WorldWideScience

Sample records for providing step-by-step instructions

  1. Using Aspen plus in thermodynamics instruction a step-by-step guide

    CERN Document Server

    Sandler, Stanley I

    2015-01-01

    A step-by-step guide for students (and faculty) on the use of Aspen in teaching thermodynamics Used for a wide variety of important engineering tasks, Aspen Plus software is a modeling tool used for conceptual design, optimization, and performance monitoring of chemical processes. After more than twenty years, it remains one of the most popular and powerful chemical engineering simulation programs used both industrially and academically. Using Aspen Plus in Thermodynamics Instruction: A Step by Step Guide introduces the reader to the use of Aspen Plus in courses in thermodynamics. It prov

  2. Step-By-Step Instructions for Retina Recordings with Perforated Multi Electrode Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrees, Saad; Mutter, Marion; Benkner, Boris; Münch, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-electrode arrays are a state-of-the-art tool in electrophysiology, also in retina research. The output cells of the retina, the retinal ganglion cells, form a monolayer in many species and are well accessible due to their proximity to the inner retinal surface. This structure has allowed the use of multi-electrode arrays for high-throughput, parallel recordings of retinal responses to presented visual stimuli, and has led to significant new insights into retinal organization and function. However, using conventional arrays where electrodes are embedded into a glass or ceramic plate can be associated with three main problems: (1) low signal-to-noise ratio due to poor contact between electrodes and tissue, especially in the case of strongly curved retinas from small animals, e.g. rodents; (2) insufficient oxygen and nutrient supply to cells located on the bottom of the recording chamber; and (3) displacement of the tissue during recordings. Perforated multi-electrode arrays (pMEAs) have been found to alleviate all three issues in brain slice recordings. Over the last years, we have been using such perforated arrays to study light evoked activity in the retinas of various species including mouse, pig, and human. In this article, we provide detailed step-by-step instructions for the use of perforated MEAs to record visual responses from the retina, including spike recordings from retinal ganglion cells and in vitro electroretinograms (ERG). In addition, we provide in-depth technical and methodological troubleshooting information, and show example recordings of good quality as well as examples for the various problems which might be encountered. While our description is based on the specific equipment we use in our own lab, it may also prove useful when establishing retinal MEA recordings with other equipment. PMID:25165854

  3. Knack knots you need step-by-step instructions for more than 100 of the best sailing, fishing, climbing, camping and decorative knots

    CERN Document Server

    Tilton, Buck

    2008-01-01

    Untie the mystery of knot-making with this clever and handy guide. This new compendium presents all the knots you need to know, with brightly colored photographs enabling you to easily follow the instructions. In addition, the book includes copious information on using knots in most popular activities. With its clear step-by-step instructions and friendly tone, this is the one volume you can count on to guide you toward quick success in knot-making.

  4. ATMS Step By Step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Library of Australia, Canberra.

    This manual is designed to provide an introduction and basic guide to the use of IBM's Advanced Text Management System (ATMS), the text processing system to be used for the creation of Australian data bases within AUSINET. Instructions are provided for using the system to enter, store, retrieve, and modify data, which may then be displayed at the…

  5. PHOEBE - step by step manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasche, P.

    2016-03-01

    An easy step-by-step manual of PHOEBE is presented. It should serve as a starting point for the first time users of PHOEBE analyzing the eclipsing binary light curve. It is demonstrated on one particular detached system also with the downloadable data and the whole procedure is described easily till the final trustworthy fit is being reached.

  6. Linear algebra step by step

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Kuldeep

    2013-01-01

    Linear algebra is a fundamental area of mathematics, and is arguably the most powerful mathematical tool ever developed. It is a core topic of study within fields as diverse as: business, economics, engineering, physics, computer science, ecology, sociology, demography and genetics. For an example of linear algebra at work, one needs to look no further than the Google search engine, which relies upon linear algebra to rank the results of a search with respect to relevance. The strength of the text is in the large number of examples and the step-by-step explanation of each topic as it is introduced. It is compiled in a way that allows distance learning, with explicit solutions to set problems freely available online. The miscellaneous exercises at the end of each chapter comprise questions from past exam papers from various universities, helping to reinforce the reader's confidence. Also included, generally at the beginning of sections, are short historicalbiographies of the leading players in the field of lin...

  7. Step by Step Microsoft Office Visio 2003

    CERN Document Server

    Lemke, Judy

    2004-01-01

    Experience learning made easy-and quickly teach yourself how to use Visio 2003, the Microsoft Office business and technical diagramming program. With STEP BY STEP, you can take just the lessons you need, or work from cover to cover. Either way, you drive the instruction-building and practicing the skills you need, just when you need them! Produce computer network diagrams, organization charts, floor plans, and moreUse templates to create new diagrams and drawings quicklyAdd text, color, and 1-D and 2-D shapesInsert graphics and pictures, such as company logosConnect shapes to create a basic f

  8. Step-by-Step Visual Manuals: Design and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urata, Toshiyuki

    2004-01-01

    The types of handouts and manuals that are used in technology training vary. Some describe procedures in a narrative way without graphics; some employ step-by-step instructions with screen captures. According to Thirlway (1994), a training manual should be like a tutor that permits a student to learn at his own pace and gives him confidence for…

  9. The way to collisions, step by step

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    While the LHC sectors cool down and reach the cryogenic operating temperature, spirits are warming up as we all eagerly await the first collisions. No reason to hurry, though. Making particles collide involves the complex manoeuvring of thousands of delicate components. The experts will make it happen using a step-by-step approach.

  10. Microsoft Office professional 2010 step by step

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Joyce; Frye, Curtis

    2011-01-01

    Teach yourself exactly what you need to know about using Office Professional 2010-one step at a time! With STEP BY STEP, you build and practice new skills hands-on, at your own pace. Covering Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, Outlook, Excel, Access, Publisher, and OneNote, this book will help you learn the core features and capabilities needed to: Create attractive documents, publications, and spreadsheetsManage your e-mail, calendar, meetings, and communicationsPut your business data to workDevelop and deliver great presentationsOrganize your ideas and notes in one placeConnect, share, and accom

  11. Preface, Soil Science: A step-by-step analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book provides step-by-step procedures for soil professionals, without a lot of background theory. Chapters are targeted toward agricultural and environmental consultants, producers, students, teachers, government, and industry. Applied soil scientists gave input through a survey, which guided t...

  12. Microsoft Office Word 2007 step by step

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Joyce

    2007-01-01

    Experience learning made easy-and quickly teach yourself how to create impressive documents with Word 2007. With Step By Step, you set the pace-building and practicing the skills you need, just when you need them!Apply styles and themes to your document for a polished lookAdd graphics and text effects-and see a live previewOrganize information with new SmartArt diagrams and chartsInsert references, footnotes, indexes, a table of contentsSend documents for review and manage revisionsTurn your ideas into blogs, Web pages, and moreYour all-in-one learning experience includes:Files for building sk

  13. Focal cryotherapy: step by step technique description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Redondo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction and objective: Focal cryotherapy emerged as an efficient option to treat favorable and localized prostate cancer (PCa. The purpose of this video is to describe the procedure step by step. Materials and methods: We present the case of a 68 year-old man with localized PCa in the anterior aspect of the prostate. Results: The procedure is performed under general anesthesia, with the patient in lithotomy position. Briefly, the equipment utilized includes the cryotherapy console coupled with an ultrasound system, argon and helium gas bottles, cryoprobes, temperature probes and an urethral warming catheter. The procedure starts with a real-time trans-rectal prostate ultrasound, which is used to outline the prostate, the urethra and the rectal wall. The cryoprobes are pretested and placed in to the prostate through the perineum, following a grid template, along with the temperature sensors under ultrasound guidance. A cystoscopy confirms the right positioning of the needles and the urethral warming catheter is installed. Thereafter, the freeze sequence with argon gas is started, achieving extremely low temperatures (-40°C to induce tumor cell lysis. Sequentially, the thawing cycle is performed using helium gas. This process is repeated one time. Results among several series showed a biochemical disease-free survival between 71-93% at 9-70 month- follow-up, incontinence rates between 0-3.6% and erectile dysfunction between 0-42% (1–5. Conclusions: Focal cryotherapy is a feasible procedure to treat anterior PCa that may offer minimal morbidity, allowing good cancer control and better functional outcomes when compared to whole-gland treatment.

  14. Focal cryotherapy: step by step technique description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Cristina; Srougi, Victor; da Costa, José Batista; Baghdad, Mohammed; Velilla, Guillermo; Nunes-Silva, Igor; Bergerat, Sebastien; Garcia-Barreras, Silvia; Rozet, François; Ingels, Alexandre; Galiano, Marc; Sanchez-Salas, Rafael; Barret, Eric; Cathelineau, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Focal cryotherapy emerged as an efficient option to treat favorable and localized prostate cancer (PCa). The purpose of this video is to describe the procedure step by step. We present the case of a 68 year-old man with localized PCa in the anterior aspect of the prostate. The procedure is performed under general anesthesia, with the patient in lithotomy position. Briefly, the equipament utilized includes the cryotherapy console coupled with an ultrasound system, argon and helium gas bottles, cryoprobes, temperature probes and an urethral warming catheter. The procedure starts with a real-time trans-rectal prostate ultrasound, which is used to outline the prostate, the urethra and the rectal wall. The cryoprobes are pretested and placed in to the prostate through the perineum, following a grid template, along with the temperature sensors under ultrasound guidance. A cystoscopy confirms the right positioning of the needles and the urethral warming catheter is installed. Thereafter, the freeze sequence with argon gas is started, achieving extremely low temperatures (-40ºC) to induce tumor cell lysis. Sequentially, the thawing cycle is performed using helium gas. This process is repeated one time. Results among several series showed a biochemical disease-free survival between 71-93% at 9-70 month- follow-up, incontinence rates between 0-3.6% and erectile dysfunction between 0-42% (1-5). Focal cryotherapy is a feasible procedure to treat anterior PCa that may offer minimal morbidity, allowing good cancer control and better functional outcomes when compared to whole-gland treatment. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  15. SPAR-H Step-by-Step Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    April M. Whaley; Dana L. Kelly; Ronald L. Boring; William J. Galyean

    2012-06-01

    Step-by-step guidance was developed recently at Idaho National Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the use of the Standardized Plant Analysis Risk-Human Reliability Analysis (SPAR-H) method for quantifying Human Failure Events (HFEs). This work was done to address SPAR-H user needs, specifically requests for additional guidance on the proper application of various aspects of the methodology. This paper overviews the steps of the SPAR-H analysis process and highlights some of the most important insights gained during the development of the step-by-step directions. This supplemental guidance for analysts is applicable when plant-specific information is available, and goes beyond the general guidance provided in existing SPAR-H documentation. The steps highlighted in this paper are: Step-1, Categorizing the HFE as Diagnosis and/or Action; Step-2, Rate the Performance Shaping Factors; Step-3, Calculate PSF-Modified HEP; Step-4, Accounting for Dependence, and; Step-5, Minimum Value Cutoff.

  16. Step by Step to Peace in Syria

    CERN Document Server

    Parens, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    The revolution and Civil War in Syria has led to substantial death and suffering, a massive refugee crisis, and growth of ISIS extremism and its terror attacks globally. Conflict between disparate groups is ongoing. Complex ethnic geography is a central reason for the large number of different groups in conflict as this geography leads to local allegiances that do not aggregate at the national scale. We have previously demonstrated that, where ethnic groups exist in geographic patches of 20-60 km in diameter, there is a high probability of conflict. We have also shown that establishing local autonomy through subnational boundaries (as is found in Switzerland) is a means of alleviating conflict. Our analysis suggests that providing some level of local autonomy to the ethnic groups would reduce the impetus for local conflict and could serve as a basis for peace and stability. Here we propose that interventions should be pursued to stop specific individual local conflicts, creating safe zones, that can be expand...

  17. SPAR-H Step-by-Step Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. J. Galyean; A. M. Whaley; D. L. Kelly; R. L. Boring

    2011-05-01

    This guide provides step-by-step guidance on the use of the SPAR-H method for quantifying Human Failure Events (HFEs). This guide is intended to be used with the worksheets provided in: 'The SPAR-H Human Reliability Analysis Method,' NUREG/CR-6883, dated August 2005. Each step in the process of producing a Human Error Probability (HEP) is discussed. These steps are: Step-1, Categorizing the HFE as Diagnosis and/or Action; Step-2, Rate the Performance Shaping Factors; Step-3, Calculate PSF-Modified HEP; Step-4, Accounting for Dependence, and; Step-5, Minimum Value Cutoff. The discussions on dependence are extensive and include an appendix that describes insights obtained from the psychology literature.

  18. Dissecting a complex neurosurgical illustration: step-by-step development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Ian

    2011-12-01

    Modern computer graphics software has enabled the medical illustrator to render very complex anatomy by composing many different layers of drawings simultaneously. This and the author's capacity to take an "editorial" approach to compress several chronological events into a single, comprehensive two-dimensional illustration are analyzed in a step-by-step process. Through a series of images, the article provides a visual synopsis of the development of an illustration for an extensive clinical case: total sacrectomy performed through an all-posterior approach. Originally given as a slide presentation at the American Association of Neurological Surgeons Theodore Kurze Lecture in April 2011, the article provides some detailed notes on the techniques the author used to develop a comprehensive neurosurgical illustration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Transoral Robotic Surgery: Step-by-Step Radical Tonsillectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Granell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Transoral robotic surgery (TORS radical tonsillectomy is an emerging minimally invasive surgical procedure for the treatment of cancer of the tonsil. The detailed surgical technique and claims for its reproducibility have been previously published. Case Presentation. We present a patient with a T2N2bM0 epidermoid carcinoma of the tonsil to illustrate step by step the surgical procedure for TORS radical tonsillectomy. Neck dissection and TORS were staged. No surgical reconstruction of the defect was required. No tracheostomy was necessary. The patient could eat without any feeding tube and was on full oral diet on the fifth postoperative day. Discussion. The transoral approach offers the benefits of minimally invasive surgery to patients with cancer of the tonsil. The excellent exposure and high precision provided by robotic instrumentation allow the surgeon to closely follow and accomplish the surgical steps, which is the best warranty for safety and effectiveness.

  20. Astronomical sketching a step-by-step introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Handy, Richard; Perez, Jeremy; Rix, Erika; Robbins, Sol

    2007-01-01

    This book presents the amateur with fine examples of astronomical sketches and step-by-step tutorials in each medium, from pencil to computer graphics programs. This unique book can teach almost anyone to create beautiful sketches of celestial objects.

  1. Green Schools Energy Project: A Step-by-Step Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Gwen

    This publication contains a step-by-step guide for implementing an energy-saving project in local school districts: the installation of newer, more energy-efficient "T-8" fluorescent tube lights in place of "T-12" lights. Eleven steps are explained in detail: (1) find out what kind of lights the school district currently uses;…

  2. A step-by-step methodology for enterprise interoperability projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmeta, Ricardo; Pazos, Verónica

    2015-05-01

    Enterprise interoperability is one of the key factors for enhancing enterprise competitiveness. Achieving enterprise interoperability is an extremely complex process which involves different technological, human and organisational elements. In this paper we present a framework to help enterprise interoperability. The framework has been developed taking into account the three domains of interoperability: Enterprise Modelling, Architecture and Platform and Ontologies. The main novelty of the framework in comparison to existing ones is that it includes a step-by-step methodology that explains how to carry out an enterprise interoperability project taking into account different interoperability views, like business, process, human resources, technology, knowledge and semantics.

  3. Microsoft Windows Sharepoint Services 3.0 Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Londer, Olga; Bleeker, Todd; Coventry, Penelope

    2007-01-01

    Experience learning made easy-and quickly teach yourself how to use Windows SharePoint Services to enable effective team collaboration. With Step By Step, you set the pace-building and practicing the skills you need, just when you need them! Build your own SharePoint site with easy-to-use templatesCreate lists and libraries to store informationAdd discussion boards, wikis, and blogsSet up Document and Meeting Workspaces for easy collaborationShare calendars, contacts, and data from Microsoft Office programsCustomize your pages with Web Parts Your all-in-one learning experience includes: Fi

  4. Information marketing business entrepreneur's step-by-step startup guide

    CERN Document Server

    magazine, Entrepreneur

    2012-01-01

    A six-figure income from information? Yes! It sounds easy because it is. You've got information that millions of others are looking for and now you can learn how to package, price and sell it.The experts at Entrepreneur take you step by step, jumpstarting your thinking about your area of expertise and showing you how to convert it into a high-demand information product. Following the example set by today's most successful information marketers, you learn the ins and outs of running your own information marketing business using proven strategies and effective marketing techniques.

  5. Microsoft® Office Access™ 2007 Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Lambert, Steve; Lambert, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Experience learning made easy-and quickly teach yourself how to build database solutions with Access 2007. With Step By Step, you set the pace-building and practicing the skills you need, just when you need them! Build databases from scratch or from templatesExchange data with other databases and Office documentsCreate forms to simplify data entryUse filters and queries to find and analyze informationDesign rich reports that help make your data meaningfulHelp prevent data corruption and unauthorized access Your all-in-one learning experience includes: Files for building skills and practic

  6. Step by step male to female transsexual surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rodrigo Uliano Moser; Abreu, Fernando Jahn da Silva; da Silva, Gabriel M V; Dos Santos, João Vitor Quadra Vieira; Batezini, Nelson Sivonei da Silva; Silva, Brasil; Rosito, Tiago Elias

    2017-10-17

    After the diagnosis of transsexualism is confirmed therapy commences with psychotherapeutic preparation for the conversion, and after conversion, long-term patient rehabilitation is maintained for at least two years. The indication for surgery is chronic discomfort caused by discord with the patient's natural gender, intense dislike of developing secondary sex characteristics and the onset of puberty. The surgical conversion of transsexuals is the main step in the complex care of these problematic patients (1). This surgery was first described by Benjamin H, using a flap of inverted penile skin (2) and is considered the gold standard since then. Male-to-female transsexual surgical techniques are well defined and give good cosmetic and functional results. Sex reassignment surgery promotes the improvement of psychological aspects and social relationships as shown in the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment applied in the patients submitted to this procedure (3). Techniques include the creation of a normal appearing female introitus, a vaginoplasty allowing sexual intercourse and the capability of clitoral orgasm (4). Various methods for neovaginoplasty have been described and can be classified into five categories, i.e. pedicled intestinal transplants, penile skin grafts, penile skin flaps, non-genital skin flaps and non-genital skin grafts (5). In our Hospital, we use penile and scrotal skin flaps. Until now, 174 procedures have been performed by our team using this technique with high rates of satisfaction (3). We present a step-by-step male to female transsexual surgery. Surgical gender reassignment of male transsexuals resulted in replicas of female genitalia which enabled coitus with orgasm (1). With this video we show step by step that a surgery using penile skin flaps is able to be performed with good cosmetic results. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  7. Acta Clinica Croatica: progress of a journal step by step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramljak, Gordana

    2014-03-01

    The journal Acta Clinica Croatica (ACC) was founded in 1962 under the title Anali Bolnice Dr. M. Stojanović. In 1995, the title of the journal was changed into its present form and ever since all papers have been published in English. In 2000, the electronic (online) edition of the ACC was released in addition to the print version. The paper presents development of the journal from 1962 to 2012 based on the analysis of the following SCOPUS citation index parameters: type and number of documents published in the journal; number of citations; and number of domestic and foreign authors. The studied period was analyzed in three time segments: the period from 1995 to 1999, the period from 2000 to 2006 and the period from 2007 to 2012. The same parameters were analyzed in the Web of Science/SCI-Expanded bibliographic and citation index for the 2007-2012 period. The increasing number of documents, authors (both domestic and foreign) and citations demonstrates gradual rise in the quality, visibility and impact of the journal. The fifty years of experience show that a goal, at first very distant and almost unachievable, may be reached by progressing step by step.

  8. From raw material to dish: pasta quality step by step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicignano, Angelo; Di Monaco, Rossella; Masi, Paolo; Cavella, Silvana

    2015-10-01

    Pasta is a traditional Italian cereal-based food that is popular worldwide because of its convenience, versatility, sensory and nutritional value. The aim of this review is to present a step-by-step guide to facilitate the understanding of the most important events that can affect pasta characteristics, directing the reader to the appropriate production steps. Owing to its unique flavor, color, composition and rheological properties, durum wheat semolina is the best raw material for pasta production. Although pasta is traditionally made from only two ingredients, sensory quality and chemical/physical characteristics of the final product may vary greatly. Starting from the same ingredients, there are a lot of different events in each step of pasta production that can result in the development of varieties of pasta with different characteristics. In particular, numerous studies have demonstrated the importance of temperature and humidity conditions of the pasta drying operation as well as the significance of the choice of raw material and operating conditions on pasta quality. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. 6D beam-beam interaction step-by-step

    CERN Document Server

    Iadarola, Giovanni; Papaphilippou, Yannis; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    This document describes in detail the numerical method used in different simulation codes for the simulation of beam-beam interactions using the “Synchro Beam Mapping” approach, in order to correctly model the coupling introduced by beam-beam between the longitudinal and the transverse plane. The goal is to provide in a compact, complete and self-consistent manner the set of equations needed for the implementation in a numerical code. The effect of a “crossing angle” in an arbitrary “crossing plane” with respect to the assigned reference frame is taken into account with a suitable coordinate transformation. The employed description of the strong beam allows correctly accounting for the hour-glass effect as well as for linear coupling at the interaction point.

  10. Perinatal Depression Algorithm: A Home Visitor Step-by-Step Guide for Advanced Management of Perinatal Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laszewski, Audrey; Wichman, Christina L.; Doering, Jennifer J.; Maletta, Kristyn; Hammel, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Early childhood professionals do many things to support young families. This is true now more than ever, as researchers continue to discover the long-term benefits of early, healthy, nurturing relationships. This article provides an overview of the development of an advanced practice perinatal depression algorithm created as a step-by-step guide…

  11. The Value of Step-by-Step Risk Assessment for Unmanned Aircraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Cour-Harbo, Anders

    2018-01-01

    The new European legislation expected in 2018 or 2019 will introduce a step-by-step process for conducting risk assessments for unmanned aircraft flight operations. This is a relatively simple approach to a very complex challenge. This work compares this step-by-step process to high fidelity risk...

  12. Convergence of step-by-step methods for non-linear integro-differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocarsky, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    The theory of consistent step-by-step methods for solving Volterra integral equations is extended to nonsingular Volterra integro-differential equations. It is shown that standard step-by-step algorithms for these more general equations are convergent. Several numerical examples are included.

  13. Digital project management the complete step-by-step guide to a successful launch

    CERN Document Server

    Olson, Taylor

    2016-01-01

    The digital world is growing and changing at a rate that can seem overwhelming to those project managers who have to keep up with it to build customer-facing solutions and applications. It's rare for project managers working in this field to be provided with much direction or a process by which to carry out a project, and there has been next to nothing available specific to these types of projects in the literary marketplace. Digital Project Management: The Complete Step-by-Step Guide to a Successful Launch was developed to fill this gap by providing the knowledge, best practices and proven steps to consistently managing these types of project successfully from end-to-end now, and in the future with just minor adjustments to adapt to changes in technology.

  14. Computer aided virtual manufacturing using Creo parametric easy to learn step by step guide

    CERN Document Server

    Kanife, Paul Obiora

    2016-01-01

    Providing a step-by-step guide for the implementation of virtual manufacturing using Creo Parametric software (formerly known as Pro-Engineer), this book creates an engaging and interactive learning experience for manufacturing engineering students. Featuring graphic illustrations of simulation processes and operations, and written in accessible English to promote user-friendliness, the book covers key topics in the field including: the engraving machining process, face milling, profile milling, surface milling, volume rough milling, expert machining, electric discharge machining (EDM), and area turning using the lathe machining process. Maximising reader insights into how to simulate material removal processes, and how to generate cutter location data and G-codes data, this valuable resource equips undergraduate, postgraduate, BTech and HND students in the fields of manufacturing engineering, computer aided design (CAD) and computer aided engineering (CAE) with transferable skills and knowledge. This book is...

  15. Traffic safety and step-by-step driving licence for young people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønning, Charlotte; Agerholm, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Young novice car drivers are much more accident-prone than other drivers - up to 10 times that of their parents' generation. A central solution to improve the traffic safety for this group is implementation of a step-by-step driving licence. A number of countries have introduced a step-by-step dr......Young novice car drivers are much more accident-prone than other drivers - up to 10 times that of their parents' generation. A central solution to improve the traffic safety for this group is implementation of a step-by-step driving licence. A number of countries have introduced a step...... presents a review of safety effects from step-by-step driving licence schemes. Most of the investigated schemes consist of a step-by-step driving licence with Step 1) various tests and education, Step 2) a period where driving is only allowed together with an experienced driver and Step 3) driving without...... companion is allowed but with various restrictions and, in some cases, additional driving education and tests. In general, a step-by-step driving licence improves traffic safety even though the young people are permitted to drive a car earlier on. The effects from driving with an experienced driver vary...

  16. Plasma-Assisted Growth of Silicon Nanowires by Sn Catalyst: Step-by-Step Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jian; Maurice, Jean-Luc; Chen, Wanghua; Misra, Soumyadeep; Foldyna, Martin; Johnson, Erik V; Roca I Cabarrocas, Pere

    2016-12-01

    A comprehensive study of the silicon nanowire growth process has been carried out. Silicon nanowires were grown by plasma-assisted-vapor-solid method using tin as a catalyst. We have focused on the evolution of the silicon nanowire density, morphology, and crystallinity. For the first time, the initial growth stage, which determines the nanowire (NW) density and growth direction, has been observed step by step. We provide direct evidence of the merging of Sn catalyst droplets and the formation of Si nanowires during the first 10 s of growth. We found that the density of Sn droplets decreases from ~9000 Sn droplets/μm 2 to 2000 droplets/μm 2 after just 10 s of growth. Moreover, the long and straight nanowire density decreases from 170/μm 2 after 2 min of growth to less than 10/μm 2 after 90 min. This strong reduction in nanowire density is accompanied by an evolution of their morphology from cylindrical to conical, then to bend conical, and finally, to a bend inverted conical shape. Moreover, the changes in the crystalline structure of nanowires are from (i) monocrystalline to (ii) monocrystalline core/defective crystalline shell and then to (iii) monocrystalline core/defective crystalline shell/amorphous shell. The evolutions of NW properties have been explained in detail.

  17. Fitting three-level meta-analytic models in R: A step-by-step tutorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assink, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Applying a multilevel approach to meta-analysis is a strong method for dealing with dependency of effect sizes. However, this method is relatively unknown among researchers and, to date, has not been widely used in meta-analytic research. Therefore, the purpose of this tutorial was to show how a three-level random effects model can be applied to meta-analytic models in R using the rma.mv function of the metafor package. This application is illustrated by taking the reader through a step-by-step guide to the multilevel analyses comprising the steps of (1 organizing a data file; (2 setting up the R environment; (3 calculating an overall effect; (4 examining heterogeneity of within-study variance and between-study variance; (5 performing categorical and continuous moderator analyses; and (6 examining a multiple moderator model. By example, the authors demonstrate how the multilevel approach can be applied to meta-analytically examining the association between mental health disorders of juveniles and juvenile offender recidivism. In our opinion, the rma.mv function of the metafor package provides an easy and flexible way of applying a multi-level structure to meta-analytic models in R. Further, the multilevel meta-analytic models can be easily extended so that the potential moderating influence of variables can be examined.

  18. Fostering Autonomy through Syllabus Design: A Step-by-Step Guide for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Espinosa, Alexánder

    2016-01-01

    Promoting learner autonomy is relevant in the field of applied linguistics due to the multiple benefits it brings to the process of learning a new language. However, despite the vast array of research on how to foster autonomy in the language classroom, it is difficult to find step-by-step processes to design syllabi and curricula focused on the…

  19. A step-by-step guide to office-based sperm retrieval for obstructive azoospermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jesse N.

    2017-01-01

    A variety of surgical options exists for sperm retrieval in the setting of obstructive azoospermia (OA). With appropriate preparation, the majority of these techniques can safely be performed in the office with local anesthesia and with or without monitored anesthesia care (MAC). The available techniques include percutaneous options such as percutaneous epididymal sperm aspiration (PESA) and testicular sperm aspiration (TESA), as well as open techniques that include testicular sperm extraction (TESE) and microsurgical epididymal sperm aspiration (MESA). In addition to providing a step-by-step description of each available approach, we introduce and describe a new technique for sperm retrieval for OA called minimally invasive epididymal sperm aspiration (MIESA). The MIESA utilizes a tiny keyhole incision, and the epididymis is exposed without testicular delivery. Epididymal aspiration is performed in the style of MESA, except using loupe magnification rather than an operating microscope. MIESA is a safe, office-based procedure in which millions of motile sperm can be retrieved for cryopreservation. While we prefer the MIESA technique for OA, there remain distinct advantages of each open and percutaneous approach. In the current era of assisted reproductive technology, sperm retrieval rates for OA should approach 100% regardless of the technique. This reference provides a roadmap for both advanced and novice male reproductive surgeons to guide them through every stage of sperm retrieval for OA, including preoperative evaluation, patient selection, procedural techniques, and complications. With the incredible advances in in vitro fertilization (IVF), combined with innovative surgical treatment for male factor infertility in recent years, OA is no longer a barrier for men to become biologic fathers. PMID:28904906

  20. Considerations for the independent reaction times and step-by-step methods for radiation chemistry simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Devroye, Luc

    2017-10-01

    Ionizing radiation interacts with the water molecules of the tissues mostly by ionizations and excitations, which result in the formation of the radiation track structure and the creation of radiolytic species such as H.,.OH, H2, H2O2, and e-aq. After their creation, these species diffuse and may chemically react with the neighboring species and with the molecules of the medium. Therefore radiation chemistry is of great importance in radiation biology. As the chemical species are not distributed homogeneously, the use of conventional models of homogeneous reactions cannot completely describe the reaction kinetics of the particles. Actually, many simulations of radiation chemistry are done using the Independent Reaction Time (IRT) method, which is a very fast technique to calculate radiochemical yields but which do not calculate the positions of the radiolytic species as a function of time. Step-by-step (SBS) methods, which are able to provide such information, have been used only sparsely because these are time-consuming in terms of calculation. Recent improvements in computer performance now allow the regular use of the SBS method in radiation chemistry. The SBS and IRT methods are both based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE). In this paper, several sampling algorithms of the GFDE and for the IRT method are presented. We show that the IRT and SBS methods are exactly equivalent for 2-particles systems for diffusion and partially diffusion-controlled reactions between non-interacting particles. We also show that the results obtained with the SBS simulation method with periodic boundary conditions are in agreement with the predictions by classical reaction kinetics theory, which is an important step towards using this method for modelling of biochemical networks and metabolic pathways involved in oxidative stress. Finally, the first simulation results obtained with the code RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) are presented.

  1. PHP|architect's guide to PHP security a step-by-step guide to writing secure and reliable PHP applications

    CERN Document Server

    Alshanetsky, Ilia

    2005-01-01

    With the number of security flaws and exploits discovered and released every day constantly on the rise, knowing how to write secure and reliable applications is become more and more important every day. Written by Ilia Alshanetsky, one of the foremost experts on PHP security in the world, php|architect's Guide to PHP Security focuses on providing you with all the tools and knowledge you need to both secure your existing applications and writing new systems with security in mind. This book gives you a step-by-step guide to each security-related topic, providing you with real-world examples of proper coding practices and their implementation in PHP in an accurate, concise and complete way. Provides techniques applicable to any version of PHP, including 4.x and 5.x Includes a step-by-step guide to securing your applications Includes a comprehensive coverage of security design Teaches you how to defend yourself from hackers Shows you how to distract hackers with a "tar pit" to help you fend off potential attacks...

  2. Robotic single-site myomectomy: a step-by-step tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, Antonio R; Lewis, Erin I; Kaser, Daniel J; Srouji, Serene S

    2015-11-01

    To provide a step-by-step description of our published technique of single-site robot-assisted laparoscopic myomectomy with the goal of promoting its safe adoption. Surgical video tutorial. University medical center. Ten women undergoing single-site robot-assisted laparoscopic myomectomy between November 2014 and March 2015. A 2.5-cm vertical incision is made within the umbilicus, through which a multilumen single-site port (da Vinci Single-Site; Intuitive Surgical) is seated. An 8.5-mm 0-degree laparoscope is introduced, and the teleoperator (da Vinci Si Surgical Platform; Intuitive Surgical) is docked, allowing subsequent placement of two curved 5-mm instrument cannulae. Two wristed, semirigid needle drivers are loaded onto robotic arms 1 and 2. An 8-mm assistant cannula is also placed through the multilumen single-site port; a flexible 2-mm CO2 laser fiber and all conventional 5-mm laparoscopic instruments are introduced through this cannula as needed. Intramyometrial dilute vasopressin is injected, and fibroid enucleation is performed. The hysterotomy is repaired in layers with unidirectional barbed suture (Stratafix; Ethicon). The teleoperator is undocked. The single-site port is exchanged for a self-retaining wound retractor with gel-sealed cap. An endoscopic pouch is placed in the abdomen, and the specimen is placed within the pouch. The edges of the pouch are exteriorized. Extracorporeal tissue extraction is performed with a scalpel. A running mass closure of the fascia and peritoneum is performed, followed by a subcuticular closure of the skin. Median number and size of fibroids removed, specimen weight, operative time, estimated blood loss, and perioperative complications. The technique described in our video was successfully employed in our first 10 patients. The median number of fibroids removed was 2.5 (range: 1-8); the median size of the largest myoma was 6 cm (range: 4-8 cm); the median specimen weight was 70 g (range: 26-154 g); the median operating

  3. Methods to construct a step-by-step beginner’s guide to decision analytic cost-effectiveness modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rautenberg T

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tamlyn Rautenberg,1 Claire Hulme,2 Richard Edlin,3 1Health Economics and HIV/AIDS Research Division (HEARD, University of Kwazulu Natal, KwaZulu Natal, South Africa; 2Leeds Institute of Health Sciences (LIHS, Academic Unit of Health Economics (AUHE, University of Leeds, West Yorkshire, United Kingdom; 3Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand Background: Although guidance on good research practice in health economic modeling is widely available, there is still a need for a simpler instructive resource which could guide a beginner modeler alongside modeling for the first time. Aim: To develop a beginner’s guide to be used as a handheld guide contemporaneous to the model development process. Methods: A systematic review of best practice guidelines was used to construct a framework of steps undertaken during the model development process. Focused methods review supplemented this framework. Consensus was obtained among a group of model developers to review and finalize the content of the preliminary beginner’s guide. The final beginner’s guide was used to develop cost-effectiveness models. Results: Thirty-two best practice guidelines were data extracted, synthesized, and critically evaluated to identify steps for model development, which formed a framework for the beginner’s guide. Within five phases of model development, eight broad submethods were identified and 19 methodological reviews were conducted to develop the content of the draft beginner’s guide. Two rounds of consensus agreement were undertaken to reach agreement on the final beginner’s guide. To assess fitness for purpose (ease of use and completeness, models were developed independently and by the researcher using the beginner’s guide. Conclusion: A combination of systematic review, methods reviews, consensus agreement, and validation was used to construct a step-by-step beginner’s guide for developing decision analytical

  4. Microsoft® Visual Basic® 2010 Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Halvorson, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Your hands-on, step-by-step guide to learning Visual Basic® 2010. Teach yourself the essential tools and techniques for Visual Basic® 2010-one step at a time. No matter what your skill level, you'll find the practical guidance and examples you need to start building professional applications for Windows® and the Web. Discover how to: Work in the Microsoft® Visual Studio® 2010 Integrated Development Environment (IDE)Master essential techniques-from managing data and variables to using inheritance and dialog boxesCreate professional-looking UIs; add visual effects and print supportBuild com

  5. Step-by-step mark-up of medical guideline documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svátek, Vojtech; Růzicka, Marek

    2002-01-01

    The quality of document-centric formalisation of medical guidelines can be improved using a decomposition of the whole process into several explicit steps. We present a methodology and a software tool supporting the step-by-step formalisation process. The knowledge elements can be marked up in the text with increasing level of detail, rearranged into an XML knowledge base and exported into the operational representation. Semi-automated transitions can be specified by means of rules. The approach has been tested in a hypertension application.

  6. Microsoft® Office Excel® 2007 Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Frye, Curtis

    2009-01-01

    Experience learning made easy-and quickly teach yourself how to organize, analyze, and present data with Excel 2007. With Step By Step, you set the pace-building and practicing the skills you need, just when you need them! Create formulas, calculate values, and analyze dataPresent information visually with graphics, charts, and diagramsBuild PivotTable dynamic views-even easier with new data tablesReuse information from databases and other documentsShare spreadsheets for review and manage changesCreate macros to automate repetitive tasks and simplify your work Your all-in-one learning expe

  7. Microsoft® Office Visio® 2007 Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Lemke, Judy

    2009-01-01

    Experience learning made easy-and quickly teach yourself how to create professional-looking business and technical diagrams with Visio 2007. With Step By Step, you set the pace-building and practicing the skills you need, just when you need them! Build organization charts, floor plans, and other diagramsAdd color, text, and other effectsConnect shapes and create effective flowchartsVisualize and analyze data with new PivotDiagramsInsert and modify diagrams in other Microsoft Office documentsCreate your own shapes and templates and build custom diagrams Your all-in-one learning experience in

  8. Generating regionalized neuronal cells from pluripotency, a step-by-step protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkeby, Agnete; Nelander, Jenny; Parmar, Malin

    2012-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells possess the potential to generate cells for regenerative therapies in patients with neurodegenerative diseases, and constitute an excellent cell source for studying human neural development and disease modeling. Protocols for neural differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells have undergone significant progress during recent years, allowing for rapid and synchronized neural conversion. Differentiation procedures can further be combined with accurate and efficient positional patterning to yield regionalized neural progenitors and subtype-specific neurons corresponding to different parts of the developing human brain. Here, we present a step-by-step protocol for neuralization and regionalization of human pluripotent cells for transplantation studies or in vitro analysis.

  9. Step-by-step magic state encoding for efficient fault-tolerant quantum computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hayato

    2014-12-16

    Quantum error correction allows one to make quantum computers fault-tolerant against unavoidable errors due to decoherence and imperfect physical gate operations. However, the fault-tolerant quantum computation requires impractically large computational resources for useful applications. This is a current major obstacle to the realization of a quantum computer. In particular, magic state distillation, which is a standard approach to universality, consumes the most resources in fault-tolerant quantum computation. For the resource problem, here we propose step-by-step magic state encoding for concatenated quantum codes, where magic states are encoded step by step from the physical level to the logical one. To manage errors during the encoding, we carefully use error detection. Since the sizes of intermediate codes are small, it is expected that the resource overheads will become lower than previous approaches based on the distillation at the logical level. Our simulation results suggest that the resource requirements for a logical magic state will become comparable to those for a single logical controlled-NOT gate. Thus, the present method opens a new possibility for efficient fault-tolerant quantum computation.

