobe Seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pregnancy Temporal lobe seizure Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  14. Temporal Lobe Seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... functions, including having odd feelings — such as euphoria, deja vu or fear. During a temporal lobe seizure, you ... include: A sudden sense of unprovoked fear A deja vu experience — a feeling that what's happening has happened ...

  15. Dynamics of absence seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeba, Farah; Sanz-Leon, Paula; Robinson, Peter

    A neural field model of the corticothalamic system is used to investigate the dynamics of absence seizures in the presence of temporally varying connection strength between the cerebral cortex and thalamus. Variation of connection strength from cortex to thalamus drives the system into seizure once a threshold is passed and a supercritical Hopf bifurcation occurs. The dynamics and spectral characteristics of the resulting seizures are explored as functions of maximum connection strength, time above threshold, and ramp rate. The results enable spectral and temporal characteristics of seizures to be related to underlying physiological variations via nonlinear dynamics and neural field theory. Notably, this analysis adds to neural field modeling of a wide variety of brain activity phenomena and measurements in recent years. Australian Research Council Grants FL1401000225 and CE140100007.

  16. Pancreatitis - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... You were in the hospital because you have pancreatitis. This is a swelling of the pancreas. You ...

  17. Fibromyalgia and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, William O; Langston, Michael E; Acton, Emily K

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this case-matched study was to determine how frequently fibromyalgia is associated with different paroxysmal neurological disorders and explore the utility of fibromyalgia as a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. The billing diagnosis codes of 1,730 new, non-selected patient encounters were reviewed over a three-year period for an epileptologist in a neurology clinic to identify all patients with historical diagnoses of fibromyalgia. The frequency with which epileptic seizures, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and physiological non-epileptic events were comorbid with fibromyalgia was assessed. Age and gender case-matched controls were used for a between-group comparison. Wilcoxon tests were used to analyse interval data, and Chi-square was used to analyse categorical data (pFibromyalgia was retrospectively identified in 95/1,730 (5.5%) patients in this cohort. Females represented 95% of the fibromyalgia sample (age: 53 years; 95% CI: 57, 51). Forty-three percent of those with fibromyalgia had a non-paroxysmal, neurological primary clinical diagnosis, most commonly chronic pain. Paroxysmal events were present in 57% of fibromyalgia patients and 54% of case-matched controls. Among patients with fibromyalgia and paroxysmal disorders, 11% had epileptic seizures, 74% had psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and 15% had physiological non-epileptic events, compared to case-matched controls with 37% epileptic seizures, 51% psychogenic non-epileptic events, and 12% physiological non-epileptic events (p = 0.009). Fibromyalgia was shown to be a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in patients with undifferentiated paroxysmal spells. However, our results suggest that the specificity and sensitivity of fibromyalgia as a marker for psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in a mixed general neurological population of patients is less than previously described.

  18. Hemifacial seizures and cerebellar ganglioglioma: an epilepsy syndrome of infancy with seizures of cerebellar origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, A S; Jayakar, P; Duchowny, M; Resnick, T; Prats, A; Altman, N; Renfroe, J B

    1996-07-01

    We investigated a 6-month-old infant with daily episodes of left hemifacial contraction, head and eye deviation to the right, nystagmoid jerks to the right, autonomic dysfunction, and retained consciousness. The episodes began on day 1 of life and were unresponsive to antiepileptic medication. Interictal and ictal scalp electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings were unremarkable. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the left cerebellar hemisphere and peduncle. Ictal single-photon emission computed tomography revealed focal hyperperfusion in the region of the cerebellar mass. Ictal EEG recordings with implanted cerebellar electrodes demonstrated focal seizure discharges in the region of the mass. Resection of the mass resulted in remission of seizures and histopathology revealed ganglioglioma. Six previously reported infants with similar semiology (described as "hemifacial spasm"), imaging findings, and histopathology are reviewed. We believe the previously reported infants and our patient constitute a rare but important clinicopathological syndrome of infancy characterized by epileptic seizures of cerebellar origin.

  19. Seizures Induced by Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Ogunyemi

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Musicogenic epilepsy is a rare disorder. Much remains to be learned about the electroclinical features. This report describes a patient who has been followed at our institution for 17 years, and was investigated with long-term telemetered simultaneous video-EEG recordings. She began to have seizures at the age of 10 years. She experienced complex partial seizures, often preceded by elementary auditory hallucination and complex auditory illusion. The seizures occurred in relation to singing, listening to music or thinking about music. She also had occasional generalized tonic clonic seizures during sleep. There was no significant antecedent history. The family history was negative for epilepsy. The physical examination was unremarkable. CT and MRI scans of the brain were normal. During long-term simultaneous video-EEG recordings, clinical and electrographic seizure activities were recorded in association with singing and listening to music. Mathematical calculation, copying or viewing geometric patterns and playing the game of chess failed to evoke seizures.

  20. Research of the serum level of neuron-specific enolase in children with various types of seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Chun

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the relevance between the level changes of serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE and neuronal damage in various seizure types of children with epilepsy. Methods According to the classification criteria of seizure types formulated by International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE in 1981, 190 children with epilepsy were enrolled including tonic-clonic seizure group (41 cases, tonic seizure group (34 cases, clonic seizure group (22 cases, myoclonic seizure group (12 cases, atonic seizure group (17 cases, absence seizure group (22 cases, simple partial seizure group (21 cases and complex partial seizure group (21 cases, and 64 healthy children were enrolled as control group. The long-range vedio-electroencephalogram (VEEG was operated and the blood samples were collected from these cases within 72 h after their seizures. Results The serum NSE levels of epileptic children were significantly higher than control group (P = 0.000. Among these seizure groups, serum NSE in myoclonic seizure group [(32.42 ± 6.62 ng/ml] was significantly higher than the other types, except for tonic-clonic seizure group (P = 0.062. There was no significant difference among the other types (P > 0.05, for all. According to rank correlation analysis, there was positive corrlation between serum NSE levels and VEEG abnormal intensity (rs = 0.613, P = 0.000. Conclusion The serum NSE were markedly increased in children with epilepsy after seizures, suggesting that a certain degree of neuronal damage may result from seizures; the higher NSE levels were, the more serious neuronal damage caused by epileptiform discharges was. The serum NSE levels in myoclonic seizure group and tonic-clonic seizure group were significantly higher than other seizure types, indicating the two kinds of seizures may result in greater neuronal damage.

  1. Prescription of emergency antiepileptic medication after a first childhood seizure: analysis of routine administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Richard Fm; Ajetunmobi, Omotomilola; Weir, Christopher J; Wood, Rachael

    2015-06-01

    UK guidelines do not recommend prescribing emergency antiepileptic drugs after first simple febrile seizures or for single afebrile seizures. Non-adherence to the guidelines could result in substantial health service cost. Scottish national hospital discharge records were used to identify children aged one month to 4 years admitted for a first febrile seizures or single afebrile seizures between April 2009 and March 2012. Prescriptions for antiepileptic drugs within 12 months of index admission were identified on the national community prescribing database by matching unique patient identifiers. There were 1,978 and 663 children admitted for febrile seizures and single afebrile seizures, respectively. One percent of children admitted with febrile seizures and 1.7% with single afebrile seizures had a subsequent community prescription record for emergency antiepileptic drugs within 12 months of index admission. Total cost of emergency antiepileptic drugs following febrile seizures and single afebrile seizures for the study period was just over £900. Health care providers and policy makers can be reassured that emergency antiepileptic drugs are not being inappropriately overprescribed for febrile seizures and single afebrile seizures.

  2. Death from seizures induced by chronic alcohol abuse--does it exist?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, S

    2007-01-01

    In a forensic setting, deaths due to seizures, either epileptic or other, present a well-known problem. Cause of death is rarely established on the basis of physical evidence, but on circumstantial evidence such as tongue biting or discharge of urine or faeces. Seizures have several different...... may die from these seizures. A literature study was performed of deaths due to alcohol-induced seizures, either during withdrawal or as late-onset seizures where the aetiology was established as long time alcohol abuse and a necropsy had shown no other possible cause of death than a seizure. RESULTS......: It was not possible to find any well-documented cases. It is, however, difficult to compare cases in the literature, as there is no generally accepted classification or nomenclature of seizures related to alcohol abuse....

  3. Thyroid Storm Provoked by Interleukin-2 Therapy for Metastatic Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Chung Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available With the growing use of immunotherapy in the treatment of cancer and autoimmune disease, severe autoimmune thyroid dysfunction may be provoked at an increasing rate. We herein report a 49-year-old male patient experiencing a life- threatening thyroid storm provoked by interleukin-2 (IL-2. This was a case of pulmonary metastasis of melanoma without a previous history of thyroid dysfunction. For the metastatic melanoma, he underwent combined immunochemotherapy including dacarbazine and IL-2. The 3rd course of immunochemotherapy was complicated with a thyroid storm manifested by high fever, tachycardia and even transient cardiac arrest. Fortunately, he recovered eventually from this crisis by immediate resuscitation followed by antithyroid dugs. Our case highlights the rare complication of a thyroid storm provoked by IL-2 treatment. Precaution against autoimmune thyroid dysfunction is required during treatment with IL-2 and probably also other kinds of newly-developed immunotherapy to avoid life-threatening complications.

  4. The First-Time Seizure Emergency Department Electroencephalogram Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, Andrew J; Mayes, Bruce N; Hernandez-Nino, Jackeline; Rozario, Nigel; Beverly, Sandra K; Asimos, Andrew W

    2017-02-01

    Seizures account for 1.2% of all emergency department (ED) visits, with 24% of those representing first-time seizures. Our primary goal is to determine whether obtaining an electroencephalogram (EEG) in the ED after a first-time seizure can identify individuals appropriate for initiation of anticonvulsant therapy on ED discharge. Our secondary goals are to determine the association of historical and clinical seizure features with epileptic EEGs and to determine the interobserver agreement for the EEG interpretation. We conducted a prospective study including patients older than 17 years with either a first-time seizure or previous seizures without a previous EEG, all of whom were candidates for discharge home from the ED without antiepileptic drug treatment. We based seizure diagnosis on provider impression. We excluded patients with laboratory studies or neuroimaging deemed to be the seizure cause. EEG technicians performed a 30-minute EEG in the ED, which was immediately remotely interpreted by an epileptologist, who made a recommendation on antiepileptic drug initiation. We categorized EEGs as normal, abnormal but not epileptic, or epileptic. In accordance with duplicate EEG interpretation by a second, blinded epileptologist, we calculated interrater agreement for EEG interpretation and antiepileptic drug initiation. As a secondary analysis, according to questionnaires completed by patients and seizure observers, we explored the association of aura, focal symptoms, provocation, or historical risk factors with epilepsy. We enrolled 73 patients, 71 of whom had an EEG performed. All EEGs were performed within 11 hours of seizure, with an average of 3.85 hours. Twenty-four percent of patients (95% confidence interval 15% to 36%) received a diagnosis of epilepsy, and all began receiving antiepileptic drug therapy from the ED. Our final study sample size afforded only an exploratory analysis about an association between aura, focal onset, provocation, or historical

  5. Do stages of dentistry training affect anxiety provoking situations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... coping with children were the anxiety provoking situations that showed statistically significant difference in the 3 studied training stages of dentistry. Bonferroni post‑hoc analysis significant difference was in the preclinical and clinical students' pair for getting diagnosis wrong, not developing radiograph properly and coping ...

  6. Foods provoking and alleviating symptoms in gastroparesis: patient experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wytiaz, Victoria; Homko, Carol; Duffy, Frank; Schey, Ron; Parkman, Henry P

    2015-04-01

    Nutritional counseling for gastroparesis focuses on reduction of meal size, fiber, and fat to control symptoms. The tolerance of gastroparesis patients for particular foods is largely anecdotal. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize foods provoking or alleviating gastroparesis symptoms. Gastroparesis patients completed: (1) Demographic Questionnaire; (2) Patient Assessment of Upper GI Symptoms; (3) Food Toleration and Aversion survey asking patients about experiences when eating certain foods utilizing a scale from -3 (greatly worsening symptoms) to +3 (greatly improving symptoms). Descriptive qualities (acidic, fatty, spicy, roughage-based, bitter, salty, bland, and sweet) were assigned to foods. Forty-five gastroparesis patients participated (39 idiopathic gastroparesis). Foods worsening symptoms included: orange juice, fried chicken, cabbage, oranges, sausage, pizza, peppers, onions, tomato juice, lettuce, coffee, salsa, broccoli, bacon, and roast beef. Saltine crackers, jello, and graham crackers moderately improved symptoms. Twelve additional foods were tolerated by patients (not provoking symptoms): ginger ale, gluten-free foods, tea, sweet potatoes, pretzels, white fish, clear soup, salmon, potatoes, white rice, popsicles, and applesauce. Foods provoking symptoms were generally fatty, acidic, spicy, and roughage-based. The foods shown to be tolerable were generally bland, sweet, salty, and starchy. This study identified specific foods that worsen as well as foods that may help alleviate symptoms of gastroparesis. Foods that provoked symptoms differed in quality from foods that alleviated symptoms or were tolerable. The results of this study illustrate specific examples of foods that aggravate or improve symptoms and provide suggestions for a gastroparesis diet.

  7. Phenomenon of isomorphic provoking responses in cases of limited scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talnikova Е.Е.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the historical origin of the term "Koebner phenomenon". The literature data reflect the etiology, pathogenesis and epidemiology of isomorphic mechanisms provoking responses in lichen planus, psoriasis, scleroder-ma, syphilis. Variants of the Koebner phenomenon's classifications are given. The clinical cases of limited scleroderma after mechanical injury are described.

  8. Tuberculoma Induced Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. James Salway

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Seizures in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV patients can be caused by a wide variety of opportunistic infections, and, especially in developing countries, tuberculosis (TB should be high on the differential. In India, TB is the most common opportunistic infection in HIV and it can have several different central nervous system manifestations, including intracranial tuberculomas. In this case, an HIV patient presenting with new-onset seizure and fever was diagnosed with tuberculous meningitis and multiple intracranial tuberculomas. The patient received standard TB medications, steroids, and anticonvulsants in the emergency department and was admitted for further care.

  9. Ictal impending danger--"sixth sense seizures"--in patients with benign focal epileptic seizures of adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Antonino; Chifari, Rosanna; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Viri, Maurizio; Lodi, Monica; Dell'Oglio, Valentina; Beccaria, Francesca; Gambardella, Antonio

    2008-03-01

    We describe nine consecutive patients with diagnosis of benign focal epileptic seizures of adolescence (BFSA), who experienced an ictal sensation of impending danger. We collected nine BFSA patients after a comprehensive clinical and laboratory investigation, video-EEG analysis and neuroimaging study. All patients displayed a distinct electro-clinical pattern of seizures characterized by a peculiar subjective feeling of impending danger coming from behind, followed by a coordinated behavior of "head-turning" toward the danger. This feeling was described in all patients as "a shadow behind me on one side" or "something or someone behind me". All of our patients explained that, at the beginning of their seizures, they felt an early warning of a high-risk situation. Electrophysiologic data favored a frontal origin of these seizures. We have described for the first time a distinct electro-clinical pattern of seizures in the context of BFSA, characterized by the ictal feeling of early warning of a high-risk situation, which we thought to term "sixth sense seizure". In the light of current neuro-anatomical knowledge, seizure discharge within anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) structures is the likely explanation for this situation. Further studies are needed to establish if this is an electroclinical variant of BFSA or a new distinct epileptic syndrome.

  10. Seizure ending signs in patients with dyscognitive focal seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavvala, Jay R; Gerard, Elizabeth E; Macken, Mícheál; Schuele, Stephan U

    2015-09-01

    Signs indicating the end of a focal seizure with loss of awareness and/or responsiveness but without progression to focal or generalized motor symptoms are poorly defined and can be difficult to determine. Not recognizing the transition from ictal to postictal behaviour can affect seizure reporting accuracy by family members and may lead to delayed or a lack of examination during EEG monitoring, erroneous seizure localization and inadequate medical intervention for prolonged seizure duration. Our epilepsy monitoring unit database was searched for focal seizures without secondary generalization for the period from 2007 to 2011. The first focal seizure in a patient with loss of awareness and/or responsiveness and/or behavioural arrest, with or without automatisms, was included. Seizures without objective symptoms or inadequate video-EEG quality were excluded. A total of 67 patients were included, with an average age of 41.7 years. Thirty-six of the patients had seizures from the left hemisphere and 29 from the right. All patients showed an abrupt change in motor activity and resumed contact with the environment as a sign of clinical seizure ending. Specific ending signs (nose wiping, coughing, sighing, throat clearing, or laughter) were seen in 23 of 47 of temporal lobe seizures and 7 of 20 extra-temporal seizures. Seizure ending signs are often subtle and the most common finding is a sudden change in motor activity and resumption of contact with the environment. More distinct signs, such as nose wiping, coughing or throat clearing, are not specific to temporal lobe onset. A higher proportion of seizures during sleep went unexamined, compared to those during wakefulness. This demonstrates that seizure semiology can be very subtle and arousals from sleep during monitoring should alert staff. Patient accounts of seizure frequency appear to be unreliable and witness reports need to be taken into account. [Published with video sequences].

  11. Absence seizure in the elderly

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-15

    Jun 15, 2011 ... seizures or myoclonus,[3] as well as frontal lobe abnormalities such as cortical atrophy.[4]. Absence status epilepticus absence seizure (AS) is a prolonged, generalized, and nonconvulsive seizure characterized by more or less severe impairment of consciousness, at times associated with other.

  12. Terminology of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C; Ausserer, Harald; Nardone, Raffaele; Tezzon, Frediano; Bongiovanni, Luigi Giuseppe; Tinazzi, Michele; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-03-01

    Several different terms have been used to describe "psychogenic nonepileptic seizures" (PNES) in the literature. In this study, we evaluated the most common English terms used to describe PNES on Google and in PubMed using multiple search terms (https://www.google.com and http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed). The information prevalence of the five terms most frequently used to refer to PNES in PubMed were: psychogenic non(-)epileptic seizure(s), followed by pseudo(-)seizure(s), non(-)epileptic seizure(s), psychogenic seizure(s), and non(-)epileptic event(s). The five most frequently adopted terms to describe PNES in Google were: psychogenic non(-)epileptic seizure(s), followed by non(-)epileptic event(s), psychogenic attack(s), non(-)epileptic attack(s), and psychogenic non(-)epileptic attack(s). The broad spectrum of synonyms used to refer to PNES in the medical literature reflects a lack of internationally accepted, uniform terminology for PNES. In addition to "seizure(s)," lay people use the word "attack(s)" to describe PNES. Although considered obsolete, some terms, e.g., pseudoseizure(s), are still used in the recent medical literature. Adopting a uniform terminology to describe PNES could facilitate communication between epileptologists, physicians without specific expertise in epilepsy, and patients. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  13. [Post traumatic partial seizures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, P; Almárcegui, C; Pablo, M J; Peralta, P; Bernal, M; Valdizán, J R

    Post traumatic epilepsy represents 4% of the prevalence of the disorder and is one of the sequelas which is most difficult to prevent. Risk factors have been described to predict the appearance of seizures. A seven year old boy with a severe head injury was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit. On neuroimaging studies there were multiple foci of contusion, mainly in the left hemisphere, and blood in the III and IV ventricles and frontal horn of the left lateral ventricle. The patient had severe sequelae of head injury with a right spastic hemiplegia and hemiparesia with hypertony of the left side, together with complete blindness of both eyes due to bilateral atrophy of the optic nerve. Serial EEG were done, in which a recording showed alternating periods of hypervoltage grapho elements superimposed on a trace of very low voltage, with continuous activity of low voltage and low frequency. There were no grapho elements with acute morphology. However, the patient had a first partial seizure a year and a half after his head injury. On the EEG an epileptogenic focus was identified in the left hemisphere. Within two years of his head injury he had seven seizures. He had not received prophylactic antiepileptic treatment after the head injury. We report a case of epilepsy secondary to a head injury, in which the first seizure occurred one and a half years after injury. In view of the risk factors, we discuss whether prophylactic anti epileptic treatment might have been beneficial.

  14. Definition and classification of epilepsy. Classification of epileptic seizures 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases, especially in childhood and adolescence. The incidence varies from 15 to 113 cases per 100 000 population with the maximum among children under 1 year old. The prevalence of epilepsy is high, ranging from 5 to 8 cases (in some regions – 10 cases per 1000 children under 15 years old. Classification of the disease has great importance for diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. The article presents a novel strategy for classification of epileptic seizures, developed in 2016. It contains a number of brand new concepts, including a very important one, saying that some seizures, previously considered as generalized or focal only, can be, in fact, both focal and generalized. They include tonic, atonic, myoclonic seizures and epileptic spasms. The term “secondarily generalized seizure” is replace by the term “bilateral tonic-clonic seizure” (as soon as it is not a separate type of epileptic seizures, and the term reflects the spread of discharge from any area of cerebral cortex and evolution of any types of focal seizures. International League Against Epilepsy recommends to abandon the term “pseudo-epileptic seizures” and replace it by the term “psychogenic non-epileptic seizures”. If a doctor is not sure that seizures have epileptic nature, the term “paroxysmal event” should be used without specifying the disease. The conception of childhood epileptic encephalopathies, developed within this novel classification project, is one of the most significant achievements, since in this case not only the seizures, but even epileptiform activity can induce severe disorders of higher mental functions. In addition to detailed description of the new strategy for classification of epileptic seizures, the article contains a comprehensive review of the existing principles of epilepsy and epileptic seizures classification.

  15. Predictors of seizures in patients with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinduja, Archana; Habetz, Kenneth; Raina, Sunil Kumar; Fitzgerald, Ryan T; Sahaya, Kinshuk

    2016-08-01

    Although seizures are common in patients with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), epilepsy is rare. Our objective was to identify predictors and impact of seizures in patients with PRES. A retrospective review of the clinical and radiological parameters of all patients diagnosed with PRES from 2007 to 2014 was performed. Patients were divided into two groups based on the occurrence of PRES-related seizures at presentation or during their hospital course. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine factors associated with the occurrence of PRES-related seizures. Of 100 patients, 70% experienced at least one seizure from PRES. On univariate analysis, the factors associated with seizures were the following: high Charlson comorbidity index (4.16±2.89 vs. 2.87±2.20, p=0.03), systemic malignancy (41.4% vs. 16.7%, p=0.02), occipital lobe involvement (97.1% vs. 83.3%, p=0.02), more lobes involved (4.6±1.48 vs. 3.9±1.32, p=0.03) but less likely in patients with visual disturbances (15.7% vs. 46.7%, p=0.005), and facial droop (12.9% vs. 16.7%, p=0.002). On multivariate analysis, only occipital lobe involvement was significantly (odds ratio: 9.63, 95% CI: 1.45-64.10, p=0.02) associated with the occurrence of PRES-related seizures. Despite the occurrence of seizures, they were less likely to require a nursing home placement upon hospital discharge (odds ratio: 0.17, 95% CI: 0.03-0.91, p=0.04). We conclude that seizures are common in patients with occipital lobe involvement from PRES. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Seizure detection with automated EEG analysis: a validation study focusing on periodic patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Marcos, Alba; Scheuer, Mark L; Rossetti, Andrea O

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate an automated seizure detection (ASD) algorithm in EEGs with periodic and other challenging patterns. Selected EEGs recorded in patients over 1year old were classified into four groups: A. Periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges (PLEDs) with intermixed electrical seizures. B. PLEDs without seizures. C. Electrical seizures and no PLEDs. D. No PLEDs or seizures. Recordings were analyzed by the Persyst P12 software, and compared to the raw EEG, interpreted by two experienced neurophysiologists; Positive percent agreement (PPA) and false-positive rates/hour (FPR) were calculated. We assessed 98 recordings (Group A=21 patients; B=29, C=17, D=31). Total duration was 82.7h (median: 1h); containing 268 seizures. The software detected 204 (=76.1%) seizures; all ictal events were captured in 29/38 (76.3%) patients; in only in 3 (7.7%) no seizures were detected. Median PPA was 100% (range 0-100; interquartile range 50-100), and the median FPR 0/h (range 0-75.8; interquartile range 0-4.5); however, lower performances were seen in the groups containing periodic discharges. This analysis provides data regarding the yield of the ASD in a particularly difficult subset of EEG recordings, showing that periodic discharges may bias the results. Ongoing refinements in this technique might enhance its utility and lead to a more extensive application. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Predictive value of S100-B and copeptin for outcomes following seizure: the BISTRO International Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Yonathan; Bloom, Benjamin; Bokobza, Jerome; Baarir, Nacera; Laribi, Said; Harris, Tim; Navarro, Vincent; Bernard, Maguy; Pearse, Rupert; Riou, Bruno; Hausfater, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the performance of S100-B protein and copeptin, in addition to clinical variables, in predicting outcomes of patients attending the emergency department (ED) following a seizure. We prospectively included adult patients presented with an acute seizure, in four EDs in France and the United Kingdom. Participants were followed up for 28 days. The primary endpoint was a composite of seizure recurrence, all-cause mortality, hospitalization or rehospitalisation, or return visit in the ED within seven days. Among the 389 participants included in the analysis, 156 (40%) experienced the primary endpoint within seven days and 195 (54%) at 28 days. Mean levels of both S100-B (0.11 μg/l [95% CI 0.07-0.20] vs 0.09 μg/l [0.07-0.14]) and copeptin (23 pmol/l [9-104] vs 17 pmol/l [8-43]) were higher in participants meeting the primary endpoint. However, both biomarkers were poorly predictive of the primary outcome with a respective area under the receiving operator characteristic curve of 0.57 [0.51-0.64] and 0.59 [0.54-0.64]. Multivariable logistic regression analysis identified higher age (odds ratio [OR] 1.3 per decade [1.1-1.5]), provoked seizure (OR 4.93 [2.5-9.8]), complex partial seizure (OR 4.09 [1.8-9.1]) and first seizure (OR 1.83 [1.1-3.0]) as independent predictors of the primary outcome. A second regression analysis including the biomarkers showed no additional predictive benefit (S100-B OR 3.89 [0.80-18.9] copeptin OR 1 [1.00-1.00]). The plasma biomarkers S100-B and copeptin did not improve prediction of poor outcome following seizure. Higher age, a first seizure, a provoked seizure and a partial complex seizure are independently associated with adverse outcomes.

  18. Benzodiazepine withdrawal seizures and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaohong

    2011-02-01

    Since the first report of benzodiazepine withdrawal seizure in 1961, many case reports have followed. Withdrawal seizures have occurred with short, medium, and long halflife benzodiazepine, if discontinued abruptly. Withdrawal seizures usually occur in patients who have been taking these medications for long periods of time and at high doses. Seizures have also been reported with less than 15 days of use and at therapeutic dosage. Almost all the withdrawal seizures reported were grand mal seizures. The severity of seizures range from a single episode to coma and death. Benzodiazepine dose tapering can be done faster in a hospital setting in high-dose abusers, but must be done more slowly in the outpatient setting in therapeutic dosage users.

  19. Sensitivity of compressed spectral arrays for detecting seizures in acutely ill adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Craig A; Wahlster, Sarah; Shafi, Mouhsin M; Westover, M Brandon

    2014-02-01

    Continuous EEG recordings (cEEGs) are increasingly used in evaluation of acutely ill adults. Pre-screening using compressed data formats, such as compressed spectral array (CSA), may accelerate EEG review. We tested whether screening with CSA can enable detection of seizures and other relevant patterns. Two individuals reviewed the CSA displays of 113 cEEGs. While blinded to the raw EEG data, they marked each visually homogeneous CSA segment. An independent experienced electroencephalographer reviewed the raw EEG within 60 s on either side of each mark and recorded any seizures (and isolated epileptiform discharges, periodic epileptiform discharges (PEDs), rhythmic delta activity (RDA), and focal or generalized slowing). Seizures were considered to have been detected if the CSA mark was within 60 s of the seizure. The electroencephalographer then determined the total number of seizures (and other critical findings) for each record by exhaustive, page-by-page review of the entire raw EEG. Within each of the 39 cEEG recordings containing seizures, one CSA reviewer identified at least one seizure, while the second CSA reviewer identified 38/39 patients with seizures. The overall detection rate was 89.0 % of 1,190 total seizures. When present, an average of 87.9 % of seizures were detected per individual patient. Detection rates for other critical findings were as follows: epileptiform discharges, 94.0 %; PEDs, 100 %; RDA, 97.9 %; focal slowing, 100 %; and generalized slowing, 100 %. CSA-guided review can support sensitive screening of critical pathological information in cEEG recordings. However, some patients with seizures may not be identified.

  20. Epileptic seizures in anaplastic gangliogliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, Marc; Pagès, Mélanie; Roux, Alexandre; Peeters, Sophie; Dezamis, Edouard; Puget, Stéphanie; Devaux, Bertrand; Sainte-Rose, Christian; Zerah, Michel; Louvel, Guillaume; Dumont, Sarah N; Meder, Jean-François; Grill, Jacques; Huberfeld, Gilles; Chrétien, Fabrice; Parraga, Eduardo; Sauvageon, Xavier; Varlet, Pascale; Pallud, Johan

    2017-04-01

    Prevalence and predictors of epileptic seizures are unknown in the malignant variant of ganglioglioma. In a retrospective exploratory dataset of 18 supratentorial anaplastic World Health Organization grade III gangliogliomas, we studied: (i) the prevalence and predictors of epileptic seizures at diagnosis; (ii) the evolution of seizures during tumor evolution; (iii) seizure control rates and predictors of epilepsy control after oncological treatments. Epileptic seizures prevalence progresses throughout the natural course of anaplastic gangliogliomas: 44% at imaging discovery, 67% at histopathological diagnosis, 69% following oncological treatment, 86% at tumor progression, and 100% at the end-of-life phase. The medical control of seizures and their refractory status worsened during the tumor's natural course: 25% of uncontrolled seizures at histopathological diagnosis, 40% following oncological treatment, 45.5% at tumor progression, and 45.5% at the end-of-life phase. Predictors of seizures at diagnosis appeared related to the tumor location (i.e. temporal and/or cortical involvement). Prognostic parameters of seizure control after first-line oncological treatment were temporal tumor location, eosinophilic granular bodies, TP53 mutation, and extent of resection. Prognostic parameters of seizure control at tumor progression were a history of epileptic seizures at diagnosis, seizure control after first-line oncological treatment, eosinophilic granular bodies, and TP53 mutation. Epileptic seizures are frequently observed in anaplastic gangliogliomas and both prevalence and medically refractory status worsen during the tumor's natural course. Both oncological and antiepileptic treatments should be employed to improve the control of epileptic seizures and the quality of life of patients harboring an anaplastic ganglioglioma.

  1. Characterization of neonatal seizures in an animal model of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Dayalan; White, Andrew M.; Raol, Yogendra H.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective In this study, we use time-locked video and electroencephalograph (EEG) recordings to characterize acute seizures and EEG abnormalities in an animal model that replicates many salient features of human neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) including the brain injury pattern and long-term neurologic outcome. Methods Hypoxia-ischemia (HI) was induced in 7-day-old rats by ligating the right carotid artery and exposing the pups to hypoxia for 2 hours (Rice-Vannucci method). To identify seizures and abnormal EEG activity, pups were monitored by video-EEG during hypoxia and at various time points after HI. Occurrence of electroclinical seizures, purely electrographic seizures and other abnormal discharges in the EEG were quantified manually. A power spectrum analysis was done to evaluate the effects of HI on EEG spectra in the 1 to 50 Hz frequency band. Results During hypoxia, all pups exhibit short duration, but frequent electroclinical seizures. Almost all pups continue to have seizures in the immediate period following termination of hypoxia. In over half of the HI rats seizures persisted for 24 hours, for some of them, the seizures continued for more than 48 hours. Seizures were not observed in any rats at 72 hours after HI-induction. A significant reduction in background EEG voltage in the cortex ipsilateral to the ligated carotid artery occurred in rats subjected to HI. In addition, purely electrographic seizures, spikes, sharp waves and brief runs of epileptiform discharges (BRED) were also observed in these rats. Significance HI-induction in P7 rats using the Rice-Vannucci method resulted in the development of seizures and EEG abnormalities similar to that seen in human neonates with HIE. Therefore, we conclude that this is a valid model to test the efficacy of novel interventions to treat neonatal seizures. PMID:24836645

  2. Analysis of Epileptic Discharges from Implanted Subdural Electrodes in Patients with Sturge-Weber Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Iimura

    Full Text Available Almost two-thirds of patients with Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS have epilepsy, and half of them require surgery for it. However, it is well known that scalp electroencephalography (EEG does not demonstrate unequivocal epileptic discharges in patients with SWS. Therefore, we analyzed interictal and ictal discharges from intracranial subdural EEG recordings in patients treated surgically for SWS to elucidate epileptogenicity in this disorder.Five intractable epileptic patients with SWS who were implanted with subdural electrodes for presurgical evaluation were enrolled in this study. We examined the following seizure parameters: seizure onset zone (SOZ, propagation speed of seizure discharges, and seizure duration by visual inspection. Additionally, power spectrogram analysis on some frequency bands at SOZ was performed from 60 s before the visually detected seizure onset using the EEG Complex Demodulation Method (CDM.We obtained 21 seizures from five patients for evaluation, and all seizures initiated from the cortex under the leptomeningeal angioma. Most of the patients presented with motionless staring and respiratory distress as seizure symptoms. The average seizure propagation speed and duration were 3.1 ± 3.6 cm/min and 19.4 ± 33.6 min, respectively. Significant power spectrogram changes at the SOZ were detected at 10-30 Hz from 15 s before seizure onset, and at 30-80 Hz from 5 s before seizure onset.In patients with SWS, seizures initiate from the cortex under the leptomeningeal angioma, and seizure propagation is slow and persists for a longer period. CDM indicated beta to low gamma-ranged seizure discharges starting from shortly before the visually detected seizure onset. Our ECoG findings indicate that ischemia is a principal mechanism underlying ictogenesis and epileptogenesis in SWS.

  3. Ion dynamics during seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Valentino Raimondo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Changes in membrane voltage brought about by ion fluxes through voltage and transmitter-gated channels represent the basis of neural activity. As such, electrochemical gradients across the membrane determine the direction and driving force for the flow of ions and are therefore crucial in setting the properties of synaptic transmission and signal propagation. Ion concentration gradients are established by a variety of mechanisms, including specialised transporter proteins. However, transmembrane gradients can be affected by ionic fluxes through channels during periods of elevated neural activity, which in turn are predicted to influence the properties of on-going synaptic transmission. Such activity-induced changes to ion concentration gradients are a feature of both physiological and pathological neural processes. An epileptic seizure is an example of severely perturbed neural activity, which is accompanied by pronounced changes in intracellular and extracellular ion concentrations. Appreciating the factors that contribute to these ion dynamics is critical if we are to understand how a seizure event evolves and is sustained and terminated by neural tissue. Indeed, this issue is of significant clinical importance as status epilepticus – a type of seizure that does not stop of its own accord – is a life-threatening medical emergency. In this review we explore how the transmembrane concentration gradient of the six major ions (K+, Na+, Cl-, Ca2+, H+ and HCO3- is altered during an epileptic seizure. We will first examine each ion individually, before describing how multiple interacting mechanisms between ions might contribute to concentration changes and whether these act to prolong or terminate epileptic activity. In doing so, we will consider how the availability of experimental techniques has both advanced and restricted our ability to study these phenomena.

  4. Features of stimulus-specific seizures in dogs with reflex epilepsy: 43 cases (2000-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, Linda; Scariano, Rachel; Rishniw, Mark

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the occurrence and management of reflex epilepsy (ie, seizure activity triggered by exposure to specific locations or situations) in dogs. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 43 client-owned dogs. PROCEDURES Discussions by veterinarians participating in the Veterinary Information Network online community for the years 2000 through 2014 were reviewed to identify dogs with a diagnosis of reflex epilepsy and seizure activity in response to stimuli. History, signalment (including age at onset), the specific stimulus or stimuli that provoked seizures, treatments, and any concurrent neurologic diagnoses were recorded. RESULTS A variety of breeds were affected. Median age at onset was 5 years (range, 3 months to 11 years). Reflex seizures were reported as being repeatedly triggered by visits to a veterinary clinic (35/43 dogs), grooming facility (24/43 dogs), or boarding facility (13/43 dogs) and, less commonly, by other situations (eg, pet store or car ride). Over half of the dogs (24/43) had multiple triggers. Eight (19%) dogs had seizures at other times that were not induced by location or a specific situation. A variety of sedatives and maintenance antiepileptic drugs administered to affected dogs failed to prevent the stimulus-specific seizure activity. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results of the present study suggested that seizures provoked by specific situations or locations occur in dogs with reflex epilepsy and that common triggers were visits to veterinary and grooming facilities. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the characteristics of reflex epilepsy in dogs and to determine the most effective means to manage these patients.

  5. [Para-infectious seizures: A retrospective multicentre study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conejo Moreno, David; Rodríguez Fernández, Cristina; Ruíz Ayúcar de la Vega, Irene; Ortiz Madinaveitia, Saturnino; Hedrera Fernández, Antonio; Maldonado Ruiz, Esther; Hernández Fabian, Aranzazu; Hortigüela Saeta, María Montesclaros; Cancho Candela, Ramón

    2016-12-01

    Para-infectious seizures are afebrile seizures that are associated with mild infections, and occur in children with no pre-existing neurological illness. They are still little known in our environment. A multicentre retrospective study was conducted that included patients with normal psychomotor development and had presented with one or more seizures in the context of a mild afebrile infection. A total of 38 patients (47% male, 53% female) were included in the study over a period of three years (2012-2015). The mean age was 2.1 years. A previous history of febrile seizures was found in 7.9% of them. Mean number of seizures per patient was 2.2, with 57.9% of them being tonic-clonic seizures. The mean duration of seizures was 3.2minutes. An EEG was performed during admission in 73.7% of cases. Lumbar punctures were performed in 34.2% of cases. All were normal. Neuroimaging tests were carried out in 36.9% of cases. Brain MRI was the imaging test performed in most cases (21.1%), with no any pathological findings. The most frequent infection found was acute gastroenteritis (68%), followed by upper respiratory tract infection (32%). Almost two-thirds (63.2%) of patients did not require anticonvulsant medication. Rectal diazepam was the most frequently used drug in emergencies. Intravenous medication was required by 28.9% of patients due to repeated seizures. The most frequently used drug in the non-emergency setting was valproic acid. Anticonvulsant treatment was continued after discharge in 16% of patients. Para-infectious seizures was the diagnosis in 76.3% of cases when discharged. Knowledge of para-infectious seizures, their clinical diagnosis and benign course is crucial, as this would avoid further testing and unnecessary treatments. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Heart bypass surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Off-pump coronary artery bypass - discharge; OPCAB - discharge; Beating heart surgery - discharge; Bypass surgery - heart - discharge; CABG - discharge; Coronary artery bypass graft - discharge; Coronary artery ...

  7. Bronchiolitis - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    RSV bronchiolitis - discharge; Respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis - discharge ... Your child has bronchiolitis , which causes swelling and mucus to build up in the smallest air passages of the lungs. In the hospital, ...

  8. Angina - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also learn how to take care of your heart disease . Diet and lifestyle Try to limit how much alcohol ... surgery - discharge Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive - discharge Heart disease - risk ... Review Date 8/2/2016 Updated by: Michael ...

  9. Modulation of epileptiform EEG discharges in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: An investigation of reflex epileptic traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Guaranha, Mirian Salvadori Bittar; Conradsen, Isa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies have suggested that cognitive tasks modulate (provoke or inhibit) the epileptiform electroencephalography (EEG) discharges (EDs) in patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME). Their inhibitory effect was found to be especially frequent (64–90%). These studies arbitr...

  10. Synchronous inhibitory potentials precede seizure-like events in acute models of focal limbic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uva, Laura; Breschi, Gian Luca; Gnatkovsky, Vadym; Taverna, Stefano; de Curtis, Marco

    2015-02-18

    Interictal spikes in models of focal seizures and epilepsies are sustained by the synchronous activation of glutamatergic and GABAergic networks. The nature of population spikes associated with seizure initiation (pre-ictal spikes; PSs) is still undetermined. We analyzed the networks involved in the generation of both interictal and PSs in acute models of limbic cortex ictogenesis induced by pharmacological manipulations. Simultaneous extracellular and intracellular recordings from both principal cells and interneurons were performed in the medial entorhinal cortex of the in vitro isolated guinea pig brain during focal interictal and ictal discharges induced in the limbic network by intracortical and brief arterial infusions of either bicuculline methiodide (BMI) or 4-aminopyridine (4AP). Local application of BMI in the entorhinal cortex did not induce seizure-like events (SLEs), but did generate periodic interictal spikes sensitive to the glutamatergic non-NMDA receptor antagonist DNQX. Unlike local applications, arterial perfusion of either BMI or 4AP induced focal limbic SLEs. PSs just ahead of SLE were associated with hyperpolarizing potentials coupled with a complete blockade of firing in principal cells and burst discharges in putative interneurons. Interictal population spikes recorded from principal neurons between two SLEs correlated with a depolarizing potential. We demonstrate in two models of acute limbic SLE that PS events are different from interictal spikes and are sustained by synchronous activation of inhibitory networks. Our findings support a prominent role of synchronous network inhibition in the initiation of a focal seizure. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/353048-08$15.00/0.

  11. In-hospital costs in patients with seizures and epilepsy after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guekht, Alla; Mizinova, Maria; Ershov, Andrey; Guz, Denis; Kaimovsky, Igor; Messina, Paolo; Beghi, Ettore

    2015-08-01

    To verify the net effect of seizures after stroke on the use of in-hospital health care resources. Consecutive patients with first-ever stroke were admitted to the stroke unit of a Moscow hospital and followed prospectively until death or discharge. Each patient experiencing seizures was matched for age, sex, stroke type, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at admission, and stroke risk factors to 2+ patients with no seizures, as controls. Resources consumed included length of hospital stay, admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), diagnostic tests, medical consultations and treatments. Cost estimates were based on the Russian National Health Service perspective. The sample comprised 30 patients with in-hospital seizures and 70 matched controls. Patients dying in hospital were 15 of 30 (50%) versus 4 of 70 (5.7%) (p stay was only slightly (nonsignificantly) higher in patients with seizures, but the cost was significantly higher in patients who died than in patients who were discharged alive. Compared to the controls, patients with seizures spent more intensive care unit (ICU) days and required more computed tomography (CT) scans, x-rays, endoscopies, and specialist consultations, causing higher in-hospital costs. In patients with first-ever stroke, seizures per se do not increase the overall in-hospital costs. However, the higher than expected mortality in patients with seizures is associated with additional hospital costs. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  12. Diagnosing psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: Video-EEG monitoring, suggestive seizure induction and diagnostic certainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkirov, Stoyan; Jungilligens, Johannes; Grönheit, Wenke; Wellmer, Jörg

    2017-08-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) can remain undiagnosed for many years, leading to unnecessary medication and delayed treatment. A recent report by the International League Against Epilepsy Nonepileptic Seizures Task Force recommends a staged approach to the diagnosis of PNES (LaFrance, et al., 2013). We aimed to investigate its practical utility, and to apply the proposed classification to evaluate the role of long-term video-EEG monitoring (VEEG) and suggestive seizure induction (SSI) in PNES workup. Using electronic medical records, 122 inpatients (mean age 36.0±12.9years; 68% women) who received the diagnosis of PNES at our epilepsy center during a 4.3-year time period were included. There was an 82.8% agreement between diagnostic certainty documented at discharge and that assigned retroactively using the Task Force recommendations. In a minority of cases, having used the Task Force criteria could have encouraged the clinicians to give more certain diagnoses, exemplifying the Task Force report's utility. Both VEEG and SSI were effective at supporting high level diagnostic certainty. Interestingly, about one in four patients (26.2%) had a non-diagnostic ("negative") VEEG but a positive SSI. On average, this subgroup did not have significantly shorter mean VEEG recording times than VEEG-positive patients. However, VEEG-negative/SSI-positive patients had a significantly lower habitual seizure frequency than their counterparts. This finding emphasizes the utility of SSI in ascertaining the diagnosis of PNES in patients who do not have a spontaneous habitual event during VEEG due to, for example, low seizure frequency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Detection of Paroxysms in Long-Term, Single Channel EEG-Monitoring of Patients with Typical Absence Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Troels W.; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing; Groenborg, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Absence seizures are associated with generalized 2.5-5 Hz spike-wave discharges in the EEG. Rarely are patients, parents or physicians aware of duration or incidence of seizures. Six patients were monitored with a portable EEG-device over four times 24 hours to evaluate how easily outpatients are...

  14. Seizure Prediction and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iasemidis, Leon D.

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy is characterized by intermittent, paroxysmal, hypersynchronous electrical activity, that may remain localized and/or spread and severely disrupt the brain’s normal multi-task and multi-processing function. Epileptic seizures are the hallmarks of such activity and had been considered unpredictable. It is only recently that research on the dynamics of seizure generation by analysis of the brain’s electrographic activity (EEG) has shed ample light on the predictability of seizures, and illuminated the way to automatic, prospective, long-term prediction of seizures. The ability to issue warnings in real time of impending seizures (e.g., tens of minutes prior to seizure occurrence in the case of focal epilepsy), may lead to novel diagnostic tools and treatments for epilepsy. Applications may range from a simple warning to the patient, in order to avert seizure-associated injuries, to intervention by automatic timely administration of an appropriate stimulus, for example of a chemical nature like an anti-epileptic drug (AED), electromagnetic nature like vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), deep brain stimulation (DBS), transcranial direct current (TDC) or transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and/or of another nature (e.g., ultrasonic, cryogenic, biofeedback operant conditioning). It is thus expected that seizure prediction could readily become an integral part of the treatment of epilepsy through neuromodulation, especially in the new generation of closed-loop seizure control systems. PMID:21939848

  15. Do stages of dentistry training affect anxiety provoking situations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obarisiagbon, A; Azodo, Cc; Omoaregba, Jo; James, Bo

    2014-11-01

    Undetected and unaddressed anxiety negatively affects performance in clinical learning environments. The aim was to investigate the anxiety provoking situations in clinical dental care delivery among students of preclinical and clinical years and house officers. A 38-item modified Moss and McManus clinical anxiety questionnaire, general health questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12) and the Zung self-rating anxiety scale were the data collection tools. Of the 84 recruited, 79 completed the study giving 94.0% (79/84) response rate. The median age of the participants was 25 years with 50.6% (40/79) being 20-25 years. Gender distribution revealed that males constituted 60.8% (48/79) of the participants. House officers constituted 29.1% (23/79), clinical students 36.7% (29/79), and preclinical students 34.2 (27/79) of the participants. The top anxiety provoking situations using the modified Moss and McManus clinical anxiety questionnaire were extracting wrong tooth 3.24 (1.06), inability to pass examination 3.32 (1.01), achieving examination requirement 3.19 (1.01), fracturing a tooth 3.08 (0.98) and accidental pulp exposure 2.96 (1.04). Getting diagnosis wrong, help in faint episode, not developing radiograph properly and coping with children were the anxiety provoking situations that showed statistically significant difference in the 3 studied training stages of dentistry. Bonferroni post-hoc analysis significant difference was in the preclinical and clinical students' pair for getting diagnosis wrong, not developing radiograph properly and coping with children while house officers/clinical students and house officers/preclinical students' pairs were for help in faint episode. Overall, 2.5% (2/79) had severe, 69.6% (55/79) moderate, 26.6% (21/79) mild clinical anxiety while 1 (1.3%) of the participants expressed no clinical anxiety. Data from this study revealed that the clinical anxiety of moderate severity was prevalent among the studied dental healthcare students. The anxiety-provoking

  16. Children's self-speech and self-regulation during a fear-provoking behavioral test.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, P.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Conducted a behavioral test and a behavioral interview to assess children's spontaneous use of self-speech and self-regulation in a fear-provoking situation. 44 children (aged 8-12 yrs) performed a series of more fear-provoking (e.g., jumping off the high diving board) or less fear-provoking (e.g.,

  17. "Ictal" lateralized periodic discharges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen-Gupta, Indranil; Schuele, Stephan U; Macken, Micheal P; Kwasny, Mary J; Gerard, Elizabeth E

    2014-07-01

    Whether lateralized periodic discharges (LPDs) represent ictal or interictal phenomena, and even the circumstances in which they may represent one or the other, remains highly controversial. Lateralized periodic discharges are, however, widely accepted as being ictal when they are time-locked to clinically apparent symptoms. We sought to investigate the characteristics of "ictal" lateralized periodic discharges (ILPDs) defined by time-locked clinical symptoms in order to explore the utility of using this definition to dichotomize LPDs into "ictal" and "nonictal" categories. Our archive of all continuous EEG (cEEG) reports of adult inpatients undergoing prolonged EEG monitoring for nonelective indications between 2007 and 2011 was searched to identify all reports describing LPDs. Lateralized periodic discharges were considered ILPDs when they were reported as being consistently time-locked to clinical symptoms; LPDs lacking a clear time-locked correlate were considered to be "nonictal" lateralized periodic discharges (NILPDs). Patient charts and available neuroimaging studies were also reviewed. Neurophysiologic localization of LPDs, imaging findings, presence of seizures, discharge outcomes, and other demographic factors were compared between patients with ILPDs and those with NILPDs. p-Values were adjusted for false discovery rate (FDR). One thousand four hundred fifty-two patients underwent cEEG monitoring at our institution between 2007 and 2011. Lateralized periodic discharges were reported in 90 patients, 10 of whom met criteria for ILPDs. Nine of the patients with ILPDs demonstrated motor symptoms, and the remaining patient experienced stereotyped sensory symptoms. Ictal lateralized periodic discharges had significantly increased odds for involving central head regions (odds ratio [OR]=11; 95% confidence interval [CI]=2.16-62.6; p=0.018, FDR adjusted), with a trend towards higher proportion of lesions involving the primary sensorimotor cortex (p=0.09, FDR

  18. Detection and Prediction of Epileptic Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Jonas

    monitoring of their brain waves. More specifically, three issues were investigated: The feasibility of automatic seizure prediction, optimization of automatic seizure detection algorithms, and the link between intra- and extracranial EEG. Regarding feasibility of automatic seizure prediction, neither...

  19. Cardiac catheterization - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheterization - cardiac - discharge; Heart catheterization - discharge: Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization discharge; CAD - cardiac catheterization discharge; Coronary ...

  20. Weighted performance metrics for automatic neonatal seizure detection using multi-scored EEG data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, A H; Cherian, P J; Caicedo, A; Jansen, K; Dereymaeker, A; De Wispelaere, L; Dielman, C; Vervisch, J; Govaert, P; De Vos, M; Naulaers, G; Van Huffel, S

    2017-09-11

    In neonatal intensive care units, there is a need for around the clock monitoring of EEG, especially for recognizing seizures. An automated seizure detector with an acceptable performance can partly fill this need. In order to develop a detector, an extensive dataset labeled by experts is needed. However, accurately defining neonatal seizures on EEG is a challenge, especially when seizure discharges do not meet exact definitions of repetitiveness or evolution in amplitude and frequency. When several readers score seizures independently, disagreement can be high. Commonly used metrics such as good detection rate (GDR) and false alarm rate (FAR) derived from data scored by multiple raters have their limitations. Therefore, new metrics are needed to measure the performance with respect to the different labels. In this paper, instead of defining the labels by consensus or majority voting, popular metrics including GDR, FAR, positive predictive value, sensitivity, specificity, and selectivity are fuzzily modified such that they can take different scores into account. To this end, 353 hours of EEG data containing seizures from 81 neonates were visually scored by a clinical neurophysiologist and then processed by an automated seizure detector. The scored seizures were mixed with false detections of an automated seizure detector and were relabeled by 3 independent EEG readers. Then, all labels were used in the proposed performance metrics and the result was compared with the majority voting technique and showed higher accuracy and robustness for the proposed metrics. Results were confirmed using a bootstrapping test.

  1. MMR Vaccination and Febrile Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mogens; Hviid, Anders; Madsen, Kreesten Meldgaard

    2004-01-01

    CONTEXT: The rate of febrile seizures increases following measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination but it is unknown whether the rate varies according to personal or family history of seizures, perinatal factors, or socioeconomic status. Furthermore, little is known about the long-term outco...