  10. A step-by-step guide to systematically identify all relevant animal studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenaars, Marlies; Hooijmans, Carlijn R; van Veggel, Nieky; ter Riet, Gerben; Leeflang, Mariska; Hooft, Lotty; van der Wilt, Gert Jan; Tillema, Alice; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel

    2012-01-01

    Before starting a new animal experiment, thorough analysis of previously performed experiments is essential from a scientific as well as from an ethical point of view. The method that is most suitable to carry out such a thorough analysis of the literature is a systematic review (SR). An essential first step in an SR is to search and find all potentially relevant studies. It is important to include all available evidence in an SR to minimize bias and reduce hampered interpretation of experimental outcomes. Despite the recent development of search filters to find animal studies in PubMed and EMBASE, searching for all available animal studies remains a challenge. Available guidelines from the clinical field cannot be copied directly to the situation within animal research, and although there are plenty of books and courses on searching the literature, there is no compact guide available to search and find relevant animal studies. Therefore, in order to facilitate a structured, thorough and transparent search for animal studies (in both preclinical and fundamental science), an easy-to-use, step-by-step guide was prepared and optimized using feedback from scientists in the field of animal experimentation. The step-by-step guide will assist scientists in performing a comprehensive literature search and, consequently, improve the scientific quality of the resulting review and prevent unnecessary animal use in the future. PMID:22037056

  11. Step-by-step deposition of synthetic dopamine-eumelanin and metal cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Vincent; Bour, Jérôme; Michel, Marc

    2013-09-01

    The photoprotection of skin depends mostly on a balance between two natural pigments: the black-brown eumelanin and the yellow-reddish pheomelanin. These pigments as well as their counterpart in the central nervous system, neuromelanin, interact strongly with metal cations like Fe(3+). In the mussel foot proteins, the coordination between catechol groups and these ions is also responsible for the strong hardness the mussel's cuticle. These examples are suggestive that coatings and materials can be made based on such materials, for instance, synthetic eumelanin colloids and metal cations. Herein, we demonstrate that films made from synthetic dopamine-eumelanin colloids and metal cations can be deposited on surfaces in a step-by-step manner. As typical metal cations, we used Cu(2+), Fe(3+), and La(3+) which are known to interact with eumelanins. In all cases, step-by-step deposition is only possible in the absence of water rinse between two deposition steps. It was found that trivalent cations allow for a faster increase in film deposition than Cu(2+). Complementary in PDADMAC-(eumelanin-Fe(3+))m films, iron III was found not to be reduced. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Step-by-Step Model for the Study of the Apriori Algorithm for Predictive Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Grigore ROŞCA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper was to develop an educational oriented application based on the Data Mining Apriori Algorithm which facilitates both the research and the study of data mining by graduate students. The application could be used to discover interesting patterns in the corpus of data and to measure the impact on the speed of execution as a function of problem constraints (value of support and confidence variables or size of the transactional data-base. The paper presents a brief overview of the Apriori Algorithm, aspects about the implementation of the algorithm using a step-by-step process, a discussion of the education-oriented user interface and the process of data mining of a test transactional data base. The impact of some constraints on the speed of the algorithm is also experimentally measured without a systematic review of different approaches to increase execution speed. Possible applications of the implementation, as well as its limits, are briefly reviewed.

  13. Step-by-Step robotic heminephrectomy for duplicated renal collecting system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homayoun Zargar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction A duplicated renal collecting system is a relatively common congenital anomaly rarely presenting in adults. Aim In this video we demonstrate our step-by-step technique of Robotic heminephrectomy in a patient with non-functioning upper pole moiety. Materials and Methods Following cystoscopy and ureteral catheter insertion the patient was placed in 600 modified flank position with the ipsilateral arm positioned at the side of the patient. A straight-line, three arm robotic port configuration was employed. The robot was docked at a 90-degree angle, perpendicular to the patient. Following mobilization the colon and identifying both ureters of the duplicated system, the ureters were followed cephalically toward, hilar vessels where the hilar anatomy was identified. The nonfunctioning pole vasculature was ligated using hem-o-lok clips. The ureter was sharply divided and the proximal ureteral stump was passed posterior the renal hilum. Ureteral stump was used as for retraction and heminephrectomy is completed along the line demarcating the upper and lower pole moieties. Renorrhaphy was performed using 0-Vicryl suture with a CT-1 needle. The nonfunctioning pole ureter was then dissected caudally toward the bladder hiatus, ligated using clips, and transected. Results The operating time was 240 minutes and blood loss was 100 cc. There was no complication post-operatively. Conclusions Wrist articulation and degree of freedom offered by robotic platform facilitates successful performance of minimally invasive heminephrectomy in the setting of an atrophic and symptomatic renal segment.

  14. Conversion of Vertical Banded Gastroplasty to Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass: a Step-By-Step Teaching Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thereaux, Jérémie; Kansou, Gaby; Badic, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG) has been demonstrated to be disappointing for long-term weight loss and quality of life (Br J Surg 100:222–230, 2013). Laparoscopic revisional gastric bypass has been found to be feasible, but this procedure in case of prior VBG is deemed both challenging and difficult and should be performed by experienced surgeons (Obes Surg 22:1554–1561, 2012; Surg Endosc 27:558–564, 2013). We present the case of a 56-year-old man with a body mass index (BMI) of 39.6 kg/m2 who had undergone open VBG, 11 years ago (initial BMI 39.2 kg/m2). He was referred to our tertiary care center for weight regain and daily vomiting. In this high definition multimedia video, we present a step-by-step laparoscopic conversion of VBG to gastric bypass. After careful adhesiolysis, key points of such procedure are resizing of the small gastric pouch and resection of the enlarged gastric pouch with the band and the upper portion of the remnant fundus, in order to avoid leakage or blind stomach pouch. No adverse outcomes occurred during the postoperative period. Laparoscopic conversion of previous open VBG to gastric bypass is a challenging procedure. Learning the key points of such procedure is mandatory to limit postoperative complications.

  15. A step-by-step procedure for pH model construction in aquatic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, A. F.; Meysman, F. J. R.; Soetaert, K.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2008-02-01

    We present, by means of a simple example, a comprehensive step-by-step procedure to consistently derive a pH model of aquatic systems. As pH modelling is inherently complex, we make every step of the model generation process explicit, thus ensuring conceptual, mathematical, and chemical correctness. Summed quantities, such as total inorganic carbon and total alkalinity, and the influences of modeled processes on them are consistently derived. The different time scales of processes involved in the pH problem (biological and physical reactions: days; aquatic chemical reactions: fractions of seconds) give rise to a stiff equation system. Subsequent reformulations of the system reduce its stiffness, accepting higher non-linear algebraic complexity. The model is reformulated until numerically and computationally simple dynamical solutions, like a variation of the operator splitting approach (OSA) and the direct substitution approach (DSA), are obtained. As several solution methods are pointed out, connections between previous pH modelling approaches are established. The final reformulation of the system according to the DSA allows for quantification of the influences of kinetic processes on the rate of change of proton concentration in models containing multiple biogeochemical processes. These influences are calculated including the effect of re-equilibration of the system due to a set of acid-base reactions in local equilibrium. This possibility of quantifying influences of modeled processes on the pH makes the end-product of the described model generation procedure a powerful tool for understanding the internal pH dynamics of aquatic systems.

  16. Step-by-step guide to reduce spatial coherence of laser light using a rotating ground glass diffuser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangner, Tim; Zhang, Hanqing; Dahlberg, Tobias; Wiklund, Krister; Andersson, Magnus

    2017-07-01

    Wide field-of-view imaging of fast processes in a microscope requires high light intensities motivating the use of lasers as light sources. However, due to their long spatial coherence length, lasers are inappropriate for such applications, as they produce coherent noise and parasitic reflections, such as speckle, degrading image quality. Therefore, we provide a step-by-step guide for constructing a speckle-free and high-contrast laser illumination setup using a rotating ground glass diffuser driven by a stepper motor. The setup is easy to build, cheap, and allows a significant light throughput of 48%, which is 40% higher in comparison to a single lens collector commonly used in reported setups. This is achieved by using only one objective to collect the scattered light from the ground glass diffuser. We validate our setup in terms of image quality, speckle contrast, motor-induced vibrations, and light throughput. To highlight the latter, we record Brownian motion of micro-particles using a 100× oil immersion objective and a high-speed camera operating at 2000 Hz with a laser output power of only 22 mW. Moreover, by reducing the objective magnification to 50×, sampling rates up to 10,000 Hz are realized. To help readers with basic or advanced optics knowledge realize this setup, we provide a full component list, 3D-printing CAD files, setup protocol, and the code for running the stepper motor.

  17. Transseptal transcatheter mitral valve-in-valve: A step by step guide from preprocedural planning to postprocedural care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Mayra; Salinger, Michael; Pursnani, Amit; Pearson, Paul; Lampert, Mark; Levisay, Justin; Russell, Hyde; Feldman, Ted

    2017-05-30

    Transcatheter mitral valve replacement has been successfully performed with the use of aortic transcatheter heart valves in hundreds of patients worldwide with severe dysfunction of a degenerated mitral bioprosthesis and high surgical risk for repeat operation. The delivery approach in the vast majority of the mitral valve-in-valve procedures has been transapical. Although the transseptal approach may be more technically challenging, it is less invasive and may be preferred by patients. Data from case series and a large international registry suggest that patients treated with transseptal mitral valve-in-valve have faster recovery, more improvement in left ventricular ejection fraction and possibly lower mortality compared with patients treated with transapical approach. A prospective clinical trial, the MITRAL trial (Mitral Implantation of TRAnscatheter vaLves) is evaluating the safety and feasibility of transvenous transseptal mitral valve-in-valve. The experience from this trial has allowed us to improve our procedural approach. In anticipation of a wider adoption of the transseptal approach for mitral valve-in-valve, we describe our current method step-by-step from planning the procedure through postprocedural management. This is an evolving technique that has changed with experience and the transition to newer generation transcatheter heart valve devices. We discuss the use of cardiac computed tomography for planning the procedure including transseptal puncture and valve size selection, provide procedural and technical tips, and discuss postprocedural care. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Step-by-step guide to building an inexpensive 3D printed motorized positioning stage for automated high-content screening microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneidereit, Dominik; Kraus, Larissa; Meier, Jochen C; Friedrich, Oliver; Gilbert, Daniel F

    2017-06-15

    High-content screening microscopy relies on automation infrastructure that is typically proprietary, non-customizable, costly and requires a high level of skill to use and maintain. The increasing availability of rapid prototyping technology makes it possible to quickly engineer alternatives to conventional automation infrastructure that are low-cost and user-friendly. Here, we describe a 3D printed inexpensive open source and scalable motorized positioning stage for automated high-content screening microscopy and provide detailed step-by-step instructions to re-building the device, including a comprehensive parts list, 3D design files in STEP (Standard for the Exchange of Product model data) and STL (Standard Tessellation Language) format, electronic circuits and wiring diagrams as well as software code. System assembly including 3D printing requires approx. 30h. The fully assembled device is light-weight (1.1kg), small (33×20×8cm) and extremely low-cost (approx. EUR 250). We describe positioning characteristics of the stage, including spatial resolution, accuracy and repeatability, compare imaging data generated with our device to data obtained using a commercially available microplate reader, demonstrate its suitability to high-content microscopy in 96-well high-throughput screening format and validate its applicability to automated functional Cl(-)- and Ca(2+)-imaging with recombinant HEK293 cells as a model system. A time-lapse video of the stage during operation and as part of a custom assembled screening robot can be found at https://vimeo.com/158813199. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Step by step. How to install CopperCore, how to publish and run a UoL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgos, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Through these four documents the full installation process of CopperCore is described in detailed. Step by step, and full supported with screenshots, it's shown how to install Cc, how to publish a UoL with Cc and Clicc, how to run a UoL and to exit of Cc and Clicc

  20. Step-by-Step Design Procedure for a Grid-Connected Three-Phase PWM Voltage Source Converter,

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liserre, Marco; Blaabjerg, Frede; Aquila, Antonio Dell’

    2004-01-01

    controllers. In this paper a step-by-step design procedure, taking into account all these elements, is proposed and validated through the tests on an experimental prototype. The reported results are particularly relevant to evaluate the influence on the grid current harmonic content of the grid sensor...

  1. The Complete Step-by-Step Guide to Designing and Teaching Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thormann, Joan; Zimmerman, Isa Kaftal

    2012-01-01

    In this valuable resource, experts share deep knowledge including practical "how-to" and preventive trouble-shooting tips. Instructors will learn about course design and development, instructional methods for online teaching, and student engagement and community building techniques. The book contains successful teaching strategies, guidance for…

  2. Creating a Positive Prior Learning Assessment (PLA Experience: A Step-by-Step Look at University PLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M. Leiste

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A prior learning assessment (PLA can be an intimidating process for adult learners. Capella University’s PLA team has developed best practices, resources, and tools to foster a positive experience and to remove barriers in PLA and uses three criteria to determine how to best administer the assessment. First, a PLA must be motivating, as described by the ARCS model. Second, it must enable success. Finally, it must use available resources efficiently. The tools and resources developed according to these criteria fall into two categories: staff and online resources. PLA programs can use both to ensure that all departments provide consistent communication to learners about the PLA process, which will foster a positive experience. The PLA online lab houses centralized resources and offers one-on-one interaction with a facilitator to assist learners step-by-step in the development of their petitions. Each unit contains resources, examples, and optional assignments that help learners to develop specific aspects of the petition. By following the examples and recommendations, learners are able to submit polished petitions after they complete the units. The lab facilitator supports learners throughout the units by answering questions and providing recommendations. When learners submit their petitions, the facilitator reviews it entirely and provides feedback to strengthen the final submission that goes to a faculty reviewer for an official evaluation. All of these individuals and tools work together to help create a positive experience for learners who submit a PLA petition. This article shares these resources with the goal of strengthening PLA as a field.

  3. Step-by-step iconographic description of a prolonged but still favourable course of orbital cellulitis in a child with acute rhinosinusitis: an iconographic case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torretta, Sara; Marchisio, Paola; Gaffuri, Michele; Capaccio, Pasquale; Esposito, Susanna; Pignataro, Lorenzo

    2014-03-04

    Orbital cellulitis is an infrequent complication of acute ethmoiditis possibly leading to life- or visual-threatening complications. Despite its natural history is well known, its clinical evolution may widely vary among patients, and even in the most favourable cases long-term sequelae may persist. We here provide a step-by-step iconographic description of a periorbital and orbital cellulitis occurring in a child with ipsilateral acute rhinosinusitis. Our report shows that an unusual long-term evolution of periorbital and orbital cellulitis is possible also in apparently favourable cases.

  4. A step-by-step approach to improve data quality when using commercial business lists to characterize retail food environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kelly K; Zenk, Shannon N; Tarlov, Elizabeth; Powell, Lisa M; Matthews, Stephen A; Horoi, Irina

    2017-01-07

    provides a step-by-step approach to purchase and process business list data obtained from commercial vendors. The approach can be followed by studies of any size, including those with datasets too large to process each record by hand and will promote consistency in characterization of the retail food environment across studies.

  5. Looking for a Job: Step by Step = Buscando Trabajo: Paso por Paso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Patricia

    This bilingual document provides guidelines and learning activities to assist migrant workers in looking for a job. The document covers the following areas: (1) a checklist providing an overview of job search skills; (2) developing a fact sheet of personal information; (3) listing good work qualities; (4) identifying references and securing…

  6. A Step-by-Step Design Methodology for a Base Case Vanadium Redox-Flow Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Mark; Counce, Robert M.; Watson, Jack S.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Kamath, Haresh

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an evolutionary procedure to be used by Chemical Engineering students for the base-case design of a Vanadium Redox-Flow Battery. The design methodology is based on the work of Douglas (1985) and provides a profitability analysis at each decision level so that more profitable alternatives and directions can be…

  7. Statistics translated a step-by-step guide to analyzing and interpreting data

    CERN Document Server

    Terrell, Steven R

    2012-01-01

    Written in a humorous and encouraging style, this text shows how the most common statistical tools can be used to answer interesting real-world questions, presented as mysteries to be solved. Engaging research examples lead the reader through a series of six steps, from identifying a researchable problem to stating a hypothesis, identifying independent and dependent variables, and selecting and interpreting appropriate statistical tests. All techniques are demonstrated both manually and with the help of SPSS software. The book provides students and others who may need to read and interpret sta

  8. Practical Biostatistics A Friendly Step-by-Step Approach for Evidence-based Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Suchmacher, Mendel

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine aims to apply the best available evidence gained from the scientific method to medical decision making. It is a practice that uses statistical analysis of scientific methods and outcomes to drive further experimentation and diagnosis. The profusion of evidence-based medicine in medical practice and clinical research has produced a need for life scientists and clinical researchers to assimilate biostatistics into their work to meet efficacy and practical standards. Practical Biostatistics provides researchers, medical professionals, and students with a friendly, practica

  9. Step by Step: Biology Undergraduates’ Problem-Solving Procedures during Multiple-Choice Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevost, Luanna B.; Lemons, Paula P.

    2016-01-01

    This study uses the theoretical framework of domain-specific problem solving to explore the procedures students use to solve multiple-choice problems about biology concepts. We designed several multiple-choice problems and administered them on four exams. We trained students to produce written descriptions of how they solved the problem, and this allowed us to systematically investigate their problem-solving procedures. We identified a range of procedures and organized them as domain general, domain specific, or hybrid. We also identified domain-general and domain-specific errors made by students during problem solving. We found that students use domain-general and hybrid procedures more frequently when solving lower-order problems than higher-order problems, while they use domain-specific procedures more frequently when solving higher-order problems. Additionally, the more domain-specific procedures students used, the higher the likelihood that they would answer the problem correctly, up to five procedures. However, if students used just one domain-general procedure, they were as likely to answer the problem correctly as if they had used two to five domain-general procedures. Our findings provide a categorization scheme and framework for additional research on biology problem solving and suggest several important implications for researchers and instructors. PMID:27909021

  10. Student-teacher education programme (STEP) by step: transforming medical students into competent, confident teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlich, Deborah R; Shaughnessy, Allen F

    2014-04-01

    While most medical schools have students teach other students, few offer formal education in teaching skills, and fewer provide teaching theory together with experiential teaching practice. Furthermore, curriculum evaluation of teaching education is lacking. This study aimed to examine effects of a novel didactic teaching curriculum for students embedded in a practical teaching experience. A longitudinal 12-week curriculum with complementary didactic and practical components for final-year students learning how to teach was developed, implemented and evaluated using a multi-level evaluation based on the Kirkpatrick approach with qualitative and quantitative methods. Thirteen student-teachers acquired measureable knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for teaching excellence. Confidence in teaching increased (p Student-teachers demonstrated teaching competence as determined by self-assessment, student feedback, and faculty observation. Top teachers impacted their first-year students' performance in patient interviewing as measured by Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Reinforcing educational theory with practical teaching experience under direct faculty supervision promotes teaching competency for graduating medical students. The intertwined didactic plus practical model can be applied to various teaching contexts to fulfil the mandate that medical schools train graduates in core teaching knowledge, skills and attitudes in preparation for their future roles as clinical teachers.

  11. Step by Step: Biology Undergraduates' Problem-Solving Procedures during Multiple-Choice Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevost, Luanna B; Lemons, Paula P

    2016-01-01

    This study uses the theoretical framework of domain-specific problem solving to explore the procedures students use to solve multiple-choice problems about biology concepts. We designed several multiple-choice problems and administered them on four exams. We trained students to produce written descriptions of how they solved the problem, and this allowed us to systematically investigate their problem-solving procedures. We identified a range of procedures and organized them as domain general, domain specific, or hybrid. We also identified domain-general and domain-specific errors made by students during problem solving. We found that students use domain-general and hybrid procedures more frequently when solving lower-order problems than higher-order problems, while they use domain-specific procedures more frequently when solving higher-order problems. Additionally, the more domain-specific procedures students used, the higher the likelihood that they would answer the problem correctly, up to five procedures. However, if students used just one domain-general procedure, they were as likely to answer the problem correctly as if they had used two to five domain-general procedures. Our findings provide a categorization scheme and framework for additional research on biology problem solving and suggest several important implications for researchers and instructors. © 2016 L. B. Prevost and P. P. Lemons. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  12. Step-by-step build-up of covalent poly(ethylene oxide) nanogel films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahouani, S; Hurman, L; De Giorgi, M; Vigier-Carrière, C; Boulmedais, F; Senger, B; Frisch, B; Schaaf, P; Lavalle, P; Jierry, L

    2017-11-30

    Hydrogels based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) are commonly used for studies related to cell fate and tissue engineering. Here we present a new covalent layer-by-layer build-up process leading to PEG coatings of nanometer size called "nanogel films". Compared to macroscopic hydrogels, such nanogels should provide a fine control over the structure and the thickness of the coating. Alternated deposition of bifunctional and tetra functional PEG molecules reacting through thiol/maleimide click chemistry is evaluated by quartz crystal microbalance. We first study parameters influencing the build-up process of such coatings and demonstrate the importance of (i) the nature of the first deposited layer, (ii) the PEG concentrations and (iii) the length of the PEG chains that appears to be the most significant parameter influencing film growth. The build-up process can be extended to a large variety of substrates like SiO2 or polymers by using an appropriate anchoring layer. Covalent functionalization of these nanogel films by proteins or enzymes is suited by modifying the biomolecules with thiol or maleimide groups and immobilizing them during the build-up process. Activity of the embedded enzymes can be maintained. Moreover ligands like biotin can be incorporated into the film and recognition by streptavidin can be modulated by playing with the number of PEG layers covering biotin. Compared to well-known PEG hydrogels, these new coatings are promising as they allow to (i) build thin nanometric coatings, (ii) finely control the amount of deposited PEG and (iii) organize the position of the embedded biomolecules inside the film layers.

  13. Step by Step: Social Skills Instruction for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder Using Video Models and Peer Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Christine R.

    2011-01-01

    For children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), impairments in social skills can impact interactions with peers, family members, and the world. Impairments in social skills vary from person to person, and may include lack of eye contact, limited affect, or nonexistent verbal communication. One strategy for teaching social skills to children with…

  14. Enjoy writing your science thesis or dissertation! a step-by-step guide to planning and writing a thesis or dissertation for undergraduate and graduate science students

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This book is a step by step illustrated guide to planning and writing dissertations and theses for undergraduate and graduate science students. Topics covered include advice on writing each section of a thesis as well as general discussions on collecting and organizing references, keeping records, presenting data, interacting with a supervisor and avoiding academic misconduct. Recommendations about how to use word processors and other software packages effectively are included, as well as advice on the use of other resources. A concise summary of important points of English grammar is given, along with appendices listing frequently confused words and wordy phrases to avoid. Further appendices are provided, including one on Si units. The aim is to provide an easy-to-read guide that gives students practical advice about all aspects of writing a science thesis or dissertation, starting from writing a thesis plan and finishing with the viva and corrections to the thesis.

  15. Starting a new residency program: a step-by-step guide for institutions, hospitals, and program directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Barajaz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Although our country faces a looming shortage of doctors, constraints of space, funding, and patient volume in many existing residency programs limit training opportunities for medical graduates. New residency programs need to be created for the expansion of graduate medical education training positions. Partnerships between existing academic institutions and community hospitals with a need for physicians can be a very successful means toward this end. Baylor College of Medicine and The Children's Hospital of San Antonio were affiliated in 2012, and subsequently, we developed and received accreditation for a new categorical pediatric residency program at that site in 2014. We share below a step-by-step guide through the process that includes building of the infrastructure, educational development, accreditation, marketing, and recruitment. It is our hope that the description of this process will help others to spur growth in graduate medical training positions.

  16. Step-by-step seeding procedure for preparing HKUST-1 membrane on porous α-alumina support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Jiangpu; Dong, Xueliang; Wang, Wenjin; Jin, Wanqin; Xu, Nanping

    2011-04-19

    Metal-organic framework (MOF) membranes have attracted considerable attention because of their striking advantages in small-molecule separation. The preparation of an integrated MOF membrane is still a major challenge. Depositing a uniform seed layer on a support for secondary growth is a main route to obtaining an integrated MOF membrane. A novel seeding method to prepare HKUST-1 (known as Cu(3)(btc)(2)) membranes on porous α-alumina supports is reported. The in situ production of the seed layer was realized in step-by-step fashion via the coordination of H(3)btc and Cu(2+) on an α-alumina support. The formation process of the seed layer was observed by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. An integrated HKUST-1 membrane could be synthesized by the secondary hydrothermal growth on the seeded support. The gas permeation performance of the membrane was evaluated. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  17. How to use multi-criteria decision analysis methods for reimbursement decision-making in healthcare: a step-by-step guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaby, Vakaramoko; Goeree, Ron

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, the quest for more comprehensiveness, structure and transparency in reimbursement decision-making in healthcare has prompted the research into alternative decision-making frameworks. In this environment, multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) is arising as a valuable tool to support healthcare decision-making. In this paper, we present the main MCDA decision support methods (elementary methods, value-based measurement models, goal programming models and outranking models) using a case study approach. For each family of methods, an example of how an MCDA model would operate in a real decision-making context is presented from a critical perspective, highlighting the parameters setting, the selection of the appropriate evaluation model as well as the role of sensitivity and robustness analyses. This study aims to provide a step-by-step guide on how to use MCDA methods for reimbursement decision-making in healthcare.

  18. Muscle Cells Provide Instructions for Planarian Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica N. Witchley

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Regeneration requires both potential and instructions for tissue replacement. In planarians, pluripotent stem cells have the potential to produce all new tissue. The identities of the cells that provide regeneration instructions are unknown. Here, we report that position control genes (PCGs that control regeneration and tissue turnover are expressed in a subepidermal layer of nonneoblast cells. These subepidermal cells coexpress many PCGs. We propose that these subepidermal cells provide a system of body coordinates and positional information for regeneration, and identify them to be muscle cells of the planarian body wall. Almost all planarian muscle cells express PCGs, suggesting a dual function: contraction and control of patterning. PCG expression is dynamic in muscle cells after injury, even in the absence of neoblasts, suggesting that muscle is instructive for regeneration. We conclude that planarian regeneration involves two highly flexible systems: pluripotent neoblasts that can generate any new cell type and muscle cells that provide positional instructions for the regeneration of any body region.

  19. Muscle cells provide instructions for planarian regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witchley, Jessica N; Mayer, Mirjam; Wagner, Daniel E; Owen, Jared H; Reddien, Peter W

    2013-08-29

    Regeneration requires both potential and instructions for tissue replacement. In planarians, pluripotent stem cells have the potential to produce all new tissue. The identities of the cells that provide regeneration instructions are unknown. Here, we report that position control genes (PCGs) that control regeneration and tissue turnover are expressed in a subepidermal layer of nonneoblast cells. These subepidermal cells coexpress many PCGs. We propose that these subepidermal cells provide a system of body coordinates and positional information for regeneration, and identify them to be muscle cells of the planarian body wall. Almost all planarian muscle cells express PCGs, suggesting a dual function: contraction and control of patterning. PCG expression is dynamic in muscle cells after injury, even in the absence of neoblasts, suggesting that muscle is instructive for regeneration. We conclude that planarian regeneration involves two highly flexible systems: pluripotent neoblasts that can generate any new cell type and muscle cells that provide positional instructions for the regeneration of any body region. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Application of a step-by-step fingerprinting identification method on a spilled oil accident in the Bohai Sea area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peiyan; Gao, Zhenhui; Cao, Lixin; Wang, Xinping; Zhou, Qing; Zhao, Yuhui; Li, Guangmei

    2011-03-01

    In recent years, oil spill accidents occur frequently in the marine area of China. Finding out the spilled oil source is a key step in the relevant investigation. In this paper, a step-by-step fingerprinting identification method was used in a spilled oil accident in the Bohai Sea in 2002. Advanced chemical fingerprinting and data interpretation techniques were used to characterize the chemical composition and determine the possible sources of two spilled oil samples. The original gas chromatography -flame ionization detection (GC-FID) chromatogram of saturated hydrocarbons was compared. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) chromatograms of aromatic hydrocarbons terpane and sterane, n-alkane and poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed. The correlation analysis on diagnostic ratios was performed with Student's t-test. It is found that the oil fingerprinting of the spilled oil (designated as sz1) from the polluted sand beach was identical with the suspected oil (designated as ky1) from a nearby crude oil refinery factory. They both showed the fingerprinting character of mixed oil. The oil fingerprinting of the spilled oil (designated as ms1) collected from the port was significantly different from oil ky1 and oil sz1 and was with a lubricating oil fingerprint character. The identification result not only gave support for the spilled oil investigation, but also served as an example for studying spilled oil accidents.

  1. Facile synthesis and step by step enhancement of blue photoluminescence from Ag-doped ZnS quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Sonal; Husain, Mushahid; Shanker, Virendra; Singh, Nahar; Haranath, D

    2011-05-15

    Our results pertaining to the step by step enhancement of photoluminescence (PL) intensity from ZnS:Ag,Al quantum dots (QDs) are presented. Initially, these QDs were synthesized using a simple co-precipitation technique involving a surfactant, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), in de-ionised water. It was observed that the blue PL originated from ZnS:Ag,Al QDs was considerably weak and not suitable for any practical display application. Upon UV (365 nm) photolysis, the PL intensity augmented to ~170% and attained a saturation value after ~100 min of exposure. This is attributed to the photo-corrosion mechanism exerted by high-flux UV light on ZnS:Ag,Al QDs. Auxiliary enhancement of PL intensity to 250% has been evidenced by subjecting the QDs to high temperatures (200 °C) and pressures (~120 bars) in a sulphur-rich atmosphere, which is due to the improvement in crystallanity of ZnS QDs. The origin of the bright-blue PL has been discussed. The results were supported by X-ray phase analysis, high-resolution electron microscopy and compositional evaluation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A step-by-step oncoplastic breast conservation surgical atlas of reproducible dissection techniques and anatomically ideal incision placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sunny D

    2017-10-01

    To develop an atlas for oncoplastic surgery (OPS) with template dissection techniques via anatomically ideal incisions for breast conservation surgery. The evolution of breast conservation techniques has evolved from placing an incision directly over the lesion to the incorporation of a thoughtful decision making process utilizing oncoplastic surgical (OPS) techniques to combining OPS with incision placement in anatomically advantageous sites. The high survival rates of breast cancer and effect of breast surgery on quality of life reinforce emphasis of optimal oncologic as well as aesthetic outcome. OPS results in greater patient satisfaction, fewer surgeries, and is oncologically safe. Today's breast surgeon is tasked with optimizing both oncologic and aesthetic outcomes. Presentation of reproducible dissection techniques and incision placement strategies to afford surgeons a step-by-step approach of OPS via anatomically ideal incisions in breast conservation surgery. Demonstration of reproducible techniques to facilitate the decision making process of optimal breast conservation surgery, eliminate knowledge gaps for surgeons, optimize outcome for individuals undergoing breast conservation surgery, and decrease disparity of care. Adoption of OPS techniques utilizing an anatomically ideal incision in breast conservation surgery is a feasible and reproducible practice for breast surgeons. Application of these techniques results in maintained optimal shape, size, and contour without the typical overlying skin envelope scars. OPS techniques performed under the skin envelope result in expected OPS oncologic and aesthetic outcomes with the addition of the resulting scar(s) in anatomically discrete position(s).

  3. Highly efficient polymer solar cells by step-by-step optimizing donor molecular packing and acceptor redistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qianqian; Zhang, Fujun; An, Qiaoshi; Zhang, Miao; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Jian

    2016-12-21

    The dynamic drying process of the active layer should play a vitally important role in determining the performance of polymer solar cells (PSCs). Donor molecular packing and acceptor redistribution can be optimized by two successive post-treatments on the active layer. The blend films were freshly prepared by spin-coating method and then immediately transferred to a covered glass Petri dish to allow self-assembly of the donor molecules. The films were then treated with methanol or PFN-methanol solution to adjust the acceptor redistribution. In this study, power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of PSCs with PffBT4T-2OD:PC71BM as the active layer were improved from 6.74% to 8.75% by employing 80 min for self-assembly and 20 s of methanol soaking. The PCE was improved even further to 9.72% by inserting a PFN interfacial layer. The performance improvement was mainly attributed to the optimized PffBT4T-2OD molecular packing during the self-assembly process, ideal vertical phase separation driven by methanol soaking and efficient charge collection by insertion of a PFN interfacial layer. The molecular packing and vertical phase separation were characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The experimental results solidly supported the effectiveness of the step-by-step optimization strategy.

  4. Step-by-step calculation and spreadsheet tools for predicting stressor levels that extirpate genera and species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Susan M; Zheng, Lei; Leppo, Erik W; Hamilton, Andrew

    2017-10-14

    In 2011, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) released a field-based method for estimating the extirpation of freshwater aquatic benthic invertebrates by ionic mixtures dominated by HCO3- , SO42- , and Ca2+ measured as specific conductivity (SC). The estimate of extirpation was SC at the 95th centile (XC95) of a weighted cumulative frequency distribution (CFD) of a genus or species over a range of SC. A CFD of XC95 values was used to predict the SC at which 5% of genera were likely to be extirpated. Because there are many uses for XC95 values and many data sets that could be analyzed using this method, we laid out a step-by-step method for calculating XC95 values and the stressor level that predicts a 5% extirpation of genera (HC05). Although the calculations can be done with a handheld calculator, we developed 2 downloadable Microsoft Excel® spreadsheet calculation tools that are easy to use to calculate XC95 values, to plot a taxon's XC95 cumulative frequency distribution with increasing SC, and to plot probabilities of observing a taxon at a particular SC. They also plot cumulative frequency distributions of XC95 values and calculate HC05 values. In addition to the tools, we share an example and the output of XC95 values for 176 distinct aquatic benthic invertebrates in Appalachia, in West Virginia, USA. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;00:000-000. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  5. The anatomy and art of writing a successful grant application: a practical step-by-step approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholipour, Ali; Lee, Edward Y; Warfield, Simon K

    2014-12-01

    Writing a compelling grant application is a skill that is crucial to conducting high-quality and high-impact scientific research. A successful grant proposal provides the resources necessary to foster activity in an important area of investigation. A concise and practical overview of the anatomy and art of grant writing is provided in this article, along with citations to resources that are particularly useful for junior investigators.

  6. Case Study: A Step-by-Step Guide to Students Writing Case Studies (and Tools for Novice Case Authors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme-Genereux, Annie

    2015-01-01

    In experimenting with ways of structuring the assignment and providing guidance to students, the author developed a series of tools that may be of interest to instructors wishing to implement a case-writing assignment in their course. This assignment is more suited for instructors experienced in case writing, as their knowledge of how to design a…

  7. [Why and how to perform an ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block: A step-by-step approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohuz, E; El Drayi, B; Triki, A; Grossmannova, K; Boudier, B; Koffi, K; Albaut, M; Dualé, C

    2016-12-01

    Used in clinical practice as part of a multimodal analgesic regimen, the transversus abdominis plane block (TAP block) is a relative novel procedure in which local anaesthetic agents are injected into the anatomic neurofascial space between the internal oblique and the transversus abdominis muscle. It allows a significantly prolonged duration of analgesia during the early postoperative stage in abdominal surgery. This regional anesthesia technique provides analgesia to the skin, muscles of the anterior abdominal wall and parietal peritoneum in order to decrease the incision-related pain. Thus, it reduces postoperative opiate requirements and opioids-related side effects (nausea, vomiting, delayed resumption of intestinal transit, drowsiness, respiratory depression, urine retention). Additionally, the TAP block appears particularly interesting when neuraxial techniques or opioids are contraindicated. Moreover, the ultrasound-guided procedure provides a significant success rate of this block and additionally avoids major complications. We describe our technique of ultrasound-guided TAP block and discuss its indications, contraindication and potential complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. EMPLOY: Step-by-step guidelines for calculating employment effects of renewable energy investments [including annex 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitschopf, Barbara [Fraunhofer Inst. for Systems and Innovation Research (Germany); Nathani, Carsten [Ruetter and Partner Socioeconomic Research and Consulting (Switzerland); Resch, Gustav [Vienna Univ. of Technology, Energy Economics Group (EEG) (Austria

    2012-07-15

    The EMPLOY project aimed to help achieve the IEA-RETD’s objective to 'empower policy makers and energy market actors through the provision of information, tools and resources' by underlining the economic and industrial impacts of renewable energy technology deployment and providing reliable methodological approaches for employment – similar to those available for the incumbent energy technologies. The EMPLOY project resulted in a comprehensive set of methodological guidelines for estimating the employment impacts of renewable energy deployment in a coherent, uniform and systematic way. Guidelines were prepared for four different methodological approaches. In the introduction section of the guidelines policy makers are guided in their choice for the most suited approach, depending on the policy questions to be answered, the data availability and budget. The guidelines were tested for the IEA-RETD member state countries and Tunisia. The results of these calculations are included in the annex to the guidelines.

  9. Penn Center for Community Health Workers: Step-by-Step Approach to Sustain an Evidence-Based Community Health Worker Intervention at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Anna U; Grande, David T; Carter, Tamala; Long, Judith A; Kangovi, Shreya

    2016-11-01

    Community-engaged researchers who work with low-income communities can be reliant on grant funding. We use the illustrative case of the Penn Center for Community Health Workers (PCCHW) to describe a step-by-step framework for achieving financial sustainability for community-engaged research interventions. PCCHW began as a small grant-funded research project but followed an 8-step framework to engage both low-income patients and funders, determine outcomes, and calculate return on investment. PCCHW is now fully funded by Penn Medicine and delivers the Individualized Management for Patient-Centered Targets (IMPaCT) community health worker intervention to 2000 patients annually.

  10. Hip and pelvic fracture patients with fear of falling: development and description of the "Step by Step" treatment protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampe, Karin; Kohler, Michaela; Albrecht, Diana; Becker, Clemens; Hautzinger, Martin; Lindemann, Ulrich; Pfeiffer, Klaus

    2017-05-01

    Based on a theoretical framework and sound evidence, this article describes a rehabilitation programme for patients with fear of falling after hip and pelvic fracture. Based on exercise science principles, current knowledge from fall prevention, emotion regulation, and the Health Action Process Approach we developed a theoretical framework, from which the components of the intervention were derived. Description of the intervention: The intervention consists of 6 components: (1) relaxation, (2) meaningful activities and mobility-based goals, (3) falls related cognitions and emotions, coping with high risk tasks and situations, (4) individual exercise programme, (5) planning and implementing exercises and activities, and (6) fall risks and hazards. The intervention comprises of 8 individual sessions during 3 to 5 weeks of inpatient rehabilitation and 4 telephone calls and 1 home visit over a 2-month post-discharge period. Each session or telephone call takes about 30-60 minutes. It is provided to geriatric hip and pelvic fracture patients with concerns about falling and no cognitive impairment. To ensure completeness of reporting, the Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDierR) is used. Fifty-seven patients were assigned to the intervention group. All 46 completers met all pre-defined criteria for an intervention per protocol. The programme is feasible to administer. We have completed a randomised controlled trial, which will be submitted in due time (for trial protocol: www.isrctn.org ; ISRCTN79191813).

  11. How to measure cortical folding from MR images: a step-by-step tutorial to compute local gyrification index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaer, Marie; Cuadra, Meritxell Bach; Schmansky, Nick; Fischl, Bruce; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Eliez, Stephan

    2012-01-02

    Cortical folding (gyrification) is determined during the first months of life, so that adverse events occurring during this period leave traces that will be identifiable at any age. As recently reviewed by Mangin and colleagues(2), several methods exist to quantify different characteristics of gyrification. For instance, sulcal morphometry can be used to measure shape descriptors such as the depth, length or indices of inter-hemispheric asymmetry(3). These geometrical properties have the advantage of being easy to interpret. However, sulcal morphometry tightly relies on the accurate identification of a given set of sulci and hence provides a fragmented description of gyrification. A more fine-grained quantification of gyrification can be achieved with curvature-based measurements, where smoothed absolute mean curvature is typically computed at thousands of points over the cortical surface(4). The curvature is however not straightforward to comprehend, as it remains unclear if there is any direct relationship between the curvedness and a biologically meaningful correlate such as cortical volume or surface. To address the diverse issues raised by the measurement of cortical folding, we previously developed an algorithm to quantify local gyrification with an exquisite spatial resolution and of simple interpretation. Our method is inspired of the Gyrification Index(5), a method originally used in comparative neuroanatomy to evaluate the cortical folding differences across species. In our implementation, which we name local Gyrification Index (lGI(1)), we measure the amount of cortex buried within the sulcal folds as compared with the amount of visible cortex in circular regions of interest. Given that the cortex grows primarily through radial expansion(6), our method was specifically designed to identify early defects of cortical development. In this article, we detail the computation of local Gyrification Index, which is now freely distributed as a part of the Free

  12. Designing LibGuides as Instructional Tools for Critical Thinking and Effective Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ruth L.

    2014-01-01

    Did you ever wish for an easy-to-maintain tool to create course-level or assignment-level instruction for online or distance students? LibGuides can provide the solution! LibGuides provide a versatile and easy-to-maintain platform for delivering step-by-step, scaffolded tutorials that enhance learning outcomes through chunking, reduced strain on…

  13. A step-by-step overview of the dynamic process of epitope selection by major histocompatibility complex class II for presentation to helper T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadegh-Nasseri, Scheherazade

    2016-01-01

    T cell antigen receptors (TCRs) expressed on cytotoxic or helper T cells can only see their specific target antigen as short sequences of peptides bound to the groove of proteins of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, and class II respectively. In addition to the many steps, several participating proteins, and multiple cellular compartments involved in the processing of antigens, the MHC structure, with its dynamic and flexible groove, has perfectly evolved as the underlying instrument for epitope selection. In this review, I have taken a step-by-step, and rather historical, view to describe antigen processing and determinant selection, as we understand it today, all based on decades of intense research by hundreds of laboratories.

  14. STEP BY STEP 2.0” – UN’APPLICAZIONE MOBILE PER ESPLORARE PALAZZO MADAMA-MUSEO CIVICO D’ARTE ANTICA (TORINO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Rubino

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The spread of mobile applications has recently exposed museums to new opportunities, both in terms of learning and engagement of new visitors: in this scenario, a special role is played by mobile applications integrating location-based services and gamification approaches. This paper presents the description and evaluation of “Step by Step 2.0”, a mobile guide developed for Palazzo Madama-Museo Civico d’Arte Antica (Turin, Italy by engineering company TonicMinds. The guide includes trails, an indoor navigation system, the connection to social networks and two location-based mobile games, specifically developed for young visitors. The results show that mobile apps can facilitate visitors’ meaning making process and enable unconventional models of exploration, which are definitely worth- investigating.

  15. A Curriculum Package for Implementing Instruction in Electricity Fundamentals/House Wiring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brian P.

    This curriculum guide is designed for instructors of secondary industrial arts, vocational, and apprenticeship programs. The material is presented in two sections. Section I provides step-by-step instructions on how to present basic electrical circuit concepts with the use of a simply-made breadboard. Included in this section is the following…

  16. Measuring border delay and crossing times at the US-Mexico border : part II. Step-by-step guidelines for implementing a radio frequency identification (RFID) system to measure border crossing and wait times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of these step-by-step guidelines is to assist in planning, designing, and deploying a system that uses radio frequency identification (RFID) technology to measure the time needed for commercial vehicles to complete the northbound border c...

  17. Meta-analyses and Forest plots using a microsoft excel spreadsheet: step-by-step guide focusing on descriptive data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neyeloff Jeruza L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meta-analyses are necessary to synthesize data obtained from primary research, and in many situations reviews of observational studies are the only available alternative. General purpose statistical packages can meta-analyze data, but usually require external macros or coding. Commercial specialist software is available, but may be expensive and focused in a particular type of primary data. Most available softwares have limitations in dealing with descriptive data, and the graphical display of summary statistics such as incidence and prevalence is unsatisfactory. Analyses can be conducted using Microsoft Excel, but there was no previous guide available. Findings We constructed a step-by-step guide to perform a meta-analysis in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet, using either fixed-effect or random-effects models. We have also developed a second spreadsheet capable of producing customized forest plots. Conclusions It is possible to conduct a meta-analysis using only Microsoft Excel. More important, to our knowledge this is the first description of a method for producing a statistically adequate but graphically appealing forest plot summarizing descriptive data, using widely available software.

  18. Meta-analyses and Forest plots using a microsoft excel spreadsheet: step-by-step guide focusing on descriptive data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyeloff, Jeruza L; Fuchs, Sandra C; Moreira, Leila B

    2012-01-20

    Meta-analyses are necessary to synthesize data obtained from primary research, and in many situations reviews of observational studies are the only available alternative. General purpose statistical packages can meta-analyze data, but usually require external macros or coding. Commercial specialist software is available, but may be expensive and focused in a particular type of primary data. Most available softwares have limitations in dealing with descriptive data, and the graphical display of summary statistics such as incidence and prevalence is unsatisfactory. Analyses can be conducted using Microsoft Excel, but there was no previous guide available. We constructed a step-by-step guide to perform a meta-analysis in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet, using either fixed-effect or random-effects models. We have also developed a second spreadsheet capable of producing customized forest plots. It is possible to conduct a meta-analysis using only Microsoft Excel. More important, to our knowledge this is the first description of a method for producing a statistically adequate but graphically appealing forest plot summarizing descriptive data, using widely available software.

  19. Sequential (step-by-step) detection, identification and quantitation of extra virgin olive oil adulteration by chemometric treatment of chromatographic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capote, F Priego; Jiménez, J Ruiz; de Castro, M D Luque

    2007-08-01

    An analytical method for the sequential detection, identification and quantitation of extra virgin olive oil adulteration with four edible vegetable oils--sunflower, corn, peanut and coconut oils--is proposed. The only data required for this method are the results obtained from an analysis of the lipid fraction by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total number of 566 samples (pure oils and samples of adulterated olive oil) were used to develop the chemometric models, which were designed to accomplish, step-by-step, the three aims of the method: to detect whether an olive oil sample is adulterated, to identify the type of adulterant used in the fraud, and to determine how much aldulterant is in the sample. Qualitative analysis was carried out via two chemometric approaches--soft independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA) and K nearest neighbours (KNN)--both approaches exhibited prediction abilities that were always higher than 91% for adulterant detection and 88% for type of adulterant identification. Quantitative analysis was based on partial least squares regression (PLSR), which yielded R2 values of >0.90 for calibration and validation sets and thus made it possible to determine adulteration with excellent precision according to the Shenk criteria.

  20. Carbon dots with efficient solid-state red-light emission through the step-by-step surface modification towards light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinyang; Bai, Xue; Chen, Xu; Xie, Zhifeng; Zhu, Yongsheng; Pan, Gencai; Zhai, Yue; Zhang, Hanzhuang; Dong, Biao; Song, Hongwei

    2018-02-15

    Carbon dots (CDs) have attracted extensive attention over the past decade due to their excellent advantages. However, few attempts have been reported for realizing the long-wavelength emission, especially for obtaining efficient solid-state red emission with high photoluminescence quantum yield (QY). Herein, we developed highly red light emitting CDs by the step-by-step surface modifications of the nitrogen-doped CDs. By introducing hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide to modulate a red CD aqueous solution, the photoluminescence QY increases from 23.2% to 43.6%. Furthermore, we dispersed CDs in a PVP matrix for a solid-state film, where the solid-state quenching was effectively suppressed, and high QY (41.3%) of red light emission was achieved. Taking advantage of the as-prepared red light emitting CDs combining with the reported high quantum yield blue and green light emitting CDs, we realized UV-pumped WLEDs with tunable correlated color temperature from 7879 to 2961 K. Moreover, a high color rendering index (CRI) of 93 for WLEDs was realized, which is superior than the best records for the semiconductor quantum dot based WLEDs. Finally, the red light emitting CDs were demonstrated to have promising application as a red color converter in traditional YAG-based WLEDs to improve their CCT and CRI.

  1. A step-by-step translation of evidence into a psychosocial intervention for everyday activities in dementia: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebel, Clarissa M; Challis, David; Hooper, Nigel M; Ferris, Sally

    2018-03-01

    In order to increase the efficacy of psychosocial interventions in dementia, a step-by-step process translating evidence and public engagement should be adhered to. This paper describes such a process by involving a two-stage focus group with people with dementia (PwD), informal carers, and staff. Based on previous evidence, general aspects of effective interventions were drawn out. These were tested in the first stage of focus groups, one with informal carers and PwD and one with staff. Findings from this stage helped shape the intervention further specifying its content. In the second stage, participants were consulted about the detailed components. The extant evidence base and focus groups helped to identify six practical and situation-specific elements worthy of consideration in planning such an intervention, including underlying theory and personal motivations for participation. Carers, PwD, and staff highlighted the importance of rapport between practitioners and PwD prior to commencing the intervention. It was also considered important that the intervention would be personalised to each individual. This paper shows how valuable public involvement can be to intervention development, and outlines a process of public involvement for future intervention development. The next step would be to formally test the intervention.

  2. Augmentation of the step-by-step Energy-Scanning EXAFS beamline BL-09 to continuous-scan EXAFS mode at INDUS-2 SRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poswal, Ashwini Kumar; Agrawal, Ankur; Poswal, Himanshu Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu; Jha, Shambhu Nath; Sahoo, Naba Kishore

    2016-11-01

    An innovative scheme to carry out continuous-scan X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements similar to quick-EXAFS mode at the Energy-Scanning EXAFS beamline BL-09 at INDUS-2 synchrotron source (Indore, India), which is generally operated in step-by-step scanning mode, is presented. The continuous XAS mode has been implemented by adopting a continuous-scan scheme of the double-crystal monochromator and on-the-fly measurement of incident and transmitted intensities. This enabled a high signal-to-noise ratio to be maintained and the acquisition time was reduced to a few seconds from tens of minutes or hours. The quality of the spectra (signal-to-noise level, resolution and energy calibration) was checked by measuring and analysing XAS spectra of standard metal foils. To demonstrate the energy range covered in a single scan, a continuous-mode XAS spectrum of copper nickel alloy covering both Cu and Ni K-edges was recorded. The implementation of continuous-scan XAS mode at BL-09 would expand the use of this beamline in in situ time-resolved XAS studies of various important systems of current technological importance. The feasibility of employing this mode of measurement for time-resolved probing of reaction kinetics has been demonstrated by in situ XAS measurement on the growth of Ag nanoparticles from a solution phase.

  3. Data on step-by-step atomic force microscopy monitoring of changes occurring in single melanoma cells undergoing ToF SIMS specialized sample preparation protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrowska, J; Pabijan, J; Wiltowska-Zuber, J; Jany, B R; Krok, F; Awsiuk, K; Rysz, J; Budkowski, A; Lekka, M

    2016-09-01

    Data included in this article are associated with the research article entitled 'Protocol of single cells preparation for time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry' (Bobrowska et al., 2016 in press) [1]. This data file contains topography images of single melanoma cells recorded using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Single cells cultured on glass surface were subjected to the proposed sample preparation protocol applied to prepare biological samples for time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF SIMS) measurements. AFM images were collected step-by-step for the single cell, after each step of the proposed preparation protocol. It consists of four main parts: (i) paraformaldehyde fixation, (ii) salt removal, (iii) dehydrating, and (iv) sample drying. In total 13 steps are required, starting from imaging of a living cell in a culture medium and ending up at images of a dried cell in the air. The protocol was applied to melanoma cells from two cell lines, namely, WM115 melanoma cells originated from primary melanoma site and WM266-4 ones being the metastasis of WM115 cells to skin.

  4. Using Blogging Software to Provide Additional Writing Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Lin B.; Todd, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Classroom teachers sometimes struggle trying to find time during the typical school day to provide the writing instruction students need to be successful. This study examined 29 fifth through twelfth grade classroom teachers' survey responses about their perception of the effectiveness of using an online blogging tool, Kidblog, to plan and provide…

  5. Using Blogging Software to Provide Additional Writing Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin B. CARVER

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Classroom teachers sometimes struggle trying to find time during the typical school day to provide the writing instruction students need to be successful. This study examined 29 fifth through twelfth grade classroom teachers’ survey responses about their perception of the effectiveness of using an online blogging tool, Kidblog, to plan and provide writing instruction for a struggling writer through survey responses and reflective journal entries. In addition, qualitative data from 16 of the 29 teachers were collected through their journals. After eight weeks of using the blogging tool, teachers perceived the tool to be more effective than they had originally thought it would be. The teachers reported that they were able to evaluate their individual student’s writing progress to determine next steps in writing instruction. They perceived that student engagement with the writing process increased during the study. Additionally, using an online format encouraged teachers to incorporate other online tools into their instruction. However, barriers to using the blogging tool were also identified. Teachers reported that they would have liked the opportunity for more face-to-face interaction with their students and they also indicated that students may need strong keyboarding skills to effectively use the Kidblog tool. Additionally, prior to implementing the tool, teachers identified practice should have been provided for the teachers, as some found the blogging software difficult to use.

  6. Step-by-step surgical technique for mandibular reconstruction with fibular free flap: application of digital technology in virtual surgical planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Succo, G; Berrone, M; Battiston, B; Tos, P; Goia, F; Appendino, P; Crosetti, E

    2015-06-01

    At present, mandibular reconstruction with a fibular free flap is the gold standard for functional and esthetic rehabilitation after oncological surgery. The purpose of this study was to describe the computer-assisted mandibular reconstruction procedure adopting the customized solution Synthes ProPlan CMF. The study reports five consecutive patients with benign or malignant disease requiring mandibular reconstruction using a microvascular fibular free flap, pre-operative virtual planning, construction of cutting guides and customized laser pre-bent titanium plates. The surgical technique is discussed in a step-by-step fashion. The average post-operative hospital stay was 18 ± 3 days. Ischemia time was recorded in all five cases, with an average of 75 ± 8 min. No problems were encountered in any surgical step and there were no major complications. Excellent precision of cutting guides and a good fit of pre-bent plates were found on both the mandible and fibula. There was excellent precision in bone to bone contact and position between mandible and fibula graft. Measurement data from the pre-operative and post-operative CT scans were compared. The average difference (Δ) between programed segment lengths and CT control segment lengths was 0.098 ± 0.077 cm. Microsurgical mandibular reconstruction using a virtual surgical planning yields significantly shorter ischemia times and allows more precise osteotomies. The technology is becoming increasingly recognized for its ability to optimize surgical outcomes and minimize operating time. Considering that the extent of resection can be wider than predicted, this results in safer modeling of the fibula only after frozen sections have demonstrated the radicality of resection.

  7. Robot-assisted Level II-III Inferior Vena Cava Tumor Thrombectomy: Step-by-Step Technique and 1-Year Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Sameer; Simone, Giuseppe; Metcalfe, Charles; de Castro Abreu, Andre Luis; Nabhani, Jamal; Ferriero, Mariaconsiglia; Bove, Alfredo Maria; Sotelo, Rene; Aron, Monish; Desai, Mihir M; Gallucci, Michele; Gill, Inderbir S

    2017-08-01

    Level II-III inferior vena cava (IVC) tumor thrombectomy for renal cell carcinoma is among the most challenging urologic oncologic surgeries. In 2015, we reported the initial series of robot-assisted level III caval thrombectomy. To describe our University of Southern California technique in a step-by-step fashion for robot-assisted IVC level II-III tumor thrombectomy. Twenty-five selected patients with renal neoplasm and level II-III IVC tumor thrombus underwent robot-assisted surgery with a minimum 1-yr follow-up (July 2011 to March 2015). Our standardized anatomic-based "IVC-first, kidney-last" technique for robot-assisted IVC thrombectomy focuses on minimizing the chances of an intraoperative tumor thromboembolism and major hemorrhage. Baseline demographics, pathology data, 90-d and 1-yr complications, and oncologic outcomes at last follow-up were assessed. Robot-assisted IVC thrombectomy was successful in 24 patients (96%) (level III: n=11; level II: n=13); one patient was electively converted to open surgery for failure to progress. Median data included operative time of 4.5h, estimated blood loss was 240ml, hospital stay 4 d; five patients (21%) received intraoperative blood transfusion. All surgical margins were negative. Complications occurred in four patients (17%): two were Clavien 2, one was Clavien 3a, and one was Clavien 3b. All patients were alive at a 16-mo median follow-up (range: 12-39 mo). Robotic IVC tumor thrombectomy is feasible for level II-III thrombi. To maximize intraoperative safety and chances of success, a thorough understanding of applied anatomy and altered vascular collateral flow channels, careful patient selection, meticulous cross-sectional imaging, and a highly experienced robotic team are essential. We present the detailed operative steps of a new minimally invasive robot-assisted surgical approach to treat patients with advanced kidney cancer. This type of surgery can be performed safely with low blood loss and excellent

  8. Using the Wharton-Sheares-George method to create a neovagina in patients with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome: a step-by-step video tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuessel, Lorenz; Wenzl, René; Marschalek, Marie-Louise; Slavka, Georg; Doerfler, Daniela; Husslein, Heinrich

    2016-12-01

    To provide a review of the literature regarding this technique as well as a step-by-step description with the goal of increasing its use as a safe surgical option. Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome is characterized by vaginal agenesis and a variety of mullerian duct anomalies. To date, a variety of procedures have been described for creating a neovagina, but the best treatment remains debated. The Wharton-Sheares-George method, a minimally invasive surgical approach for the creation of a neovagina, is remarkably simple to perform. Surgical video tutorial. University hospital and referral center for pediatric and adolescent gynecology. A 20-year-old woman with MRKH syndrome who underwent Wharton-Sheares-George neovaginoplasty. With the Wharton-Sheares-George neovaginoplasty the rudimentary müllerian ducts are dilated incrementally by pushing Hegar dilators in the direction of the pelvic axis, and the resulting median raphe is then intersected using diathermy. Subsequently a vaginal mold is inserted into the newly created cavity and held in position by two sutures. Discussion of the surgical steps according to the Wharton-Sheares-George method and review of the anatomic and functional results. Reviewing the existing literature shows that a mean vaginal length and width of 8.3 and 3.3 cm, respectively, can be achieved, and so far no major intraoperative or postoperative complications or prolapse of the neovagina has been reported. Patients can achieve a high degree of general well-being as well as sexual and psychosocial functioning. However, as with most other methods, the presented method requires diligent patient compliance due to the lifelong need to actively avoid contraction of the neovagina. Also, as revealed by vaginal cultures and biopsies, the neovaginas remarkably resemble natural vaginas with regard to type of bacterial colonization and structure of epithelium. The process of spontaneous epithelialization of the neovagina is not fully

  9. Providing Business English Instruction: Thai Instructors' Practices and Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratoomrat, Panadda; Rajprasit, Krich

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine how Business English courses are conducted in the Thai Higher Education, and to investigate students' perceptions toward the instructional management of the courses in their universities. The participants were four instructors, and one hundred and forty students enrolling in the courses of four universities in…

  10. Making Information Literacy Instruction More Efficient by Providing Individual Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Johannes; Leichner, Nikolas; Mayer, Anne-Kathrin; Krampen, Günter

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to information literacy instruction in colleges and universities that combines online and classroom learning (Blended Learning). The concept includes only one classroom seminar, so the approach presented here can replace existing one-shot sessions at colleges and universities without changes to the current workflow.…

  11. Deconstructing Chronic Low Back Pain in the Older Adult-Step-by-Step Evidence and Expert-Based Recommendations for Evaluation and Treatment: Part XII: Leg Length Discrepancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havran, Mark; Scholten, Joel D; Breuer, Paula; Lundberg, Jennifer; Kochersberger, Gary; Newman, Dave; Weiner, Debra K

    2016-12-01

     To present the last in a 12-part series designed to deconstruct chronic low back pain (CLBP) in older adults. This article focuses on leg length discrepancy (LLD) and presents an algorithm outlining approaches to diagnosis and management of LLD in older adults, along with a representative clinical case. METHODS : Using a modified Delphi approach, the LLD evaluation and treatment algorithm was developed by a multidisciplinary expert panel representing expertise in physical therapy, geriatric medicine, and physical medicine and rehabilitation. The materials were subsequently refined through an iterative process of input from a primary care provider panel comprised of VA and non-VA providers. The clinical case was taken from one of the authors. RESULTS : We present an algorithm and illustrative clinical case to help guide the care of older adults with LLD, which can be an important contributor to CLBP. Firstline assessment includes referral to physical therapy or orthopedics, depending on the context of the LLD. A variety of nonsurgical interventions may ensue depending on the etiology of the LLD, including shoe inserts, customized shoes, manual therapy, or a combination. CONCLUSIONS : To promote a patient-centered approach, providers should consider evaluating for leg length discrepancy when treating older adults with CLBP to help diminish pain and disability. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Academy of Pain Medicine 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  12. Deconstructing Chronic Low Back Pain in the Older Adult-Step by Step Evidence and Expert-Based Recommendations for Evaluation and Treatment: Part IX: Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Jordan F; DiNapoli, Elizabeth A; Wetherell, Julie; Bolon, Chloe; Rodriguez, Eric; Shega, Joseph; Weiner, Debra K

    2016-08-01

    As a part of a series of articles designed to deconstruct chronic low back pain (CLBP) in older adults, this article focuses on anxiety-a significant contributor of reduced health-related quality of life, increased use of medical services, and heightened disability in older adults with CLBP. A modified Delphi technique was used to develop an algorithm for the screening and clinical care of older adults with CLBP and anxiety. A 4-member content expert panel and a nine-member primary care panel were involved in this iterative development process. Evidence underlying the recommendations is not strictly based on VA populations; therefore, the algorithm can be applied in both VHA and civilian settings. The illustrative clinical case was taken from one of the contributor's clinical practice. We present a treatment algorithm and supporting tables to be used by providers treating older adults who have anxiety and CLBP. A case of an older adult with anxiety and CLBP is provided to illustrate the approach to management. To promote early engagement in evidence-based treatments, providers should routinely evaluate anxiety in older adults with CLBP using a screening and treatment algorithm. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. A step-by-step review on patient-specific biomechanical finite element models for breast MRI to X-ray mammography registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Eloy; Diez, Yago; Diaz, Oliver; Lladó, Xavier; Martí, Robert; Martí, Joan; Oliver, Arnau

    2017-11-17

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and X-ray mammography are two image modalities widely used for the early detection and diagnosis of breast diseases in women. The combination of these modalities leads to a more accurate diagnosis and treatment of breast diseases. The aim of this paper is to review the registration between breast MRI and X-ray mammographic images using patient-specific finite element-based biomechanical models. Specifically, a biomechanical model is obtained from the patient's MRI volume and is subsequently used to mimic the mammographic acquisition. Due to the different patient positioning and movement restrictions applied in each image modality, the finite element analysis provides a realistic physics-based approach to perform the breast deformation. In contrast with other reviews, we do not only expose the overall process of compression and registration but we also include main ideas, describe challenges and provide an overview of the used software in each step of the process. Extracting an accurate description from the MR images and preserving the stability during the finite element analysis require an accurate knowledge about the algorithms used, as well as the software and underlying physics. The wide perspective offered makes the paper suitable not only for expert researchers but also for graduate students and clinicians. We also include several medical applications in the paper, with the aim to fill the gap between the engineering and clinical performance. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Deconstructing Chronic Low Back Pain in the Older Adult-Step by Step Evidence and Expert-Based Recommendations for Evaluation and Treatment: Part VII: Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramoweth, Adam D; Renqvist, Jenna G; Germain, Anne; Buysse, Daniel J; Gentili, Angela; Kochersberger, Gary; Rodriguez, Eric; Rossi, Michelle I; Weiner, Debra K

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE : To present the seventh in a series of articles designed to deconstruct chronic low back pain (CLBP) in older adults. This article focuses on insomnia and presents a treatment algorithm for managing insomnia in older adults, along with a representative clinical case. METHODS : A modified Delphi process was used to develop the algorithm and supportive materials. A multidisciplinary expert panel representing expertise in health psychology and sleep medicine developed the algorithm and supporting documents that were subsequently refined through an iterative process of input from a primary care provider panel. RESULTS : We present an illustrative clinical case and an algorithm to help guide the care of older adults with insomnia, an important contributor to CLBP and disability. Multicomponent cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) and similar treatments (e.g., brief behavioral treatment for insomnia [BBTI]) are the recommended first-line treatment. Medications should be considered only if BBTI/CBTI is suboptimal or not effective and should be prescribed at the lowest effective dose for short periods of time (pain and disability. The algorithm presented was structured to assist primary care providers in planning treatment for older adults with CLBP and insomnia. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  15. Deconstructing Chronic Low Back Pain in the Older Adult-Step by Step Evidence and Expert-Based Recommendations for Evaluation and Treatment: Part II: Myofascial Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisi, Anthony J; Breuer, Paula; Gallagher, Rollin M; Rodriguez, Eric; Rossi, Michelle I; Schmader, Kenneth; Scholten, Joel D; Weiner, Debra K

    2015-07-01

    To present an algorithm of sequential treatment options for managing myofascial pain (MP) in older adults, along with a representative clinical case. A modified Delphi process was used to synthesize evidence-based recommendations. A multidisciplinary expert panel developed the algorithm, which was subsequently refined through an iterative process of input from a primary care physician panel. We present an algorithm and supportive materials to help guide the care of older adults with MP, an important contributor to chronic low back pain (CLBP). Addressing any perpetuating factors should be the first step of managing MP. Patients should be educated on self-care approaches, home exercise, and the use of safe analgesics when indicated. Trigger point deactivation can be accomplished by manual therapy, injection therapy, dry needling, and/or acupuncture. The algorithm presented gives a structured approach to guide primary care providers in planning treatment for patients with MP as a contributor to CLBP. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Deconstructing Chronic Low Back Pain in the Older Adult-Step by Step Evidence and Expert-Based Recommendations for Evaluation and Treatment: Part XI: Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Rollin; Malec, Monica; Shega, Joseph W; Rodriguez, Eric; Kulas, Joseph; Morrow, Lisa; Rodakowski, Juleen; Semla, Todd; Weiner, Debra K

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE : To present the 11th in a series of articles designed to deconstruct chronic low back pain (CLBP) in older adults. The series presents CLBP as a syndrome, a final common pathway for the expression of multiple contributors rather than a disease localized exclusively to the lumbosacral spine. Each article addresses one of 12 important contributions to pain and disability in older adults with CLBP. This article focuses on dementia.  A modified Delphi technique was used to develop an algorithm for an approach to treatment for older adults living with CLBP and dementia. A panel of content experts on pain and cognition in older adults developed the algorithm through an iterative process. Though developed using resources available within Veterans Health Administration (VHA) facilities, the algorithm is applicable across all health care settings. A case taken from the clinical practice of one of the contributors demonstrates application of the algorithm.  We present an evidence-based algorithm and biopsychosocial rationale to guide providers evaluating CLBP in older adults who may have dementia. The algorithm considers both subtle and overt signs of dementia, dementia screening tools to use in practice, referrals to appropriate providers for a complete a workup for dementia, and clinical considerations for persons with dementia who report pain and/or exhibit pain behaviors. A case of an older adult with CLBP and dementia is presented that highlights how an approach that considers the impact of dementia on verbal and nonverbal pain behaviors may lead to more appropriate and successful pain management.  Comprehensive pain evaluation for older adults in general and for those with CLBP in particular requires both a medical and a biopsychosocial approach that includes assessment of cognitive function. A positive screen for dementia may help explain why reported pain severity does not improve with usual or standard-of-care pain management interventions. Pain

  17. Snuggle T and protrusion (S-TAP) technique for coronary bifurcation stenting: A step-by-step angiographic and illustration demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahdouh, Ziad; Fadel, Bahaa M; Roule, Vincent; Sarkis, Antoine; Grollier, Gilles

    2017-09-01

    T and small protrusion (TAP) is a stenting technique that is utilized for the management of coronary bifurcation lesions when using a two-stent strategy. This technique is also useful whenever stenting of a main vessel (MV) jeopardizes a side branch (SB) or when a sub-optimal result is encountered in a daughter vessel after starting with one-stent approach. The conversion from one-stent strategy to TAP could be achieved smoothly and often leads to good results. Technically, optimal positioning of the SB stent to achieve the required protrusion into the lumen of the MV remains a challenge. Toward that goal we propose an added step that involves inflating a balloon in the MV to serve as an anvil with simultaneous pullback of the SB stent, to be followed by stent deployment. We refer to this approach as the snuggle T and protrusion (S-TAP) technique owing to close contact between the SB stent and the MV balloon during simultaneous inflation. In this manuscript, we detail this interventional technique and provide a demonstrative case study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Converting lignin to aromatics: step by step

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strassberger, Z.I.

    2014-01-01

    Lignin, the glue that holds trees together, is the most abundant natural resource of aromatics. In that respect, it is a far more advanced resource than crude oil. This is because lignin already contains the aromatic functional groups. Thus, catalytic conversion of lignin to high-value aromatics is

  19. Diabetes PSA (:60) Step By Step

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-24

    First steps to preventing diabetes. For Hispanic and Latino American audiences.  Created: 10/24/2009 by National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), a joint program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.   Date Released: 10/24/2009.

  20. Diabetes PSA (:30) Step By Step

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-24

    First steps to preventing diabetes. For Hispanic and Latino American audiences.  Created: 10/24/2009 by National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), a joint program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.   Date Released: 10/24/2009.

  1. Step-by-step cyclic processes scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bocewicz, G.; Nielsen, Izabela Ewa; Banaszak, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Automated Guided Vehicles (AGVs) fleet scheduling is one of the big problems in Flexible Manufacturing System (FMS) control. The problem is more complicated when concurrent multi-product manufacturing and resource deadlock avoidance policies are considered. The objective of the research is to pro...

  2. Paso a Paso (Step by Step)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-01

    This podcast encourages people to increase physical activity with original music with a Latino beat. (Este podcast estimula a las personas a aumentar la actividad física usando música original con ritmos latinos.).  Created: 11/1/2007 by National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), a joint program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.   Date Released: 11/26/2007.

  3. Using Technology to Provide Differentiated Instruction for Deaf Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Carol M.; Alpert, Madelon

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge is power. Technological devices provide the new pathway to online learning and student retention. This is especially true for deaf learners, who have difficulty learning with the traditional pedagogies used in teaching. Results of studies have indicated that students using the suggested new technologies become more interested and…

  4. A step by step selection method for the location and the size of a waste-to-energy facility targeting the maximum output energy and minimization of gate fee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakis, Efstathios; Psomopoulos, Constantinos; Kokkotis, Panagiotis; Bourtsalas, Athanasios; Themelis, Nikolaos

    2017-06-23

    This study attempts the development of an algorithm in order to present a step by step selection method for the location and the size of a waste-to-energy facility targeting the maximum output energy, also considering the basic obstacle which is in many cases, the gate fee. Various parameters identified and evaluated in order to formulate the proposed decision making method in the form of an algorithm. The principle simulation input is the amount of municipal solid wastes (MSW) available for incineration and along with its net calorific value are the most important factors for the feasibility of the plant. Moreover, the research is focused both on the parameters that could increase the energy production and those that affect the R1 energy efficiency factor. Estimation of the final gate fee is achieved through the economic analysis of the entire project by investigating both expenses and revenues which are expected according to the selected site and outputs of the facility. In this point, a number of commonly revenue methods were included in the algorithm. The developed algorithm has been validated using three case studies in Greece-Athens, Thessaloniki, and Central Greece, where the cities of Larisa and Volos have been selected for the application of the proposed decision making tool. These case studies were selected based on a previous publication made by two of the authors, in which these areas where examined. Results reveal that the development of a «solid» methodological approach in selecting the site and the size of waste-to-energy (WtE) facility can be feasible. However, the maximization of the energy efficiency factor R1 requires high utilization factors while the minimization of the final gate fee requires high R1 and high metals recovery from the bottom ash as well as economic exploitation of recovered raw materials if any.

  5. Postsecondary Disability Service Providers' Perceptions about Implementing Universal Design for Instruction (UDI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embry, Priscilla B.; Parker, David R.; McGuire, Joan M.; Scott, Sally S.

    2005-01-01

    Sixteen disability service providers from 2-year and 4-year public and private postsecondary institutions were divided into 2 focus groups, each with 8 participants. When asked to share their perspectives on the implementation of Universal Design for Instruction (UDI) on their campus, service providers described strengths and weaknesses of UDI,…

  6. The instruction in pelvic floor exercises provided to women during pregnancy or following delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, L; Glenn, S; Walton, I; Hughes, C

    2001-03-01

    to examine the instruction in pelvic floor exercises given to women during pregnancy or following delivery, to assess the quality of any instruction provided, and to consider these in light of the women's views about the service. a postal questionnaire was sent to a sample of women when they reached 34 weeks of pregnancy and a second at 8 weeks postpartum. A sub-sample of women who reported symptoms of stress incontinence at 8 weeks postpartum were interviewed about the instruction in pelvic floor exercises that they received during their pregnancy, or in the puerperium. of the 918 women who were sent the first questionnaire, 717 returned it completed (78%). Five-hundred-and-seventy-two of 894 women (64%) completed the second questionnaire. Forty-two of 179 symptomatic women (23%) took part in an interview. 55% of women received some form of instruction in pelvic floor exercises by 34 weeks of pregnancy. Eighty-six percent received instruction following birth. The way the information was given varied, ranging from a brief reminder, to exercising in a class with an instructor. The information was provided by a range of health professionals, and no single profession appeared to undertake responsibility for the service. As a result, the views of the service varied. A few women reported that they had received good quality instruction, others were critical of it, and a small number reported that they had received no instruction at all. The widespread practice of leaving a leaflet by the women's beds during their stay in hospital, was criticised by a large proportion of the women. the instruction in pelvic floor exercises by health service professionals was provided on an ad hoc basis. In many instances, the programme of instruction did not meet recommendations made in the literature. It is likely that the success of randomised controlled trials reported in the literature would not be repeated in the 'real world' Implications for practice: there is a need for the service

  7. Administrator Views on Providing Self-Determination Instruction in Elementary and Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Erik W.; Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Jenkins, Abbie B.; Magill, Lauren; Germer, Kathryn; Greiner, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    We report findings from a statewide study of 333 administrators focused on (a) the extent to which they prioritize each of seven self-determination skills, (b) whether and where staff at their schools are providing instruction on these seven skills, and (c) potential avenues for equipping educators to learn strategies for fostering…

  8. 28 CFR 58.25 - Qualifications for approval as providers of a personal financial management instructional course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of a personal financial management instructional course. 58.25 Section 58.25 Judicial Administration... Qualifications for approval as providers of a personal financial management instructional course. (a) Definition... personal financial management instructional course must be in compliance with all applicable laws and...

  9. How Experts and Nonexperts Operate Electronic Equipment from Instructions. Technical Report No. 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieras, David E.; And Others

    Three questions were addressed in a Navy experiment in which subjects followed instructions to complete tasks involving several pieces of electronic equipment. First, two instructional formats were compared; a hierarchical menu format containing natural chunks of instruction was not superior overall to a simple step-by-step instructional format.…

  10. Dental and dental hygiene students' diagnostic accuracy in oral radiology: effect of diagnostic strategy and instructional method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdady, Mariam T; Carnahan, Heather; Lam, Ernest W N; Woods, Nicole N

    2014-09-01

    There has been much debate surrounding diagnostic strategies and the most appropriate training models for novices in oral radiology. It has been argued that an analytic approach, using a step-by-step analysis of the radiographic features of an abnormality, is ideal. Alternative research suggests that novices can successfully employ non-analytic reasoning. Many of these studies do not take instructional methodology into account. This study evaluated the effectiveness of non-analytic and analytic strategies in radiographic interpretation and explored the relationship between instructional methodology and diagnostic strategy. Second-year dental and dental hygiene students were taught four radiographic abnormalities using basic science instructions or a step-by-step algorithm. The students were tested on diagnostic accuracy and memory immediately after learning and one week later. A total of seventy-three students completed both immediate and delayed sessions and were included in the analysis. Students were randomly divided into two instructional conditions: one group provided a diagnostic hypothesis for the image and then identified specific features to support it, while the other group first identified features and then provided a diagnosis. Participants in the diagnosis-first condition (non-analytic reasoning) had higher diagnostic accuracy then those in the features-first condition (analytic reasoning), regardless of their learning condition. No main effect of learning condition or interaction with diagnostic strategy was observed. Educators should be mindful of the potential influence of analytic and non-analytic approaches on the effectiveness of the instructional method.

  11. Providing Students with Foundational Field Instruction within a 50 Minute Class Period: A Practical Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, M.

    2014-12-01

    There is a growing recognition among secondary educators and administrators that students need to have a science education that provides connections between familiar classes like biology, chemistry, and physics. Because of this waxing interest in an integrative approach to the sciences, there is a broader push for school districts to offer classes geared towards the earth sciences, a field that incorporates knowledge and skills gleaned from the three core science subjects. Within the contexts of a regular secondary school day on a traditional schedule (45- to 50-minute long classes), it is challenging to engage students in rigorous field-based learning, critical for students to develop a deeper understanding of geosciences content, without requiring extra time outside of the regular schedule. We suggest instruction using common, manmade features like drainage retention ponds to model good field practices and provide students with the opportunity to calculate basic hydrologic budgets, take pH readings, and, if in an area with seasonal rainfall, make observations regarding soils by way of trenching, and near-surface processes, including mass wasting and the effects of vegetation on geomorphology. Gains in student understanding are discussed by analyzing the difference in test scores between exams provided to the students after they had received only in-class instruction, and after they had received field instruction in addition to the in-class lectures. In an advanced setting, students made measurements regarding ion contents and pollution that allowed the classes to practice lab skills while developing a data set that was analyzed after field work was completed. It is posited that similar fieldwork could be an effective approach at an introductory level in post-secondary institutions.

  12. The Status of Home Intravenous Therapy Instruction Provided by U.S. Schools and Colleges of Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Mary R.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 74 pharmacy schools found under half offered home intravenous (IV) therapy instruction. About 13 percent offered a course primarily devoted to home IV therapy; only two schools required it. Clinical departments were the primary providers, and various instructional resources were used. Additional home health care coursework is…

  13. [Does impact factor influence the ethics of the instructions provided to journal authors?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Renan Kleber Costa; Yamaki, Vitor Nagai; Gonçalves, Thiago Barbosa; Botelho, Nara Macedo; Silva, José Antonio Cordero da

    2013-01-01

    Verify whether a journal's impact factor is a mechanism that modifies the ethical requirements described in the instructions provided to authors of articles published in Brazilian medical journals. 48 selected journals were divided into two groups: impact-factor (n=24), and no-impact-factor (n=24). The number of ethical requirements was compared between both groups based on a specific research protocol, ranging from zero to six points, analyzing the presence of an approval by a research ethics committee; reference to the fact that the research follows the precepts of the Declaration of Helsinki and the rules of Resolution 196/96; use of an informed consent; information about the authors' conflicts of interest; and a request for registration of clinical trials in the Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry. The average score of the impact-factor group was significantly higher than that of the no-impact-factor group (3.12 ± 1.03 vs. 2.08 ± 1.64, p=0.0121). When each ethical requirement was compared between the groups, there was significant difference only between the requirement of an informed consent and the disclosure of conflicts of interest (p impact factor is a determinant factor on the ethics included in the instructions to authors of articles in scientific journals, showing that higher-quality journals seek better-designed articles that are conscientious at the beginning of the research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Targeted Evolution of Embedded Librarian Services: Providing Mobile Reference and Instruction Services Using iPads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellrecht, Elizabeth; Chiarella, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The University at Buffalo Health Sciences Library provides reference and instructional services to support research, curricular, and clinical programs of the University at Buffalo. With funding from an NN/LM MAR Technology Improvement Award, the University at Buffalo Health Sciences Library (UBHSL) purchased iPads to develop embedded reference and educational services. Usage statistics were collected over a ten-month period to measure the frequency of iPad use for mobile services. While this experiment demonstrates that the iPad can be used to meet the library user's needs outside of the physical library space, this article will also offer advice for others who are considering implementing their own program.