  2. Fluoxetine Overdose-Induced Seizure

    OpenAIRE

    Suchard, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman experienced a witnessed generalized seizure in the Emergency Department three hours after ingesting approximately 1400 mg of fluoxetine in a suicide attempt. Although the majority of fluoxetine ingestions are benign, seizures may occur after large intentional overdoses. [WestJEM. 2008;9:154-156

  3. Localization of pediatric seizure semiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrame, Martina; Zarowski, Marcin; Alexopoulos, Andreas V; Wyllie, Elaine; Kothare, Sanjeev V; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between semiology of seizures in children and adolescents to the corresponding EEG localization. Charts of 225 consecutive pediatric epilepsy patients undergoing Video-EEG monitoring (VEM) over 2 years were reviewed. Seizure semiology recorded during VEM was classified according to ILAE seizure semiology terminology and EEG localization, and analyzed based on onset as defined by the EEG data (generalized, frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital or multilobar). A total of 1008 seizures were analyzed in 225 children (mean age 8.5 years, range 0-20), with 50% boys. Auras and seizures with automatisms arose predominantly from the temporal lobes (psemiologies relate to specific brain regions, with overlap between focal and generalized semiological seizure types, as identified electrographically. Semiology of seizures can provide important information for epilepsy localization, and should not be overlooked, especially in patients undergoing pre-surgical evaluation. Separation of clinical seizure description and EEG findings may be useful, in particular when only incomplete information is available. i.e. during the first office visit. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Epileptic fast intracerebral EEG activity: evidence for spatial decorrelation at seizure onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Fabrice; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Bourien, Jérôme; Chauvel, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    Low-voltage rapid discharges (or fast EEG ictal activity) constitute a characteristic electrophysiological pattern in focal seizures of human epilepsy. They are characterized by a decrease of signal voltage with a marked increase of signal frequency (typically beyond 25 Hz). They have long been observed in stereoelectroencephalographic (SEEG) signals recorded with intra-cerebral electrodes, generally occurring at seizure onset and simultaneously involving distinct brain regions. Spectral properties of rapid ictal discharges as well as spatial correlations measured between SEEG signals generated from distant sites before, during and after these discharges were studied. Cross-correlation estimates within typical EEG sub-bands and statistical tests performed in ten patients suffering from partial epilepsy (frontal, temporal or fronto-temporal) reveal that SEEG signals are significantly de-correlated during the discharge period compared to periods that precede and follow this discharge. These results can be interpreted as a functional decoupling of distant brain sites at seizure onset followed by an abnormally high re-coupling when the seizure develops. They lead to the concept of “disruption” that is complementary of that of “activation” (revealed by significantly high correlations between signals recorded during seizures), both giving insights into our understanding of pathophysiological processes involved in human partial epilepsies as well as in the interpretation of clinical semiology. PMID:12764064

  5. Disinhibition-induced transitions between absence and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Denggui; Wang, Qingyun; Perc, Matjaž

    2015-07-01

    Electrophysiological experiments have long revealed the existence of two-way transitions between absence and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures in the cerebral cortex. Based on a modified spatially-extended Taylor & Baier neural field model, we here propose a computational framework to mathematically describe the transition dynamics between these epileptic seizures. We first demonstrate the existence of various transition types that are induced by disinhibitory functions between two inhibitory variables in an isolated Taylor & Baier model. Moreover, we show that these disinhibition-induced transitions can lead to stable tonic-clonic oscillations as well as periodic spike with slow-wave discharges, which are the hallmark of absence seizures. We also observe fascinating dynamical states, such as periodic 2-spike with slow-wave discharges, tonic death, bursting oscillations, as well as saturated firing. Most importantly, we identify paths that represent physiologically plausible transitions between absence and tonic-clonic seizures in the modified spatially-extended Taylor & Baier model.

  6. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot.

  7. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures as a frequent diagnostic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Škrijelj Fadil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures represent a paroxysmal event followed by a sudden change of behavior, cognition or consciousness, mostly of short duration, which resemble or can be understood as epileptic seizures. They occur in persons without epilepsy and in patients with epilepsy. They are not associated with abnormal EEG discharges because their cause is a psychic disorder. Case report: A 20-year-old patient has been suffering of occasional 'morning short-lasting jerking hand movements, staring and fainting' since the age of 14 years. Beside a symptomatic anamnesis for epilepsy and non-specifically changed standard EEG, antiepileptic therapy (valproate and lamotrigine was introduced. Because of non-response to antiepileptic therapy, the patient was forwarded for further clinical examination involving video EEG telemetry, which indicated that this was a case of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. A successive withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs was initiated, and also, a psychologist and psychiatrist were included into treatment, which resulted in the reduction of seizures and improvement of the patient's general condition. Conclusion: Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures represent a frequent diagnostic problem requiring team's work, while the video EEG telemetry is the method of choice for diagnosis.

  8. Pure cannabidiol in the treatment of malignant migrating partial seizures in infancy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saade, Dimah; Joshi, Charuta

    2015-05-01

    Malignant migrating partial seizures in infancy is a devastating pharmacoresistent epileptic encephalopathy of unknown etiology characterized by onset in the first 6 months of life, continuous migrating focal seizures with corresponding multifocal electroencephalographic discharges, developmental deterioration, and early mortality. Recent widespread interest in the nonpsychoactive component of the cannabis plant, cannabidiol, as a potential treatment for refractory devastating epilepsies has led to individual trials initiated by families or physicians in states that have legalized medical marijuana with anecdotal success. We describe a now 10-month-old boy with malignant migrating partial seizures in infancy who made developmental gains and demonstrated sustained seizure reduction with the addition of cannabidiol to his antiepileptic regimen. This report supports a role for cannabidiol in the treatment of malignant migrating partial seizures in infancy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Audiogenic reflex seizures in cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrie, Mark; Bessant, Claire; Harvey, Robert J; Sparkes, Andrew; Garosi, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to characterise feline audiogenic reflex seizures (FARS). Methods An online questionnaire was developed to capture information from owners with cats suffering from FARS. This was collated with the medical records from the primary veterinarian. Ninety-six cats were included. Results Myoclonic seizures were one of the cardinal signs of this syndrome (90/96), frequently occurring prior to generalised tonic–clonic seizures (GTCSs) in this population. Other features include a late onset (median 15 years) and absence seizures (6/96), with most seizures triggered by high-frequency sounds amid occasional spontaneous seizures (up to 20%). Half the population (48/96) had hearing impairment or were deaf. One-third of cats (35/96) had concurrent diseases, most likely reflecting the age distribution. Birmans were strongly represented (30/96). Levetiracetam gave good seizure control. The course of the epilepsy was non-progressive in the majority (68/96), with an improvement over time in some (23/96). Only 33/96 and 11/90 owners, respectively, felt the GTCSs and myoclonic seizures affected their cat’s quality of life (QoL). Despite this, many owners (50/96) reported a slow decline in their cat’s health, becoming less responsive (43/50), not jumping (41/50), becoming uncoordinated or weak in the pelvic limbs (24/50) and exhibiting dramatic weight loss (39/50). These signs were exclusively reported in cats experiencing seizures for >2 years, with 42/50 owners stating these signs affected their cat’s QoL. Conclusions and relevance In gathering data on audiogenic seizures in cats, we have identified a new epilepsy syndrome named FARS with a geriatric onset. Further studies are warranted to investigate potential genetic predispositions to this condition. PMID:25916687

  10. Predicting epileptic seizures in advance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Moghim

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is the second most common neurological disorder, affecting 0.6-0.8% of the world's population. In this neurological disorder, abnormal activity of the brain causes seizures, the nature of which tend to be sudden. Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs are used as long-term therapeutic solutions that control the condition. Of those treated with AEDs, 35% become resistant to medication. The unpredictable nature of seizures poses risks for the individual with epilepsy. It is clearly desirable to find more effective ways of preventing seizures for such patients. The automatic detection of oncoming seizures, before their actual onset, can facilitate timely intervention and hence minimize these risks. In addition, advance prediction of seizures can enrich our understanding of the epileptic brain. In this study, drawing on the body of work behind automatic seizure detection and prediction from digitised Invasive Electroencephalography (EEG data, a prediction algorithm, ASPPR (Advance Seizure Prediction via Pre-ictal Relabeling, is described. ASPPR facilitates the learning of predictive models targeted at recognizing patterns in EEG activity that are in a specific time window in advance of a seizure. It then exploits advanced machine learning coupled with the design and selection of appropriate features from EEG signals. Results, from evaluating ASPPR independently on 21 different patients, suggest that seizures for many patients can be predicted up to 20 minutes in advance of their onset. Compared to benchmark performance represented by a mean S1-Score (harmonic mean of Sensitivity and Specificity of 90.6% for predicting seizure onset between 0 and 5 minutes in advance, ASPPR achieves mean S1-Scores of: 96.30% for prediction between 1 and 6 minutes in advance, 96.13% for prediction between 8 and 13 minutes in advance, 94.5% for prediction between 14 and 19 minutes in advance, and 94.2% for prediction between 20 and 25 minutes in advance.

  11. Mucosal versus muscle pain sensitivity in provoked vestibulodynia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witzeman K

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn Witzeman,1 Ruby HN Nguyen,2 Alisa Eanes,3 Sawsan As-Sanie,4 Denniz Zolnoun51Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, CO, 2Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 3Pelvic Pain Research Unit, Division of Advanced Laparoscopy and Pelvic Pain, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 5Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USABackground: An estimated 8.3%–16% of women experience vulvovaginal discomfort during their lifetime. Frequently these patients report provoked pain on contact or with attempted intercourse, commonly referred to as provoked vestibulodynia (PVD. Despite the burden of this condition, little is known about its potential etiologies including pelvic floor muscular dysfunction and mucosal components. This knowledge would be beneficial in developing targeted therapies including physical therapy.Objective: To explore the relative contribution of mucosal versus muscle pain sensitivity on pain report from intercourse among women with PVD.Design: In this proof of concept study, 54 women with PVD underwent a structured examination assessing mucosal and pelvic muscle sensitivity.Methods: We examined three mucosal sites in the upper and lower vestibule. Patients were asked to rate their pain on cotton swab palpation of the mucosa using a 10-point visual analog scale. Muscle pain was assessed using transvaginal application of pressure on right and left puborectalis, and the perineal muscle complex. The Gracely pain scale (0–100 was used to assess the severity of pain with intercourse, with women rating the lowest, average, and highest pain levels; a 100 rating the

  12. Combined Effects of Feedforward Inhibition and Excitation in Thalamocortical Circuit on the Transitions of Epileptic Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Denggui; Duan, Lixia; Wang, Qian; Luan, Guoming

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying electrophysiologically observed two-way transitions between absence and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures in cerebral cortex remain unknown. The interplay within thalamocortical network is believed to give rise to these epileptic multiple modes of activity and transitions between them. In particular, it is thought that in some areas of cortex there exists feedforward inhibition from specific relay nucleus of thalamus (TC) to inhibitory neuronal population (IN) which has even more stronger functions on cortical activities than the known feedforward excitation from TC to excitatory neuronal population (EX). Inspired by this, we proposed a modified computational model by introducing feedforward inhibitory connectivity within thalamocortical circuit, to systematically investigate the combined effects of feedforward inhibition and excitation on transitions of epileptic seizures. We first found that the feedforward excitation can induce the transition from tonic oscillation to spike and wave discharges (SWD) in cortex, i.e., the epileptic tonic-absence seizures, with the fixed weak feedforward inhibition. Thereinto, the phase of absence seizures corresponding to strong feedforward excitation can be further transformed into the clonic oscillations with the increasing of feedforward inhibition, representing the epileptic absence-clonic seizures. We also observed the other fascinating dynamical states, such as periodic 2/3/4-spike and wave discharges, reversed SWD and clonic oscillations, as well as saturated firings. More importantly, we can identify the stable parameter regions representing the tonic-clonic oscillations and SWD discharges of epileptic seizures on the 2-D plane composed of feedforward inhibition and excitation, where the physiologically plausible transition pathways between tonic-clonic and absence seizures can be figured out. These results indicate the functional role of feedforward pathways in controlling epileptic seizures and

  13. Combined Effects of Feedforward Inhibition and Excitation in Thalamocortical Circuit on the Transitions of Epileptic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denggui Fan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying electrophysiologically observed two-way transitions between absence and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures in cerebral cortex remain unknown. The interplay within thalamocortical network is believed to give rise to these epileptic multiple modes of activity and transitions between them. In particular, it is thought that in some areas of cortex there exists feedforward inhibition from specific relay nucleus of thalamus (TC to inhibitory neuronal population (IN which has even more stronger functions on cortical activities than the known feedforward excitation from TC to excitatory neuronal population (EX. Inspired by this, we proposed a modified computational model by introducing feedforward inhibitory connectivity within thalamocortical circuit, to systematically investigate the combined effects of feedforward inhibition and excitation on transitions of epileptic seizures. We first found that the feedforward excitation can induce the transition from tonic oscillation to spike and wave discharges (SWD in cortex, i.e., the epileptic tonic-absence seizures, with the fixed weak feedforward inhibition. Thereinto, the phase of absence seizures corresponding to strong feedforward excitation can be further transformed into the clonic oscillations with the increasing of feedforward inhibition, representing the epileptic absence-clonic seizures. We also observed the other fascinating dynamical states, such as periodic 2/3/4-spike and wave discharges, reversed SWD and clonic oscillations, as well as saturated firings. More importantly, we can identify the stable parameter regions representing the tonic-clonic oscillations and SWD discharges of epileptic seizures on the 2-D plane composed of feedforward inhibition and excitation, where the physiologically plausible transition pathways between tonic-clonic and absence seizures can be figured out. These results indicate the functional role of feedforward pathways in controlling epileptic

  14. Treating acute seizures with benzodiazepines: does seizure duration matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, David E

    2014-10-01

    Several clinical trials have shown improved seizure control and outcome by early initiation of treatment with benzodiazepines, before arrival in the emergency department and before intravenous access can be established. Here, evidence is provided and reviewed for rapid treatment of acute seizures in order to avoid the development of benzodiazepine pharmacoresistance and the emergence of self-sustaining status epilepticus. Alterations in the physiology, pharmacology, and postsynaptic level of GABA-A receptors can develop within minutes to an hour and hinder the ability of synaptic inhibition to stop seizures while also impairing the efficacy of GABAergic agents, such as benzodiazepines, to boost impaired inhibition. In addition, heightened excitatory transmission further exacerbates the inhibitory/excitatory balance and makes seizure control even more resistant to treatment. The acute increase in the surface expression of NMDA receptors during prolonged seizures also may cause excitotoxic injury, cell death, and other pathological expressions and re-arrangements of receptor subunits that all contribute to long-term sequelae such as cognitive impairment and chronic epilepsy. In conclusion, a short window of opportunity exists when seizures are maximally controlled by first-line benzodiazepine treatment. After that, multiple pathological mechanisms quickly become engaged that make seizures increasingly more difficult to control with high risk for long-term harm.

  15. Cluster analysis of clinical seizure semiology of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröppel, G; Kapitany, T; Baumgartner, C

    2000-05-01

    To develop an objective classification of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (NES) based on cluster analysis of clinical seizure semiology. We studied the clinical seizure semiology in 27 patients with psychogenic NES documented by prolonged video-EEG monitoring. We analyzed the following clinical symptoms: clonic and hypermotor movements as well as trembling of the upper and/or lower extremities, pelvic thrusting, head movements, tonic posturing backward of the head, and falling. We used cluster analysis to identify symptoms occurring together in a systematic way and thus tried to achieve a clinical classification of psychogenic NES. We could identify three symptom clusters. Cluster 1 was characterized by clonic and hypermotor movements of the extremities, pelvic thrusting, head movements, and tonic posturing of the head, and therefore was named "psychogenic motor seizures." Cluster 2 comprised trembling of the upper and lower extremities and was termed "psychogenic minor motor or trembling seizures." Cluster 3 consisted of falling to the floor as the only symptom and was referred to as "psychogenic atonic seizures." Our study represents the first study to analyze the clinical semiology of psychogenic NES by cluster analysis, which should be useful for an objective classification of psychogenic NES. This classification should allow both a better characterization of psychogenic NES and an easier differential diagnosis against specific epileptic seizures.

  16. Assessment of time interval between tramadol intake and seizure and second drug-induced attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Abbasi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tramadol is a synthetic drug which is prescribed in moderate and severe pain. Tramadol overdose can induce severe complications such as consciousness impairment and convulsions. This study was done to determine the convulsions incidence after tramadol use until one week after hospital discharge. Methods: This prospective study was done in tramadol overdose patients without uncontrolled epilepsy and head injury history. All cases admitted in Loghman and Rasol Akram Hospitals, Tehran, Iran from 1, April 2011 to 1, April 2012 were included and observed for at least 12 hours. Time interval between tramadol intake and first seizure were record. Then, patients with second drug-induced seizure were recognized and log time between the first and second seizure was analyzed. The patients were transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU if clinical worsening status observed. One week after hospital discharge, telephone follow-up was conducted. Results: A total of 150 patients with a history of tramadol induced seizures (141 men, 9 women, age: 23.23±5.94 years were enrolled in this study. Convulsion was seen in 104 patients (69.3%. In 8 out of 104 patients (7.6% two or more convulsion was seen. Time interval between tramadol use and the onset of the first and second seizure were 0.93±0.17 and 2.5±0.75 hours, respectively. Tramadol induced seizures are more likely to occur in males and patients with a history of drug abuse. Finally, one hundred forty nine patients (99.3% were discharged with good condition and the only one patient died from tramadol overdose. Conclusion: The results of the study showed tramadol induced seizure most frequently occurred within the first 4 hours of tramadol intake. The chance of experiencing a second seizure exists in the susceptible population. Thus, 4 hours after drug intake is the best time for patients to be hospital discharged.

  17. High-energy drinks may provoke aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonjev, Zivojin S; Bala, Gustav

    2013-05-01

    High-energy drinks have become extremely popular after Red Bull's promotion at 1987 in Austria and 1997 in the United States. Since then, we witnessed spectacular increase in different brands, caffeine content and market consumption all over the world. However, there are no reports published in the scientific literature related with detrimental side effects after heavy consumption of high-energy drinks. We report a series of three high-risk cardiovascular patients who had aortic dissection (De Bakey type I and II) following significant consumption of high-energy drinks. All of them required emergency surgical procedure and were remaining stable after surgery. We propose that uncontrolled consumption of high-energy drinks, especially in patients with underlying heart disease, could provoke potentially lethal cardiovascular events as well as acute aortic dissection.

  18. [Adulthood atopic dermatitis: epidemiology, clinical symptoms, provoking and prognostic factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pónyai, Györgyi; Temesvári, Erzsébet; Kárpáti, Sarolta

    2007-01-07

    The prevalence of atopic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, asthma bronchiale and atopic dermatitis is increasing both in children and adults at different parts of the world. Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease affecting mostly children, but the atopic trait continues, not only for later respiratory allergies, but also for skin symptoms in adulthood. In this form dry skin, flexural lichenification, head and neck dermatitis, hand dermatitis are typical. The exact etiology of atopic dermatitis is unknown, in the background interactions of genetical predisposition, skin barrier defects and immunological and environmental factors can be verified. In the complex approach of atopic dermatitis, a pivotal role is ascribed to the evaluation and possibly the elimination of provoking factors, like gender, family structure, clothing, aero-, alimentary and contact allergens, psychosocial stress, migration, infections, and personal home environment. Authors review clinical manifestations, triggering and prognostic factors of the adulthood atopic dermatitis.

  19. Stepping outside the box: an adolescent with a new-onset seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Christopher M; Davis, Matthew S; Callanan, Deborah L

    2013-09-01

    First-time seizures are frightening to children and their families, but the practice parameter recommends minimal evaluation in the emergency department (ED) for the child who presents in a neurologically normal state. We report a 12-year-old girl with seizure whose evaluation in the ED included a computed tomographic scan, largely because of parental anxiety. Computed tomography demonstrated a cerebral cavernous hemangioma or cavernoma. Because of the high recurrence risk of seizures with cavernomas, she was discharged from the ED with a prescription for an antiepileptic drug.

  20. Recent Advances in Neonatal Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Tristan T; McDonough, Tiffani L

    2016-10-01

    This article strives to review and summarize selected recent literature and topics contributing to a greater understanding of the diagnosis and treatments of neonatal seizures that have emerged in the past several years. Continuous EEG is recommended as the gold standard for neonatal seizure monitoring as it can provide additional information that may stratify patients by etiology, as well as identify at-risk groups of newborns for neuromonitoring. Investigations are moving beyond traditional antiepileptic agents in search of treatments with better efficacy and with less concern for developmental effects. Targeted therapies for seizures resulting from particular genetic conditions are increasing, highlighting the importance of early genetic diagnosis. Better understanding of the risk of post-neonatal epilepsy based on etiology is emerging with new epidemiological studies. Evidence is growing for deleterious effects of seizures on outcomes, elevating the importance of seizure detection and effective treatment. Advances in utilization of continuous EEG monitoring have improved the accuracy of seizure detection and have identified at-risk groups of newborns for neuromonitoring. Ultimately, the goal in management of neonatal seizures is not only clinical stabilization in the acute period but also to influence neurodevelopmental outcome and modify the risk of future epilepsy.

  1. NIPPLE DISCHARGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Bukharova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the data available in the literature, as high as 50% of women have benign breast tumors frequently accompanied by nip- ple discharge. Nipple discharge may be serous, bloody, purulent, and colostric. The most common causes are breast abscess, injury, drugs, prolactinoma, intraductal pappiloma, ductal ectasia, intraductal cancer (not more than 10%.

  2. Semiology of hypermotor (hyperkinetic) seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqadi, Khalid; Sankaraneni, Ram; Thome, Ursula; Kotagal, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Hypermotor seizures (HMSs) consist of complex movements involving proximal segments of the limbs and trunk that appear violent and inappropriate for the situation. We analyzed hypermotor seizure videos in seizure-free patients (Engel class I) following resective epilepsy surgery. After completion of video analysis, we reviewed EEG and neuroimaging data. Search of our epilepsy surgery database yielded 116 patients classified as having hypermotor seizures between 1996 and 2013. From this subset, 17/31 (55%) patients had been seizure-free for >6months (mean follow-up: 3.3years). Mean seizure duration was 35s (range: 6-91s), of which the HM phase lasted a mean of 22s (range: 3-53s). In 16 patients (95%), hypermotor activity was seen at or within 10s of clinical seizure onset. Type I semiology occurred in 6 patients, type II semiology in 10 patients, and 1 patient exhibited features of both. Type I and type II semiologies were noted in patients who had frontal lobe as well as extrafrontal resections. Nonversive head and body turning occurred in 10 patients (ranging from 90° to 270°) which was ipsilateral to the side of resection in all patients and seen both in frontal and extrafrontal resections. Six out of eleven patients with abnormal MRI and 4/6 patients with nonlesional MRI underwent invasive EEG evaluation. Eight patients (47%) had frontal lobe resection, 4/17 (23%) patients had temporal lobe resection, and one patient each had parietal lobe, insular, temporoparietooccipital, or motor sparing resection; 1 patient had functional hemispherectomy. Hypermotor semiology typically occurs at or within 10s after seizure onset. Ipsilateral head/body turning appears to be of lateralizing value whereas asymmetry of limb movement was not lateralizing. Hypermotor semiology is most often seen in frontal lobe epilepsy but may occur in seizures arising from other locations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Epileptic seizures due to multiple cerebral cavernomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasić Mirjana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cavernous angiomas are angiographically occult vascular malformations that are present in 0.4−0.9 % of people, and represent around 5% of all cerebrovascular malformations. They can be single or multiple, and sporadic or familial. The presence of multiple lesions is more frequent in familial cavernomatosis. Ten to 30 % are associated with familial clustering. Case report. We presented the case of a 43-year-old man, admitted to the Emergency Department due to unprovoked seizure during the wide awake and everyday activities. Neurological examination was with no focal signs. A 32-channel standard digital EEG was without any significant changes of normal baseline activity. After sleep deprivation EEG showed multifocal, bilateral and asymmetric polyspikes and sharpwaves activity. Hyperventilation induced generalized epileptiform discharges. MRI scan demonstrated multiple small cavernous angiomas. Neuropsychological testing demonstrated a delayed memory impairment. Neurosurgery treatment was not recommended, and the therapy with valproate 1 250 mg/day had an excellent efficacy with no singnificant adverse effects. Conclusion. This patient considered as a rare case with multiple cavernomatosis highlights the importance of neuroradiological examination in adult patients with the first epileptic seizure but with no focal neurological signs. .

  4. Endoscopic disconnection for hypothalamic hamartoma with intractable seizure. Report of four cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Joong-Uhn; Yang, Kook-Hee; Kim, Tae-Gon; Chang, Jong Hee; Chang, Jin Woo; Lee, Byung-In; Kim, Dong-Seok

    2004-05-01

    Although intractable epilepsy associated with hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) can be controlled by microsurgical resection of the lesion, excision of deep-seated lesions is often associated with morbidity and mortality. Endoscopic disconnection is less invasive and seems to be well suited for this indication. The authors discuss the role of endoscopic-assisted surgery in the management of HH-induced seizures. Four patients with HH-related intractable gelastic seizure underwent endoscopic disconnection surgery. Postoperatively, all patients exhibited improvement. Two patients became seizure free immediately after endoscopic disconnection surgery, one patient with a widespread seizure focus involving the motor strip continued to experience rare complex partial seizures but gelastic seizures ceased, and one experienced a reduced frequency of seizures but persistence of some generalized seizures. Three patients suffered postoperative disconnection-like syndrome, which continued 3 to 7 days and spontaneously disappeared. The authors advocate the endoscopic disconnection surgery as a safe and effective treatment for HH-related epilepsy by blocking the spread of epileptic discharges from the lesion.

  5. Multiscale Entropy of Electroencephalogram as a Potential Predictor for the Prognosis of Neonatal Seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yu Lu

    Full Text Available Increasing animal studies supported the harmful effects of prolonged or frequent neonatal seizures in developing brain, including increased risk of later epilepsy. Various nonlinear analytic measures had been applied to investigate the change of brain complexity with age. This study focuses on clarifying the relationship between later epilepsy and the changes of electroencephalogram (EEG complexity in neonatal seizures.EEG signals from 19 channels of the whole brain from 32 neonates below 2 months old were acquired. The neonates were classified into 3 groups: 9 were normal controls, 9 were neonatal seizures without later epilepsy, and 14 were neonatal seizures with later epilepsy. Sample entropy (SamEn, multiscale entropy (MSE and complexity index (CI were analyzed.Although there was no significant change in SamEn, the CI values showed significantly decreased over Channels C3, C4, and Cz in patients with neonatal seizures and later epilepsy compared with control group. More multifocal epileptiform discharges in EEG, more abnormal neuroimaging findings, and higher incidence of future developmental delay were noted in the group with later epilepsy.Decreased MSE and CI values in patients with neonatal seizures and later epilepsy may reflect the mixed effects of acute insults, underlying brain immaturity, and prolonged seizures-related injuries. The analysis of MSE and CI can therefore provide a quantifiable and accurate way to decrypt the mystery of neonatal seizures, and could be a promising predictor.

  6. A study of 43 patients with panayiotopoulos syndrome, a common and benign childhood seizure susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lada, Christina; Skiadas, Konstantinos; Theodorou, Virginia; Loli, Nomiki; Covanis, Athanasios

    2003-01-01

    To determine prevalence, clinical, EEG features, and prognosis of Panayiotopoulos syndrome and to examine the proposition that clinical manifestations are more important than EEG findings. We analyzed retrospectively the clinical and EEG records of 1,340 children with one or more focal seizures seen in the last 18 years, supplemented with a prospective study from 1998. Panayiotopoulos syndrome was defined by clinical criteria, mainly ictal emesis, irrespective of EEG findings. We analyzed 43 of 90 patients with Panayiotopoulos syndrome who were seizure free >2 years. Girls predominated. Mean age at first seizure was 5 years. Seizures consisted mainly of autonomic manifestations; ictal emesis was often the first symptom, culminating in vomiting in 86%. Of nonautonomic manifestations, lateral eye deviation was the most common; visual symptoms were exceptional. Impairment of consciousness ensued in all seizures, half of which ended with hemi or generalized convulsions. Nearly 46.5% of cases had at least one seizure >30 min, constituting autonomic status epilepticus. Seizures during sleep (84%) were more common than those in wakefulness. EEG showed occipital spikes in 29 patients. Of the other 14 cases, five had extraoccipital abnormalities or brief generalized discharges, and nine had normal awake and sleep EEG. Prognosis was excellent. All 43 children have been free of seizures for > or =2 years, 53% having a single seizure, and 47%, an average two to three seizures. Panayiotopoulos syndrome is common and needs wider recognition. EEG shows occipital or extraoccipital abnormalities, is normal in one third of patients, and does not determine clinical manifestations or prognosis, which is excellent despite the high prevalence of lengthy seizures.

  7. Management of Reflex Anoxic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at the Roald Dahl EEG Unit, Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation, Liverpool, UK, review the definition, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management of reflex anoxic seizures (RAS in children.

  8. Cannabinoid antagonist SLV326 induces convulsive seizures and changes in the interictal EEG in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perescis, Martin F J; de Bruin, Natasja; Heijink, Liesbeth; Kruse, Chris; Vinogradova, Lyudmila; Lüttjohann, Annika; van Luijtelaar, Gilles; van Rijn, Clementina M

    2017-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 antagonists have been investigated for possible treatment of e.g. obesity-related disorders. However, clinical application was halted due to their symptoms of anxiety and depression. In addition to these adverse effects, we have shown earlier that chronic treatment with the CB1 antagonist rimonabant may induce EEG-confirmed convulsive seizures. In a regulatory repeat-dose toxicity study violent episodes of "muscle spasms" were observed in Wistar rats, daily dosed with the CB1 receptor antagonist SLV326 during 5 months. The aim of the present follow-up study was to investigate whether these violent movements were of an epileptic origin. In selected SLV326-treated and control animals, EEG and behavior were monitored for 24 hours. 25% of SLV326 treated animals showed 1 to 21 EEG-confirmed generalized convulsive seizures, whereas controls were seizure-free. The behavioral seizures were typical for a limbic origin. Moreover, interictal spikes were found in 38% of treated animals. The frequency spectrum of the interictal EEG of the treated rats showed a lower theta peak frequency, as well as lower gamma power compared to the controls. These frequency changes were state-dependent: they were only found during high locomotor activity. It is concluded that long term blockade of the endogenous cannabinoid system can provoke limbic seizures in otherwise healthy rats. Additionally, SLV326 alters the frequency spectrum of the EEG when rats are highly active, suggesting effects on complex behavior and cognition.

  9. Dynamics of muscle activation during tonic-clonic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradsen, Isa; Moldovan, Mihai; Jennum, Poul; Wolf, Peter; Farina, Dario; Beniczky, Sándor

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of our study was to elucidate the dynamics of muscle activation during generalised tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS). We recorded surface electromyography (EMG) from the deltoid muscle during 26 GTCS from 13 patients and compared it with GTCS-like events acted by 10 control subjects. GTCS consisted of a sequence of phases best described quantitatively by dynamics of the low frequency (LF) wavelet component (2-8Hz). Contrary to the traditional view, the tonic phase started with a gradual increase in muscle activity. A longer clonic phase was associated with a shorter onset of the tonic phase and a higher seizure occurrence. Increase in LF occurred during the onset phase and during the transition from the tonic to the clonic phase, corresponding to the vibratory movements. The clonic phase consisted of EMG discharges of remarkably constant duration (0.2s) separated by silent periods (SP) of exponentially increasing duration - features that could not be reproduced voluntarily. The last SP was longer in seizures with higher EMG peak frequency whereas the energy of the last clonus was higher in seizures with a short clonic phase. We found specific features of muscle activation dynamics during GTCS. Our findings suggest that the same inhibitory mechanisms that contribute to GTCS termination counteract seizure initiation, accounting for the gradual onset. Both active inhibition and mechanisms related to metabolic depletion act synergistically to stop the seizure. Analysis of the ictal EMG dynamics is a valuable tool for monitoring the balance between pro-convulsive and anti-convulsive factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Distribution and initiation of seizure activity in a rat brain with subcortical band heterotopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z F; Schottler, F; Bertram, E; Gall, C M; Anzivino, M J; Lee, K S

    2000-05-01

    Misplaced (heterotopic) cortical neurons are a common feature of developmental epilepsies. To better understand seizure disorders associated with cortical heterotopia, the sites of aberrant discharge activity were investigated in vivo and in vitro in a seizure-prone mutant rat (tish) exhibiting subcortical band heterotopia. Depth electrode recordings and postmortem assessment of regional c-fos mRNA levels were used to characterize the distribution of aberrant discharge activity during spontaneous seizures in vivo. Electrophysiologic recordings of spontaneous and evoked activity also were performed by using in vitro brain slices from the tish rat treated with proconvulsant drugs (penicillin and 4-aminopyridine). Depth electrode recordings demonstrate that seizure activity begins almost simultaneously in the normotopic and heterotopic areas of the tish neocortex. Spontaneous seizures induce c-fos mRNA in normotopic and heterotopic neocortical areas, and limbic regions. The threshold concentrations of proconvulsant drugs for inducing epileptiform spiking were similar in the normotopic and heterotopic areas of tish brain slices. Manipulations that blocked communication between the normotopic and heterotopic areas of the cortex inhibited spiking in the heterotopic, but not the normotopic, area of the cortex. These findings indicate that aberrant discharge activity occurs in normotopic and heterotopic areas of the neocortex, and in certain limbic regions during spontaneous seizures in the tish rat. Normotopic neurons are more prone to exhibit epileptiform activity than are heterotopic neurons in the tish cortex, and heterotopic neurons are recruited into spiking by activity initiated in normotopic neurons. The findings indicate that seizures in the tish brain primarily involve telencephalic structures, and suggest that normotopic neurons are responsible for initiating seizures in the dysplastic neocortex.

  11. Management Of Post Stroke Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavian Ghandehari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of seizures in relation to stroke is 8.9%, with a frequency of 10.6 and 8.6% in haemorrhagic and ischaemic stroke, respectively. In subarachnoid haemorrhage the incidence is 8.5%. Due to the fact that infarcts are significantly more frequent than haemorrhages, seizures are mainly related to occlusive vascular disease of the brain. The general view is to consider stroke-related seizures as harmless complications in the course of a prolonged vascular disease involving the heart and brain. Seizures can be classified as those of early and those of late onset in a paradigm comparable to post-traumatic epilepsy, with an arbitrary dividing point of two weeks after the event. Most early-onset seizures occur during the first day after the stroke. Late-onset seizures occur three times more often than early-onset ones. A first late-onset epileptic event is most likely to take place between six months and two years after the stroke. However, up to 28% of patients develop their first seizure several years later. Simple partial seizures, with or without secondary generalisation, account for about 50% of total seizures, while complex partial spells, with or without secondary generalisation, and primary generalised tonic–clonic insults account for approximately 25% each. Status epilepticus occurs in 12% of stroke patients, but the recurrence rate after an initial status epilepticus is not higher than after a single seizure. Inhibitory seizures, mimicking transient ischaemic attacks, are observed in 7.1% of cases. The only clinical predictor of late-onset seizures is the initial presentation of partial anterior circulation syndrome due to a territorial infarct. Patients with total anterior circulation syndrome have less chance of developing epileptic spells, not only due to their shorter life expectancy but also due to the fact that the large infarcts are sharply demarcated in these patients. The optimal timing and type of antiepileptic drug

  12. Ear discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... antibiotic medicines, which are placed in the ear. Antibiotics may be given by mouth if a ruptured eardrum from an ear infection is causing the discharge. Alternative Names Drainage from the ear; Otorrhea; Ear bleeding; ...

  13. Osteomyelitis - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000297.htm Osteomyelitis - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You have osteomyelitis , a bone infection caused by bacteria or other ...

  14. Assimilating seizure dynamics.

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    Ghanim Ullah

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Observability of a dynamical system requires an understanding of its state-the collective values of its variables. However, existing techniques are too limited to measure all but a small fraction of the physical variables and parameters of neuronal networks. We constructed models of the biophysical properties of neuronal membrane, synaptic, and microenvironment dynamics, and incorporated them into a model-based predictor-controller framework from modern control theory. We demonstrate that it is now possible to meaningfully estimate the dynamics of small neuronal networks using as few as a single measured variable. Specifically, we assimilate noisy membrane potential measurements from individual hippocampal neurons to reconstruct the dynamics of networks of these cells, their extracellular microenvironment, and the activities of different neuronal types during seizures. We use reconstruction to account for unmeasured parts of the neuronal system, relating micro-domain metabolic processes to cellular excitability, and validate the reconstruction of cellular dynamical interactions against actual measurements. Data assimilation, the fusing of measurement with computational models, has significant potential to improve the way we observe and understand brain dynamics.

  15. Pain Symptoms in Fibromyalgia Patients with and without Provoked Vulvodynia

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    Anna Ghizzani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of the study was to compare the pain symptoms of fibromyalgia patients exhibiting (FMS+PVD and not exhibiting (FMS comorbidity with provoked vulvodynia. Study Design. The case control study was performed in 39 patients who had been diagnosed with FMS and accepted to undergo gynaecological examination and in 36 healthy women (C. All patients completed standardized questionnaires for pain intensity, pain area, and psychological functioning. The gynaecological examination included vulvar pain pressure reactivity (Q-tip, pelvic tone assessment (Kegel manoeuver, and a semistructured interview collecting detailed information about pelvic symptoms and sexual function. Results. FMS+PVD patients displayed a higher number of associated symptoms than FMS patients. The vulvar excitability was significantly higher in FMS+PVD than in FMS and in both groups than in Controls. Half of FMS+PVD patients were positive to Kegel manoeuver and displayed higher scores in widespread pain intensity, STAI-Y2, and CESD levels than Kegel negative patients. Conclusions. The study reveals that increased vulvar pain excitability may occur in FMS patients independently of the presence of coital pain. Results suggest that coital pain develops in patients with higher FMS symptoms severity due to the cooperative effects of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms.

  16. Alteration in the gut microbiota provokes susceptibility to tuberculosis

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    Nargis Khan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe microbiota that resides in the gastrointestinal tract provides essential health benefits to the host. In particular, they regulate immune homeostasis. Recently, several evidences indicate that alteration in the gut microbial community can cause infectious and non-infectious diseases. Tuberculosis (TB is the most devastating disease, inflicting mortality and morbidity. It remains unexplored, whether changes in the gut microbiota can provoke or prevent TB. In the current study, we have demonstrated the antibiotics driven changes in the gut microbial composition and their impact on the survival of Mtb in the lungs, liver and spleen of infected mice, compared to those with intact microbiota. Interestingly, dysbiosis of microbes showed significant increase in the bacterial burden in lungs and dissemination of Mtb to spleen and liver. Further, elevation in the number of Tregs and decline in the pool of IFN-γ and TNF-α releasing CD4 T cells was noticed. Interestingly, fecal transplantation in the gut microbiota disrupted animals exhibited improved Th1 immunity and lesser Tregs population. Importantly, these animals displayed reduced severity to Mtb infection. This study for the first time demonstrated the novel role of gut microbes in the susceptibility to TB and its prevention by microbial implants. In future, microbial therapies may help in treating patients suffering from TB.

  17. Automated seizure detection systems and their effectiveness for each type of seizure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ulate-Campos, A; Coughlin, F; Gaínza-Lein, M; Fernández, I Sánchez; Pearl, P L; Loddenkemper, T

    2016-01-01

    ...% of patients with refractory epilepsy have one or more seizures per month. Seizure detection devices allow an objective assessment of seizure frequency and a treatment tailored to the individual patient...

  18. Seizure burden is independently associated with short term outcome in critically ill children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Eric T.; Zhao, Xiu Yan; Frndova, Helena; McBain, Kristin; Sharma, Rohit; Hutchison, James S.

    2014-01-01

    Seizures are common among critically ill children, but their relationship to outcome remains unclear. We sought to quantify the relationship between electrographic seizure burden and short-term neurological outcome, while controlling for diagnosis and illness severity. Furthermore, we sought to determine whether there is a seizure burden threshold above which there is an increased probability of neurological decline. We prospectively evaluated all infants and children admitted to our paediatric and cardiac intensive care units who underwent clinically ordered continuous video-electroencephalography monitoring over a 3-year period. Seizure burden was quantified by calculating the maximum percentage of any hour that was occupied by electrographic seizures. Outcome measures included neurological decline, defined as a worsening Paediatric Cerebral Performance Category score between hospital admission and discharge, and in-hospital mortality. Two hundred and fifty-nine subjects were evaluated (51% male) with a median age of 2.2 years (interquartile range: 0.3 days–9.7 years). The median duration of continuous video-electroencephalography monitoring was 37 h (interquartile range: 21–56 h). Seizures occurred in 93 subjects (36%, 95% confidence interval = 30–42%), with 23 (9%, 95% confidence interval = 5–12%) experiencing status epilepticus. Neurological decline was observed in 174 subjects (67%), who had a mean maximum seizure burden of 15.7% per hour, compared to 1.8% per hour for those without neurological decline (P seizure burden threshold of 20% per hour (12 min), both the probability and magnitude of neurological decline rose sharply (P seizure burden. Seizure burden was not associated with mortality (odds ratio: 1.003, 95% confidence interval: 0.99–1.02, P = 0.613). We conclude that in this cohort of critically ill children, increasing seizure burden was independently associated with a greater probability and magnitude of neurological decline. Our

  19. Comparative potency of sensory-induced brainstem activation to trigger spreading depression and seizures in the cortex of awake rats: Implications for the pathophysiology of migraine aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Lyudmila V

    2015-10-01

    Migraine and epilepsy are highly co-morbid neurological disorders associated with episodic dysfunction of both cortical and subcortical networks. The study examined the interrelation between cortical spreading depression, the electrophysiological correlate of migraine aura and seizures triggered at cortical and brainstem levels by repeated sound stimulation in rats with acoustic hypersensitivity (reflex audiogenic epilepsy). In awake, freely moving rats with innate audiogenic epilepsy, 25 episodes of running seizure (brainstem seizures) were induced by repeated sound stimulation. Spreading depression and seizures were recorded using implanted cortical electrodes. The first sound-induced brainstem seizures evoked neither spreading depression nor seizures in the cortex. With repetition, brainstem seizures began to be followed by a single cortical spreading depression wave and an epileptiform discharge. Spreading depression was more frequent an early cortical event than seizures: spreading depression appeared after 8.4 ± 1.0 repeated stimulations in 100% rats (n = 24) while cortical seizures were recorded after 12.9 ± 1.2 tests in 46% rats. Brainstem seizure triggered unilateral long-latency spreading depression. Bilateral short-latency cortical spreading depression was recorded only after intense cortical seizures. These data show that episodic brainstem activation is a potent trigger of unilateral cortical spreading depression. Development of intense seizures in the cortex leads to initiation of spreading depression in multiple cortical sites of both hemispheres. © International Headache Society 2014.

  20. Treatment of typical absence seizures and related epileptic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayiotopoulos, C P

    2001-01-01

    Typical absences are brief (seconds) generalised seizures of sudden onset and termination. They have 2 essential components: clinically, the impairment of consciousness (absence) and, generalised 3 to 4Hz spike/polyspike and slow wave discharges on electroencephalogram (EEG). They differ fundamentally from other seizures and are pharmacologically unique. Their clinical and EEG manifestations are syndrome-related. Impairment of consciousness may be severe, moderate, mild or inconspicuous. This is often associated with motor manifestations, automatisms and autonomic disturbances. Clonic, tonic and atonic components alone or in combination are motor symptoms; myoclonia, mainly of facial muscles, is the most common. The ictal EEG discharge may be consistently brief (2 to 5 seconds) or long (15 to 30 seconds), continuous or fragmented, with single or multiple spikes associated with the slow wave. The intradischarge frequency may be constant or may vary (2.5 to 5Hz). Typical absences are easily precipitated by hyperventilation in about 90% of untreated patients. They are usually spontaneous, but can be triggered by photic, pattern, video games stimuli, and mental or emotional factors. Typical absences usually start in childhood or adolescence. They occur in around 10 to 15% of adults with epilepsies, often combined with other generalised seizures. They may remit with age or be lifelong. Syndromic diagnosis is important for treatment strategies and prognosis. Absences may be severe and the only seizure type, as in childhood absence epilepsy. They may predominate in other syndromes or be mild and nonpredominant in syndromes such as juvenile myoclonic epilepsy where myoclonic jerks and generalised tonic clonic seizures are the main concern. Typical absence status epilepticus occurs in about 30% of patients and is more common in certain syndromes, e.g. idiopathic generalised epilepsy with perioral myoclonia or phantom absences. Typical absence seizures are often easy to

  1. Characterization of Seizures Induced by Acute and Repeated Exposure to Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolkowska, Dorota; Banks, Christopher N.; Dhir, Ashish; Inceoglu, Bora; Sanborn, James R.; McCoy, Mark R.; Bruun, Donald A.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Lein, Pamela J.

    2012-01-01

    Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (tetramine; TETS) is a potent convulsant poison that is considered to be a chemical threat agent. To provide a basis for the investigation of antidotes for TETS-induced seizures, we characterized the convulsant activity of TETS in mice and rats when administered by the intraperitoneal, intravenous, oral, and intraventricular routes as a single acute dose and with repeated sublethal doses. In mice, parenteral and oral TETS caused immobility, myoclonic body jerks, clonic seizures of the forelimbs and/or hindlimbs, tonic seizures, and death. The CD50 values for clonic and tonic seizures after oral administration were 0.11 and 0.22 mg/kg, respectively. Intraventricular administration of TETS (5–100 μg) in rats also caused clonic-tonic seizures and death. In mice, repeated sublethal doses of TETS at intervals of 2, 24, and 48 h failed to result in the development of persistent enhanced seizure responsivity (“kindling”) as was observed with repeated pentylenetetrazol treatment. In mice, sublethal doses of TETS that produced clonic seizures did not cause observable structural brain damage as assessed with routine histology and Fluoro-Jade B staining 7 days after treatment. However, 1 to 3 days after a single convulsant dose of TETS the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, an astrocyte marker, and ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1, a microglia marker, were markedly increased in cortex and hippocampus. Although TETS doses that are compatible with survival are not associated with overt evidence of cellular injury or neurodegeneration, there is transient reactive astrocytosis and microglial activation, indicating that brain inflammatory responses are provoked. PMID:22328574

  2. Dissociation, Epileptiform Discharges and Chaos in the Brain: Toward a Neuroscientific Theory of Dissociation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bob, Petr

    2012-01-01

    ... of somatic symptoms or seizures. For the explanation of these connections between dissociative states and epileptic discharges the author proposes a neuroscientific model of dissociation based on the theory of competitive neural...

  3. Epileptic seizure as the first sign of hypoparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Milica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hypoparathyroidism refers to a group of disorders in which extracellular calcium levels cannot be maintained within the normal range due to relative or absolute deficiency of parathyroid hormone (PTH. The clinical features of hypoparathyroidism are consistent with hypocalcaemia and, predominantly, neuromuscular dysfunction. Although hypocalcaemia-induced seizures are well documented hypoparathyroidism-induced epilepsy is often misdiagnosed as idiopathic epilepsy. Case report. We reported a 57-year-old woman with new-onset seizure due to hypoparathyroidism. At first, diagnosis of epilepsy was established and the antiepileptic therapy was initiated with gradual increase of the dose. Computerized tomography scan of the head revealed bilateral basal ganglia and cerebellar calcification and many punctiform calcifications between cortical and subcortical parts. During hospitalization, laboratory tests showed hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia and low PTH level. Once the diagnosis of hypoparathyroidism was established, a proper treatment with calcium and vitamin D was started, and the patient was discharged from hospital with full seizure control. Conclusion. Standard evaluation of serum calcium levels in patients with new-onset epileptic seizures should be obligatory part of a diagnostic algoritam to avoid misdiagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy.

  4. Uncontrolled seizures resulting from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis complicating neurobrucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fardin Faraji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare form of stroke caused by thrombosis in venous sinuses of the brain. In this study, we reported on a patient with venous sinus thrombosis and brucellosis who presented with uncontrolled seizure despite being treated with anti-epileptic drugs at high doses. The case was a 33-year-old woman with a history of controlled complex partial seizure who presented with headache, asthenia, and uncontrolled seizure for one month. She was febrile and a brain CT scan indicated hemorrhagic focus in the left posterior parietal and the temporal lobe. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venography also proved venous sinus thrombosis in the left transverse sinus. Besides [In addition], a laboratory assessment confirmed brucellosis. Following the treatment with anti-coagulant, anti-brucellosis, and anti-epileptic agents, the patient was discharged in good condition with medical orders. Clinical suspicion and accurate evaluation of a patient′s history is the most important clue in diagnosis and treatment of brucellosis and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, especially in uncontrolled seizure in patients who had previously been under control.

  5. Discharges in ventromedial frontal cortex during absence spells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Don M; Brown, Micah; Luu, Phan; Holmes, Mark D

    2007-12-01

    Neural mechanisms of conscious attention require thalamic control of widespread cortical networks. Absence spells involve a momentary loss of voluntary control of attention, during which the person is inactive and unresponsive. The spike-wave seizure discharges of these spells rapidly engage both cerebral hemispheres in the classic sign of a "generalized" seizure. Animal evidence suggests that spike-wave seizures are caused by a disruption of thalamic circuitry, with extensive spread to cortex through thalamocortical propagation. We applied advanced methods of electrical source analysis to dense array (256-channel) electroencephalographic recordings of spike-wave discharges of absence spells. Neither the onset nor the spread of these seizures is generalized. Rather, the slow waves of the discharges are restricted to frontotemporal networks, and the spikes represent a highly localized and stereotyped progression of electrophysiological activity in ventromedial frontal networks. Given the current knowledge of the neurophysiology of absence seizures, this specificity of the frontal cortical discharges suggests the hypothesis that absence spells are associated with pathology in a circuit comprising ventromedial frontal cortex, rostral thalamic reticular nucleus, and limbic nuclei of the thalamus. Disrupted in absence, this circuit appears to regulate important aspects of the voluntary control of conscious attention.

  6. Hip fracture - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inter-trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Subtrochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Femoral neck fracture repair - discharge; Trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Hip pinning surgery - ...

  7. Epileptic seizures in nonalcoholic Wernicke's encephalopathy: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Wenjin; Chen, Xiuhui; Li, Xunhua; Chen, Hongbing; Tang, Shujin; Hong, Hua

    2017-09-06

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is characterized by eye signs, cerebellar dysfunction, and confusion. Epileptic seizures are rare in nonalcoholic WE. We reviewed the clinical, laboratory, radiological, and prognostic characteristics of nonalcoholic WE accompanied by epileptic seizures. We reported 1 case and searched similar cases using PubMed, WoK, Ovid, and Embase. WE was diagnosed according to dietary deficiencies, clinical symptoms and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We reviewed 13 patients (median age, 27 years; 5 men) with clear histories of thiamine deficiency and symptoms of typical WE. The type of epileptic seizures reported in the 13 cases reviewed was generically reported as seizures or convulsions in 4 patients; 7 patients had generalized tonic-clonic seizures, 1 partial seizure, and 1 generalized convulsive status epileptics. Two patients had epileptic seizures as the first symptom of WE. Laboratory tests mainly indicated metabolic acidosis and electrolyte disturbances. Electroencephalography may present as normal patterns, increased slow waves or epileptic discharge. Six patients had cortical lesions on brain MRI. These lesions were usually diffuse and band-like, and sometimes involved all lobes either symmetrically or asymmetrically, with the frontal lobe as the most susceptible area. All cortical lesions were accompanied by non-cortical lesions typical of WE. Brain MRI abnormalities, after thiamine treatment, mostly disappeared on follow-up MRIs. The patients had good prognoses. Only 1 patient had repeated seizures, and there were no comas or deaths. Patients with nonalcoholic WE accompanied by seizures are young and generally have good prognoses. Most patients experienced generalized convulsive seizures, which may have been related to abnormal cerebral cortical metabolism due to subacute thiamine deficiency.

  8. Seizure semiology and electroencephalography in young children with lesional temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Rui-Juan; Sun, Zhen-Rong; Cui, Tao; Shao, Xiao-Qiu

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to discuss the clinical features of seizure semiology and electroencephalography (EEG) in young children with lesional temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Children with lesional TLE received presurgical evaluation for intractable epilepsy. They were followed up for more than one year after temporal lobectomy. We reviewed the medical history and video-EEG monitoring of children with TLE to analyze the semiology of seizures and EEG findings and compared the semiology of seizures and EEG findings of childhood TLE and adult TLE. A total of 84 seizures were analyzed in 11 children (aged 23-108 months). The age of seizure onset was from 1 month to 26 months (a mean of 17.6 months). All of the patients exhibited prominent motor manifestations including epileptic spasm, tonic seizure, and unilateral clonic seizure. Seven children manifested behavioral arrest similar to an automotor seizure in adult TLE but with a shorter duration and higher frequency. The automatisms were typically orofacial, whereas manual automatisms were rarely observed. The EEG recordings revealed that diffuse discharge patterns were more common in younger children, whereas focal or unilateral patterns were more typical in older children. All of the patients were seizure-free after temporal lobectomy with more than one-year follow-up. All of the children had a mental development delay or regression; however, there was improvement after surgery, especially in those with surgery performed early. In contrast to TLE in adults, young children with lesional TLE probably represent a distinct nosological and probably less homogeneous syndrome. Although they had generalized clinical and electrographic features, resective epilepsy surgery should be considered as early as possible to obtain seizure control and improvement in mental development. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Heart rate changes during partial seizures: A study amongst Singaporean patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Shih-Hui

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Studies in Europe and America showed that tachycardia, less often bradycardia, frequently accompanied partial seizures in Caucasian patients. We determine frequency, magnitude and type of ictal heart rate changes during partial seizures in non-Caucasian patients in Singapore. Methods Partial seizures recorded during routine EEGs performed in a tertiary hospital between 1995 and 1999 were retrospectively reviewed. All routine EEGs had simultaneous ECG recording. Heart rate before and during seizures was determined and correlated with epileptogenic focus. Differences in heart rate before and during seizures were grouped into 4 types: (1 >10% decrease; (2 -10 to +20% change; (3 20–50% increase; (3 >50% increase. Results Of the total of 37 partial seizures, 18 were left hemisphere (LH, 13 were right hemisphere (RH and 6 were bilateral (BL in onset. 51% of all seizures showed no significant change in heart rate (type 2, 22% had moderate sinus tachycardia (type 3, 11% showed severe sinus tachycardia (type 4, while 16% had sinus bradycardia (type 1. Asystole was recorded in one seizure. Apart from having more tachycardia in bilateral onset seizures, there was no correlation between side of ictal discharge and heart rate response. Compared to Caucasian patients, sinus tachycardia was considerably less frequent. Frequency of bradycardia was similar to those recorded in the literature. Conclusions Significant heart rate changes during partial seizures were seen in half of Singaporean patients. Although sinus tachycardia was the most common heart rate change, the frequency was considerably lower compared to Caucasian patients. This might be due to methodological and ethnic differences. Rates of bradycardia are similar to those recorded in the literature.

  10. Cue-Provoked Craving and Nicotine Replacement Therapy in Smoking Cessation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Andrew J.; Shiffman, Saul; Sayette, Michael A.; Paty, Jean A.; Gwaltney, Chad J.; Balabanis, Mark H.

    2004-01-01

    Cue exposure paradigms have been used to examine reactivity to smoking cues. However, it is not known whether cue-provoked craving is associated with smoking cessation outcomes or whether cue reactivity can be attenuated by nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) in clinical samples. Cue-provoked craving ratings and reaction time responses were…

  11. Intranasal therapies for acute seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kälviäinen, Reetta

    2015-08-01

    Most seizure emergencies occur outside of the hospital, and there is a need for treatment interventions that can be administered quickly and safely by nonclinical caregivers. Intranasal benzodiazepine administration does not require intravenous access and offers rapid seizure cessation. Intranasal midazolam is faster at aborting seizure activity than rectal diazepam and quicker to administer than intravenous diazepam. Although time to seizure cessation varies from study to study, intranasal midazolam is efficacious when administered not only by emergency department personnel but also by paramedics and caregivers in out-of-hospital and home settings. Absorption of midazolam intranasal formulations appears to be relatively rapid compared to diazepam formulations. Its shorter elimination half-life may also be beneficial in that patients may more quickly return to normal function because of rapid offset of effect. On the other hand, the faster rate of elimination of midazolam may expose patients to a higher rate of seizure recurrence compared with diazepam. Two diazepam formulations and one midazolam formulation are being currently developed for intranasal use. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Automated seizure detection systems and their effectiveness for each type of seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulate-Campos, A; Coughlin, F; Gaínza-Lein, M; Fernández, I Sánchez; Pearl, P L; Loddenkemper, T

    2016-08-01

    Epilepsy affects almost 1% of the population and most of the approximately 20-30% of patients with refractory epilepsy have one or more seizures per month. Seizure detection devices allow an objective assessment of seizure frequency and a treatment tailored to the individual patient. A rapid recognition and treatment of seizures through closed-loop systems could potentially decrease morbidity and mortality in epilepsy. However, no single detection device can detect all seizure types. Therefore, the choice of a seizure detection device should consider the patient-specific seizure semiologies. This review of the literature evaluates seizure detection devices and their effectiveness for different seizure types. Our aim is to summarize current evidence, offer suggestions on how to select the most suitable seizure detection device for each patient and provide guidance to physicians, families and researchers when choosing or designing seizure detection devices. Further, this review will guide future prospective validation studies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Semiological seizure classification of epileptic seizures in children admitted to video-EEG monitoring unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan, Serdar; Yalnızoğlu, Dilek; Turanlı, Güzide; Karlı-Oğuz, Kader; Lay-Ergun, Eser; Söylemezoğlu, Figen; Akalan, Nejat; Topçu, Meral

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to determine seizure characteristics of pediatric patients with epilepsy, and evaluate if Semiological Seizure Classification (SSC) system is applicable in this cohort. We retrospectively studied 183 patients, aged between 3 months-18 years, admitted to the video-EEG monitoring unit (VEMU). Most patients suffered from intractable epilepsy with comorbidities, and had structural lesions. Seizures were classified based on ictal video-EEG recordings by using SSC system; 157 patients had only one seizure type, 26 had more than one seizure types. Overall 211 seizures and 373 semiologies were analyzed; 114 seizures (54%) had more than one semiological subtype. The most frequent semiology was motor seizures (78%), followed by dialeptic seizures (12%). The most common subtypes were simple motor seizures (49%); tonic seizures constituted (28.4%) of all semiologies. We conclude that SSC system is applicable for children with epilepsy admitted to VEMU; complementary EEG and imaging data are required for evaluation of patients with epilepsy.

  14. Lamotrigine adjunctive therapy among children and adolescents with primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevathan, Edwin; Kerls, Susan P; Hammer, Anne E; Vuong, Alain; Messenheimer, John A

    2006-08-01

    counts of absence seizure frequency require electroencephalogram-video monitoring; absence seizure frequency was not an outcome measure for this analysis. Forty-five (21 lamotrigine and 24 placebo) patients 2 to 19 years of age were randomly assigned and received study drug. Eight patients (3 lamotrigine and 5 placebo) had a combination of clinical (myoclonus and/or absence seizures) and electroencephalogram findings that were consistent with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. Among the 45 children randomly assigned, 74% had generalized spike, polyspike, and/or generalized spike and wave discharges on routine electroencephalogram recordings; the remaining 26% of children had no electroencephalogram findings suggestive of partial epilepsy and a clear history consistent with primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Electroencephalogram findings were not significantly different between the lamotrigine and the placebo treatment groups. The median percentage decrease from baseline in primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures during the entire treatment period was 77% in the lamotrigine group and 40% in the placebo group (P = .044). The median primary generalized tonic-clonic seizure counts per month were 0.7 in the lamotrigine group and 3.6 in the placebo group during escalation (P = .008), 0.3 in the lamotrigine group and 2.0 in the placebo group during maintenance (P = .005), and 0.4 in the lamotrigine group and 2.5 in the placebo group during the entire treatment period (P = .007). Trends were noted during escalation and maintenance with a median percentage decrease in primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures during escalation of 72% in the lamotrigine group and 30% in the placebo group (P = .059), and 83% in the lamotrigine group and 42% in the placebo group during maintenance (P = .058). During the maintenance phase, 48% of lamotrigine patients were seizure free compared with 17% treated with placebo (P = .051). One patient from each treatment group discontinued from the

  15. Emergency Department Management of Pediatric Unprovoked Seizures and Status Epilepticus in the State of Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Connie; Piantino, Juan; Hageman, Joseph; Lyons, Evelyn; Janies, Kathryn; Leonard, Daniel; Kelley, Kent; Fuchs, Susan

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this survey and record review was to characterize emergency department management of unprovoked seizures and status epilepticus in children in Illinois. The survey was sent to 119 participating emergency departments in the Emergency Medical Services for Children program; responses were received from 103 (88% response rate). Only 44% of the emergency departments had a documented protocol for seizure management. Only 12% of emergency departments had child neurology consultation available at all times. Record review showed that 58% of patients were discharged home, 26% were transferred to another institution, and 10% were admitted to a non-intensive care unit setting. Ninety percent of patients were treated with anticonvulsants. Seizure education was provided by the primary emergency department nurse (97%) and the treating physician (79%). This project demonstrated strengths and weaknesses in the current management of pediatric seizure patients in Illinois emergency departments. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Epileptic Seizure Classification of EEGs using Time-Frequency Analysis based Multiscale Radial Basis Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Wang, Xu; Luo, Lin; Li, Ke; Yang, Xiao; Guo, Qi

    2017-03-10

    The automatic detection of epileptic seizures from electroencephalography (EEG) signals is crucial for the localization and classification of epileptic seizure activity. However, seizure processes are typically dynamic and nonstationary, and thus distinguishing rhythmic discharges from nonstationary processes is one of the challenging problems. In this paper, an adaptive and localized time-frequency representation in EEG signals is proposed by means of multiscale radial basis functions (MRBF) and a modified particle swarm optimization (MPSO) to improve both time and frequency resolution simultaneously, which is a novel MRBF-MPSO framework of the time-frequency feature extraction for epileptic EEG signals. The dimensionality of extracted features can be greatly reduced by the principle component analysis (PCA) algorithm before the most discriminative features selected are fed into a SVM classifier with the radial basis function (RBF) in order to separate epileptic seizure from seizure-free EEG signals. The classification performance of the proposed method has been evaluated by using several state-of-art feature extraction algorithms and other five different classifiers like linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and Logistic Regression (LR). The experimental results indicate that the proposed MRBF-MPSO-SVM classification method outperforms competing techniques in terms of classification accuracy, and show the effectiveness of the proposed method for classification of seizure epochs and seizure-free epochs.

  17. Do seizures and epileptic activity worsen epilepsy and deteriorate cognitive function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanzini, Giuliano; Depaulis, Antoine; Tassinari, Alberto; de Curtis, Marco

    2013-11-01

    Relevant to the definition of epileptic encephalopathy (EE) is the concept that the epileptic activity itself may contribute to bad outcomes, both in terms of epilepsy and cognition, above and beyond what might be expected from the underlying pathology alone, and that these can worsen over time. The review of the clinical and experimental evidence that seizures or interictal electroencephalography (EEG) discharges themselves can induce a progression toward more severe epilepsy and a regression of brain function leads to the following conclusions: The possibility of seizure-dependent worsening is by no means a general one but is limited to some types of epilepsy, namely mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and EEs. Clinical and experimental data concur in indicating that prolonged seizures/status epilepticus (SE) are a risky initial event that can set in motion an epileptogenic process leading to persistent, possibly drug-refractory epilepsies. The mechanisms for SE-related epileptogenic process are incompletely known; they seem to involve inflammation and/or glutamatergic transmission. The evidence of the role of recurrent individual seizures in sustaining epilepsy progression is ambiguous. The correlation between high seizure frequency and bad outcome does not necessarily demonstrate a cause-effect relationship, rather high seizure frequency and bad outcome can both depend on a particularly aggressive epileptogenic process. The results of EE studies challenge the idea of a common seizure-dependent mechanism for epilepsy progression/intellectual deterioration. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  18. The seizures of Peter Alexeevich = Peter the Great, father of modern Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, John R

    2007-02-01

    This article deals with the seizures of Tsar Peter the Great, Father of Modern Russia. At the age of 10 in 1682, he witnessed the very brutal deaths of two men who were close to his family and the hacking of these men to pieces, directly in front of him. This savagery could have left scars, explaining possible psychogenic seizures. Also, such great quantities of alcohol were consistently consumed by this giant of a man at 6 ft 8 in. that alcohol withdrawal seizures would also seem possible. However, evidence of the latter two types of seizures is lacking. At the age of 21, he likely had severe encephalitis and, within that year, developed simple partial seizures with jerking movements of his left face that spread to his arm, and occasionally to his leg, finally evolving into a complex partial attack with loss of consciousness later. It is entirely possible that the seizures of Peter the Great are an example of a new entity called acute encephalitis with refractory, repetitive partial seizures, associated at times with epilepsia partialis continua and periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges.

  19. Utility of Obtaining a Serum Basic Metabolic Panel in the Setting of a First-Time Nonfebrile Seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccarelli, Britton D; Hall, Ara S

    2016-06-01

    New-onset nonfebrile seizures in an otherwise healthy child are common, affecting 25 000 to 40 000 U.S. children annually. We hypothesized seizure-provoking electrolyte disturbances such as hyponatremia, hypoglycemia, and hypocalcemia are uncommon in these children. From January 1, 2009 to May 31, 2009, 358 children aged 29 days to 18 years with a diagnosis code of 780.39 ("other convulsions" including "first time seizure," etc) were included for potential retrospective review. Children with known epilepsy and febrile seizures were excluded. Electrolytes were obtained in nearly all children with a history suggestive of an underlying abnormality (13 of 14, 93%) but also in half of children with a reassuring history (62 of 119, 52%). No child with an unremarkable history and exam was found to have electrolyte abnormalities falling below levels most likely to be associated with acute symptomatic seizures. Electrolytes are unlikely to be abnormal in an otherwise well-appearing child after a first-time nonfebrile seizure. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Localizing value of seizure manifestations of temporal lobe epilepsies and the consequence of analyzing their sequential appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihara, T; Inoue, Y; Hiyoshi, T; Watanabe, Y; Kubota, Y; Tottori, T; Matsuda, K; Yagi, K; Seino, M

    1993-06-01

    We investigated the localizing and lateralizing value of principal seizure manifestations in temporal lobe epilepsies (signal symptoms, oroalimentary automatisms, somatomotor manifestations, unilateral dystonic posturing, ictal speech, motionless stare) of 223 complex partial seizures in 50 patients. All the patients had invasive long-term monitoring with the combined implantation of intracerebral electrodes in and subdural electrodes on the bilateral temporal lobes. Postoperative freedom from seizures was ascertained for longer than one year. We found that 35 patients had amygdalohippocampal seizures and 15 had lateral temporal seizures. The value of the manifestations was established in relation to the site and side of seizure origin and to the progression of seizure discharges within the unilateral temporal lobe or to the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. Several signs among the manifestations were found to be reliable in predicting the site or side of the temporal lobe seizure focus. We emphasized the importance of investigating sequential changes of seizure manifestations in relation to ictal EEG findings by means of simultaneous recording.

  1. Varying seizure semiology according to age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordli, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of seizures change in a predictable fashion with advancing age. For focal seizures these changes can be summarized into domains similar to those used in developmental models. These include fine motor, communication, and gross motor manifestations. Instead of socialization the fourth domain for seizure semiology concerns synchronization. Focal seizures in the very young tend to be simpler with fewer fine motor manifestations. Auras are uncommon, even in young children with some linguistic skill and it is often difficult to discern alteration of consciousness. Infantile focal seizures can present with spasms or even diffuse tonic seizures. In terms of synchronization, orderly secondary generalization is rarely seen so that primary generalized clonic seizures are rarely recorded in infants. Amongst so-called "generalized" seizures spasms are most often seen in the first year of life. Absence seizures, myoclonic-astatic and generalized tonic-clonic seizures are all usually not seen until after age 2 years. A full description of the clinical details of seizures is probably the most important part of the epilepsy history. A detailed knowledge of seizure semiology can make the history more effective and also in the identification of the correct seizure classification. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Caffeine provokes adverse interactions with 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ‘ecstasy’) and related psychostimulants: mechanisms and mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanattou-Saïfoudine, N; McNamara, R; Harkin, A

    2012-01-01

    Concomitant consumption of caffeine with recreational psychostimulant drugs of abuse can provoke severe acute adverse reactions in addition to longer term consequences. The mechanisms by which caffeine increases the toxicity of psychostimulants include changes in body temperature regulation, cardiotoxicity and lowering of the seizure threshold. Caffeine also influences the stimulatory, discriminative and reinforcing effects of psychostimulant drugs. In this review, we consider our current understanding of such caffeine-related drug interactions, placing a particular emphasis on an adverse interaction between caffeine and the substituted amphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ‘ecstasy’), which has been most recently described and characterized. Co-administration of caffeine profoundly enhances the acute toxicity of MDMA in rats, as manifested by high core body temperature, tachycardia and increased mortality. In addition, co-administration of caffeine enhances the long-term serotonergic neurotoxicity induced by MDMA. Observations to date support an interactive model of drug-induced toxicity comprising MDMA-related enhancement of dopamine release coupled to a caffeine-mediated antagonism of adenosine receptors in addition to inhibition of PDE. These experiments are reviewed together with reports of caffeine-related drug interactions with cocaine, d-amphetamine and ephedrine where similar mechanisms are implicated. Understanding the underlying mechanisms will guide appropriate intervention strategies for the management of severe reactions and potential for increased drug-related toxicity, resulting from concomitant caffeine consumption. PMID:22671762

  3. Explosive Blast Neuropathology and Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krisztian eKovacs

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI due to explosive blast exposure is a leading combat casualty. It is also implicated as a key contributor to war related mental health diseases. A clinically important consequence of all types of TBI is a high risk for development of seizures and epilepsy. Seizures have been reported in patients who have suffered blast injuries in the Global War on Terror but the exact prevalence is unknown. The occurrence of seizures supports the contention that explosive blast leads to both cellular and structural brain pathology. Unfortunately, the exact mechanism by which explosions cause brain injury is unclear, which complicates development of meaningful therapies and mitigation strategies. To help improve understanding, detailed neuropathological analysis is needed. For this, histopathological techniques are extremely valuable and indispensable. In the following we will review the pathological results, including those from immunohistochemical and special staining approaches, from recent preclinical explosive blast studies.

  4. Predictive value of S100-B and copeptin for outcomes following seizure: the BISTRO International Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonathan Freund

    Full Text Available To evaluate the performance of S100-B protein and copeptin, in addition to clinical variables, in predicting outcomes of patients attending the emergency department (ED following a seizure.We prospectively included adult patients presented with an acute seizure, in four EDs in France and the United Kingdom. Participants were followed up for 28 days. The primary endpoint was a composite of seizure recurrence, all-cause mortality, hospitalization or rehospitalisation, or return visit in the ED within seven days.Among the 389 participants included in the analysis, 156 (40% experienced the primary endpoint within seven days and 195 (54% at 28 days. Mean levels of both S100-B (0.11 μg/l [95% CI 0.07-0.20] vs 0.09 μg/l [0.07-0.14] and copeptin (23 pmol/l [9-104] vs 17 pmol/l [8-43] were higher in participants meeting the primary endpoint. However, both biomarkers were poorly predictive of the primary outcome with a respective area under the receiving operator characteristic curve of 0.57 [0.51-0.64] and 0.59 [0.54-0.64]. Multivariable logistic regression analysis identified higher age (odds ratio [OR] 1.3 per decade [1.1-1.5], provoked seizure (OR 4.93 [2.5-9.8], complex partial seizure (OR 4.09 [1.8-9.1] and first seizure (OR 1.83 [1.1-3.0] as independent predictors of the primary outcome. A second regression analysis including the biomarkers showed no additional predictive benefit (S100-B OR 3.89 [0.80-18.9] copeptin OR 1 [1.00-1.00].The plasma biomarkers S100-B and copeptin did not improve prediction of poor outcome following seizure. Higher age, a first seizure, a provoked seizure and a partial complex seizure are independently associated with adverse outcomes.

  5. CLINICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF NEW - ONSET EPILETIC SEIZURES IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalapathi Rao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epilepsy is one of the most familiar neurological disorders which can cause bodily injury and death from inadequately treated or untreated cases. The imaging and EEG of new onset seizures is done with different indications, to identify an acute illness as the underline course for the seizure and possible neurological deficit. To this purpose we have evaluated new onset seizures in adult patients in correlation with their clinical profile, Electroencephalography (EEG and Computerized tomography (CT imaging of brain. METHODS: This cro ss sectional study was studied in 100 adult patients, presenting with seizures attending the Emergency department, General Medicine and Neurology wards and OPD of Tertiary care teaching hospital during the period of March 2006 to March 2008. All the patien ts were examined clinically and subjected to CT imaging of brain and EEG. Other necessary blood investigations were also done. Correlation between various seizures and CT scan brain and EEG were studied. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data . RESULTS: 63% of patients were in the age group of 20 - 39 years, 63% were males and 37% were females. 65% presented with GTCS, 35% with partial seizures. CT scan was found abnormal in 49.2% patients in GTCS, 71.4% in partial seizures. EEG showed abnormal p attern in 39% patients. 40% of the patients with partial seizures had epileptic form discharges. 33% patients had focal lesions on CT brain with normal EEG. CONCLUSION: Generalized Tonic clonic seizures were the commonest type of seizures was present, seen mostly in male patients. CT scan brain was abnormal in 57% of the patients. Neurocysticercosis and calcified granuloma were the commonest causes for seizures up to 3 rd decade of life. Majority of the patients with focal lesions on CT scan brain had epileptic form discharges on EEG which indicate a strong correlation of EEG with CT findings. Initiating the treatment with antiepileptic drugs was

  6. Dynamics of muscle activation during tonic-clonic seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Moldovan, Mihai; Jennum, Poul

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to elucidate the dynamics of muscle activation during generalised tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS). We recorded surface electromyography (EMG) from the deltoid muscle during 26 GTCS from 13 patients and compared it with GTCS-like events acted by 10 control subjects. GTCS...... consisted of a sequence of phases best described quantitatively by dynamics of the low frequency (LF) wavelet component (2-8Hz). Contrary to the traditional view, the tonic phase started with a gradual increase in muscle activity. A longer clonic phase was associated with a shorter onset of the tonic phase...... and a higher seizure occurrence. Increase in LF occurred during the onset phase and during the transition from the tonic to the clonic phase, corresponding to the vibratory movements. The clonic phase consisted of EMG discharges of remarkably constant duration (0.2s) separated by silent periods (SP...

  7. Epilepsy management in older people: Lessons from National Audit of Seizure management in Hospitals (NASH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziso, B; Dixon, P A; Marson, A G

    2017-08-01

    Epilepsy is the third most common diagnosis in older people, however management in this group remains variable. National Audit of Seizure management in Hospitals (NASH) set out to assess care provided to patients attending hospitals in England following a seizure. 154 Emergency Departments (EDs) across the UK took part. 1256 patients aged 60 years or over were included for analysis (median age 74 years, 54% men). 51% were known to have epilepsy, 17% had history of previous seizure or blackout and 32% presented with a suspected first seizure. 14% of older patients with epilepsy were not on treatment, 59% were on monotherapy. Sodium valproate was the most commonly used antiepileptic, 28%. 35% of patients with epilepsy, aged 60 and over, had a CT during admission compared to only 17% of those under 60. 80% of patients aged 60 and over presenting with a likely first seizure were admitted to hospital, compared to 65% of those under 60. 34% of those with suspected first seizure were referred to a neurologist on discharge compared to 68% of patients under the age of 60. 52% of 60-69year olds with a suspected first seizure were referred to neurology compared to 25% of patients aged 80-89. Older patients presenting with seizures are more likely to be admitted to hospital and have imaging. They are less likely to be referred to specialist services on discharge. There appears to be significant disparity in patient age and rate of referral. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. febrile seizures, Tripoli, Libya, knowledge, attitude

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kim

    ABSTRACT. Introduction. Febrile seizures are the most common seizure disorder in children. ... Adequate provision of information seemed to reduce this anxiety (2, 16). .... Effects of educational intervention on changing parental practices for.

  9. Temperature, age, and recurrence of febrile seizure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Stuijvenberg (Margriet); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); G. Derksen-Lubsen (Gerarda); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: Prediction of a recurrent febrile seizure during subsequent episodes of fever. DESIGN: Study of the data of the temperatures, seizure recurrences, and baseline patient characteristics that were collected at a randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen

  10. Seizures by the clock: Temporal patterns of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, Udaya; Minato, Erica; Paul, Eldho

    2017-09-11

    We hypothesized that (1) the occurrence of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) is modulated by the interaction between the 24-hour clock and the sleep-wake cycle and (2) the pattern of modulation in PNES differs from epileptic seizures (ES). We sought to test our hypotheses in a cohort of patients diagnosed with PNES or ES in the setting of an epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU). We retrospectively reviewed consecutive video-EEG (VEEG) recordings of patients who underwent monitoring at the EMU of a tertiary hospital. The seizure type (PNES vs ES), onset time, and the state (sleep vs awake) were tabulated. The relationship between the onset time, the state of arousal, and the occurrence of PNES was determined using logistic regression analysis. To determine if the nature of the relationship between the state of arousal and PNES differed according to the onset time, an interaction between the onset time and the state of arousal was also fitted to the model. We studied a total of 754 seizures (ES, 437; PNES, 317) from 135 patients consisting of 71 (52.6%) females and 64 (47.4%) males with the median age of 39years (range, 18-91). We found a significant association between the state of arousal and PNES with the odds of being PNES four times higher when patients were awake (OR: 4.27, 95% CI: 2.44-7.48; p24-hour time cycle in the generation of PNES. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Seizure management at Auckland City Hospital Emergency Department between July and December 2009: time for a change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemergy, I; Bergin, P; Jones, P; Walker, E

    2012-09-01

    To assess the management of epileptic seizures and status epilepticus in adult patients at Auckland City Hospital emergency department. This information will form the basis of future seizure management protocols and further research on the management of status epilepticus. The prehospital and acute hospital management of all adult seizure patients seen between 1 July 2009 and 31 December 2009 was reviewed with respect to seizure type, presence of first seizure, pre-existing epilepsy diagnosis and disposition from the emergency department. Two hundred and fifty-five seizure events were identified in 227 patients. Nineteen patients presented twice during the study period and three patients presented three or more times. Generalised seizures were much more common than focal seizures. There were 75 presentations with first seizure (29.4%). Thirty-seven patients (49.3%) with a first seizure received treatment with an anti-epileptic drug. Status epilepticus occurred on 12 occasions (4.7%) with only three patients receiving lorazepam as treatment. The majority of seizure patients were managed by emergency department staff (58.4%) while general medicine (17.6%) and neurology (11.8%) teams managed fewer patients. Phenytoin was used in 56 patients (22%) with the majority (n= 43) receiving intravenous phenytoin. Many of the patients who received intravenous phenytoin were not subsequently discharged on that medication (46%). More patients than would be expected received treatment after their first seizure. Phenytoin was a widely used anti-epileptic drug. There was a wide variability in the management of status epilepticus, and intravenous lorazepam was underutilised.

  12. Perioperative seizures in patients with a history of a seizure disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesen, Adam D; Jacob, Adam K; Aho, Lucyna E; Botten, Emily J; Nase, Karen E; Nelson, Julia M; Kopp, Sandra L

    2010-09-01

    The occurrence of perioperative seizures in patients with a preexisting seizure disorder is unclear. There are several factors unique to the perioperative period that may increase a patient's risk of perioperative seizures, including medications administered, timing of medication administration, missed doses of antiepileptic medications, and sleep deprivation. We designed this retrospective chart review to evaluate the frequency of perioperative seizures in patients with a preexisting seizure disorder. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients with a documented history of a seizure disorder who received an anesthetic between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2007. Patients excluded from this study include those who had an outpatient procedure or intracranial procedure, ASA classification of V, pregnant women, and patients younger than 2 years of age. The first hospital admission of at least 24 hours during which an anesthetic was provided was identified for each patient. Patient demographics, character of the seizure disorder, details of the surgical procedure, and clinically apparent seizure activity in the perioperative period (within 3 days after the anesthetic) were recorded. During the 6-year study period, 641 patients with a documented seizure disorder were admitted for at least 24 hours after an anesthetic. Twenty-two patients experienced perioperative seizure activity for an overall frequency of 3.4%(95% confidence interval, 2.2%-5.2%). The frequency of preoperative seizures (P seizure (P seizure. As the number of antiepileptic medications increased, so did the frequency of perioperative seizures (P seizures in this patient population. We conclude that the majority of perioperative seizures in patients with a preexisting seizure disorder are likely related to the patient's underlying condition. The frequency of seizures is not influenced by the type of anesthesia or procedure. Because patients with frequent seizures at baseline are

  13. Reappraisal of epileptic pain as a rare symptom of seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuloğlu Pazarcı, Nevin; Bebek, Nerses; Baykan, Betül; Gürses, Candan; Gökyiğit, Ayşen

    2016-02-01

    To draw attention to epileptic pain which is a rare seizure symptom mostly causing wrong diagnosis and delayed treatment. We present nine patients in whom pain was a prominent initial or early ictal symptom. We reviewed the records of 4736 patients, and found nine patients who had pain as an aura or an early prominent symptom of their seizures. Seizure semiology, EEG, and cranial imaging features were evaluated retrospectively. Age at seizure onset ranged from 6 months to 50 years, and the mean age during the study was 37.7±11.9 years. Pain was predominantly peripherally localized in four patients, whereas cephalic pain was detected in three patients, and abdominal pain was detected in two patients. Electroencephalography (EEG) revealed epileptic abnormalities on the temporoparietal and frontotemporal regions in three patients each. Photosensitive generalized epileptic discharges were detected in one and diffuse background slowing in the remaining two other patients. Electroencephalography abnormalities were lateralized to the contralateral site of the pain in four patients with strictly localized pain. Three patients revealed no abnormality on the cranial MR imaging, whereas others showed different types of abnormality such as heterotopias (n:1), mesial temporal lobe atrophy (n:1), white and gray matter sequela lesions (n:1), diffuse white matter lesion (n:1), chronic encephalomalacia and gliosis (n:1), and perivascular space dilatation (n:1). Epileptic pain is a neglected, but important, semiologic symptom with localization and lateralization value in the patients with somatosensorial seizures of parietal as well as temporal lobe origin. It occurs mainly as peripherally localized, cephalic, or abdominal pain and is usually associated with a symptomatic etiology. Awareness of epileptic pain is important to avoid misdiagnosis and delayed treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Treatment of seizures in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Marcus W.; Polman, Susanne K. L.; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; De Keyser, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Background Epileptic seizures occur in only a minority of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), but can have serious consequences. The available literature suggests an association of seizures in MS with cortical and subcortical demyelinating lesions, which suggest that seizures in MS are probably

  15. Neonatal seizures in a rural Kenyan District Hospital: aetiology, Incidence and outcome of hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newton Charles RJC

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute seizures are common among children admitted to hospitals in resource poor countries. However, there is little data on the burden, causes and outcome of neonatal seizures in sub-Saharan Africa. We determined the minimum incidence, aetiology and immediate outcome of seizures among neonates admitted to a rural district hospital in Kenya. Methods From 1st January 2003 to 31st December 2007, we assessed for seizures all neonates (age 0-28 days admitted to the Kilifi District Hospital, who were resident in a defined, regularly enumerated study area. The population denominator, the number of live births in the community on 1 July 2005 (the study midpoint was modelled from the census data. Results Seizures were reported in 142/1572 (9.0% of neonatal admissions. The incidence was 39.5 [95% confidence interval (CI 26.4-56.7] per 1000 live-births and incidence increased with birth weight. The main diagnoses in neonates with seizures were sepsis in 85 (60%, neonatal encephalopathy in 30 (21% and meningitis in 21 (15%, but only neonatal encephalopathy and bacterial meningitis were independently associated with seizures. Neonates with seizures had a longer hospitalization [median period 7 days - interquartile range (IQR 4 to10] -compared to 5 days [IQR 3 to 8] for those without seizures, P = 0.02. Overall, there was no difference in inpatient case fatality between neonates with and without seizures but, when this outcome was stratified by birth weight, it was significantly higher in neonates ≥ 2.5 kg compared to low birth weight neonates [odds ratio 1.59 (95%CI 1.02 to 2.46, P = 0.037]. Up to 13% of the surviving newborn with seizures had neurological abnormalities at discharge. Conclusion There is a high incidence of neonatal seizures in this area of Kenya and the most important causes are neonatal encephalopathy and meningitis. The high incidence of neonatal seizures may be a reflection of the quality of the perinatal and

  16. Recognition Memory After Febrile Seizures

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2012-01-01

    Researchers at the Institute of Child Health, London; Epilepsy Center, University of Edinburgh; and Dartmouth Medical School, New Hampshire, US studied memory abilities in 26 children (mean age 23 months, SD 12.6 months) after prolonged febrile seizures (median, 37.5 days), and compared to 37 normal controls.

  17. Viral Infections and Febrile Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of febrile seizures (FS in a cohort of children, ages 3 months to 5 years, living in a Netherlands province was compared with the incidence of common viral infections reported to a national registry and the results reported from the Department of Medical Microbiology, Public Health Laboratory Friesland, Leeuwarden, The Netherlands.

  18. Hippocampal Abnormalities and Seizure Recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal volumetry and T2 relaxometry were performed on 84 consecutive patients (adolescents and adults with partial epilepsy submitted to antiepileptic drug (AED withdrawal after at least 2 years of seizure control, in a study at State University of Campinas-UNICAMP, Brazil.

  19. Intermittent prophylaxis of recurrent febrile seizures with clobazam versus diazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, S; Saha, S K; Parveen, F; Banu, L A; Momen, A; Ahmed, A U; Quddush, M R; Karim, M M; Begum, S A; Haque, M A; Hoque, M R

    2014-10-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common type of seizure among children that can be prevented by using prophylactic drugs like Clobazam and Diazepam. The present prospective study was conducted in the Department of Pediatrics, Mymensingh Medical College Hospital and Community Based Medical College Hospital, Bangladesh over a period of 1 year from July 2012 to June 2013 to compare the effectiveness of intermittent Clobazam versus Diazepam therapy in preventing the recurrence of febrile seizures and assessed adverse effects of each drug. A total of 65 patients (32 children administered Clobazam and rest 33 children received Diazepam) of simple and complex febrile seizures aged 6 months to 5 years of both sexes were the study population. Data were collected by interview of the patients, clinical examination and laboratory investigations using the research instrument. Data were analyzed by using Chi-square (χ2) Test, Student's 't' Test and Fisher's Exact Test. For all analytical tests, the level of significance was set at 0.05 and pDiazepam groups. Over 31% of patients in Clobazam group who experienced episode of fever within 3 months, 40.6% within 6 months and 9.4% within 9 months compared to 36.4% in Diazepam group within 3 months, 45.5% within 6 months & 12.1% within 9 months after discharge from the hospital. Three (9.4%) patients in Clobazam group and 7(21.3%) in Diazepam group who experienced febrile convulsion during the follow up period. From the data adverse effects within 3 and 6 months experienced by the patient's drowsiness, sedation and ataxia were higher in Diazepam group than those in Clobazam group. However, within 9 months lethargy and irritability were somewhat higher in Clobazam group than those in Diazepam group. The mean duration of hospitalization was significantly higher in Diazepam group compared to Clobazam group (6.0±1.0 vs. 4.6±0.08 days, PDiazepam group had a history of recurrent seizures, whereas 3(9.4%) of 32 children in the Clobazam group

  20. Characteristics and acute outcomes of ICU patients with initial presentation of seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobochnik, Steven; Gutierrez, Camilo; Jacobson, Mercedes P

    2015-03-01

    Seizures are a common cause of presentation to the emergency department (ED) but vary widely in severity and prognostic significance, with some cases requiring ICU management. Most evidence regarding seizure outcomes in the ICU comes from patients exclusively with status epilepticus (SE) or with new seizures detected after ICU admission. To aid in determining early prognosis of ICU patients with and without SE, we performed an analysis of patients initially presenting with any type of seizure and requiring ICU management. Analysis of hospital records of 247 consecutive patients presenting to the ED initially with seizure and directly admitted to the ICU between January 2010 and June 2013. The primary outcome was composite in-hospital death or discharge to hospice, and the secondary outcome was recurrent ICU seizures. The primary outcome occurred in 7.7% of patients. Both early mechanical ventilation and an acute intracranial process on neuroimaging were associated with a poor outcome. About half of this cohort presented with SE. Although SE was associated with recurrent seizures in the ICU, the primary outcome was similar between patients presenting with and without SE. Patients with SE had greater rates of early intubation in the ED and were treated more aggressively with medication, whereas patients without SE had greater rates of first ever seizure, acute intracranial disease including intracranial hemorrhage, and neurosurgical intervention. Patients presenting to the ED with and without SE requiring ICU admission may have similar acute outcomes, yet differ in risk factors and seizure etiologies. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pretreatment seizure semiology in childhood absence epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Sudha Kilaru; Shinnar, Shlomo; Cnaan, Avital; Dlugos, Dennis; Conry, Joan; Hirtz, Deborah G; Hu, Fengming; Liu, Chunyan; Mizrahi, Eli M; Moshé, Solomon L; Clark, Peggy; Glauser, Tracy A

    2017-08-15

    To determine seizure semiology in children with newly diagnosed childhood absence epilepsy and to evaluate associations with short-term treatment outcomes. For participants enrolled in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, comparative-effectiveness trial, semiologic features of pretreatment seizures were analyzed as predictors of treatment outcome at the week 16 to 20 visit. Video of 1,932 electrographic absence seizures from 416 participants was evaluated. Median seizure duration was 10.2 seconds; median time between electrographic seizure onset and clinical manifestation onset was 1.5 seconds. For individual seizures and by participant, the most common semiology features were pause/stare (seizure 95.5%, participant 99.3%), motor automatisms (60.6%, 86.1%), and eye involvement (54.9%, 76.5%). The interrater agreement for motor automatisms and eye involvement was good (72%-84%). Variability of semiology features between seizures even within participants was high. Clustering analyses revealed 4 patterns (involving the presence/absence of eye involvement and motor automatisms superimposed on the nearly ubiquitous pause/stare). Most participants experienced more than one seizure cluster pattern. No individual semiologic feature was individually predictive of short-term outcome. Seizure freedom was half as likely in participants with one or more seizure having the pattern of eye involvement without motor automatisms than in participants without this pattern. Almost all absence seizures are characterized by a pause in activity or staring, but rarely is this the only feature. Semiologic features tend to cluster, resulting in identifiable absence seizure subtypes with significant intraparticipant seizure phenomenologic heterogeneity. One seizure subtype, pause/stare and eye involvement but no motor automatisms, is specifically associated with a worse treatment outcome. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  2. Chronic metformin treatment facilitates seizure termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Zhu, Binglin; Zheng, Fangshuo; Li, Yun; Zhang, Yanke; Hu, Yida; Wang, Xuefeng

    2017-03-04

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key energy sensor. Its activator metformin could suppress epileptogenesis in the pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) kindling model. However, the effect of metformin on the acute and chronic seizures has not been studied. We first detected the expression of AMPK in the brain tissue of human and mice with chronic seizures, as well as in mice with acute seizures. Second, using behavioral assay and local filed potentials (LFPs) recording, we investigated the effect of chronic metformin treatment on seizures in a acute seizure model and a chronic seizure model. Our results showed that AMPK was expressed in neurons in the epileptic brain. The expression level was decreased in the brain tissue that experienced chronic and acute seizures. In PTZ-induced acute seizures model, behavioral assay showed that chronic metformin treatment decreased the mortality, and LFPs recording showed that chronic metformin treatment shortened the duration of generalized tonic-clonic seizures and prolonged the duration of postictal depression. Moreover, in kainic acid-induced chronic seizures model, LFPs recording showed that chronic metformin treatment shortened the duration of epileptic activity. Our study suggests that chronic metformin treatment could facilitate seizure termination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nonlinear analysis of EEG for epileptic seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Daw, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Eisenstadt, M.L. [Knoxville Neurology Clinic, St. Mary`s Medical Center, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    We apply chaotic time series analysis (CTSA) to human electroencephalogram (EEG) data. Three epoches were examined: epileptic seizure, non-seizure, and transition from non-seizure to seizure. The CTSA tools were applied to four forms of these data: raw EEG data (e-data), artifact data (f-data) via application of a quadratic zero-phase filter of the raw data, artifact-filtered data (g- data) and that was the residual after subtracting f-data from e-data, and a low-pass-filtered version (h-data) of g-data. Two different seizures were analyzed for the same patient. Several nonlinear measures uniquely indicate an epileptic seizure in both cases, including an abrupt decrease in the time per wave cycle in f-data, an abrupt increase in the Kolmogorov entropy and in the correlation dimension for e-h data, and an abrupt increase in the correlation dimension for e-h data. The transition from normal to seizure state also is characterized by distinctly different trends in the nonlinear measures for each seizure and may be potential seizure predictors for this patient. Surrogate analysis of e-data shows that statistically significant nonlinear structure is present during the non-seizure, transition , and seizure epoches.

  4. Localizing epileptic seizure onsets with Granger causality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Bhim M.; Epstein, Charles M.; Dhamala, Mukesh

    2013-09-01

    Accurate localization of the epileptic seizure onset zones (SOZs) is crucial for successful surgery, which usually depends on the information obtained from intracranial electroencephalography (IEEG) recordings. The visual criteria and univariate methods of analyzing IEEG recordings have not always produced clarity on the SOZs for resection and ultimate seizure freedom for patients. Here, to contribute to improving the localization of the SOZs and to understanding the mechanism of seizure propagation over the brain, we applied spectral interdependency methods to IEEG time series recorded from patients during seizures. We found that the high-frequency (>80 Hz) Granger causality (GC) occurs before the onset of any visible ictal activity and causal relationships involve the recording electrodes where clinically identifiable seizures later develop. These results suggest that high-frequency oscillatory network activities precede and underlie epileptic seizures, and that GC spectral measures derived from IEEG can assist in precise delineation of seizure onset times and SOZs.

  5. INHIBITORY MOTOR SEIZURES: SEMIOLOGY AND THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Мukhin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to rare and unique type of epileptic seizures – inhibitory motor seizures, characterized by the inability to execute a voluntary movement with preserved consciousness. The exact prevalence of this type of seizures is not known, but many cases are unrecognized or non-correctly diagnosed as Todd's paralysis. Therefore practical doctors should know the clinical and electroencephalographic characteristics of this type of seizures andtake them into account in the differential diagnoses . The authors presented a detailed review of the literature, including the historical data, etiology, pathogenesis and proposed mechanisms of formation of inhibitory motor seizures, clinical and EEG characteristics, therapeutic approaches. Antiepileptic drugs of choice used in the treatment of inhibitory motor seizures are valproic acid (preferably depakine chronosphere – original prolonged form of valproate. The authors also presented their observations of patients with inhibitory motor seizures.

  6. Recent advances in understanding provoked vestibulodynia [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahinoam Lev-Sagie

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Vulvodynia refers to pain in the vulva of at least 3 months’ duration in the absence of a recognized underlying cause. Provoked, localized vestibulodynia is the term used to describe superficial pain confined to the vulvar vestibule, provoked by touch. This review will focus on provoked vestibulodynia with regard to its suggested causative factors and will discuss the role of inflammation, vulvovaginal infections, mucosal nerve fiber proliferation, hormonal associations, central pain mechanisms, pelvic floor muscle dysfunction, and genetic factors. Clinical observations, epidemiological studies, and data from basic research emphasize the heterogeneity of vulvar pain syndromes. There is a critical need to perform prospective, longitudinal studies that will allow better diagnostic criteria and subgrouping of patients that would lead to improvements in our understanding of provoked vestibulodynia and its treatment.

  7. Cross-sectional study of the hospital management of adult patients with a suspected seizure (EPIC2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Jon Mark; Dudhill, Hannah; Shewan, Jane; Mason, Sue; Grünewald, Richard A; Reuber, Markus

    2017-07-13

    To determine the clinical characteristics, management and outcomes of patients taken to hospital by emergency ambulance after a suspected seizure. Quantitative cross-sectional retrospective study of a consecutive series of patients. An acute hospital trust in a large city in England. In 2012-2013, the regions' ambulance service managed 605 481 emergency incidents, 74 141/605 481 originated from Sheffield (a large city in the region), 2121/74 141 (2.9%) were suspected seizures and 178/2121 occurred in May 2012. We undertook detailed analysis of the medical records of the 91/178 patients who were transported to the city's acute hospital. After undertaking a retrospective review of the medical records, the best available aetiological explanation for the seizures was determined. The best available aetiological explanation for 74.7% (68/91) of the incidents was an epileptic seizure, 11.0% (10/91) were psychogenic non-epileptic seizures and 9.9% (9/91) were cardiogenic events. The epileptic seizures fall into the following four categories: first epileptic seizure (13.2%, 12/91), epileptic seizure with a historical diagnosis of epilepsy (30.8%, 28/91), recurrent epileptic seizures without a historical diagnosis of epilepsy (20.9%, 19/91) and acute symptomatic seizures (9.9%, 9/91). Of those with seizures (excluding cardiogenic events), 2.4% (2/82) of patients were seizing on arrival in the Emergency Department (ED), 19.5% (16/82) were postictal and 69.5% (57/82) were alert. 63.4% (52/82) were discharged at the end of their ED attendance and 36.5% (19/52) of these had no referral or follow-up. Most suspected seizures are epileptic seizures but this is a diagnostically heterogeneous group. Only a small minority of patients require emergency medical care but most are transported to hospital. Few patients receive expert review and many are discharged home without referral to a specialist leaving them at risk of further seizures and the associated morbidity, mortality

  8. Role of the temporal pole in temporal lobe epilepsy seizure networks: an intracranial electrode investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Taylor J; Woodroffe, Royce W; Nourski, Kirill V; Moritani, Toshio; Capizzano, Aristides A; Kirby, Patricia; Kawasaki, Hiroto; Howard, Matthew; Werz, Mary Ann

    2017-10-13

    OBJECTIVE A convergence of clinical research suggests that the temporal pole (TP) plays an important and potentially underappreciated role in the genesis and propagation of seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Understanding its role is becoming increasingly important because selective resections for medically intractable TLE spare temporopolar cortex (TPC). The purpose of this study was to characterize the role of the TPC in TLE after using dense electrocorticography (ECoG) recordings in patients undergoing invasive monitoring for medically intractable TLE. METHODS Chronic ECoG recordings were obtained in 10 consecutive patients by using an array customized to provide dense coverage of the TP as part of invasive monitoring to localize the epileptogenic zone. All patients would eventually undergo cortico-amygdalohippocampectomy. A retrospective review of the patient clinical records including ECoG recordings, neuroimaging studies, neuropathology reports, and clinical outcomes was performed. RESULTS In 7 patients (70%), the TP was involved at seizure onset; in 7 patients (70%), there were interictal discharges from the TP; and in 1 case, there was early spread to the TP. Seizure onset in the TP did not necessarily correlate with preoperative neuroimaging abnormalities of the TP. CONCLUSIONS These data demonstrate that TPC commonly plays a crucial role in temporal lobe seizure networks. Seizure onset from the TP would not have been predicted based on available neuroimaging data or interictal discharges. These findings illustrate the importance of thoroughly considering the role of the TP prior to resective surgery for TLE, particularly when selective mesial resection is being considered.

  9. Seizure outcomes of temporal lobe epilepsy surgery in patients with normal MRI and without specific histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovic, Jugoslav; Larsson, Pål G; Østby, Ylva; Hald, John; Krossnes, Bård K; Fjeld, Jan G; Pripp, Are H; Alfstad, Kristin Å; Egge, Arild; Stanisic, Milo

    2017-05-01

    Seizure outcome following surgery in pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy patients with normal magnetic resonance imaging and normal or non-specific histopathology is not sufficiently presented in the literature. In a retrospective design, we reviewed data of 263 patients who had undergone temporal lobe epilepsy surgery and identified 26 (9.9%) who met the inclusion criteria. Seizure outcomes were determined at 2-year follow-up. Potential predictors of Engel class I (satisfactory outcome) were identified by logistic regression analyses. Engel class I outcome was achieved in 61.5% of patients, 50% being completely seizure free (Engel class IA outcome). The strongest predictors of satisfactory outcome were typical ictal seizure semiology (p = 0.048) and localised ictal discharges on scalp EEG (p = 0.036). Surgery might be an effective treatment choice for the majority of these patients, although outcomes are less favourable than in patients with magnetic resonance imaging-defined lesional temporal lobe epilepsy. Typical ictal seizure semiology and localised ictal discharges on scalp EEG were predictors of Engel class I outcome.

  10. 5% CO₂ inhalation suppresses hyperventilation-induced absence seizures in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Fan; Shi, Xiu-Yu; Ju, Jun; Zhang, Wei-Na; Liu, Yu-Jie; Li, Xiao-Yan; Zou, Li-Ping

    2014-02-01

    Hyperventilation can cause respiratory alkalosis by exhaling CO2, and is often used to confirm diagnosis of absence epilepsy. CO2 has long been known for its anticonvulsant properties since the 1920s. In this pilot study, we aimed to determine whether inhaling medical carbogen containing 5% CO2 and 95% O2 can suppress hyperventilation-induced absence seizures and spike-and-wave discharges (SWDs). We examined 12 patients whose absence seizures were induced by hyperventilation using video electroencephalographic recording for at least 4h. The patients were asked to hyperventilate for 3 min while breathing the following gases: (1) room air (12 patients); (2) carbogen (12 patients); and (3) 100% O2 (8 patients). Eight out of twelve patients were also examined in room air through pretreatment with carbogen for 3 min before the 3 min hyperventilation. Compared with hyperventilation in room air, hyperventilation supplemented with 5% CO2 had the following effects: (a) decrease in the number and duration of seizures; (b) prolonged appearance of epileptic discharges; and (c) reduction in the number and duration of SWDs (Phyperventilation-induced absence seizures and SWDs, supporting the claim that 5% CO2 is an effective anticonvulsant agent. Our pilot study provides clinical basis that 5% CO2 inhalation could be a therapeutic approach for hyperventilation-related seizures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Epileptic Seizures from Abnormal Networks: Why Some Seizures Defy Predictability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    appeared along this diagonal. The surrogates were generated using the amplitude adjusted Fourier transform algorithm (Theiler et al., 1992). This shuffles ...and (E), respectively. The y-axis represents the fraction of surrogate ( shuffled , see ‘‘Materials and methods’’ section) sequences with a maximal...Wilkinson, S.B., 2001. An introduction to contingent (closed-loop) brain electrical stimulation for seizure blockage, ultra -short-term clinical trials

  12. Cerebellar output controls generalized spike-and-wave discharge occurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Kros (Lieke); S.J. Eelkman Rooda; J.K. Spanke (Jochen); P. Alva (Parimala); M. van Dongen (Marijn); A. Karapatis (Athanasios); E.A. Tolner (Else A.); C. Strydis (Christos); N. Davey (Neil); B.H.J. Winkelman (Beerend); M. Negrello (Mario); W. Serdijn (Wouter); V. Steuber (Volker); A.M.J.M. Maagdenberg (Arn); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); F.E. Hoebeek (Freek)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective Disrupting thalamocortical activity patterns has proven to be a promising approach to stop generalized spike-and-wave discharges (GSWDs) characteristic of absence seizures. Here, we investigated to what extent modulation of neuronal firing in cerebellar nuclei (CN), which are

  13. Cerebellar Output Controls Generalized Spike-and-Wave Discharge Occurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kros, L.; Eelkman Rooda, O.H.J.; Spanke, J.K.; Alva, P.; Van Dongen, M.N.; Karapatis, A.; Tolner, E.A.; Strydis, C.; Davey, N.; Winkelman, B.H.J.; Negrello, M.; Serdijn, W.A.; Steuber, V.; Van den Maagdenberg, A.M.J.M.; De Zeeuw, C.I.; Hoebeek, F.E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Disrupting thalamocortical activity patterns has proven to be a promising approach to stop generalized spike-and-wave discharges (GSWDs) characteristic of absence seizures. Here, we investigated to what extent modulation of neuronal firing in cerebellar nuclei (CN), which are anatomically

  14. Cerebellar output controls generalized spike-and-wave discharge occurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kros, Lieke; Eelkman Rooda, Oscar H J; Spanke, Jochen K; Alva, Parimala; van Dongen, Marijn N; Karapatis, Athanasios; Tolner, Else A; Strydis, Christos; Davey, Neil; Winkelman, Beerend H J; Negrello, Mario; Serdijn, Wouter A; Steuber, Volker; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Hoebeek, Freek E

    OBJECTIVE: Disrupting thalamocortical activity patterns has proven to be a promising approach to stop generalized spike-and-wave discharges (GSWDs) characteristic of absence seizures. Here, we investigated to what extent modulation of neuronal firing in cerebellar nuclei (CN), which are anatomically

  15. [Ictal semiology of temporal partial complex seizures: usefulness for localizing and lateralizing the origin of the attacks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Torre, J L

    1999-01-01

    To review signs and symptoms associated with temporal complex partial seizures (CPS) and their utility in the localization and lateralization of seizure onset. CPS are particularly resistant to the standard antiepileptic drugs. Since surgical treatment is a therapeutical alternative in patients with intractable seizures, localization and lateralization of seizure origin are the principal aims in the preoperative assessment. Video-EEG monitorization has made possible characterization of ictal behaviour and correlation with cerebral regions generating the epileptic discharge. Therefore, ictal semiology has increased its importance in the localization and lateralization of seizures. The utility of auras, automatisms, motor manifestations, speech disturbances and autonomic features have been reviewed in relation to this approach. Viscerosensorial and experiential auras have been associated with temporal lobe epilepsy. The automatisms are not exclusive of temporal seizures and may be observed in frontal epilepsy and parietal and occipital seizures with spreading to temporal structures. There is not agreement in relation to head turning and version, therefore, this clinical sign should be used in correlation to other clinical manifestations. Distonic posturing, comprehensible ictal speech and postictal dysphasia appear to be the most reliable clinical signs in the lateralisation of temporal lobe seizures.

  16. Focal BOLD-fMRI changes in bicuculline-induced tonic-clonic seizures in the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSalvo, Matthew N.; Schridde, Ulrich; Mishra, Asht M.; Motelow, Joshua E.; Purcaro, Michael J.; Danielson, Nathan; Bai, Xiaoxiao; Hyder, Fahmeed; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2010-01-01

    Generalized tonic-clonic seizures cause widespread physiological changes throughout the cerebral cortex and subcortical structures in the brain. Using combined blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 9.4 T and electroencephalography (EEG) these changes can be characterized with high spatiotemporal resolution. We studied BOLD changes in anesthetized Wistar rats during bicuculline-induced tonic-clonic seizures. Bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, was injected systemically and seizure activity was observed on EEG as high amplitude, high-frequency polyspike discharges followed by clonic paroxysmal activity of lower frequency, with mean electrographic seizure duration of 349 s. Our aim was to characterize the spatial localization, direction, and timing of BOLD signal changes during the pre-ictal, ictal and post-ictal periods. Group analysis was performed across seizures using paired t-maps of BOLD signal superimposed on high resolution anatomical images. Regional analysis was then performed using volumes of interest to quantify BOLD timecourses. In the pre-ictal period we found focal BOLD increases in specific areas of somatosensory cortex (S1, S2) and thalamus several seconds before seizure onset. During seizures we observed BOLD increases in cortex, brainstem and thalamus and BOLD decreases in the hippocampus. The largest ictal BOLD increases remained in the focal regions of somatosensory cortex showing pre-ictal increases. During the post-ictal period we observed widespread BOLD decreases. These findings support a model in which “generalized” tonic-clonic seizures begin with focal changes before electrographic seizure onset, which progress to non-uniform changes during seizures, possibly shedding light on the etiology and pathophysiology of similar seizures in humans. PMID:20079442

  17. Focal BOLD fMRI changes in bicuculline-induced tonic-clonic seizures in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSalvo, Matthew N; Schridde, Ulrich; Mishra, Asht M; Motelow, Joshua E; Purcaro, Michael J; Danielson, Nathan; Bai, Xiaoxiao; Hyder, Fahmeed; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2010-04-15

    Generalized tonic-clonic seizures cause widespread physiological changes throughout the cerebral cortex and subcortical structures in the brain. Using combined blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 9.4 T and electroencephalography (EEG), these changes can be characterized with high spatiotemporal resolution. We studied BOLD changes in anesthetized Wistar rats during bicuculline-induced tonic-clonic seizures. Bicuculline, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, was injected systemically and seizure activity was observed on EEG as high-amplitude, high-frequency polyspike discharges followed by clonic paroxysmal activity of lower frequency, with mean electrographic seizure duration of 349 s. Our aim was to characterize the spatial localization, direction, and timing of BOLD signal changes during the pre-ictal, ictal and post-ictal periods. Group analysis was performed across seizures using paired t-maps of BOLD signal superimposed on high-resolution anatomical images. Regional analysis was then performed using volumes of interest to quantify BOLD timecourses. In the pre-ictal period we found focal BOLD increases in specific areas of somatosensory cortex (S1, S2) and thalamus several seconds before seizure onset. During seizures we observed BOLD increases in cortex, brainstem and thalamus and BOLD decreases in the hippocampus. The largest ictal BOLD increases remained in the focal regions of somatosensory cortex showing pre-ictal increases. During the post-ictal period we observed widespread BOLD decreases. These findings support a model in which "generalized" tonic-clonic seizures begin with focal changes before electrographic seizure onset, which progress to non-uniform changes during seizures, possibly shedding light on the etiology and pathophysiology of similar seizures in humans. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prediction of seizure control in non-ketotic hyperglycemic induced seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratipanawatr Thongchai

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the factors predictive for seizure control in non-ketotic hyperglycemic induced seizures (NKHS. Methods We studied 21 patients who were clinically diagnosed as NKHS at Khon Kaen University hospital, Thailand. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to identify the factors predictive for seizure control. Results Most patients had no previous history of diabetes and presented with repetitive partial seizures. The mean number of seizure attacks was 45 times prior to admission. The average duration to terminate seizure was 36 hours and significantly predicted by frequency of seizures (estimate 0.9, p value 0.013. Conclusion Frequency of seizures is the only predictive factor for the success of seizure control in NKHS.