  15. The Programed Math Tutorial--Paraprofessionals Provide One-to-one Instruction in Primary School Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronshausen, Nina L.

    The "Programed Math Tutorial" is an approach to individualizing instruction through the use of tutoring by paraprofessionals and peer teaching. Designed for use in the primary grades, the program incorporates training tutors in the determination of acceptable or unacceptable answers. Tutors are given detailed instruction on the use of materials…

  16. Providing Off-Campus Bibliographic Instruction: When Off-Campus Means Someone Else's Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Anita; Long, Maxine M.

    1995-01-01

    Discussion of off-campus bibliographic instruction focuses on the experiences of Genesee Community College (New York) students who receive their bibliographic instruction in the library of the State University of New York College at Geneseo. Topics include cooperation between librarians, and communication between faculty and librarians.…

  17. Step by Step': A Community Based Rehabilitation Project with Disabled Children in Guyana. Bilingual Version = Pas a pas: Un project de readaptation a base communautaire pour les enfants handicapes en Guyane. Version bilingue. Notes, Comments...No. 189.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Brian

    The document, in both English and French, describes a 2-year project in Guyana based on the principle of community-based rehabilitation (CBR), which stresses training local community residents as supervisors to provide training of rehabilitation workers and direct services to children with disabilities living in rural areas. The program provided…

  18. Library Research Instruction for Doctor of Ministry Students: Outcomes of Instruction Provided by a Theological Librarian and by a Program Faculty Member

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles D. Kamilos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At some seminaries the question of who is more effective teaching library research is an open question.  There are two camps of thought: (1 that the program faculty member is more effective in providing library research instruction as he or she is intimately engaged in the subject of the course(s, or (2 that the theological librarian is more effective in providing library research instruction as he or she is more familiar with the scope of resources that are available, as well as how to obtain “hard to get” resources.   What began as a librarian’s interest in determining the extent to which Doctor of Ministry (DMin students begin their research using Google, resulted in the development of a survey.  Given the interesting results returned from the first survey in fall of 2008, the survey was conducted again in the fall of 2011.  The results of the comparative data led to the discovery of some useful data that will be used to adjust future instruction sessions for DMin students.  The results of the surveys indicated that the instruction provided by the theological librarian was more effective as students were more prepared to obtain and use resources most likely to provide the best information for course projects. Additionally, following the instruction of library research skills by the librarian (2011 survey, DMin students were more likely to begin the search process for information resources using university provided catalogs and databases than what was reported in the 2008 survey. The responses to the two surveys piqued interest regarding both eBook use during the research process and the reduction of research frustration to be addressed in a follow-up survey to be given in 2014, results of which we hope to report in a future article.

  19. A step-by-step workflow for low-level analysis of single-cell RNA-seq data with Bioconductor [version 2; referees: 1 approved, 4 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron T.L. Lun

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq is widely used to profile the transcriptome of individual cells. This provides biological resolution that cannot be matched by bulk RNA sequencing, at the cost of increased technical noise and data complexity. The differences between scRNA-seq and bulk RNA-seq data mean that the analysis of the former cannot be performed by recycling bioinformatics pipelines for the latter. Rather, dedicated single-cell methods are required at various steps to exploit the cellular resolution while accounting for technical noise. This article describes a computational workflow for low-level analyses of scRNA-seq data, based primarily on software packages from the open-source Bioconductor project. It covers basic steps including quality control, data exploration and normalization, as well as more complex procedures such as cell cycle phase assignment, identification of highly variable and correlated genes, clustering into subpopulations and marker gene detection. Analyses were demonstrated on gene-level count data from several publicly available datasets involving haematopoietic stem cells, brain-derived cells, T-helper cells and mouse embryonic stem cells. This will provide a range of usage scenarios from which readers can construct their own analysis pipelines.

  20. Effectiveness of a Glasgow Coma Scale instructional video for EMS providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Peter L; Báez, Amado Alejandro; Brabson, Thomas; Burmeister, David D; Kelly, John J

    2002-01-01

    The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is the standard measure used to quantify the level of consciousness of patients who have sustained head injuries. Rapid and accurate GCS scoring is essential. To evaluate the effectiveness of a GCS teaching video shown to prehospital emergency medical services (EMS) providers. Participants and setting--United States, Mid-Atlantic region EMS providers. Intervention--Each participant scored all of the three components of the GCS for each of four scenarios provided before and after viewing a video-tape recording containing four scenarios. Design--Before-and-after single (Phase I) and parallel Cohort (Phase II). Analysis--Proportions of correct scores were compared using chi-square, and relative risk was calculated to measure the strength of the association. 75 participants were included in Phase I. In Phase II, 46 participants participated in a parallel cohort design: 20 used GCS reference cards and 26 did not use the cards. Before observing the instructional video, only 14.7% score all of the scenarios correctly, where as after viewing the video, 64.0% scored the scenarios results were observed after viewing the video for those who used the GCS cards (p = 0.001; RR = 2.0; 95% CI = 1.29 to 3.10) than for those not using the cards (p < 0.0001; RR = 10.0; 95% CI = 2.60 to 38.50). Post-video viewing scores were better than those observed before the video presentation. Ongoing evaluations include analysis of long-term skill retention and scoring accuracy in the clinical environment.

  1. Deconstructing Chronic Low Back Pain in the Older Adult-Step by Step Evidence and Expert-Based Recommendations for Evaluation and Treatment. Part VIII: Lateral Hip and Thigh Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Monica; Camacho-Soto, Alejandra; Cheng, Abby; Havran, Mark; Morone, Natalia E; Rodriguez, Eric; Shega, Joseph; Weiner, Debra K

    2016-06-21

    This article presents an evidence-based algorithm to assist primary care providers with the diagnosis and management of lateral hip and thigh pain in older adults. It is part of a series that focuses on coexisting pain patterns and contributors to chronic low back pain (CLBP) in the aging population. The objective of the series is to encourage clinicians to take a holistic approach when evaluating and treating CLBP in older adults. A content expert panel and a primary care panel collaboratively used the modified Delphi approach to iteratively develop an evidence-based diagnostic and treatment algorithm. The panelists included physiatrists, geriatricians, internists, and physical therapists who treat both civilians and Veterans, and the algorithm was developed so that all required resources are available within the Veterans Health Administration system. An illustrative patient case was chosen from one of the author's clinical practices to demonstrate the reasoning behind principles presented in the algorithm. An algorithm was developed which logically outlines evidence-based diagnostic and therapeutic recommendations for lateral hip and thigh pain in older adults. A case is presented which highlights the potential complexities of identifying the true pain generator and the importance of implementing proper treatment. Lateral hip and thigh pain in older adults can contribute to and coexist with CLBP. Distinguishing the true cause(s) of pain from potentially a myriad of asymptomatic degenerative changes can be challenging, but a systematic approach can assist in identifying and treating some of the most common causes. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. 2016. This work is written by US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. Blogging business step-by-step startup guide

    CERN Document Server

    magazine, Entrepreneur

    2012-01-01

    Blogs are still one of the internet's fastest-growing phenomena--and one of the best and easiest ways to make money online. Packed with the latest blog tools, tricks, and up-and-coming trends, this fully revised edition teaches you the ins and outs of creating an eye-catching blog that captures millions of eyeballs and reaps huge financial rewards--all within hours and with little to no financial investment.We'll reveal:The latest forms of blogging including Twitter/micro-blogging, mobile blogging, and video bloggingHow you can make money as a YouTube partner and develop a YouTube Channel10 pr

  3. Painter 12 for photographers creating painterly images step by step

    CERN Document Server

    Addison, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Transform your photographs into stunning works of art with this fully updated, authoritative guide to the all-new Painter 12. Whether you are new to Painter or a seasoned pro wanting to go further with your digital art, Painter 12 for Photographers will show you how to get the most of Corel's powerful painting software. Starting with the basics and moving on to cover brushes, textures, cloning, toning, and other effects, Martin Addison will help you master the techniques needed to transform photographs into beautiful painterly images. Packed with vivid images to illustrate what can be achieve

  4. Comprehensive intellectual capital management: step-by-step

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Al-Ali, Nermien

    2003-01-01

    ... as a business management approach for the management of human capital, knowledge and intellectual property in the new economy at Franklin Pierce Law Center. It is not only the first course of its kind to be offered at a U.S. law school, but one that offers a comprehensive approach for understanding the emerging field of ICM- hence her Comprehensive...

  5. Tick Removal: A Step-by-Step Guide (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne disease in the United States, but your child's risk ... the site of the bite with soap and water. Step 5: Swab the bite site with ... of disease transmission). Next Steps Call your doctor after the ...

  6. Nonparametric statistics: a step-by-step approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Corder, Gregory W; Foreman, Dale I

    2014-01-01

    .... The book continues to follow the same format in all chapters to aid in reader comprehension, and each chapter begins with a general introduction and a list of the chapter's main learning objectives...

  7. Furniture manufacturing: a step-by-step profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, W L

    1981-07-01

    Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) 25 -- furniture and fixtures manufacturing -- covers a variety of furniture products. These include household furniture, office furniture, and institutional furniture as well as partitions and fixtures. Statistically, household furniture accounts for two-thirds of the establishments, sales, and employment in this SIC category and will be emphasized in this presentation. A profile of the household furniture industry (Table 1) indicates that it is very appropriate to discuss this industry in the context of small plants. With 320,000 employees in 5400 plants, the average plant has less than 60 employees. The largest companies in this industry have fever than 7500 employees and account for less than three percent of the total sales each. Except where furniture manufacturing is a subsidiary or division of a larger company, full-time industrial physicians and hygienists are not employed in this industry. A few of the larger companies have full-time safety managers, and nurses are found in some of the larger plants.

  8. Blogging business step-by-step startup guide

    CERN Document Server

    magazine, Entrepreneur

    2014-01-01

    This kit includes: Essential industry and business-specific startup steps with worksheets, calculators, checklists and more. Entrepreneur Editors' Start Your Own Business, a guide to starting any business and surviving the first three years. Downloadable, customizable business letters, sales letters, and other sample documents. Entrepreneur's Small Business Legal Toolkit. Blogs are still one of the internet's fastest-growing phenomena–and one of the best and easiest ways to make money online. Packed with the latest blog tools, tricks, and up-and-coming trends, this fully revised edition teache

  9. WebSphere Application Server Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Cline, Owen; Van Sickel, Peter

    2012-01-01

    WebSphere Application Server (WAS) is complex and multifaceted middleware used by huge enterprises as well as small businesses. In this book, the authors do an excellent job of covering the many aspects of the software. While other books merely cover installation and configuration, this book goes beyond that to cover the critical verification and management process to ensure a successful installation and implementation. It also addresses all of the different packages-from Express to Network-so that no matter what size your company is, you will be able to successfully implement WAS V6. To de

  10. Nonparametric statistics a step-by-step approach

    CERN Document Server

    Corder, Gregory W

    2014-01-01

    "…a very useful resource for courses in nonparametric statistics in which the emphasis is on applications rather than on theory.  It also deserves a place in libraries of all institutions where introductory statistics courses are taught."" -CHOICE This Second Edition presents a practical and understandable approach that enhances and expands the statistical toolset for readers. This book includes: New coverage of the sign test and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov two-sample test in an effort to offer a logical and natural progression to statistical powerSPSS® (Version 21) software and updated screen ca

  11. Microsoft Office SharePoint Designer 2007 Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Coventry, Penelope

    2008-01-01

    The smart way to learn Office SharePoint Designer 2007-one step at a time! Work at your own pace through the easy numbered steps, practice files on CD, helpful hints, and troubleshooting tips to master the fundamentals of building customized SharePoint sites and applications. You'll learn how to work with Windows® SharePoint Services 3.0 and Office SharePoint Server 2007 to create Web pages complete with Cascading Style Sheets, Lists, Libraries, and customized Web parts. Then, make your site really work for you by adding data sources, including databases, XML data and Web services, and RSS fe

  12. Step by step: finding compensatory order in science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutjens, B.T.; van Harreveld, F.; van der Pligt, J.

    2013-01-01

    People are motivated to maintain the belief that they live in an orderly world in which things are under control. Previous research has shown that perceptions of order can be maintained via two routes: affirming personal control over one’s life and future outcomes, and bolstering one’s belief in

  13. User acceptance testing a step-by-step guide

    CERN Document Server

    Hambling, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Every information system brought into service in every type of organisation requires user acceptance testing. This book is a hands-on manual for non-testing specialists to plan and carry out an effective acceptance test of an information system. It also identifies ways of making the process as simple and cost-effective as possible.

  14. Designing a medical records review tool: an instructional guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell-Henry, Tracy; Cooper, Simon; Endacott, Ruth; Porter, Joanne; Missen, Karen; Sparks, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Medical Records Reviews (MRR) are commonly used in research and quality activities in health care, however, there is a paucity of literature offering a step by step guide to devising a reliable, user-friendly tool. This instructional paper focuses on the stages used to design and implement successful MRR using examples from two reviews in Australian rural hospitals investigating the responses of Registered Nurses to patient deterioration, and guided by time series principals. The MRR were conducted in two rural hospitals in conjunction with a simulation learning intervention where nurses rehearsed clinical management of a deteriorating patient. A six-step template is presented to guide practitioners on how to design and use a MRR tool. When well-planned and appropriately used, MRR provides an excellent means for examining patient outcomes in addition to safety and quality of care.

  15. An Examination of the Instruction Provided in Australian Essay Guides for Students' Development of a Critical Viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Sara

    2017-01-01

    The argumentative essay has endured as a popular form of university assessment, yet students still struggle to meet key intended learning outcomes, such as those associated with critical thinking. This paper presents the results of a study that examines the instruction provided by Australian essay writing guides to support students' development of…

  16. Effectiveness of health instruction provided by student nurses in rural secondary schools of Zimbabwe: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munodawafa, D; Marty, P J; Gwede, C

    1995-02-01

    This demonstration project used student nurses (n = 12) on community deployment to provide health instruction among rural school-age populations in Zimbabwe. A quasi-experimental (pre- and post-test), non-equivalent control group design was used and consisted of 141 school pupils in the intervention group and 144 pupils in the comparison group (N = 285). The curriculum focused on prevention of STDs, HIV/AIDS and drugs (alcohol, tobacco and marijuana). A gain in health knowledge scores among the intervention group was reported at post-test. More than 70% of the pupils who received health instruction from student nurses gave a high approval rating of student nurses' performance. Further, student nurses, teachers and tutors all support school health instruction by student nurses although tutors and teachers differ on teaching about condoms.

  17. Providing Elementary Teachers in South Texas with Professional Development to Improve Earth Science Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, H.; Ellins, K. K.

    2011-12-01

    Through three years of participation in the TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution, an NSF-sponsored teacher professional development program, my knowledge of earth science, new pedagogical approaches, and confidence has improved dramatically. I have also received instructional materials and learned how to access high quality online resources and use a variety of web-based tools. In this session, I will share my experiences and report on how I used my own learning to help both teachers and students to become more earth science literate individuals. Earth Science test scores at the elementary level throughout South Texas are consistently low in comparison to other regions in the state. The majority of the teachers lack the content-knowledge, confidence, or experience to teach Earth Sciences. My TXESS Revolution experience helped me to understand the needs of these teachers and to identify teaching resources that would be useful to them. Particularly noteworthy are TERC's EarthLabs: Earth System Science and GLOBE activities. Although these Earthlab investigations are designed for high schools students, I demonstrated how they could be adapted for elementary students. As a result, I have provided professional development in the Earth Sciences to about 300 South Texas elementary teachers. TXESS Revolution has also equipped me to empower the students I teach. My students this past year presented their challenge Legacy Cycle Project to the community. The TXESS Revolution teamed up with the Texas Water Development Board to deliver training on the implementation of a new online challenged-based curriculum called the Water Exploration Legacy Cycles. This training gave me the tools to guide my students learning through authentic scientific research. To carry out their challenge, students researched an area of interest, read literature, consulted with experts in the field, consider different prospective, and presented their final products via PowerPoint, poster

  18. Knowing How and Knowing Why: testing the effect of instruction designed for cognitive integration on procedural skills transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Jeffrey J H; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan M; Woods, Nicole N; Moulton, Carol-Anne; Ringsted, Charlotte V; Brydges, Ryan

    2017-04-22

    Transfer is a desired outcome of simulation-based training, yet evidence for how instructional design features promote transfer is lacking. In clinical reasoning, transfer is improved when trainees experience instruction integrating basic science explanations with clinical signs and symptoms. To test whether integrated instruction has similar effects in procedural skills (i.e., psychomotor skills) training, we studied the impact of instruction that integrates conceptual (why) and procedural (how) knowledge on the retention and transfer of simulation-based lumbar puncture (LP) skill. Medical students (N = 30) were randomized into two groups that accessed different instructional videos during a 60-min self-regulated training session. An unintegrated video provided procedural How instruction via step-by-step demonstrations of LP, and an integrated video provided the same How instruction with integrated conceptual Why explanations (e.g., anatomy) for key steps. Two blinded raters scored post-test, retention, and transfer performances using a global rating scale. Participants also completed written procedural and conceptual knowledge tests. We used simple mediation regression analyses to assess the total and indirect effects (mediated by conceptual knowledge) of integrated instruction on retention and transfer. Integrated instruction was associated with improved conceptual (p  .05). We did find a positive indirect group effect on skill retention (B ab  = .93, p instruction may improve trainees' skill retention and transfer through gains in conceptual knowledge. Such integrated instruction may be an instructional design feature for simulation-based training aimed at improving transfer outcomes.

  19. A Standard's Guide for the Authoring of Instructional Software. Reference Manual Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Stuart

    This guide gives step-by-step directions for authoring computer-assisted instruction materials as well as advice on planning, designing, coding, documenting, and evaluating computer assisted courseware. The importance of prospective courseware designers having a sound background in both educational theory and practice is also discussed, and…

  20. E-Mail Writing: Providing Background Information in the Core of Computer Assisted Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Behzad; Ninknejad, Sahar

    2015-01-01

    The present study highly supported the effective role of providing background information via email by the teacher to write e-mail by the students in learners' writing ability. A total number of 50 EFL advanced male students aged between 25 and 40 at different branches of Iran Language Institute in Tehran, Tehran. Through the placement test of…

  1. Novel combined patient instruction and discharge summary tool improves timeliness of documentation and outpatient provider satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliam, Meredith; Krein, Sarah L; Belanger, Karen; Fowler, Karen E; Dimcheff, Derek E; Solomon, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Incomplete or delayed access to discharge information by outpatient providers and patients contributes to discontinuity of care and poor outcomes. Objective: To evaluate the effect of a new electronic discharge summary tool on the timeliness of documentation and communication with outpatient providers. Methods: In June 2012, we implemented an electronic discharge summary tool at our 145-bed university-affiliated Veterans Affairs hospital. The tool facilitates completion of a comprehensive discharge summary note that is available for patients and outpatient medical providers at the time of hospital discharge. Discharge summary note availability, outpatient provider satisfaction, and time between the decision to discharge a patient and discharge note completion were all evaluated before and after implementation of the tool. Results: The percentage of discharge summary notes completed by the time of first post-discharge clinical contact improved from 43% in February 2012 to 100% in September 2012 and was maintained at 100% in 2014. A survey of 22 outpatient providers showed that 90% preferred the new summary and 86% found it comprehensive. Despite increasing required documentation, the time required to discharge a patient, from physician decision to discharge note completion, improved from 5.6 h in 2010 to 4.1 h in 2012 (p = 0.04), and to 2.8 h in 2015 (p discharge summary tool improved the timeliness and comprehensiveness of discharge information as needed for the delivery of appropriate, high-quality follow-up care, without adversely affecting the efficiency of the discharge process. PMID:28491308

  2. At the Elbows of Scientists: Shaping Science Teachers' Conceptions and Enactment of Inquiry-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Cheryl A.; MacFadden, Bruce J.

    2014-12-01

    This study stemmed from concerns among researchers that reform efforts grounded in promoting inquiry as the basis for teaching science have not achieved the desired changes in American science classrooms. Many science teachers assume that they are employing inquiry-based strategies when they use cookbook investigations with highly structured step-by-step instructions. Additionally, most science teachers equate hands-on activities with classroom inquiry and, as such, repeatedly use prepackaged, disconnected activities to break the monotony of direct instruction. Despite participation in numerous professional development activities, many science teachers continue to hold misconceptions about inquiry that influence the way they design and enact instruction. To date, there is very limited research exploring the role of inquiry-based professional development in facilitating desired changes in science teachers' conceptions of inquiry. This qualitative study of five high school science teachers explores the ways in which authentic inquiry experiences with a team of scientists in Panama shaped their conceptions and reported enactments of inquiry-based instruction. Our findings suggest that professional development experiences engaging science teachers in authentic research with scientists have the potential to change teachers' naïve conceptions of inquiry, provided that necessary supports are provided for reflection and lesson design.

  3. IBES: A Tool for Creating Instructions Based on Event Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina eMura

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Receiving informative, well-structured, and well-designed instructions supports performance and memory in assembly tasks. We describe IBES, a tool with which users can quickly and easily create multimedia, step-by-step instructions by segmenting a video of a task into segments. In a validation study we demonstrate that the step-by-step structure of the visual instructions created by the tool corresponds to the natural event boundaries, which are assessed by event segmentation and are known to play an important role in memory processes. In one part of the study, twenty participants created instructions based on videos of two different scenarios by using the proposed tool. In the other part of the study, ten and twelve participants respectively segmented videos of the same scenarios yielding event boundaries for coarse and fine events. We found that the visual steps chosen by the participants for creating the instruction manual had corresponding events in the event segmentation. The number of instructional steps was a compromise between the number of fine and coarse events. Our interpretation of results is that the tool picks up on natural human event perception processes of segmenting an ongoing activity into events and enables the convenient transfer into meaningful multimedia instructions for assembly tasks. We discuss the practical application of IBES, for example, creating manuals for differing expertise levels, and give suggestions for research on user-oriented instructional design based on this tool.

  4. Pre-Service Science Teachers' Views about Nuclear Energy with Respect to Gender and University Providing Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, H.; Saracoglu, M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate pre-service science teachers' (PST) views about nuclear energy and to examine what effects, if any, of gender and the university of instruction had on their views. Data were collected through the Risks and Benefits about Nuclear Energy Scale (Iseri, 2012). The sample consisted of 214 PSTs who…

  5. An Analysis of Social Skills Instruction Provided in Teacher Education and In-Service Training Programs for General and Special Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbins, Nicole; Higgins, Kyle; Pierce, Tom; Tandy, Richard D.; Tincani, Matt

    2010-01-01

    An adapted version of the "Teacher/Staff Skillstreaming Checklist" was used to determine the level, type, and area of social skills instruction provided to general and special education teachers. Nine universities participated in the study in which facilitators advertised the adapted questionnaire to licensed general and special education teachers…

  6. Peer Instruction in an Algebra-Based General Physics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listerman, Thomas W.

    1999-10-01

    We have restructured our algebra-based general physics course to increase peer instruction. For the last three years each lecture has been followed by a recitation class. In recitation class students break up into small groups to work on "study guides" concerning the previous lecture. The recitation instructor is available to answer questions and to provide encouragement. The study guides ask qualitative and quantitative questions to lead students step-by-step through the material. Two completed study guides and a homework assignment are submitted each week for grading and the solutions are available later on the internet. Student surveys show the majority of students have a good attitude about the course, like to work in groups with their friends, and like the ready availability of the instructor for help. Both students and faculty seem to like the more frequent one-to-one contact of this format. We have also noticed that one student in each group tends to ask most of the questions and then "translates" the instructor's response into words the others understand. Lest you think "the millenium has arrived," student performance on multiple-choice tests has not improved markedly, some students strongly resist cooperation with others, and many students still think this is the hardest course they have ever taken.

  7. Provide for Student Safety. Second Edition. Module E-5 of Category E--Instructional Management. Professional Teacher Education Module Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    One in a series of 127 performance-based teacher education learning packages focusing on specific professional competencies of vocational teachers, this learning module deals with providing for student safety. It consists of four learning experiences. Covered in the individual learning experiences are the following topics: providing for student…

  8. Supporting students' scientific explanations: A case study investigating the synergy focusing on a teacher's practices when providing instruction and using mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delen, Ibrahim

    Engage students in constructing scientific practices is a critical component of science instruction. Therefore a number of researchers have developed software programs to help students and teachers in this hard task. The Zydeco group, designed a mobile application called Zydeco, which enables students to collect data inside and outside the classroom, and then use the data to create scientific explanations by using claim-evidence-reasoning framework. Previous technologies designed to support scientific explanations focused on how these programs improve students' scientific explanations, but these programs ignored how scientific explanation technologies can support teacher practices. Thus, to increase our knowledge how different scaffolds can work together, this study aimed to portray the synergy between a teacher's instructional practices (part 1) and using supports within a mobile devices (part 2) to support students in constructing explanations. Synergy can be thought of as generic and content-specific scaffolds working together to enable students to accomplish challenging tasks, such as creating explanations that they would not normally be able to do without the scaffolds working together. Providing instruction (part 1) focused on understanding how the teacher scaffolds students' initial understanding of the claim-evidence-reasoning (CER) framework. The second component of examining synergy (part 2: using mobile devices) investigated how this teacher used mobile devices to provide feedback when students created explanations. The synergy between providing instruction and using mobile devices was investigated by analyzing a middle school teacher's practices in two different units (plants and water quality). Next, this study focused on describing how the level of synergy influenced the quality of students' scientific explanations. Finally, I investigated the role of focused teaching intervention sessions to inform teacher in relation to students' performance. In

  9. How to read a chest x-ray – a step by step approach | Voigt | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article is an attempt to give the reader guidance how to read a chest x-ray. There is no perfect way to read an x-ray. However, the important message I would like to give is, to adopt one or the other approach, and to use the chosen approach consistently.

  10. A step-by-step framework to assess benefits of established temperate marine protected areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht Götz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine protected areas (MPAs have been advocated as a solution to the challenges of both conservation and modern fishery management, but their application remains controversial, partly because there are only general guidelines for evaluating their effectiveness. We propose a framework to specifically evaluate established MPAs in six steps. We tested the approach by reviewing published research and unpublished information on the Goukamma MPA in the centre of the South African temperate south coast. Information reviewed included effects on the structure of fish populations, catch and abundance indices of fish species, and ecosystem effects. We investigated factors that determine the usefulness of a MPA in fisheries management, including the movement behaviour of adult fishes, larval dispersal and fisher-displacement patterns. We found that differences in the rates of exploitation across the MPA border resulted in differences in abundance, size and condition of the main target species, roman (Chrysoblephus laticeps. The diversity and abundance of non-target fish species, and the composition of the benthic invertebrate community, were affected by the cessation of fishing. The potential for "spillover" of adult roman might be limited to the vicinity of the MPA by their small home range, but there is potential for self-seeding and dispersal of roman eggs and larvae over wider areas. These theoretical considerations were confirmed by an analysis of catch data from before and after MPA implementation. The framework presented here may help to identify and fill gaps in the knowledge of established MPAs along South Africa's temperate south coast.

  11. Microsoft® SQL Server® 2008 MDX Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Bryan; Consulting, Hitachi

    2009-01-01

    Teach yourself the Multidimensional Expressions (MDX) query language-one step at a time. With this practical, learn-by-doing tutorial, you'll build the core techniques for using MDX with Analysis Services to deliver high-performance business intelligence solutions. Discover how to: Construct and execute MDX queriesWork with tuples, sets, and expressionsBuild complex sets to retrieve the exact data users needPerform aggregation functions and navigate data hierarchiesAssemble time-based business metricsCustomize an Analysis Services cube through the MDX scriptImplement dynamic security to cont

  12. Microsoft® SQL Server® 2008 Analysis Services Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Teach yourself to use SQL Server 2008 Analysis Services for business intelligence-one step at a time. You'll start by building your understanding of the business intelligence platform enabled by SQL Server and the Microsoft Office System, highlighting the role of Analysis Services. Then, you'll create a simple multidimensional OLAP cube and progressively add features to help improve, secure, deploy, and maintain an Analysis Services database. You'll explore core Analysis Services 2008 features and capabilities, including dimension, cube, and aggregation design wizards; a new attribute relatio

  13. A step-by-step plan to manage and measure adding value by FM/CREM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Voordt, Theo; Jensen, Per Anker; Hoendervanger, Jan Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To present a new Value Adding Management model in order to support decision makers in identifying appropriate interventions to add value to the organisation, to manage its implementation, and to measure the output and outcomes. Theory The paper builds on value adding management theories...... different European countries present a state of the art of theory and research on 12 value parameters, how to manage and measure each value, and to discuss the costs and benefits of typical FM and CREM interventions to enhance satisfaction, image, culture, health and safety, productivity, adaptability...... and models including the triplet input-throughput-output, a distinction between output, outcome and added value, the Plan-Do-Act-Check cycle, change management and performance measurement. Design/methodology/approach Literature review and a cross-chapter analysis of a forthcoming book, where authors from...

  14. Surface Aesthetics in Tip Rhinoplasty: A Step-by-Step Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakır, Barış; Öreroğlu, Ali Rıza; Daniel, Rollin K

    2014-08-01

    Tip rhinoplasty is a key component of aesthetic rhinoplasty. An understanding of the correlation between tip surface aesthetics and the underlying anatomic structures enables proper identification and correction of tip abnormalities. Surface aesthetics of the attractive nose are created by certain lines, shadows, and highlights with specific proportions and breakpoints. In this Featured Operative Technique, the authors describe a stepwise process for tip rhinoplasty that conceptualizes aesthetic subunits as geometric polygons to define the existing deformity, the operative plan, and the aesthetic goals. Tip rhinoplasty is described in detail, from initial markings through incisions and dissection. The autorim graft concept is explained, and lateral crural steal and footplate setback techniques are described for the attainment of symmetric domes with correct lateral crural resting angles. Methods in columellar reconstruction are described, including creating the columella (C') breakpoint and the infralobular caudal contour graft. The principal author (B.Ç.) has applied these techniques to 257 consecutive "polygon rhinoplasties" over the past 3 years. © 2014 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc.

  15. Practical recording techniques the step-by-step approach to professional audio recording

    CERN Document Server

    Bartlett, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Hands-on practical guide covering all aspects of recording, ideal for beginning and intermediate recording engineers, producers, musicians and audio enthusiasts. Filled with tips and shortcuts, this book offers advice on equipping a home studio (both low-budget and advanced), suggestions for set-up, acoustics, choosing monitor speakers, and preventing hum. This best-selling guide also tells how to judge recordings and improve them to produce maximum results. New material covered in the 5th edition to include: * complete revision and update of dig

  16. Treatment of Antibody-Mediated Renal Allograft Rejection: Improving Step by Step

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Lachmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the past years we stepwise modified our immunosuppressive treatment regimen for patients with antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR. Here, we describe three consecutive groups treated with different regimens. From 2005 until 2008, we treated all patients with biopsy-proven ABMR with rituximab (500 mg, low-dose (30 g intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG, and plasmapheresis (PPH, 6x (group RLP, n=12. Between 2009 and June 2010, patients received bortezomib (1.3 mg/m2, 4x together with low-dose IVIG and PPH (group BLP, n=11. In July 2010, we increased the IVIG dose and treated all subsequent patients with bortezomib, high-dose IVIG (1.5 g/kg, and PPH (group BHP, n=11. Graft survival at three years after treatment was 73% in group BHP as compared to 45% in group BLP and 25% in group RLP. At six months after treatment median serum creatinine was 2.1 mg/dL, 2.9 mg/dL, and 4.2 mg/dL in groups BHP, BLP, and RLP, respectively (p=0.02. Following treatment, a significant decrease of donor-specific HLA antibody (DSA mean fluorescence intensity from 8467±6876 to 5221±4711 (p=0.01 was observed in group BHP, but not in the other groups. Our results indicate that graft survival, graft function, and DSA levels could be improved along with stepwise modifications to our treatment regimen, that is, the introduction of bortezomib and high-dose IVIG treatment.

  17. How to read a chest x-ray – a step by step approach

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    System Administrator

    This article is an attempt to give the reader guidance how to read a chest x-ray. There is no perfect way to read an x-ray. However, the important message I would like to give is, to adopt one or the other approach, and to use the chosen approach consistently. ➢ Check patient details. - First name, surname, date of birth.

  18. Real astronomy with small telescopes step-by-step activities for discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Gainer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This book demonstrates the use of an 80mm refractor and shows how it can be used as a real scientific instrument. Users will find many activities and projects suitable for an 80mm refractor or 90mm reflector or Maksutov that have not been published elsewhere.

  19. The neurotoxic mechanisms of amphetamine: Step by step for striatal dopamine depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Che-Se; Chang, Shang-Tang; Huang, Chuen-Lin; Huang, Nai-Kuei

    2017-02-03

    Amphetamine (AMPH) is a commonly abused psychostimulant that induces neuronal cell death/degeneration in humans and experimental animals. Although multiple neurotoxic mechanisms of AMPH have been intensively investigated, the interplay between these mechanisms has remained elusive. In this study, we used a rat model of AMPH-induced long-lasting striatal dopamine (DA) depletion and identified mechanisms of neurotoxicity, energy failure, excitotoxicity, and oxidative stress. Pretreatment with nicotinamide (NAM, a co-factor for the electron transport chain) blocked AMPH-induced free radical formation, energy failure, and striatal DA decrease. Also, MK-801 (a NMDA receptor antagonist) blocked AMPH-induced free radical formation and striatal DA but not energy failure decrease, indicating excitotoxicity may occur before free radical formation and after energy failure. Thus, these results show that during AMPH intoxication, energy failure, excitotoxicity, and free radical formation are orchestrated consecutively to mediate the depletion of striatal DA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Quality for Global Knowledge-Intensive Organizations: A Step-by-Step Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, Jan M.; Walter, Monika

    Learning and education as well as knowledge-intensive work processes have become more and more internationalized. Knowledge workers are distributed around the world, study programs are exported across borders, and learners work in globally distributed groups. However, the quality of their work differs in many cases. In this paper, an approach to manage quality within the process of internationalization for globally distributed knowledge-intensive organizations (such as universities) is presented. A particular focus is the field of e-Learning. The key quality factors for internationalization of global learning are defined and examples for quality criteria resulting from these factors are introduced.

  1. How to read a chest x-ray – a step by step approach

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    System Administrator

    the important message I would like to give is, to adopt one or the other approach, and to use the chosen approach ... diaphragm, consider infiltrate or effusion. ➢ If film is taken in erect or upright position you may see .... Undernutrition in Adults and Children: causes, consequences and what we can do. Ann Burgess MPH* ...

  2. Step-By-Step In Vitro Mutagenesis: Lessons From Fucose-Binding Lectin PA-IIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrázková, Jana; Malinovská, Lenka; Wimmerová, Michaela

    2017-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis is a powerful technique which is used to understand the basis of interactions between proteins and their binding partners, as well as to modify these interactions. Methods of rational design that are based on detailed knowledge of the structure of a protein of interest are often used for preliminary investigations of the possible outcomes which can result from the practical application of site-directed mutagenesis. Also, random mutagenesis can be used in tandem with site-directed mutagenesis for an examination of amino acid "hotspots."Lectins are sugar-binding proteins which, among other functions, mediate the recognition of host cells by a pathogen and its adhesion to the host cell surface. Hence, lectins and their binding properties are studied and engineered using site-directed mutagenesis.In this chapter, we describe a site-directed mutagenesis method used for investigating the sugar binding pattern of the PA-IIL lectin from the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Moreover, procedures for the production and purification of PA-IIL mutants are described, and several basic methods for characterizing the mutants are discussed.

  3. Algal biomass conversion to bioethanol - a step-by-step assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harun, Razif; Yip, Jason W S; Thiruvenkadam, Selvakumar; Ghani, Wan A W A K; Cherrington, Tamara; Danquah, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    The continuous growth in global population and the ongoing development of countries such as China and India have contributed to a rapid increase in worldwide energy demand. Fossil fuels such as oil and gas are finite resources, and their current rate of consumption cannot be sustained. This, coupled with fossil fuels' role as pollutants and their contribution to global warming, has led to increased interest in alternative sources of energy production. Bioethanol, presently produced from energy crops, is one such promising alternative future energy source and much research is underway in optimizing its production. The economic and temporal constraints that crop feedstocks pose are the main downfalls in terms of the commercial viability of bioethanol production. As an alternative to crop feedstocks, significant research efforts have been put into utilizing algal biomass as a feedstock for bioethanol production. Whilst the overall process can vary, the conversion of biomass to bioethanol usually contains the following steps: (i) pretreatment of feedstock; (ii) hydrolysis; and (iii) fermentation of bioethanol. This paper reviews different technologies utilized in the pretreatment and fermentation steps, and critically assesses their applicability to bioethanol production from algal biomass. Two different established fermentation routes, single-stage fermentation and two-stage gasification/fermentation processes, are discussed. The viability of algal biomass as an alternative feedstock has been assessed adequately, and further research optimisation must be guided toward the development of cost-effective scalable methods to produce high bioethanol yield under optimum economy. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. SPSS survival manual a step by step guide to data analysis using SPSS

    CERN Document Server

    Pallant, Julie

    2010-01-01

    In this thoroughly revised edition of her bestselling text, now covering up to version 18 of the SPSS software, Julie Pallant guides you through the entire research process, helping you choose the right data analysis technique for your project.