  19. Prehospital Glucose Testing for Children with Seizures: A Proposed Change in Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remick, Katherine; Redgate, Christopher; Ostermayer, Daniel; Kaji, Amy H; Gausche-Hill, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    Many Emergency Medicine Services (EMS) protocols require point-of-care blood glucose testing (BGT) for any pediatric patient who presents with seizure or altered level of conscious. Few data describe the diagnostic yield of BGT when performed on all pediatric seizures regardless of presenting mental status. We analyzed a large single center dataset of pediatric patients presenting with prehospital seizures to determine the prevalence of hypoglycemic seizures and the utility of repeat BGT in the emergency department (ED). This was a retrospective, IRB-approved chart analysis of all pediatric patients (≤14 years) transported by EMS to the Harbor-UCLA pediatric ED over a 2-year period with a chief complaint of seizure. Cases were selected in which witnessed seizures had occurred in the field by family or EMS. Chart review included prehospital, nursing and physician records. Hypoglycemia was defined as blood glucose <60 mg/dL. Analysis included blood glucose, witnessed field seizure, initial mental status assessed by Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), and further mental status assessments, along with age, sex, and medical history. Medical records were reviewed for subsequent BGT and patient outcome. A total 770 children were transported by EMS due to seizures. Four patients (0.5%) had recorded hypoglycemia in the field, yet only two received treatment to raise blood glucose. Additionally, one child (0.1%) was normoglycemic (81 mg/dL) in the field with hypoglycemia (43 mg/dL) in the ED but required no intervention. Two were found by EMS to have an ALOC (GCS ≤ 12) and hypoglycemia. Only the patient with hypoglycemia secondary to a suspected glipizide ingestion received ED glucose administration. The most common discharge diagnosis was simple febrile seizure (38.6%). Hypoglycemia in the pediatric seizure patient is extremely rare, thus universal field BGT has low utility and potential downstream effects. We propose a novel algorithm for the initial evaluation and

  20. Evaluation of the Effect of Jobelyn® on Chemoconvulsants- Induced Seizure in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Umukoro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Epilepsy is a common central nervous system (CNS disorder characterized by seizures resulting from episodic neuronal discharges. The incidence of toxicity and refractoriness has compromised the clinical efficacy of the drugs currently used for the treatment of convulsions. Thus, there is a need to search for new medicines from plant origin that are readily available and safer for the control of seizures. Jobelyn® (JB is a unique African polyherbal preparation used by the natives to treat seizures in children. This investigation was carried out to evaluate whether JB has anti-seizure property in mice. Methods: The animals received JB (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg, p.o 30 min before induction of convulsions with intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of picrotoxin (6 mg/kg, strychnine (2 mg/ kg and pentylenetetrazole (85 mg/kg respectively. Diazepam (2 mg/kg, p.o. was used as the reference drug. Anti-seizure activities were assessed based on the ability of test drugs to prevent convulsions, death or to delay the onset of seizures in mice. Results: JB (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg, p.o could only delay the onset of seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole (85 mg/kg, i.p. in mice. However, it did not offer any protection against seizure episodes, as it failed to prevent the animals, from exhibiting tonic-clonic convulsions caused by pentylenetetrazole (85 mg/kg, i.p., strychnine (2 mg/kg or picrotoxin (6 mg/kg, i.p.. On the other hand, diazepam (2 mg/kg, p.o., offered 100% protection against convulsive seizures, induced by pentylenetetrazole (85 mg/kg, i.p.. However, it failed to prevent seizures produced by strychnine (2 mg/kg, i.p. or picrotoxin (6 mg/kg, i.p.. Discussion: Our results suggest that JB could not prevent the examined chemoconvulsants-induced convulsions. However, its ability to delay the latency to seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole suggests that JB might be effective in the control of the seizure spread in epileptic brains.

  1. Seizure characteristics of epilepsy in childhood after acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuji; Natsume, Jun; Kidokoro, Hiroyuki; Ishihara, Naoko; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Tsuji, Takeshi; Okumura, Akihisa; Kubota, Tetsuo; Ando, Naoki; Saitoh, Shinji; Miura, Kiyokuni; Negoro, Tamiko; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi; Kojima, Seiji

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify characteristics of post-encephalopathic epilepsy (PEE) in children after acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD), paying particular attention to precise diagnosis of seizure types. Among 262 children with acute encephalopathy/encephalitis registered in a database of the Tokai Pediatric Neurology Society between 2005 and 2012, 44 were diagnosed with AESD according to the clinical course and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and were included in this study. Medical records were reviewed to investigate clinical data, MRI findings, neurologic outcomes, and presence or absence of PEE. Seizure types of PEE were determined by both clinical observation by pediatric neurologists and ictal video-electroencephalography (EEG) recordings. Of the 44 patients after AESD, 10 (23%) had PEE. The period between the onset of encephalopathy and PEE ranged from 2 to 39 months (median 8.5 months). Cognitive impairment was more severe in patients with PEE than in those without. Biphasic seizures and status epilepticus during the acute phase of encephalopathy did not influence the risk of PEE. The most common seizure type of PEE on clinical observation was focal seizures (n = 5), followed by epileptic spasms (n = 4), myoclonic seizures (n = 3), and tonic seizures (n = 2). In six patients with PEE, seizures were induced by sudden unexpected sounds. Seizure types confirmed by ictal video-EEG recordings were epileptic spasms and focal seizures with frontal onset, and all focal seizures were startle seizures induced by sudden acoustic stimulation. Intractable daily seizures remain in six patients with PEE. We demonstrate seizure characteristics of PEE in children after AESD. Epileptic spasms and startle focal seizures are common seizure types. The specific seizure types may be determined by the pattern of diffuse subcortical white matter injury in AESD and age-dependent reorganization of the brain

  2. Usefulness of ketogenic diet in a girl with migrating partial seizures in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Tatsuo; Imai, Katsumi; Oboshi, Taikan; Fujiwara, Yuh; Takeshita, Saoko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Inoue, Yushi

    2016-06-01

    Migrating partial seizures in infancy (MPSI) are an age-specific epilepsy syndrome characterized by migrating focal seizures, which are intractable to various antiepileptic drugs and cause severe developmental delay. We report a case of MPSI with heterozygous missense mutation in KCNT1, which was successfully managed by ketogenic diet. At age 2months, the patient developed epilepsy initially manifesting focal seizures with eye deviation and apnea, then evolving to secondarily generalized clonic convulsion. Various antiepileptic drugs including phenytoin, valproic acid, zonisamide, clobazam, levetiracetam, vitamin B6, and carbamazepine were not effective, but high-dose phenobarbital allowed discontinuation of midazolam infusion. Ictal scalp electroencephalogram showed migrating focal seizures. MPSI was suspected and she was transferred to our hospital for further treatment. Potassium bromide (KBr) was partially effective, but the effect was transient. High-dose KBr caused severe adverse effects such as over-sedation and hypercapnia, with no further effects on the seizures. At age 9months, we started a ketogenic diet, which improved seizure frequency and severity without obvious adverse effects, allowing her to be discharged from hospital. Ketogenic diet should be tried in patients with MPSI unresponsive to antiepileptic drugs. In MPSI, the difference in treatment response in patients with and those without KCNT1 mutation remains unknown. Accumulation of case reports would contribute to establish effective treatment options for MPSI. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Complex seizure disorder caused by Brunol4 deficiency in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yang

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic epilepsy is a common human disorder with a strong genetic component, usually exhibiting complex inheritance. We describe a new mouse mutation in C57BL/6J mice, called frequent-flyer (Ff, in which disruption of the gene encoding RNA-binding protein Bruno-like 4 (Brunol4 leads to limbic and severe tonic-clonic seizures in heterozygous mutants beginning in their third month. Younger heterozygous adults have a reduced seizure threshold. Although homozygotes do not survive well on the C57BL/6J background, on mixed backgrounds homozygotes and some heterozygotes also display spike-wave discharges, the electroencephalographic manifestation of absence epilepsy. Brunol4 is widely expressed in the brain with enrichment in the hippocampus. Gene expression profiling and subsequent analysis revealed the down-regulation of at least four RNA molecules encoding proteins known to be involved in neuroexcitability, particularly in mutant hippocampus. Genetic and phenotypic assessment suggests that Brunol4 deficiency in mice results in a complex seizure phenotype, likely due to the coordinate dysregulation of several molecules, providing a unique new animal model of epilepsy that mimics the complex genetic architecture of common disease.

  4. The effect of Rosa damascena essential oil on the amygdala electrical kindling seizures in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Roohollah; Moghimi, Ali; Rakhshandeh, Hassan; Ejtehadi, Hamid; Kheirabadi, Masoumeh

    2008-03-01

    We investigated the effect of Rosa damascena Mill, essential oil on the development of induced amygdala kindling seizures. Male Wistar rats were implanted with one tripolar and two monopolar electrodes in right basolateral amygdala and dura surface, respectively. The control group was injected solvent of essential oil and two experimental groups were injected 750 and 1000 mg kg(-1) of essential oil (ip), 30 min before a daily kindling stimulation. The number of stimulations required for the first appearance of seizure stages was significantly larger in two experimental groups than in control group. Mean after discharge duration was significantly different and essential oil reduced the increase of after discharge duration. Mean after discharge amplitude was also shorter in the groups treated with essential oil than in control group. Duration time for 5th stage of seizure at fully-kindled rats was significantly shorter in two experimental groups than control group. These results suggest that Rosa damascena essential oil significantly retarded the development of seizure stages and possesses the ability to counteract kindling acquisition. The flavonoids of Rosa damascena may act via GABAA receptors as previous studies have proposed for flavonoids of other medicinal plants. More detailed studies are recommended to define the effective component(s) of Rosa on different types of epilepsy.

  5. Emergent diagnostic testing for pediatric nonfebrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Ashley M; Gill, Vikramjit S; Witting, Michael D; Teshome, Getachew

    2015-09-01

    Guidelines from the American Academy of Neurology recommend laboratory studies or computed tomography (CT) for children who experience a nonfebrile seizure if anything in their history suggests a clinically significant abnormality. To ascertain if any patient or seizure characteristics are associated with a greater likelihood that laboratory studies or CT scan will yield clinically significant results. This retrospective case series reviewed 93 children with nonfebrile seizure, who were evaluated in an urban pediatric emergency department (ED) between July 2007 and June 2011. Laboratory studies were performed in 87% of the study group; 7% of those tests gave clinically significant results. Computed tomographic scans were obtained in 35% of our patients; 9% showed clinically significant findings. Presence of an active seizure in the ED or a first nonfebrile seizure had an 8% and 11% difference, respectively, for clinically significant laboratory abnormality. Children younger than 2 years showed a 7% difference of clinically significant laboratory abnormality. This study did not identify statistically significant predictors of laboratory or CT abnormalities for children with nonfebrile seizure presenting to the ED. Age less than 2years, having an active seizure in the ED, and experiencing a first-time seizure showed a trend toward an increased yield of laboratory testing. In accordance with the American Academy of Neurology guidelines, we conclude that the history of a child's present illness preceding the nonfebrile seizure, not characteristics of the seizure, should be used to determine the need for further testing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical Features of Late-Onset Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eda Derle

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We aimed to evaluate the types of seziures, etiological factors, effectiveness and adverse effects of antiepileptic treatment in the elderly. METHODS: We evaluated the medical data of the 138 patients, who had their first seizure above the age of 65, and admitted to our clinic between years 2011-2013. We determined the type of seizure, etiological factors, seizure reccurence, antiepileptic treatment, adverse effects of the treatment and the rate of patients who were seizure free at the last visit RESULTS: In the 138 patients, whose mean age was 75,62±7.2 years at the time of first seizure, we found the most common seizure type was generalized seizure and the most common etiologic factor was cerebrovascular diseases. Levetirasetam was the most used antiepileptic drug, and for the overall group the rate of adverse effect of the antiepileptic drugs were 20.3%. At the last visit, 89.9% of the patients were seizure free with a mean time of 17.8±22.7 months. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: In conclusion, symptomatic seizures were common in elderly with better response to antiepileptic drugs and usually monotheraphy was sufficent for maintanence of the seizure free period. The side effects and drug interactionsmust be taken into account while choosing the antiepileptic treatment, since the comorbid diseases and multiple drug usage is common in elderly

  7. Smartphone applications for seizure management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandher, Puneet Singh; Bhullar, Karamdeep Kaur

    2016-06-01

    Technological advancements continue to provide innovative ways of enhancing patient care in medicine. In particular, the growing popularity of smartphone technology has seen the recent emergence of a myriad of healthcare applications (or apps) that promise to help shape the way in which health information is delivered to people worldwide. While limited research already exists on a range of such apps, our study is the first to examine the salient features of smartphone applications as they apply to the area of seizure management. For the purposes of this review, we conducted a search of the official online application stores of the five major smartphone platforms: iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Windows Mobile and Nokia-Symbian. Apps were included if they reported to contain some information or tools relating to seizure management and excluded if they were aimed exclusively at health professionals. A total of 28 applications met these criteria. Overall, we found an increasing number of epilepsy apps available on the smartphone market, but with only a minority offering comprehensive educational information alongside tools such as seizure diaries, medication tracking and/or video recording. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. New-onset seizures in pediatric emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Chang, Yu-Jun; Wu, Han-Ping

    2010-04-01

    Seizures account for 1% of all pediatric emergency department (ED) visits. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical spectrum and prevalence rates of various etiologies in children with a first attack of acute seizure disorder in the ED. We evaluated 319 children who presented to the ED at the Changhua Children's Hospital with a first attack of seizure disorder from 2005 to 2007. Variables including demographics, clinical presentations, laboratory tests, brain imaging studies, electroencephalography, diagnoses and hospital course were compared between patients with seizures and fever, and patients with seizures without fever. These variables were also compared between patients with simple and complex febrile seizures and among different age groups. Among these 319 patients, 218 (68%) presented with seizures and fever and 299 (94%) children were younger than 6 years of age. Generalized tonic-clonic seizures were the most common type (71.2%). Febrile seizures (62.1%) were the main etiology of the first seizure (p Seizures caused by severe electrolyte imbalance or hypoglycemia were noted in three patients. Abnormal brain images were noted in 16 (26%) of 61 patients, most (12/16, 75%) of whom had abnormal histories and physical or neurologic examinations. Primary care pediatricians should evaluate children presenting to the ED with a first seizure for age, coexistence of fever, seizure type, associated symptoms and history of head injury. We suggest that electrolytes, blood sugar and emergent brain imaging studies should be arranged based on detailed history-taking and thorough physical examinations, but should not be performed routinely. Copyright 2010 Taiwan Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Stereotactic radiosurgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discharge; Linear accelerator - discharge; Lineacs - discharge; Proton beam radiosurgery - discharge ... You received stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), or radiotherapy. This is a form of radiation therapy that focuses high-powered x-rays onto a small ...

  10. Atrial fibrillation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auricular fibrillation - discharge; A-fib - discharge; AF - discharge; Afib - discharge ... Avoid salty and fatty foods. Stay away from fast-food restaurants. ... how to check your pulse, and check it every day. It is better ...

  11. Medication Discrepancies at Pediatric Hospital Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattari, Theresa B; Krieger, Lauren N; Hu, Hsou Mei; Mychaliska, Kerry P

    2015-08-01

    The pediatric hospital discharge process presents significant challenges, and medication discrepancies remain an unsolved problem. The purpose of this study was to determine the discrepancy rates at the time of discharge when multiple sources of medication documentation exist, and to characterize the medication discrepancies into error type, medication category, and discharge summary authorship. A prospective study was performed on pediatric patients admitted to a general inpatient floor for >24 hours. After discharge, medication lists were obtained from the patients' parent/guardian, discharge summary, and Patient Summary List, a medication list that is part of the electronic medical record. These 3 medication lists were then compared with the pharmacy record to identify discrepancies, defined as any difference in medication name, dose, route, or frequency. Medication discrepancies were analyzed in terms of error type (dosage or addition/omission), category of medication, and final signers of the discharge summary. Sixty-nine patient charts were analyzed, and 8% of medications contained a documentation discrepancy between sources. Overall, 26% (18 of 69) of the charts contained ≥1 discrepant medication; the Patient Summary List had the highest rate of discrepancy at 29%. Allergy (27%) and seizure medications (25%) were the categories with the highest rates of discrepancy. Addition/omission errors were much more common than dosage errors. Medication discrepancies exist in inpatient documentation at the time of pediatric hospital discharge when multiple sources of documentation exist. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. Febrile seizures and risk of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mogens; Pedersen, Carsten Bøcker; Christensen, Jakob

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Febrile seizure is a benign condition for most children, but experiments in animals and neuroimaging studies in humans suggest that some febrile seizures may damage the hippocampus, a brain area of possible importance in schizophrenia. METHODS: A population-based cohort of all childre...... among persons with a history of febrile seizures. The association may be due to a damaging effect of prolonged febrile seizures on the developing brain, shared etiological factors, or confounding by unmeasured factors......BACKGROUND: Febrile seizure is a benign condition for most children, but experiments in animals and neuroimaging studies in humans suggest that some febrile seizures may damage the hippocampus, a brain area of possible importance in schizophrenia. METHODS: A population-based cohort of all children...

  13. Overview: definitions and classifications of seizure emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellock, John M

    2007-05-01

    Seizure emergencies are potentially life-threatening events that are under-recognized. Status epilepticus is associated with considerable rates of morbidity and mortality. Experts currently believe that any episode of seizure activity lasting 5 minutes or longer should be considered status epilepticus. Treatment should be initiated as early as possible; evidence has shown that once seizures persist for 5 to 10 minutes, they are unlikely to stop on their own in the subsequent few minutes. Prehospital treatment with benzodiazepines has been shown to reduce seizure activity significantly compared with seizures that remain untreated until the patient reaches the emergency department. The consequences of delayed treatment of status epilepticus include a serious risk of subsequent prolonged seizure activity or epileptogenesis, memory deficits, and learning difficulties. The importance of timely intervention in generalized tonic-clonic status epilepticus must be emphasized. Recent research has found that emergency department personnel fail to recognize the condition in children in 34% of cases.

  14. Channel selection for automatic seizure detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Jonas; Kjaer, Troels Wesenberg; Madsen, Rasmus Elsborg

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the performance of epileptic seizure detection using only a few of the recorded EEG channels and the ability of software to select these channels compared with a neurophysiologist. Methods: Fifty-nine seizures and 1419 h of interictal EEG are used for training and testing...... of an automatic channel selection method. The characteristics of the seizures are extracted by the use of a wavelet analysis and classified by a support vector machine. The best channel selection method is based upon maximum variance during the seizure. Results: Using only three channels, a seizure detection...... sensitivity of 96% and a false detection rate of 0.14/h were obtained. This corresponds to the performance obtained when channels are selected through visual inspection by a clinical neurophysiologist, and constitutes a 4% improvement in sensitivity compared to seizure detection using channels recorded...

  15. Low glycemic index treatment for seizures in Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibert, Ronald L; Pfeifer, Heidi H; Larson, Anna M; Raby, Annabel R; Reynolds, Ashley A; Morgan, Amy K; Thiele, Elizabeth A

    2012-09-01

    The low glycemic index treatment (LGIT) is a high fat, limited carbohydrate diet used in the treatment of epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of the LGIT for the treatment of refractory seizures in pediatric patients with Angelman syndrome. A pediatric Angelman syndrome cohort with refractory epilepsy was treated with the LGIT and followed prospectively over 4 months. Parents recorded a daily seizure log for a minimum of 1 month prior to the start of treatment as well as throughout the LGIT trial. Electroencephalography (EEG) and neuropsychological assessments (Scales of Independent Behavior-Revised and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-2nd Edition were obtained for each subject at both baseline and 4-month follow-up time points. Clinical evaluations of subjects were completed by a neurologist and dietitian at the time of enrollment, as well as following both the first and fourth months of dietary therapy. At each time point, blood for laboratory chemistries was drawn and anthropometric measures were obtained. Six children (mean age 3.3 years, range 1.1-4.8) with genetically confirmed Angelman syndrome initiated the LGIT, and completed the trial with no significant adverse events. Cohort averages for indices of seizure severity were as follows: age of 1.6 years at seizure onset, 3 lifetime antiepileptic drugs tried (range 1-6), and baseline seizure frequency of 10.1 events/week (range: 0.4-30.9). All subjects had a decrease in seizure frequency on the LGIT, with five of six exhibiting >80% seizure frequency reduction. All posttrial EEG studies showed improvement and three of four children with epileptiform activity on his or her baseline EEG had no discharges present on follow-up EEG. Developmental gains were noted by parents in all cases, although few of these neurocognitive gains were statistically significant on neuropsychological assessment. This is the first prospective study assessing the LGIT for epilepsy. Our

  16. 19 CFR 162.22 - Seizure of conveyances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure of conveyances. 162.22 Section 162.22... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Seizures § 162.22 Seizure of conveyances. (a) General applicability. If it shall appear to any officer authorized to board conveyances and make seizures that there...

  17. Seizure Recognition and Observation: A Guide for Allied Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epilepsy Foundation of America, Landover, MD.

    Intended for allied health professionals, this guide provides information on seizure recognition and classification to help them assist the patient, the family, and the treating physician in obtaining control of epileptic seizures. A section on seizure recognition describes epilepsy and seizures, covering seizure classification and the causes of…

  18. Emergency Management of Seizures in the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Christine; O'Hara, Kathryn; Kiel, Sarah; McCullough, Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    Effective seizure management in the school setting is a critical issue for students with seizures, as well as their parents, classmates, and school personnel. The unpredictable nature of seizures and the potential outcomes of experiencing a seizure in school are sources of anxiety for students with seizures. The ability to respond appropriately to…

  19. Orgasm Induced Seizures: A Rare Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaukimath, SP; Patil, PS

    2015-01-01

    A variety of stimuli can cause reflex seizures, Some triggers include light, music and cognitive phenomenon. There are case reports however where the phenomenon of sexual activity has been a trigger for epileptic seizures. Most of these cases reported are in women so far, and were found to be localized to right cerebral hemisphere. We report a case of a 36-year-old male with orgasm-induced seizures, with other atypical features compared to majority of previous reports. PMID:27057393

  20. Orgasm Induced Seizures: A Rare Phenomenon

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006;47:2193‑7. 6. Janszky J, Ebner A, Szupera Z, Schulz R, Hollo A,. Szücs A, et al. Orgasmic aura – A report of seven cases. Seizure. 2004;13:441‑4. 7. Sengupta A, Mahmoud A, Tun SZ, Goulding P. Orgasm‑induced seizures: Male studied with ictal electroencephalography. Seizure 2010;19:306‑9. 8. Bancaud J, Favel P, ...

  1. Internal derangement as a predictor of provoked pain on mouth opening: A magnetic resonance imaging study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ha-Na; Kim, Kyoung-A

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the relationship between pain and internal derangement in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods This study analyzed 356 TMD patients (712 temporomandibular joints [TMJs]). The inclusion criteria were the presence of spontaneous or provoked pain on one or both TMJs and having undergone MRI. The patients with provoked pain were divided into 3 groups: pain on palpation, pain on mouth opening, and pain on mastication. MRI was performed using a 1.5-T scanner. T1- and T2-weighted parasagittal and paracoronal images were obtained. According to the findings on the T1-weighted images, another 3 groups were created based on internal derangement: normal, disc displacement with reduction, and disc displacement without reduction. The MRI findings were independently interpreted by 2 experienced oral and maxillofacial radiologists at 2 different times. Statistical analysis was performed by the chi-square test using SPSS (version 12.0; SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results Provoked pain on mouth opening was found to be correlated with internal derangement in TMD patients (Ppain and provoked pain on palpation or mastication were not associated with internal derangement (P>.05). Conclusion These results suggest that internal derangement was a significant predictor of provoked pain on mouth opening. PMID:29279820

  2. Myoclonic Absence Seizures in Dravet Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kenneth A; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2017-05-01

    Dravet syndrome is a developmental and epileptic encephalopathy that occurs as a result of SCN1A mutations in more than 80% of affected individuals. The core clinical features of Dravet syndrome include febrile and afebrile seizures beginning before 12 months; multiple seizure types, usually medically refractory, including hemiclonic, generalized tonic-clonic, focal impaired awareness, myoclonic, and absence seizures; status epilepticus; and normal early development with plateau or regression by age two years. Myoclonic absence seizures have not previously been described. This 20-year-old man had infantile-onset epilepsy with the classical clinical features of Dravet syndrome and a de novo A1326P SCN1A mutation. By five years of age, photosensitive myoclonic absence seizures had become his dominant seizure type, occurring up to 20 times per day. The seizures were refractory to multiple antiepileptic medications and a vagus nerve stimulator. Although photosensitivity is well recognized in Dravet syndrome, myoclonic absence seizures have not been previously reported. This rare seizure type may be underreported in Dravet syndrome, as the myoclonic features may be subtle and can be missed if thorough history taking and video recordings are not available. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Flumazenil and seizures: analysis of 43 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, W H

    1992-01-01

    Flumazenil is a new drug indicated for the reversal of the sedative effects of benzodiazepines mediated at the benzodiazepine-receptor site. Worldwide sources to date have disclosed 43 cases of seizures related, at least temporally, to the intravenous administration of flumazenil. There was no apparent relationship between the dose of flumazenil and the development of seizures, which occurred at doses ranging from 0.2 to 10.0 mg. The seizures were not considered to be a toxic effect of flumazenil, but many of them probably were due to an unmasking of the anticonvulsant effect of the previously used benzodiazepine or to a severe benzodiazepine-withdrawal syndrome. Eighteen (42%) of the patients had ingested overdoses of cyclic antidepressants, which were considered responsible for the seizures. In addition to patients with concurrent cyclic antidepressant poisoning, high-risk populations include patients who have been treated with benzodiazepines for a seizure disorder or an acute convulsive episode, patients with concurrent major sedative-hypnotic drug withdrawal, patients who have recently been treated with repeated doses of parenteral benzodiazepines, and overdose patients with myoclonic jerking or seizure activity before flumazenil administration. To minimize the likelihood of a seizure, it is recommended that flumazenil not be administered to patients who have used benzodiazepines for the treatment of seizure disorders or to patients who have ingested drugs (eg, cyclic antidepressants, cocaine, lithium, methylxanthines, isoniazid, propoxyphene, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, buproprion HCl, and cyclosporine) that place them at risk for the development of seizures.

  4. Involvement of fast-spiking cells in ictal sequences during spontaneous seizures in rats with chronic temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Adam R; Raedt, Robrecht; Steenland, Hendrik W; Sprengers, Mathieu; Bzymek, Katarzyna; Navratilova, Zaneta; Mesina, Lilia; Xie, Jeanne; Lapointe, Valerie; Kloosterman, Fabian; Vonck, Kristl; Boon, Paul A J M; Soltesz, Ivan; McNaughton, Bruce L; Luczak, Artur

    2017-09-01

    See Lenck-Santini (doi:10.1093/awx205) for a scientific commentary on this article. Epileptic seizures represent altered neuronal network dynamics, but the temporal evolution and cellular substrates of the neuronal activity patterns associated with spontaneous seizures are not fully understood. We used simultaneous recordings from multiple neurons in the hippocampus and neocortex of rats with chronic temporal lobe epilepsy to demonstrate that subsets of cells discharge in a highly stereotypical sequential pattern during ictal events, and that these stereotypical patterns were reproducible across consecutive seizures. In contrast to the canonical view that principal cell discharges dominate ictal events, the ictal sequences were predominantly composed of fast-spiking, putative inhibitory neurons, which displayed unusually strong coupling to local field potential even before seizures. The temporal evolution of activity was characterized by unique dynamics where the most correlated neuronal pairs before seizure onset displayed the largest increases in correlation strength during the seizures. These results demonstrate the selective involvement of fast spiking interneurons in structured temporal sequences during spontaneous ictal events in hippocampal and neocortical circuits in experimental models of chronic temporal lobe epilepsy. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  5. Semiology of temporal lobe seizures: value in lateralizing the seizure focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, W J; Laxer, K D

    1998-07-01

    To determine the lateralizing value of the clinical manifestations of seizures in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), we made a retrospective videotape analysis of complex partial seizures (CPS) in 55 patients who underwent temporal lobectomy and were seizure-free postoperatively for >2 years. Blinded to clinical details, we reviewed videotapes from video-EEG telemetry monitoring with attention paid to seizure semiology. Useful lateralizing features included unilateral clonic activity (with the seizure focus contralateral in all patients), unilateral dystonic or tonic posturing (with the seizure focus contralateral in 90 and 86%, respectively), unilateral automatisms (with the seizure focus ipsilateral in 80%), and ictal speech preservation (with the seizure focus contralateral to the language-dominant hemisphere in 80%). Versive head rotation occurring head movements occurring at times other than immediately before seizures secondarily generalized. In TLE, several clinical seizure manifestations are useful in lateralizing the seizure focus, although some provide no reliable information. Therefore, ictal semiology can assist in the evaluation of patients for seizure surgery, providing additional information in the lateralization of TLE.

  6. Deep Recurrent Neural Networks for seizure detection and early seizure detection systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talathi, S. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-06-05

    Epilepsy is common neurological diseases, affecting about 0.6-0.8 % of world population. Epileptic patients suffer from chronic unprovoked seizures, which can result in broad spectrum of debilitating medical and social consequences. Since seizures, in general, occur infrequently and are unpredictable, automated seizure detection systems are recommended to screen for seizures during long-term electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings. In addition, systems for early seizure detection can lead to the development of new types of intervention systems that are designed to control or shorten the duration of seizure events. In this article, we investigate the utility of recurrent neural networks (RNNs) in designing seizure detection and early seizure detection systems. We propose a deep learning framework via the use of Gated Recurrent Unit (GRU) RNNs for seizure detection. We use publicly available data in order to evaluate our method and demonstrate very promising evaluation results with overall accuracy close to 100 %. We also systematically investigate the application of our method for early seizure warning systems. Our method can detect about 98% of seizure events within the first 5 seconds of the overall epileptic seizure duration.

  7. [Epileptic seizures during childbirth in a patient with idiopathic generalised epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voermans, N C; Zwarts, M J; Renier, W O; Bloem, B R

    2005-06-18

    During her first pregnancy, a 37-year-old woman with idiopathic generalised epilepsy that was adequately controlled with lamotrigine experienced a series of epileptic seizures following an elective caesarean section. The attacks were terminated with diazepam. The following day, she developed EEG-confirmed status epilepticus, for which midazolam was administered intravenously. No further attacks were observed and the patient was later discharged in good condition with a healthy newborn son. She remained on lamotrigine therapy. At the end of her second pregnancy, the patient again experienced tonic-clonic seizures. The dosage of lamotrigine was increased and the patient received clonazepam intravenously, but a new seizure quickly occurred. Following an emergency caesarean section with midazolam treatment, a healthy daughter was born. No further attacks were observed. This case history illustrates the occurrence of adult idiopathic generalised epilepsy and highlights the problems that can arise late in pregnancy and during childbirth.

  8. Provokative Elemente einer Didaktik internetgestützter Lehr-Lernarrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Müskens

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Onlinebasiertes kollaboratives Lernen erfordert eine neue Rolle der Lehrenden und damit verbunden auch neue didaktische Methoden. Ausgehend vom Begriff der Provokation wird eine solche Didaktik in Abgrenzung zur Vorstellung eines ausschliesslich selbstgesteuerten Lernens entwickelt. Provokation wird in diesem Zusammenhang als die intendierte Konfrontation eines Lernenden mit einstellungskonträrem Material verstanden. Die Grundlagen der hier vorgestellten Didaktik werden aus einer Vielzahl theoretischer Wurzeln und empirischer Forschungsergebnisse hergeleitet: Es wird auf die Beziehung zum Kompetenzbegriff, zur Systemtheorie, zur Emotionspsychologie, zur Induzierung kognitiver Konflikte, zur Dissonanztheorie und zu Kellys Theorie der persönlichen Konstrukte eingegangen. Als konkrete Methoden der provokativen Didaktik für das E-Learning werden u. a. provokative Statements, das Induzieren einstellungskonträrer Perspektiven und eine an die «Fixed-Role-Therapy» angelehnte Aufgabenstellung diskutiert. Die Methoden der provokativen Didaktik bedeuten eine hochgradige Individualisierung des Lernens und eine Intensivierung des Verhältnisses zwischen Lerner und Lehrendem.

  9. Intrusions and provoked and spontaneous confabulations on memory tests in Korsakoff's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensen, Yvonne C M; Oosterman, Joukje M; Walvoort, Serge J W; Eling, Paul A T M; Kessels, Roy P C

    2017-03-01

    Intrusions on verbal memory tests have been used as an index for clinical confabulation. Severe memory impairments in combination with executive dysfunction have been suggested to be the underlying mechanism of confabulation, but to date, this relation is unclear. The aim of this study was (a) to examine the relation between (different types of) intrusions and confabulations in a large sample of confabulating patients with Korsakoff's syndrome (KS) and (b) to investigate whether different measures of executive functioning and memory performance are related to provoked and spontaneous confabulation. The Dutch version of the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) and various executive function and memory tests were administered to a group of 51 confabulating patients with KS. Professional caregivers rated the severity of provoked and spontaneous confabulation behavior of the patients using the Nijmegen-Venray Confabulation List-20 (NVCL-20). The total number of intrusions on the CVLT was not related to either provoked or spontaneous confabulation scores. None of the CVLT intrusion scores correlated significantly with any of the confabulation scores, but we did find small-to-medium, positive correlations between unrelated intrusions and both provoked confabulations and spontaneous confabulation. Provoked confabulation behavior was associated with executive dysfunction and poorer memory performances. Spontaneous confabulation was not related to performance on measures of executive function and memory. The total number of intrusions on verbal memory tests and clinical confabulations appear to be different phenomena. Only unrelated intrusions produced on the CVLT might possibly be related to confabulations. The production of provoked, but not spontaneous, confabulation is associated with executive dysfunction and memory deficits.

  10. All together now: Analogies between chimera state collapses and epileptic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejak, Ralph G.; Rummel, Christian; Mormann, Florian; Schindler, Kaspar

    2016-03-01

    Conceptually and structurally simple mathematical models of coupled oscillator networks can show a rich variety of complex dynamics, providing fundamental insights into many real-world phenomena. A recent and not yet fully understood example is the collapse of coexisting synchronous and asynchronous oscillations into a globally synchronous motion found in networks of identical oscillators. Here we show that this sudden collapse is promoted by a further decrease of synchronization, rather than by critically high synchronization. This strikingly counterintuitive mechanism can be found also in nature, as we demonstrate on epileptic seizures in humans. Analyzing spatiotemporal correlation profiles derived from intracranial electroencephalographic recordings (EEG) of seizures in epilepsy patients, we found a pronounced decrease of correlation at the seizure onsets. Applying our findings in a closed-loop control scheme to models of coupled oscillators in chimera states, we succeed in both provoking and preventing outbreaks of global synchronization. Our findings not only advance the understanding of networks of coupled dynamics but can open new ways to control them, thus offering a vast range of potential new applications.

  11. Ecstatic epileptic seizures: a glimpse into the multiple roles of the insula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eGschwind

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ecstatic epileptic seizures are a rare but compelling epileptic entity. During the first seconds of these seizures, ecstatic auras provoke feelings of well-being, intense serenity, bliss, and enhanced self-awareness. They are associated with the impression of time dilation, and can be described as a mystic experience by some patients. The functional neuroanatomy of ecstatic seizures is still debated. During recent years several patients presenting with ecstatic auras have been reported by others and us (in total n=49; a few of them in the setting of presurgical evaluation including electrical brain stimulation. According to the recently recognized functions of the insula, and the results of nuclear brain imaging and electrical stimulation, the ecstatic symptoms in these patients seem to localize to a functional network centered around the anterior insular cortex, where we thus propose to locate this rare ictal phenomenon. Here we summarize the role of the multiple sensory, autonomic, affective and cognitive functions of the insular cortex, which are integrated into the creation of self-awareness, and we suggest how this system may become dysfunctional on several levels during ecstatic aura.

  12. Impact of sleep on the localizing value of video EEG in patients with refractory focal seizures - a prospective video-EEG with EOG and submental EMG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shaily; Shukla, Garima; Goyal, Vinay; Srivastava, Achal K; Singh, Mamta B; Vibha, Deepti; Behari, Madhuri

    2014-12-01

    To examine the role of sleep and its stages on the localizing value of video EEG in the evaluation of refractory focal seizures. Video-electroencephalographic (VEEG) evaluation with additional polygraphic recording was carried out for 70 consecutive patients with refractory focal epilepsy, undergoing pre-surgical evaluation, over a two-year period. Localization of video EEG for each seizure was made based on clinical, ictal and interictal data. Seizure localization in each patient was assessed for concordance with MRI and other imaging data (SPECT, PET) for both wake and sleep seizures. Interictal discharges in sleep and wake were similarly compared for concordance with imaging data. A total of 608 seizures were recorded in 70 patients, 289 in sleep. Overall, concordance with imaging data was found in 218 out of 322 wake seizures (67.8%) and in 157 out of 286 sleep seizures (54.8%) (p=0.0314). On analyzing the subset of patients with seizures recorded in both wake and sleep states (total 279 seizures recorded, 113 out of sleep), concordance was observed in 93 out of 166 (56%) wake seizures and in 80 out of 113 (70.7%) sleep seizures (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.17 to 3.56; p 0.007). Interictal discharges were more common and more precisely localizing in sleep, mostly in stage N2. This prospective VEEG-PSG study demonstrates the role of sleep versus wake state in the localizing value of different components of long-term VEEG recording for patients with medically refractory epilepsy. Our findings show that while wake state ictal EEG has more localizing value in a mixed group of patients, sleep ictal and interictal EEG is significantly more useful in patients who have seizures recorded both during wake and sleep states. In addition, interictal discharges recorded during NREM sleep have high localizing value. This is only the second study elucidating the effect of sleep on the localizing value of video-electroencephalographic evaluation of patients with medically refractory

  13. Autism Spectrum Disorder: Correlation between aberrant behaviors, EEG abnormalities and seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Elena Hartley-McAndrew

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between epilepsy, epileptiform discharges, cognitive, language and behavioral symptoms is not clearly understood. Since difficulties with socialization and maladaptive behaviors are found in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD, we inquired whether epileptiform activity and seizures are associated with adverse behavioral manifestations in this population. We reviewed our EEG database between 1999-2006, and identified 123 children with ASD. EEG abnormalities were found in 39 children (31%. A control group of age and gender matched ASD children with normal EEG’s was obtained. Packets of questionnaires including the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale II (VABS, Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC and the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS were sent by mail. Out of 21 packets received, 11 had normal and 10 had abnormal EEG’s. There were no statistically significant differences in behavior between the two groups. Statistical analysis of discharge location and frequency did not reveal a significant trend. However, children with ASD and seizures had statistically significant lower scores in VABS daily living (P=0.009 and socialization (P=0.007 as compared to those without seizures. ASD children with seizures had higher ABC levels of hyperactivity and irritability. Differences in irritability scores nearly reached statistical significance (P=0.058. There was no significant difference in the degree of CARS autism rating between the groups. Our study did not reveal statistically significant differences in behaviors between ASD children with and without EEG abnormalities. However, ASD children with seizures revealed significantly worse behaviors as compared to counterparts without seizures.

  14. Functional Network Connectivity Patterns between Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy with Myoclonic and Absence Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifu Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The extensive cerebral cortex and subcortical structures are considered as the major regions related to the generalized epileptiform discharges in idiopathic generalized epilepsy. However, various clinical syndromes and electroencephalogram (EEG signs exist across generalized seizures, such as the loss of consciousness during absence seizures (AS and the jerk of limbs during myoclonic seizures (MS. It is presumed that various functional systems affected by discharges lead to the difference in syndromes of these seizures. Twenty epileptic patients with MS, 21 patients with AS, and 21 healthy controls were recruited in this study. The functional network connectivity was analyzed based on the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. The statistical analysis was performed in three groups to assess the difference in the functional brain networks in two types of generalized seizures. Twelve resting-state networks were identified in three groups. Both patient groups showed common abnormalities, including decreased functional connectivity in salience network (SN, cerebellum network, and primary perceptional networks and decreased connection between SN and visual network, compared with healthy controls. Interestingly, the frontal part of high-level cognitive resting-state networks showed increased functional connectivity (FC in patients with MS, but decreased FC in patients with AS. Moreover, patients with MS showed decreased negative connections between high-level cognitive networks and primary system. The common alteration in both patient groups, including SN, might reflect a similar mechanism associated with the loss of consciousness during generalized seizures. This study provided the evidence of brain network in generalized epilepsy to understand the difference between MS and AS.

  15. Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... collapse, shake uncontrollably, or even just stare into space. All of these are brief disturbances in brain ... Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart.com

  16. De novo psychogenic seizures after epilepsy surgery: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MONTENEGRO MARIA AUGUSTA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of de novo psychogenic seizures after epilepsy surgery is rare, and is estimated in 1.8% to 3.6%. Seizures after epilepsy surgery should be carefully evaluated, and de novo psychogenic seizures should be considered especially when there is a change in the ictal semiology. We report a patient with de novo psychogenic seizures after anterior temporal lobe removal for refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. Once psychogenic seizures were diagnosed and psychiatric treatment was started, seizures stopped.

  17. Complex partial seizures: cerebellar metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodore, W.H.; Fishbein, D.; Deitz, M.; Baldwin, P.

    1987-07-01

    We used positron emission tomography (PET) with (/sup 18/F)2-deoxyglucose to study cerebellar glucose metabolism (LCMRglu) and the effect of phenytoin (PHT) in 42 patients with complex partial seizures (CPS), and 12 normal controls. Mean +/- SD patient LCMRglu was 6.9 +/- 1.8 mg glucose/100 g/min (left = right), significantly lower than control values of 8.5 +/- 1.8 (left, p less than 0.006), and 8.3 +/- 1.6 (right, p less than 0.02). Only four patients had cerebellar atrophy on CT/MRI; cerebellar LCMRglu in these was 5.5 +/- 1.5 (p = 0.054 vs. total patient sample). Patients with unilateral temporal hypometabolism or EEG foci did not have lateralized cerebellar hypometabolism. Patients receiving phenytoin (PHT) at the time of scan and patients with less than 5 years total PHT exposure had lower LCMRglu, but the differences were not significant. There were weak inverse correlations between PHT level and cerebellar LCMRglu in patients receiving PHT (r = -0.36; 0.05 less than p less than 0.1), as well as between length of illness and LCMRglu (r = -0.22; 0.05 less than p less than 0.1). Patients with complex partial seizures have cerebellar hypometabolism that is bilateral and due only in part to the effect of PHT.

  18. Effects of music on seizure frequency in institutionalized subjects with severe/profound intellectual disability and drug-resistant epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Patrizia; Giuglietti, Marta; Baglioni, Antonella; Verdolini, Norma; Murgia, Nicola; Piccirilli, Massimo; Elisei, Sandro

    2017-09-01

    Approximately one-third of patients with epilepsy continue to experience seizures despite adequate therapy with antiepileptic drugs. Drug-resistant epilepsy is even more frequent in subjects with intellectual disability. As a result, several non-pharmacological interventions have been proposed to improve quality of life in patients with intellectual disability and drug-resistant epilepsy. A number of studies have demonstrated that music can be effective at reducing seizures and epileptiform discharges. In particular, Mozart's sonata for two pianos in D major, K448, has been shown to decrease interictal EEG discharges and recurrence of clinical seizures in patients with intellectual disability and drug-resistant epilepsy as well. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of Mozart's music on seizure frequency in institutionalized epileptic subjects with profound/severe intellectual disability. Twelve patients (10 males and 2 females) with a mean age of 21.6 years were randomly assigned to two groups in a cross-over design; they listened to Mozart K448 once a day for six months. A statistically significant difference was observed between the listening period and both baseline and control periods. During the music period, none of the patients worsened in seizure frequency; one patient was seizure-free, five had a greater than 50% reduction in seizure frequency and the remaining showed minimal (N=2) or no difference (N=4). The average seizure reduction compared to the baseline was 20.5%. Our results are discussed in relation to data in the literature considering differences in protocol investigation. Music may be considered a useful approach as add-on therapy in some subjects with profound intellectual disability and drug-resistant epilepsy and can provide a new option for clinicians to consider, but further large sample, multicenter studies are needed to better understand the characteristics of responders and non-responders to this type of non

  19. Can developmental venous anomalies cause seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussaule, Claire; Masnou, Pascal; Nasser, Ghaïdaa; Archambaud, Frédérique; Cauquil-Michon, Cécile; Gagnepain, Jean-Paul; Bouilleret, Viviane; Denier, Christian

    2017-12-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) are congenital anatomical variants of normal venous drainage of normal brain. Although DVAs are often discovered on the occasion of a seizure, their involvement in epilepsy is poorly studied. Our objective was to determine whether DVA can cause seizures, in the cases where there is no associated lesion, including no cavernoma or dysplasia. Based on clinical history, cerebral MRI, EEG recording, and 18 F-FDG PET, we report 4 patients with DVA revealed by seizures. The first patient had a convulsive seizure caused by a hemorrhagic infarction due to thrombosis of her DVA. The second patient had a left temporo-parietal DVA next to a nonspecific lesion, possibly a sequelae of a venous infarction. The last two patients disclosed an isolated and uncomplicated DVA with a concordant epileptic focus confirmed on ictal video EEG recording. We reviewed literature and identified 21 other published cases of seizures caused by complications of a DVA and 9 patients that may have a direct link between epilepsy and an isolated and uncomplicated DVA. Seizures are linked to a DVA in two main situations: presence of an associated epileptogenic lesion, such as cavernoma or dysplasia, and occurrence of a complication of the DVA. Before concluding that a seizure is caused by a DVA, it is essential to perform full MRI protocols to search them. It remains rare and uncertain that isolated and uncomplicated DVA can cause seizures. In this last situation, physiopathological processes are probably different in each patient.

  20. 43 CFR 3.16 - Seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Seizure. 3.16 Section 3.16 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PRESERVATION OF AMERICAN ANTIQUITIES § 3.16 Seizure. Any object of antiquity taken, or collection made, on lands owned or controlled by the United States, without...

  1. Orgasm Induced Seizures: A Rare Phenomenon

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Reflex seizures are well known entities developing in response to a discrete or specific stimulus. Reflex seizures are the ones that “Objectively and consistently are demonstrated to be evoked by a specific afferent stimulus or by the activity of the patient. Afferent stimuli can be: Elementary, that is, unstructured ( ...

  2. Seizure-Alerting Dogs in Epilepsy Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Families of all children (1 to 18 years old followed at the Refractory Epilepsy Clinic, Alberta Children’s Hospital, Canada, were surveyed and those who had a dog for at least one year while having at least 1 seizure/month were selected and questioned regarding seizure-related behaviors.

  3. Seizure-Alerting Dogs in Epilepsy Management

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-01-01

    Families of all children (1 to 18 years old) followed at the Refractory Epilepsy Clinic, Alberta Children’s Hospital, Canada, were surveyed and those who had a dog for at least one year while having at least 1 seizure/month were selected and questioned regarding seizure-related behaviors.

  4. Seizure complicating interscalene brachail plexus block | Idehen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We describe a case of seizure occurring immediately after completion of interscalene brachial plexus block, using 20mls mixture of 10mls of 0.5% bupivacaine and 10mls of 2% lidocaine with adrenaline for post operative analgesia. Seizure occurred despite negative test aspiration and non response to the use of 0.5mls of ...

  5. New-onset Seizures in Pediatric Emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yu Chen

    2010-04-01

    Conclusion: Primary care pediatricians should evaluate children presenting to the ED with a first seizure for age, coexistence of fever, seizure type, associated symptoms and history of head injury. We suggest that electrolytes, blood sugar and emergent brain imaging studies should be arranged based on detailed history-taking and thorough physical examinations, but should not be performed routinely.

  6. Effect of Seizure Clustering on Epilepsy Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A prospective, long-term population-based study was performed to determine whether seizure clustering (3 or more afebrile seizures during a 24 hour period is associated with drug resistance and increased mortality in childhood-onset epilepsy, in a study at University of Turku, Finland, and the Epilepsy Research Group, Berlin, Germany.

  7. Protection against generalised seizured by Dalbergia saxatilis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... provide protection against generalized absence and partial seizures, which further justifies its use in the management of epilepsies and convulsions in traditional African medicine. Keywords: Dalbergia saxatilis, generalized seizure, pentylenetetrazole, kindling, electro- foot shock. West African Joural of Pharmacology and ...

  8. Seizure phenotypes, periodicity, and sleep-wake pattern of seizures in Kcna-1 null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Samantha; Wallace, Eli; Hwang, Youngdeok; Maganti, Rama

    2016-02-01

    This study was undertaken to describe seizure phenotypes, natural progression, sleep-wake patterns, as well as periodicity of seizures in Kcna-1 null mutant mice. These mice were implanted with epidural electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) electrodes, and simultaneous video-EEG recordings were obtained while animals were individually housed under either diurnal (LD) condition or constant darkness (DD) over ten days of recording. The video-EEG data were analyzed to identify electrographic and behavioral phenotypes and natural progression and to examine the periodicity of seizures. Sleep-wake patterns were analyzed to understand the distribution and onset of seizures across the sleep-wake cycle. Four electrographically and behaviorally distinct seizure types were observed. Regardless of lighting condition that animals were housed in, Kcna-1 null mice initially expressed only a few of the most severe seizure types that progressively increased in frequency and decreased in seizure severity. In addition, a circadian periodicity was noted, with seizures peaking in the first 12h of the Zeitgeber time (ZT) cycle, regardless of lighting conditions. Interestingly, seizure onset differed between lighting conditions where more seizures arose out of sleep in LD conditions, whereas under DD conditions, the majority occurred out of the wakeful state. We suggest that this model be used to understand the circadian pattern of seizures as well as the pathophysiological implications of sleep and circadian disturbances in limbic epilepsies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Wind turbines, flicker, and photosensitive epilepsy: characterizing the flashing that may precipitate seizures and optimizing guidelines to prevent them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Graham; Harding, Pamela; Wilkins, Arnold

    2008-06-01

    Wind turbines are known to produce shadow flicker by interruption of sunlight by the turbine blades. Known parameters of the seizure provoking effect of flicker, i.e., contrast, frequency, mark-space ratio, retinal area stimulated and percentage of visual cortex involved were applied to wind turbine features. The proportion of patients affected by viewing wind turbines expressed as distance in multiples of the hub height of the turbine showed that seizure risk does not decrease significantly until the distance exceeds 100 times the hub height. Since risk does not diminish with viewing distance, flash frequency is therefore the critical factor and should be kept to a maximum of three per second, i.e., sixty revolutions per minute for a three-bladed turbine. On wind farms the shadows cast by one turbine on another should not be viewable by the public if the cumulative flash rate exceeds three per second. Turbine blades should not be reflective.

  10. The Role of Seizure-Related SEZ6 as a Susceptibility Gene in Febrile Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Mulley

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sixty cases of febrile seizures from a Chinese cohort had previously been reported with a strong association between variants in the seizure-related (SEZ 6 gene and febrile seizures. They found a striking lack of genetic variation in their controls. We found genetic variation in SEZ6 at similar levels at the same DNA sequence positions in our 94 febrile seizure cases as in our 96 unaffected controls. Two of our febrile seizure cases carried rare variants predicted to have damaging consequences. Combined with some of the variants from the Chinese cohort, these data are compatible with a role for SEZ6 as a susceptibility gene for febrile seizures. However, the polygenic determinants underlying most cases of febrile seizures with complex inheritance remain to be determined.

  11. Do recurrent seizure-related head injuries affect seizures in people with epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, David E; Chiang, Sharon; Tobias, Ronnie S

    2012-02-01

    Seizure-related head injuries (SRHIs) are among the most commonly encountered injuries in people with epilepsy (PWE). Whether head injury has an effect on preexisting epilepsy is not known. The purpose of this study was to systematically assess for any possible effects of SRHIs on seizure frequency and seizure semiology over a 2-year period. We identified 204 patients who have been followed at the Baylor Comprehensive Epilepsy Center from 2008 to 2010. SRHI occurred in 18.1% of the cohort. Most injuries (91%) were classified as mild. Though seizure frequency varied following head injury, overall seizure frequency was not significantly impacted by presence or absence of SRHI over the 2-year study period. Changes in seizure semiology were not observed in those with SRHIs. Although mild SRHI is common among PWE, it does not appear to have an effect on seizure characteristics over a relatively short period. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Do recurrent seizure-related head injuries affect seizures in people with epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, David E.; Chiang, Sharon; Tobias, Ronnie S.

    2015-01-01

    Seizure-related head injuries (SRHIs) are among the most commonly encountered injuries in people with epilepsy (PWE). Whether head injury has an effect on preexisting epilepsy is not known. The purpose of this study was to systematically assess for any possible effects of SRHIs on seizure frequency and seizure semiology over a 2-year period. We identified 204 patients who have been followed at the Baylor Comprehensive Epilepsy Center from 2008 to 2010. SRHI occurred in 18.1% of the cohort. Most injuries (91%) were classified as mild. Though seizure frequency varied following head injury, overall seizure frequency was not significantly impacted by presence or absence of SRHI over the 2-year study period. Changes in seizure semiology were not observed in those with SRHIs. Although mild SRHI is common among PWE, it does not appear to have an effect on seizure characteristics over a relatively short period. PMID:22227592

  13. Electroencephalogram in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: spike and wave paroxysms, foci, and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunel, Attila; Altunel, Emine Özlem; Sever, Ali

    2013-08-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a syndrome of unknown etiology that affects 3% to 7% of the population. Although no objective test exists to support the diagnosis, EEG discharges related to the neuropsychiatric abnormalities have a high incidence in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The aim of this study was to elucidate the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of EEG abnormality in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Nonrapid eye movement sleep EEGs were evaluated in 134 patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in terms of age, EEG timing, spike and wave index, foci, and seizures. All patients had spike and wave paroxysms that changed with age at and time to first EEG. Only half of the patients had seizures and 46 patients had neither seizures nor foci. Thirty-eight patients had the EEG findings of benign focal epilepsy of childhood. Our data support the view that spike and wave activity evolves in time and that EEG discharges are related to neuropsychiatric symptoms even when a diagnosable seizure disorder is absent.

  14. Development and validation of a seizure prediction model in critically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Amy; Arndt, Daniel H; Berg, Robert A; Carpenter, Jessica L; Chapman, Kevin E; Dlugos, Dennis J; Gallentine, William B; Giza, Christopher C; Goldstein, Joshua L; Hahn, Cecil D; Lerner, Jason T; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Matsumoto, Joyce H; Nash, Kendall B; Payne, Eric T; Sánchez Fernández, Iván; Shults, Justine; Topjian, Alexis A; Williams, Korwyn; Wusthoff, Courtney J; Abend, Nicholas S

    2015-02-01

    Electrographic seizures are common in encephalopathic critically ill children, but identification requires continuous EEG monitoring (CEEG). Development of a seizure prediction model would enable more efficient use of limited CEEG resources. We aimed to develop and validate a seizure prediction model for use among encephalopathic critically ill children. We developed a seizure prediction model using a retrospectively acquired multi-center database of children with acute encephalopathy without an epilepsy diagnosis, who underwent clinically indicated CEEG. We performed model validation using a separate prospectively acquired single center database. Predictor variables were chosen to be readily available to clinicians prior to the onset of CEEG and included: age, etiology category, clinical seizures prior to CEEG, initial EEG background category, and inter-ictal discharge category. The model has fair to good discrimination ability and overall performance. At the optimal cut-off point in the validation dataset, the model has a sensitivity of 59% and a specificity of 81%. Varied cut-off points could be chosen to optimize sensitivity or specificity depending on available CEEG resources. Despite inherent variability between centers, a model developed using multi-center CEEG data and few readily available variables could guide the use of limited CEEG resources when applied at a single center. Depending on CEEG resources, centers could choose lower cut-off points to maximize identification of all patients with seizures (but with more patients monitored) or higher cut-off points to reduce resource utilization by reducing monitoring of lower risk patients (but with failure to identify some patients with seizures). Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Differential antagonism of tetramethylenedisulfotetramine-induced seizures by agents acting at NMDA and GABAA receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakarjian, Michael P.; Velíšková, Jana; Stanton, Patric K.; Velíšek, Libor

    2012-01-01

    Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TMDT) is a highly lethal neuroactive rodenticide responsible for many accidental and intentional poisonings in mainland China. Ease of synthesis, water solubility, potency, and difficulty to treat make TMDT a potential weapon for terrorist activity. We characterized TMDT-induced convulsions and mortality in male C57BL/6 mice. TMDT (ip) produced a continuum of twitches, clonic, and tonic-clonic seizures decreasing in onset latency and increasing in severity with increasing dose; 0.4 mg/kg was 100% lethal. The NMDA antagonist, ketamine (35 mg/kg) injected ip immediately after the first TMDT-induced seizure, did not change number of tonic-clonic seizures or lethality, but increased the number of clonic seizures. Doubling the ketamine dose decreased tonic-clonic seizures and eliminated lethality through a 60 min observation period. Treating mice with another NMDA antagonist, MK-801, 0.5 or 1 mg/kg ip, showed similar effects as low and high doses of ketamine, respectively, and prevented lethality, converting status epilepticus EEG activity to isolated interictal discharges. Treatment with these agents 15 min prior to TMDT administration did not increase their effectiveness. Post-treatment with the GABAA receptor allosteric enhancer diazepam (5 mg/kg) greatly reduced seizure manifestations and prevented lethality 60 min post-TMDT, but ictal events were evident in EEG recordings and, hours post-treatment, mice experienced status epilepticus and died. Thus, TMDT is a highly potent and lethal convulsant for which single-dose benzodiazepine treatment is inadequate in managing electrographic seizures or lethality. Repeated benzodiazepine dosing or combined application of benzodiazepines and NMDA receptor antagonists are more likely to be effective in treating TMDT poisoning. PMID:23022509

  16. Cooling of the epileptic focus suppresses seizures with minimal influence on neurologic functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Masami; Inoue, Takao; Nomura, Sadahiro; Maruta, Yuichi; He, Yeting; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Shirao, Satoshi; Owada, Yuji; Kunitsugu, Ichiro; Yamakawa, Toshitaka; Tokiwa, Tatsuji; Ishizuka, Satoshi; Yamakawa, Takeshi; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2012-03-01

    Focal brain cooling is effective for suppression of epileptic seizures, but it is unclear if seizures can be suppressed without a substantial influence on normal neurologic function. To address the issue, a thermoelectrically driven cooling system was developed and applied in free-moving rat models of focal seizure and epilepsy. Focal seizures limited to the unilateral forelimb were induced by local application of a penicillin G solution or cobalt powder to the unilateral sensorimotor cortex. A proportional integration and differentiation (PID)-controlled, thermoelectrically driven cooling device (weight of 11 g) and bipolar electrodes were chronically implanted on the eloquent area (on the epileptic focus) and the effects of cooling (20, 15, and 10°C) on electrocorticography, seizure frequency, and neurologic changes were investigated. Cooling was associated with a distinct reduction of the epileptic discharges. In both models, cooling of epileptic foci significantly improved both seizure frequency and neurologic functions from 20°C down to 15°C. Cooling to 10°C also suppressed seizures, but with no further improvement in neurologic function. Subsequent investigation of sensorimotor function revealed significant deterioration in foot-fault tests and the receptive field size at 15°C. Despite the beneficial effects in ictal rats, sensorimotor functions deteriorated at 15°C, thereby suggesting a lower limit for the therapeutic temperature. These results provide important evidence of a therapeutic effect of temperatures from 20 to 15°C using an implantable, hypothermal device for focal epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League Against Epilepsy.

  17. Acute disc prolapse secondary to seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satia, Imran; Goodwin, Lynsey; Madi, Salem; Hamdalla, Hisham

    2011-06-09

    A 37-year-old female presented following a witnessed generalised tonic clonic seizure while washing her car. Witnesses reported the patient hit her head on the car bumper upon falling. She was investigated for a cause of a second seizure with blood tests, CT and MR brain which were normal. On day 3 of her admission she was still unable to walk since the seizure and a neurological examination was performed which revealed signs consistent with a cervical myelopathy. A cervical MRI scan revealed a disc prolapse with cord compression at C5/6. This was successfully operated and the patient made a good recovery. Given that many of our medical assessment units and emergency department frequently assess patient with seizures, there was an important lesson for us to be more aware of the consequences as well as the cause of seizures.

  18. Seizure detection algorithms based on EMG signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa

    Background: the currently used non-invasive seizure detection methods are not reliable. Muscle fibers are directly connected to the nerves, whereby electric signals are generated during activity. Therefore, an alarm system on electromyography (EMG) signals is a theoretical possibility. Objective......: to show whether medical signal processing of EMG data is feasible for detection of epileptic seizures. Methods: EMG signals during generalised seizures were recorded from 3 patients (with 20 seizures in total). Two possible medical signal processing algorithms were tested. The first algorithm was based...... the frequency-based algorithm was efficient for detecting the seizures in the third patient. Conclusion: Our results suggest that EMG signals could be used to develop an automatic seizuredetection system. However, different patients might require different types of algorithms /approaches....

  19. Surgical treatment of late-onset post-traumatic partial seizures in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Julio César; Bulacio, Juan Carlos; Armelini, Pedro; Sfaello, Zenón Milciades; Viano, Juan Carlos; Herrera, Enrique J; Ballarino, Lucrecia; Bergallo, Roberto; Suárez, Maria S

    2004-06-01

    Although post-traumatic epilepsy accounts for a small number of epileptic patients, it should not be underestimated since it primarily affects children and young adults and can result in psychosocial disability and death. We present the case of a 14-year-old girl referred to us because of refractory partial seizures. The patient had experienced a head trauma at the age of 6 months requiring surgical treatment due to a large right fronto-temporo-parietal extradural hematoma. She was discharged on phenytoin prophylactically. At the age of 4 she had her first partial seizure, characterized by left arm and leg tonic-clonic movements. Her physical examination revealed a subtle left brachiocrural hemiparesis and developmental delay. Several antiepileptic drugs were tried and seizure control was not achieved. They were occurring 8-10 times per day. The proposed surgical treatment was based on the consistent seizure semiology and on the affected area as identified by MRI and visible macroscopically to the neurosurgeon. At 9 years follow-up the patient is seizure free. Her motor skills are adequate for living a normal life. We emphasize that selected patients may benefit from surgical treatment when epilepsy results from a trauma.

  20. IPS Interest in the EEG of Patients after a Single Epileptic Seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Zahra Taoufiqi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aims to evaluate the incidence of pathological cerebral activity responses to intermittent rhythmic photic stimulation (IPS after a single epileptic seizure. Patients and Methods. One hundred and thirty-seven EEGs were performed at the Neurophysiology Department of Mohamed V Teaching Military Hospital in Rabat. Clinical and EEG data was collected. Results. 9.5% of our patients had photoparoxysmal discharges (PPD. Incidence was higher in males than in females, but p value was not significant (p=0.34, and it was higher in children compared to adults with significant p value (p=0.08. The most epileptogenic frequencies were within the range 15–20 Hz. 63 patients had an EEG after 72 hours; among them 11 were photosensitive (p=0.001. The frequency of the PPR was significantly higher in patients with generalized abnormalities than in focal abnormalities (p=0.001. EEG confirmed a genetic generalized epilepsy in 8 cases among 13 photosensitive patients. Conclusion. PPR is age related. The frequencies within the range 15–20 Hz should inevitably be included in EEG protocols. The presence of PPR after a first seizure is probably more in favor of generalized seizure rather than the other type of seizure. PPR seems independent from the delay Seizure-EEG. Our study did not show an association between sex and photosensitivity.

  1. Seizure-induced disinhibition of the HPA axis increases seizure susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Kate K; Hooper, Andrew; Wakefield, Seth; Maguire, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Stress is the most commonly reported precipitating factor for seizures. The proconvulsant actions of stress hormones are thought to mediate the effects of stress on seizure susceptibility. Interestingly, epileptic patients have increased basal levels of stress hormones, including corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and corticosterone, which are further increased following seizures. Given the proconvulsant actions of stress hormones, we proposed that seizure-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may contribute to future seizure susceptibility. Consistent with this hypothesis, our data demonstrate that pharmacological induction of seizures in mice with kainic acid or pilocarpine increases circulating levels of the stress hormone, corticosterone, and exogenous corticosterone administration is sufficient to increase seizure susceptibility. However, the mechanism(s) whereby seizures activate the HPA axis remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that seizure-induced activation of the HPA axis involves compromised GABAergic control of CRH neurons, which govern HPA axis function. Following seizure activity, there is a collapse of the chloride gradient due to changes in NKCC1 and KCC2 expression, resulting in reduced amplitude of sIPSPs and even depolarizing effects of GABA on CRH neurons. Seizure-induced activation of the HPA axis results in future seizure susceptibility which can be blocked by treatment with an NKCC1 inhibitor, bumetanide, or blocking the CRH signaling with Antalarmin. These data suggest that compromised GABAergic control of CRH neurons following an initial seizure event may cause hyperexcitability of the HPA axis and increase future seizure susceptibility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. CLINICAL AND EEG PREDICTORS OF INCREASED FREQUENCY OF GENERALIZED SEIZURES IN GESTATIONAL AND POSTGRAVIDARUM PERIOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Grebenyuk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the predictors of increased seizures’ frequency among women with various forms of idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGE in the gestational and postgravid period. We observed 41 patients with Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE before, during and after pregnancy. During the period of observation EEG was recorded in the states of relaxed and active awakeness and sleeping. Patients, who have stopped to take anticonvulsants before pregnancy, have had increased frequency of seizures, more than1 ina year, with interictal epileptiform discharges in a state of relaxed and active awakeness. Increased seizures after pregnancy was observed in patients with interictal epileptiform discharges during sleep. The results can be used during the preparation of pregravid women with IGE. 

  3. Concussion - adults - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain injury - concussion - discharge; Traumatic brain injury - concussion - discharge; Closed head injury - concussion - discharge ... a car Ski, snowboard, skate, skateboard, or do gymnastics or martial arts Participate in any activity where ...

  4. Tennis elbow surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateral epicondylitis surgery - discharge; Lateral tendinosis surgery - discharge; Lateral tennis elbow surgery - discharge ... Soon after surgery, severe pain will decrease, but you may have mild soreness for 3 to 6 months.

  5. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  6. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... VP shunt - discharge; Shunt revision - discharge; Hydrocephalus shunt placement - discharge ... The major problems to watch for are an infected shunt and a blocked shunt. Call your child's provider if your child ...

  7. Personality and Aggressive Behavior under Provoking and Neutral Conditions: A Meta-Analytic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettencourt, Ann B.; Talley, Amelia; Benjamin, Arlin James; Valentine, Jeffery

    2006-01-01

    The authors conducted a comprehensive review to understand the relation between personality and aggressive behavior, under provoking and nonprovoking conditions. The qualitative review revealed that some personality variables influenced aggressive behavior under both neutral and provocation conditions, whereas others influenced aggressive…

  8. Acute hypotension induced by aortic clamp vs. PTH provokes distinct proximal tubule Na+ transporter redistribution patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leong, Patrick K K; Yang, Li E; Lin, Harrison W

    2004-01-01

    in renal cortical membranes fractionated on sorbitol density gradients. Aortic clamp-induced acute hypotension (from 100 +/- 3 to 78 +/- 2 mmHg) provoked a 62% decrease in urine output and a significant decrease in volume flow from the proximal tubule detected as a 66% decrease in endogenous lithium......-density membranes enriched in apical markers. PTH at much lower doses (

  9. Anisocoria in the dog provoked by a toxic contact with an ornamental plant: Datura stramonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Philippe; Clerc, Bernard

    2002-12-01

    We report an unusual case of anisocoria in the dog provoked by Datura stramonium, and an experimental clinical assay to reproduce the anisocoria using simple contact with part of the plant in four healthy dogs. Any part of the D. stramonium plant produced anisocoria following simple contact with the eye.

  10. MLA Report on Foreign-Language Education Continues to Provoke Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasley, Paula

    2008-01-01

    This article reports that, nearly one year after its release, the report on foreign language and higher education issued by an ad hoc committee of the Modern Language Association (MLA) is still provoking discussion about reforms in the teaching of foreign languages and the role of the association in any revamp. The debate continued at a panel held…

  11. Randomized, controlled trial of ibuprofen syrup administered during febrile illnesses to prevent febrile seizure recurrences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Stuijvenberg (Margriet); G. Derksen-Lubsen (Gerarda); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); J.D.F. Habbema (Dik); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: Febrile seizures recur frequently. Factors increasing the risk of febrile seizure recurrence include young age at onset, family history of febrile seizures, previous recurrent febrile seizures, time lapse since previous seizure <6 months,

  12. Laboratory markers of cardiac and metabolic complications after generalized tonic-clonic seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Nass, Robert D.; Meiling, Sina; Andri?, Ren? P.; Elger, Christian E.; Surges, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Background Generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) frequently lead to emergency inpatient referrals. Laboratory blood values are routinely performed on admission to detect underlying causes and metabolic or cardiac complications. Our goal was to assess the nature and frequency of complications occurring in association with GTCS. Methods We retrospectively extracted data from emergency protocols and discharge letters of adult patients admitted to the Department of Epileptology between 01/2010...

  13. Clinical seizure lateralization in frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonelli, Silvia Beatrice; Lurger, Stefanie; Zimprich, Fritz; Stogmann, Elisabeth; Assem-Hilger, Eva; Baumgartner, Christoph

    2007-03-01

    We systematically analyzed the lateralizing value of clinical seizure semiology in patients with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE). We studied the incidence, positive predictive value (PPV), and the lateralizing significance of various clinical symptoms in 228 seizures (s) of 31 patients (p) with medically refractory FLE (17 with left-sided and 14 with right-sided seizure onset). Seizures recorded during prolonged video-EEG monitoring were assessed by two independent reviewers blinded for the patient's clinical data. Analysis was performed both for patients and seizures. Version [16 p (52%); PPV, 94%; p=0.001; 47 s (21%); PPV, 75%; p=0.001], unilateral clonic movements [16 p (52%); PPV, 81%; p=0.021; 32 s (14%); PPV, 81%; p=0.001], unilateral dystonic posturing [eight p (26%); PPV, 75%; p=0.289; 46 s (20%); PPV, 80%; p=0.001], unilateral tonic posturing [10 p (32%); PPV, 80%; p=0.109; 19 s (7.4%); PPV, 79%; p=0.019], and unilateral grimacing [10 p (32%); PPV, 100%; p=0.002; 19 s (8%); PPV, 100%; p=0.001] were of lateralizing significance, indicating a contralateral seizure onset. Asymmetric ending [five p (16%); PPV, 80%; p=0.375; nine s (4%); PPV, 89%; p=0.039] after secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizures was significantly associated with an ipsilateral seizure onset. Pure ictal vocalizations occurred significantly more frequently in seizures of right hemispheric onset [13 p (42%); PPV, 62%; p=0.581; 63 s (28%); PPV, 73%; p=0. 001], whereas in individual patients, this symptom showed no lateralizing significance. The remaining clinical symptoms (figure 4 sign, unilateral hand automatisms, early head turning, postictal nose wiping, and unilateral eye blinking) were not of lateralizing significance in our patients. The results of clinical seizure lateralization corresponded with the final lateralization of the seizure-onset zone in 81% of our patients. Clinical seizure semiology can provide correct information on the lateralization of the seizure-onset zone in >80

  14. Prostate brachytherapy - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer - discharge; Radioactive seed placement - discharge ... You had a procedure called brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Your treatment lasted 30 minutes or more, ...

  15. Epilepsy - children - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... them climb on a jungle gym or perform gymnastics. Ask your child's doctor about your child participating ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 593. Read More Brain aneurysm repair Brain surgery Epilepsy - overview Seizures Stereotactic ...

  16. First seizure definitions and worldwide incidence and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, W Allen; Beghi, Ettore

    2008-01-01

    While all patients with epilepsy experience seizures, not all individuals with seizures have epilepsy. Seizures may be acute symptomatic or unprovoked. Acute symptomatic seizures are seizures occurring at the time of a systemic insult or in close temporal association with a documented brain insult. Unprovoked seizures are seizures occurring in the absence of precipitating factors and may be caused by a static injury (remote symptomatic seizures) or a progressing injury (progressive symptomatic seizures). Unprovoked seizures may be single or recurrent (epilepsy). The incidence of acute symptomatic seizures is 29-39 per 100,000 per year. These predominate in men, in the youngest age class, and in the elderly. Traumatic brain injury, cerebrovascular disease, drug withdrawal, infarction, and metabolic insults are the commonest causes. The incidence of single unprovoked seizures is 23-61 per 100,000 person-years. As with epilepsy, single unprovoked seizures predominate in men and in patients less than 12 months and older than 65 years. Studies on the mortality of acute symptomatic seizures are lacking. A standardized mortality ratio (SMR) of 2.3 has been reported in patients experiencing a single unprovoked seizure. The SMR in patients with a newly diagnosed unprovoked seizure ranges from 2.5 to 4.1 according to the study population and design. The SMR is highest in the youngest patients and in those with symptomatic seizures.

  17. Physics of the Brain: Interaction of the Optical-Fiber-Guided Multi-Ultraviolet-Photon Beams with the Epilepsy Topion, (the Seizure Onset Area)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    A novel method for the possible prevention of epileptic seizures is proposed, based on the multi-ultraviolet-photon beam interaction with the epilepsy topion, (nonlinear coupling of an ultra high frequency mode to the brain beta phonons). It is hypothesized that epilepsy is a chaotic-dynamics phenomenon: small electrical changes in the epilepsy-topion lead, (within the 10s of milliseconds), to the onset of chaos, (seizure--excessive electrical discharge), and subsequent cascading into adjacent areas. The ultraviolet photons may control the imbalance of sodium and potassium ions and, consequently, may prove to be efficient in the prevention of epileptic seizures. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, Stefan University.

  18. Degree of Postictal Suppression Depends on Seizure Induction Time in Magnetic Seizure Therapy and Electroconvulsive Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Sarah; Bewernick, Bettina H; Soehle, Martin; Switala, Christina; Gippert, Sabrina M; Dreimueller, Nadine; Schlaepfer, Thomas E

    2017-09-01

    Anesthesia is required for both magnetic seizure therapy (MST) and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), although it has anticonvulsant properties. In this case, bispectral index (BIS) monitoring, a specific electroencephalogram-derived monitoring, can be used to find the optimal seizure induction time during anesthesia to elicit adequate seizures. A measurement of seizure adequacy in electroencephalogram is the postictal suppression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of seizure induction time on the degree of postictal suppression by comparing BIS versus no-BIS monitoring in MST and ECT. Twenty patients with treatment-resistant depression were randomly assigned to either MST or ECT. Each patient underwent 3 treatments with the determination of seizure induction time by defined prestimulation BIS (BIS condition) and 3 treatments with determination of seizure induction time by controlled clinical trial protocol (no-BIS condition). Statistical analysis was calculated by repeated-measures analysis of variance. The degree of postictal suppression was more pronounced in both MST and ECT, with BIS monitoring. In this connection, no differences between MST and ECT were found. Seizure induction time was significantly later in the BIS condition (181.3 ± 6 seconds) compared with the no-BIS condition (114.3 ± 12 seconds) (P < 0.001). Adequacy of seizures, in the form of the degree of postictal suppression, was superior by determining the seizure induction time with BIS in both MST and ECT. Further research is needed to investigate the correlation between the degree of postictal suppression and treatment response.

  19. New onset seizures in HIV--seizure semiology, CD4 counts, and viral loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Mala; Mochan, Andre; Modi, Girish

    2009-05-01

    Thirty-seven HIV-positive patients with new-onset seizures (NOS) were prospectively identified during a 1-year study period. The patients were categorized according to the different mechanisms causing NOS in HIV, namely focal brain lesion (FBL) in 21 patients (57%), meningitis in 6 patients (16%), metabolic derangement (no patient), and no identified cause (NIC) other than HIV itself (10 patients, 27%). Seizure semiology, CD4 counts, and blood and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) viral loads were studied to identify any special characteristics of the different categories. With respect to seizure semiology, all NIC patients had generalized seizures. Two-thirds of the meningitis patients had generalized seizures with one-third having focal seizures. Half of the patients with FBL had generalized seizures and one-third had focal seizures. Status epilepticus was strongly associated with FBL. No significant difference could be detected between the subgroups with respect to CD4 counts and serum and CSF viral loads. The median CD4 count in all patients was 108 cells/ml, indicating advanced immunosuppression. In the FBL group this was 104 cells/ml. In the meningitis group the median CD4 count was 298 cells/ml, and in the NIC group this was 213 cells/ml. Similarly, no differences were noted in the NOS categories with respect to serum and CSF viral loads. Seizures in HIV are a nonspecific manifestation of the seizure mechanism.

  20. Hyperthyroidism and seizures during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, D C; Thorp, J; Baucom, D; Spielman, F J

    1995-05-01

    Untreated hyperthyroidism during pregnancy is associated with increased maternal and perinatal morbidity. Some features of this disease simulate preeclampsia, which may encourage delivery of the fetus. We report a case of poorly controlled hyperthyroidism associated with generalized seizures, where patient management was directed at a diagnosis of preeclampsia-eclampsia. Although the presence of eclampsia and marked hyperthyroidism is very rare, this case illustrates the importance of aggressive medical management of hyperthyroidism. A 17-year-old gravida was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism at 15 weeks' gestation. At 26 weeks' gestation, she was admitted to the hospital after noting edema of the upper and lower extremities, nausea, vomiting, shortness of breath, and a cough. At admission, she was hypertensive, tachycardic, and dyspneic. The patient was believed to have preeclampsia with pulmonary edema complicated by hyperthyroidism. We initiated magnesium sulfate therapy and administered several bolus doses of hydralazine, with little effect on blood pressure. Oliguria was noted, and a pulmonary artery catheter was inserted. Hours later, generalized seizure activity occurred, and a decision was made for abdominal delivery. Postoperatively, cardiovascular function stabilized. On postoperative day 3, we received the results of the thyroid function tests obtained at admission, which suggested a markedly hyperthyroid condition. Untreated or poorly treated hyperthyroidism may present a clinical picture similar to preeclampsia. In our case, both disease processes coexisted in their severest forms. It is possible, although completely unproven, that a relationship exists between poorly controlled hyperthyroidism and preeclampsia-eclampsia. More importantly, accurate diagnosis of hyperthyroidism should lead to prompt medical or surgical management, thereby decreasing maternal and perinatal morbidity.

  1. Nonepileptic Seizures: An Updated Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, David L.; LaFrance, W. Curt

    2016-01-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures are a Functional Neurological Disorder/ Conversion Disorder subtype, which are neurobehavioral conditions at the interface of Neurology and Psychiatry. Significant advancements over the past decade have been made in the diagnosis, management and neurobiological understanding of PNES. This article reviews published PNES research focusing on semiologic features that distinguish PNES from epileptic seizures, consensus diagnostic criteria, the intersection of PNES and other comorbidities, neurobiological studies, evidence-based treatment interventions and outcome studies. Epidemiology and health care utilization studies highlight a continued unmet medical need in the comprehensive care of PNES. Consensus guidelines for diagnostic certainty are based on clinical history, semiology of witnessed typical event(s), and EEG findings. While certain semiologic features may aid the diagnosis of PNES, the gold standard remains capturing a typical event on video electroencephalography (EEG) showing the absence of epileptiform activity with history and semiology consistent with PNES. Medical-neurologic and psychiatric comorbidities are prevalent in PNES and should be assessed in diagnostic evaluations, and integrated into treatment interventions and prognostic considerations. Several studies, including a pilot multicenter, randomized clinical trial, have now demonstrated that a cognitive behavioral therapy informed psychotherapy is an efficacious treatment for PNES, and additional efforts are necessary to evaluate the utility of pharmacologic and other psychotherapy treatments. Neuroimaging studies, while requiring replication, suggest that PNES may occur in the context of alterations within and across sensorimotor, emotion regulation/processing, cognitive control and multimodal integration brain systems. Future research could investigate similarities and differences between PNES and other somatic symptom disorders. PMID:26996600

  2. Risk of seizure recurrence after a first unprovoked seizure: a prospective study among Jordanian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, A S; Ajloni, S; El-Salem, K; Horani, K; Otoom, S; Daradkeh, T

    2004-03-01

    There is wide variation in the reported recurrence rate after a first unprovoked seizure in children. We investigated the risk of recurrence after a first unprovoked seizure in Jordanian children and the risk factors associated with increased recurrence rate. All consecutive patients aged 3 months-14 years who presented with their first unprovoked seizures between January 1997 and 2000, were included in a prospective study and followed up for 3 years for possible recurrence. Of the patients studied, there was slight male predominance (56.6%) and 55% of them were 2-9 years of age. Generalised seizures were reported in 75% and the remaining 25% had partial seizures. The duration of seizure was 1-4 minutes in 59%. Family history of epilepsy was positive in 31% and parental consanguinity in 32%. The role of these factors in increasing the risk of recurrence was also investigated. Two hundred sixty-five patients were included in the study and continued follow up for 3 years. Ninety-eight (37%) of them experienced seizure recurrence. Among the predictor factors for recurrence, partial seizure (P = 0.003) and positive family history (P = 0.000) were associated with a statistically significant increased risk. Sex, age, duration of seizure and consanguinity were not associated with increased risk of recurrence. Thirty-seven percent of the children studied experienced a second attack after a first unprovoked seizure over the 3 years follows up period. The risk of recurrence was significantly higher in children with a partial seizure (55%) and among those with a positive family history of epilepsy (59%). Age at first seizure, sex, duration of seizure and consanguinity were not significantly related to the risk of recurrence.

  3. Do oral contraceptives increase epileptic seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2017-02-01

    Hormonal contraceptives are used by over 100 million people worldwide. Recently, there has been an emerging interest in studying the potential impact of oral contraceptives (OCs) on certain neurological conditions. It has been suspected for some time that hormonal birth control increases seizure activity in women with epilepsy, but there is little supportive data. Areas covered: Literature from PubMed and online sources was analyzed with respect to hormonal contraception and epilepsy or seizures. New evidence indicates that OCs can cause an increase in seizures in women with epilepsy. The epilepsy birth control registry, which surveyed women with epilepsy, found that those using hormonal contraceptives self-reported 4.5 times more seizures than those that did not use such contraceptives. A preclinical study confirmed these outcomes wherein epileptic animals given ethinyl estradiol, the primary component of OCs, had more frequent seizures that are more likely to be resistant. Expert commentary: OC pills may increase seizures in women with epilepsy and such refractory seizures are more likely to cause neuronal damage in the brain. Thus, women of child bearing age with epilepsy should consider using non-hormonal forms of birth control to avoid risks from OC pills. Additional research into the mechanisms and prospective clinical investigation are needed.

  4. Oxaliplatin-Induced Tonic-Clonic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad K. Rahal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxaliplatin is a common chemotherapy drug used for colon and gastric cancers. Common side effects are peripheral neuropathy, hematological toxicity, and allergic reactions. A rare side effect is seizures which are usually associated with posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome (PRES. A 50-year-old male patient presented with severe abdominal pain. CT scan of the abdomen showed acute appendicitis. Appendectomy was done and pathology showed mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma. Adjuvant chemotherapy was started with Folinic acid, Fluorouracil, and Oxaliplatin (FOLFOX. During the third cycle of FOLFOX, the patient developed tonic-clonic seizures. Laboratory workup was within normal limits. EEG and MRI of the brain showed no acute abnormality. The patient was rechallenged with FOLFOX but he had tonic-clonic seizures for the second time. His chemotherapy regimen was switched to Folinic acid, Fluorouracil, and Irinotecan (FOLFIRI. After 5 cycles of FOLFIRI, the patient did not develop any seizures, making Oxaliplatin the most likely culprit for his seizures. Oxaliplatin-induced seizures rarely occur in the absence of PRES. One case report has been described in the literature. We present a rare case of tonic-clonic seizures in a patient receiving Oxaliplatin in the absence of PRES.

  5. Oxaliplatin-Induced Tonic-Clonic Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahal, Ahmad K; Truong, Phu V; Kallail, K James

    2015-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a common chemotherapy drug used for colon and gastric cancers. Common side effects are peripheral neuropathy, hematological toxicity, and allergic reactions. A rare side effect is seizures which are usually associated with posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome (PRES). A 50-year-old male patient presented with severe abdominal pain. CT scan of the abdomen showed acute appendicitis. Appendectomy was done and pathology showed mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma. Adjuvant chemotherapy was started with Folinic acid, Fluorouracil, and Oxaliplatin (FOLFOX). During the third cycle of FOLFOX, the patient developed tonic-clonic seizures. Laboratory workup was within normal limits. EEG and MRI of the brain showed no acute abnormality. The patient was rechallenged with FOLFOX but he had tonic-clonic seizures for the second time. His chemotherapy regimen was switched to Folinic acid, Fluorouracil, and Irinotecan (FOLFIRI). After 5 cycles of FOLFIRI, the patient did not develop any seizures, making Oxaliplatin the most likely culprit for his seizures. Oxaliplatin-induced seizures rarely occur in the absence of PRES. One case report has been described in the literature. We present a rare case of tonic-clonic seizures in a patient receiving Oxaliplatin in the absence of PRES.

  6. Improved neonatal seizure detection using adaptive learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, A H; Cherian, P J; Caicedo, A; De Vos, M; Naulaers, G; Van Huffel, S

    2017-07-01

    In neonatal intensive care units performing continuous EEG monitoring, there is an unmet need for around-the-clock interpretation of EEG, especially for recognizing seizures. In recent years, a few automated seizure detection algorithms have been proposed. However, these are suboptimal in detecting brief-duration seizures (<; 30s), which frequently occur in neonates with severe neurological problems. Recently, a multi-stage neonatal seizure detector, composed of a heuristic and a data-driven classifier was proposed by our group and showed improved detection of brief seizures. In the present work, we propose to add a third stage to the detector in order to use feedback of the Clinical Neurophysiologist and adaptively retune a threshold of the second stage to improve the performance of detection of brief seizures. As a result, the false alarm rate (FAR) of the brief seizure detections decreased by 50% and the positive predictive value (PPV) increased by 18%. At the same time, for all detections, the FAR decreased by 35% and PPV increased by 5% while the good detection rate remained unchanged.

  7. Semiology of the rare seizure subtype piloerection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Erek M; Worrell, Gregory A; Laughlin, Ruple S

    2010-12-01

    To report piloerection and vasomotor instability as a sole manifestation of partial seizures. Case report. Inpatient tertiary care center. A 72-year-old man with acute onset of repetitive autonomic events. Extensive cardiovascular evaluation, electroencephalographic testing, radiology, laboratory assessment, and frequency of clinical events (seizures). We characterize an uncommon manifestation of right temporal lobe partial seizures, initially thought to be cardiovascular in origin, as pilomotor seizures accompanied by other autonomic phenomena. The ictal electroencephalogram recordings established the diagnosis of right temporal lobe seizures, and head magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated right mesial temporal T2 signal change, enhancement, and subsequent atrophy. The underlying etiology was not uncovered despite an extensive laboratory and radiological evaluation. However, given the history and imaging findings, an infectious or secondary immunological etiology was suspected. Pilomotor events with other transient autonomic features, such as tachycardia and blood pressure fluctuations, may represent localization-related epilepsy. The acute onset of these events accompanied by other autonomic phenomena in the setting of focal magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities within the hippocampal region raises questions concerning pilomotor seizures as well as the differential diagnosis of acute seizure activity in the setting of neuroimaging findings characteristic for limbic encephalitis.

  8. Epileptic seizure after treatment with thiocolchicoside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Giavina-Bianchi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Pedro Giavina-Bianchi1,2, Mara Giavina-Bianchi1, Luciana Kase Tanno1, Luis Felipe Chiaverini Ensina1, Antôno Abílio Motta1, Jorge Kalil1,21Division of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil; 2Institute of Science, Hospital Alemao Oswaldo CruzBackground: Adverse drug reactions are important determinants of inpatient and outpatient morbidity. Thiocolchicoside is a semisynthetic derivate of naturally occurring colchicoside, which is largely used in humans as a centrally acting muscle relaxant. Epileptic seizures after thiocolchicoside intake have been reported in individuals with a history of epilepsy, acute brain injury or possible blood–brain barrier disruption.Case report: We report the case of a 66-year-old male patient presenting a sudden epileptic seizure temporally related to the intake of thiocolchicoside for muscle contracture and pain. The probably causes of the seizures were thiocolchicoside intake and cerebral microhemorrhages attributed to cerebral amyloid angiopathy.Discussion: Drugs only rarely cause focal seizures. Our case indicates that thiocolchicoside can precipitate seizures in predisposed patients, and that its use should be avoided in patients with brain diseases (and therefore lower seizure thresholds or blood–brain barrier disruption. This information should be provided in the drug package insert.Keywords: adverse drug reaction, thiocolchicoside, coltrax, epileptic seizure, muscle relaxant, cerebral amyloid angiopathy

  9. Rare Cause of Seizures, Renal Failure, and Gangrene in an 83-Year-Old Diabetic Male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stalin Viswanathan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an 83-year-old diabetic male who presented with acute-onset renal failure, seizures, psychosis, pneumonia, and right foot gangrene. Investigations revealed thrombocytopenia, CSF lymphocytosis, ANA and dsDNA positivity, hypocomplementemia, and pneumonitis following which he was treated with pulse methylprednisolone. He was treated for Pseudomonas-related ventilator-associated pneumonia, candiduria, and E. coli-related bedsore infection prior to discharge. He was discharged at request and died 17 days later due to a respiratory infection.

  10. Biotelemetry system for Epilepsy Seizure Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, LaCurtise; Bohnert, George W.

    2009-07-02

    The Biotelemetry System for Epilepsy Seizure Control Project developed and tested an automated telemetry system for use in an epileptic seizure prevention device that precisely controls localized brain temperature. This project was a result of a Department of Energy (DOE) Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (GIPP) grant to the Kansas City Plant (KCP), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to partner with Flint Hills Scientific, LLC, Lawrence, KS and Biophysical Laboratory Ltd (BIOFIL), Sarov, Russia to develop a method to help control epileptic seizures.

  11. [Semiology and propagation of epileptic seizures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellner, A-K; Fritsch, B

    2013-06-01

    The evaluation of episodic seizure-like symptoms is a common challenge in the neurologist's daily routine. The clinical signs (semiology) are the most important puzzle pieces to distinguish epileptic seizures from other episodic entities. Due to the often far-reaching health and social consequences of the diagnosis of epilepsy, the early and rigorous assessment of episodic symptoms by means of the patient history is important. This assessment is based on knowledge of the association of certain semiologies with epileptic syndromes and brain regions; however, certain limitations and pitfalls have to be considered. Typical propagation pathways of seizure activity determine the serial occurrence of semiological features and provide supplementary information.

  12. Acute disc prolapse secondary to seizure

    OpenAIRE

    Satia, Imran; Goodwin, Lynsey; Madi, Salem; Hamdalla, Hisham

    2011-01-01

    A 37-year-old female presented following a witnessed generalised tonic clonic seizure while washing her car. Witnesses reported the patient hit her head on the car bumper upon falling. She was investigated for a cause of a second seizure with blood tests, CT and MR brain which were normal. On day 3 of her admission she was still unable to walk since the seizure and a neurological examination was performed which revealed signs consistent with a cervical myelopathy. A cervical MRI scan revealed...

  13. Are afebrile seizures associated with minor infections a single seizure category? A hospital-based prospective cohort study on outcomes of first afebrile seizure in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Ma, Jiannan; Gan, Xiaoming; Xiao, Nong

    2014-07-01

    To explore if afebrile seizures associated with minor infections are a single category of seizure, or a set of different kinds of seizures. We conducted this prospective cohort study on three kinds of first afebrile seizure: first afebrile seizure associated with gastrointestinal infection (AS-GI), first afebrile seizure associated with nongastrointestinal infection (AS-nGI), and first unprovoked seizure (US). The Kaplan-Meier estimate risks of recurrent seizures were analyzed and compared pairwise. The characteristics of recurrent seizures were also compared pairwise. The Kaplan-Meier estimate risks of recurrent seizure at 2 years of the AS-GI, AS-nGI, and US groups were 6.9%, 23.7%, and 37.8%, respectively. The pairwise differences were significant between the AS-GI and US groups (p seizures in patients with recurrence, the pairwise differences were significant between the AS-GI and US groups (p seizures associated with minor infections are indeed of two distinguishable kinds: AS-GI, if free of risk factors such as a family history of epilepsy, had a better prognosis and should be categorized as an acute symptomatic seizure, whereas patients with first AS-nGI, like patients with first US, may have recurrent unprovoked seizures, which suggests this category's essential difference from AS-GI. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  14. Seizure prognosis of patients with low-grade tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlenberg, Cynthia A; Fadul, Camilo E; Roberts, David W; Thadani, Vijay M; Bujarski, Krzysztof A; Scott, Rod C; Jobst, Barbara C

    2012-09-01

    Seizures frequently impact the quality of life of patients with low grade tumors. Management is often based on best clinical judgment. We examined factors that correlate with seizure outcome to optimize seizure management. Patients with supratentorial low-grade tumors evaluated at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. Using multiple regression analysis the patient characteristics and treatments were correlated with seizure outcome using Engel's classification. Of the 73 patients with low grade tumors and median follow up of 3.8 years (range 1-20 years), 54 (74%) patients had a seizure ever and 46 (63%) had at least one seizure before tumor surgery. The only factor significantly associated with pre-surgical seizures was tumor histology. Of the 54 patients with seizures ever, 25 (46.3%) had a class I outcome at last follow up. There was no difference in seizure outcome between grade II gliomas (astrocytoma grade II, oligodendroglioma grade II, mixed oligo-astrocytoma grade II) and other pathologies (pilocytic astrocytoma, ependymomas, DNET, gangliocytoma and ganglioglioma). Once seizures were established seizure prognosis was similar between different pathologies. Chemotherapy (p=0.03) and radiation therapy (p=0.02) had a positive effect on seizure outcome. No other parameter including significant tumor growth during the follow up period predicted seizure outcome. Only three patients developed new-onset seizures after tumor surgery that were non-perioperative. Anticonvulsant medication was tapered in 14 patients with seizures and 10 had no further seizures. Five patients underwent additional epilepsy surgery with a class I outcome in four. Two patients received a vagal nerve stimulator with >50% seizure reduction. Seizures at presentation are the most important factor associated with continued seizures after tumor surgery. Pathology does not influence seizure outcome. Use of long term prophylactic anticonvulsants is unwarranted. Chemotherapy and

  15. 50 CFR 12.11 - Notification of seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notification of seizure. 12.11 Section 12... SEIZURE AND FORFEITURE PROCEDURES Preliminary Requirements § 12.11 Notification of seizure. Except where the owner or consignee is personally notified or seizure is made pursuant to a search warrant, the...

  16. 50 CFR 12.5 - Seizure by other agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Seizure by other agencies. 12.5 Section 12... SEIZURE AND FORFEITURE PROCEDURES General Provisions § 12.5 Seizure by other agencies. Any authorized... the laws listed in § 12.2 will, if so requested, deliver such seizure to the appropriate Special Agent...

  17. Seizure variables and cognitive performance in patients with epilepsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are scanty reports on the contributions of seizure variables like seizure types, frequency of seizures, duration of epilepsy, age at onset and anti-epileptic drugs to cognitive disturbances in Nigerian Africans. This study assessed the effects of seizure variables on the cognitive performances of patients with epilepsy.

  18. Seizure semiology identifies patients with bilateral temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesch, Anna Mira; Feddersen, Berend; Tezer, F Irsel; Hartl, Elisabeth; Rémi, Jan; Vollmar, Christian; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2015-01-01

    Laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy is usually defined by EEG and imaging results. We investigated whether the analysis of seizure semiology including lateralizing seizure phenomena identifies bilateral independent temporal lobe seizure onset. We investigated the seizure semiology in 17 patients in whom invasive EEG-video-monitoring documented bilateral temporal seizure onset. The results were compared to 20 left and 20 right consecutive temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients who were seizure free after anterior temporal lobe resection. The seizure semiology was analyzed using the semiological seizure classification with particular emphasis on the sequence of seizure phenomena over time and lateralizing seizure phenomena. Statistical analysis included chi-square test or Fisher's exact test. Bitemporal lobe epilepsy patients had more frequently different seizure semiology (100% vs. 40%; psemiology for the identification of bilateral TLE was high (100%) with a specificity of 60%. Lateralizing seizure phenomena had a low sensitivity (59%) but a high specificity (89%). The combination of lateralizing seizure phenomena and different seizure semiology showed a high specificity (94%) but a low sensitivity (59%). The analysis of seizure semiology including lateralizing seizure phenomena adds important clinical information to identify patients with bilateral TLE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ethosuximide, sodium valproate or lamotrigine for absence seizures in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C

    2017-02-14

    This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review originally published in 2003, Issue 3, and updated in 2005, Issue 4.Absence seizures are brief epileptic seizures which present in childhood and adolescence. Depending on clinical features and electroencephalogram (EEG) findings they are divided into typical, atypical absences, and absences with special features. Typical absences are characterised by sudden loss of awareness and an EEG typically shows generalised spike wave discharges at three cycles per second. Ethosuximide, valproate and lamotrigine are currently used to treat absence seizures. This review aims to determine the best choice of antiepileptic drug for children and adolescents with typical absence seizures. To review the evidence for the effects of ethosuximide, valproate and lamotrigine as treatments for children and adolescents with absence seizures, when compared with placebo or each other. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialized Register (1 September 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Register of Studies Online (CRSO, 1 September 2016), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to 1 September 2016), ClinicalTrials.gov (1 September 2016) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform ICTRP (1 September 2016). Previously we searched Embase (1988 to March 2005) and SCOPUS (1823 to 31 March 2014). No language restrictions were imposed. In addition, we contacted Sanofi Winthrop, Glaxo Wellcome (now GlaxoSmithKline) and Parke Davis (now Pfizer), manufacturers of sodium valproate, lamotrigine and ethosuximide respectively. Randomised parallel group monotherapy or add-on trials which include a comparison of any of the following in children or adolescents with absence seizures: ethosuximide; sodium valproate; lamotrigine; or placebo. Outcome measures were: (1) proportion of individuals seizure free at one, three, six, 12 and 18 months post randomisation; (2) people with a 50% or greater

  20. What are people afraid of during dental treatment? Anxiety-provoking capacity of 67 stimuli characteristic of the dental setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterink, F.M.D.; de Jongh, A.; Aartman, I.H.A.

    2008-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the anxiety-provoking capacity of the various objects and situations characteristic of the dental setting. The aims of the current study were to establish a hierarchy of anxiety-provoking capacities of a large set of dental stimuli and to determine the differences in

  1. Neonatal seizures triple the risk of a remote seizure after perinatal ischemic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, CK; Glass, HC; Sidney, S; Smith, SE; Fullerton, HJ

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 American Academy of Neurology. To determine incidence rates and risk factors of remote seizure after perinatal arterial ischemic stroke. Methods: We retrospectively identified a population-based cohort of children with perinatal arterial ischemic stroke (presenting acutely or in a delayed fashion) from a large Northern Californian integrated health care system. We determined incidence and predictors of a remote seizure (unprovoked seizure after neonatal period, defined as 28 days of li...

  2. High Risk of Seizures and Epilepsy after Decompressive Hemicraniectomy for Malignant Middle Cerebral Artery Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Brondani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Decompressive hemicraniectomy (DHC is a life-saving procedure for treatment of large malignant middle cerebral artery (MCA strokes. Post-stroke epilepsy is an additional burden for these patients, but its incidence and the risk factors for its development have been poorly investigated. Objective: To report the prevalence and risk factors for post-stroke seizures and post-stroke epilepsy after DHC for treatment of large malignant MCA strokes in a cohort of 36 patients. Methods: In a retrospective cohort study of 36 patients we report the timing and incidence of post-stroke epilepsy. We analyzed if age, sex, vascular risk factors, side of ischemia, reperfusion therapy, stroke etiology, extension of stroke, hemorrhagic transformation, ECASS scores, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores, or modified Rankin scores were risk factors for seizure or epilepsy after DHC for treatment of large MCA strokes. Results: The mean patient follow-up time was 1,086 days (SD = 1,172. Out of 36 patients, 9 (25.0% died before being discharged. After 1 year, a total of 11 patients (30.6% had died, but 22 (61.1% of them had a modified Rankin score ≤4. Thirteen patients (36.1% developed seizures within the first week after stroke. Seizures occurred in 22 (61.1% of 36 patients (95% CI = 45.17–77.03%. Out of 34 patients who survived the acute period, 19 (55.9% developed epilepsy after MCA infarcts and DHC (95% CI = 39.21–72.59%. In this study, no significant differences were observed between the patients who developed seizures or epilepsy and those who remained free of seizures or epilepsy regarding age, sex, side of stroke, presence of the clinical risk factors studied, hemorrhagic transformation, time of craniectomy, and Rankin score after 1 year of stroke. Conclusion: The incidence of seizures and epilepsy after malignant MCA infarcts submitted to DHC might be very high. Seizure might occur precociously in patients who are not

  3. Personalization of NonEEG-based seizure detection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, D; Heydarzadeh, M; Nourani, M

    2016-08-01

    Seizures affect each patient differently, so personalization is a vital part of developing a reliable nonEEG based seizure detection system. This personalization must be done while the patient is undergoing video EEG monitoring in an epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) because seizure detection by EEG is considered to be the ground truth. We propose the use of confidence interval analysis for determining how many seizures must be captured from a patient before we can reliably personalize such a seizure detection system for him/her. Our analysis indicates that 6 to 8 seizures are required. In addition, we create seizure likelihood tables for future use by said system by comparing the number of times a prespecified biosignal activity level is induced by seizure to the total number of occurrences of that level of activity. We focus on complex partial seizures in this paper because they are more difficult to detect than are generalized seizures.

  4. Pathophysiology of Tonic Muscle Activation During Epileptic Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, S.; Conradsen, Isa; Wolf, P.

    2011-01-01

    Tonic seizures and the tonic phase of tonic-clonic epileptic seizures are defined as a “sustained tonic” muscle contraction. Visual inspection of the surface electromyograms (sEMG) during seizures significantly contributed to a better understanding and diagnosis of several seizure types. However......, quantitative analysis of the sEMG during the epileptic seizures has received surprisingly little attention. The aim of our study was to elucidate the pathophysiology of the tonic muscle activation during seizures. SEMG was recorded from the deltoid muscles, during 58 seizures from 18 patients (9...... with generalised tonic and 9 with tonic-clonic seizures). 18 age and gender matched normal controls simulated 90 generalised tonic seizures. We calculated the root mean square (RMS) of the amplitudes, the median frequency (MF), the relative power (RP) and the coherence. During the epileptic seizures (especially...

  5. Optimal Vagus Nerve Stimulation Frequency for Suppression of Spike-and-Wave Seizures in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jianhang; Harreby, Kristian R; Sevcencu, Cristian; Jensen, Winnie

    2016-06-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is used as an adjunctive therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy and results in a 50% seizure reduction in up to 50% of treated patients. The VNS frequency used in the clinic today is in the range of 10-30 Hz. The evidence for choosing the stimulation frequency is limited, and little knowledge is available on the effect of other VNS frequencies. Deep brain, trigeminal nerve, or spinal cord stimulation studies have suggested the use of stimulation frequencies above 80 Hz for seizure control. Therefore, our objective for the present study was to investigate if VNS using frequencies higher than those currently used in the clinic could be more effective in attenuating seizures. Spike-and-wave (SW) discharges were induced in 11 rats, which then were subjected to VNS sessions applied at the frequencies of 10, 30, 80, 130, and 180 Hz combined with control intervals without stimulation. The anticonvulsive effect of VNS was evaluated by comparing the normalized mean power (nMP) and frequency (nMSF) of the SW discharges derived from intracortical recordings collected during the stimulation and control intervals. Compared with the control intervals, all the tested VNS frequencies significantly reduced the nMP (in the range of 9-21%). However, we found that 130 and 180 Hz VNS induced a 50% larger attenuation of seizures than that achieved by 30 Hz VNS. In addition, we found that 80, 130, and 180 Hz VNS induced a significant reduction of the nMSF, that is by 5, 7, and 8%, respectively. These results suggest that a VNS stimulation frequency in the range of 130-180 Hz may be more effective in inhibiting seizures than the 30 Hz VNS applied in the clinic today. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. [Epileptic seizures and syndromes in children. Classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plouin, Perrine; Kaminska, Anna; Eisermann, Monika; Soufflet, Christine

    2012-12-01

    In front of any clinical paroxysmal event in childhood, the first step is to make a positive diagnostic of an epileptic seizure; for this it is necessary to eliminate non epileptic seizures which are different according to age. Then the type of seizures has to be precised, being focal or generalized. EEG will contribute to determine the epileptic syndrome according to interictal and/or ictal findings. The epilepsy syndrome is the main entity to go further in etiology and treatment. According to the type of epilepsy syndrome it will be possible to look for a structural or metabolic cause, or to perform a genetic study. The present classification of seizures and syndromes as proposed by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) allows a common language in the world community as in clinical and therapeutic research.

  7. Multiple Sclerosis: Can It Cause Seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it cause seizures? Is there any connection between multiple sclerosis and epilepsy? Answers from B Mark Keegan, M. ... article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/multiple-sclerosis/expert-answers/multiple-sclerosis/FAQ-20058138 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions ...

  8. Epilepsy Risk Factors Following Neonatal Seizures

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-01-01

    Clinical and polysomnographic risk factors as early predictors for the development of postnatal epilepsy were determined in 158 infants presenting with two or more seizures, in a study at Hospital Sao Lucas, Porto Alegre, Brazil.

  9. Serum Prolactin in Diagnosis of Epileptic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies in databases and references concerning serum prolactin levels (PRL in patients with suspected seizures were rated for quality and analyzed by members of the Therapeutics Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

  10. Seizures and Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence, morbidity and mortality, diagnosis and management of cases of fabricated seizures and child abuse (Munchausen syndrome by proxy (MSbp are assessed by pediatricians at the University of Wales College of Medicine, Cardiff, UK.