  5. Developing a Successful Coaching Philosophy: A Step-by-Step Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Mullem, Pete; Brunner, Dave

    2013-01-01

    The coaching profession demands a high level of accountability and responsibility for the coach. Challenged to achieve success on the scoreboard and promote the positive personal growth of the athlete, a coach seeks guidance from their coaching philosophy. A coaching philosophy is built on a set of standards by which a coach influences, teaches,…

  6. Step by Step Implementation of Knowledge Sharing for Library In Indonesian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nove E. Variant Anna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak. Knowledge sharing banyak diyakini sebagai kegiatan yang mampu mendorong kreativitas dan terciptanya inovasi bagi sebuah organisasi. Banyak organisasi yang memiliki inisiatif menerapkan knowledge sharing demi terciptanya inovasi. Paper ini ingin memberikan wacana bagi perpustakaan yang ingin mengimplementasikan knowledge sharing di perpustakaan. Paper ini terdiri dari pemaparan dan analisis kondisi perpustakaan dan implementasi knowledge sharig di perpustakaan, teknologi yang mendukung knowledge sharing. Langkah-langkah yang bisa diimplementasikan dalam knowledge sharing antara lain dengan menciptakan leader dan champion, menciptakan budaya sharing dan trust antar pegawai, menciptakan office layout yang mendorong terjadinya kolaborasi, dan memberikan motivasi bagi para pegawai agar mau berpartisipasi dalam knowledge sharing. Metode yang digunakan pada paper ini adalah studi pustaka dengan menelusur sumber informasi baik dari jurnal, artikel, berita, studi kasus, dan standar terkait knowledge sharing.   Kata kunci: knowledge sharing, knowledge sharing di perpustakaan, perpustakaan, strategi knowledge sharing   Abstract. Knowledge sharing is believed to be an activity that is able to encourage creativity and create innovation in an organization. Many organizations have the initiative to implement knowledge sharing in order to create innovations. This paper proposes a discourse for libraries that want to implement knowledge sharing. This paper explains and analyzes the condition of the library and the implementation of knowledge sharing in the library and the technology that supports knowledge sharing. The steps that can be implemented in knowledge sharing include creating leaders and champions, creating sharing culture and trust among employees, creating office layout which encourage collaboration and motivating the employees to participate in knowledge sharing. This paper used literature study to search sources of information from journals, articles, news, case studies and standards related to knowledge sharing.   Keywords: knowledge sharing, library, knowledge sharing strategies

  7. A Step-by-Step Conservative Approach for CAD-CAM Laminate Veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán Ojeda, Gerardo; Henríquez Gutiérrez, Ismael; Guzmán Marusic, Álvaro; Báez Rosales, Abelardo; Tisi Lanchares, José Pablo

    2017-01-01

    The use of CAD/CAM technology has allowed the fabrication of ceramic restorations efficiently and with predictable results. Lithium disilicate is a type of glass ceramic material that can be used for the elaboration of laminate veneers, being monolithic restorations which require characterization through a covering ceramic in order to achieve acceptable esthetic results. The next case report shows a predictable clinical protocol for the rehabilitation of the anterior teeth through the preparation of CAD/CAM veneers (e.max CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent, Liechtenstein) which have been characterized by a nanofluorapatite ceramic (e.max Ceram, Ivoclar Vivadent, Liechtenstein) through the layering technique.

  8. A Step-by-Step Conservative Approach for CAD-CAM Laminate Veneers

    OpenAIRE

    Gerardo Durán Ojeda; Ismael Henríquez Gutiérrez; Álvaro Guzmán Marusic; Abelardo Báez Rosales; José Pablo Tisi Lanchares

    2017-01-01

    The use of CAD/CAM technology has allowed the fabrication of ceramic restorations efficiently and with predictable results. Lithium disilicate is a type of glass ceramic material that can be used for the elaboration of laminate veneers, being monolithic restorations which require characterization through a covering ceramic in order to achieve acceptable esthetic results. The next case report shows a predictable clinical protocol for the rehabilitation of the anterior teeth through the prepara...

  9. A Step-by-Step Conservative Approach for CAD-CAM Laminate Veneers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Durán Ojeda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of CAD/CAM technology has allowed the fabrication of ceramic restorations efficiently and with predictable results. Lithium disilicate is a type of glass ceramic material that can be used for the elaboration of laminate veneers, being monolithic restorations which require characterization through a covering ceramic in order to achieve acceptable esthetic results. The next case report shows a predictable clinical protocol for the rehabilitation of the anterior teeth through the preparation of CAD/CAM veneers (e.max CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent, Liechtenstein which have been characterized by a nanofluorapatite ceramic (e.max Ceram, Ivoclar Vivadent, Liechtenstein through the layering technique.

  10. A Step-by-Step Conservative Approach for CAD-CAM Laminate Veneers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henríquez Gutiérrez, Ismael; Guzmán Marusic, Álvaro; Báez Rosales, Abelardo; Tisi Lanchares, José Pablo

    2017-01-01

    The use of CAD/CAM technology has allowed the fabrication of ceramic restorations efficiently and with predictable results. Lithium disilicate is a type of glass ceramic material that can be used for the elaboration of laminate veneers, being monolithic restorations which require characterization through a covering ceramic in order to achieve acceptable esthetic results. The next case report shows a predictable clinical protocol for the rehabilitation of the anterior teeth through the preparation of CAD/CAM veneers (e.max CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent, Liechtenstein) which have been characterized by a nanofluorapatite ceramic (e.max Ceram, Ivoclar Vivadent, Liechtenstein) through the layering technique. PMID:28884029

  11. Step by Step: How Your Schools Can Live through the Tragedy of Teen Suicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Claire

    1987-01-01

    To deal with rising teen suicide and attempted suicide, this Michigan school system developed a comprehensive crisis response plan encouraging greater communication with students, parents, and school staff members and involving immediate response by trained professionals and followup procedures to stabilize the school community. (WTH)

  12. Microsoft® SQL Server® 2008 Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Hotek, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Teach yourself SQL Server 2008-one step at a time. Get the practical guidance you need to build database solutions that solve real-world business problems. Learn to integrate SQL Server data in your applications, write queries, develop reports, and employ powerful business intelligence systems.Discover how to:Install and work with core components and toolsCreate tables and index structuresManipulate and retrieve dataSecure, manage, back up, and recover databasesApply tuning plus optimization techniques to generate high-performing database applicationsOptimize availability through clustering, d

  13. Step-by-step manual for planning and performing bifurcation PCI: a resource-tailored approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milasinovic, Dejan; Wijns, William; Ntsekhe, Mpiko; Hellig, Farrel; Mohamed, Awad; Stankovic, Goran

    2017-11-28

    As bifurcation PCI can often be resource demanding due to the use of multiple guidewires, balloons and stents, different technical options are sometimes being explored, in different local settings, to meet the need of optimally treating a patient with a bifurcation lesion, while being confronted with limited material resources. Thereby, it seems important to keep a proper balance between what is recognized as the contemporary state-of-the-art, and, what is known as potentially harmful, and to be discouraged. Ultimately, the resource-tailored approach to bifurcation PCI may be characterized by the notion of minimum technical requirements for each step of a successful procedure. Hence, this paper describes the logical sequence of steps when performing bifurcation PCI with provisional SB stenting, starting with basic anatomy assessment and ending with the optimization of MB stenting and the evaluation of the potential need to stent the SB, suggesting, for each step, the minimum technical requirement of a successful intervention.

  14. The art of scientific storytelling transform your research manuscript using a step-by-step formula

    CERN Document Server

    Luna, Rafael E

    2013-01-01

    We all want our research to have an impact and to be cited by others. There are thousands of research articles published in our respective fields. How do we get someone to read our publications? This book shows you how to put your Title and Abstract into a story, along with the rest of your manuscript. Your research will stand out in a sea of peer-review publications, since it will be forged into a Scientific Story. As a research fellow in the laboratory of Professor Gerhard Wagner at Harvard Medical School, Dr. Luna was collaborating with four other top-notch laboratories in an interdisciplinary research effort to understand the end of the scanning mechanism required for protein synthesis in cells. They were sitting on a mound of research data collected by the various laboratories with varying expertise. This super-collaboration consisted of Physicists, Biologists, Structural Biologists, Biochemists, Chemists, a Computer Scientist, and a Chemical Engineer. There was so much data; yet they struggled to fashio...

  15. Diabetic foot and exercise therapy: step by step the role of rigid posture and biomechanics treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Piergiorgio; Gulisano, Massimo; Anichini, Roberto; Seghieri, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    Lower extremity ulcers represent a serious and costly complication of diabetes mellitus. Many factors contribute to the development of diabetic foot. Peripheral neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease are the main causes of foot ulceration and contribute in turn to the growth of additional risk factors such as limited joint mobility, muscular alterations and foot deformities. Moreover, a deficit of balance, posture and biomechanics can be present, in particular in patients at high risk for ulceration. The result of this process may be the development of a vicious cycle which leads to abnormal distribution of the foot's plantar pressures in static and dynamic postural conditions. This review shows that some of these risk factors significantly improve after a few weeks of exercise therapy (ET) intervention. Accordingly it has been suggested that ET can be an important weapon in the prevention of foot ulcer. The aim of ET can relate to one or more alterations typically found in diabetic patients, although greater attention should be paid to the evaluation and possible correction of body balance, rigid posture and biomechanics. Some of the most important limitations of ET are difficult access to therapy, patient compliance and the transitoriness of the results if the training stops. Many proposals have been made to overcome such limitations. In particular, it is important that specialized centers offer the opportunity to participate in ET and during the treatment the team should work to change the patient's lifestyle by improving the execution of appropriate daily physical activity.

  16. Action research: A practical step-by-step guide for Agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agricultural extension professionals lag behind their counterparts in research and training institutions with regard to conducting research and generating new knowledge. This is mainly because conventional research methods are not appropriate for field practitioners whose main preoccupation is improving livelihoods of ...

  17. Step-by-step external fixation of unstable pelvis with separate anterior and posterior modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Viktorovich Borozda

    2016-02-01

    Conclusions: The modular approach applied is the advantage of the transosseous osteosynthesis allowing for a separate anterior (anti-shock fixation and final posterior reposition of the pelvic ring preceded by the stabilization of vital functions. The above mentioned method gives an opportunity to increase the amount of techniques applied for the pelvic external fixation in polytrauma cases.

  18. Generating regionalized neuronal cells from pluripotency, a step-by-step protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Agnete eKirkeby; Jenny eNelander; Malin eParmar

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells possess the potential to generate cells for regenerative therapies in patients with neurodegenerative diseases, and constitute an excellent cell source for studying human neural development and disease modeling. Protocols for neural differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells have undergone significant progress during recent years, allowing for rapid and synchronized neural conversion. Differentiation procedures can further be combined with accurate and effici...

  19. Microsoft® Windows® Communication Foundation Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Sharp, John

    2009-01-01

    Teach yourself the essentials of Windows Communication Foundation-one step at a time. With this practical tutorial, you get hands-on guidance for creating the Web services you need to implement robust business applications for Windows. Discover how to: Build and host a Web service Design service contracts and data contractsMaintain state information and support transactionsProgrammatically configure bindings and endpoints Use load-balancing and perform content-based message routingImplement message encryption, authentication, authorizationOptimize performance with service throttling, encodi

  20. The grouting handbook a step-by-step guide for foundation design and machinery installation

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Donald M

    2013-01-01

    Minimize loss of revenue and the downtime of critical assets by avoiding foundation cracking, poor bonds, and initial alignment changes. After their successful introduction as a maintenance material, machinery grouts are now being used for equipment placement in new construction. While certainly suitable for both markets and applications, a successful installation depends on proper grout selection, application, foundation preparation, and forming methods. Therefore, guidelines on their uses and limitations are needed for engineers and maintenance personnel. Based on 45 years of field experi

  1. Creating a Healthier Life: A Step-By-Step Guide to Wellness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... play in the lives of others—like being students, friends, parents, spouses, coworkers, congregants, hobbyists, community members, ... even be avoiding the news at night, or spending less time online. You, as the expert on ...

  2. A step-by-step guide to visual circuit assembly in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjieconomou, Dafni; Timofeev, Katarina; Salecker, Iris

    2011-02-01

    The ability of vertebrates and insects to perceive and process information about the visual world is mediated by neural circuits, which share a strikingly conserved architecture of reiterated columnar and layered synaptic units. Recent genetic approaches conferring single-cell resolution have enabled major advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular strategies that orchestrate visual circuit assembly in Drosophila. Photoreceptor axon targeting relies on a sequence of interdependent developmental steps to achieve temporal coordination with the formation and maturation of partner neurons. Distinct targeting events depend on anterograde and autocrine signaling, neuron-glia interactions, axon tiling and the timely expression of homophilic cell surface molecules. These mediate local adhesive or repulsive interactions of photoreceptor axons with each other and with target neurons. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Implementing a stronger patient safety program using the Internet takes step-by-step planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, T

    2001-11-01

    Just over a year ago at the 104-bed Baylor Medical Center at Grapevine in Texas, supporting patient safety meant mostly relying on paper to get the job done. Now, it means going online to report adverse events and close calls--and promote patient safety.

  4. A step-by-step guide for countries conducting a Technology Needs Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haselip, James Arthur; Narkeviciute, Rasa; Rogat Castillo, Jorge Enrique

    The purpose of this document is to summarise the various steps in the implementation of a TNA, serving as the ‘go-to’ document for national coordinators and consultants. It also points to the various materials that are available to further guide and support project management and methodology. For...

  5. Instructional Ventures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Prus

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Beyond promoting a mode of ethnographic inquiry that is conceptually informed and rigorously attentive to the actualities of human lived experience, this article encourages a more sustained, comparative analysis of the ways that administrators and instructors deal with education as a collectively developed venture. After (a establishing an analytic frame for a more comprehensive approach to education as a socially engaged process, this article focuses on (b the administration of educational programs and (c providing instruction as activity “in the making,” using an ethnographic study of two Protestant Christian seminaries as an empirical, illustrative case. While providing an agenda for examining the ways that people generate and sustain instructional ventures in any educational context, the material presented here also represents an important focal point for theoretically, conceptually, and methodologically integrating research that attends to the ways that instructional (administrative and teaching activities are accomplished in practice.

  6. Instructional Media

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experiments on using Instructional Television. Most experiments compare instruction using TV, with the conventional classroom instruction by the teacher. The findings are clear. ... scientific reliability, and all of these showed no significant difference.

  7. ACTUAL REQUIREMENTS REGARDING THE INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL AT AN EUROPEAN AND INTERNATIONAL LEVEL. THE ASSESSMENT OF QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS IN ORGANISATIONS PROVIDING INSTRUCTION SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danut Neacsu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The European Union Council had and still has in view the profound changes taking place in society: globalization represents for Europe a competitors intensification in all the economical sectors, while the developing and the diversification of the information technologies can lead to a radical change of the whole learning and educational system, opening the perspectives for learning possibilities and accumulating knowledge during all one’s life. The topic actuality of this article consist from the fact that, due to the globalization and the international competition intensification the request for workers with a low qualification level decreases; the new jobs presuppose high performances, flexibility, stress on qualities such as: high level of performance, creativity, openness to change, initiative. People will be obliged to possess much more knowledge, competences and they will have to work in multi spheres teams. Of course that not all the people can become conceptual analysts, something like this cannot be required, but an adaptation to the new system, to the new economy is required. At present, more and more people work in domains in which information is created. In the future this percent will grow. The utilizing on a large scale of machines and installations will determine that even workers from the basic domains to be better and better prepared. In the countries OECD the unemployment rate is higher for the persons with a second education, unlike the persons with a higher education, the manpower being in this way forced to become more qualified. On the other hand, as more and more work is taking place at an intellectual level, the detaining and manipulating of information becomes an essential quality for each employee. This article has as a main objective the highlighting of actual requirements regarding the quality assurance in instruction services at an European and international level. Thus, the permanent learning strategies from the

  8. Machine Shop Operations--2. Milling Machine, Heat Treatment of Metals, and Grinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currao, Joseph; Usarzewicz, Louis

    This manual was prepared for the student who plans to enter the machine shop field. The 20 selected jobs provide the student with knowledge and step-by-step procedures for the operation of milling machines. The text is organized so that each job has an objective, tools needed, step-by-step instructions, a progress quiz, and space for reference,…

  9. Applying learning theories and instructional design models for effective instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohammed K; Elkhider, Ihsan A

    2016-06-01

    Faculty members in higher education are involved in many instructional design activities without formal training in learning theories and the science of instruction. Learning theories provide the foundation for the selection of instructional strategies and allow for reliable prediction of their effectiveness. To achieve effective learning outcomes, the science of instruction and instructional design models are used to guide the development of instructional design strategies that elicit appropriate cognitive processes. Here, the major learning theories are discussed and selected examples of instructional design models are explained. The main objective of this article is to present the science of learning and instruction as theoretical evidence for the design and delivery of instructional materials. In addition, this article provides a practical framework for implementing those theories in the classroom and laboratory. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  10. ARS-Media for excel instruction manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARS-Media for Excel Instruction Manual is the instruction manual that explains how to use the Excel spreadsheet ARS-Media for Excel application. ARS-Media for Excel Instruction Manual is provided as a pdf file....

  11. Instructional Leadership Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, James W., Ed.; Jenkins, John M., Ed.

    Instructional leadership is the principal's role in providing direction, resources, and support to teachers and students for the improvement of teaching and learning in the school. This handbook reviews factors affecting that role in four broad domains: keeping informed about trends, planning for instructional improvement, implementing…

  12. Applying Learning Theories and Instructional Design Models for Effective Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohammed K.; Elkhider, Ihsan A.

    2016-01-01

    Faculty members in higher education are involved in many instructional design activities without formal training in learning theories and the science of instruction. Learning theories provide the foundation for the selection of instructional strategies and allow for reliable prediction of their effectiveness. To achieve effective learning…

  13. Individual Differences, Computers, and Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayersman, David J.; Minden, Avril von

    1995-01-01

    Provides a conceptual foundation for the development of hypermedia as an instructional tool for addressing individual differences in learning styles. Highlights include a literature review; computers and instruction; individual differences, computers, and instruction; cognitive controls; cognitive styles and learning; personality types; and future…

  14. Research methodology: a step by step guide for beginners Ranjit Kumar Research methodology: a step by step guide for beginners Sage £26.99 440pp 9781849203012 1849203016 [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    THIS IS a practical introductory text for healthcare students with minimal understanding of the research process. The focus of the text integrates quantitative and qualitative methodologies through the following operational steps.

  15. The Potential of Directed Instruction to Teach Effectively Technology Usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Hosseini

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Currently, teacher educational systems tend to develop their teacher’s knowledge to effectively integrate technology in teaching. Consequently, numerous studies have attempted to describe strategies, models and approaches to develop teachers’ knowledge for teaching with technology. However, most teachers are still following their traditional teaching methods regarding their cultural, individual and situational conditions. While teaching technology in traditional form and separated from pedagogy and content has already shown its failure in many studies, this study suggests an advanced directed instruction teaching model for preparing teachers for teaching with technology. In this study, directed instruction teaching model offers a step-by-step process to individually guide pre-service teachers how to infuse the appropriate technology for teaching the selected content. Subsequently, Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK is selected to define and measure technology integration. The result of this study demonstrated that participating teachers learned technology integration in the new directed setting as well as a constructivist setting. In particular, this study pointed out how the suggested directed instructional teaching model could be easily situated in the traditional setting and helped non-constructivist teacher educators in collaborative or individual learning.

  16. Document Ordering through Lockheed's DIALOG and SDC's ORBIT--A User's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Mary Margaret; Laszlo, George A.

    1980-01-01

    Provides step-by-step instructions for ordering documents online through DIALOG and ORBIT, including some helpful hints. Tables show database or independent document suppliers; list ordering commands, with examples; and explain optional commands, for the two retrieval systems. (SW)

  17. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Professionals Detecting Oral Cancer: A Guide for Health Care Professionals A step-by-step, illustrated guide for health professionals that provides instruction on examining the mouth ...

  18. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professionals A step-by-step, illustrated guide for health professionals that provides instruction on examining the mouth for signs of oral cancer. For Patients and the Public Oral Cancer Pamphlet that describes the risk factors, ...

  19. Bowel cancer screening: how to take the test (English and 10 translations)

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2010-01-01

    Format: 6 page A5 leaflet Target group: Prospective participants in the Northern Ireland Bowel cancer screening programme Description: This leaflet provides step by step instructions on using the Faecal Occult Blood test (FOBt) for bowel cancer screening.

  20. The hands-on guide for science communicators: a step-by-step approach to public outreach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christensen, Lars Lindberg

    2007-01-01

    ... fundamental research, the taxpayer must get something back. Communication is essential - not only because of some vague "obligation", but for the long term benefit of people working in the areas of astronomy, spaceflight and physics. So long as the general public is interested in these areas of research they will accept the need to pay for it. Easy, right? Well, at least in theory. Unfortunately, there are many players out there who obviously haven't got the message. Many institutions, agencies, observatories...

  1. A step-by-step dual cycle sequencing method for unit-load automated storage and retrieval systems

    OpenAIRE

    Hachemi, Khalid; Sari, Zaki; Ghouali, Noureddine

    2012-01-01

    The sequencing of requests in an automated storage and retrieval system was the subject of many studies in literature. However, these studies assumed that the locations of items to be stored and retrieved are known and the sequencing problem consisted in determining a route of minimal travel time between these locations. In reality, for a retrieval request, an item can be in multiple locations of the rack and so there is a set of locations associated with this item and not only one predetermi...

  2. How To Adapt a Measuring Instrument for Use with Various Culture Groups: A Practical Step-by-Step Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ede, Dorette M.

    1996-01-01

    Outlines steps in adapting tests for cross-cultural use: selection of an appropriate instrument for adaptation; translation of the source instrument; selecting an experimental design; determining administration parameters; pilot testing; and assessing psychometric equivalence. Focuses on potential problems during the adaptation process and on…

  3. Cleaning Method for VLF Cooling Water System Development and History of Application With Step-by-Step Procedure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lamontagne, Robert

    2000-01-01

    .... Chemical analysis of the black solid showed it to be copper (II) oxide CuO. This result implied uncontrolled corrosion in these systems and it was apparent that the following efforts were needed...

  4. Step-by-step vascular naming algorithms for a precise understanding of major anomalies in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindoh, Junichi; Satou, Shoichi; Aoki, Taku; Kawaguchi, Yoshikuni; Beck, Yoshifumi; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2012-01-01

    To establish an objective and precise vascular naming method to explore the segmental anatomy of the liver with major anomalies using three dimensional (3D) simulations. Two algorithms, "Alternative vascular visualization method" (Algorithm A) and "Cholecystic axis based definition" (Algorithm B), were devised. Twenty livers with typical anatomy and four anomalous cases were screened by six masked physicians using a blinded protocol. After confirming the feasibility in subjects with a typical anatomy, the accuracies of the algorithms were tested in anomalous cases. Using conventional 3D screening, the accuracies of the portal and hepatic venous definitions were 40.6% and 61.1%, respectively. However, after the introduction of the presently reported algorithms, these results improved to 83.4% and 83.4%, respectively, for Algorithm A, and 88.5% and 83.3%, respectively, for Algorithm B. In particular, the accuracy was further improved to nearly 100% when the naming process was started from the larger side of the liver in Algorithm A. The present study confirmed that Algorithm A enables the precise vascular definitions when the process is started from the larger side of the liver. This method may be a useful tool for anatomic exploration of liver with major anomalies.

  5. Surface functionalizing of a lipid nanosystem to promote brain targeting: step-by-step design and physico-chemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cózar-Bernal, M J; García-Esteban, E; Sánchez-Soto, P J; Rabasco, A M; González-Rodríguez, M L

    2016-11-01

    The use of lipid nanosystems as drug delivery to the central nervous system may be advantageous over the current strategies. The aim of this study was to develop and characterize functionalized liposomes for treatment of brain diseases. The covalent method of coupling IgG to liposomes via the derivatized lipid 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[4-(p-maleimidophenyl)butyramide](MPB-PE) was investigated. Optimized coupling conditions are shown to result in the efficient conjugation of IgG to liposomes containing low concentrations of MPB-PE (3/1 SH:IgG). The qualitative analysis has shown that after the extrusion process, more homogeneous populations of vesicles have been obtained with a nanometric size suitable to be effective to further anchor the protein. Negative values of zeta potential demonstrate that they are stable systems. Lyophilization was used to maintain the stability of the formulation. These very interesting results encourage further investigations to formulate peptide- and protein-loaded immunoliposomes, making targeting of liposomes as an attractive approach for brain drug delivery.

  6. Step by step control of a deep drawing process with piezo-electric actuators in serial operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bäume Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the design-driven increase in complexity of forming car body parts, it becomes more difficult to ensure a stable forming process. Piezoelectric actuators can influence the material flow of stamping parts effectively. In this article the implementation of piezoelectric actuators in a large scale sheet metal forming tool of a car manufacturer is described. Additionally, it is shown that part quality can be assessed with the help of triangulation laser sensors, which are mounted on the blankholder. The resulting flange draw-in signals were used to reduce the occurrence of wrinkling or the rate of cracking. It was shown that process control improved the quality of the stamping parts significantly.

  7. Data Set for: Step-by-Step Calculation and Spreadsheet Tools for Predicting Stressor Levels that Extirpate Genera and Species

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The data includes measured data from Ecoregions 69 and 70 in West Virginia. Paired biological and chemical grab samples are included. These data were used to...

  8. A current perspective on cancer immune therapy: step-by-step approach to constructing the magic bullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Errico, Gabriele; Machado, Heather L; Sainz, Bruno

    2017-12-01

    Immunotherapy is the new trend in cancer treatment due to the selectivity, long lasting effects, and demonstrated improved overall survival and tolerance, when compared to patients treated with conventional chemotherapy. Despite these positive results, immunotherapy is still far from becoming the perfect magic bullet to fight cancer, largely due to the facts that immunotherapy is not effective in all patients nor in all cancer types. How and when will immunotherapy overcome these hurdles? In this review we take a step back to walk side by side with the pioneers of immunotherapy in order to understand what steps need to be taken today to make immunotherapy effective across all cancers. While early scientists, such as Coley, elicited an unselective but effective response against cancer, the search for selectivity pushed immunotherapy to the side in favor of drugs focused on targeting cancer cells. Fortunately, the modern era would revive the importance of the immune system in battling cancer by releasing the brakes or checkpoints (anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1/PD-L1) that have been holding the immune system at bay. However, there are still many hurdles to overcome before immunotherapy becomes a universal cancer therapy. For example, we discuss how the redundant and complex nature of the immune system can impede tumor elimination by teeter tottering between different polarization states: one eliciting anti-cancer effects while the other promoting cancer growth and invasion. In addition, we highlight the incapacity of the immune system to choose between a fight or repair action with respect to tumor growth. Finally we combine these concepts to present a new way to think about the immune system and immune tolerance, by introducing two new metaphors, the "push the accelerator" and "repair the car" metaphors, to explain the current limitations associated with cancer immunotherapy.

  9. Imaging atrial septal defects by real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography: step-by-step approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saric, Muhamed; Perk, Gila; Purgess, Jan R; Kronzon, Itzhak

    2010-11-01

    There are currently no standardized three-dimensional (3D) transesophageal echocardiographic (TEE) views of the interatrial septum and atrial septal defects (ASDs). Without a standardized approach, it is difficult to ascertain the important anatomic relationships (such as the location of the aortic rim of an ASD), to perform relevant measurements (such as the size of an ASD or the size of its rims), or to guide the deployment of catheters and devices during atrial septal closure. Using a 3D TEE matrix-array transducer, 706 TEE studies were performed over a 14-month period. The purpose of the study was to develop a standardized protocol for anatomically correct orientation of 3D TEE images of the interatrial septum and ASDs. Among 706 TEE studies, there were 23 patients with ASDs, representing 3.3% of the study population. Eighteen patients had secundum ASDs, two had primum ASDs, and three had sinus venosus ASDs of the superior vena cava type. A protocol for properly orienting 3D TEE images of the interatrial septum and ASDs was developed. When the images are acquired at an angle of 0°, the septum is properly oriented by the tilt-up-then-left maneuver. The initial 3D TEE image in first tilted up to reveal the right atrial side of the septum. Then the image is tilted 180° around its vertical axis to reveal the left atrial side of the septum; the aortic rim is on the left, the superior vena cava on the top, and the right-sided pulmonary vein ostia on the right side of the screen. For acquisitions at a higher angle, the rotate-left-in-z-axis maneuver is used. The image is first tilted up to reveal the right atrial side of the septum, as in the tilt-up-then-left maneuver. The image is then rotated counterclockwise in the z axis until the superior vena cave is at 12 o'clock. Finally, the image is tilted 180° around its vertical axis to reveal the left atrial side of the septum. The use of standardized tilt-up-then-left and rotate-left-in-z-axis maneuvers enhances the diagnosis of ASDs, ascertains the important anatomic relationships of ASDs to surrounding structures, and facilitates communication between echocardiographers obtaining 3D TEE images and interventional cardiologists or cardiac surgeons performing ASD closures. Copyright © 2010 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Hands-On Guide For Science Communicators A Step-By-Step Approach to Public Outreach

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Lars Lindberg

    2007-01-01

    Lars Lindberg Christensen is a science communication specialist and works in Munich, Germany, as head of communication for the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope in Europe. Many people know something about communication – it is after all an innate human ability – but a full comprehension of how to do science communication effectively is not acquired easily. This Guide touches upon all aspects of science communication, revealing a tightly interwoven fabric of issues: product types, target groups, written communication, visual communication, validation processes, practices of efficient workflow, distribution, promotion, advertising and much more. New science communicators will find this Guide both helpful and inspirational. "I am overwhelmed at how thorough and how well thought-through this book is. Even with my regular relationships with popular communication and with public relations officers, I hadn’t realized how well documented the field could be until I saw it done here." -Jay M. Pasachoff, Williams Co...

  11. Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation in Toxicology: A Step-by-Step Guide to Increasing Efficiency, Reducing Variability, and Expanding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histone modifications work in concert with DNA methylation to regulate cellular structure, function, and the response to environmental stimuli. More than 130 unique histone modifications have been described to date and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) allows for the explorat...

  12. Plant DNA Detection from Grasshopper Guts: A Step-by-Step Protocol, from Tissue Preparation to Obtaining Plant DNA Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Avanesyan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: A PCR-based method of identifying ingested plant DNA in gut contents of Melanoplus grasshoppers was developed. Although previous investigations have focused on a variety of insects, there are no protocols available for plant DNA detection developed for grasshoppers, agricultural pests that significantly influence plant community composition. Methods and Results: The developed protocol successfully used the noncoding region of the chloroplast trnL (UAA gene and was tested in several feeding experiments. Plant DNA was obtained at seven time points post-ingestion from whole guts and separate gut sections, and was detectable up to 12 h post-ingestion in nymphs and 22 h post-ingestion in adult grasshoppers. Conclusions: The proposed protocol is an effective, relatively quick, and low-cost method of detecting plant DNA from the grasshopper gut and its different sections. This has important applications, from exploring plant “movement” during food consumption, to detecting plant–insect interactions.

  13. Plant DNA detection from grasshopper guts: A step-by-step protocol, from tissue preparation to obtaining plant DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanesyan, Alina

    2014-02-01

    A PCR-based method of identifying ingested plant DNA in gut contents of Melanoplus grasshoppers was developed. Although previous investigations have focused on a variety of insects, there are no protocols available for plant DNA detection developed for grasshoppers, agricultural pests that significantly influence plant community composition. • The developed protocol successfully used the noncoding region of the chloroplast trnL (UAA) gene and was tested in several feeding experiments. Plant DNA was obtained at seven time points post-ingestion from whole guts and separate gut sections, and was detectable up to 12 h post-ingestion in nymphs and 22 h post-ingestion in adult grasshoppers. • The proposed protocol is an effective, relatively quick, and low-cost method of detecting plant DNA from the grasshopper gut and its different sections. This has important applications, from exploring plant "movement" during food consumption, to detecting plant-insect interactions.

  14. Explicit Instruction Elements in Core Reading Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Child, Angela R.

    2012-01-01

    Classroom teachers are provided instructional recommendations for teaching reading from their adopted core reading programs (CRPs). Explicit instruction elements or what is also called instructional moves, including direct explanation, modeling, guided practice, independent practice, discussion, feedback, and monitoring, were examined within CRP reading lessons. This study sought to answer the question: What elements of explicit instruction or instructional moves are included in the five most...

  15. Psychologism and Instructional Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, Bekir S.; Wiley, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Little of the work in critical and hermeneutical psychology has been linked to instructional technology (IT). This article provides a discussion in order to fill the gap in this direction. The article presents a brief genealogy of American IT in relation to the influence of psychology. It also provides a critical and hermeneutical framework for…

  16. To Change the Things I Can: Making Instruction More Intensive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Nathan A.; Reed, Deborah K.

    2017-01-01

    When students do not respond adequately to core instruction, teachers must provide instruction and intervention that is more intensive and, therefore, more effective. However, for many educators, it is often unclear what it means to intensify instruction and how intensive instruction differs from high-quality core instruction. This article…

  17. Editorial - Instructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastberg, Peter; Grinsted, Annelise

    2007-01-01

    Why you may wonder - have we chosen a topic which at first glance may seem trivial, and even a bit dull? Well, looks can be deceiving, and in this case they are! There are many good reasons for taking a closer look at instructions.......Why you may wonder - have we chosen a topic which at first glance may seem trivial, and even a bit dull? Well, looks can be deceiving, and in this case they are! There are many good reasons for taking a closer look at instructions....

  18. Instruction of Disabled Learners: A Reading Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartain, Harry W.

    1976-01-01

    Reading instruction for learning disabled students is discussed, with emphasis on the instruction provided by the general classroom teacher and by the reading specialist with cooperation from other personnel. (IM)

  19. Motivational Measure Of The Instruction Compared: 
Instruction Based On The Arcs Motivation Theory 
V.S. Traditional Instruction In Blended Courses

    OpenAIRE

    COLAKOGLU, Ozgur M.; Omur AKDEMIR

    2015-01-01

    The ARCS Motivation Theory was proposed to guide instructional designers and teachers who develop their own instruction to integrate motivational design strategies into the instruction. There is a lack of literature supporting the idea that instruction for blended courses if designed based on the ARCS Motivation Theory provides different experiences for learners in terms of motivation than instruction developed following the standard instructional design procedure for blended courses. Thi...

  20. Paratransit: An Instructional Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalici, Anthony

    A concept-based introduction to paratransit is provided in this instructional module for undergraduate and graduate transportation-related courses for disciplines such as engineering, business, marketing, and technology. The concept of paratransit generally refers to modes of transportation other than mass transit and solo-driven automobiles. The…

  1. Coordinating Supplemental Reading Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeney, Theresa A.

    2008-01-01

    Although supplemental reading services are meant to improve reading achievement of struggling readers and students with reading disabilities, without concerted effort to ensure communication and coordination with in-school instruction, they may fall short of their desired mark. To promote learning, it is critical that any services provided outside…

  2. Inclusive differentiated instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerković Ljiljana S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inclusive differentiated instruction is a new model of didactic instruction, theoretically described and established in this paper for the first time, after being experimentally verified through teaching of the mother tongue (instruction in reading and literature. Inclusive individually planned instruction is based on a phenomenological and constructivist didactic instructional paradigm. This type of teaching is essentially developmental and person-oriented. The key stages of inclusive differentiated instruction of literature are: 1 recognition of individual students' potential and educational needs regarding reading and work on literary texts; 2 planning and preparation of inclusive individually planned instruction in reading and literature; 3 actual class teaching of lessons thus prepared; and 4 evaluation of the student achievement following inclusive differentiated instruction in reading and literature. A highly important element of the planning and preparation of inclusive differentiated instruction is the creation of student profiles and inclusive individualized syllabi. Individualized syllabi specify the following: 1. a brief student profile; 2. the student position on the continuum of the learning outcomes of instruction in the Serbian language; 3. reverse-engineered macro-plan stages of instruction in the Serbian language (3.1. identifying expected outcomes and fundamental qualities of learners' work, 3.2. defining acceptable proofs of their realisation, 3.3. planning learning and teaching experiences, and 3.4. providing material and technical requisites for teaching; 4 the contents and procedure of individualized lessons targeting the student; 5 a plan of syllabus implementation monitoring and evaluation. The continuum of the learning outcomes of inclusive differentiated instruction in literature exists at three main levels, A, B and C. The three levels are: A reading techniques and learning about the main literary theory concepts; B

  3. Explicit Instruction Elements in Core Reading Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, Angela R.

    2012-01-01

    Classroom teachers are provided instructional recommendations for teaching reading from their adopted core reading programs (CRPs). Explicit instruction elements or what is also called instructional moves, including direct explanation, modeling, guided practice, independent practice, discussion, feedback, and monitoring, were examined within CRP…

  4. Absolute and Relative Measures of Instructional Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Alexander; Hartig, Johannes; Hochweber, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Valid inferences on teaching drawn from students' test scores require that tests are sensitive to the instruction students received in class. Accordingly, measures of the test items' instructional sensitivity provide empirical support for validity claims about inferences on instruction. In the present study, we first introduce the concepts of…

  5. Introducing Maya 2011

    CERN Document Server

    Derakhshani, Dariush

    2010-01-01

    A practical, step-by-step guide to Maya 2011. Four previous editions can't be wrong: this book is the perfect introduction to 3D and Maya. Learn to build and animate your own digital models and scenes with step-by-step instruction and fun and practical examples, while you draw inspiration from the striking examples included from talented Maya users. You'll create a simple animation of the planets in the solar system, learn to model a human hand and a decorative box?among other projects?and master all essential tools.: Provides a thorough, step-by-step introduction to Maya 2011; Explains the co

  6. Designing the Implementation of Model and Instructional Media

    OpenAIRE

    Mawardi Mawardi

    2018-01-01

    The indicator of a professional teachers is the extent to which the teachers has the ability to design instructional well. A good instructional design will effectively achieve the instructional objectives that have been set. The problem that arises is that there is a signal that the teachers implement the learning without first doing systematic instructional design. This paper aims to provide guidance on how instructional components are designed. The instructional components include instructi...

  7. A New Robotics Instructional Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Singer, Neal

    1985-01-01

    An instructional robotics laboratory that is unique in the United States was created in 1984 at the University of New Mexico. Descriptions of the laboratory, course work offered, student projects, and other areas are provided. (JN)

  8. Advancing Climate Literacy through Investment in Science Education Faculty, and Future and Current Science Teachers: Providing Professional Learning, Instructional Materials, and a Model for Locally-Relevant and Culturally-Responsive Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halversen, C.; Apple, J. K.; McDonnell, J. D.; Weiss, E.

    2014-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) call for 5th grade students to "obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect Earth's resources and environment". Achieving this, and other objectives in NGSS, will require changes in the educational system for both students and teachers. Teachers need access to high quality instructional materials and continuous professional learning opportunities starting in pre-service education. Students need highly engaging and authentic learning experiences focused on content that is strategically interwoven with science practices. Pre-service and early career teachers, even at the secondary level, often have relatively weak understandings of the complex Earth systems science required for understanding climate change and hold alternative ideas and naïve beliefs about the nature of science. These naïve understandings cause difficulties in portraying and teaching science, especially considering what is being called for in NGSS. The ACLIPSE program focuses on middle school pre-service science teachers and education faculty because: (1) the concepts that underlie climate change align well with the disciplinary core ideas and practices in NGSS for middle grades; and (2) middle school is a critical time for capturing students interest in science as student engagement by eighth grade is the most effective predictor of student pursuit of science in high school and college. Capturing student attention at this age is critical for recruitment to STEM careers and lifelong climate literacy. THE ACLIPSE program uses cutting edge research and technology in ocean observing systems to provide educators with new tools to engage students that will lead to deeper understanding of the interactions between the ocean and climate systems. Establishing authentic, meaningful connections between indigenous and place-based, and technological climate observations will help generate a more holistic perspective

  9. Types of verbal interaction with instructable robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crangle, C.; Suppes, P.; Michalowski, S.

    1987-01-01

    An instructable robot is one that accepts instruction in some natural language such as English and uses that instruction to extend its basic repertoire of actions. Such robots are quite different in conception from autonomously intelligent robots, which provide the impetus for much of the research on inference and planning in artificial intelligence. Examined here are the significant problem areas in the design of robots that learn from vebal instruction. Examples are drawn primarily from our earlier work on instructable robots and recent work on the Robotic Aid for the physically disabled. Natural-language understanding by machines is discussed as well as in the possibilities and limits of verbal instruction. The core problem of verbal instruction, namely, how to achieve specific concrete action in the robot in response to commands that express general intentions, is considered, as are two major challenges to instructability: achieving appropriate real-time behavior in the robot, and extending the robot's language capabilities.