  11. The influence of hubs in the structure of a neuronal network during an epileptic seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Abner Cardoso; Cerdeira, Hilda A.; Machado, Birajara Soares

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we propose changes in the structure of a neuronal network with the intention to provoke strong synchronization to simulate episodes of epileptic seizure. Starting with a network of Izhikevich neurons we slowly increase the number of connections in selected nodes in a controlled way, to produce (or not) hubs. We study how these structures alter the synchronization on the spike firings interval, on individual neurons as well as on mean values, as a function of the concentration of connections for random and non-random (hubs) distribution. We also analyze how the post-ictal signal varies for the different distributions. We conclude that a network with hubs is more appropriate to represent an epileptic state.

  12. Using a structured questionnaire improves seizure description by medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Kapadia, Saher; Shah, Hemang; McNair, Nancy; Pruitt, J. Ned; Murro, Anthony; Park, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate a structured questionnaire for improving a medical students? ability to identify, describe and interpret a witnessed seizure. Methods Ninety two 3rd year medical students, blinded to seizure diagnosis, viewed videos of a primary generalized seizure and a complex partial seizure.? Students next completed an unstructured questionnaire that asked the students to describe the seizure video recordings. The students then completed a structured qu...

  13. 15 CFR 904.501 - Notice of seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notice of seizure. 904.501 Section 904... Seizure and Forfeiture Procedures § 904.501 Notice of seizure. Within 60 days from the date of the seizure, NOAA will serve the Notice of Seizure as provided in § 904.3 to the owner or consignee, if known or...

  14. Epidemiology of Acute Symptomatic Seizures among Adult Medical Admissions

    OpenAIRE

    Nwani, Paul Osemeke; Nwosu, Maduaburochukwu Cosmas; Nwosu, Monica Nonyelum

    2016-01-01

    Acute symptomatic seizures are seizures occurring in close temporal relationship with an acute central nervous system (CNS) insult. The objective of the study was to determine the frequency of presentation and etiological risk factors of acute symptomatic seizures among adult medical admissions. It was a two-year retrospective study of the medical files of adults patients admitted with acute symptomatic seizures as the first presenting event. There were 94 cases of acute symptomatic seizures ...

  15. Hyponatremia-induced seizure during carbamazepine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtschmidt-Täschner, Bettina; Soyka, Michael

    2007-01-01

    We report the case of a 54-year-old woman who was admitted for benzodiazepine withdrawal. After 6 weeks of carbamazepine treatment (600, then 200 mg) the patient suddenly suffered from a grand mal seizure. Laboratory findings revealed a clinical significant hyponatremia of Na 125 mmol/l (baseline: 143 mmol/l). CCT and ECG were normal. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a seizure related to hyponatremia in an adult carbamazepine-treated patient.

  16. Ketogenic diet: Predictors of seizure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nitin; Arkilo, Dimitrios; Farooq, Osman; Gillogly, Cynthia; Kavak, Katelyn S; Weinstock, Arie

    2017-01-01

    The ketogenic diet is an effective non-pharmacologic treatment for medically resistant epilepsy. The aim of this study was to identify any predictors that may influence the response of ketogenic diet. A retrospective chart review for all patients with medically resistant epilepsy was performed at a tertiary care epilepsy center from 1996 to 2012. Patient- and diet-related variables were evaluated with respect to seizure reduction at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12-month intervals and divided into four possible outcome classes. Sixty-three patients met inclusion. Thirty-seven (59%) reported >50% seizure reduction at 3 months with 44% and 37% patients benefiting at 6-month and 12-month follow up, respectively. A trend toward significant seizure improvement was noted in 48% patients with seizure onset >1 year at 12-month (p = 0.09) interval and in 62% patients with >10 seizure/day at 6-month interval (p = 0.054). An ordinal logistic regression showed later age of seizure to have higher odds of favorable response at 1-month (p = 0.005) and 3-month (p = 0.013) follow up. Patients with non-fasting diet induction were more likely to have a favorable outcome at 6 months (p = 0.008) as do females (p = 0.037) and those treated with higher fat ratio diet (p = 0.034). Our study reports the effectiveness of ketogenic diet in children with medically resistant epilepsy. Later age of seizure onset, female gender, higher ketogenic diet ratio and non-fasting induction were associated with better odds of improved seizure outcome. A larger cohort is required to confirm these findings.

  17. Seizure disorders in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanly, John G.; Urowitz, Murray B.; Su, Li; Gordon, Caroline; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Sanchez-Guerrero, Jorge; Romero-Diaz, Juanita; Wallace, Daniel J; Clarke, Ann E.; Ginzler, E.M.; Merrill, Joan T.; Isenberg, David A.; Rahman, Anisur; Petri, M.; Fortin, Paul R.; Gladman, D. D.; Bruce, Ian N.; Steinsson, Kristjan; Dooley, M.A.; Khamashta, Munther A.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Fessler, Barri J.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Manzi, Susan; Zoma, Asad A.; Sturfelt, Gunnar K.; Nived, Ola; Aranow, Cynthia; Mackay, Meggan; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; van Vollenhoven, R.F.; Kalunian, Kenneth C.; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Lim, Sam; Kamen, Diane L.; Peschken, Christine A.; Inanc, Murat; Theriault, Chris; Thompson, Kara; Farewell, Vernon

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the frequency, attribution, outcome and predictors of seizures in SLE Methods The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) performed a prospective inception cohort study. Demographic variables, global SLE disease activity (SLEDAI-2K), cumulative organ damage (SLICC/ACR Damage Index (SDI)) and neuropsychiatric events were recorded at enrollment and annually. Lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin, anti-β2 glycoprotein-I, anti-ribosomal P and anti-NR2 glutamate receptor antibodies were measured at enrollment. Physician outcomes of seizures were recorded. Patient outcomes were derived from the SF-36 mental (MCS) and physical (PCS) component summary scores. Statistical analyses included Cox and linear regressions. Results The cohort was 89.4% female with a mean follow up of 3.5±2.9 years. 75/1631 (4.6%) had ≥1 seizure, the majority around the time of SLE diagnosis. Multivariate analysis indicated a higher risk of seizures with African race/ethnicity (HR(CI):1.97 (1.07–3.63); p=0.03) and lower education status (1.97 (1.21–3.19); pattributed to SLE frequently resolved (59/78(76%)) in the absence of anti-seizure drugs. There was no significant impact on the MCS or PCS scores. Anti-malarial drugs in absence of immunosuppressive agents were associated with reduced seizure risk (0.07(0.01–0.66); p=0.03). Conclusion Seizures occurred close to SLE diagnosis, in patients with African race/ethnicity, lower educational status and cumulative organ damage. Most seizures resolved without a negative impact on health-related quality of life. Anti-malarial drugs were associated with a protective effect. PMID:22492779

  18. From here to epilepsy: the risk of seizure in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicastro, Nicolas; Assal, Frédéric; Seeck, Margitta

    2016-03-01

    To describe the association between Alzheimer's disease and seizures by reviewing epidemiological data from available literature and to assess the putative pathophysiological links between neurodegeneration and altered cortical excitability. We also discuss specific antiepileptic treatment strategies in patients with Alzheimer's disease, as well as transient epileptic amnesia as a possible crossroads between degeneration and epilepsy. Regarding epidemiology, we searched publications in Pubmed, Medline, Scopus and Web of Science (until September 2015) using the keywords "incidence", "prevalence" and "frequency", as well as "Alzheimer's disease" and "seizures". In addition, therapeutic aspects for seizures in Alzheimer's disease were searched using the key words "antiepileptic drugs", "seizure treatment" and "Alzheimer". The prevalence and incidence rates of seizures were found to be increased 2 to 6-fold in patients with Alzheimer's disease compared to age-adjusted control patients. Treatment strategies have mainly been extrapolated from elderly patients without dementia, except for one single randomised trial, in which levetiracetam, lamotrigine and phenobarbital efficacy and tolerance were investigated in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mouse models appear to show a major role of amyloid precursor protein and its cleavage products in the generation of cortical hyperexcitability. A link between Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy has long been described and recent cohort studies have more clearly delineated risk factors associated with the genesis of seizures, such as early onset and possibly severity of dementia. As genetic forms of Alzheimer's disease and experimental mouse models suggest, beta-amyloid may play a prominent role in the propagation of synchronised abnormal discharges, perhaps more via an excitatory mode than a direct neurodegenerative effect.

  19. Time trend of neurocysticercosis in children with seizures in a tertiary hospital of western Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kalipatnam Seshagiri; Adhikari, Sudhir; Gauchan, Eva; Sathian, Brijesh; B K, Ganesh; Basnet, Sahisnuta; Tiwari, Prabhat Kumar; Bahadur, Namraj; Mishra, Rajnish

    2017-05-01

    Neurocysticercosis is a common cause of seizure disorders in children of Western Nepal. The clinical presentation is variable. The incidence varies depending on the food habits and ethnicity of the population. The present study was undertaken with the objective of studying the mode of presentation, radiological findings and to determine the recent trend of the disease in children of Western Nepal. Records from the Department of Pediatrics, Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal of children aged 0-17 years admitted from 2003 to 2015 and with the discharge diagnosis of seizure and neurocysticercosis (NCC) were reviewed. The diagnosis was primarily based on clinical features, neurological involvement and CT and MRI studies. Seizures due to other CNS pathologies were excluded. Patients with NCC were treated with Albendazole15mg/kg/day for 28 days with supportive treatments for seizures and raised intracranial pressure. Patients were followed up for one year after the completion of the treatment. There were 1355 cases of seizure disorders, out of which 229 (16.90%) were NCC. There were 99 (43.23%) in the age group 6-10 years followed by 91 (41.09%) in the age group of 11-15 years. Seizures were the most common presenting symptom in 88.65%, followed by raised ICP in 9.61%. Neuropsychiatric changes were noted in 38 cases (16.59%). CT scan findings revealed single lesion in 78.16% and multiple lesions in 21.83%. Poisson regression analysis showed statistically significant decline of year-wise incidence of NCC cases (p<0.05) from 2003 to 2015. The decline in the incidence of NCC in recent years is most probably attributed to improved hygiene with the construction of household toilets to avoid open defecation and biannual deworming with Albendazole as a part of School Health and Nutrition Project.

  20. Time trend of neurocysticercosis in children with seizures in a tertiary hospital of western Nepal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalipatnam Seshagiri Rao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis is a common cause of seizure disorders in children of Western Nepal. The clinical presentation is variable. The incidence varies depending on the food habits and ethnicity of the population. The present study was undertaken with the objective of studying the mode of presentation, radiological findings and to determine the recent trend of the disease in children of Western Nepal.Records from the Department of Pediatrics, Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal of children aged 0-17 years admitted from 2003 to 2015 and with the discharge diagnosis of seizure and neurocysticercosis (NCC were reviewed. The diagnosis was primarily based on clinical features, neurological involvement and CT and MRI studies. Seizures due to other CNS pathologies were excluded. Patients with NCC were treated with Albendazole15mg/kg/day for 28 days with supportive treatments for seizures and raised intracranial pressure. Patients were followed up for one year after the completion of the treatment.There were 1355 cases of seizure disorders, out of which 229 (16.90% were NCC. There were 99 (43.23% in the age group 6-10 years followed by 91 (41.09% in the age group of 11-15 years. Seizures were the most common presenting symptom in 88.65%, followed by raised ICP in 9.61%. Neuropsychiatric changes were noted in 38 cases (16.59%. CT scan findings revealed single lesion in 78.16% and multiple lesions in 21.83%. Poisson regression analysis showed statistically significant decline of year-wise incidence of NCC cases (p<0.05 from 2003 to 2015.The decline in the incidence of NCC in recent years is most probably attributed to improved hygiene with the construction of household toilets to avoid open defecation and biannual deworming with Albendazole as a part of School Health and Nutrition Project.

  1. Automated analysis of brain activity for seizure detection in zebrafish models of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunyadi, Borbála; Siekierska, Aleksandra; Sourbron, Jo; Copmans, Daniëlle; de Witte, Peter A M

    2017-08-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic neurological condition, with over 30% of cases unresponsive to treatment. Zebrafish larvae show great potential to serve as an animal model of epilepsy in drug discovery. Thanks to their high fecundity and relatively low cost, they are amenable to high-throughput screening. However, the assessment of seizure occurrences in zebrafish larvae remains a bottleneck, as visual analysis is subjective and time-consuming. For the first time, we present an automated algorithm to detect epileptic discharges in single-channel local field potential (LFP) recordings in zebrafish. First, candidate seizure segments are selected based on their energy and length. Afterwards, discriminative features are extracted from each segment. Using a labeled dataset, a support vector machine (SVM) classifier is trained to learn an optimal feature mapping. Finally, this SVM classifier is used to detect seizure segments in new signals. We tested the proposed algorithm both in a chemically-induced seizure model and a genetic epilepsy model. In both cases, the algorithm delivered similar results to visual analysis and found a significant difference in number of seizures between the epileptic and control group. Direct comparison with multichannel techniques or methods developed for different animal models is not feasible. Nevertheless, a literature review shows that our algorithm outperforms state-of-the-art techniques in terms of accuracy, precision and specificity, while maintaining a reasonable sensitivity. Our seizure detection system is a generic, time-saving and objective method to analyze zebrafish LPF, which can replace visual analysis and facilitate true high-throughput studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Seizure semiology in leucine-rich glioma-inactivated protein 1 antibody-associated limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Wang, Xiu; Zhang, Chao; Cui, Tao; Shi, Wei-Xiong; Guan, Hong-Zhi; Ren, Hai-Tao; Shao, Xiao-Qiu

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to advance the characterization of seizure semiology in leucine-rich glioma-inactivated protein 1 (LGI1) antibody-associated limbic encephalitis (LE). Eighteen patients diagnosed with LGI1 LE were identified. Seizure semiology, demographic features, MRI and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), electroencephalograms, and outcomes following immunotherapy were evaluated. Patients were divided into the following groups based on seizure semiology: faciobrachial dystonic seizure only (FBDS-only, n=4), epileptic seizure without FBDS (Non-FBDS, n=6), and FBDS plus epileptic seizure (FBDS+, n=8). In the group with Non-FBDS, the majority of patients (5/6) manifested mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) like semiology (i.e., fear, epigastric rising, staring, and automatisms) with a frequency of 7±5 times per day and a duration of 15.3±14.3s. In the group with FBDS+, the distinctive symptom was FBDS followed by epileptic events, especially automatisms (7/8), with a frequency of 16±12 times per day and a duration of 13.0±8.0s. In these cases, 67% and 50% of the patients showed abnormalities on MRI and FDG-PET, respectively, and the mesial temporal lobe structures were most often involved. Ictal discharges were observed in 0/4, 6/6, and 8/8 of the patients in the groups with FBDS only, Non-FBDS, and FBDS+, respectively. The temporal lobe was mainly affected. Immunotherapy had favorable therapeutic effects. The LGI1 LE should be considered as one disease syndrome with a series of clinical manifestation. Identifying types of unique semiology features will facilitate the early diagnosis and the timely initiation of immunotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dextromethorphan abuse masquerading as a recurrent seizure disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majlesi, Nima; Lee, David C; Ali, Sayed S

    2011-03-01

    Dextromethorphan (DXM) has unique toxicity that may be difficult to diagnose. We present a case of a young woman who presented to our emergency department (ED) initially diagnosed with recurrent seizures. Paramedics brought a 19-year-old woman to the ED. Witnesses noted "shaking," which the patient did not recall. The patient denied fever, antecedent trauma, or neurological complaint. She was recently administered lamotrigine for bipolar disorder. She was a former alcoholic with no history of developing withdrawal. She admitted to marijuana use but denied use of any other illicit substances. Her vital signs and physical examination were unremarkable. She had a normal brain computed tomography, electrocardiogram, and laboratory evaluation. There was no alcohol detected. Her urine drug screen was negative for opiates, benzodiazepines, cocaine, amphetamines, barbiturates, phencyclidine, and tricyclic antidepressants. She was diagnosed with new-onset seizure and discharged home. No abnormalities were seen in the brain magnetic resonance imaging scan and electroencephalogram. She was scheduled for a cardiac syncope workup, but never followed through. Two months later, she presented to the hospital again for a similar complaint. Coworkers reported witnessing sudden tonic-clonic movements and confusion. On ED presentation, the patient was tachycardic with a heart rate of 110 beats/min and had horizontal nystagmus. She was alert with a flat affect. She did not recall events but answered questions appropriately. Repeat radiographic and laboratory evaluations were normal including urine drug screen and computed tomography. Upon questioning, she admitted to abusing DXM for the past several months. A serum DXM level at this time was 988.3 ng/mL. She was admitted to the hospital for 24 hours without sequelae. All further diagnostic testing was cancelled, and she was referred to a drug rehabilitation program. Abuse of DXM is increasing in incidence. The serum level of our

  4. Sudden infant death syndrome, sleep, and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppenbrouwers, Toke

    2015-06-01

    benign febrile seizures seen in 7% of infants before 6 months play a role in the terminal pathway in a subset of sudden infant death syndrome victims. Supporting evidence: (1) lack of 5-hydroxitryptamine, one consistent finding in sudden infant death syndrome that Kinney et al coined a developmental serotonopathy, is consistent with risk for seizures. (2) Non-rapid eye movement sleep increasing during the age of highest risk for sudden infant death syndrome facilitates some seizures (seizure gate). (3) Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy is associated with severe hypoxemia and hypercapnia during postictal generalized electroencephalographic (EEG) suppression. In toddlers, sudden unexplained deaths are associated with hippocampal abnormalities and some seizures. (4) The sudden nature of both deaths warrants an exploration of similarities in the terminal pathway. Moreover, sudden infant death syndrome, febrile seizures, sudden unexplained death in childhood, and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy share some of the following risk factors: prone sleeping, infections, hyperthermia, preterm birth, male gender, maternal smoking, and mutations in genes that regulate sodium channels. State-of-the-art molecular studies can be exploited to test this hypothesis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Intravenous Carbamazepine for Adults With Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, P Brittany; Tillery, Erika E; DeFalco, Alicia Potter

    2018-03-01

    To review the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety, dosage and administration, potential drug-drug interactions, and place in therapy of the intravenous (IV) formulation of carbamazepine (Carnexiv) for the treatment of seizures in adult patients. A comprehensive PubMed and EBSCOhost search (1945 to August 2017) was performed utilizing the keywords carbamazepine, Carnexiv, carbamazepine intravenous, IV carbamazepine, seizures, epilepsy, and seizure disorder. Additional data were obtained from literature review citations, manufacturer's product labeling, and Lundbeck website as well as Clinicaltrials.gov and governmental sources. All English-language trials evaluating IV carbamazepine were analyzed for this review. IV carbamazepine is FDA approved as temporary replacement therapy for treatment of adult seizures. Based on a phase I trial and pooled data from 2 open-label bioavailability studies comparing oral with IV dosing, there was no noted indication of loss of seizure control in patients switched to short-term replacement antiepileptic drug therapy with IV carbamazepine. The recommended dose of IV carbamazepine is 70% of the patient's oral dose, given every 6 hours via 30-minute infusions. The adverse effect profile of IV carbamazepine is similar to that of the oral formulation, with the exception of added infusion-site reactions. IV carbamazepine is a reasonable option for adults with generalized tonic-clonic or focal seizures, previously stabilized on oral carbamazepine, who are unable to tolerate oral medications for up to 7 days. Unknown acquisition cost and lack of availability in the United States limit its use currently.

  6. Acute Symptomatic Seizures Caused by Electrolyte Disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    In this narrative review we focus on acute symptomatic seizures occurring in subjects with electrolyte disturbances. Quite surprisingly, despite its clinical relevance, this issue has received very little attention in the scientific literature. Electrolyte abnormalities are commonly encountered in clinical daily practice, and their diagnosis relies on routine laboratory findings. Acute and severe electrolyte imbalances can manifest with seizures, which may be the sole presenting symptom. Seizures are more frequently observed in patients with sodium disorders (especially hyponatremia), hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia. They do not entail a diagnosis of epilepsy, but are classified as acute symptomatic seizures. EEG has little specificity in differentiating between various electrolyte disturbances. The prominent EEG feature is slowing of the normal background activity, although other EEG findings, including various epileptiform abnormalities may occur. An accurate and prompt diagnosis should be established for a successful management of seizures, as rapid identification and correction of the underlying electrolyte disturbance (rather than an antiepileptic treatment) are of crucial importance in the control of seizures and prevention of permanent brain damage.

  7. Anoxic seizures: self-terminating syncopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, J B

    2001-01-01

    This review focuses on anoxic seizures induced by self terminating syncopes in the young. Anoxic seizures are nonepileptic events consequent upon abrupt interruption of the energy supply to metabolically active cerebral neurones. Anoxic seizures are the most common paroxysmal events misdiagnosed as epilepsy. Neurally mediated syncopes have numerous appellations, especially in the young. This proliferation of terminology likely results from uncertainty regarding pathophysiology. The most important type of self-limiting syncope from the point of view of diagnostic difficulty has been called neurocardiogenic or vasovagal syncope and reflex anoxic seizure, amongst other names: this review includes a video clip of such a child with prolonged asystole. It also includes a detailed case history emphasising the feelings of a patient with this type of syncope who was misdiagnosed as having epilepsy for many years. The second class of self-terminating syncope discussed and illustrated on video is the so-called breath-holding spell of young children. The third example illustrated is the compulsive Valsalva manoeuvre of individuals with autistic spectrum disorder, in which anoxic seizures - as shown on the video clips - are easily misdiagnosed as epileptic seizures, with unfortunate consequences.

  8. Hungry Neurons: Metabolic Insights on Seizure Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bazzigaluppi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy afflicts up to 1.6% of the population and the mechanisms underlying the appearance of seizures are still not understood. In past years, many efforts have been spent trying to understand the mechanisms underlying the excessive and synchronous firing of neurons. Traditionally, attention was pointed towards synaptic (dysfunction and extracellular ionic species (dysregulation. Recently, novel clinical and preclinical studies explored the role of brain metabolism (i.e., glucose utilization of seizures pathophysiology revealing (in most cases reduced metabolism in the inter-ictal period and increased metabolism in the seconds preceding and during the appearance of seizures. In the present review, we summarize the clinical and preclinical observations showing metabolic dysregulation during epileptogenesis, seizure initiation, and termination, and in the inter-ictal period. Recent preclinical studies have shown that 2-Deoxyglucose (2-DG, a glycolysis blocker is a novel therapeutic approach to reduce seizures. Furthermore, we present initial evidence for the effectiveness of 2-DG in arresting 4-Aminopyridine induced neocortical seizures in vivo in the mouse.

  9. [Seizures in neurofibromatosis. What is the risk?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouet, A

    2011-12-01

    The prevalence and the type of seizures associated with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) and 2 (NF2) are not adequately characterized. NF1 has a birth incidence of one in 2500, and NF2 one in 25000. Seizures are an occasional complication in NF1 patients and there is no data for NF2 patients. Central nervous system tumors are always suspected, since NF1 and NF2 are caused by mutations in tumor suppressor gene controlling cell proliferation and differentiation. The aim of this article is to provide a synthetic overview about epilepsy associated with NF1 and NF2 based on published studies. In NF1, the type of seizures and their response to therapy are reported, the heterogeneity of etiology is also discussed. For NF2 patients, no specific data are available; the current knowledge comes from series of NF2 patients for which seizures has revealed the disease or from isolated case reports of tumors associated with seizures. Cryptogenic epilepsy without anatomic defect is likely to be related to NF1, while seizures seem to be secondary to leptomeningeal tumors (meningioma, meningioangiomatosis) in NF2 patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Inhibition of Bcl-2 or IAP proteins does not provoke mutations in surviving cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shekhar, Tanmay M. [Department of Biochemistry, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3083 (Australia); Green, Maja M. [Department of Biochemistry, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3083 (Australia); Department of Anatomy & Neuroscience, The University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Rayner, David M.; Miles, Mark A.; Cutts, Suzanne M. [Department of Biochemistry, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3083 (Australia); Hawkins, Christine J., E-mail: c.hawkins@latrobe.edu.au [Department of Biochemistry, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3083 (Australia)

    2015-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Mutagenicities of anti-cancer drugs were tested using HPRT, γH2AX and comet assays. • TRAIL, doxorubicin and etoposide were more mutagenic than BH3- or Smac-mimetics. • Physiologically achievable levels of the BH3-mimetic ABT-737 were not mutagenic. • High concentrations of ABT-737 provoked mutations via an off-target mechanism. • Even very high concentrations of IAP antagonists were not mutagenic. - Abstract: Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can cause permanent damage to the genomes of surviving cells, provoking severe side effects such as second malignancies in some cancer survivors. Drugs that mimic the activity of death ligands, or antagonise pro-survival proteins of the Bcl-2 or IAP families have yielded encouraging results in animal experiments and early phase clinical trials. Because these agents directly engage apoptosis pathways, rather than damaging DNA to indirectly provoke tumour cell death, we reasoned that they may offer another important advantage over conventional therapies: minimisation or elimination of side effects such as second cancers that result from mutation of surviving normal cells. Disappointingly, however, we previously found that concentrations of death receptor agonists like TRAIL that would be present in vivo in clinical settings provoked DNA damage in surviving cells. In this study, we used cell line model systems to investigate the mutagenic capacity of drugs from two other classes of direct apoptosis-inducing agents: the BH3-mimetic ABT-737 and the IAP antagonists LCL161 and AT-406. Encouragingly, our data suggest that IAP antagonists possess negligible genotoxic activity. Doses of ABT-737 that were required to damage DNA stimulated Bax/Bak-independent signalling and exceeded concentrations detected in the plasma of animals treated with this drug. These findings provide hope that cancer patients treated by BH3-mimetics or IAP antagonists may avoid mutation-related illnesses that afflict

  11. Cardiopulmonary complications during pediatric seizures: A prelude to understanding SUDEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kanwaljit; Katz, Eliot S.; Zarowski, Marcin; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Llewellyn, Nichelle; Manganaro, Sheryl; Gregas, Matt; Pavlova, Milena; Kothare, Sanjeev V.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Purpose Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is an important, unexplained cause of death in epilepsy. Role of cardiopulmonary abnormalities in the pathophysiology of SUDEP is unclear in the pediatric population. Our objective was to assess cardiopulmonary abnormalities during epileptic seizures in children, with the long-term goal of identifying potential mechanisms of SUDEP. Methods We prospectively recorded cardiopulmonary functions using pulse-oximetry, electrocardiography (ECG), and respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP). Logistic regression was used to evaluate association of cardiorespiratory findings with seizure characteristics and demographics. Key Findings We recorded 101 seizures in 26 children (average age 3.9 years). RIP provided analyzable data in 78% and pulse-oximetry in 63% seizures. Ictal central apnea was more prevalent in patients with younger age (p = 0.01), temporal lobe (p seizures (p seizures (p seizures (p seizures (p seizures (p seizures (p seizures (p = 0.01). Ictal and postictal bradycardia were directly associated (p seizures (p epileptic seizures are associated with predictable patient and seizure characteristics, including seizure subtype and duration. PMID:23731396

  12. Recruitment methods in a clinical trial of provoked vulvodynia: Predictors of enrollment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachour, Candi C; Bachmann, Gloria A; Foster, David C; Wan, Jim Y; Rawlinson, Leslie A; Brown, Candace S

    2017-02-01

    Successful recruitment in clinical trials for chronic pain conditions is challenging, especially in women with provoked vulvodynia due to reluctance in discussing pain associated with sexual intercourse. The most successful recruitment methods and the characteristics of women reached with these methods are unknown. To compare the effectiveness and efficiency of four recruitment methods and to determine socioeconomic predictors for successful enrollment in a National Institutes of Health-sponsored multicenter clinical trial evaluating a gabapentin intervention in women with provoked vulvodynia. Recruitment methods utilized mass mailing, media, clinician referrals and community outreach. Effectiveness (number of participants enrolled) and efficiency (proportion screened who enrolled) were determined. Socioeconomic variables including race, educational level, annual household income, relationship status, age, menopausal status and employment status were also evaluated regarding which recruitment strategies were best at targeting specific cohorts. Of 868 potential study participants, 219 were enrolled. The most effective recruitment method in enrolling participants was mass mailing ( p recruitment methods ( p = 0.11). Relative to clinician referral, black women were 13 times as likely to be enrolled through mass mailing (adjusted odds ratio 12.5, 95% confidence interval, 3.6-43.1) as white women. There were no differences in enrollment according to educational level, annual income, relationship status, age, menopausal status, or employment status and recruitment method. In this clinical trial, mass mailing was the most effective recruitment method. Race of participants enrolled in a provoked vulvodynia trial was related to the recruitment method.

  13. Entitled vengeance: A meta-analysis relating narcissism to provoked aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Kyler

    2016-07-01

    Narcissism has long been used to predict aggressive or vengeful responses to provocations from others. The strength of this relation can, however, vary widely from study to study. Narcissism and revenge were examined in 84 independent samples (N = 11297), along with the moderating role of sample type (i.e., child/adolescent, prisoner, undergraduate, or general samples), type of narcissism measure used (i.e., Narcissistic Personality Inventory, Psychological Entitlement Scale, Short D3, etc.), the nature of the provocation, and the type of provoked aggression examined. Narcissism was positively related to provoked aggression across studies (ρ = .25), but that relation was stronger in child/adolescent samples (ρ = .36) and when measures of entitlement or vulnerable narcissism were employed (ρ = .29). Implications for practical research, as well as neglected areas of research on narcissism and provoked aggression are discussed. Aggr. Behav. 42:362-379, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A case report of successful team approach treatment of provoked vulvodynia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrijela Simetinger

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: Vulvodynia has been defined as vulvar discomfort, most often described as burning pain, occurring in the absence of relevant findings or a specific, clinically identifiable, neurologic disorder. Vulvodynia is a genital syndrome of multi-causal origin and requires a team approach. The purpose of the case report of provoked vulvodynia is to show the efficacy of individualized, multifaceted and multidisciplinary therapeutic team approach used by a gynaecologist with special knowledge of sexology and a physiotherapist specialising in treatment of pelvic floor dysfunction. Case report: A 35-year old patient presented with a complaint of genital itching and consequently burning pain which first occurred during sexual intercourse one year previously. Afterwards a gynaecologist with special knowledge of sexology performed a biopsychosocial assessment, broader gynaecological examination and psychoeducation. Diagnosed was provoked vulvodynia. Than she was assessed by the physiotherapist specialising in treatment of pelvic floor dysfunction and treated with TENS. To assess the effectiveness of treatment were used Female Sexual Function Index questionnaire and the visual analogue scale before and after the team approach treatment. Conclusions: In our case individualized, multifaceted and multidisciplinary therapeutic approach proved to be a good choice for treating genital syndrome of provoked vulvodynia of multi-causal origin.

  15. Serum Prolactin Level after Febrile Seizure versus Epileptic Seizure in 6-Month-Old to 5-Year-Old Children

    OpenAIRE

    Zahra Yekta; Nader Pashapoor; Ali Aghayar Macooie; Mohammad Karamyar

    2009-01-01

    Background: Serum prolactin level has been used as analternative determinant to help differentiate epileptic fromnon-epileptic seizures. We aimed to analyze the associationbetween serum prolactin concentration and epileptic seizureversus febrile seizure as well as seizure duration, single versusmultiple seizure attacks and time lapse between seizure onsetand blood sampling.Methods: Seventy patients aged 6 months to 5 years withseizure who admitted to the emergency department betweenMarch 2004...

  16. The adult seizure and social outcomes of children with partial complex seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camfield, Carol S; Camfield, Peter R

    2013-02-01

    Most intellectually normal children with focal epilepsy have partial complex or focal with secondary generalization seizures without a precise epilepsy syndrome. Their long-term outcome is largely unknown. Cases were identified from the population-based Nova Scotia Childhood Epilepsy cohort. Those eligible had seizure onset at 1 month to 16 years between 1977 and 1985, normal intelligence, ≥10 years of follow-up, only focal seizures and no benign epilepsy syndromes. There were 108 patients with partial complex with or without secondary generalization as the only seizure type(s) throughout (partial complex group) and 80 with secondary generalization as the only seizure type (secondary generalization group). Average age ± standard deviation at onset was 7.3 ± 4.5 years and follow-up was 27.9 ± 5.4 years. At follow-up, 57% of the partial complex group were in remission versus 81% of the secondary generalization group (P = 0.001). The partial complex group was more likely to be intractable or have undergone epilepsy surgery (36% versus 5%, P = 0.000). In the partial complex group, 28% had seizure free versus 5% in the secondary generalized group (P = 0.000). More patients in the partial complex group had undergone mental health assessments (59% versus 32%, P = 0.000), and 33% had a psychiatric diagnosis versus 15% in the secondary generalized group (P = 0.004). More patients with partial complex seizures had specific learning disorders (63% versus 45%, P = 0.03). Seven markers of poor social outcome were more common in patients with partial complex seizures (>2 markers: 34% versus 10%, P = 0.000). During 25-30 years of follow-up, >50% of intellectually normal patients with childhood-onset partial complex seizures had difficult-to-control seizures and learning and psychiatric/social problems. Most with secondary generalized seizures only had remission and better academic and psychiatric/social outcomes.

  17. Epileptic seizures in Neuro-Behcet disease: why some patients develop seizure and others not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Gulnihal; Semercioglu, Sencer; Ucler, Serap; Erdal, Abidin; Inan, Levent E

    2015-03-01

    Behcet disease (BD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory disorder. Neuro BD (NBD) is seen in approximately 5% of all patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency, type and prognosis of epileptic seizures in different forms of NBD. All files of 42 patients with NBD were evaluated between 2006 and 2012, retrospectively. The demographic data, the presentation of NBD, clinical findings including seizures, EEG and neuroimaging findings were reviewed. The mean age of patients was 35.02±8.43 years. Thirty (71.4%) patients were male; the remaining 12 of them were female. Twenty-four patients had brainstem lesions; 16 patients had cerebral venous thrombosis. Spinal cord involvement was seen in two patients. Seven patients had epileptic seizures (six partial onset seizures with or without secondary generalization). Six of them had cerebral sinus thrombosis (CVT). Four patients had a seizure as the first symptom of the thrombosis. One patient had late onset seizure due to chronic venous infarct. The other patient with seizure had brainstem involvement. The remaining was diagnosed as epilepsy before the determination of NBD. CVT seen in BD seems to be the main risk factor for epileptic seizures in patients with NBD. The prognosis is usually good especially in patients with CVT. Epileptic seizures in patients with brainstem involvement may be an indicator for poor prognosis. Superior sagittal thrombosis or cortical infarct would be predictor of seizures occurrence because of the high ratio in patients with seizures. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Asymmetric seizure termination in primary and secondary generalized tonic-clonic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Gerald; Unterberger, Iris; Dobesberger, Judith; Embacher, Norbert; Falkenstetter, Tina; Larch, Julia; Kuchukhidze, Giorgi; Gotwald, Thaddaeus; Ortler, Martin; Bauer, Gerhard; Trinka, Eugen

    2009-09-01

    In temporal lobe epilepsies an asymmetric termination (AST) of the clonic phase of secondary generalized tonic-clonic seizures (sGTCS) reliably lateralizes the side of seizure onset. The last clonic activity occurs ipsilateral to the side of the seizure onset zone. We compared the prevalence and lateralizing value of AST in sGTCS of frontal and temporal lobe origin as well as in primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures (pGTCS). We analyzed 177 seizures in 84 consecutive patients. Forty-one patients had temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), 24 frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), and 19 had nonfocal (primary) generalized epilepsies (GE). All patients underwent intensive video-EEG (electroencephalography) monitoring, high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), neuropsychological testing, and single photon emission computed tomography/positron emission tomography (SPECT/PET) when feasible. Two investigators blinded for diagnosis, EEG, and imaging data assessed frequency and side of the last clonic jerk. AST occurred in 63% of patients with TLE (47% of seizures), in 71% with FLE (60% of seizures), and in 42% with GE (21% of seizures). These results were not significant for patients, but significant for seizures in TLE versus GE and in FLE versus GE (p seizure onset was 74% (p = 0.003) in TLE and 75% (p = 0.008) in FLE. AST in sGTCS lateralizes the side of seizure onset in TLE and in FLE to the ipsilateral hemisphere with a high PPV. However, AST was also observed in GE. Therefore, asymmetric clinical signs should not inevitably lead to the assumption of focal epilepsy syndromes.

  19. Mild traumatic brain injury in children is associated with a low risk for posttraumatic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguenard, Anna L; Miller, Brandon A; Sarda, Samir; Capasse, Meredith; Reisner, Andrew; Chern, Joshua J

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT Of the 1.7 million traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) in the US, a third occur in patients under 14 years of age. The rate of posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE) may be as high as 19% after severe pediatric TBI, but the risk for seizures after mild TBI is unknown. Although the rate of seizures after mild TBI may be low, current practice is often driven by high clinical concern for posttraumatic seizures. In this study, the authors evaluated electroencephalography (EEG) results and antiepileptic drug (AED) use in a large cohort of children with mild TBI to estimate the incidence of posttraumatic seizures in this population. METHODS Patients presenting to Children's Hospital of Atlanta for mild TBI from 2010 to 2013 were evaluated. Five thousand one hundred forty-eight patients with mild TBI were studied and divided into 3 groups: 4168 who were discharged from the emergency department, 868 who were admitted without neurosurgical intervention, and 112 who underwent neurosurgical procedures (craniotomy for hematoma evacuation or elevation of depressed skull fractures) but were discharged without an extended stay. Demographic information, CT characteristics, EEG reports, and prescriptions for AEDs were analyzed. Long-term follow-up was sought for all patients who underwent EEG. Correlation between EEG result and AED use was also evaluated. RESULTS All patients underwent head CT, and admitted patients were more likely to have an abnormal study (p < 0.0001). EEG evaluations were performed for less than 1.0% of patients in all 3 categories, without significant differences between groups (p = 0.97). Clinicians prescribed AEDs in less than 2.0% of patients for all groups, without significant differences between groups (p = 0.094). Even fewer children continue to see a neurologist for long-term seizure management. The EEG result had good negative predictive value, but only an abnormal EEG reading that was diagnostic of seizures correlated significantly with AED prescription (p

  20. Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive - discharge

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    Minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass - discharge; MIDCAB - discharge; Robot assisted coronary artery bypass - discharge; RACAB - discharge; Keyhole heart surgery - discharge; Coronary artery disease - MIDCAB discharge; CAD - ...

  1. Plasticity-modulated seizure dynamics for seizure termination in realistic neuronal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppert, M.M.J.; Kalitzin, S.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Viergever, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    In previous studies we showed that autonomous absence seizure generation and termination can be explained by realistic neuronal models eliciting bi-stable dynamics. In these models epileptic seizures are triggered either by external stimuli (reflex epilepsies) or by internal fluctuations. This

  2. Seizures and Teens: Surgery for Seizures--What's It All About?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchowny, Michael S.; Dean, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Nearly 1 out of 2 children and teens with seizures may need to take medications throughout their lives. At least 25% will develop a condition called refractory epilepsy--meaning that their seizures do not respond to medical therapy. For these children and teens, non-drug therapies such as brain surgery are available that may offer a chance to…

  3. Seizures and Teens: When Seizures Aren't the Only Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanner, Andres M.; Shafer, Patricia O.

    2006-01-01

    Some teenagers with epilepsy only have to deal with seizures, which can be tough enough, but for other teens, seizures are not the only problem. Parents and caregivers often report changes in their teens' abilities to think clearly, learn in school, or remain focused in class. Mood and other behavioral problems may also be seen. It is critical…

  4. Triheptanoin reduces seizure susceptibility in a syndrome-specific mouse model of generalized epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Borges, Karin; Petrou, Steven; Reid, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    Triheptanoin is a triglyceride containing heptanoate, an odd-chained medium fatty acid that is metabolized to produce propionyl-CoA and subsequently C4 intermediates of the citric acid cycle and therefore capable of anaplerosis. These metabolic products are believed to underlie triheptanoin's anticonvulsant effects in rodent seizure models. Here we investigate the anticonvulsive effects of oral triheptanoin in a syndrome-specific genetic mouse model of generalized epilepsy based on the GABA(A)γ2(R43Q) mutation. Mice were fed a diet supplemented with triheptanoin from weaning for three weeks prior to electrocortical recordings. Occurrence and durations of spike and wave discharges (SWDs) were measured. Triheptanoin did not alter body weight or basal blood glucose levels suggesting that it was well tolerated. Triheptanoin supplementation halved the time spent in seizures due to a reduction in both SWD occurrence and duration. An injection of insulin was used to reduce blood glucose, a metabolic stress known to precipitate seizures in the GABA(A)γ2(R43Q) mouse. The reduction in seizure count was also evident following insulin induced hypoglycemia with the triheptanoin treated group having significantly less SWDs than control animals under similar low blood glucose conditions. In summary, triheptanoin may be an effective and well tolerated dietary therapy for generalized epilepsy. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A Seizure Care Pathway in the Emergency Department: Preliminary Quality and Safety Improvements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parameswaran M. Iyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the utility of a seizure care pathway for seizure presentations to the emergency department (ED in order to safely avoid unnecessary admission and to provide early diagnostic and therapeutic guidance and minimize length of stay in those admitted. Methods. 3 studies were conducted, 2 baseline audits and a 12-month intervention study and prospective data was collected over a 12-month period (Nov 2008-09. Results. Use of the Pathway resulted in a reduction in the number of epilepsy related admissions from 341 in 2004 to 276 in 2009 (=0.0006; a reduction in the median length of stay of those admittedfrom 4-5 days in the baseline audits to 2 days in the intervention study (≤0.001; an improvement in time to diagnostic investigations such as CT brain, MRI brain and Electroencephalography (≤0.001, ≤0.048, ≤0.001; a reduction in readmission rates from 45.1% to 8.9% (≤0.001; and an improvement in follow-up times from a median of 16 weeks to 5 weeks (<0.001. From a safety perspective there were no deaths in the early discharged group after 12 months follow-up. Conclusion. The burden of seizure related admissions through the ED can be improved in a safe and effective manner by the provision of a seizure care pathway.

  6. Neonatal seizures: the overlap between diagnosis of metabolic disorders and structural abnormalities. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Alessandra; Casella, Erasmo B; Valente, Marcelo; Buchpiguel, Carlos A; Valente, Kette D R

    2003-06-01

    Inborn metabolic errors (IME) and cortical developmental malformations are uncommon etiologies of neonatal seizures, however they may represent treatable causes of refractory epilepsy and for this reason must be considered as possible etiological factors. This case report aims to demonstrate the importance of neuroimaging studies in one patient with neonatal seizures, even when there are clues pointing to a metabolic disorder. A previously healthy 14 day-old child started presenting reiterated focal motor seizures (FMS) which evolved to status epilepticus. Exams showed high serum levels of ammonia and no other abnormalities. A metabolic investigation was conducted with normal results. During follow-up, the patient presented developmental delay and left side hemiparesia. Seizures remained controlled with anti-epileptic drugs for four months, followed by relapse with repetitive FMS on the left side. Temporary improvement was obtained with anti-epileptic drug adjustment. At the age of 6 months, during a new episode of status epilepticus, high ammonia levels were detected. Other metabolic exams remained normal. The child was referred to a video-electroencephalographic monitoring and continuous epileptiform discharges were recorded over the right parasagittal and midline regions, with predominance over the posterior quadrant. A new neuroimaging study was performed and displayed a malformation of cortical development. Our case illustrates that because newborns are prone to present metabolic disarrangement, an unbalance such as hyperammonemia may be a consequence of acute events and conduct to a misdiagnosis of IME.

  7. Neonatal seizures: the overlap between diagnosis of metabolic disorders and structural abnormalities. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freitas Alessandra

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Inborn metabolic errors (IME and cortical developmental malformations are uncommon etiologies of neonatal seizures, however they may represent treatable causes of refractory epilepsy and for this reason must be considered as possible etiological factors. This case report aims to demonstrate the importance of neuroimaging studies in one patient with neonatal seizures, even when there are clues pointing to a metabolic disorder. CASE REPORT: A previously healthy 14 day-old child started presenting reiterated focal motor seizures (FMS which evolved to status epilepticus. Exams showed high serum levels of ammonia and no other abnormalities. A metabolic investigation was conducted with normal results. During follow-up, the patient presented developmental delay and left side hemiparesia. Seizures remained controlled with anti-epileptic drugs for four months, followed by relapse with repetitive FMS on the left side. Temporary improvement was obtained with anti-epileptic drug adjustment. At the age of 6 months, during a new episode of status epilepticus, high ammonia levels were detected. Other metabolic exams remained normal. The child was referred to a video-electroencephalographic monitoring and continuous epileptiform discharges were recorded over the right parasagittal and midline regions, with predominance over the posterior quadrant. A new neuroimaging study was performed and displayed a malformation of cortical development. Our case illustrates that because newborns are prone to present metabolic disarrangement, an unbalance such as hyperammonemia may be a consequence of acute events and conduct to a misdiagnosis of IME.

  8. Video games are exciting: a European study of video game-induced seizures and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, D G A; Martins da Silva, A; Ricci, S; Rubboli, G; Tassinari, C A; Lopes, J; Bettencourt, M; Oosting, J; Segers, J P

    2002-06-01

    Video game seizures have been reported in photosensitive and non-photosensitive patients with epilepsy. The game Super Mario World, has led to many cases of first seizures. We examined whether this game was indeed more provocative than other programs and whether playing the game added to this effect. We prospectively investigated 352 patients in four European cities, using a standard protocol including testing of a variety of visual stimuli. We correlated historical data on provocative factors in daily life with electroencephalographic laboratory findings. The video game, Super Mario World proved more epileptogenic than standard TV programs and as provocative as programs with flashing lights and patterns. Most striking was the fact that video game-viewing and-playing on the 50 and 100 Hz TV was significantly more provocative than viewing the standard program (P history of TV-, VG- or CG-seizures, 85% of them showed epileptiform discharges in response to photic stimulation, 44% to patterns, 59% to 50 Hz TV and 29% to 100 Hz TV. Children and adolescents with a history of video game seizures are, in the vast majority, photosensitive and should be investigated with standardised photic stimulation. Games and programs with bright background or flashing images are specifically provocative. Playing a video game on a 100 Hz TV is less provocative [published with videosequences].

  9. Can magnesium supplementation reduce seizures in people with epilepsy? A hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Alan W C; Sander, Josemir W

    2012-06-01

    Magnesium is required for over 300 enzyme systems and is critical for many cellular functions including oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis, DNA transcription and protein synthesis. Studies suggest that the modern Western diet and lifestyle may lead to magnesium deficiency, and this appears to be associated with a wide range of medical conditions. Magnesium deficiency decreases seizure thresholds in animal models of epilepsy and indeed low magnesium concentration in the perfusate is a common method of generating spontaneous epileptiform discharges from rat hippocampal slices. Magnesium is a potential modulator of seizure activity because of its ability to antagonize excitation through the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor. Some studies have shown that people with epilepsy have lower magnesium levels than people without epilepsy. There are case reports of seizures being controlled with magnesium supplementation in people with specific conditions, and recently in an open randomized trial, children with infantile spasms responded better to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) plus magnesium than to ACTH alone. We hypothesise that magnesium supplementation can reduce seizures in people with epilepsy. This hypothesis can be tested in a controlled randomised supplementation trial. If proven, magnesium supplementation needs to be considered in the overall management of people with refractory epilepsy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Seizure frequency and characteristics in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg-Stern, H; Strawsburg, R H; Patterson, B; Hickey, F; Bare, M; Gadoth, N; Degrauw, T J

    2001-10-01

    Seizures have not historically been considered a major component of Down syndrome. We examined the prevalence of epileptic seizures in 350 children and adolescents with Down syndrome evaluated at a regional center between 1985 and 1997. Results showed that 28 patients (8%) had epileptic seizures: 13 (47%) partial seizures; 9 (32%) infantile spasms, and 6 (21%) generalized tonic-clonic seizures. In the infantile spasm group, there was no relationship between the initial electroencephalogram (EEG) pattern and response to treatment or long-term seizure control, or between type of pharmacologic treatment (valproic acid, adrenocorticotropic hormone or both) and clinical remission, EEG normalization or long-term seizure control. Neurodevelopmental outcome was poor despite good seizure control in the infantile spasm group. This regional study reinforces the relative association of seizures and Down syndrome. A prospective study including a national/international registry with emphasis on developmental assessment and long-term follow up is warranted.

  11. EEG for children with complex febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pankaj B; James, Saji; Elayaraja, S

    2015-12-08

    This is an updated version of original Cochrane review published in Issue 1, 2014.Febrile seizures can be classified as simple or complex. Complex febrile seizures are associated with fever that lasts longer than 15 minutes, occur more than once within 24 hours and are confined to one side of the child's body. It is common in some countries for doctors to recommend an electroencephalograph (EEG) for children with complex febrile seizures. A limited evidence base is available to support the use of EEG and its timing after complex febrile seizures among children. To assess the use of EEG and its timing after complex febrile seizures in children younger than five years of age. For the latest update of this review, we searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (6 July 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, 2005, Issue 6), MEDLINE (6 July 2015) and ClinicalTrials.gov (6 July 2015). We applied no language restrictions. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that examined the utility of an EEG and its timing after complex febrile seizures in children. Review authors selected and retrieved the articles and independently assessed which articles should be included. We resolved disagreements by discussion and by consultation with the Cochrane Epilepsy Group. We applied standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Of 37 potentially eligible studies, no RCTs met the inclusion criteria. We found no RCTs as evidence to support or refute the use of EEG and its timing after complex febrile seizures among children. An RCT can be planned in such a way that participants are randomly assigned to the EEG group and to the non-EEG group with sufficient sample size. Since the last version of this review, we found no new studies.

  12. Assessing the risk of subsequent tonic-clonic seizures in patients with a history of simple or complex partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jennifer K; Hutton, Jane; Marson, Anthony G; Chadwick, David W

    2012-08-01

    Patients who present with only simple or complex partial seizures have a poorly documented prognosis. Treatment may be advocated to prevent future secondary generalised seizures, reduce the frequency of further simple or complex partial seizures or a combination of both. A full statistical analysis on 1334 patients was carried out. The outcomes measured were post-randomisation times to first seizure of any type and first tonic-clonic seizure. Methodology was adopted that accounted for individuals' underlying pre-randomisation seizure counts and allowed for the possibility that there may be a proportion of the sample that will not experience post-randomisation seizure recurrence. 103 subjects randomised to the MESS (Multicentre Study of Early Epilepsy and Single Seizures) study had only partial seizures at randomisation. Only 17 of these had a tonic-clonic seizure during follow-up. The presence of an abnormal EEG at randomisation influenced this risk: an estimated 23% of those with EEG abnormality were at risk of tonic-clonic seizures during follow-up compared with 16% of those with a normal EEG. The group did, however, continue to have partial seizures during follow-up, and modelling showed that the impact of treatment on these seizures was significantly less than the effects of treatment on the frequency of tonic-clonic seizures in those patients with such pre-randomisation seizures. Patients presenting with a history of only partial seizures are at low risk of subsequent tonic-clonic seizures in the period of time to which therapeutic decisions are relevant. The effects of the antiepileptic drugs used in the MESS study are greater for tonic-clonic seizures than they are for partial seizures.

  13. The inflammatory molecules IL-1β and HMGB1 can rapidly enhance focal seizure generation in a brain slice model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela eChiavegato

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by a hyperexcitable brain tissue and unpredictable seizures, i.e., aberrant firing discharges in large neuronal populations. It is well established that proinflammatory cytokines, in addition to their canonical involvement in the immune response, have a crucial role in the mechanism of seizure generation. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of interleukin-1β (IL-1β and high mobility group B1 (HMGB1 in the generation of seizure-like discharges using two models of focal epilepsy in a rat entorhinal cortex slice preparation. Seizure like-discharges were evoked by either slice perfusion with low Mg2+ and picrotoxin or with a double NMDA local stimulation in the presence of the proconvulsant 4-amino-pyridine. The effects of IL-1β or HMGB1 were evaluated by monitoring seizure discharge generation through laser scanning microscope imaging of Ca2+ signals from neurons and astrocytes. In the picrotoxin model, we revealed that both cytokines increased the mean frequency of spontaneous ictal-like discharges, whereas only IL-1β reduced the latency and prolonged the duration of the first ictal-like event. In the second model, a single NMDA pulse, per se ineffective, became successful when it was performed after IL-β or HMGB1 local applications. These findings demonstrate that both IL-1β and HMGB1 can rapidly lower focal ictal event threshold and strengthen the possibility that targeting these inflammatory pathways may represent an effective therapeutic strategy to prevent seizures.

  14. Urethral discharge culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture of urethral discharge; Genital exudate culture; Culture - genital discharge or exudate ... 2015:chap 109. Craft AC, Woods GL. Specimen collection and handling for diagnosis of infectious diseases. In: ...

  15. Foot amputation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amputation - foot - discharge; Trans-metatarsal amputation - discharge ... You have had a foot amputation. You may have had an accident, or your foot may have had an infection or disease and doctors could ...

  16. Hysterectomy - laparoscopic - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a shower the day after surgery. If tape strips were used to close your skin, they should ... cancer Endometriosis Hysterectomy Uterine fibroids Patient Instructions Hysterectomy - abdominal - discharge Hysterectomy - vaginal - discharge Review Date 2/18/ ...