  10. Using an Instructional Design Model to Teach Medical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Lawrence

    Educators are often tasked with developing courses and curricula that teach learners how to perform medical procedures. This instruction must provide an optimal, uniform learning experience for all learners. If not well designed, this instruction risks being unstructured, informal, variable amongst learners, or incomplete. This article shows how an instructional design model can help craft courses and curricula to optimize instruction in performing medical procedures. Educators can use this as a guide to developing their own course instruction.

  11. Designing the Instructional Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, L. L.

    2000-01-01

    Designing the instructional interface is a challenging endeavor requiring knowledge and skills in instructional and visual design, psychology, human-factors, ergonomic research, computer science, and editorial design. This paper describes the instructional interface, the challenges of its development, and an instructional systems approach to its…

  12. Data Recipes: Easy-to-Follow Instructions for Using SAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, C.; Laurencelle, J. C.; Drew, L.; Myers, A.

    2016-12-01

    To make synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data more user friendly, the Alaska Satellite Facility DAAC has created a growing library of online data recipes. The ASF DAAC offers SAR data from more than a dozen datasets, increasingly used by researchers for applications as varied as mapping wetlands, analyzing volcanic eruptions, measuring subsidence, following sea-ice movements, and tracking the paths of oil spills into sensitive marshes. Yet because learning how to use SAR data can seem intimidating or difficult, many researchers in relevant Earth sciences never access ASF's 25 year, 2.5 petabyte archive of day/night all-weather earth images. The data recipes help address this issue. With varied combinations of written instructions, scripts, pictures, and videos, the recipes give users step-by-step instructions for accomplishing discrete tasks. Recipe difficulty is rated and labeled from "Easier" to "More Advanced" with ski-slope type symbols. Recipe examples include creating a regional inundation map; radiometrically terrain correcting Sentinel-1A data using either a GUI or a script; viewing RTC power images in a GIS environment; and radiometrically terrain correcting ERS-1, ERS-2, JERS-1, RADARSAT-1, and ALOS PALSAR images using ASF MapReady software.

  13. Learning, Teaching and Assessing Dance in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sherif, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Many physical educators have limited dance experience and may lack the skills, knowledge and confidence to teach dance in their school programs. Yet, including dance units in physical education curriculums can provide positive experiences for students who may not enjoy traditional instruction. This article provides step-by-step instructions for…

  14. Metabolic Instruction of Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Michael D; Sowell, Ryan T; Kaech, Susan M; Pearce, Erika L

    2017-05-04

    Choices have consequences. Immune cells survey and migrate throughout the body and sometimes take residence in niche environments with distinct communities of cells, extracellular matrix, and nutrients that may differ from those in which they matured. Imbedded in immune cell physiology are metabolic pathways and metabolites that not only provide energy and substrates for growth and survival, but also instruct effector functions, differentiation, and gene expression. This review of immunometabolism will reference the most recent literature to cover the choices that environments impose on the metabolism and function of immune cells and highlight their consequences during homeostasis and disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Software Engineering Design Principles Applied to Instructional Design: What Can We Learn from Our Sister Discipline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Nor Hafizah; Ritzhaupt, Albert D.

    2018-01-01

    The failure of many instructional design initiatives is often attributed to poor instructional design. Current instructional design models do not provide much insight into design processes for creating e-learning instructional solutions. Given the similarities between the fields of instructional design and software engineering, instructional…

  16. Standardized instructions urged for OCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    FDA has developed standardized, simplified instructions for all brands of combined estrogen and progestogen oral contraceptives (OCs) to help reduce unplanned pregnancies. FDA asked manufacturers in April to incorporate these changes into patient package inserts as soon as possible. Since current instructions vary significantly from brand to brand, problems can occur when women switch brands and compare instructions. If they become confused, women may either take the pills incorrectly or stop altogether, risking an unwanted pregnancy. In addition to reducing patients' confusion about correct use, the new recommended instructions reflect current research on the effective use of OCs. An important change concerns when women should start taking pills. The new instructions provide only 2 options (current instructions provide more): either start on day 1 of the next normal menstrual cycle ("Day 1 Start") or on the 1st Sunday after the next cycle begins ("Sunday Start"). Although the "Sunday Start" option is popular, the "Day 1 Start" has been shown to be more effective since back-up contraceptive methods are not required for the 1st week, as they are for the "Sunday Start." Other changes in the patient package insert simplify and clarify the instructions when different numbers of pills are missed. Any patient who is unsure about what to do when pills are missed is told to use a back-up method of birth control and to keep taking pills with hormones until she van consult with a health professional. The new labeling also advises women to consult a health professional regarding other methods of contraception if taking a daily pill is a problem. These new directions for patients are for combination pills and do not apply to progestin-only OCs. FDA is still developing new labeling for them. FDA's Fertility and Maternal Health Advisory Committee recommended on FEb. 8, 1991, that the agency ask manufacturers of OCs to make these changes in the patient package insert. full text

  17. A Model for Designing Library Instruction for Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Angela Doucet

    2013-01-01

    Providing library instruction in distance learning environments presents a unique set of challenges for instructional librarians. Innovations in computer-mediated communication and advances in cognitive science research provide the opportunity for designing library instruction that meets a variety of student information seeking needs. Using a…

  18. 34 CFR 300.172 - Access to instructional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... provide books for adult blind,” approved March 3, 1931, 2 U.S.C. 135a; (ii) National Instructional... instructional materials to blind persons or other persons with print disabilities, in a timely manner after... Secretary that it will provide instructional materials to blind persons or other persons with print...

  19. Setting Curricular Priorities for Students with Visual Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueck, Amanda Hall

    1999-01-01

    Presents a step-by-step method for identifying curricular priorities for students who are visually impaired once a comprehensive educational assessment has been completed. This methodological approach to analyzing instruction needs provides data to substantiate informed decisions about what to teach and the amount of instruction time required. (CR)

  20. Houghton Mifflin Reading©. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2015

    2015-01-01

    "Houghton Mifflin Reading"© is a reading program designed for grades K-6. The program provides step-by-step instruction in reading using Big Books (fiction and nonfiction literature), anthologies, Read Aloud books, and audio compact discs. The product is designed to be used as a full-year curriculum program with instruction on developing…

  1. Fluency Interventions for Developmental Readers: Repeated Readings and Wide Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari, Omer

    2011-01-01

    Despite recent findings that show fluency deficits in developmental readers, the field of developmental reading remains remiss in fluency instruction. This article provides a summary intended to increase college reading teachers' understanding of reading fluency and fluency instruction. In addition, included are the step-by-step procedures of…

  2. ARES: automated response function code. Users manual. [HPGAM and LSQVM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maung, T.; Reynolds, G.M.

    1981-06-01

    This ARES user's manual provides detailed instructions for a general understanding of the Automated Response Function Code and gives step by step instructions for using the complete code package on a HP-1000 system. This code is designed to calculate response functions of NaI gamma-ray detectors, with cylindrical or rectangular geometries.

  3. For Whom the Theories Toil. 1996 Reston Prize Winner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Gaye Leigh

    1996-01-01

    Charts a step-by-step path from the pedagogical theories of teacher education to an effective and engaging method of classroom instruction using excerpts from Ernest Hemingway's "For Whom the Bell Tolls," as illustrative guideposts. Provides cogent, insightful, and productive ideas for improving classroom instruction. (MJP)

  4. Scientific Writing: A Blended Instructional Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, MaryAnn; Olson, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Scientific writing is composed of a unique skill set and corresponding instructional strategies are critical to foster learning. In an age of technology, the blended instructional model provides the instrumental format for student mastery of the scientific writing competencies. In addition, the course management program affords opportunities for…

  5. Processing Instruction: A Review of Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasuki, Muhlisin

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides a critical review of Processing Instruction (PI). This type of instructional option was specifically designed to help second/foreign language (L2) learners grasp meaning manifested in the use of particular grammatical forms in a target language effectively through the provision of input. In this way, PI attempts to help…

  6. Are Individual Differences Undertreated in Instructional Design?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gropper, George L.

    2015-01-01

    Instructional design can be more effective if it is as fixedly dedicated to the accommodation of individual differences as it currently is to the accommodation of subject matters. That is the hypothesis. A menu of accommodation options is provided that is applicable at each of three stages of instructional development or administration: before,…

  7. Instructional Design Processes and Traditional Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasser, Nichole

    2010-01-01

    Traditional colleges who have implemented distance education programs would benefit from using instructional design processes to develop their courses. Instructional design processes provide the framework for designing and delivering quality online learning programs in a highly-competitive educational market. Traditional college leaders play a…

  8. Individualizing Instruction in Spelling: A Practical Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Roger A.; Floyd, Barbara J.

    This book outlines a plan for individualizing instruction in spelling. Part 1 describes how to organize and manage the program and provides examples of instructional materials. Part 2 concerns the ways that students learn to spell words as they work within this individualized spelling program. The appendixes which comprise over half the document,…

  9. USING GOOGLE+ FOR INSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin YEE

    Full Text Available Introduced in July, 2011 in a beta test of invited users only, the new social media service Google+ (or G+ quickly spread by word of mouth, and Google leader Larry Page (2011 blogged that within sixteen days it had 10 million users. By August, it had 25 million users (Cashmore, 2011. Even with slower growth ahead (still with no marketing budget, the service looks likely to crest 100 million users perhaps as early as ten months, a feat that took Facebook three years. Other social networks, most notably Facebook and Twitter, have been used increasingly as instructional tools, since they are platforms with which students are already familiar (Maloney, 2007; McLoughlin & Lee, 2007. Selwyn (2009 found that students often eschew official channels for communication in favor of less formal community-based formats such as Facebook, implying a growing need for instructional communication tools that will be used willingly by students. The question is whether Google+ can be used like Twitter or Facebook to augment instruction, or even, perhaps, to improve upon those predecessors for academic purposes. Google+ is like Twitter in that anyone can follow a given user’s posts. There is no direct “friend” relationship required to read the posts written by others. However, it also approximates some features of Facebook. Rather than friends sorted into “lists” like in Facebook, Google+ allows users to place feeds into one or more “circles,” the better to monitor (or control the flow of information to and from different audiences. Circles are more intuitive, and more central to the experience, than the Facebook lists. They provide an explicit organizational structure, compared to the less-obvious listing functionality, which feels like an afterthought, found in Facebook.

  10. Classes of Instructional Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigeluth, Charles M.; Merrill, M. David

    1979-01-01

    Describes three classes of variables which should be considered when one is designing instructional materials, doing research on instruction, or developing better methods of instruction, and proposes a classification scheme which is summarized in the last of the 13 figures that illustrate the article. A blbliography is included. (Author/RAO)

  11. Cement Mason's Curriculum. Instructional Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendirx, Laborn J.; Patton, Bob

    To assist cement mason instructors in providing comprehensive instruction to their students, this curriculum guide treats both the skills and information necessary for cement masons in commercial and industrial construction. Ten sections are included, as follow: related information, covering orientation, safety, the history of cement, and applying…

  12. Market Segmentation: An Instructional Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Peter H.

    A concept-based introduction to market segmentation is provided in this instructional module for undergraduate and graduate transportation-related courses. The material can be used in many disciplines including engineering, business, marketing, and technology. The concept of market segmentation is primarily a transportation planning technique by…

  13. Learning Strategy Instruction Innovation Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumaker, Jean B.

    2011-01-01

    One way of helping students with learning disabilities and other struggling students to be independent life-long learners is to teach them how to use learning strategies in efficient ways. Learning strategy instruction can provide students the opportunity to succeed in today's schools and meet rigorous standards, transforming ineffective learners…

  14. Transportation Brokerage: An Instructional Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Linda

    A concept-based introduction to transportation brokerage is provided in this instructional module for undergraduate and graduate transportation-related courses for disciplines such as engineering, business, marketing, and technology. The concept of transportation brokerage is defined as an assignment of the management of a specific element of a…

  15. Preparing Instructional Leaders: A Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazer, S. David; Bauer, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This article proposes a model that provides one means of making instructional leadership the central focus of leadership preparation. It draws from conceptualizations of teaching and learning as well as organizational and leadership theory to advocate for greater coherence in education leadership programs. Conceptual Argument: We begin…

  16. New Approaches to String Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teaching Music, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Maintains that use of the Suzuki, Orff, and Dalcroze methods have assisted string teachers in helping music students achieve mastery from the beginning of instruction. Describes how these methods are used by five music teachers. Includes addresses of organizations that provide information about these music teaching methods. CFR)

  17. A Step by Step Approach for Evaluating the Reliability of the Main Engine Lube Oil System for a Ship's Propulsion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Anantharaman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Effective and efficient maintenance is essential to ensure reliability of a ship's main propulsion system, which in turn is interdependent on the reliability of a number of associated sub- systems. A primary step in evaluating the reliability of the ship's propulsion system will be to evaluate the reliability of each of the sub- system. This paper discusses the methodology adopted to quantify reliability of one of the vital sub-system viz. the lubricating oil system, and development of a model, based on Markov analysis thereof. Having developed the model, means to improve reliability of the system should be considered. The cost of the incremental reliability should be measured to evaluate cost benefits. A maintenance plan can then be devised to achieve the higher level of reliability. Similar approach could be considered to evaluate the reliability of all other sub-systems. This will finally lead to development of a model to evaluate and improve the reliability of the main propulsion system.

  18. A step-by-step tutorial on using the cognitive architecture ACT-R in combination with fMRI data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, Jelmer P.; Anderson, John R.

    The cognitive architecture ACT-R is at the same time a psychological theory and a modeling framework for constructing cognitive models that adhere to the principles of the theory. ACT-R can be used in combination with fMRI data in two different ways: (1) fMRI data can be used to evaluate and

  19. Sustainable Materials Management (SMM) Web Academy Webinar Series: A Step-by-Step Guide to Conducting a Wasted Food Assessment with the Reducing Wasted Food & Packaging Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a webinar page for the Sustainable Management of Materials (SMM) Web Academy webinar titled Let’s WRAP (Wrap Recycling Action Program): Best Practices to Boost Plastic Film Recycling in Your Community

  20. Modified one-stage dorsal-inlay buccal mucosa graft technique for ventral penile urethral and penile skin erosion: A step-by-step guide

    OpenAIRE

    Van Putte, Lennert; De Win, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the use of a modified single-stage technique for the repair of a ventral penile urethral erosion with involvement of the penile skin, as penile urethral erosion is a rare but potential complication of chronic indwelling catheterisation with a lack of available recommendations for reconstructive options. Patient and methods A 44-year-old male with paraplegia, neurogenic bladder dysfunction and chronic sacral decubitus, presented with a large mid-penile erosion of the v...

  1. Introducing ultrasound-guided vein catheterization into clinical practice: A step-by-step guide for organizing a hands-on training program with inexpensive handmade models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Domenico, S; Licausi, M; Porcile, E; Piaggio, F; Troilo, B; Centanaro, M; Valente, U

    2008-12-01

    Central vein catheterization (CVC) plays a central role in hospital patient management. Compared with the use of traditional anatomical landmarks, ultrasound-guidance is associated with higher CVC success rates, fewer complications, and more rapid central venous access. The use of US-guided CVC in clinical practice has not become widespread, largely because anesthesiology and general surgery residents receive limited training in this technique. To increase the use of US-guided CVC in our surgical department, we organized a hands-on training program based on the use of handmade models. Three different models were constructed using plastic food-storage containers, segments of rubber tourniquet and silastic tubing (to simulate vessels), and agar gelatin. The hands-on training course allowed progressive acquisition of the basic hand-eye coordination skills necessary for performing US-guided venipuncture. The overall cost for each model was less than €5.00. The models described in this report are useful tools for teaching US-guided CVC. Thanks to their low-cost, they can be widely used to facilitate the introduction of this technique in clinical practice.

  2. Step by Step Design of a High Order Power Filter for Three-Phase Three-Wire Grid-connected Inverter in Renewable Energy System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Min; Blaabjerg, Frede; Yang, Yongheng

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, when designing an LCL-filter, a three-phase inverter is simplified as a single-phase inverter for analysis and the output phase voltage is used to calculate the inverter-side current harmonics and to design inverter-side inductor. However, for a three-phase three-wire grid-tied sys...... method of the high order power filter is introduced. Simulations are carried out to verify the accuracy and the validity of the proposed methods through a 6 kW, 380V/50 Hz grid-connected inverter model with three different types of high order power filters....

  3. A step-by-step model of phototransduction cascade shows that Ca2+ regulation of guanylate cyclase accounts only for short-term changes of photoresponse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriondo, Andrea; Rispoli, Giorgio

    2003-12-01

    A mathematical model of the vertebrate phototransduction mechanism was designed in a modular fashion, in that increasingly complex behaviors can be turned on and off to evaluate the relative involvement of all elements of the phototransduction cascade. The problem was approached by starting with a minimum model in which the intracellular cGMP concentration ([cGMP]i) was determined by guanylate cyclase (GC), whose activity was assumed not to be regulated by any factor (such as Ca2+) and by phosphodiesterase (PDE), whose activity was assumed to be proportional to the light intensity. All dependences were subsequently introduced, i.e. the equations describing PDE activation in detail, the Ca2+ regulation of GC and the action of intracellular Ca2+ buffers. The simulations and fits show that a high-gain, smooth time- and light-dependent PDE activation, a Ca2+-dependent GC, and a Ca2+-dependent buffer mechanism are required to account for the flash response kinetics in the dark and on dim backgrounds of light, and the effect of exogenous Ca2+ buffers to produce responses characterized by slow and damped oscillations and to enhance the low-frequency noise. However, it was not possible to find any set of parameters able to simultaneously interpolate the waveform of the flash responses (in the dark and on a background of light) and the responses to steps of light. It is therefore concluded that at least one more shut-off mechanism (possibly not Ca-dependent) is necessary to fully account for the phenomenology of the light response in rod photoreceptors.

  4. Deconstructing chronic low back pain in the older adult--Step by step evidence and expert-based recommendations for evaluation and treatment part III: Fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, Gita; Fang, Meika A; Breuer, Paula; Cherniak, Paul E; Gentili, Angela; Hanlon, Joseph T; Karp, Jordan F; Morone, Natalia E; Rodriguez, Eric; Rossi, Michelle I; Schmader, Kenneth; Weiner, Debra K

    2015-09-01

    To present the third in a series of articles designed to deconstruct chronic low back pain (CLBP) in older adults. The series presents CLBP as a syndrome, a final common pathway for the expression of multiple contributors rather than a disease localized exclusively to the lumbosacral spine. Each article addresses one of 12 important contributors to pain and disability in older adults with CLBP. This article focuses on fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). A modified Delphi approach was used to create the evaluation and treatment algorithm, the table discussing the rationale behind each of the algorithm components, and the stepped-care drug recommendations. The team involved in the creation of these materials consisted of a principal investigator, a 5-member content expert panel, and a 9-member primary care panel. The evaluation and treatment recommendations were based on availability of medications and other resources within the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) facilities. However, non-VHA panelists were also involved in the development of these materials, which can be applied to both VA and civilian settings. The illustrative clinical case was taken from the clinical practice of the principal investigator. Following expert consultations and a review of the literature, we developed an evaluation and treatment algorithm with supporting materials to aid in the care of older adults with CLBP who have concomitant FMS. A case is presented that demonstrates the complexity of pain evaluation and management in older patients with CLBP and concomitant FMS. Recognition of FMS as a common contributor to CLBP in older adults and initiating treatment targeting both FMS and CLBP may lead to improved outcomes in pain and disability. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Deconstructing Chronic Low Back Pain in the Older Adult-Step by Step Evidence and Expert-Based Recommendations for Evaluation and Treatment. Part VI: Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Julie M; Rundell, Sean D; Dougherty, Paul; Gentili, Angela; Kochersberger, Gary; Morone, Natalia E; Naga Raja, Srinivasa; Rodriguez, Eric; Rossi, Michelle I; Shega, Joseph; Sowa, Gwendolyn; Weiner, Debra K

    2016-03-01

    . To present the sixth in a series of articles designed to deconstruct chronic low back pain (CLBP) in older adults. This article focuses on the evaluation and management of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), the most common condition for which older adults undergo spinal surgery. . The evaluation and treatment algorithm, a table articulating the rationale for the individual algorithm components, and stepped-care drug recommendations were developed using a modified Delphi approach. The Principal Investigator, a five-member content expert panel and a nine-member primary care panel were involved in the iterative development of these materials. The illustrative clinical case was taken from the clinical practice of a contributor's colleague (SR). . We present an algorithm and supportive materials to help guide the care of older adults with LSS, a condition that occurs not uncommonly in those with CLBP. The case illustrates the importance of function-focused management and a rational approach to conservative care. . Lumbar spinal stenosis exists not uncommonly in older adults with CLBP and management often can be accomplished without surgery. Treatment should address all conditions in addition to LSS contributing to pain and disability. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. A step-by-step diagnosis of exclusion in a twin pregnancy with acute respiratory failure due to non-fatal amniotic fluid embolism: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papaioannou Vasilios E

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Respiratory failure may develop during the later stages of pregnancy and is usually associated with tocolysis or other co-existing conditions such as pneumonia, sepsis, pre-eclampsia or amniotic fluid embolism syndrome. Case presentation We present the case of a 34-year-old healthy woman with a twin pregnancy at 31 weeks and 6 days who experienced acute respiratory failure, a few hours after administration of tocolysis (ritodrine, due to preterm premature rupture of the membranes. Her chest discomfort was significantly ameliorated after the ritodrine infusion was stopped and a Cesarean section was performed 48 hours later under spinal anesthesia; however, 2 hours after surgery she developed severe hypoxemia, hypotension, fever and mild coagulopathy. The patient was intubated and transferred to the intensive care unit where she made a quick and uneventful recovery within 3 days. As there was no evidence for drug- or infection-related thromboembolic or myocardial causes of respiratory failure, we conclude that our patient experienced a rare type of non-fatal amniotic fluid embolism. Conclusion In spite of the lack of solid scientific support for our diagnosis, we conclude that our patient suffered an uncommon type of amniotic fluid embolism syndrome and we believe that this report highlights the need for extreme vigilance and a high index of suspicion for such a diagnosis in any pregnant individual.

  7. Praegune "step by step" arenguvõimalus on üks paremaid, arvab Sven Mällo / Sven Mällo ; interv. Signe Kalberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Mällo, Sven

    2008-01-01

    Maailma ühe suurema geneerilisi ravimeid tootva firma Sandoz D. D. Eesti, Läti ja Leedu filiaali juht räägib oma haridusteest, tööst arstina, karjäärist ravimite müügi alal, perekonnast, hobidest. Kommenteerib kursusekaaslane, Eesti Kohtuekspertiisi instituudi direktor Üllar Lanno

  8. Step-by-Step Design of an FPGA-Based Digital Compensator for DC/DC Converters Oriented to an Introductory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumel, P.; Fernandez, C.; Sanz, M.; Lazaro, A.; Barrado, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a short introductory course to introduce field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based digital control of dc/dc switching power converters is presented. Digital control based on specific hardware has been at the leading edge of low-medium power dc/dc switching converters in recent years. Besides industry's interest in this topic, from…

  9. Deconstructing Chronic Low Back Pain in the Older Adult: Step by Step Evidence and Expert-Based Recommendations for Evaluation and Treatment: Part IV: Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carley, Joseph A; Karp, Jordan F; Gentili, Angela; Marcum, Zachary A; Reid, M Carrington; Rodriguez, Eric; Rossi, Michelle I; Shega, Joseph; Thielke, Stephen; Weiner, Debra K

    2015-11-01

    To present the fourth in a series of articles designed to deconstruct chronic low back pain (CLBP) in older adults. The series presents CLBP as a syndrome, a final common pathway for the expression of multiple contributors rather than a disease localized exclusively to the lumbosacral spine. Each article addresses one of twelve important contributors to pain and disability in older adults with CLBP. This article focuses on depression. The evaluation and treatment algorithm, a table articulating the rationale for the individual algorithm components, and stepped-care drug recommendations were developed using a modified Delphi approach. The Principal Investigator, a three-member content expert panel, and a nine-member primary care panel were involved in the iterative development of these materials. The algorithm was developed keeping in mind medications and other resources available within Veterans Health Administration (VHA) facilities. As panelists were not exclusive to the VHA, the materials can be applied in both VHA and civilian settings. The illustrative clinical case was taken from one of the contributor's clinical practice. We present an algorithm and supportive materials to help guide the care of older adults with depression, an important contributor to CLBP. The case illustrates an example of a complex clinical presentation in which depression was an important contributor to symptoms and disability in an older adult with CLBP. Depression is common and should be evaluated routinely in the older adult with CLBP so that appropriately targeted treatments can be planned and implemented. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Deconstructing chronic low back pain in the older adult--step by step evidence and expert-based recommendations for evaluation and treatment: part I: Hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Debra K; Fang, Meika; Gentili, Angela; Kochersberger, Gary; Marcum, Zachary A; Rossi, Michelle I; Semla, Todd P; Shega, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    To present the first in a series of articles designed to deconstruct chronic low back pain (CLBP) in older adults. The series presents CLBP as a syndrome, a final common pathway for the expression of multiple contributors rather than a disease localized exclusively to the lumbosacral spine. Each article addresses one of twelve important contributors to pain and disability in older adults with CLBP. This article focuses on hip osteoarthritis (OA). The evaluation and treatment algorithm, a table articulating the rationale for the individual algorithm components, and stepped-care drug recommendations were developed using a modified Delphi approach. The Principal Investigator, a five-member content expert panel and a nine-member primary care panel were involved in the iterative development of these materials. The algorithm was developed keeping in mind medications and other resources available within Veterans Health Administration (VHA) facilities. As panelists were not exclusive to the VHA, the materials can be applied in both VHA and civilian settings. The illustrative clinical case was taken from one of the contributor's clinical practice. We present an algorithm and supportive materials to help guide the care of older adults with hip OA, an important contributor to CLBP. The case illustrates an example of complex hip-spine syndrome, in which hip OA was an important contributor to disability in an older adult with CLBP. Hip OA is common and should be evaluated routinely in the older adult with CLBP so that appropriately targeted treatment can be designed. © 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine.

  11. Deconstructing Chronic Low Back Pain in the Older Adult: Step by Step Evidence and Expert-Based Recommendations for Evaluation and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carley, Joseph A.; Karp, Jordan F.; Gentili, Angela; Marcum, Zachary A.; Reid, M. Carrington; Rodriguez, Eric; Rossi, Michelle I.; Shega, Joseph; Thielke, Stephen; Weiner, Debra K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To present the fourth in a series of articles designed to deconstruct chronic low back pain (CLBP) in older adults. The series presents CLBP as a syndrome, a final common pathway for the expression of multiple contributors rather than a disease localized exclusively to the lumbosacral spine. Each article addresses one of twelve important contributors to pain and disability in older adults with CLBP. This article focuses on depression. Methods The evaluation and treatment algorithm, a table articulating the rationale for the individual algorithm components, and stepped-care drug recommendations were developed using a modified Delphi approach. The Principal Investigator, a three-member content expert panel, and a nine-member primary care panel were involved in the iterative development of these materials. The algorithm was developed keeping in mind medications and other resources available within Veterans Health Administration (VHA) facilities. As panelists were not exclusive to the VHA, the materials can be applied in both VHA and civilian settings. The illustrative clinical case was taken from one of the contributor’s clinical practice. Results We present an algorithm and supportive materials to help guide the care of older adults with depression, an important contributor to CLBP. The case illustrates an example of a complex clinical presentation in which depression was an important contributor to symptoms and disability in an older adult with CLBP. Conclusions Depression is common and should be evaluated routinely in the older adult with CLBP so that appropriately targeted treatments can be planned and implemented. PMID:26539754

  12. Inclusion of service robots in the daily lives of frail older users: A step-by-step definition procedure on users' requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Soler, Álvaro; Facal, David; Díaz-Orueta, Unai; Pigini, Lucia; Blasi, Lorenzo; Qiu, Renxi

    2018-01-01

    The implications for the inclusion of robots in the daily lives of frail older adults, especially in relation to these population needs, have not been extensively studied. The "Multi-Role Shadow Robotic System for Independent Living" (SRS) project has developed a remotely-controlled, semi-autonomous robotic system to be used in domestic environments. The objective of this paper is to document the iterative procedure used to identify, select and prioritize user requirements. Seventy-four requirements were identified by means of focus groups, individual interviews and scenario-based interviews. The list of user requirements, ordered according to impact, number and transnational criteria, revealed a high number of requirements related to basic and instrumental activities of daily living, cognitive and social support and monitorization, and also involving privacy, safety and adaptation issues. Analysing and understanding older users' perceptions and needs when interacting with technological devices adds value to assistive technology and ensures that the systems address currently unmet needs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Life Cost Based FMEA Manual: A Step by Step Guide to Carrying Out a Cost-based Failure Modes and Effects Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Seung; Spencer, Cherrill; /Stanford U. /SLAC

    2009-01-23

    Failure occurs when one or more of the intended functions of a product are no longer fulfilled to the customer's satisfaction. The most critical product failures are those that escape design reviews and in-house quality inspection and are found by the customer. The product may work for a while until its performance degrades to an unacceptable level or it may have not worked even before customer took possession of the product. The end results of failures which may lead to unsafe conditions or major losses of the main function are rated high in severity. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a tool widely used in the automotive, aerospace, and electronics industries to identify, prioritize, and eliminate known potential failures, problems, and errors from systems under design, before the product is released (Stamatis, 1997). Several industrial FMEA standards such as those published by the Society of Automotive Engineers, US Department of Defense, and the Automotive Industry Action Group employ the Risk Priority Number (RPN) to measure risk and severity of failures. The Risk Priority Number (RPN) is a product of 3 indices: Occurrence (O), Severity (S), and Detection (D). In a traditional FMEA process design engineers typically analyze the 'root cause' and 'end-effects' of potential failures in a sub-system or component and assign penalty points through the O, S, D values to each failure. The analysis is organized around categories called failure modes, which link the causes and effects of failures. A few actions are taken upon completing the FMEA worksheet. The RPN column generally will identify the high-risk areas. The idea of performing FMEA is to eliminate or reduce known and potential failures before they reach the customers. Thus, a plan of action must be in place for the next task. Not all failures can be resolved during the product development cycle, thus prioritization of actions must be made within the design group. One definition of detection difficulty (D) is how well the organization controls the development process. Another definition relates to the detectability of a particular failure in the product when it is in the hands of the customer. The former asks 'What is the chance of catching the problem before we give it to the customer'? The latter asks 'What is the chance of the customer catching the problem before the problem results in a catastrophic failure?' (Palady, 1995) These differing definitions confuse the FMEA users when one tries to determine detection difficulty. Are we trying to measure how easy it is to detect where a failure has occurred or when it has occurred? Or are we trying to measure how easy or difficult it is to prevent failures? Ordinal scale variables are used to rank-order industries such as, hotels, restaurants, and movies (Note that a 4 star hotel is not necessarily twice as good as a 2 star hotel). Ordinal values preserve rank in a group of items, but the distance between the values cannot be measured since a distance function does not exist. Thus, the product or sum of ordinal variables loses its rank since each parameter has different scales. The RPN is a product of 3 independent ordinal variables, it can indicate that some failure types are 'worse' than others, but give no quantitative indication of their relative effects. To resolve the ambiguity of measuring detection difficulty and the irrational logic of multiplying 3 ordinal indices, a new methodology was created to overcome these shortcomings, Life Cost-Based FMEA. Life Cost-Based FMEA measures failure/risk in terms of monetary cost. Cost is a universal parameter that can be easily related to severity by engineers and others. Thus, failure cost can be estimated using the following simplest form: Expected Failure Cost = {sup n}{Sigma}{sub i=1}p{sub i}c{sub i}, p: Probability of a particular failure occurring; c: Monetary cost associated with that particular failure; and n: Total number of failure scenarios. FMEA is most effective when there are inputs into it from all concerned disciplines of the product development team. However, FMEA is a long process and can become tedious and won't be effective if too many people participate. An ideal team should have 3 to 4 people from: design, manufacturing, and service departments if possible. Depending on how complex the system is, the entire process can take anywhere from one to four weeks working full time. Thus, it is important to agree to the time commitment before starting the analysis else, anxious managers might stop the procedure before it is completed.

  14. Plant DNA detection from grasshopper guts: A step-by-step protocol, from tissue preparation to obtaining plant DNA sequences 1

    OpenAIRE

    Avanesyan, Alina

    2014-01-01

    Premise of the study: A PCR-based method of identifying ingested plant DNA in gut contents of Melanoplus grasshoppers was developed. Although previous investigations have focused on a variety of insects, there are no protocols available for plant DNA detection developed for grasshoppers, agricultural pests that significantly influence plant community composition. Methods and Results: The developed protocol successfully used the noncoding region of the chloroplast trnL (UAA) gene and was te...

  15. Plant DNA detection from grasshopper guts: A step-by-step protocol, from tissue preparation to obtaining plant DNA sequences1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanesyan, Alina

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: A PCR-based method of identifying ingested plant DNA in gut contents of Melanoplus grasshoppers was developed. Although previous investigations have focused on a variety of insects, there are no protocols available for plant DNA detection developed for grasshoppers, agricultural pests that significantly influence plant community composition. • Methods and Results: The developed protocol successfully used the noncoding region of the chloroplast trnL (UAA) gene and was tested in several feeding experiments. Plant DNA was obtained at seven time points post-ingestion from whole guts and separate gut sections, and was detectable up to 12 h post-ingestion in nymphs and 22 h post-ingestion in adult grasshoppers. • Conclusions: The proposed protocol is an effective, relatively quick, and low-cost method of detecting plant DNA from the grasshopper gut and its different sections. This has important applications, from exploring plant “movement” during food consumption, to detecting plant–insect interactions. PMID:25202604

  16. Generating and executing programs for a floating point single instruction multiple data instruction set architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwind, Michael K

    2013-04-16

    Mechanisms for generating and executing programs for a floating point (FP) only single instruction multiple data (SIMD) instruction set architecture (ISA) are provided. A computer program product comprising a computer recordable medium having a computer readable program recorded thereon is provided. The computer readable program, when executed on a computing device, causes the computing device to receive one or more instructions and execute the one or more instructions using logic in an execution unit of the computing device. The logic implements a floating point (FP) only single instruction multiple data (SIMD) instruction set architecture (ISA), based on data stored in a vector register file of the computing device. The vector register file is configured to store both scalar and floating point values as vectors having a plurality of vector elements.

  17. Direct Vocabulary Instruction in Preschool: A Comparison of Extended Instruction, Embedded Instruction, and Incidental Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus-Rattan, Susan M.; Mitchell, Alison M.; Coyne, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Based on its coincidence with a significant period in language development for children, preschool provides a favorable setting to foster vocabulary growth. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of two instructional conditions and an incidental exposure condition for teaching targeted vocabulary words to preschool students…

  18. Phonetics Instruction Improves Learners' Perception of L2 Sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissling, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Explicit phonetics instruction can help second language (L2) learners to moderately improve their pronunciation, but less is known about how the instruction affects learners' perception, even though there is evidence that perception and pronunciation are related. This study provided phonetics instruction to students (n = 46) studying Spanish as a…

  19. Research Timeline: Form-Focused Instruction and Second Language Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassaji, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a timeline of research on form-focused instruction (FFI). Over the past 40 years, research on the role of instruction has undergone many changes. Much of the early research concentrated on determining whether formal instruction makes any difference in the development of learner language. This question was motivated in part by…

  20. Instructions That Enhance Multiple-Text Comprehension for College Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linderholm, Tracy; Kwon, Heekyung; Therriault, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Two experiments tested the hypothesis that prereading instructions, including how to self-explain during reading, would enhance multiple-text comprehension for college readers. Three prereading instruction conditions included a control condition that provided only the instruction for participants to try to comprehend well; a definition-only…

  1. My Hopes for the Future of Instructional Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, M. David

    2014-01-01

    This article provides the rationales for three recommendations for the future of Instructional Technology: (1) instructional technology as a field seems to have reached a tipping point, where the basic approach to instructional design has stabilized to where further research at this level has waned, suggesting that it is time for instructional…

  2. Brisk and Effective Fluency Instruction for Small Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Judith K.

    2012-01-01

    Fluency is known as the bridge between phonics and comprehension. Teachers of reading provide high-quality instruction in phonics and decoding strategies, usually in a small-group format, but may be unsure how to insert fluency instruction into the small-group lesson. This article presents key concepts in fluency instruction and a description of…

  3. Student-Centered Instruction in a Theoretical Statistics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates Prins, Samantha C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides an example of how student-centered instruction can be used in a theoretical statistics class. The author taught a two-semester undergraduate probability and mathematical statistics sequence using primarily teacher-centered instruction in the first semester and primarily student-centered instruction in the second semester. A…

  4. The Role of Coaching within the Context of Instructional Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, Jill E.

    2017-01-01

    Upon entry into the instructional design workforce, there is a need for instructional designers to continue to hone their craft and skill development. Often times novice instructional designers are paired with experts during the onboarding process. Coaching is utilized to provide novices and those less experienced with the necessary support they…

  5. Medicare Provider Data - Hospice Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Hospice Utilization and Payment Public Use File provides information on services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by hospice providers. The Hospice PUF...

  6. Differentiated Instruction: Understanding the Personal Factors and Organizational Conditions that Facilitate Differentiated Instruction in Elementary Mathematics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbati, Diana Guglielmo

    2012-01-01

    Differentiated instruction is a widely held practice used by teachers to provide diverse learners with complex learning opportunities in the area of mathematics. Research on differentiated instruction shows a multitude of factors that support high quality instruction in mixed-ability elementary classrooms. These factors include small-class size,…

  7. CPR Instruction in a Human Anatomy Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutton, Lewis M.

    1978-01-01

    Describes how cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) instruction can be included in a college anatomy and physiology course. Equipment and instructors are provided locally by the Red Cross or American Heart Association. (MA)

  8. Differentiated Instruction: Understanding the personal factors and organizational conditions that facilitate differentiated instruction in elementary mathematics classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Abbati, Diana Guglielmo

    2012-01-01

    Differentiated instruction is a widely held practice used by teachers to provide diverse learners with complex learning opportunities in the area of mathematics. Research on differentiated instruction shows a multitude of factors that support high quality instruction in mixed-ability elementary classrooms. These factors include small-class size, extra time and resources that allow for a highly individualized approach to instruction, teacher commitment, and subject-matter competency in mathema...

  9. The impact of inquiry-based instructional professional development upon instructional practice: An action research study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broom, Frances A.

    This mixed method case study employs action research, conducted over a three month period with 11 elementary math and science practitioners. Inquiry as an instructional practice is a vital component of math and science instruction and STEM teaching. Teachers examined their beliefs and teaching practices with regard to those instructional factors that influence inquiry instruction. Video-taped lessons were compared to a rubric and pre and post questionnaires along with two interviews which informed the study. The results showed that while most beliefs were maintained, teachers implemented inquiry at a more advanced level after examining their teaching and reflecting on ways to increase inquiry practices. Because instructional practices provide only one component of inquiry-based instruction, other components need to be examined in a future study.

  10. Differentiating Mathematics Instruction

    OpenAIRE

    Walter, Brett

    2016-01-01

    The importance of teaching students based on their levels of development and ability, or differentiated instruction, has been used in Language Arts classes increasingly over the last decade. However, it is only recently that attention in research has been given to the use of differentiated instruction in a mathematics lesson. This paper aims to explore what research is being done to not only improve mathematics instruction in the classroom, but to better prepare future teachers for teaching m...

  11. Evaluation of pictorial assembly instructions for young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Cortney V; Smith-Jackson, Tonya L

    2008-08-01

    We examined the usability of common formats of pictorial toy assembly instructions for 6- and 9-year-old children. Interlocking building toys and models are increasingly prevalent and important for developing spatial abilities and fine motor skills among children. Little is known about how effectively the intended child users can interpret and carry out the instructions. Twenty-four children used five sets of manufacturer-supplied pictorial toy assembly instructions. We evaluated the impact of toy instruction set, age, gender, and previous experience on usability problems, assembly speed and accuracy, instruction gaze time, and subjective ratings. The children had difficulty with all but the simplest instructions and assemblies. As predicted, older participants assembled more quickly, with fewer errors and fewer instruction looks. However, the 6-year-old girls assembled the fewest parts correctly, and the 9-year-old girls reported having the least fun. Instruction look time and frequency revealed differences in instruction complexity and were correlated with subjective ratings of fun. Thirty-two usability problems were observed, and 10 are described in detail. Product age recommendations may not reflect developmentally appropriate instructions. Small design changes should contribute to improved instruction usability among young children. For instance, designers should avoid complex graphic syntax, depict colors accurately, select clear angles of view, and support natural tendencies to assemble top to bottom. This research provides pictorial assembly instruction guidelines to inform instruction designers and describes performance and look-time benchmarks for future usability studies.

  12. Development and Exchange of Instructional Resources in Water Quality Control Programs, II: Instructional Materials Available.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, John H.

    This document is one in a series of reports which reviews instructional materials and equipment for water and wastewater treatment plant personnel. Approximately 900 items are listed in this document along with guidelines for the production of instructional materials. Information is provided regarding the source, type of material, intended…

  13. Technology for Early Braille Literacy: Comparison of Traditional Braille Instruction and Instruction with an Electronic Notetaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickford, James O.; Falco, Ruth A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The study reported here evaluated whether there was a difference in students' outcomes for braille fluency when instruction was provided with traditional braille media or refreshable braille. Students' and teachers' perceptions of the efficacy of the use of the different instructional media were analyzed. Methods: Nine students from…

  14. Universal Design for Instruction: Extending the Universal Design Paradigm to College Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Joan M.; Scott, Sally S.

    2006-01-01

    Universal design for instruction (UDI) represents the systematic application of universal design, the construct from architecture and product development, to instructional practices in higher education. In addition to a description of the deliberative process by which UDI was developed, this article provides confirmatory evidence of the validity…

  15. Developing Early Literacy Skills: A Meta-Analysis of Alphabet Learning and Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasta, Shayne B; Wagner, Richard K

    2010-01-01

    Alphabet knowledge is a hallmark of early literacy and facilitating its development has become a primary objective of pre-school instruction and intervention. However, little agreement exists about how to promote the development of alphabet knowledge effectively. A meta-analysis of the effects of instruction on alphabet outcomes demonstrated that instructional impacts differed by type of alphabet outcome examined and content of instruction provided. School-based instruction yielded larger effects than home-based instruction; small-group instruction yielded larger effects than individual tutoring programs. We found minimal evidence of transfer of alphabet instruction to early phonological, reading, or spelling skills. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  16. Instructional leaders for all? High school science department heads and instructional leadership across all science disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanborn, Stephen

    Many high school science departments are responding to changes in state standards with respect to both curricular content and instructional practices. In the typical American high school organization, the academic department head is ideally positioned to influence change in the instructional practices of teachers within the department. Even though science department heads are well situated to provide leadership during this period of transition, the literature has not addressed the question of how well science department heads believe they can provide instructional leadership for all of the teachers in their department, whether they are teaching within and outside of the head's own sub-discipline. Nor is it known how science department heads view the role of pedagogical content knowledge in teaching different science disciplines. Using an online survey comprised of 26 objective questions and one open response question, a 54-respondent sample of science department heads provided no strong consensus regarding their beliefs about the role of pedagogical content knowledge in science instruction. However, science department heads expressed a significant difference in their views about their capacity to provide instructional leadership for teachers sharing their science content area compared to teachers instructing other science content areas. Given wide-spread science education reform efforts introduced in response to the Next Generation Science Standards, these findings may serve to provide some direction for determining how to best support the work of science department heads as they strive to provide instructional leadership for the teachers in their departments.

  17. Inclusive Design in Assisted Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel ZAMFIR

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Much instruction starts with abstract representations for which learners have insufficient foundation [1]. The British Standard, BS 7000-6:2005 Guide to Managing Inclusive Design, provides a comprehensive framework that can help all private enterprises, public sector and not-for-profit organizations, build a consistent approach to inclusive design into organizational culture as well as processes [2]. While courses, technology, and student services are typically designed for the narrow range of characteristics of the average student, the practice of universal design in education (UDE considers people with a broad range of characteristics in the design of all educational products and environments [3]. This paper has been designed to provide an overview about the curriculum paradigm consisting in the fusion of the technology and the classroom instruction in economic higher education.

  18. Aligning Instructional Strategies with Learning Outcomes and Leadership Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Daniel M; Allen, Scott J

    2017-12-01

    This chapter provides recommendations for aligning instructional strategies with learning outcomes and leadership competencies to foster intentional student leadership development. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  19. Supplemental instruction in chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundeberg, Mary A.

    This study was designed to measure some effects of supplemental instruction in chemistry. Supplemental instruction is a peer-led cooperative learning program that encourages students to develop conceptual understanding by articulating both understandings and misconceptions in a think-aloud fashion. Supplemental instruction was offered three hours weekly outside of class and lab time for students in four classes of General Organic and Biological Chemistry. Over a two-year period 108 students volunteered to participate in this program; 45 students did not participate. As measured by final grades in chemistry and responses to a questionnaire, supplemental instruction was effective in increasing students' achievement in chemistry. Further research is needed to determine the in-depth effects of supplemental instruction on students' learning, problem solving, and self-esteem.

  20. Designing Instruction That Supports Cognitive Learning Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ruth; Harrelson, Gary L

    2002-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an overview of current cognitive learning processes, including a summary of research that supports the use of specific instructional methods to foster those processes. We have developed examples in athletic training education to help illustrate these methods where appropriate. DATA SOURCES: Sources used to compile this information included knowledge base and oral and didactic presentations. DATA SYNTHESIS: Research in educational psychology within the past 15 years has provided many principles for designing instruction that mediates the cognitive processes of learning. These include attention, management of cognitive load, rehearsal in working memory, and retrieval of new knowledge from long-term memory. By organizing instruction in the context of tasks performed by athletic trainers, transfer of learning and learner motivation are enhanced. CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS: Scientific evidence supports instructional methods that can be incorporated into lesson design and improve learning by managing cognitive load in working memory, stimulating encoding into long-term memory, and supporting transfer of learning.

  1. Designing Instruction That Supports Cognitive Learning Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ruth; Harrelson, Gary L.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To provide an overview of current cognitive learning processes, including a summary of research that supports the use of specific instructional methods to foster those processes. We have developed examples in athletic training education to help illustrate these methods where appropriate. Data Sources: Sources used to compile this information included knowledge base and oral and didactic presentations. Data Synthesis: Research in educational psychology within the past 15 years has provided many principles for designing instruction that mediates the cognitive processes of learning. These include attention, management of cognitive load, rehearsal in working memory, and retrieval of new knowledge from long-term memory. By organizing instruction in the context of tasks performed by athletic trainers, transfer of learning and learner motivation are enhanced. Conclusions/Recommendations: Scientific evidence supports instructional methods that can be incorporated into lesson design and improve learning by managing cognitive load in working memory, stimulating encoding into long-term memory, and supporting transfer of learning. PMID:12937537

  2. Rethinking monolingual instructional strategies in multilingual classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Cummins

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Three inter-related assumptions regarding best practice in second/foreign language teaching and bilingual/immersion education continue to dominate classroom instruction. These assumptions are that: (a the target language (TL should be used exclusively for instructional purposes without recourse to students’ first language (L1; (b translation between L1 and TL has no place in the language classroom; and (c within immersion and bilingual programs, the two languages should be kept rigidly separate. Research evidence provides minimal support for these assumptions and they are also inconsistent with the instructional implications of current theory in the areas of cognitive psychology and applied linguistics. Based on current research and theory, a set of bilingual instructional strategies are proposed and concrete examples are provided to illustrate how these strategies can be used together with monolingual strategies in a balanced and complementary way.

  3. Ameliorating Reading Disabilities Early: Examining an Effective Encoding and Decoding Prevention Instruction Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Beverly L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether integrating encoding instruction with reading instruction provides stronger gains for students who struggle with reading than instruction that includes little or no encoding. An instructional design model was investigated to best fit the data of 175 first-grade readers at risk for reading…

  4. Speech-Assisted Learning Provides Unique Braille Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangold, Sally S.

    2003-01-01

    This article describes Speech Assisted Learning (SAL), a portable, interactive Braille learning station that combines synthesized speech, full-page paper Braille exercises, and bar-code technology. Findings from field-testing of SAL with 25 individuals with visual impairments (grades K-adult) and 12 teachers indicate students acquired new…

  5. Data analysis with small samples and non-normal data nonparametrics and other strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Siebert, Carl F

    2017-01-01

    Written in everyday language for non-statisticians, this book provides all the information needed to successfully conduct nonparametric analyses. This ideal reference book provides step-by-step instructions to lead the reader through each analysis, screenshots of the software and output, and case scenarios to illustrate of all the analytic techniques.

  6. Short Cycle Assessment: Improving Student Achievement through Formative Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Susan; Stanley, Todd; Moore, Betsy

    2008-01-01

    This book shows you how to improve student achievement by providing them with frequent feedback on their work. It provides a step-by-step process to help you: (1) write good questions that assess student learning; (2) design your own formative assessments; (3) administer short-cycle assessments; (4) analyze and use data to shape instruction; and…

  7. Differentiating Science Instruction: Secondary science teachers' practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeng, Jennifer L.; Bell, Randy L.

    2015-09-01

    This descriptive study investigated the implementation practices of secondary science teachers who differentiate instruction. Participants included seven high school science teachers purposefully selected from four different schools located in a mid-Atlantic state. Purposeful selection ensured participants included differentiated instruction (DI) in their lesson implementation. Data included semi-structured interviews and field notes from a minimum of four classroom observations, selected to capture the variety of differentiation strategies employed. These data were analyzed using a constant-comparative approach. Each classroom observation was scored using the validated Differentiated Instruction Implementation Matrix-Modified, which captured both the extent to which critical indicators of DI were present in teachers' instruction and the performance levels at which they engaged in these components of DI. Results indicated participants implemented a variety of differentiation strategies in their classrooms with varying proficiency. Evidence suggested all participants used instructional modifications that required little advance preparation to accommodate differences in students' interests and learning profile. Four of the seven participants implemented more complex instructional strategies that required substantial advance preparation by the teacher. Most significantly, this study provides practical strategies for in-service science teachers beginning to differentiate instruction and recommendations for professional development and preservice science teacher education.

  8. Basic Operational Robotics Instructional System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Brian Keith; Fischer, James; Falgout, Jane; Schweers, John

    2013-01-01

    The Basic Operational Robotics Instructional System (BORIS) is a six-degree-of-freedom rotational robotic manipulator system simulation used for training of fundamental robotics concepts, with in-line shoulder, offset elbow, and offset wrist. BORIS is used to provide generic robotics training to aerospace professionals including flight crews, flight controllers, and robotics instructors. It uses forward kinematic and inverse kinematic algorithms to simulate joint and end-effector motion, combined with a multibody dynamics model, moving-object contact model, and X-Windows based graphical user interfaces, coordinated in the Trick Simulation modeling environment. The motivation for development of BORIS was the need for a generic system for basic robotics training. Before BORIS, introductory robotics training was done with either the SRMS (Shuttle Remote Manipulator System) or SSRMS (Space Station Remote Manipulator System) simulations. The unique construction of each of these systems required some specialized training that distracted students from the ideas and goals of the basic robotics instruction.

  9. Instructional Design and the Importance of Instructional Alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Florence

    2011-01-01

    This paper highlights the instructional design process followed by the Maricopa Community College faculty in the creation of instructional modules in Digital Visual Literacy. The paper categorizes 10 tasks that an instructional designer, a teacher, or a trainer performs during the design phase of the instructional design process. The importance of…

  10. Medium of Instruction in Thai Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanjavanakul, Natpat

    The goal of this study is to compare classroom discourse in Thai 9th grade science lessons with English or Thai as a medium of instruction. This is a cross-sectional study of video recordings from five lessons in an English-medium instruction class and five lessons in a Thai- medium instruction class from a Thai secondary school. The study involved two teachers and two groups of students. The findings show the use of both English and Thai in English-medium lessons. Students tend to be more responsive to teacher questions in Thai than in English. The findings suggest the use of students' native language during English-medium lessons to help facilitate learning in certain situations. Additionally, the study provides implications for research, practice and policy for using English as a medium of instruction.

  11. Knowledge engineering for the instructional developer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trainor, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper explores the cognitive approach to instruction and provides several strategies for using knowledge engineering information in the instructional development process to strengthen the systems approach to training. When students learn using the behavioral approach to instruction, drawbacks have been noted because gaps are apparent between the students' high performance levels on objective tests and their inadequate problem solving performance levels. Augmentation of the behaviorist process with applications of knowledge engineering can result in obtaining detailed information about student misconceptions relative to expert knowledge. This information is then applied to individualized learning prescriptions. Normally, instructional developers are working under significant resource and time constraints, and this modified systems approach is an efficient solution to this problem. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Bibliographic Instruction : A Webliography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available A Webliography about the Bibliographic Instruction, it collects a variety of internet resources divided to main categories; directories, articles, bibliographies, organization, mailing lists, and interest groups.

  13. Instructional Technology and Objectification

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gur, Bekir S; Wiley, David A

    2008-01-01

    .... A critique of objectification in instructional technology is presented. In the context of Heidegger’s critique of technology, the authors claim that objectification in education is metaphysical in the sense that the intelligibility...

  14. Evaluation of a Theory of Instructional Sequences for Physics Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackermann, Rainer; Trendel, Georg; Fischer, Hans E.

    2010-05-01

    The background of the study is the theory of basis models of teaching and learning, a comprehensive set of models of learning processes which includes, for example, learning through experience and problem-solving. The combined use of different models of learning processes has not been fully investigated and it is frequently not clear under what circumstances a particular model should be used by teachers. In contrast, the theory under investigation here gives guidelines for choosing a particular model and provides instructional sequences for each model. The aim is to investigate the implementation of the theory applied to physics instruction and to show if possible effects for the students may be attributed to the use of the theory. Therefore, a theory-oriented education programme for 18 physics teachers was developed and implemented in the 2005/06 school year. The main features of the intervention consisted of coaching physics lessons and video analysis according to the theory. The study follows a pre-treatment-post design with non-equivalent control group. Findings of repeated-measures ANOVAs show large effects for teachers' subjective beliefs, large effects for classroom actions, and small to medium effects for student outcomes such as perceived instructional quality and student emotions. The teachers/classes that applied the theory especially well according to video analysis showed the larger effects. The results showed that differentiating between different models of learning processes improves physics instruction. Effects can be followed through to student outcomes. The education programme effect was clearer for classroom actions and students' outcomes than for teachers' beliefs.

  15. Instant Moodle quiz module how-to

    CERN Document Server

    Coy, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Step-by step application of the features of Moodle Quiz provides a good grounding in creating effective assessment FOR and OF learning. If you are doing any kind of instruction using Moodle as your Learning Management System, this book is for you! Strong assessment is one of the keys to effective instruction and successful learners. Readers are expected to have a basic working knowledge of Moodle and access to a course they are instructing.

  16. The Need for Imagination and Creativity in Instructional Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Pat

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the need for imagination and creativity in adult education instructional design both online and face-to-face. It defines both imagination and creativity as well as provides an overview of the history of instructional design. It provides an examination of imagination and its application in educational…

  17. Designing Instruction in the Face of Technology Transience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder-VanBerschot, Jennifer A.; Summers, Laura L.

    2015-01-01

    As we strive to provide quality and sustainable online learning experiences, we must frame instructional design decisions around learners' current needs and interaction with technology. This article explores the implications of technology transience on instructional design. We provide numerous examples of programs assuming a purposeful approach to…

  18. Managing Resistance to Instructional Modifications in Mainstreamed Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Howard; McGettigan, James

    1988-01-01

    Classroom teachers serving handicapped students in the mainstream often need to make instructional modifications. This article discusses reasons for teacher resistance to instructional modifications and provides strategies that consultative staff can use to prevent or reduce resistance. Expectancy theory is used to provide a framework for…

  19. Woodrow Wilson and the U.S. Ratification of the Treaty of Versailles. Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne, John; Sesso, Gloria

    1995-01-01

    Presents a high school lesson plan on the struggle over ratification of the Treaty of Versailles and U.S. participation in the League of Nations. Includes a timeline of events, four primary source documents, and biographical portraits of two opposing senators. Provides student objectives and step-by-step instructional procedures. (CFR)

  20. Using iPhones, iPads, and iPods a practical guide for librarians

    CERN Document Server

    Connolly, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Using iPhones and iPads: A Practical Guide for Librarians offers library professionals a clear path to Apple readiness. The authors combine their experience in library public services and mobile technology to provide easy-to-follow, step-by-step instructions to help you get up to speed.

  1. Commercial Building Energy Asset Rating Tool User's Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Na; Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Matsumoto, Steven W.

    2012-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Commercial Building Energy Asset Rating Tool is a web-based system that is designed to allow building owners, managers, and operators to more accurately assess the energy performance of their commercial buildings. This document provide a step-by-step instruction on how to use the tool.

  2. Beyond the Numbers Making Sense of Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Christmann, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    Statistics is required coursework within most teacher certification programs. Beyond the Numbers presents a nonthreatening, practical approach to statistics, providing step-by-step instructions for understanding and implementing the essential components of the subject.The basic and understandable explanations in Beyond the Numbers break down complex statistical processes to simple arithmetic computations that can be applied with the confidence that accompanies understanding.

  3. Converting Spreadsheet Files into Data Base Files Using AppleWorks V2.0 and the Apple IIGS Computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This guide was developed as a "how to" training device for converting spreadsheet files into database files using AppleWorks version 2.0 on the Apple IIGS computer with two disk drives. Step-by-step instructions are provided for loading spreadsheet files, transferring spreadsheet files to the monitor, printing spreadsheet files, and…

  4. Merging Data Base and Word Processing Files Using AppleWorks V2.0 and the Apple IIGS Computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This guide was developed as a "how to" training device for merging database and word processing files using AppleWorks version 2.0 and the Apple IIGS computer with two disk drives. Step-by-step instructions are provided for loading database files, transferring database files to the clipboard, merging database files into word processor…

  5. Hillside Administration Reporting Timetabling System. HARTS II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, William P.

    This second version of a computerized school records system utilizing punch cards was developed by high school students under faculty guidance. Not only is it inexpensive to use, but it is tailored to the needs of a particular school and, therefore, responsive to its needs. Detailed step by step instructions are provided for utilizing the system.…

  6. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professionals A step-by-step, illustrated guide for health professionals that provides instruction on examining the mouth for signs of oral cancer. For Patients and the Public Oral Cancer Pamphlet that describes the risk factors, signs and symptoms of oral cancer, and ...

  7. Plunge into the Fun World of Local Production. Media Production for the Classroom Teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Hans

    Designed to assist teachers and media professionals in the development of media presentations that can creatively capture learner attention, this manual provides step-by-step instructions for preparing materials using a dry mount press, copy machines, and cassette tape recordings. Sources of visual materials are suggested, the equipment needed,…

  8. Building America's Industrial Revolution: The Boott Cotton Mills of Lowell, Massachusetts. Teaching with Historic Places.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    Presents a high school unit about the U.S. Industrial Revolution featuring the Boott Cotton Mills of Lowell, Massachusetts. Includes student objectives, step-by-step instructional procedures, and discussion questions. Provides two maps, five illustrations, one photograph, and three student readings. (ACM)

  9. Steps for Creating a Specialized Corpus and Developing an Annotated Frequency-Based Vocabulary List

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toriida, Marie-Claude

    2016-01-01

    This article provides introductory, step-by-step explanations of how to make a specialized corpus and an annotated frequency-based vocabulary list. One of my objectives is to help teachers, instructors, program administrators, and graduate students with little experience in this field be able to do so using free resources. Instructions are first…

  10. Tips for Using Microsoft Excel in Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, David

    Acknowledging the need for additional practical resources for integrating technology into physical education assessment, this paper provides strategies and step-by-step instructions for incorporating Microsoft Excel into physical educators' assessment tools. The first section briefly reviews the literature on assessment in physical education. The…

  11. The complete book of holograms how they work and how to make them

    CERN Document Server

    Kasper, Joseph Emil

    2001-01-01

    Clear, thorough account, without complicated mathematics, explains the two models of holography - the geometric and the zone plate - and different types of holograms, including transmission, reflection, phase, projection, rainbow, and multiplex. They also show basic setups for making holograms and provide step-by-step instructions so readers can make their own.

  12. Drawing Children into Reading: A Qualitative Case Study of a Preschool Drawing Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFauw, Danielle L.

    2016-01-01

    This article details a qualitative case study of 24 preschool children engaged with step-by-step drawing instruction provided by five educators as they developed their fine motor skills and drew detailed objects using the Drawing Children Into Reading curriculum (Halperin, W. A. (2011a). "Project 50 preschool manual." South Haven, MI:…

  13. Navajo Language Teaching in Immersion Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Wayne; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Provides a conceptual framework and concrete guidance for Navajo language teaching that follows an immersion approach. Explains key theoretical starting points for immersion instruction and program development; then describes in step-by-step fashion how to go about implementing immersion language teaching in various classroom contexts. (Author/TD)

  14. A guide to the TWIGS program for the North Central United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cynthia L. Miner; Nancy R. Walters; Monique L. Belli

    1988-01-01

    This is a complete reference to TWIGS, a forest growth-and-yield program with management and economic components developed for Lake and Central States tree species. The guide describes how TWIGS models growth and yield and how the model can be applied to obtain the best results. Step-by-step operating instructions are provided for TWIGS and its companion program,...

  15. TUTOR: Techniques Used in the Teaching of Reading. A Handbook for Teaching Basic Reading to Adults and Teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Ruth J.; Root, Jane H.

    Intended for those who have had no technical training in the teaching of basic reading, this manual provided step-by-step instructions so that inexperienced tutors can apply professional approaches to teaching reading. The chapters of the book discuss the problem of functional illiteracy, the profile of a good literacy teacher, the profile of an…

  16. AppleWorks for Educators: A Beginning and Intermediate Workbook. Version 3.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathje, Linda

    This manual provides teachers with learning activities designed to improve their use of computer applications and to facilitate the integration of computers into the curriculum. Step-by-step instructions for AppleWorks allow hands-on experience in the following applications: (1) formatting disks and getting started in general; (2) word processing,…

  17. Bowel cancer screening: how to take the test (English and 10 translations)

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2015-01-01

    This leaflet provides step by step instructions on using the Faecal Occult Blood test (FOBt) for bowel cancer screening.The translations are of the 2010 versions when screening was for 60��-69 year olds but this has been extended to 60��-74 year olds.

  18. Instructions for minipill users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, M; Hatcher, R A

    1985-01-01

    Guidelines are provided for women who use minipills. Minipills are low dose, progestin only oral contraceptives (OC), which are frequently prescribed for women who 1) experience estrogen related side effects if they take combined OCs; 2) are 35 years of age or older; 3) are 30 years of age or aver and smoke; 4) have a history of headaches, hypertension, or varicose veins; 5) desire immediate postpartum protection; or 6) are lactating. Minipills prevent pregnancy by inhibiting ovulation and implantation and by making the cervical mucus more impervious to sperm penetration. Minipills can be effective if they are used properly. Women who take minipills should be advised to carefully read and follow the instructions provided in the OC packet, initiate pill taking on the 1st day of menstrual bleeding, and take 1 pill every day without and breaks. A backup method should be used during the 1st month and subsequently, during each midcycle phase. If a woman misses 1 pill, she should immediately, upon remembering, take a pill, take her next day's pill at regular time, and use a backup method until menstruation reoccurs. If a woman misses 2 pills, she should immediately, upon remembering, take 2 pills, take 2 pills the following day, and use a backup method until menstruation begins. Women should be advised that many minipill users experience irregular menstural cycles, including amenorrhea and spotting between periods. If menstruation is delayed for 45 days, a pregnancy test is advisable. Women should be advised to immediately seek medical attention if they experience severe chest pain, shortness breath, severe headaches, vision problems, or severe leg pain. Minipill users should let their clinicians know if they experience and changes in mood or sexual drive. These problems can frequently be avoided by switching to another brand of minipills.

  19. MOTIVATIONAL MEASURE OF THE INSTRUCTION COMPARED: Instruction Based on the ARCS Motivation Theory V.S. Traditional Instruction in Blended Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur M. COLAKOGLU

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The ARCS Motivation Theory was proposed to guide instructional designers and teachers who develop their own instruction to integrate motivational design strategies into the instruction. There is a lack of literature supporting the idea that instruction for blended courses if designed based on the ARCS Motivation Theory provides different experiences for learners in terms of motivation than instruction developed following the standard instructional design procedure for blended courses. This study was conducted to compare the students’ motivational evaluation of blended course modules developed based on the ARCS Motivation Theory and students’ motivational evaluation of blended course modules developed following the standard instructional design procedure. Randomly assigned fifty junior undergraduate students studying at the department of Turkish Language and Literature participated in the study. Motivation Measure for the Blended Course Instruction (MMBCI instrument was used to collect data for the study after the Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA. Results of the study indicated that designing instruction in blended courses based on the ARCS Motivation Theory provides more motivational benefits for students and consequently contributes student learning.

  20. Cross Cultural Instruction: An Instructional Design Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica W. Tracey

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In an authentic example of linking design and development with learning and performance, an international real estate development firm defined a problem; implementing a cleaning system in the largest mall in the world with a cross-cultural unskilled work force in Dubai, UAE. Partnering with a university instructional design team employing a rapid prototyping methodology and the constructivist ID approach, Layers of Negotiation Model, a comprehensive curriculum was designed. This article describes the project background, initial design, the ID team's work in Dubai, illustrates the product, and summarizes the design experience.

  1. Illustrator CC digital classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    A complete training package lets you learn Adobe Illustrator CC at your own speed Adobe Illustrator is the leading drawing and illustration software used to create artwork for a variety of media. This book-and-DVD package provides 13 self-paced lessons that get you up to speed on the latest version of Illustrator (Creative Cloud). Step-by-step instructions in the full-color book are supported by video tutorials on the DVD. Together, these tools will help you learn Adobe Illustrator basics, essential skills, and all the new capabilities in Illustrator CC-in no time.  Includes step-by-step in

  2. Instant optimizing embedded systems using BusyBox

    CERN Document Server

    Zhangjin, Wu

    2013-01-01

    Filled with practical, step-by-step instructions and clear explanations for the most important and useful tasks. A step-by-step guide which provides concise and clear recipes for getting started with Busybox.If you are an embedded system developer or Android developer who wishes to learn to build an embedded (Android Linux) system from scratch, as well as to optimize the system performance, then this book will be great for you. It's assumed that you have some experience in Linux and UNIX utilities. If you are a new developer, this book will also help you to get started with Busybox and Android

  3. Instant PageSpeed optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Jaiswal, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    Filled with practical, step-by-step instructions and clear explanations for the most important and useful tasks. Instant PageSpeed Optimization is a hands-on guide that provides a number of clear, step-by-step exercises for optimizing your websites for better performance and improving their efficiency.Instant PageSpeed Optimization is aimed at website developers and administrators who wish to make their websites load faster without any errors and consume less bandwidth. It's assumed that you will have some experience in basic web technologies like HTML, CSS3, JavaScript, and the basics of netw

  4. Instant SQL Server Analysis Services 2012 Cube Security

    CERN Document Server

    Jayanty, Satya SK

    2013-01-01

    Filled with practical, step-by-step instructions and clear explanations for the most important and useful tasks. Instant Microsoft SQL Server Analysis Services 2012 Cube Security is a practical, hands-on guide that provides a number of clear, step-by-step exercises for getting started with cube security.This book is aimed at Database Administrators, Data Architects, and Systems Administrators who are managing the SQL Server data platform. It is also beneficial for analysis services developers who already have some experience with the technology, but who want to go into more detail on advanced

  5. Effective Instructional Strategies for Kindergarten and First-Grade Students at Risk in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Ben; Doabler, Christian T.; Nelson, Nancy J.; Shanley, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an overview of effective instructional strategies and interventions for kindergarten and first-grade students at risk in mathematics. The article reviews instructional strategies and interventions within a multitier instructional model in order to provide a framework for teachers and schools looking to increase the…

  6. Instruction manual for operating the Sensys System for temporary traffic counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This instruction manual provides information and the procedures for using the Sensys System, which was initially designed to operate in a server controlled network, for temporary traffic counts. The instructions will allow the user to fully understan...

  7. Business faculty e-readiness and willingness towards online instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Elsaadani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Online instruction provides a rich integrated environment, as recent innovative educational technologies are changing lives of both students and faculty staff. This research aims to investigate e-readiness and willingness of Business faculty staff towards online instruction, and whether their experience in using educational technologies influences their attitude. Survey methodology is facilitated through the use of the questionnaires. The survey domain is a random sampling of Business faculty staff in Egyptian HEI. The population for this study was 479 full- time Faculty staff, and only 456 returned and completed questionnaires are considered as the study sample. Results showed that faculty attitude toward online instruction is positive, which reflect their e-readiness and willingness to include online instruction, but experience in using educational technology did not significantly predict their attitude towards online instruction. The result of this research has significant implications to HEI when they plan, develop, and adopt online instruction strategies.

  8. Enhancing Instructional Design Efficiency: Methodologies Employed by Instructional Designers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roytek, Margaret A.

    2010-01-01

    Instructional systems design (ISD) has been frequently criticised as taking too long to implement, calling for a reduction in cycle time--the time that elapses between project initiation and delivery. While instructional design research has historically focused on increasing "learner" efficiencies, the study of what instructional designers do to…

  9. Instructional Conceptions: Analysis from an Instructional Design Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowyck, Joost; Elen, Jan; Clarebout, Geraldine

    2004-01-01

    Learners are active actors in learning environments and not mere consumers of instructional designers' products. In line with mediating paradigm instructional conceptions of students are analysed. These conceptions act as cognitive filters that affect students' use of both instructional interventions and support in learning environments. To gain…

  10. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  11. Revitalizing Strategy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitalone-Raccaro, Nancy A.

    2017-01-01

    The national focus on teacher accountability and the resulting emphasis on raising the bar for teacher evaluations challenge teachers of students with learning disabilities (LD) to rethink instructional design and delivery. In response to these challenges, this article introduces a two-part protocol for planning and teaching strategy instruction…

  12. Reviews in instructional video

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meij, Hans

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of a video tutorial for software training whose construction was based on a combination of insights from multimedia learning and Demonstration-Based Training. In the videos, a model of task performance was enhanced with instructional features that were

  13. Grammar Instruction and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacina, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Much of the research literature from the past 25 years has supported the importance of teaching grammar in the context of writing instruction (Calkins, 1980; DiStefano & Killion, 1984; Weaver, 1996,1998). Unlike other content areas, practice does not make perfect when learning grammar. While isolated drill and practice of grammatical concepts may…

  14. Instructional Psychology 1976 - 1981,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    includes evaluative essays on mental measurement and the contributions of E. L. Thorndike, Piaget, Freud , Skinner, and others. A recent book edited by...as a private audio visual aid. Instructional Science, 1980, 9, 295-309. Paolitto, D. P. The effect of cross-age tutoring on adolescence : An inquiry

  15. Instructional Guide for Cosmetology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Dept. of Education.

    Intended as a tool for cosmetology teachers in Virginia public and private schools, the document is an instructional guide which offers 12 units of study, arranged in a three year course. Materials covered help prepare students for licensure in the State of Virginia and the guide is designed to cover the 1,500 hours required to be spent in the…

  16. Safety Instruction No 43

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    Please note that the Safety Instruction No 43 (IS 43) entitled "ASBESTOS - DANGERS AND PRECAUTIONS" is available on the web at the following URL: https://edms.cern.ch/document/335809/LAST_RELEASED/ Paper copies can also be obtained from the SC secretariat, e-mail: tis.secretariat@cern.ch. SC Secretariat

  17. Computers in writing instruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwartz, Helen J.; van der Geest, Thea; Smit-Kreuzen, Marlies

    1992-01-01

    For computers to be useful in writing instruction, innovations should be valuable for students and feasible for teachers to implement. Research findings yield contradictory results in measuring the effects of different uses of computers in writing, in part because of the methodological complexity of

  18. New instructional technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Sal; Odle, Teresa

    2008-09-01

    An ASRT task force on new educational delivery methods produced research and resources to guide publication of a white paper titled New Models, New Tools: The Role of Instructional Technology in Radiologic Science Education. This special report summarizes the white paper findings.

  19. Windows into Instructional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbacher-Reed, Christina; Rotella, Sam A.

    2017-01-01

    Administrators are often removed from the daily instructional realities in classrooms, while teachers aren't given enough opportunities to lead in their schools, write Christina Steinbacher-Reed and Sam A. Rotella Jr. The result is a wall that prevents the two parties from collaborating in a way that improves school culture, teaching practices,…

  20. Nuclear Energy. Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kenneth; Thessing, Dan

    This document is one of five learning packets on alternative energy (see note) developed as part of a descriptive curriculum research project in Arkansas. The overall objectives of the learning packets are to improve the level of instruction in the alternative energies by vocational exploration teachers, and to facilitate the integration of new…

  1. Learning, Instruction, and Hypermedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Wayne A.; Palumbo, David B.

    1992-01-01

    Examines the psychological basis of hypermedia as a medium for learning, surveys the characteristics of current hypermedia systems, and suggests ways to make hypermedia systems more valuable as instructional environments. Highlights include parallels between human memory and hypermedia architectures; and hypermedia as knowledge presentation,…

  2. Wind Power. Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kenneth; Thessing, Dan

    This document is one of five learning packets on alternative energy developed as part of a descriptive curriculum research project in Arkansas (see note). The overall objectives of the learning packets are to improve the level of instruction in the alternative energies by vocational exploration teachers, and to facilitate the integration of new…

  3. Developing Effective Instructional Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Barbara; And Others

    A group of three conference papers, all addressing effective instructional programs, is presented in this document. The first paper, entitled "The Organization--A Viable Instrument for Progress" (Barbara Sizemore), addresses the subject of high-achieving, predominantly black elementary schools. Routines in these schools not present in…

  4. Guide to Instructional Videoconferencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Denise; Reiss, John G.

    An instructional videoconference (IVC) is an interactive delivery mechanism for long-distance communication and education, which uses 2-way audio and 1- or 2-way video to facilitate interaction between presenters and learners who are separated by significant distance. This guide, intended for the staff of federal, state, and local programs that…

  5. Characteristics of Instructional Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Mobina; Taspolat, Ata; Kaya, Omer Sami; Sapanca, Hamza Fatih

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays, video plays a significant role in education in terms of its integration into traditional classes, the principal delivery system of information in classes particularly in online courses as well as serving as a foundation of many blended classes. Hence, education is adopting a modern approach of instruction with the target of moving away…

  6. Computer-assisted instruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, J.; Fisser, P.; Wright, J.D.

    2015-01-01

    Since the early days of computer technology in education in the 1960s, it was claimed that computers can assist instructional practice and hence improve student learning. Since then computer technology has developed, and its potential for education has increased. In this article, we first discuss

  7. Gaze Interactive Building Instructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, John Paulin; Ahmed, Zaheer; Mardanbeigi, Diako

    We combine eye tracking technology and mobile tablets to support hands-free interaction with digital building instructions. As a proof-of-concept we have developed a small interactive 3D environment where one can interact with digital blocks by gaze, keystroke and head gestures. Blocks may be moved...

  8. Revisiting "Beyond Instructional Design"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Rod

    2015-01-01

    Since the article "Beyond Instructional Design: Making Learning Design a Reality" (Sims, 2006) was published, much has changed in the opportunities we have for learning, and Professor Rod Sims's thinking has evolved. In this article, Professor Rod Sims reflects upon his original article, and he offers an evolved model of learning design,…

  9. Individualistic Instructional Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Mehmet Can

    2007-01-01

    This study proposes a new approach to the Instructional Design field. By the constructivism, education systems are moving from a massive structure to the more learner centered and more individualist structure. So far, ID field has adopted and digested the individualism notion partly. This paper proposes an individualistic approach to the…

  10. Differentiated Instruction for Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Kym

    2010-01-01

    Gender based learning has become an acceptable facet of the differentiated classroom. The female learner has unique needs that can be addressed through differentiated instruction. There are distinct differences between men and women. These differences effect how females approach learning as well as how they retain information. "A fundamental…

  11. Orwell's Instructive Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, Liam

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about George Orwell, his instructive errors, and the manner in which Orwell pierced worthless theory, faced facts and defended decency (with fluctuating success), and largely ignored the tradition of accumulated wisdom that has rendered him a timeless teacher--one whose inadvertent lessons, while infrequently…

  12. A Pilot Study of the Impact of Double-Dose Robust Vocabulary Instruction on Children's Vocabulary Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Ann M.; Davis, Dawn L.

    2016-01-01

    Double-dose instruction, in which instructional lessons are supplemented to provide additional instructional time, is a mechanism used in some schools for boosting outcomes in certain academic areas. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of double-dose vocabulary instruction, relative to single-dose and business-as-usual control…

  13. Tutorial Instruction in Science Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhea Miles

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to examine the tutorial practices of in-service teachers to address the underachievement in the science education of K-12 students. Method: In-service teachers in Virginia and North Carolina were given a survey questionnaire to examine how they tutored students who were in need of additional instruction. Results: When these teachers were asked, “How do you describe a typical one-on-one science tutorial session?” the majority of their responses were categorized as teacher-directed. Many of the teachers would provide a science tutorial session for a student after school for 16-30 minutes, one to three times a week. Respondents also indicated they would rely on technology, peer tutoring, scientific inquiry, or themselves for one-on-one science instruction. Over half of the in-service teachers that responded to the questionnaire stated that they would never rely on outside assistance, such as a family member or an after school program to provide tutorial services in science. Additionally, very few reported that they incorporated the ethnicity, culture, or the native language of ELL students into their science tutoring sessions.

  14. Sex Stereotyping in Instructional Materials and Television: Awareness Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Matilda

    This awareness kit provides information on the portrayals of women and men in two media--instructional materials and television; discusses how to evaluate and choose the best media materials from those that exist; recommends actions that will help to eliminate sex stereotyping in instructional materials and television; and suggests an approach to…

  15. Correlation of Emotional Intelligence and Instructional Leadership Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munroe, Myra D.