  17. Clinical characteristics of seizures associated with viral gastroenteritis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Hitoshi; Tajiri, Hitoshi; Kimura, Sadami; Etani, Yuri; Hosoi, Gaku; Maruyama, Tomoko; Noma, Haruyoshi; Kusumoto, Yoshio; Takano, Tomoko; Baba, Yoshiko; Nagai, Toshizaburo

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the clinical features of seizures during gastroenteritis in children by comparing the norovirus and rotavirus pathogen, and the impact of fever, if present, during the seizure episodes. Retrospective analysis was performed on 293 consecutive pediatric patients admitted with viral gastroenteritis to Osaka General Hospital between November 2007 and May 2009. Eighteen patients developed seizures, 12 of whom were positive for norovirus and six for rotavirus, as revealed by antigen detection. Of these 18 seizure patients, eight presented without fever (the aFS group) and 10 presented with febrile episodes (FS group). Seizure patients in the rotavirus group (83%) were more likely to be febrile than those in the norovirus group (58%). Compared with the aFS group, 90% of patients in the FS group presented seizures at an early stage of gastroenteritis. The frequency of clustered seizures in the FS group was considerably higher than that of febrile seizures in general and was also as high as that of "convulsions with mild gastroenteritis (CwG)". All seizure patients, whether febrile or afebrile, presented with generalized tonic clonic seizures (GTCS), complex partial seizures (CPS), or both. Diazepam (DZP) was less effective and carbamazepine (CBZ) was completely effective for the cessation of seizures in the FS group, similar to the drug response observed in CwG. The causative pathogen (norovirus or rotavirus) affected the frequency of febrile episodes during gastroenteritis, but fever had little effect on the clinical features of seizures. However, seizures occurred earlier during gastroenteritis in the FS group. On the whole, the clinical features of febrile seizures during viral gastroenteritis may closely resemble those of "convulsions with mild gastroenteritis" (CwG) than those of febrile seizures in general with respect to the frequency of clustered seizures and the antiepileptic drug responses and may have a pathogenic mechanism distinct from those of

  18. Vagus nerve stimulation for induced spinal cord seizures: insights into seizure cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Killingsworth, Cheryl R; Rollins, Dennis L; Smith, William M; Ideker, Raymond E; Wellons, John C; Blount, Jeffrey P; Oakes, W Jerry

    2005-03-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation is known to decrease the frequency, duration, and intensity of some types of intracranial seizures in both humans and animals. Although many theories abound concerning the mechanism for this action, the true cause remains speculative. To potentially elucidate a pathway in which vagus nerve stimulation aborts seizure activity, seizures were initiated not in the cerebral cortex but in the spinal cord and then vagus nerve stimulation was performed. Ten pigs were anesthetized and placed in the lateral position, and a small laminectomy was performed in the lumbar region. Topical penicillin, a known epileptogenic drug to the cerebral cortex and spinal cord, was applied to the dorsal surface of the exposed cord. With the exception of two animals that were used as controls, once seizure activity was discernible via motor convulsion or increased electrical activity the left vagus nerve, which had been previously isolated in the neck, was stimulated. Following multiple stimulations of the vagus nerve and with seizure activity confirmed, the cord was transected in the midthoracic region and vagus nerve stimulation was performed. Vagus nerve stimulation resulted in cessation of spinal cord seizure activity in all (87.5%) but one experimented animal. Transection of the spinal cord superior to the site of seizure induction resulted in the ineffectiveness of vagus nerve stimulation to cause cessation of seizure activity in all study animals. The effects of vagus nerve stimulation on induced spinal cord seizures involve descending spinal pathways. The authors believe that this experiment is the first to demonstrate that spinal cord neuronal hyperactivity can be suppressed by stimulation of a cranial nerve. These data may aid in the development of alternative mechanisms for electrical stimulation in patients with medically intractable seizures. Further studies are now necessary to isolate which specific tracts, nuclei, and neurotransmitters are involved in

  19. Quantitative analysis of surface electromyography during epileptic and nonepileptic convulsive seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Conradsen, Isa; Moldovan, Mihai; Jennum, Poul; Fabricius, Martin; Benedek, Krisztina; Andersen, Noémi; Hjalgrim, Helle; Wolf, Peter

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the characteristics of sustained muscle activation during convulsive epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), as compared to voluntary muscle activation. The main goal was to find surface electromyography (EMG) features that can distinguish between convulsive epileptic seizures and convulsive PNES. In this case-control study, surface EMG was recorded from the deltoid muscles during long-term video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring in 25 patients and in 21 healthy controls. A total of 46 clinical episodes were recorded: 28 generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) from 14 patients with epilepsy, and 18 convulsive PNES from 12 patients (one patient had both GTCS and PNES). The healthy controls were simulating GTCS. To quantitatively characterize the signals we calculated the following parameters: root mean square (RMS) of the amplitude, median frequency (MF), coherence, and duration of the seizures, of the clonic EMG discharges, and of the silent periods between the cloni. Based on wavelet analysis, we distinguished between a low-frequency component (LF 2-8 Hz) and a high-frequency component (HF 64-256 Hz). Duration of the seizure, and separation between the tonic and the clonic phases distinguished at group-level but not at individual level between convulsive PNES and GTCS. RMS, temporal dynamics of the HF/LF ratio, and the evolution of the silent periods differentiated between epileptic and nonepileptic convulsive seizures at the individual level. A combination between HF/LF ratio and RMS separated all PNES from the GTCS. A blinded review of the EMG features distinguished correctly between GTCS and convulsive PNES in all cases. The HF/LF ratio and the RMS of the PNES were smaller compared to the simulated seizures. In addition to providing insight into the mechanism of muscle activation during convulsive PNES, these results have diagnostic significance, at the individual level. Surface EMG features can accurately distinguish

  20. Epileptic Seizures in Patients Following Surgical Treatment of Acute Subdural Hematoma-Incidence, Risk Factors, Patient Outcome, and Development of New Scoring System for Prophylactic Antiepileptic Treatment (GATE-24 score).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Sae-Yeon; Dubinski, Daniel; Herrmann, Eva; Cuca, Colleen; Strzelczyk, Adam; Seifert, Volker; Konczalla, Juergen; Freiman, Thomas M

    2017-05-01

    Clinically evident or subclinical seizures are common manifestations in acute subdural hematoma (aSDH); however, there is a paucity of research investigating the relationship between seizures and aSDH. The purpose of this study is 2-fold: determine incidence and predictors of seizures and then establish a guideline in patients with aSDH to standardize the decision for prophylactic antiepileptic treatment. The author analyzed 139 patients with aSDH treated from 2007 until 2015. Baseline characteristics and clinical findings including Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) at admission, 24 hours after operation, timing of operation, anticoagulation, and Glasgow Outcome Scale at hospital discharge and after 3 months were analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to detect independent predictors of seizures, and a scoring system was developed. Of 139 patients, overall incidence of seizures was 38%, preoperatively 16% and postoperatively 24%. Ninety percent of patients with preoperative seizures were seizure free after operation for 3 months. Independent predictors of seizures were GCS <9 (odds ratio [OR] 3.3), operation after 24 hours (OR 2.0), and anticoagulation (OR 2.2). Patients with seizures had a significantly higher rate of unfavorable outcome at hospital discharge (P = 0.001) and in 3-month follow-up (P = 0.002). Furthermore, a score system (GATE-24) was developed. In patients with GCS <14, anticoagulation, or surgical treatment 24 hours after onset, a prophylactic antiepileptic treatment is recommended. Occurrence of seizures affected severity and outcomes after surgical treatment of aSDH. Therefore seizure prophylaxis should be considered in high-risk patients on the basis of the GATE-24 score to promote better clinical outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Seizures arising from the inferior parietal lobule can show ictal semiology of the second sensory seizure (SII seizure).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, J; Ikeda, A; Matsuhashi, M; Satow, T; Takayama, M; Ohara, S; Matsumoto, R; Mikuni, N; Takahashi, J; Miyamoto, S; Taki, W; Hashimoto, N; Shibasaki, H

    2003-03-01

    A 52-year-old right handed man presented with medically intractable partial seizures consisting of numbness on the left upper back spreading to the left upper as well as lower limbs. Head computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed a round calcified lesion in the depth of the superior ramus of the right sylvian fissure. Ictal electrocorticographic recording with chronically implanted subdural electrodes showed low voltage fast activities starting exclusively from an electrode located on the right inferior parietal lobule. No apparent ictal activities were observed from the depth electrodes inserted in the parietal operculum. Somatosensory evoked potentials of 75 ms to 145 ms latency were recorded from the ictal onset zone, which was 2 cm caudal to the perisylvian area corresponding to the second somatosensory area. Seizures arising from the inferior parietal lobule including the angular and supuramarginal gyri can produce partial seizures whose ictal semiology and scalp electroencephalography are indistinguishable from the ones originating from the second somatosensory area.

  2. Sex Differences in Seizure Types and Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Chad; Dugan, Patricia; Kirsch, Heidi E; Friedman, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the increasing interest in sex differences in disease manifestations and responses to treatment, very few data are available on sex differences in seizure types and semiology. The Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP) is a large-scale, multi-institutional, collaborative study that aims to create a comprehensive repository of detailed clinical information and DNA samples from a large cohort of people with epilepsy. We used this well-characterized cohort to explore differences in seizure types as well as focal seizure symptoms between males and females. Methods We reviewed the EPGP database and identified individuals with generalized epilepsy of unknown etiology (GE) (n=760; female 446, male 314), non-acquired focal epilepsy (NAFE) (n=476; female 245, male 231), or both (n=64; female 33, male 31). Demographic data along with characterization of seizure type and focal seizure semiologies were examined. Results In GE, males reported atonic seizures more frequently than females (6.5% vs. 1.7%; p<0.001). No differences were observed in other generalized seizure types. In NAFE, no sex differences were seen for seizure types with or without alteration of consciousness or progression to secondary generalization. Autonomic (16.4% vs. 26.6%; p=0.005), psychic (26.7% vs. 40.3%; p=0.001), and visual symptoms (10.3% vs. 19.9%; p=0.002) were more frequently reported in females than males. Specifically, of psychic symptoms, more females than males endorsed déjà vu (p=0.001), but not forced thoughts, derealization/depersonalization, jamais vu, or fear. With corrections for multiple comparisons, there were no significant differences in aphasic, motor, somatosensory, gustatory, olfactory, auditory, vertiginous, or ictal headache symptoms between sexes. Conclusions Significant differences between the sexes were observed in the reporting of atonic seizures, which was more common in males with GE, and for autonomic, visual, and psychic symptoms associated with NAFE

  3. Amantadine for the treatment of refractory absence seizures in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, M Scott; Bailey, Laurie J; Kotecha, Amy C; Malik, Saleem I; Hernandez, Angel W

    2012-04-01

    Amantadine has demonstrated efficacy in small series for absence and myoclonic type seizures. We examined the efficacy of amantadine for treating refractory absence seizures in a cohort of pediatric patients. We retrospectively reviewed medical records for patients with absence seizures treated with amantadine at Cook Children's Medical Center after January 2007. Abstracted data included sex, age at initiation, concomitant antiepileptic drugs, amantadine dosing, and seizure frequency. Outcomes at 3, 6, and 12 months after initiation were categorized as >90%, ≥50%, or 90% reduction in seizure frequency. Amantadine may constitute an efficacious alternative treatment for refractory absence seizures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nurse-led discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Carole

    2010-12-01

    Delayed discharges have financial implications for hospital trusts and cause dissatisfaction for patients and their families. This article looks at nurse-led discharge pathways at Milton Keynes Hospital's ambulatory care unit. It explains how giving nurses the responsibility to discharge has improved the patient experience, made nurses more accountable and saved money for the trust.

  5. An integrative view of mechanisms underlying generalized spike-and-wave epileptic seizures and its implication on optimal therapeutic treatments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyuan Yan

    Full Text Available Many types of epileptic seizures are characterized by generalized spike-and-wave discharges. In the past, notable effort has been devoted to understanding seizure dynamics and various hypotheses have been proposed to explain the underlying mechanisms. In this paper, by taking an integrative view of the underlying mechanisms, we demonstrate that epileptic seizures can be generated by many different combinations of synaptic strengths and intrinsic membrane properties. This integrative view has important medical implications: the specific state of a patient characterized by a set of biophysical characteristics ultimately determines the optimal therapeutic treatment. Through the same view, we further demonstrate the potentiation effect of rational polypharmacy in the treatment of epilepsy and provide a new angle to resolve the debate on polypharmacy. Our results underscore the need for personalized medicine and demonstrate that computer modeling and simulation may play an important role in assisting the clinicians in selecting the optimal treatment on an individual basis.

  6. Clinical Impact of Epileptiform Discharge in Children With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Hye; Choi, Yong Sung; Yoon, Hoi Soo; Bahn, Geon Ho

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and clinical significance of epileptiform discharges in patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The authors retrospectively reviewed 180 children who were diagnosed with ADHD and had an electroencephalography (EEG) recording. Epileptiform discharges were found in 29 (16.1%) of 180 patients with ADHD. Of these, 15 (8.3%) had generalized epileptiform discharges and 14 (7.7%) had focal epileptiform discharges. The focal epileptiform discharges were most prevalent from the frontal (5/14) and rolandic area (5/14). Among the 29 patients with epileptiform discharges and ADHD, 5 patients had previous history of epilepsy and 4 patients developed epilepsy later, whereas none of the normal EEG group developed epilepsy. The authors suggest that interictal epileptiform discharges appear to be associated with seizure occurrence in children with ADHD and might reflect maturational pathophysiology overlapping with epilepsy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Physical Therapy for Provoked Vestibulodynia: A Randomized Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfinger, Corrie; Pukall, Caroline F; Thibault-Gagnon, Stephanie; McLean, Linda; Chamberlain, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Non-medical and non-surgical treatments for provoked vestibulodynia target psychological, sexual, and pelvic floor muscle factors that maintain the condition. The goal of the study was to compare the effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and physical therapy (PT) on pain and psychosexual outcomes in women with provoked vestibulodynia. In a clinical trial, 20 women with provoked vestibulodynia were randomly assigned to receive CBT or comprehensive PT. Participants were assessed before treatment, after treatment, and at 6-month follow-up by gynecologic examination, structured interviews, and standardized questionnaires measuring pain, psychological, and sexual variables. Outcome measurements were based on an adaptation of the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials recommendations. The primary outcome was change in intercourse pain intensity. Secondary outcomes included pain during the cotton swab test, pain with various sexual and non-sexual activities, and sexual functioning and negative pain cognitions. The two treatment groups demonstrated significant decreases in vulvar pain during sexual intercourse, with 70% and 80% of participants in the CBT and PT groups demonstrating a moderate clinically important decrease in pain (≥30%) after treatment. Participants in the two groups also had significant improvements in pain during the gynecologic examination, the percentage of painful intercourse attempts, the percentage of activities resulting in pain, and the ability to continue intercourse without stopping because of pain. Psychological outcomes, including pain catastrophizing and perceived control over pain, also showed improvement in the two groups. Significant improvements in sexual functioning were observed only in participants who completed CBT. Few between-group differences were identified other than the PT group showing earlier improvements in some outcomes. Nearly all improvements were maintained at the 6-month

  8. Self-control of epileptic seizures by nonpharmacological strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwas, Iliana; McGonigal, Aileen; Trebuchon, Agnès; Bastien-Toniazzo, Mireille; Nagai, Yoko; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Micoulaud-Franchi, Jean-Arthur

    2016-02-01

    Despite the unpredictability of epileptic seizures, many patients report that they can anticipate seizure occurrence. Using certain alert symptoms (i.e., auras, prodromes, precipitant factors), patients can adopt behaviors to avoid injury during and after the seizure or may implement spontaneous cognitive and emotional strategies to try to control the seizure itself. From the patient's view point, potential means of enhancing seizure prediction and developing seizure control supports are seen as very important issues, especially when the epilepsy is drug-resistant. In this review, we first describe how some patients anticipate their seizures and whether this is effective in terms of seizure prediction. Secondly, we examine how these anticipatory elements might help patients to prevent or control their seizures and how the patient's neuropsychological profile, specifically parameters of perceived self-control (PSC) and locus of control (LOC), might impact these strategies and quality of life (QOL). Thirdly, we review the external supports that can help patients to better predict seizures. Finally, we look at nonpharmacological means of increasing perceived self-control and achieving potential reduction of seizure frequency (i.e., stress-based and arousal-based strategies). In the past few years, various approaches for detection and control of seizures have gained greater interest, but more research is needed to confirm a positive effect on seizure frequency as well as on QOL. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A new model to study sleep deprivation-induced seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, Brendan P; Leahy, Averi; Rosas, Regine; Shaw, Paul J

    2015-05-01

    A relationship between sleep and seizures is well-described in both humans and rodent animal models; however, the mechanism underlying this relationship is unknown. Using Drosophila melanogaster mutants with seizure phenotypes, we demonstrate that seizure activity can be modified by sleep deprivation. Seizure activity was evaluated in an adult bang-sensitive seizure mutant, stress sensitive B (sesB(9ed4)), and in an adult temperature sensitive seizure mutant seizure (sei(ts1)) under baseline and following 12 h of sleep deprivation. The long-term effect of sleep deprivation on young, immature sesB(9ed4) flies was also assessed. Laboratory. Drosophila melanogaster. Sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation increased seizure susceptibility in adult sesB(9ed4)/+ and sei(ts1) mutant flies. Sleep deprivation also increased seizure susceptibility when sesB was disrupted using RNAi. The effect of sleep deprivation on seizure activity was reduced when sesB(9ed4)/+ flies were given the anti-seizure drug, valproic acid. In contrast to adult flies, sleep deprivation during early fly development resulted in chronic seizure susceptibility when sesB(9ed4)/+ became adults. These findings show that Drosophila is a model organism for investigating the relationship between sleep and seizure activity. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  10. Phenytoin versus valproate monotherapy for partial onset seizures and generalised onset tonic-clonic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Sarah J; Marson, Anthony G; Pulman, Jennifer; Tudur Smith, Catrin

    2013-08-23

    This is an updated version of the previously published Cochrane review (Issue 4, 2009)Worldwide, phenytoin and valproate are commonly used antiepileptic drugs. It is generally believed that phenytoin is more effective for partial onset seizures, and that valproate is more effective for generalised onset tonic-clonic seizures with or without other generalised seizure types. To review the best evidence comparing phenytoin and valproate when used as monotherapy in individuals with partial onset seizures or generalised onset tonic-clonic seizures with or without other generalised seizure types. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialised Register (19 February 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 1, The Cochrane Library, January 2013), MEDLINE (1946 to 18 February 2013), SCOPUS (19 February 2013), ClinicalTrials.gov (19 February 2013), and WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform ICTRP (19 February 2013). We handsearched relevant journals, contacted pharmaceutical companies, original trial investigators and experts in the field. Randomised controlled trials in children or adults with partial onset seizures or generalised onset tonic-clonic seizures with a comparison of valproate monotherapy versus phenytoin monotherapy. This was an individual patient data review. Outcomes were time to (a) treatment withdrawal (b) 12-month remission (c) six-month remission and (d) first seizure post randomisation. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to obtain study-specific estimates of hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) with the generic inverse variance method used to obtain the overall pooled HR and 95% CI. Individual patient data were available for 669 individuals out of 1119 eligible individuals from five out of 11 trials, 60% of the potential data. Results apply to generalised tonic-clonic seizures, but not absence or myoclonus seizure types. For remission outcomes, HR > 1 indicates an

  11. Do psychosexual factors play a role in the etiology of provoked vestibulodynia? A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrochers, Geneviève; Bergeron, Sophie; Landry, Tina; Jodoin, Mélanie

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this review was to critically examine published studies concerning the psychosexual aspects of provoked vestibulodynia. Despite the presence of several methodological limitations, some findings were consistently replicated. Overall, women with vestibulodynia demonstrate impaired sexual functioning, namely, lower levels of sexual desire, arousal, and frequency of intercourse. Childhood physical and sexual abuse represent potential risk factors for the development of this condition. Additionally, specific psychological states such as anxiety, fear of pain, hypervigilance, catastrophizing, and depression, are more frequently reported by these women. More rigorous studies are needed to establish which psychosexual variables may exacerbate and/or maintain vestibulodynia.

  12. Gender difference in acquired seizure susceptibility in adult rats after early complex febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yun-Jian; Xu, Zheng-Hao; Feng, Bo; Xu, Ceng-Lin; Zhao, Hua-Wei; Wu, Deng-Chang; Hu, Wei-Wei; Chen, Zhong

    2014-12-01

    Gender differences are involved in many neurological disorders including epilepsy. However, little is known about the effect of gender difference on the risk of epilepsy in adults with a specific early pathological state such as complex febrile seizures (FSs) in infancy. Here we used a well-established complex FS model in rats and showed that: (1) the susceptibility to seizures induced by hyperthermia, pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), and maximal electroshock (MES) was similar in male and female rat pups, while males were more susceptible to PTZ- and MES-induced seizures than age-matched females in normal adult rats; (2) adult rats with complex FSs in infancy acquired higher seizure susceptibility than normal rats; importantly, female FS rats were more susceptible to PTZ and MES than male FS rats; and (3) the protein expression of interleukin-1β, an inflammatory factor associated with seizure susceptibility, was higher in adult FS females than in males, which may reflect a gender-difference phenomenon of seizure susceptibility. Our results provide direct evidence that the acquired seizure susceptibility after complex FSs is gender-dependent.

  13. Febrile Seizures and Febrile Seizure Syndromes: An Updated Overview of Old and Current Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khair, Abdulhafeez M.; Elmagrabi, Dalal

    2015-01-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common paroxysmal episode during childhood, affecting up to one in 10 children. They are a major cause of emergency facility visits and a source of family distress and anxiety. Their etiology and pathophysiological pathways are being understood better over time; however, there is still more to learn. Genetic predisposition is thought to be a major contributor. Febrile seizures have been historically classified as benign; however, many emerging febrile seizure syndromes behave differently. The way in which human knowledge has evolved over the years in regard to febrile seizures has not been dealt with in depth in the current literature, up to our current knowledge. This review serves as a documentary of how scientists have explored febrile seizures, elaborating on the journey of knowledge as far as etiology, clinical features, approach, and treatment strategies are concerned. Although this review cannot cover all clinical aspects related to febrile seizures at the textbook level, we believe it can function as a quick summary of the past and current sources of knowledge for all varieties of febrile seizure types and syndromes. PMID:26697219

  14. Hashimoto Encephalopathy with an Unusual Presentation of Status Epilepticus Seizures: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazeri, Masoume; Abolhasani Foroughi, Amin; Heidari, Hora; Sajadianfard, Sarvin; Eghbali, Tannaz; Arasteh, Peyman

    2016-09-01

    A 33 yr old man, previously diagnosed with hypothyroidism, presented with decreased level of consciousness and generalized tonic-clonic (GTC) seizure to Namazi hospital, Shiraz, Iran, during April 2015. The patient later referred with another episode of seizure like attack for which he received phenytoin, carbamazepine and levothyroxine and was discharged. During his last admission, the patient was admitted with chief complaints of decreased consciousness and four GTC attacks. On admission, the patients had aphasia, ataxia, loss of verbal communication, eye contact and complete loss of obedience. Thyroid function tests showed low levels of T3 and T4 with high levels of thyroid stimulating hormone. Other blood tests were all either normal or slightly abnormal. Lumbar puncture and CSF analysis had a high titer of Anti-TPO antibodies. With high suspicion of Hashimoto encephalopathy, pulsed methyl prednisolone (10 mg) was administered, however the patient showed little improvement. Therefore, plasmaphresis was started, to which the patient showed dramatic response.

  15. Widespread EEG changes precede focal seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Perucca

    Full Text Available The process by which the brain transitions into an epileptic seizure is unknown. In this study, we investigated whether the transition to seizure is associated with changes in brain dynamics detectable in the wideband EEG, and whether differences exist across underlying pathologies. Depth electrode ictal EEG recordings from 40 consecutive patients with pharmacoresistant lesional focal epilepsy were low-pass filtered at 500 Hz and sampled at 2,000 Hz. Predefined EEG sections were selected immediately before (immediate preictal, and 30 seconds before the earliest EEG sign suggestive of seizure activity (baseline. Spectral analysis, visual inspection and discrete wavelet transform were used to detect standard (delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma and high-frequency bands (ripples and fast ripples. At the group level, each EEG frequency band activity increased significantly from baseline to the immediate preictal section, mostly in a progressive manner and independently of any modification in the state of vigilance. Preictal increases in each frequency band activity were widespread, being observed in the seizure-onset zone and lesional tissue, as well as in remote regions. These changes occurred in all the investigated pathologies (mesial temporal atrophy/sclerosis, local/regional cortical atrophy, and malformations of cortical development, but were more pronounced in mesial temporal atrophy/sclerosis. Our findings indicate that a brain state change with distinctive features, in the form of unidirectional changes across the entire EEG bandwidth, occurs immediately prior to seizure onset. We postulate that these changes might reflect a facilitating state of the brain which enables a susceptible region to generate seizures.

  16. Widespread EEG Changes Precede Focal Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perucca, Piero; Dubeau, François; Gotman, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The process by which the brain transitions into an epileptic seizure is unknown. In this study, we investigated whether the transition to seizure is associated with changes in brain dynamics detectable in the wideband EEG, and whether differences exist across underlying pathologies. Depth electrode ictal EEG recordings from 40 consecutive patients with pharmacoresistant lesional focal epilepsy were low-pass filtered at 500 Hz and sampled at 2,000 Hz. Predefined EEG sections were selected immediately before (immediate preictal), and 30 seconds before the earliest EEG sign suggestive of seizure activity (baseline). Spectral analysis, visual inspection and discrete wavelet transform were used to detect standard (delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma) and high-frequency bands (ripples and fast ripples). At the group level, each EEG frequency band activity increased significantly from baseline to the immediate preictal section, mostly in a progressive manner and independently of any modification in the state of vigilance. Preictal increases in each frequency band activity were widespread, being observed in the seizure-onset zone and lesional tissue, as well as in remote regions. These changes occurred in all the investigated pathologies (mesial temporal atrophy/sclerosis, local/regional cortical atrophy, and malformations of cortical development), but were more pronounced in mesial temporal atrophy/sclerosis. Our findings indicate that a brain state change with distinctive features, in the form of unidirectional changes across the entire EEG bandwidth, occurs immediately prior to seizure onset. We postulate that these changes might reflect a facilitating state of the brain which enables a susceptible region to generate seizures. PMID:24260523

  17. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - adults - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adults - discharge; Chronic obstructive airways disease - adults - discharge; Chronic obstructive lung disease - adults - discharge; Chronic bronchitis - adults - discharge; Emphysema - adults - ...

  18. What is a seizure network? Long-range network consequences of focal seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenfeld, Hal

    2014-01-01

    What defines the spatial and temporal boundaries of seizure activity in brain networks? To fully answer this question a precise and quantitative definition of seizures is needed, which unfortunately remains elusive. Nevertheless, it is possible to ask under conditions where clearly divergent patterns of activity occur in large-scale brain networks whether certain activity patterns are part of the seizure while others are not. Here we examine brain network activity during focal limbic seizures, including diverse regions such as the hippocampus, subcortical arousal systems and fronto-parietal association cortex. Based on work from patients and from animal models we describe a characteristic pattern of intense increases in neuronal firing, cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI) signals and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption in the hippocampus during focal limbic seizures. Similar increases are seen in certain closely linked subcortical structures such as the lateral septal nuclei and anterior hypothalamus, which contain inhibitory neurons. In marked contrast, decreases in all of these parameters are seen in the subcortical arousal systems of the upper brainstem and intralaminar thalamus, as well as in the fronto-parietal association cortex. We propose that the seizure proper can be defined as regions showing intense increases, while those areas showing opposite changes are inhibited by the seizure network and constitute long-range network consequences beyond the seizure itself. Importantly, the fronto-parietal cortex shows sleep-like slow wave activity and depressed metabolism under these conditions, associated with impaired consciousness. Understanding which brain networks are directly involved in seizures versus which sustain secondary consequences can provide new insights into the mechanisms of brain dysfunction in epilepsy, hopefully leading to innovative treatment

  19. ABHD6 blockade exerts antiepileptic activity in PTZ-induced seizures and in spontaneous seizures in R6/2 mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Christine S.; Swinney, Katie; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Cao, Jessica K.; Marrs, William; Blankman, Jacqueline L.; Tu, Sarah; Cherry, Allison E.; Fung, Susan; Wen, Andy; Li, Weiwei; Saporito, Michael S.; Selley, Dana E.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Oakley, John C.; Stella, Nephi

    2014-01-01

    The serine hydrolase α/β-hydrolase domain 6 (ABHD6) hydrolyzes the most abundant endocannabinoid (eCB) in the brain, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and controls its availability at cannabinoid receptors. We show that ABHD6 inhibition decreases pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced generalized tonic-clonic and myoclonic seizure incidence, and severity. This effect is retained in cnr1−/− or cnr2−/− mice, but blocked by addition of a subconvulsive dose of picrotoxin, suggesting the involvement of GABAA receptors. ABHD6 inhibition also blocked spontaneous seizures in R6/2 mice, a genetic model of Juvenile Huntington’s disease known to exhibit dysregulated eCB signaling. ABHD6 blockade retained its antiepileptic activity over chronic dosing and was not associated with psychomotor or cognitive effects. While the etiology of seizures in R6/2 mice remains unsolved, involvement of the hippocampus is suggested by interictal epileptic discharges, increased expression of vGLUT1 but not vGAT, and reduced Neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression. We conclude that ABHD6 inhibition may represent a novel antiepileptic strategy. PMID:25033180

  20. Seizures and Praziquantel. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime R. Torres R.

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available A 27 year Old male developed seizures after receiving a single 20 mg/kg dose of praziquantel for the treatment of an intestinal Hymenolepis nana infection. On further clinical and laboratorial evaluations, he was found to suffer from an until then asymptomatic parenchymal brain cysticercosis. Praziquantel must be used with caution in those areas where cysticercosis represents a mayor public health problem. The occurrence of unexpected seizures in an individual being treated with the compound, must prompt clinicians to rule out cysticercosis of the CNS.

  1. Treating seizures and epilepsy with anticoagulants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola eMaggio

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Thrombin is a serine protease playing an essential role in the blood coagulation cascade. Recent work, however, has identified a novel role for thrombin-mediated signaling pathways in the central nervous system. Binding of thrombin to protease-activated receptors (PARs in the brain appears to have multiple actions affecting both health and disease. Specifically, thrombin has been shown to lead to the onset of seizures via PAR-1 activation. In this perspective article, we review the putative mechanisms by which thrombin causes seizures and epilepsy. We propose a potential role of PAR-1 antagonists and novel thrombin inhibitors as new, possible antiepileptic drugs.

  2. A systematic review of suggestive seizure induction for the diagnosis of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkirov, Stoyan; Grönheit, Wenke; Wellmer, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    Suggestive seizure induction is a widely used method for diagnosing psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). Despite seven decades of multidisciplinary research, however, there is still no unified protocol, no definitive agreement on the ethical framework and no consensus on diagnostic utility. This systematic review surveys the evidence at hand and addresses clinically relevant aspects of suggestive seizure induction. In addition to its use for facilitating the diagnostic process, its mechanism of action and utility in elucidating the psychopathology of PNES will be discussed. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Do recurrent seizure-related head injuries affect seizures in people with epilepsy?

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, David E.; Chiang, Sharon; Tobias, Ronnie S.

    2012-01-01

    Seizure-related head injuries (SRHIs) are among the most commonly encountered injuries in people with epilepsy (PWE). Whether head injury has an effect on preexisting epilepsy is not known. The purpose of this study was to systematically assess for any possible effects of SRHIs on seizure frequency and seizure semiology over a 2-year period. We identified 204 patients who have been followed at the Baylor Comprehensive Epilepsy Center from 2008 to 2010. SRHI occurred in 18.1% of the cohort. Mo...

  4. Hyperkinetic motor seizures: a common semiology generated by two different cortical seizure origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaugier, Lisa; McGonigal, Aileen; Lagarde, Stanislas; Trébuchon, Agnes; Szurhaj, William; Derambure, Philippe; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2017-09-01

    We report a 37-year-old, right-handed patient with drug-resistant focal epilepsy whose seizures were characterized by explosive hyperkinetic behaviour. Video-SEEG revealed bifocal organization of epilepsy with two distinct cortical origins of seizures: the right temporal pole and left temporal lateral and perisylvian cortex. Irrespective of the cortical pattern of seizure onset, the hyperkinetic semiology was extremely similar. This supports a major role for "final common pathway" subcortical circuits in the genesis of the hyperkinetic semiology in this patient.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus Genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus Printable PDF Open ... 9):1426-9. Citation on PubMed More from Genetics Home Reference Bulletins January is National Birth Defects ...

  6. Glatiramer acetate, an anti-demyelination drug, reduced rats' epileptic seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol via protection of myelin sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yu; Zhao, Yaqun; Bai, Hui; Liu, Zhiliang; Meng, Fanxin; Zhang, Hua; Xu, Ruxiang

    2013-06-14

    Glatiramer acetate (GA) is a clinically prescribed immunomodulator drug used to treat demyelinating disease like multiple sclerosis (MS). Persistent down-regulation in the expression of myelin sheath proteins has been observed in both rats with pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) induced chronic epilepsy and some clinical epilepsy patients. Hypothetically, protection of myelin sheath by pharmaceutical means in the process of epilepsy might, to some extent, be helpful to control epileptic seizures. Therefore, we tried to use GA to treat PTZ-induced epilepsy rats. GA treatment successfully protected rats' myelin sheath from demyelination in the process of PTZ-induced epileptic seizures. Notably, electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring demonstrated that GA-treated epilepsy rats showed significantly lowered epileptiform discharges. Correspondingly, behavioral recording showed reduced frequency of seizures in GA-treated epilepsy rats. The results indicate that epilepsy associated demyelination may be a contributing factor in seizures behavior, and early intervention with anti-demyelination drugs may be beneficial to reduce the severity of seizures behavior. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Pharmacotherapy for neonatal seizures: current knowledge and future perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Donovan, Maria D.; Griffin, Brendan T; Kharoshankaya, Liudmila; Cryan, John F.; Boylan, Geraldine B.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are the most common neurological emergencies in the neonatal period and are associated with poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. Seizures affect up to five per 1000 term births and population-based studies suggest that they occur even more frequently in premature infants. Seizures are a sign of an underlying cerebral pathology, the most common of which is hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy in term infants. Due to a growing body of evidence that seizures exacerbate cerebral injury, effecti...

  8. Multicenter clinical assessment of improved wearable multimodal convulsive seizure detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorati, Francesco; Regalia, Giulia; Caborni, Chiara; Migliorini, Matteo; Bender, Daniel; Poh, Ming-Zher; Frazier, Cherise; Kovitch Thropp, Eliana; Mynatt, Elizabeth D; Bidwell, Jonathan; Mai, Roberto; LaFrance, W Curt; Blum, Andrew S; Friedman, Daniel; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Mohammadpour-Touserkani, Fatemeh; Reinsberger, Claus; Tognetti, Simone; Picard, Rosalind W

    2017-11-01

    New devices are needed for monitoring seizures, especially those associated with sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). They must be unobtrusive and automated, and provide false alarm rates (FARs) bearable in everyday life. This study quantifies the performance of new multimodal wrist-worn convulsive seizure detectors. Hand-annotated video-electroencephalographic seizure events were collected from 69 patients at six clinical sites. Three different wristbands were used to record electrodermal activity (EDA) and accelerometer (ACM) signals, obtaining 5,928 h of data, including 55 convulsive epileptic seizures (six focal tonic-clonic seizures and 49 focal to bilateral tonic-clonic seizures) from 22 patients. Recordings were analyzed offline to train and test two new machine learning classifiers and a published classifier based on EDA and ACM. Moreover, wristband data were analyzed to estimate seizure-motion duration and autonomic responses. The two novel classifiers consistently outperformed the previous detector. The most efficient (Classifier III) yielded sensitivity of 94.55%, and an FAR of 0.2 events/day. No nocturnal seizures were missed. Most patients had seizure frequency. When increasing the sensitivity to 100% (no missed seizures), the FAR is up to 13 times lower than with the previous detector. Furthermore, all detections occurred before the seizure ended, providing reasonable latency (median = 29.3 s, range = 14.8-151 s). Automatically estimated seizure durations were correlated with true durations, enabling reliable annotations. Finally, EDA measurements confirmed the presence of postictal autonomic dysfunction, exhibiting a significant rise in 73% of the convulsive seizures. The proposed multimodal wrist-worn convulsive seizure detectors provide seizure counts that are more accurate than previous automated detectors and typical patient self-reports, while maintaining a tolerable FAR for ambulatory monitoring. Furthermore, the multimodal system

  9. Pitfall of bispectral index during intraoperative seizure -a case report-

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyungdong; Kim, Sae Young

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 42-year-old male who developed generalized tonic-clonic seizure with sudden, brief decrease in bispectral index (BIS) value while undergoing emergency kidney transplantation. Few reports have been made on intraoperative pitfall of BIS value associated with seizure. This case report suggests seizure should be taken into account as a reason for such brief fall of BIS, especially while under general anesthesia or in other specific cases in which clinical signs of seizure ar...

  10. Improving Hospital Discharge Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Eid, Ghada R.; Kaddoum, Roland; Tamim, Hani; Hitti, Eveline A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Delays in discharging patients can impact hospital and emergency department (ED) throughput. The discharge process is complex and involves setting specific challenges that limit generalizability of solutions. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of using Six Sigma methods to improve the patient discharge process. This is a quantitative pre and post-intervention study. Three hundred and eighty-six bed tertiary care hospital. A series of Six Sigma driven interventions over a 10-month period. The primary outcome was discharge time (time from discharge order to patient leaving the room). Secondary outcome measures included percent of patients whose discharge order was written before noon, percent of patients leaving the room by noon, hospital length of stay (LOS), and LOS of admitted ED patients. Discharge time decreased by 22.7% from 2.2 hours during the preintervention period to 1.7 hours post-intervention (P discharge. Hospital LOS dropped from 3.4 to 3.1 days postintervention (P hospital was significantly lower in the postintervention period (6.9 ± 7.8 vs 5.9 ± 7.7 hours; P discharge time. The focus of institutions aspiring to tackle delays in the discharge process should be on adopting the core principles of Six Sigma rather than specific interventions that may be institution-specific. PMID:25816029

  11. Synergism between endotoxin priming and exotoxin challenge in provoking severe vascular leakage in rabbit lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütte, H; Rosseau, S; Czymek, R; Ermert, L; Walmrath, D; Krämer, H J; Seeger, W; Grimminger, F

    1997-09-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of gram-negative bacteria prime rabbit lungs for enhanced thromboxane-mediated vasoconstriction upon subsequent challenge with the exotoxin Escherichia coli hemolysin (HlyA) (Walmrath et al. J. Exp. Med. 1994;180:1437-1443). We investigated the impact of endotoxin priming and subsequent HlyA challenge on lung vascular permeability while maintaining constancy of capillary pressure. Rabbit lungs were perfused in a pressure-controlled mode in the presence of the thromboxane receptor antagonist BM 13.505, with continuous monitoring of flow. Perfusion for 180 min with 10 ng/ml LPS did not provoke vasoconstriction or alteration of capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc) values. HlyA (0.021 hemolytic units/ml) induced thromboxane release and a transient decrease in perfusion flow in the absence of significant changes in Kfc. Similar results were obtained when LPS and HlyA were coapplied simultaneously. However, when the HlyA challenge was undertaken after 180 min of LPS priming, a manifold increase in Kfc values was noted, with concomitant severe lung edema formation, although capillary pressure remained unchanged. Thus, endotoxin primes the lung vasculature to respond with a severe increase in vascular permeability to a subsequent low-dose application of HlyA. Such synergism between endotoxin priming and exotoxin challenge in provoking lung vascular leakage may contribute to the pathogenesis of respiratory failure in sepsis and severe lung infection.

  12. Beer flavor provokes striatal dopamine release in male drinkers: mediation by family history of alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlin, Brandon G; Dzemidzic, Mario; Tran, Stella M; Soeurt, Christina M; Albrecht, Daniel S; Yoder, Karmen K; Kareken, David A

    2013-08-01

    Striatal dopamine (DA) is increased by virtually all drugs of abuse, including alcohol. However, drug-associated cues are also known to provoke striatal DA transmission- a phenomenon linked to the motivated behaviors associated with addiction. To our knowledge, no one has tested if alcohol's classically conditioned flavor cues, in the absence of a significant pharmacologic effect, are capable of eliciting striatal DA release in humans. Employing positron emission tomography (PET), we hypothesized that beer's flavor alone can reduce the binding potential (BP) of [(11)C]raclopride (RAC; a reflection of striatal DA release) in the ventral striatum, relative to an appetitive flavor control. Forty-nine men, ranging from social to heavy drinking, mean age 25, with a varied family history of alcoholism underwent two [(11)C]RAC PET scans: one while tasting beer, and one while tasting Gatorade. Relative to the control flavor of Gatorade, beer flavor significantly increased self-reported desire to drink, and reduced [(11)C]RAC BP, indicating that the alcohol-associated flavor cues induced DA release. BP reductions were strongest in subjects with first-degree alcoholic relatives. These results demonstrate that alcohol-conditioned flavor cues can provoke ventral striatal DA release, absent significant pharmacologic effects, and that the response is strongest in subjects with a greater genetic risk for alcoholism. Striatal DA responses to salient alcohol cues may thus be an inherited risk factor for alcoholism.

  13. Effects of Thought Suppression on Provoked Men's Alcohol-Related Physical Aggression in the Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Kathryn E; Lisco, Claire G; Parrott, Dominic J; Giancola, Peter R

    2014-01-01

    This study utilized a comprehensive theoretical approach to provide the first data on the impact of thought suppression on provoked men's alcohol-related aggression. A diverse community sample (58% African-American) of males between the ages of 21 and 35 (M = 25.25) were randomly assigned to one of two beverage conditions (i.e., alcohol, no-alcohol control). Following beverage consumption, participants were provoked via reception of electric shocks and a verbal insult from a fictitious male opponent. Participants' physical aggression was measured using a shock-based aggression task. Results indicated that acute alcohol intoxication significantly increased physical aggression among lower, but not higher, thought suppressing men. Results suggest that, under conditions of interpersonal provocation, alcohol intoxication produces a myopic focus on hostile thoughts and angry affect in lower, but not higher, suppression men. This pattern of results provides support for the durability of the alcohol myopia effect and highlights the need for continued examination of alcohol's role in the disruption of protective factors for men's aggression. It is important for research to continue to identify modifiable cognitive variables that influence self-regulation of behavior; however, it is imperative that researchers consider the extent to which these variables withstand alcohol's effects.

  14. 27 CFR 555.186 - Seizure or forfeiture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure or forfeiture. 555... Seizure or forfeiture. Any plastic explosive that does not contain a detection agent in violation of 18 U.S.C. 842(l)-(n) is subject to seizure and forfeiture, and all provisions of 19 U.S.C. 1595a...

  15. 19 CFR 12.101 - Seizure of prohibited switchblade knives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure of prohibited switchblade knives. 12.101...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Switchblade Knives § 12.101 Seizure of prohibited... accordance with § 12.100(a) shall be seized under 19 U.S.C. 1595a(c). (b) Notice of seizure. Notice of...

  16. 26 CFR 403.25 - Personal property subject to seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Personal property subject to seizure. 403.25... AND ADMINISTRATION DISPOSITION OF SEIZED PERSONAL PROPERTY Seizures and Forfeitures § 403.25 Personal property subject to seizure. Personal property may be seized by the Commissioner of Internal Revenue or his...

  17. 27 CFR 447.63 - Seizure and forfeiture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure and forfeiture. 447.63 Section 447.63 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS... IMPLEMENTS OF WAR Penalties, Seizures and Forfeitures § 447.63 Seizure and forfeiture. Whoever knowingly...

  18. 9 CFR 118.4 - Seizure and condemnation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure and condemnation. 118.4... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DETENTION; SEIZURE AND CONDEMNATION § 118.4 Seizure and condemnation. Any biological product which is prepared, sold, bartered...

  19. 27 CFR 555.166 - Seizure or forfeiture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure or forfeiture. 555... EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Unlawful Acts, Penalties, Seizures and Forfeitures § 555.166 Seizure or forfeiture. Any explosive materials involved or used or intended to be used...

  20. 26 CFR 301.7321-1 - Seizure of property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure of property. 301.7321-1 Section 301... ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Other Offenses § 301.7321-1 Seizure of property. Any property subject... director or assistant regional commissioner (alcohol, tobacco, and firearms). Upon seizure of property by...

  1. Complex partial seizure, disruptive behaviours and the Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Complex partial seizure is an epileptic seizure which results in impairment of responsiveness or awareness such as altered level of consciousness. Complex partial seizures are often preceded by an aura such as depersonalization, feelings of de javu, jamais vu and fear. The ictal phase of complex partial ...

  2. Rapidly Learned Identification of Epileptic Seizures from Sonified EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Psyche eLoui

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sonification refers to a process by which data are converted into sound, providing an auditory alternative to visual display. Currently, the prevalent method for diagnosing seizures in epilepsy is by visually reading a patient’s electroencephalogram (EEG. However, sonification of the EEG data provides certain advantages due to the nature of human auditory perception. We hypothesized that human listeners will be able to identify seizures from EEGs using the auditory modality alone, and that accuracy of seizure identification will increase after a short training session. Here we describe an algorithm we have used to sonify EEGs of both seizure and non-seizure activity, followed by a training study in which subjects listened to short clips of sonified EEGs and determine whether each clip was of seizure or normal activity, both before and after a short training session. Results show that before training subjects performed at chance level in differentiating seizures vs. non-seizures, but there was a significant improvement of accuracy after the training session. After training, subjects successfully distinguished seizures from non-seizures using the auditory modality alone. Further analyses using signal detection theory demonstrated improvement in sensitivity and reduction in response bias as a result of training. This study demonstrates the potential of sonified EEGs to be used for the detection of seizures. Future studies will attempt to increase accuracy using novel training and sonification modifications, with the goals of managing, predicting, and ultimately controlling seizures using sonification as a possible biofeedback-based intervention for epilepsy.

  3. Seizure-like activity during fentanyl anesthesia. A case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    Fentanyl induced seizures have been described previously in the literature. Clinical observations has labeled the movements seen in fentanyl anesthesia as seizure activity but electroencephalographic studies have not supported this. A case of seizure-like activity after the administration of fentanyl in a 20-year-old female is reported.

  4. CSF and plasma adipokines after tonic–clonic seizures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Palmio, Johanna; Vuolteenaho, Katriina; Lehtimäki, Kai; Nieminen, Riina; Peltola, Jukka; Moilanen, Eeva

    2016-01-01

    ... neurological disorder [4] . Recent studies suggest a role for adipokines in the genesis of seizures and neuroprotection related to seizures [2,5] . Adiponectin has shown neuroprotective effects in hippocampal neurons after kainic-acid induced seizures [6] . To the best of our knowledge, adipokines have not been studied in humans shortly after epileptic sei...

  5. Seizure variables and cognitive performance in patients with epilepsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Purpose Epilepsy is highly prevalent in developing African countries with significant morbidity, social stigmatization, poor quality of life and preventable mortality. There are scanty reports on the contributions of seizure variables like seizure types, frequency of seizures, duration of epilepsy, age at onset and ...

  6. Out-of-body experiences associated with seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce eGreyson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Alterations of consciousness are critical factors in the diagnosis of epileptic seizures. With these alterations in consciousness, some persons report sensations of separating from the physical body, experiences that may in rare cases resemble spontaneous out-of-body experiences. This study was designed to identify and characterize these out-of-body-like subjective experiences associated with seizure activity. 55% of the patients in this study recalled some subjective experience in association with their seizures. Among our sample of 100 patients, 7 reported out-of-body experiences associated with their seizures. We found no differentiating traits that were associated with patients’ reports of out-of-body experiences, in terms of either demographics; medical history, including age of onset and duration of seizure disorder, and seizure frequency; seizure characteristics, including localization, lateralization, etiology, and type of seizure, and epilepsy syndrome; or ability to recall any subjective experiences associated with their seizures. Reporting out-of-body experiences in association with seizures did not affect epilepsy-related quality of life. It should be noted that even in those patients who report out-of-body experiences, such sensations are extremely rare events that do not occur routinely with their seizures. Most patients who reported out-of-body experiences described one or two experiences that occurred an indeterminate number of years ago, which precludes the possibility of associating the experience with the particular characteristics of that one seizure or with medications taken or other conditions at the time.

  7. Out-of-body experiences associated with seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greyson, Bruce; Fountain, Nathan B.; Derr, Lori L.; Broshek, Donna K.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations of consciousness are critical factors in the diagnosis of epileptic seizures. With these alterations in consciousness, some persons report sensations of separating from the physical body, experiences that may in rare cases resemble spontaneous out-of-body experiences. This study was designed to identify and characterize these out-of-body-like subjective experiences associated with seizure activity. Fifty-five percent of the patients in this study recalled some subjective experience in association with their seizures. Among our sample of 100 patients, 7 reported out-of-body experiences associated with their seizures. We found no differentiating traits that were associated with patients' reports of out-of-body experiences, in terms of either demographics; medical history, including age of onset and duration of seizure disorder, and seizure frequency; seizure characteristics, including localization, lateralization, etiology, and type of seizure, and epilepsy syndrome; or ability to recall any subjective experiences associated with their seizures. Reporting out-of-body experiences in association with seizures did not affect epilepsy-related quality of life. It should be noted that even in those patients who report out-of-body experiences, such sensations are extremely rare events that do not occur routinely with their seizures. Most patients who reported out-of-body experiences described one or two experiences that occurred an indeterminate number of years ago, which precludes the possibility of associating the experience with the particular characteristics of that one seizure or with medications taken or other conditions at the time. PMID:24592228

  8. Gyratory seizures revisited: a video-EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobesberger, J; Walser, G; Embacher, N; Unterberger, I; Luef, G; Bauer, G; Benke, T; Bartha, L; Ortler, M; Trinka, E

    2005-06-14

    Gyratory seizures (GSs) have been rarely described in generalized as well as in focal epilepsies. They were defined as a rotation around the body axis during a seizure for at least 180 degrees. The mechanisms of generation are unknown and have been discussed controversially. The aim of this investigation was to further delineate seizure semiology and assess a possible lateralizing and localizing value of GSs. The authors screened 277 consecutive patients with intractable epilepsies referred to a University Hospital for presurgical evaluation between 1998 and 2004 for GSs: 169 had temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), 47 frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), 38 generalized epilepsies (GE), and 23 had extratemporal or multifocal epilepsy. Twelve patients showed gyratory movements in 17 seizures. Eight had FLE and four TLE (p head followed by a rotation toward the contralateral side of seizure onset. In 42% (5/12), the gyratory movement was not preceded by a forced head version. In these seizures, the direction of the rotation was toward the side of seizure onset. The direction of rotation lateralizes seizure onset zone in focal epilepsy depending on the seizure evolution: 1) gyratory seizures (GSs) starting with a forced version of the head ensuing into a body rotation lateralize seizure onset zone contralateral to the direction of rotation. 2) In GSs without a preceding gyratory forced head version, the direction of rotation is toward the side of seizure onset. GSs occur more frequently in frontal lobe epilepsy than temporal lobe epilepsy, while none of our patients with GSs had generalized epilepsies.

  9. Rapidly learned identification of epileptic seizures from sonified EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loui, Psyche; Koplin-Green, Matan; Frick, Mark; Massone, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Sonification refers to a process by which data are converted into sound, providing an auditory alternative to visual display. Currently, the prevalent method for diagnosing seizures in epilepsy is by visually reading a patient's electroencephalogram (EEG). However, sonification of the EEG data provides certain advantages due to the nature of human auditory perception. We hypothesized that human listeners will be able to identify seizures from EEGs using the auditory modality alone, and that accuracy of seizure identification will increase after a short training session. Here, we describe an algorithm that we have used to sonify EEGs of both seizure and non-seizure activity, followed by a training study in which subjects listened to short clips of sonified EEGs and determined whether each clip was of seizure or normal activity, both before and after a short training session. Results show that before training subjects performed at chance level in differentiating seizures from non-seizures, but there was a significant improvement of accuracy after the training session. After training, subjects successfully distinguished seizures from non-seizures using the auditory modality alone. Further analyses using signal detection theory demonstrated improvement in sensitivity and reduction in response bias as a result of training. This study demonstrates the potential of sonified EEGs to be used for the detection of seizures. Future studies will attempt to increase accuracy using novel training and sonification modifications, with the goals of managing, predicting, and ultimately controlling seizures using sonification as a possible biofeedback-based intervention for epilepsy.

  10. Pre and post craniotomy psychosis and seizure disorder in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This report highlights psychosis and seizures presenting at two distinct periods of time in the course of Meningioma, in a 43 year old Nigerian medical doctor and buttresses the fact that the risk for post operative seizures and other symptoms include a history of pre-operative seizures and the site of the tumor. The subject ...

  11. Seizures in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Kelley, Brendan J.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2009-01-01

    Seizures have been recognized to occur in multiple sclerosis since early descriptions of the disease. Various studies have attempted to determine the incidence and prevalence of seizures in multiple sclerosis; although they differ in the reported prevalence, seizures do appear to be more common in multiple sclerosis cohorts than in the general population.

  12. Patterns of antiepileptic drug use and seizure control among people ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Epilepsy is characterized by episodic and unpredictable seizure recurrences which are often amenable to medical treatment. Simple and readily available medications can be used to control seizures in epilepsy. However, in many communities in developing countries seizure control among people living with ...

  13. 28 CFR 0.86 - Seizure of gambling devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Seizure of gambling devices. 0.86 Section... Bureau of Investigation § 0.86 Seizure of gambling devices. The Director, Associate Director, Assistants... General to make seizures of gambling devices (18 U.S.C. 1955(d), 15 U.S.C. 1171 et seq.) and wire or oral...

  14. Automatic seizure detection in rats using Laplacian EEG and verification with human seizure signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltane, Amal; Faye Boudreaux-Bartels, G; Besio, Walter

    2013-03-01

    Automated detection of seizures is still a challenging problem. This study presents an approach to detect seizure segments in Laplacian electroencephalography (tEEG) recorded from rats using the tripolar concentric ring electrode (TCRE) configuration. Three features, namely, median absolute deviation, approximate entropy, and maximum singular value were calculated and used as inputs into two different classifiers: support vector machines and adaptive boosting. The relative performance of the extracted features on TCRE tEEG was examined. Results are obtained with an overall accuracy between 84.81 and 96.51%. In addition to using TCRE tEEG data, the seizure detection algorithm was also applied to the recorded EEG signals from Andrzejak et al. database to show the efficiency of the proposed method for seizure detection.

  15. Seizure Management for School-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frueh, Eileen

    2008-01-01

    As many as 325,000 school-age children, ages 5-14, have epilepsy in the U.S. Thankfully, with medication, surgery, a special diet or vagus nerve stimulation, most go to school and fully participate in school activities. Children who continue to have seizures, however, may run into problems. Many of these problems can be overcome or prevented…

  16. Relations between epileptic seizures and headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gameleira, Fernando Tenório; Ataíde, Luiz; Raposo, Maria Cristina Falcão

    2013-10-01

    To describe headaches in patients with epilepsy and try to identify relations between epileptic seizures and headaches. Cross-sectional study, with 304 patients from the epilepsy out-patient section of University Hospital of Federal University of Alagoas (Brazil) between February 2007 and February 2008. The presence of headaches and their relationships with the epileptic seizures were analyzed. Frequent seizures were associated with a greater tendency of occurrence of headaches (odds ratio=1.6 times, p=0.077). Headaches occurred in 66.1% of the cases. The highest occurrence was of migraine (32.9% of the patients), followed by tension-type headaches (9.2%). Two syndromes with a continuum epilepsy-migraine in the same seizure are worth mentioning: migralepsy in 6.6% and epilepgraine in 10.2% of the patients with epilepsy. A high prevalence of headaches in patients with epilepsy was observed, with emphasis on hybrid crises of epilepsy and migraine. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Idiopathic first seizure in adult life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. van Donselaar (Cees)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis is based on a prospective investigation of 226 patients aged 15 years and older, who were referred to one of the participating hospitals due to a possible idiopathic first seizure. Only those patients were admitted to the study in whom an obvious cause on clinical grounds

  18. Pharmacotherapy for tonic-clonic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheims, Sylvain; Ryvlin, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    Occurrence of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) is one of the most important risk factors of seizure-related complications and comorbidities in patients with epilepsy. Their prevention is therefore an important aspect of therapeutic management both in idiopathic generalized epilepsies and in focal epilepsies. It has been shown that the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) varies across epilepsy syndromes, with some AEDs efficacious against focal seizures with secondary GTCS (sGTCS) but aggravating primary GTCS (pGTCS). In patients with pGTCS, evidence-based data support the preferential use of valproic acid, lamotrigine, levetiracetam and topiramate. In patients with sGTCS, all AEDs approved in the treatment of focal epilepsies might be used. Both in pGTCS and sGTCS, additional data are required, specifically to inform about the relative efficacy of AEDs in relation to each other. Although valproic acid might be the most efficacious drug in idiopathic generalized epilepsies, it should be avoided in women of childbearing age due to its safety profile. In patients with sGTCS, AEDs for which the impact on this seizure type has been formally evaluated and which have demonstrated greater efficacy than placebo might preferentially be used, such as lacosamide, perampanel and topiramate.

  19. S100B proteins in febrile seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkonen, Kirsi; Pekkala, Niina; Pokka, Tytti

    2011-01-01

    at the hospital after FS and S100B concentration in serum (r=-0.130, P=0.28) or in cerebrospinal fluid samples (r=-0.091, P=0.52). Our findings indicate that FS does not cause significant blood-brain barrier openings, and increase the evidence that these seizures are relatively harmless for the developing brain....

  20. Treatment Of Seizures In The Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleem MA

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing life expectancy over the preceding decades and trend towards further increase means that the elderly is now a growing section of the population. Seizures are a particularly common disorder in the age group. Considering that above the age of 50 years, one is prone to suffer from atleast one chromic illness, the interplay between associated medical and neurologic diseases and seizures need to be understood. These comorbidities like hypertension, cerebrovascular accidents, diabetes, renal failure and others not only contribute to seizures, they may also interfere with their appropriate treatment. Seizures, on the other hand, may be the cause of added morbidity like fractures, head injury and poor self esteem which may lead to poor quality of life. In addition, the unique pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and side effect profile of the various antieplileptic drugs in the elderly and the multiple drug interactions, require judicious use along with regular monitoring. However, an ideal antiepileptic drug for the elderly is yet to be found.

  1. Lumbar Puncture for First Simple Febrile Seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Compliance with American Academy of Pediatrics consensus statement recommendations regarding lumbar puncture for infants 6-18 months of age with a first simple febrile seizure was investigated by a retrospective review of 704 infants evaluated in the pediatric emergency medicine division at Children’s Hospital Boston, MA, Oct 1995-Oct 2006.

  2. Neonatal seizures: soothing a burning topic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Matthew D; Chen, Lei; Langhan, Melissa L

    2013-10-01

    Neonatal seizures are a potentially life-threatening pediatric problem with a variety of causes, such as birth trauma, asphyxia, congenital anomalies, metabolic disturbances, infections, and drug withdrawal or intoxication. Thorough and timely evaluations of such patients are necessary to identify and treat the underlying etiology, therefore reducing potential morbidity and mortality. We review neonatal seizures and hypocalcemia and present the case of a 6-day-old male infant who presented to a tertiary pediatric emergency department with seizure-like episodes. He was found to have markedly low serum calcium, magnesium, and parathyroid hormone concentrations, as well as a significantly elevated serum phosphate concentration. The etiology of these abnormalities was found to be maternal ingestion of extremely high doses of calcium carbonate during the third trimester of her pregnancy, an occurrence that has been reported only once in the literature. Education pertaining to the dangers of excessive calcium carbonate intake during pregnancy may be an important piece of anticipatory guidance for pregnant mothers with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux, and questioning the mother of a neonate presenting with seizures about such over-the-counter medications may help to elucidate the diagnosis.

  3. Uncommon Etiology for Seizure: Cerebral Hyperperfusion Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohankumar Kurukumbi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS is a rare life-threatening complication of carotid endarterectomy (CEA and carotid artery stenting (CAS for carotid artery stenosis. The incidence varies between 0 and 3%, depending on the severity of the stenosis, perioperative hypertension, and contralateral carotid stenosis. This case report reports a 53-year-old female patient presenting with decreased alertness and multiple tonic-clonic seizures, in the background of bilateral CEA. She was found to have bilateral carotid stenosis. Her left CEA was performed three months prior and right CEA was four days prior to her current presentation with seizures. After bilateral CEA, the imaging showed extensive pathologic process involving primarily the subcortical white matter and overlying cortex, more on the right cerebral hemisphere. On follow-up six weeks later, she reported no recurrent seizures and imaging showed decrease in abnormal signal intensity of the grey and white matter. This was indicative of near complete resolution of hyperperfusion damage. CHS is a rare complication due to the loss of autoregulation of the cerebrovascular system and increased blood flow status after bilateral CEA. This case is reported because of a rare and unique presentation of seizures in the background of bilateral CEA.

  4. Uncommon Etiology for Seizure: Cerebral Hyperperfusion Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurukumbi, Mohankumar; Truong, Ahn; Pirsaharkhiz, Naghemeh

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS) is a rare life-threatening complication of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and carotid artery stenting (CAS) for carotid artery stenosis. The incidence varies between 0 and 3%, depending on the severity of the stenosis, perioperative hypertension, and contralateral carotid stenosis. This case report reports a 53-year-old female patient presenting with decreased alertness and multiple tonic-clonic seizures, in the background of bilateral CEA. She was found to have bilateral carotid stenosis. Her left CEA was performed three months prior and right CEA was four days prior to her current presentation with seizures. After bilateral CEA, the imaging showed extensive pathologic process involving primarily the subcortical white matter and overlying cortex, more on the right cerebral hemisphere. On follow-up six weeks later, she reported no recurrent seizures and imaging showed decrease in abnormal signal intensity of the grey and white matter. This was indicative of near complete resolution of hyperperfusion damage. CHS is a rare complication due to the loss of autoregulation of the cerebrovascular system and increased blood flow status after bilateral CEA. This case is reported because of a rare and unique presentation of seizures in the background of bilateral CEA.

  5. Seizure Triggered by Sick Sinus Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nilesh; Majeed, Faisal; Sule, Anupam Ashutosh

    2017-11-04

    Sick sinus syndrome (SSS) is a dysfunction of sinoatrial node resulting in symptomatic bradycardia or sinus pauses causing decreased cardiac output with cerebral hypoperfusion and usually presents as syncope, presyncope or fatigue. The occurrence of a seizure is very rare. A 69-year-old man suffered two episodes of generalised tonic-clonic seizures. MRI and electroencephalogram failed to reveal the cause of seizures. In the emergency room, he experienced presyncope simultaneous to bradycardia and sinus pauses. He was stabilised with atropine and dopamine infusion and underwent definitive therapy with a permanent dual-chamber pacemaker with complete symptom resolution. Diagnostic confounders include convulsive syncope and ictal bradycardia. Syncope may be accompanied by myoclonic jerks (convulsive syncope), but postictal confusion is absent. Bradycardia may be seen during the postictal period (ictal bradycardia syndrome), but protracted sinus dysfunction is not present. Hypoperfusion due to significant SSS triggered seizures in this patient who may have an underlying predisposition. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Topiramate monotherapy for partial onset seizures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sachdeo, R C; Reife, R A; Lim, P; Pledger, G

    1997-01-01

    .... A total of 48 patients were evaluated in a double-blind, parallel-group trial. During a 56-day baseline period, patients had at least eight partial onset seizures while being treated with one or two standard antiepileptic drugs (AEDs...

  7. Clinical and economic burden of breakthrough seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divino, Victoria; Petrilla, Allison A; Bollu, Vamsi; Velez, Fulton; Ettinger, Alan; Makin, Charles

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure health-care resource utilization and costs in treatment-adherent, previously seizure-free patients with epilepsy who were treated in the inpatient/emergency room (ER) setting for new-onset seizures, compared with matched controls. The study used a retrospective case/control study design using administrative claims from the IMS PharMetrics™ database. We identified adult patients with epilepsy with 1+ ER visit/hospitalization with primary diagnosis of epilepsy between 1/1/2006 and 3/31/2011, preceded by 6months of seizure-free activity and antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment adherence (≥80% of days covered by any AED); the first observed seizure defined the "breakthrough" seizure/index event. Treatment-adherent patients with epilepsy without any ER/hospital admission for seizures served as controls: an outpatient epilepsy-related medical claim within the selection window was chosen at random as the index date. The following were continuous enrollment requirements for all patients: ≥12-month pre- and ≥6-month postindex. Each case matched 1:1 to a control using propensity score matching. All-cause and epilepsy-related (epilepsy/convulsion diagnosis, AED pharmacy) resource utilization and unadjusted and adjusted direct health-care costs (per person, 2012 US dollars (USD)) were assessed in a 6-month follow-up period. There were 5729 cases and 14,437 controls eligible. The final sample comprised 5279 matched case/control pairs. In unadjusted analyses, matched cases had significantly higher rates of all-cause hospitalization and ER visits compared to controls and significantly higher total all-cause direct health-care costs (median $12,714 vs. $5095, pseizure (driven by inpatient costs). Cases had 2.3 times higher adjusted all-cause costs and 8.1 times higher adjusted epilepsy-related costs than controls (both pseizures occurred among 28.4% of our treatment-adherent study sample and were associated with significant

  8. Early and late postoperative seizure outcome in 97 patients with supratentorial meningioma and preoperative seizures: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhe; Chen, Peng; Fu, Weiming; Zhu, Junming; Zhang, Hong; Shi, Jian; Zhang, Jianmin

    2013-08-01

    We identified factors associated with early and late postoperative seizure control in patients with supratentorial meningioma plus preoperative seizures. In this retrospective study, univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis compared 24 clinical variables according to the occurrence of early (≤1 week) or late (>1 week) postoperative seizures. Sixty-two of 97 patients (63.9 %) were seizure free for the entire postoperative follow-up period (29.5 ± 11.8 months), while 13 patients (13.4 %) still had frequent seizures at the end of follow-up. Fourteen of 97 patients (14.4 %) experienced early postoperative seizures, and emergence of new postoperative neurological deficits was the only significant risk factor (odds ratio = 7.377). Thirty-three patients (34.0 %) experienced late postoperative seizures at some time during follow-up, including 12 of 14 patients with early postoperative seizures. Associated risk factors for late postoperative seizures included tumor progression (odds ratio = 7.012) and new permanent postoperative neurological deficits (odds ratio = 4.327). Occurrence of postoperative seizures in patients with supratentorial meningioma and preoperative seizure was associated with new postoperative neurological deficits. Reduced cerebral or vascular injury during surgery may lead to fewer postoperative neurological deficits and better seizure outcome.

  9. Influence of seizures on early development in tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capal, Jamie K; Bernardino-Cuesta, Beatriz; Horn, Paul S; Murray, Donna; Byars, Anna Weber; Bing, Nicole M; Kent, Bridget; Pearson, Deborah A; Sahin, Mustafa; Krueger, Darcy A

    2017-05-01

    Epilepsy is commonly seen in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC). The relationship between seizures and developmental outcomes has been reported, but few studies have examined this relationship in a prospective, longitudinal manner. The objective of the study was to evaluate the relationship between seizures and early development in TSC. Analysis of 130 patients ages 0-36months with TSC participating in the TSC Autism Center of Excellence Network, a large multicenter, prospective observational study evaluating biomarkers predictive of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), was performed. Infants were evaluated longitudinally with standardized evaluations, including cognitive, adaptive, and autism-specific measures. Seizure history was collected continuously throughout, including seizure type and frequency. Data were analyzed at 6, 12, 18, and 24months of age. Patients without a history of seizures performed better on all developmental assessments at all time points compared to patients with a history of seizures and exhibited normal development at 24months. Patients with a history of seizures not only performed worse, but developmental progress lagged behind the group without seizures. All patients with a history of infantile spasms performed worse on all developmental assessments at 12, 18, and 24months. Higher seizure frequency correlated with poorer outcomes on developmental testing at all time points, but particularly at 12months and beyond. Patients with higher seizure frequency during infancy continued to perform worse developmentally through 24months. A logistic model looking at the individual impact of infantile spasms, seizure frequency, and age of seizure onset as predictors of developmental delay revealed that age of seizure onset was the most important factor in determining developmental outcome. Results of this study further define the relationship between seizures and developmental outcomes in young children with TSC. Early seizure onset in infants with TSC

  10. Evaluation of Seizure Attacks in Patients with Cerebrovascular Accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Koochaki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most common reason for seizure in elderly duration is the stroke. This study was conducted aiming to assess the frequency of seizure attack occurrence in those patients. Materials and Methods: This investigation was carried out through a cross-sectional method for one year on 330 patients admitted to the neurology ward as diagnosed with stroke. The required data was collected through the researcher-made questionnaire from the patients suffering from stoke which was diagnosed based on clinical findings, CT-Scan and MRI as required. Results: Among 330 patient suffering from stroke (162 men and 168 women, 48 cases (14.5% were suffering from seizure. Six percent of the patients had early seizure and another 8.5% had late seizure. Among 162 men suffering from the stroke, 32 ones were without seizures and 30 men were suffering the seizure. A number of 150 women out of total 168 ones suffering from the stroke, had no seizure and 18 others had seizures; frequency of seizure occurrence was more in male samples (p=0.044. In the people under 60 year, there were mostly early types of seizure (45% and in the age range above 60 year, it was mostly late type (89.3%. A 68.5% of the patients suffering from the seizure had experienced ischemic stroke. However, the frequency of seizure occurrence in the patients with hemorrhagic stroke was statistically greater (p=0.003. Conclusion: This examination showed that occurrence of seizure attacks in the people with stroke is 14.5% and it is seen more in the hemorrhagic strokes than ischemic ones. The frontoparietal area is the most common location involved and tonic clonic was the most common seizure in the patients suffering from it who have experienced the stroke

  11. Seizure Forecasting from Idea to Reality. Outcomes of the My Seizure Gauge Epilepsy Innovation Institute Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Jaqueline A.; Fureman, Brandy E.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The Epilepsy Innovation Institute (Ei2) is a new research program of the Epilepsy Foundation designed to be an innovation incubator for epilepsy. Ei2 research areas are selected based on community surveys that ask people impacted by epilepsy what they would like researchers to focus on. In their 2016 survey, unpredictability was selected as a top issue regardless of seizure frequency or severity. In response to this need, Ei2 launched the My Seizure Gauge challenge, with the end goal of creating a personalized seizure advisory system device. Prior to moving forward, Ei2 convened a diverse group of stakeholders from people impacted by epilepsy and clinicians, to device developers and data scientists, to basic science researchers and regulators, for a state of the science assessment on seizure forecasting. From the discussions, it was clear that we are at an exciting crossroads. With the advances in bioengineering, we can utilize digital markers, wearables, and biosensors as parameters for a seizure-forecasting algorithm. There are also over a thousand individuals who have been implanted with ambulatory intracranial EEG recording devices. Pairing up peripheral measurements to brain states could identify new relationships and insights. Another key component is the heterogeneity of the relationships indicating that pooling findings across groups is suboptimal, and that data collection will need to be done on longer time scales to allow for individualization of potential seizure-forecasting algorithms.

  12. Seizure Forecasting from Idea to Reality. Outcomes of the My Seizure Gauge Epilepsy Innovation Institute Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumanis, Sonya B; French, Jaqueline A; Bernard, Christophe; Worrell, Gregory A; Fureman, Brandy E

    2017-01-01

    The Epilepsy Innovation Institute (Ei2) is a new research program of the Epilepsy Foundation designed to be an innovation incubator for epilepsy. Ei2 research areas are selected based on community surveys that ask people impacted by epilepsy what they would like researchers to focus on. In their 2016 survey, unpredictability was selected as a top issue regardless of seizure frequency or severity. In response to this need, Ei2 launched the My Seizure Gauge challenge, with the end goal of creating a personalized seizure advisory system device. Prior to moving forward, Ei2 convened a diverse group of stakeholders from people impacted by epilepsy and clinicians, to device developers and data scientists, to basic science researchers and regulators, for a state of the science assessment on seizure forecasting. From the discussions, it was clear that we are at an exciting crossroads. With the advances in bioengineering, we can utilize digital markers, wearables, and biosensors as parameters for a seizure-forecasting algorithm. There are also over a thousand individuals who have been implanted with ambulatory intracranial EEG recording devices. Pairing up peripheral measurements to brain states could identify new relationships and insights. Another key component is the heterogeneity of the relationships indicating that pooling findings across groups is suboptimal, and that data collection will need to be done on longer time scales to allow for individualization of potential seizure-forecasting algorithms.

  13. Comparison of the Effects of Adenosine A1 Receptors Activity in CA1 Region of the Hippocampus on Entorhinal Cortex and Amygdala Kindled Seizures in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Heidarianpour

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: In the CNS, adenosine is known to suppress repetitive neuronal Firing, suggesting a role as an endogenous modifier of seizures. Indeed, intracerebral adenosine concentrations rise acutely during seizure activity and are thought to be responsible for terminating seizures and establishing a period of post-ictal refractoriness. However, it is unclear whether this suppression results from a general depression of brain excitability or through action on particular sites critical for the control of after discharge generation and/or seizure development and propagation. In this regard, comparison of the effects of adenosine A1 receptors of CA1 (region of the ‎hippocampus on entorhinal cortex and amygdala kindled seizures was ‎investigated in this study. Materials & Methods: In this experimental study, Animals were kindled by daily electrical stimulation of amygdale (group A or entorhinal cortex (group B. In the fully kindled animals, N6-‎cyclohexyladenosine (CHA;1 and 10 M; a selective adenosine A1 receptor ‎agonist and 1,3-dimethyl-8-cyclohexylxanthine(CPT;1 ‎µ‎M; a selective ‎adenosine A1 receptors antagonist were microinfused bilaterally into the CA1 ‎region of hippocampus (1l/2min and animals were stimulated at 5 and 15 minutes after drug ‎injection. All animals were received artificial cerebrospinal fluid, 24 h before ‎each drug injection and this result were used as control. Results: The seizure parameters were measured at 5 and 15min post injection. Obtained data showed that CHA at concentrations of 10 ‎µ‎M reduced ‎entorhinal cortex and amygdala after discharge and stage5 seizure durations and ‎increased stage4 latency. CHA at concentration 1‎µ‎M significantly alters ‎seizure parameters of group A but not effect on group B. Intrahippocampal (CA1 region pretreatment of CPT (1 ‎µ‎M before CHA abolished the effects of CHA on seizure parameters.Conclusion: It ‎may be

  14. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Early Seizure in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: Analysis from National Trauma Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Shahram; Makke, Yamane; Ewida, Amr; Sianati, Bahareh; Qureshi, Adnan I; Koubeissi, Mohamad Z

    2017-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a well-known risk factor for seizures. We aimed to identify the frequency and risk factors for seizure occurrence during hospitalization for TBI. We used ICD-9-CM codes to identify patients 18 years of age or older from the National Trauma Data Bank who were admitted with TBI. We also used ICD-9-CM codes to identify the subset who had seizures during hospitalization. Patient demographics, comorbidities, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, Injury Severity Score Abbreviated Injury Scale (ISSAIS), in-hospital complications, and discharge disposition were compared in the seizure group (SG) and no-seizure group (NSG). A total of 1559 patients had in-hospital seizures, comprising 0.4% of all patients admitted with TBI. The mean age of SG was 3 years older than NSG [51 vs. 48; p < 0.0001]. African-American ethnicity (20 vs. 12%, p < 0.0001) and moderate TBI (8 vs. 4%, p < 0.0001) were more common in SG. History of alcohol dependence was more common in the SG (25 vs. 11%, p < 0.0001). Fall was the most common mechanism of injury in SG (56 vs. 36% in NSG; p < 0.0001). Subdural hematoma was more common in SG (31 vs. 21%, p < 0.0001). SG had higher rates of pneumonia, ARDS, acute kidney injury, and increased ICP. The average length of hospital stay was significantly higher in SG (10 vs. 6 days, p < 0.0001), and these patients had higher rate of discharge to nursing facility (32 vs. 25%, p < 0.0001). In-hospital seizures occur in 0.4% of all TBI patients. Although infrequent, seizure occurrence is associated with higher rates of hospital complications such as pneumonia and ARDS and is an independent predictor of longer hospital stay and worse hospital outcome.

  15. Change of interictal epileptiform discharges after antiepiletic drug treatment in childhood epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mun Ju Kim

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Electroencephalography (EEG findings can play a critical role in a variety of decisions, including initiation and withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs therapy. Interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs are predictor of recurrent seizures. We investigated IEDs in EEG after AED therapy and related factors in epileptic children. Methods : The subjects were 257 children [151 males and 106 females; age, 6.79 (3.40 years; duration of therapy, 2.48 (1.85 years] diagnosed with epilepsy at the Department of Pediatrics, Pusan National University Hospital between January 2001 and December 2007, who received AEDs for more than 6 months. EEG was performed at the intervals of 6-12 months. We divided patients into 4 groups according to IED detection before and after AEDs treatment. Related clinical factors, including gender, age at the start of treatment, seizure type, cause of seizure, AED frequency, seizure control, duration of AED therapy, and background activity were investigated in the 4 groups. Results : Generalized epilepsy was relatively frequen in patients who did not show IEDs in last follow-up EEG. There were no clinically significant differences according to gender, age at the start of treatment, cause of seizure, AED frequency, seizure control, duration of AED medication, and background activity in the 4 groups (P&gt;0.05. Conclusion : IEDs changed after AED treatment in one-third of the patients. Generalized epilepsy is positive factor for negative IEDs in last follow-up EEG.

  16. Risk Factors for Preoperative Seizures and Loss of Seizure Control in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Metastatic Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Adela; Weingart, Jon D; Gallia, Gary L; Lim, Michael; Brem, Henry; Bettegowda, Chetan; Chaichana, Kaisorn L

    2017-08-01

    Metastatic brain tumors are the most common brain tumors in adults. Patients with metastatic brain tumors have poor prognoses with median survival of 6-12 months. Seizures are a major presenting symptom and cause of morbidity and mortality. In this article, risk factors for the onset of preoperative seizures and postoperative seizure control are examined. Adult patients who underwent resection of one or more brain metastases at a single institution between 1998 and 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Of 565 patients, 114 (20.2%) patients presented with seizures. Factors independently associated with preoperative seizures were preoperative headaches (P = 0.044), cognitive deficits (P = 0.031), more than 2 intracranial metastatic tumors (P = 0.013), temporal lobe location (P = 0.031), occipital lobe location (P = 0.010), and bone involvement by tumor (P = 0.029). Factors independently associated with loss of seizure control after surgical resection were preoperative seizures (P = 0.001), temporal lobe location (P = 0.037), lack of postoperative chemotherapy (P = 0.010), subtotal resection of tumor (P = 0.022), and local recurrence (P = 0.027). At last follow-up, the majority of patients (93.8%) were seizure-free. Thirty patients (5.30%) in total had loss of seizure control, and only 8 patients (1.41%) who did not have preoperative seizures presented with new-onset seizures after surgical resection of their metastases. The brain is a common site for metastases from numerous primary cancers, such as breast and lung. The identification of factors associated with onset of preoperative seizures as well as seizure control postoperatively could aid management strategies for patients with metastatic brain tumors. Patients with preoperative seizures who underwent resection tended to have good seizure control after surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Probability of detection of clinical seizures using heart rate changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Ivan; Manly, B F J

    2015-08-01

    Heart rate-based seizure detection is a viable complement or alternative to ECoG/EEG. This study investigates the role of various biological factors on the probability of clinical seizure detection using heart rate. Regression models were applied to 266 clinical seizures recorded from 72 subjects to investigate if factors such as age, gender, years with epilepsy, etiology, seizure site origin, seizure class, and data collection centers, among others, shape the probability of EKG-based seizure detection. Clinical seizure detection probability based on heart rate changes, is significantly (pprobability of detecting clinical seizures (>0.8 in the majority of subjects) using heart rate is highest for complex partial seizures, increases with a patient's years with epilepsy, is lower for females than for males and is unrelated to the side of hemisphere origin. Clinical seizure detection probability using heart rate is multi-factorially dependent and sufficiently high (>0.8) in most cases to be clinically useful. Knowledge of the role that these factors play in shaping said probability will enhance its applicability and usefulness. Heart rate is a reliable and practical signal for extra-cerebral detection of clinical seizures originating from or spreading to central autonomic network structures. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Analyzing reliability of seizure diagnosis based on semiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Bo; Wu, Han; Xu, Jiahui; Yan, Jianwei; Ding, Yao; Wang, Z Irene; Guo, Yi; Wang, Zhongjin; Shen, Chunhong; Chen, Zhong; Ding, Meiping; Wang, Shuang

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to determine the accuracy of seizure diagnosis by semiological analysis and to assess the factors that affect diagnostic reliability. A total of 150 video clips of seizures from 50 patients (each with three seizures of the same type) were observed by eight epileptologists, 12 neurologists, and 20 physicians (internists). The videos included 37 series of epileptic seizures, eight series of physiologic nonepileptic events (PNEEs), and five series of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNESs). After observing each video, the doctors chose the diagnosis of epileptic seizures or nonepileptic events for the patient; if the latter was chosen, they further chose the diagnosis of PNESs or PNEEs. The overall diagnostic accuracy rate for epileptic seizures and nonepileptic events increased from 0.614 to 0.660 after observations of all three seizures (p semiological diagnosis of seizures is greatly affected by the seizure type as well as the doctor's experience. Although the overall reliability is limited, it can be improved by observing more seizures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Seizure semiology of lesional frontal lobe epilepsies in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, D; Lettori, D; Contaldo, I; Veredice, C; Sacco, A; Vasco, J; Martinelli, D; Chieffo, D; Tartaglione, T; Colosimo, C; Di Rocco, C; Guzzetta, F

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the semiology of seizures in children with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) and to compare them with other paediatric cohorts described in the literature as well as with adult counterparts. We analysed 174 registered seizures of 18 cases under 12 years with lesional epilepsy whose frontal origin was defined by the concordance of neuroimaging and ictal electrographic findings, and confirmed by surgery in the six cases operated on. Seizures were generally short, with a high daily frequency and usually related to sleep. The most characteristic semiological pattern consisted of complex motor seizures, particularly hypermotor. Often seizures corresponded to a mixture of different semiological patterns (tonic, gelastic, automotor, hypermotor, versive) presenting in the same seizure, often as a unique type in the same patient. With regard to several aspects the semiology of FLE in our cohort looks like that reported in adult series, in particular as to the frequency of complex motor seizures. However, our cohort was also characterised by a more protean array of seizure semiology, stressing the occurrence of seizures typically present in adults (versive and complex motor) and of some seizure patterns more characteristic in children such as epileptic spasms; moreover, the rare occurrence of secondarily generalised tonic clonic seizures (SGTCS) was confirmed.

  20. Cloxacillin-induced seizure in a hemodialysis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Nekidy, Wasim; Dziamarski, Nicole; Soong, Derrick; Donaldson, Christine; Ibrahim, Muhieldean; Kadri, Albert

    2015-10-01

    We are reporting a cloxacillin-induced seizure in a patient with stage 5 chronic kidney disease requiring hemodialysis. To our knowledge, there are no published case reports of seizures induced by parenteral cloxacillin in hemodialysis patients. A young hemodialysis female was admitted to the hospital with decreased level of consciousness. Blood cultures revealed methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus where cloxacillin 2 g intravenously every 4 hours was initiated. Head computed tomography (CT) was not significant. After 14 hours of cloxacillin therapy (4 doses), the patient demonstrated tonic/clonic seizure activity, where phenytoin and lorazepam were initiated. The anti-seizure medications partially reduced seizure activity. Once the cloxacillin was discontinued, the seizures stopped. Two weeks later, all anti-seizure medications were stopped with no further seizure activity. Cloxacillin elimination in hemodialysis patients is similar to patients with normal kidney function. Although cloxacillin does not significantly cross the blood-brain barrier, the correlation between the start of seizures and cloxacillin initiation was confirmed by the negative CT and blood chemistry laboratory results. Moreover, seizure activity was terminated upon discontinuation of cloxacillin. Although further investigation for the cause of such seizures is warranted, clinicians should use caution when giving high doses of cloxacillin in hemodialysis patients. © 2015 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  1. Content analysis of subjective experiences in partial epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Mirja; Valli, Katja; Revonsuo, Antti; Wedlund, Jan-Eric

    2008-01-01

    A new content analysis method for systematically describing the phenomenology of subjective experiences in connection with partial epileptic seizures is described. Forty patients provided 262 descriptions of subjective experience relative to their partial epileptic seizures. The results revealed that subjective experiences during seizures consist mostly of sensory and bodily sensations, hallucinatory experiences, and thinking. The majority of subjective experiences during seizures are bizarre and distorted; nevertheless, the patients are able to engage in adequate behavior. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study for which detailed subjective seizure descriptions were collected immediately after each seizure and the first study in which the content of verbal reports of subjective experiences during seizures, including both the ictal and postictal experiences, has been analyzed in detail.

  2. Analysis of Seizure EEG in Kindled Epileptic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Sen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Using wavelet analysis we have detected the presence of chirps in seizure EEG signals recorded from kindled epileptic rats. Seizures were induced by electrical stimulation of the amygdala and the EEG signals recorded from the amygdala were analyzed using a continuous wavelet transform. A time–frequency representation of the wavelet power spectrum revealed that during seizure the EEG signal is characterized by a chirp-like waveform whose frequency changes with time from the onset of seizure to its completion. Similar chirp-like time–frequency profiles have been observed in newborn and adult patients undergoing epileptic seizures. The global wavelet spectrum depicting the variation of power with frequency showed two dominant frequencies with the largest amounts of power during seizure. Our results indicate that a kindling paradigm in rats can be used as an animal model of human temporal lobe epilepsy to detect seizures by identifying chirp-like time–frequency variations in the EEG signal.

  3. Experimental activation of the sphenopalatine ganglion provokes cluster-like attacks in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik W; Barløse, Mads; Guo, Song

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundHigh frequency (HF) stimulation of the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) is an emerging abortive treatment for cluster headache (CH) attacks. HF SPG stimulation is thought to exert its effect by physiologically blocking parasympathetic outflow. We hypothesized that low frequency (LF) SPG...... stimulation may activate the SPG, causing increased parasympathetic outflow and thereby provoking cluster attacks in CH patients.MethodsIn a double-blind randomized cross-over study, seven CH patients implanted with an SPG neurostimulator were randomly allocated to receive HF or LF stimulation for 3 min on 2...... separate days. We recorded headache characteristics and autonomic symptoms during and after stimulation.ResultsSix patients completed the study. Three out of six patients (50%) reported ipsilateral cluster-like attacks during or within 30 min of LF SPG stimulation. These cluster-like attacks were all...

  4. Paediatric vaginal discharge

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vaginal discharge in the prepubertal patient is a common symptom, and can be a source of distress for the caregiver and con- cern for the healthcare worker. Several factors predispose these patients to the development of recurrent vaginal discharge. Unless noticed by the caregiver, this problem can persist for long periods ...

  5. Graywater Discharges from Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    both sewage and graywater, or sewage collected from “ honey dipper” trucks, which may contain far less graywater, depending on the source (See... crystal clean effluent discharge. As a reference, Cruiseliners equipped with Scanship AWP systems has obtained continous discharge permits in Hawaii and

  6. Lithium battery discharge tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    The long term discharge of a variety of lithium cells was characterized and the susceptibility of the cells to chemical variation during the slow discharge was tested. A shunt resistor was set across the terminals to monitor the voltage as a function of time. Failures were identified by premature voltage drops.

  7. Systematic Review of the Effectiveness of Physical Therapy Modalities in Women With Provoked Vestibulodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Mélanie; Carroll, Marie-Soleil; Bergeron, Sophie

    2017-07-01

    Pelvic floor muscle physical therapy is recommended in clinical guidelines for women with provoked vestibulodynia (PVD). Including isolated or combined treatment modalities, physical therapy is viewed as an effective first-line intervention, yet no systematic review concerning the effectiveness of physical therapy has been conducted. To systematically appraise the current literature on the effectiveness of physical therapy modalities for decreasing pain during intercourse and improving sexual function in women with PVD. A systematic literature search using PubMed, Scopus, CINHAL, and PEDro was conducted until October 2016. Moreover, a manual search from reference lists of included articles was performed. Ongoing trials also were reviewed using clinicaltrial.gov and ISRCTNregistry. Randomized controlled trials, prospective and retrospective cohorts, and case reports evaluating the effect of isolated or combined physical therapy modalities in women with PVD were included in the review. Main outcome measures were pain during intercourse, sexual function, and patient's perceived improvement. The literature search resulted in 43 eligible studies including 7 randomized controlled trials, 20 prospective studies, 5 retrospective studies, 6 case reports, and 6 study protocols. Most studies had a high risk of bias mainly associated with the lack of a comparison group. Another common bias was related to insufficient sample size, non-validated outcomes, non-standardized intervention, and use of other ongoing treatment. The vast majority of studies showed that physical therapy modalities such as biofeedback, dilators, electrical stimulation, education, multimodal physical therapy, and multidisciplinary approaches were effective for decreasing pain during intercourse and improving sexual function. The positive findings for the effectiveness of physical therapy modalities in women with PVD should be investigated further in robust and well-designed randomized controlled trials

  8. Understanding the Uncanny: Both Atypical Features and Category Ambiguity Provoke Aversion toward Humanlike Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strait, Megan K.; Floerke, Victoria A.; Ju, Wendy; Maddox, Keith; Remedios, Jessica D.; Jung, Malte F.; Urry, Heather L.

    2017-01-01

    Robots intended for social contexts are often designed with explicit humanlike attributes in order to facilitate their reception by (and communication with) people. However, observation of an “uncanny valley”—a phenomenon in which highly humanlike entities provoke aversion in human observers—has lead some to caution against this practice. Both of these contrasting perspectives on the anthropomorphic design of social robots find some support in empirical investigations to date. Yet, owing to outstanding empirical limitations and theoretical disputes, the uncanny valley and its implications for human-robot interaction remains poorly understood. We thus explored the relationship between human similarity and people's aversion toward humanlike robots via manipulation of the agents' appearances. To that end, we employed a picture-viewing task (Nagents = 60) to conduct an experimental test (Nparticipants = 72) of the uncanny valley's existence and the visual features that cause certain humanlike robots to be unnerving. Across the levels of human similarity, we further manipulated agent appearance on two dimensions, typicality (prototypic, atypical, and ambiguous) and agent identity (robot, person), and measured participants' aversion using both subjective and behavioral indices. Our findings were as follows: (1) Further substantiating its existence, the data show a clear and consistent uncanny valley in the current design space of humanoid robots. (2) Both category ambiguity, and more so, atypicalities provoke aversive responding, thus shedding light on the visual factors that drive people's discomfort. (3) Use of the Negative Attitudes toward Robots Scale did not reveal any significant relationships between people's pre-existing attitudes toward humanlike robots and their aversive responding—suggesting positive exposure and/or additional experience with robots is unlikely to affect the occurrence of an uncanny valley effect in humanoid robotics. This work

  9. Sexual arousal in women with provoked vestibulodynia: the application of laser Doppler imaging to sexual pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Stéphanie C; Pukall, Caroline F; Chamberlain, Susan M

    2013-04-01

    Introduction.  Women with provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) report lower sexual arousal than nonaffected women, however, laboratory studies of arousal have reported contradictory results about whether group differences exist in genital and subjective arousal. Aim.  To examine genital and subjective sexual arousal in women with and without PVD. Methods.  Eligible women with and without PVD (N = 42) attended a laboratory session that included an interview, questionnaire completion, and genital imaging. A direct measure of superficial blood flow-laser Doppler imaging-was used to assess vulvar blood flow levels while participants watched three films, including an erotic film. Participants answered questions about their level of sexual arousal before, during, and after the erotic film. Main Outcome Measures.  Average vulvar blood flow levels during the baseline and erotic films, numerical ratings of subjective sexual arousal and anxiety, as well as questionnaire measures of arousal. Results.  There was a significant group difference in genital arousal, whereby the PVD group showed a lower genital response to the erotic film, as well as a significant interaction between baseline blood flow and group membership. Separate group regression analyses demonstrated that baseline blood flow explained a substantial amount of the variance in erotic film blood flow in the control group (70%), while only 27% was explained by this variable in the PVD group. There were no differences in subjective sexual arousal or anxiety between the groups. Across questionnaire measures, women with PVD reported lower sexual arousal than the control group. Conclusions.  The results suggest that women with PVD show lower genital responsiveness than nonaffected women to sexual stimuli in a laboratory setting and that their genital arousal is likely impacted by a number of biopsychosocial factors. Boyer SC, Pukall CF, and Chamberlain SM. Sexual arousal in women with provoked vestibulodynia

  10. Understanding the Uncanny: Both Atypical Features and Category Ambiguity Provoke Aversion toward Humanlike Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strait, Megan K; Floerke, Victoria A; Ju, Wendy; Maddox, Keith; Remedios, Jessica D; Jung, Malte F; Urry, Heather L

    2017-01-01

    Robots intended for social contexts are often designed with explicit humanlike attributes in order to facilitate their reception by (and communication with) people. However, observation of an "uncanny valley"-a phenomenon in which highly humanlike entities provoke aversion in human observers-has lead some to caution against this practice. Both of these contrasting perspectives on the anthropomorphic design of social robots find some support in empirical investigations to date. Yet, owing to outstanding empirical limitations and theoretical disputes, the uncanny valley and its implications for human-robot interaction remains poorly understood. We thus explored the relationship between human similarity and people's aversion toward humanlike robots via manipulation of the agents' appearances. To that end, we employed a picture-viewing task ( N agents = 60) to conduct an experimental test ( N participants = 72) of the uncanny valley's existence and the visual features that cause certain humanlike robots to be unnerving. Across the levels of human similarity, we further manipulated agent appearance on two dimensions, typicality (prototypic, atypical, and ambiguous) and agent identity (robot, person), and measured participants' aversion using both subjective and behavioral indices. Our findings were as follows: (1) Further substantiating its existence, the data show a clear and consistent uncanny valley in the current design space of humanoid robots. (2) Both category ambiguity, and more so, atypicalities provoke aversive responding, thus shedding light on the visual factors that drive people's discomfort. (3) Use of the Negative Attitudes toward Robots Scale did not reveal any significant relationships between people's pre-existing attitudes toward humanlike robots and their aversive responding-suggesting positive exposure and/or additional experience with robots is unlikely to affect the occurrence of an uncanny valley effect in humanoid robotics. This work furthers

  11. The abdominal compartment syndrome as a second insult during systemic neutrophil priming provokes multiple organ injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende-Neto, Joao B; Moore, Ernest E; Masuno, Tomohiko; Moore, Peter K; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Sheppard, Forest R; Cunha-Melo, Jose R; Silliman, Christopher C

    2003-10-01

    In our recent clinical study of damage control laparotomy, the abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) emerged as an independent risk factor for postinjury multiple organ failure (MOF). We and others have shown previously that the ACS promotes the systemic production of proinflammatory cytokines. Our study objective was to develop a clinically relevant two-event animal model of postinjury MOF using the ACS as a second insult during systemic neutrophil priming to provoke organ dysfunction. Male adult rats underwent hemorrhagic shock (30 mmHg x 45 min) and were resuscitated with crystalloids and shed blood. The timing of postshock systemic neutrophil (PMN) priming was determined by the surface expression of CD11b via flow cytometry. Finding maximal PMN priming at 8 h, but no priming at 2 h (early) and 18 h (late), the ACS (25 mmHg x 60 min) was introduced at these time points. At 24 h postshock, lung injury was assessed by lung elastase concentration and Evans blue dye extravasation in bronchoalveolar lavage. Liver and renal injuries were determined by serum alanine aminotransferase, serum creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen. The ACS during the time of maximal systemic PMN priming (8 h) provoked lung and liver injury, but did not if introduced at 2 or 18 h postshock when there was no evidence of systemic PMN priming. The 24-h mortality of this two-event model was 33%. These findings corroborate the potential for the ACS to promote multiple organ injury when occurring at the time of systemic PMN priming. This clinically relevant two-event animal model of PMN organ injury may be useful in elucidating therapy strategies to prevent postinjury MOF.

  12. Understanding the Uncanny: Both Atypical Features and Category Ambiguity Provoke Aversion toward Humanlike Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan K. Strait

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Robots intended for social contexts are often designed with explicit humanlike attributes in order to facilitate their reception by (and communication with people. However, observation of an “uncanny valley”—a phenomenon in which highly humanlike entities provoke aversion in human observers—has lead some to caution against this practice. Both of these contrasting perspectives on the anthropomorphic design of social robots find some support in empirical investigations to date. Yet, owing to outstanding empirical limitations and theoretical disputes, the uncanny valley and its implications for human-robot interaction remains poorly understood. We thus explored the relationship between human similarity and people's aversion toward humanlike robots via manipulation of the agents' appearances. To that end, we employed a picture-viewing task (Nagents = 60 to conduct an experimental test (Nparticipants = 72 of the uncanny valley's existence and the visual features that cause certain humanlike robots to be unnerving. Across the levels of human similarity, we further manipulated agent appearance on two dimensions, typicality (prototypic, atypical, and ambiguous and agent identity (robot, person, and measured participants' aversion using both subjective and behavioral indices. Our findings were as follows: (1 Further substantiating its existence, the data show a clear and consistent uncanny valley in the current design space of humanoid robots. (2 Both category ambiguity, and more so, atypicalities provoke aversive responding, thus shedding light on the visual factors that drive people's discomfort. (3 Use of the Negative Attitudes toward Robots Scale did not reveal any significant relationships between people's pre-existing attitudes toward humanlike robots and their aversive responding—suggesting positive exposure and/or additional experience with robots is unlikely to affect the occurrence of an uncanny valley effect in humanoid robotics

  13. CO-AXIAL DISCHARGES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, J.S.; Smith, L.P.

    1960-11-22

    A method and apparatus are given for producing coaxial arc discharges in an evacuated enclosure and within a strong, confining magnetic field. The arcs are maintained at a high potential difference. Electrons will diffuse to the more positive arc from the negative arc, and positive ions will diffuse from the more positive arc to the negative arc. Coaxial arc discharges have the advantage that ions which return to strike the positive arc discharge will lose no energy since they do not strike a solid wall or electrode. Those discharges are useful in confining an ionized plasma between the discharges, and have the advantage of preventing impurities from the walls of the enclosure from entering ihe plasma area because of the arc barrier set up bv the cylindrical outer arc.

  14. Computed Tomography Findings in Patients with Seizure Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumnima Acharya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Seizure occurs in up to 10% of the population, whereas epilepsy is a chronic disease characterized by recurrent seizures that may affect up to 2% of the population. Modern neuroimaging is useful in diagnosis of  abnormalities underlying the epilepsies, but the information provided by imaging techniques can also contribute to proper classification of certain epileptic disorders and can delineate the genetics of some underlying syndromes. Neuroimaging is even more important for those patients who have medically intractable seizures. This study was carried out to establish different etiologies of seizures, to correlate the clinical data and radiological findings in cases of seizure, and to identify the common etiologies in different types of seizures. Methods: This was a retrospective hospital-based study conducted in the Department of Radiodiagnosis of Lumbini Medical College Teaching Hospital. Records of patients of past two years, admitted in any department of the hospital with history of seizure disorder and underwent a Computed Tomography  (CT of brain were included. The CT patterns were assessed and the data were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Results: There were a total of 480 cases out of which 263 (55% were male and 217 (45% were female with M:F ratio of 1.2:1. Generalized seizure was more frequent than partial seizure in both gender. In 274 cases of generalized seizures, CT scan findings were abnormal in 151 cases and normal finding observed in 123 cases. In 206 cases of partial seizures, 125 cases were abnormal and 81 having normal CT scan findings. Age wise distribution showed highest number (n=218 of cases in young group (60 yr. The most common cause of seizure  was  calcified granuloma (n=79, 16.5% followed by neurocysticercosis (NCC, n=64, 13%. Diffuse cerebral edema, sub-arachnoid hemorrhage, and hydrocephalus was seen only in lower age group particularly among 1-20 years. Infarct and diffuse cortical

  15. Silane Discharge Ion Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatham, Robert Hood, III

    We have studied silane dc, rf and dc proximity discharges, using mass spectroscopic measurements of the positive ions as a detailed diagnostic for the type of discharge used to produce hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar photovoltaic cells. The properties and quality of these films depends in a very complex way upon the interactions of the many reactive neutral and ion species in the discharge. We have developed qualitative models of the ion chemical processes in these discharges from our measurements. Knowledge of the ion-molecule and electron-molecule collision cross sections is important to any attempt at understanding silane discharge chemistry. Consequently, we have measured the electron impact ionization cross sections for silane and disilane, and for comparison purposes also for methane and ethane. In addition, we have measured the rate coefficients for charge exchange reactions of He('+), Ne('+), and Ar('+) with silane, disilane, methane, and ethane, as these are important to understanding discharges in inert gas-silane mixtures. We have developed a detailed quantitative model of the cathode sheath region of a silane dc discharge, by extending the best recent calculation of the electron motion in the sheath to a self-consistent form which includes the ion motion. This model is used with comparison of silane dc discharge data to diagnose the ion chemistry occurring in the sheath region of silane dc discharge. The understanding of the discharge ion chemical processes that we have gained in this study represent an important step toward understanding the chemical and physical processes leading to film growth.

  16. Predictors of early seizure recurrence in patients admitted for seizures in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquet, Christophe; Depret-Vassal, Jaqueline; Doumenc, Benoit; Sarnel, Sophie; Casalino, Enrique

    2008-10-01

    To determine the frequency of early seizure recurrence (ESR) and to evaluate predictors of ESR among patients attending the Emergency Department (ED) for seizure. Prospective observational 12-month study in two Paris metropolitan area EDs including all consecutive adult patients presenting after one or more convulsive seizure episodes. Patients were classified into four groups: alcoholism (A), nonalcoholism (nA), new-onset seizure (NO), and past history of seizures (PS). ESR was defined as a seizure recurrence during the first 24 h after admission. A total of 1025 patients were enrolled. The groups were as follows: A-NO 176 patients (17.2%); A-PS 263 patients (25.6%); nA-NO 170 patients (16.6%); and nA-PS 416 patients (40.6%). Alcohol-related episodes involved 439 patients (42.8) with 346 NO seizures (33.7%). ESR rates were 16.3 and 18.6% at 6 and 24 h. Alcoholism, diagnostic group, age >or=40 years, glucose >or=5 and >or=8.5 mmol/l, and Glasgow Coma Scale 5 mmol/l, OR: 1.68 (95% CI: 1.37-2.1), >or=8.5 mmol/l, 2.83 (95% CI: 2.3-3.47), P=0.000001], and Glasgow Coma Scale [<15 OR: 1.9 (95% CI: 1.29-2.78); P=0.001] remained significantly associated on multivariate analysis. We constructed a predictive model from these data. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 89.1, 27.4, 60.4, and 91.7%, respectively. ESR is common in the ED setting. Alcohol consumption, capillary glucose, and abnormal neurological examination on arrival at the ED are associated with increased risk of ESR.

  17. Role of biomarkers in differentiating new-onset seizures from psychogenic nonepileptic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahendra Javali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Review of literature revealed very limited studies considering a combination of serum prolactin (PRL and serum creatine kinase (CK as markers for differentiating epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES. Therefore, in the present study, we analyzed the role of serum PRL and serum CK, individually and in combination. Methodology: This prospective study was conducted in a tertiary care medical teaching hospital over a period of 18 months. Patients aged over 15 years suspected to have new-onset seizures presenting within 5 h of ictus were included in this study. CK, serum PRL was measured at 0–1, 1–3, and 3–5 h after seizures. Results: Hundred subjects were studied for the role of serum PRL and serum CK in differentiating epileptic and PNES. The mean age was 42.24 years with a male:female ratio of 1.27:1. All patients of generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTCS, who presented within 1 h, had elevated PRL, whereas 75% of patients with partial seizures had elevated PRL within 1 h of presentation. Nearly 91.66% of patients with GTCS who presented within 1 h had elevated CPK, whereas 70% of patients with partial seizures had elevated CPK. None of the patients diagnosed with PNES showed rise in either of the markers. Conclusion: In the present study, none of the patients with PNES showed raise in either serum PRL or CK. However, there was no correlation between the types of seizure and PRL or serum CK levels.

  18. Using trend templates in a neonatal seizure algorithm improves detection of short seizures in a foetal ovine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanenburg, Alex; Andriessen, Peter; Jellema, Reint K; Niemarkt, Hendrik J; Wolfs, Tim G A M; Kramer, Boris W; Delhaas, Tammo

    2015-03-01

    Seizures below one minute in duration are difficult to assess correctly using seizure detection algorithms. We aimed to improve neonatal detection algorithm performance for short seizures through the use of trend templates for seizure onset and end. Bipolar EEG were recorded within a transiently asphyxiated ovine model at 0.7 gestational age, a common experimental model for studying brain development in humans of 30-34 weeks of gestation. Transient asphyxia led to electrographic seizures within 6-8 h. A total of 3159 seizures, 2386 shorter than one minute, were annotated in 1976 h-long EEG recordings from 17 foetal lambs. To capture EEG characteristics, five features, sensitive to seizures, were calculated and used to derive trend information. Feature values and trend information were used as input for support vector machine classification and subsequently post-processed. Performance metrics, calculated after post-processing, were compared between analyses with and without employing trend information. Detector performance was assessed after five-fold cross-validation conducted ten times with random splits. The use of trend templates for seizure onset and end in a neonatal seizure detection algorithm significantly improves the correct detection of short seizures using two-channel EEG recordings from 54.3% (52.6-56.1) to 59.5% (58.5-59.9) at FDR 2.0 (median (range); p trend templates might therefore aid in detection of short seizures by EEG monitoring at the NICU.

  19. An optimum allocation sampling based feature extraction scheme for distinguishing seizure and seizure-free EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taran, Sachin; Bajaj, Varun; Siuly, Siuly

    2017-12-01

    Epileptic seizure is the common neurological disorder, which is generally identified by electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. In this paper, a new feature extraction methodology based on optimum allocation sampling (OAS) and Teager energy operator (TEO) is proposed for detection of seizure EEG signals. The OAS scheme selects the finite length homogeneous sequence from non-homogeneous recorded EEG signal. The trend of selected sequence by OAS is still non-linear, which is analyzed by non-linear operator TEO. The TEO convert non-linear but homogenous EEG sequence into amplitude-frequency modulated (AM-FM) components. The statistical measures of AM-FM components used as input features to least squares support vector machine classifier for classification of seizure and seizure-free EEG signals. The proposed methodology is evaluated on a benchmark epileptic seizure EEG database. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed scheme has capability to effectively distinguish seizure and seizure-free EEG signals.

  20. Characterization of seizure-like events recorded in vivo in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colic, Sinisa; Wither, Robert G; Zhang, Liang; Eubanks, James H; Bardakjian, Berj L

    2013-10-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the X-linked gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). Spontaneous recurrent discharge episodes are displayed in Rett-related seizures as in other types of epilepsies. The aim of this paper is to investigate the seizure-like event (SLE) and inter-SLE states in a female MeCP2-deficient mouse model of Rett syndrome and compare them to those found in other spontaneous recurrent epilepsy models. The study was performed on a small population of female MeCP2-deficient mice using telemetric local field potential (LFP) recordings over a 24 h period. Durations of SLEs and inter-SLEs were extracted using a rule-based automated SLE detection system for both daytime and nighttime, as well as high and low power levels of the delta frequency range (0.5-4 Hz) of the recorded LFPs. The results suggest SLE occurrences are not influenced by circadian rhythms, but had a significantly greater association with delta power. Investigating inter-SLE and SLE states by fitting duration histograms to the gamma distribution showed that SLE initiation and termination were associated with random and deterministic mechanisms, respectively. These findings when compared to reported studies on epilepsy suggest that Rett-related seizures share many similarities with absence epilepsy. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.