    2009-01-01

    Leadership is second only to classroom instruction among all school-related factors contributing to student learning (Marzano et al., 2005). Understanding the role of emotional intelligence in instructional leadership behaviors with a focus on establishing expectations for student academic success provides valuable information about practices…

  16. Intravenous Therapy Instruction for Licensed Practical Nurses. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Pam; Carey, Jean

    This Idaho instructor's guide lists tasks and enabling objectives, outlines instruction, and provides handout masters, overhead masters, and tests for intravenous therapy (IV) instruction for licensed practical nurses. Following an introduction and a list of criteria for successful completion of IV therapy courses, the document lists tasks and…

  17. Multimedia Instructional Tools and Student Learning in Computer Applications Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Debra Laier

    2013-01-01

    Advances in technology and changes in educational strategies have resulted in the integration of technology into the classroom. Multimedia instructional tools (MMIT) have been identified as a way to provide student-centered active-learning instructional material to students. MMITs are common in introductory computer applications courses based on…

  18. Instructional Coaching as High-Quality Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desimone, Laura M.; Pak, Katie

    2017-01-01

    In response to policy initiatives calling for the implementation of evidence-based classroom practice, instructional coaches are frequently utilized as providers of professional development (PD). Despite the demand for instructional coaches, there is little empirical evidence that coaching improves teacher practice. We address this limitation by…

  19. Instructional strategy and aptitude in a driving simulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmerik, M.L. van

    2004-01-01

    In the search for innovative instruction and feedback concepts for simulator training, this paper provides a description of the final experiment of a series of three that was done to compare the effectiveness of verbal versus non-verbal instructions in a driving simulator. In the experiment,

  20. Designing Problem-Driven Instruction with Online Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyeong-Ju Seo, Kay, Ed.; Pellegrino, Debra A., Ed.; Engelhard, Chalee, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Designing Problem-Driven Instruction with Online Social Media has the capacity to transform an educator's teaching style by presenting innovative ways to empower problem-based instruction with online social media. Knowing that not all instructors are comfortable in this area, this book provides clear, systematic design approaches for instructors…

  1. Dynamic instruction set extension of microprocessors with embedded FPGAs

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Heiner

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly complex applications and recent shifts in technology scaling have created a large demand for microprocessors which can perform tasks more quickly and more energy efficient. Conventional microarchitectures exploit multiple levels of parallelism to increase instruction throughput and use application specific instruction sets or hardware accelerators to increase energy efficiency. Reconfigurable microprocessors adopt the same principle of providing application specific hardware, how...

  2. Effects of Differentiated Instruction on Student Achievement in Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Darryl L.

    2011-01-01

    Reading teachers are faced with the challenge of providing instruction to a population of diverse students with various abilities and styles of learning within local and state school districts. In an effort to improve student performance on high-stake examinations in reading, teachers continue to seek the most effective instructional strategies.…

  3. Restructuring the Inclusion Classroom to Facilitate Differentiated Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Joshua L.; Conolly, Mindy C.; Ritter, Shirley A.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how the teachers in a sixth grade mathematics inclusion class used differentiated instruction to better meet the needs of all learners in the classroom. In an inclusion class with students of mixed abilities, differentiated instruction allows the teacher to meet the needs of every learner by providing students with multiple…

  4. American Reading Instruction: Pre-Revolutionary Religious Influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutzel, Douglas Ray

    To provide some understanding of current reading methodology, this paper traces the history of reading instruction from ancient times to pre-Revolutionary America and examines the influences exerted upon that instruction by religion. The major portion of the paper discusses the cultures, religions, and educational systems of ancient Egypt;…

  5. Motivational elements in user instructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loorbach, N.R.

    2013-01-01

    Concerning the design of user instructions, two view can be distinguished. The traditional view considers instructions as purely instrumental documents. The more and more emerging affective view still assumes that above all, instructions should enable readers to perform tasks. But in order to

  6. Intelligent Frameworks for Instructional Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, J. Michael; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents a taxonomy describing various uses of artificial intelligence techniques in automated instructional development systems. Instructional systems development is discussed in relation to the design of computer-based instructional courseware; two systems being developed at the Air Force Armstrong Laboratory are reviewed; and further research…

  7. Instructional Leadership Practices in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Foo Seong David; Nguyen, Thanh Dong; Wong, Koon Siak Benjamin; Choy, Kim Weng William

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the literature on principal instructional leadership in Singapore. The authors investigated the dimensions of instructional leadership in the practices of Singapore principals and highlighted the strategies these leaders adopt to enact their instructional roles. Singapore principals were found to play an active role…

  8. An Investigation of the Impact of Instructional Fading Using Completion Problems on Student Performance in Principles of Accounting Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingry, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    The effects of instructional fading using completion problems on student performance were investigated in this study. Instructional fading is the gradual withdrawal of the amount of assistance provided to the student and was accomplished in this study using completion problems. They were used to gradually transition the student from completely…

  9. Case-Based Instructional Practices: A Multiple-Case Study from Torts, Marketing, and Online Instructional Design Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ji yoon

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a comprehensive account on case-based instructional practices. Semester-long participant observation records in torts, marketing, and online instructional design classes, instructor interviews, course syllabi and teaching materials were used to describe the within-class complexity of the practices in terms…

  10. Using Critical Incidents of Instructional Design and Multimedia Production Activities to Investigate Instructional Designers' Current Practices and Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, William A.; Luterbach, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Through consideration of critical incidents, this study analyzed 106 effective, ineffective and extraordinary instructional design and multimedia production (MP) activities discussed by 36 instructional design professionals. This evaluation provided insights into these professionals' best and not so best practices during the past 6 months.…

  11. Effective Instructional Leadership through the Teachers' Eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blase, Jo; Blase, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    A survey of teachers revealed that principals who want to promote classroom instruction must talk openly and freely with teachers about teaching and learning, provide time and encourage peer connections for teachers, empower teachers, embrace the challenge of teachers' professional development, and lead and motivate teachers. (MLH)

  12. Evaluation: Its Role in Instructional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, Robert; And Others

    An instructional development model is described that provides for evaluation of the feasibility of a project, evaluation during the formative design and development phases, summative evaluation prior to dissemination, and continued evaluation after implementation. These guidelines view evaluation as an integral part of development; before the…

  13. An Instructional Module on Mokken Scale Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, Stefanie A.

    2017-01-01

    Mokken scale analysis (MSA) is a probabilistic-nonparametric approach to item response theory (IRT) that can be used to evaluate fundamental measurement properties with less strict assumptions than parametric IRT models. This instructional module provides an introduction to MSA as a probabilistic-nonparametric framework in which to explore…

  14. Process-oriented instruction: Some considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, F.P.C.M. de

    1995-01-01

    This paper does not attempt to be an introduction on process-oriented instruction by providing all the assumptions and key principles. It rather highlights the necessary epistemological shift in education from learning as a receptive process towards learning as a constructive process. The basis for

  15. Orchestrating Semiotic Resources in Explicit Strategy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Lynn E.; Flury-Kashmanian, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Research and pedagogical information provided to teachers on implementing explicit strategy instruction has primarily focused on teachers' speech, with limited attention to other modes of communication, such as gesture and artefacts. This interpretive case study investigates two teachers' use of different semiotic resources when introducing…

  16. Educational Technology Research Journals: "Instructional Science,"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrie, Curtis R.; Williams, Greg S.; West, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    The authors analyzed all research articles published between 2002 and 2011 in the international journal "Instructional Science," with a goal to provide an understanding of the type of research being published in this journal, major contributing authors, and the most-cited publications of this time period. They examined research…

  17. Perceptions about Implementation of Differentiated Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lora; Maldonado, Nancy; Whaley, Jerita

    2014-01-01

    The absence of differentiated instruction in many classrooms stifles success for students who do not learn the same way as their peers. Providing teachers with the knowledge and tools to differentiate in their classrooms may increase test scores and help low achieving students find success, while expanding the learning growth of gifted and…

  18. Bottling Fog? The Quest for Instructional Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Joseph; Neumerski, Christine M.; Goldring, Ellen; Grissom, Jason; Porter, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Elsewhere, the authors have unpacked instructional leadership and have documented that such leadership is associated with more effective schools. Indeed, there has been for a considerable time nearly universal acceptance that learning-centered leadership should provide the central platform on which leadership is enacted. In this paper, a less…

  19. Understanding Children's Museum Learning from Multimedia Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwi, Asmidah; McKay, Elspeth

    2013-01-01

    The use of multimedia instructions for online learning has become very common particularly with the advances of the Internet technology. Consequently museums around the world utilize such information and communications technology (ICT) tools in order to provide richer learning experiences for their visitors. This paper discusses a study that…

  20. A Note on Evaluating Supplemental Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloyo, Alfredo R.

    2015-01-01

    Selection bias pervades the evaluation of supplemental instruction (SI) in non-experimental settings. This brief note provides a formal framework to understand this issue. The objective is to contribute to the accumulation of credible evidence on the impact of SI.

  1. Rural Public Transportation: An Instructional Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Linda

    A concept-based introduction to rural public transportation is provided in this instructional module for undergraduate and graduate transportation-related courses for disciplines such as engineering, business, sociology, and technology. Rural public transportation involves systems in rural and small urban areas with populations under 50,000…

  2. Reforming Science Instruction in California: A Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    EdSource, 2017

    2017-01-01

    As schools across the state implement the Next Generation Science Standards, this EdSource primer provides an easy-to-read guide for parents and other community members to understand the rationale for the standards and their potential to affect science instruction in California schools. California adopted the Next Generation Science Standards, or…

  3. Best Practices in Literacy Instruction. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Lesley Mandel, Ed.; Gambrell, Linda B., Ed.; Pressley, Michael, Ed.

    Now revised and updated, this book's second edition aims to guide teachers in providing effective, engaging literacy instruction that meets the challenges of today's legislative mandates. Identified in the book are principles of best practice that reflect cutting-edge scientific research as well as decades of hands-on classroom experience.…

  4. Optimizing Our Teaching: Hybrid Mode of Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Usova

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The digital revolution changes the way we teach and learn. This paper introduces a concept of a Hybrid course structure. It aims to show the benefits of blended learning and describes the course design used at the Bibliothèque Saint-Jean (BSJ, University of Alberta (U of A. We seek to assist other librarians in their choice of instructional model by providing a rational for combining onsite and online instruction, and by giving recommendations for the development and implementation of a hybrid course.

  5. Processing Instruction: A review of issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhlisin Rasuki

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a critical review of Processing Instruction (PI. This type of instructional option was specifically designed to help second/foreign language (L2 learners grasp meaning manifested in the use of particular grammatical forms in a target language effectively through the provision of input. In this way, PI attempts to help learners develop grammatical competence in a target language in ways that foster their comprehension and production skills. The paper starts with outlining main characteristics of PI which distinguish it from other types of L2 grammar instruction. Then, a large body of research attempting to investigate the relative efficacy of PI is scrutinized. The paper concludes with a number of important issues that future studies on PI need to address.

  6. Instructional Strategies Alternative for Reading Comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajaira del Valle Cadenas Terán

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to expose significantly instruccionales strategic alternatives that help improve the process of reading in college students to be trained holistically, able to make critical decisions, thoughtful and successful in the academic field. The strategies implemented educational event isolated to produce no change is necessary, that are planned and executed in the proper context of the need to ensure a certain extent the instructional success. It is also essential that teachers be the first to appropriate it. This study was conducted with a literature review serves as instructional foundation - strategic. In conclusion the importance of instructional strategies in reading comprehension was determined, since they increase communication skills, provide specific or complex experiences and promote meaningful learning.

  7. Effects of multimedia vocabulary instruction on adolescents with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Michael J; Deshler, Donald D; Lloyd, John Wills

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this experimental study is to investigate the effects of using content acquisition podcasts (CAPs), an example of instructional technology, to provide vocabulary instruction to adolescents with and without learning disabilities (LD). A total of 279 urban high school students, including 30 with LD in an area related to reading, were randomly assigned to one of four experimental conditions with instruction occurring at individual computer terminals over a 3-week period. Each of the four conditions contained different configurations of multimedia-based instruction and evidence-based vocabulary instruction. Dependent measures of vocabulary knowledge indicated that students with LD who received vocabulary instruction using CAPs through an explicit instructional methodology and the keyword mnemonic strategy significantly outperformed other students with LD who were taught using the same content, but with multimedia instruction that did not adhere to a specific theoretical design framework. Results for general education students mirrored those for students with LD. Students also completed a satisfaction measure following instruction with multimedia and expressed overall agreement that CAPs are useful for learning vocabulary terms. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2013.

  8. Instructions to Prospective Authors by Indian Biomedical Journals: An Opportunity to Promote Responsible Conduct of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Anup; Shah, Akash; Sherighar, Swathi G

    2017-04-01

    Journals provide instructions to prospective authors to facilitate the process of manuscript publication. The information provided under such instructions could be a potential opportunity to promote responsible conduct of research (RCR). We analyzed 74 Indian biomedical journals for the type of information provided in the "instructions to authors" section and adherence to the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) recommendations. Among the 71 journals that had an "instructions to authors" section, 53 journals adhered to ICMJE recommendations. We discuss sections of the ICMJE recommendations detailed by Indian biomedical journals under the "instructions to authors" section and emphasize components that require greater exposure.

  9. Safety instruction No. 36

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Secretariat

    2005-01-01

    Please note that a revised version of Safety Instruction No. 36 (IS 36), entitled "Safety rules for the use of static magnetic fields at CERN" is available on the Web at the following url: https://edms.cern.ch/document/335801/LAST_RELEASED Paper copies can also be obtained from the SC unit secretariat (e-mail : sc.secretariat@cern.ch) SC Secretariat

  10. Exploring the Amount and Type of Writing Instruction during Language Arts Instruction in Kindergarten Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puranik, Cynthia S.; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Sidler, Jessica Folsom; Greulich, Luana

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this exploratory investigation was to examine the nature of writing instruction in kindergarten classrooms and to describe student writing outcomes at the end of the school year. Participants for this study included 21 teachers and 238 kindergarten children from nine schools. Classroom teachers were videotaped once each in the fall and winter during the 90 minute instructional block for reading and language arts to examine time allocation and the types of writing instructional practices taking place in the kindergarten classrooms. Classroom observation of writing was divided into student-practice variables (activities in which students were observed practicing writing or writing independently) and teacher-instruction variables (activities in which the teacher was observed providing direct writing instruction). In addition, participants completed handwriting fluency, spelling, and writing tasks. Large variability was observed in the amount of writing instruction occurring in the classroom, the amount of time kindergarten teachers spent on writing and in the amount of time students spent writing. Marked variability was also observed in classroom practices both within and across schools and this fact was reflected in the large variability noted in kindergartners’ writing performance. PMID:24578591

  11. Exploring the Amount and Type of Writing Instruction during Language Arts Instruction in Kindergarten Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puranik, Cynthia S; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Sidler, Jessica Folsom; Greulich, Luana

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this exploratory investigation was to examine the nature of writing instruction in kindergarten classrooms and to describe student writing outcomes at the end of the school year. Participants for this study included 21 teachers and 238 kindergarten children from nine schools. Classroom teachers were videotaped once each in the fall and winter during the 90 minute instructional block for reading and language arts to examine time allocation and the types of writing instructional practices taking place in the kindergarten classrooms. Classroom observation of writing was divided into student-practice variables (activities in which students were observed practicing writing or writing independently) and teacher-instruction variables (activities in which the teacher was observed providing direct writing instruction). In addition, participants completed handwriting fluency, spelling, and writing tasks. Large variability was observed in the amount of writing instruction occurring in the classroom, the amount of time kindergarten teachers spent on writing and in the amount of time students spent writing. Marked variability was also observed in classroom practices both within and across schools and this fact was reflected in the large variability noted in kindergartners' writing performance.

  12. Improving conceptual and procedural knowledge: The impact of instructional content within a mathematics lesson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittle-Johnson, Bethany; Fyfe, Emily R; Loehr, Abbey M

    2016-12-01

    Students, parents, teachers, and theorists often advocate for direct instruction on both concepts and procedures, but some theorists suggest that including instruction on procedures in combination with concepts may limit learning opportunities and student understanding. This study evaluated the effect of instruction on a math concept and procedure within the same lesson relative to a comparable amount of instruction on the concept alone. Direct instruction was provided before or after solving problems to evaluate whether the type of instruction interacted with the timing of instruction within a lesson. We worked with 180 second-grade children in the United States. In a randomized experiment, children received a classroom lesson on mathematical equivalence in one of four conditions that varied in instruction type (conceptual or combined conceptual and procedural) and in instruction order (instruction before or after solving problems). Children who received two iterations of conceptual instruction had better retention of conceptual and procedural knowledge than children who received both conceptual and procedural instruction in the same lesson. Order of instruction did not impact outcomes. Findings suggest that within a single lesson, spending more time on conceptual instruction may be more beneficial than time spent teaching a procedure when the goal is to promote more robust understanding of target concepts and procedures. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  13. Effective Multicultural Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin T. Thompson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The reason why the Trayvon Martin murder trial and similar court cases create a philosophical rift in our nation is due in part to flaws in the delivery of multicultural education. Traditional multicultural instruction does not prepare citizens for the subtleties and complexities of race relations. This study investigates critical strategies and practices that address multicultural missing gaps. I also seek to fill a void in the literature created by a lack of student input regarding teaching strategies that encourage lifelong learning. Students (N = 337 enrolled at a Midwestern university were asked to rate the efficacy of selected instructional strategies. Utilizing a 9-point Likert-type scale, students gave themselves a personal growth rating of 7.15 (SD = 1.47. Variables important to predicting that growth (R2 = .56, p < .0005 were a six-factor variable known as a non-color-blind instructional approach (t = 10.509, p ≤ .0005, allowing students an opportunity to form their own opinions apart from the instructor (t = 4.797, p ≤ .0005, and a state law that mandated multicultural training (t = 3.234, p = .001. Results demonstrated that utilizing a 35% traditional and 65% critical pedagogy mixture when teaching multicultural education helped promote win/win scenarios for education candidates hoping to become difference makers.

  14. Evaluating Reading and Mathematics Instruction for Students with Learning Disabilities: A Synthesis of Observation Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, John William; Shin, Mikyung; Ciullo, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Systematically observing instruction for students with learning disabilities (LD) provides information regarding the quality of school-based interventions, allocation of instructional time, and other implementation variables associated with student outcomes. In this synthesis, observation studies of reading and mathematics instruction from 2000 to…

  15. From Better Tests to Better Texts: Instructional Design Models for Writing Better Textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigeluth, Charles M.; Sari, Fulya

    1980-01-01

    Briefly summarizes some recent advances in instructional science and indicates how this knowledge can be used to improve the instructional quality of textbooks and other instructional materials. Procedures for developing a textbook and for evaluating a textbook are provided. (Author/MER)

  16. Reading Instruction for Fourth-Grade Struggling Readers and the Relation to Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Shawn C.; Wanzek, Jeanne; Al Otaiba, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined the amount, type, and quality of Tier 1 and supplemental reading instruction provided to 4th-grade struggling readers and whether specific elements of instruction predicted growth in reading skills. In all, 110 students identified as having reading difficulty who were receiving school-based reading instruction in 22…

  17. The Effects of Goal-Oriented Instructions in Digital Game-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhel, Séverine; Jamet, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the effects of the instructions provided in educational computer games on cognitive processing and learning outcomes. In our experiment, we sought to compare the effects on learning outcomes of two different types of goal-oriented instructions: "mastery-goal" instructions, which prompt learners to develop…

  18. Is Your Design Story Limiting You? Purposefully Perturbing Our Practices through Instructional Design "Mashups"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honebein, Peter C.; Goldsworthy, Richard C.

    2009-01-01

    Instructional designers are trained to choose instructional methods rationally by considering the conditions and outcomes associated with an instructional situation. However, designers come to these situations with their own "design stories" as well. Our design stories, constructed over time through learning and practice, not only provide meaning…

  19. The Effects of Segmentation and Personalization on Superficial and Comprehensive Strategy Instruction in Multimedia Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Short, cause-and-effect instructional multimedia tutorials that provide learner control of instructional pace (segmentation) and verbal representations of content in a conversational tone (personalization) have been demonstrated to benefit problem solving transfer. How might a more comprehensive multimedia instructional environment focused on…

  20. Configuring Eclipse for GMAT Builds: Instructions for Windows Users, Rev. 0.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Darrel J.

    2007-01-01

    This document provides instructions about how to configure the Eclipse IDE to build GMAT on Windows based PCs. The current instructions are preliminary; the Windows builds using Eclipse are currently a bit crude. These instructions are intended to give you enough information to get Eclipse setup to build wxWidgets based executables in general, and GMAT in particular.

  1. The Role of Theory in Instructional Design: Some Views of an ID Practitioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Trudy K.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how an experienced instructional designer thinks about and uses learning theories to inform instructional design decisions. It uses a vision metaphor to provide a simple heuristic framework for identifying the nature of instructional problems and relating different types of problems to useful theoretical perspectives,…

  2. Kinaesthetic activities in physics instruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Christiansen, Frederik V

    2016-01-01

    One of the major difficulties in learning physics is for students to develop a conceptual understanding of the core concepts of physics. Many authors argue that students’ conceptions of basic physical phenomena are rooted in basic schemas, originating in fundamental kinaesthetic experiences...... of being. We argue that this idea should be utilized in physics instruction, that kinaesthetic activities will provide useful entry point for students’ acquisition of the basic conceptions of physics, and that they can overcome the phenomenological gap between experiential and conceptual understanding. We...... discuss the nature of image schemas and focus particularly on one: effort-resistance-flow. This schema is fundamental not only in our everyday experience, but also in most of school physics. We show how enactment of a particular kinaesthetic model can support student understanding and intuition...

  3. Teaching Strategies for Direct and Indirect Instruction in Teaching Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiia Rüütmann

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available It is important to select the proper instructional strategy for a specific learning outcome in teaching engineering. There are two broad types of learning outcomes: facts, rules and action sequences (on lower levels of complexity in the cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains, and concepts, patterns and abstractions (on higher level of complexity in the above named domains. Facts, rules and action sequences are taught using instructional strategies of direct instruction. Concepts, patterns and abstractions are taught using strategies of indirect instruction. Strategies of both types of learning may be combined, providing a menu of teaching strategies that help students solve problems, think critically and work cooperatively. This article presents teaching strategies suitable for direct and indirect instruction used in teaching engineering.

  4. EST Vocabulary Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia D.S. Bell

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at contributing to the investigation on the instruction of EST (English for Science and Technology vocabulary, in terms of receptive use of the language. It evaluates the effectiveness of two teaching approaches to the acquisition of vocabulary. The first approach consisted of teaching vocabulary through the use of dictionaries, where the words were merely translated into the learners’ L1 or defined in the target language thus promoting superficial level of word processing. The second approach employed activities promoting deep level of word processing. Data were analysed quantitatively. Results indicated that the two approaches seem to have some equipotentiality, as far as EST vocabulary is concerned.

  5. Testing the Impact of Child Characteristics × Instruction Interactions on Third Graders’ Reading Comprehension by Differentiating Literacy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Carol McDonald; Morrison, Fredrick J.; Fishman, Barry; Giuliani, Sarah; Luck, Melissa; Underwood, Phyllis S.; Bayraktar, Aysegul; Crowe, Elizabeth C.; Schatschneider, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    There is accumulating correlational evidence that the effect of specific types of reading instruction depends on children’s initial language and literacy skills, called child characteristics × instruction (C×I) interactions. There is, however, no experimental evidence beyond first grade. This randomized control study examined whether C×I interactions might present an underlying and predictable mechanism for explaining individual differences in how students respond to third-grade classroom literacy instruction. To this end, we designed and tested an instructional intervention (Individualizing Student Instruction [ISI]). Teachers (n = 33) and their students (n = 448) were randomly assigned to the ISI intervention or a vocabulary intervention, which was not individualized. Teachers in both conditions received professional development. Videotaped classroom observations conducted in the fall, winter, and spring documented the instruction that each student in the classroom received. Teachers in the ISI group were more likely to provide differentiated literacy instruction that considered C×I interactions than were the teachers in the vocabulary group. Students in the ISI intervention made greater gains on a standardized assessment of reading comprehension than did students in the vocabulary intervention. Results indicate that C×I interactions likely contribute to students’ varying response to literacy instruction with regard to their reading comprehension achievement and that the association between students’ profile of language and literacy skills and recommended instruction is nonlinear and dependent on a number of factors. Hence, dynamic and complex theories about classroom instruction and environment impacts on student learning appear to be warranted and should inform more effective literacy instruction in third grade. PMID:27867226

  6. Testing the Impact of Child Characteristics × Instruction Interactions on Third Graders' Reading Comprehension by Differentiating Literacy Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Carol McDonald; Morrison, Fredrick J; Fishman, Barry; Giuliani, Sarah; Luck, Melissa; Underwood, Phyllis S; Bayraktar, Aysegul; Crowe, Elizabeth C; Schatschneider, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    There is accumulating correlational evidence that the effect of specific types of reading instruction depends on children's initial language and literacy skills, called child characteristics × instruction (C×I) interactions. There is, however, no experimental evidence beyond first grade. This randomized control study examined whether C×I interactions might present an underlying and predictable mechanism for explaining individual differences in how students respond to third-grade classroom literacy instruction. To this end, we designed and tested an instructional intervention (Individualizing Student Instruction [ISI]). Teachers ( n = 33) and their students ( n = 448) were randomly assigned to the ISI intervention or a vocabulary intervention, which was not individualized. Teachers in both conditions received professional development. Videotaped classroom observations conducted in the fall, winter, and spring documented the instruction that each student in the classroom received. Teachers in the ISI group were more likely to provide differentiated literacy instruction that considered C×I interactions than were the teachers in the vocabulary group. Students in the ISI intervention made greater gains on a standardized assessment of reading comprehension than did students in the vocabulary intervention. Results indicate that C×I interactions likely contribute to students' varying response to literacy instruction with regard to their reading comprehension achievement and that the association between students' profile of language and literacy skills and recommended instruction is nonlinear and dependent on a number of factors. Hence, dynamic and complex theories about classroom instruction and environment impacts on student learning appear to be warranted and should inform more effective literacy instruction in third grade.

  7. Future development of instructional television

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, H. J.; Denzau, A. T.; Dumolin, J. R.; Singh, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    The use of television in schools as an aid to instruction is proposed for individualized instruction, repetition for slow learners, acceleration for fast learners, and lectures from the best teachers for all students. A dedicated school district cable system, a 40 channel cable to each school and classroom, is considered. This innovation offers an opportunity for improving the quality and content of the school's instruction and for reducing the cost.

  8. An alternative time for telling: when conceptual instruction prior to problem solving improves mathematical knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Emily R; DeCaro, Marci S; Rittle-Johnson, Bethany

    2014-09-01

    The sequencing of learning materials greatly influences the knowledge that learners construct. Recently, learning theorists have focused on the sequencing of instruction in relation to solving related problems. The general consensus suggests explicit instruction should be provided; however, when to provide instruction remains unclear. We tested the impact of conceptual instruction preceding or following mathematics problem solving to determine when conceptual instruction should or should not be delayed. We also examined the learning processes supported to inform theories of learning more broadly. We worked with 122 second- and third-grade children. In a randomized experiment, children received instruction on the concept of math equivalence either before or after being asked to solve and explain challenging equivalence problems with feedback. Providing conceptual instruction first resulted in greater procedural knowledge and conceptual knowledge of equation structures than delaying instruction until after problem solving. Prior conceptual instruction enhanced problem solving by increasing the quality of explanations and attempted procedures. Providing conceptual instruction prior to problem solving was the more effective sequencing of activities than the reverse. We compare these results with previous, contrasting findings to outline a potential framework for understanding when instruction should or should not be delayed. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  9. Metacognitive instruction in middle school science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonney, Dianna

    The purpose of this action research project was to determine the extent to which metacognitive instruction affected students' performance in the middle-grade science classroom. Conducted with four seventh grade science classes over a three-month time period, 105 students were engaged in 21 metacognitively enhanced lessons. Both quantitative and qualitative data sources were collected for this study and analyzed according to grounded theory methodology. Quantitative data came from the Jr. Metacognitive Awareness Inventory, administered as a pre-post test. Qualitative teacher-generated data was collected in a metacognitive observation protocol containing observations and reflections while student-generated data was gathered from reflective journal entries, modified rubrics, and checklists. Analysis of the data led to the assertions that metacognitive development occurred over time through systematic and varied implementation of explicit instruction. In addition, students perceived they learned best both when working collaboratively and when making multiple connections with content material. Implications for middle-grade teachers include the need for explicit instruction of metacognitive strategies, providing for instructional variation and student collaboration, and guiding students in making connections to prior learning.

  10. Allocating instruction time: How language instruction can affect multiple skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghans, L.; Diris, R.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    There exists substantial variation in how schools allocate instruction time to school subjects. The effectiveness of that allocation depends on the immediate effect of instruction in one subject on achievement in the same subject, on how skills further develop over time, and on possible spillover

  11. The Instructional Network: Using Facebook to Enhance Undergraduate Mathematics Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Peter; Gregory, Karen; Eddy, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Facebook is a website with over one billion users worldwide that is synonymous with social-networking. However, in this study, Facebook is used as an "instructional network". Two sections of an undergraduate calculus course were used to study the effects of participating in a Facebook group devoted solely to instruction. One section was…

  12. Evaluation of Instructional Design Capabilities of Asynchronous and Synchronous Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Kristi N.; Benson, Angela D.

    2017-01-01

    From a quantitative perspective, this study examined the instructional design knowledge of higher education instructors and others within the instructional design/technology arena who are members of a global educational based Internet forum. Results showed significant difference in opinions between genders, where males were more inclined to…

  13. On Using Various Mathematics Instructions versus Traditional Instruction: An Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzabut, Jehad

    2017-01-01

    In this research, I provide an overview of potentially selected interactive mathematical instructions that help learners-educators identifying the most effective practices for teaching a course on differential equations. Based on my practical experience, positive and negative aspects of the used techniques are discussed. Immediate reactions on the…

  14. Forum: Interpersonal Communication in Instructional Settings: Interpersonal Communication Research in Instructional Contexts: A Dyadic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodboy, Alan K.; Kashy, Deborah A.

    2017-01-01

    Do we study too much interpersonal communication and not enough of other topics in the instructional communication literature? This forum provides a mixed bag of both affirmative and negative responses to this question. On one hand, answering "yes" is quite defensible because there are many recent studies examining interpersonal…

  15. Designing Instruction with Learning Objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Cheryl J.; Ryan-Jones, David

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of online learning and standards for web-based and computer-based courseware focuses on learning objects, defined here as small, stand-alone units of instruction that can be tagged with descriptors and stored for reuse in various instructional contexts. Presents principles of learning object design and guidelines for assuring that…

  16. Instructional Model for Concept Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, Robert D.

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of applying research variables for concept acquisition into a generalized instructional model for teaching concepts. This paper does not present the methodology for the decision/selection stages in designing the actual instruction task, but offers references to other sources which give…

  17. Science Approach to Instructional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigeluth, Charles M.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Distinguishes between the process and products of science and describes the role of each in Instructional Development (ID). The observe, hypothesize, test components of the scientific process are examined as they apply to front-end analysis, instructional strategy description, and formative evaluation stages used in ID models. Thirty-four…

  18. Critical Analysis of Instructional Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Fen; Reigeluth, Charles M.

    The discussion of the critical analysis of instructional design is framed within Habermas' three fundamental human interests: technical, practical, and emancipatory. The primary goal of this paper is to explore alternative approaches for instructional designers' reflection and critique. Ultimately, this reflection and critique should shed light on…

  19. Professional Cosmetology Practices. Instructional Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopcus, Sharron; Armstrong, Ivan J.

    This publication is designed to assist the instructor and students in understanding the latest concepts and techniques of the instructional phase of cosmetology programs. The instructional units are in five areas: (1) orientation, (2) professional practices: hair, (3) professional practices: skin and nails, (4) cosmetology science, and (5)…

  20. Unpacking Corrections in Mobile Instruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Lena; Cromdal, Jakob; Broth, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with the organisation of correction in mobile instructional settings. Five sets of video data (>250 h) documenting how learners were instructed to fly aeroplanes, drive cars and ride bicycles in real life traffic were examined to reveal some common features of correction exchan...

  1. Instructional Theory for Teaching Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Jan R.; Dinham, Sarah M.

    Metatheoretical analysis of Ausubel's Theory of Meaningful Verbal Learning and Gagne's Theory of Instruction using the Dickoff and James paradigm produced two instructional systems for basic statistics. The systems were tested with a pretest-posttest control group design utilizing students enrolled in an introductory-level graduate statistics…

  2. PROGRAMMED INSTRUCTION AND LANGUAGE LEARNING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LUELSDORFF, PHILIP A.

    PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION, A TEACHING METHOD WHICH INCORPORATES (1) A DETAILED SPECIFICATION OF TERMINAL BEHAVIOR, (2) A CAREFUL SEQUENCING OF THE MATERIAL INTO GRADED STEPS, AND (3) THE REINFORCEMENT OF STUDENT RESPONSE, WORKS MORE FAVORABLY IN CERTAIN INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA THAN IN OTHERS. CARROLL AND SKINNER BELIEVE THAT SUCCESS IN PROGRAMED…

  3. Using Microcomputers for Composition Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronnell, Bruce; Humes, Ann

    One of the most valuable uses of microcomputers and word processors in composition instruction is in the teaching of writing revision. A number of activities can be carried out with these tools; for example, (1) after appropriate instruction on revision, students can be given prewritten text and asked to revise it on the word processors; (2) after…

  4. Differentiated Instruction in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Gretchen

    2013-01-01

    Low achievement on standardized tests may be attributed to many factors, including teaching methods. Differentiated instruction has been identified as a teaching method using different learning modalities that appeal to varied student interests with individualized instruction. The purpose of this quantitative study was to compare whole-group…

  5. Technology-Assisted University Instruction: Large Course Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William GREENBERG

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe a model of instruction in mathematics which combines the traditional university lecture with computer aided delivery of homework and testing. While this model of emporium instruction was developed at Virginia Tech to deal with the burden of increased class sizes and increasing demands on faculty time, it has, in fact, proven to be an effective pedagogical method with advantages as compared to traditional lecture style instruction. We will argue that it also provides an economic alternative for less developed nations, with partiuclar benefits for the special problems faced by these universities.

  6. Instruction or distraction in the driving school?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mike Kirk; Caglio, Agnese

    In this paper we report an ongoing study of driving school practice. We recorded several hours of driving lessons in different environments, which we analyze with the Interaction Analysis method. Our initial analysis suggests that looking at how teachers make use of different communicative resour...... resources to instruct students in driving, can provide insights for the development of technologies that support drivers in managing distractions....

  7. Unaligned instruction relocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolli, Carlo; O' Brien, John K.; Sallenave, Olivier H.; Sura, Zehra N.

    2018-01-23

    In one embodiment, a computer-implemented method includes receiving source code to be compiled into an executable file for an unaligned instruction set architecture (ISA). Aligned assembled code is generated, by a computer processor. The aligned assembled code complies with an aligned ISA and includes aligned processor code for a processor and aligned accelerator code for an accelerator. A first linking pass is performed on the aligned assembled code, including relocating a first relocation target in the aligned accelerator code that refers to a first object outside the aligned accelerator code. Unaligned assembled code is generated in accordance with the unaligned ISA and includes unaligned accelerator code for the accelerator and unaligned processor code for the processor. A second linking pass is performed on the unaligned assembled code, including relocating a second relocation target outside the unaligned accelerator code that refers to an object in the unaligned accelerator code.

  8. Unaligned instruction relocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolli, Carlo; O' Brien, John K.; Sallenave, Olivier H.; Sura, Zehra N.

    2017-10-17

    In one embodiment, a computer-implemented method includes receiving source code to be compiled into an executable file for an unaligned instruction set architecture (ISA). Aligned assembled code is generated, by a computer processor. The aligned assembled code complies with an aligned ISA and includes aligned processor code for a processor and aligned accelerator code for an accelerator. A first linking pass is performed on the aligned assembled code, including relocating a first relocation target in the aligned accelerator code that refers to a first object outside the aligned accelerator code. Unaligned assembled code is generated in accordance with the unaligned ISA and includes unaligned accelerator code for the accelerator and unaligned processor code for the processor. A second linking pass is performed on the unaligned assembled code, including relocating a second relocation target outside the unaligned accelerator code that refers to an object in the unaligned accelerator code.

  9. Recent research on the high-probability instructional sequence: A brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipschultz, Joshua; Wilder, David A

    2017-04-01

    The high-probability (high-p) instructional sequence consists of the delivery of a series of high-probability instructions immediately before delivery of a low-probability or target instruction. It is commonly used to increase compliance in a variety of populations. Recent research has described variations of the high-p instructional sequence and examined the conditions under which the sequence is most effective. This manuscript reviews the most recent research on the sequence and identifies directions for future research. Recommendations for practitioners regarding the use of the high-p instructional sequence are also provided. © 2017 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  10. Intelligent Educational Systems for Anchored Instruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, David D.

    1995-01-01

    Explores the potential for using Intelligent Educational Systems (IES) for anchoring instruction in macro contexts in science education. Topics include anchored instruction; situated cognition; problem solving; cognitivism; interactive video environments; and examples of combining IES and anchored instruction. (LRW)

  11. Current status of information literacy instruction practices in medical libraries of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Midrar; Ameen, Kanwal

    2014-10-01

    The research explored the current practices of information literacy (IL) instruction in medical libraries of Pakistan. A semi-structured questionnaire was mailed to the head librarians of all 114 academic medical libraries in Pakistan. It investigated the types of IL instruction provided, topics covered, methods of delivery and assessment, level of integration in the curriculum, and level of collaboration with teaching staff. The study revealed that 74% of the respondents had offered some types of IL instruction in their institutions during the previous year, ranging from library orientation to research-level skills. IL instruction is typically only offered to new students or first-time library users or on demand. A majority of the respondents developed IL instruction programs without faculty involvement. Librarians were primarily responsible for offering IL instruction in medical institutions. Face-to-face instruction in computer labs or lecture halls and individual instruction at reference desks were identified as the most common IL instruction delivery methods. The data indicated that oral feedback, written feedback, and searching in a computer lab were the most popular assessment methods that medical librarians used. IL instruction activities in medical libraries of Pakistan are in their infancy. Medical librarians also lack systematic approaches to IL instruction. Medical librarians need to develop educational partnerships with faculty for integrating IL instruction into the mainstream curriculum.

  12. Current status of information literacy instruction practices in medical libraries of Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Midrar; Ameen, Kanwal

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The research explored the current practices of information literacy (IL) instruction in medical libraries of Pakistan. Methods: A semi-structured questionnaire was mailed to the head librarians of all 114 academic medical libraries in Pakistan. It investigated the types of IL instruction provided, topics covered, methods of delivery and assessment, level of integration in the curriculum, and level of collaboration with teaching staff. Results: The study revealed that 74% of the respondents had offered some types of IL instruction in their institutions during the previous year, ranging from library orientation to research-level skills. IL instruction is typically only offered to new students or first-time library users or on demand. A majority of the respondents developed IL instruction programs without faculty involvement. Librarians were primarily responsible for offering IL instruction in medical institutions. Face-to-face instruction in computer labs or lecture halls and individual instruction at reference desks were identified as the most common IL instruction delivery methods. The data indicated that oral feedback, written feedback, and searching in a computer lab were the most popular assessment methods that medical librarians used. Conclusion: IL instruction activities in medical libraries of Pakistan are in their infancy. Medical librarians also lack systematic approaches to IL instruction. Implications: Medical librarians need to develop educational partnerships with faculty for integrating IL instruction into the mainstream curriculum. PMID:25349546

  13. INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN FOR TEACHERS: Improving classroom practice

    OpenAIRE

    Reviewed by Yavuz Akbulut

    2011-01-01

    The key to successful learning in most formal instructional settings is effective instructional design (ID). Instructional design for teachers serves as an organized source of directions, which can help classroom teachers to integrate available resources to improve students‘ acquisition of the instructional goals. The book is consisted of 151 pages (+xvii) covering eight chapters which address a commonsense model of instructional design to guide K-12 teachers during their unique instructional...

  14. Language used in interaction during developmental science instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avenia-Tapper, Brianna

    The coordination of theory and evidence is an important part of scientific practice. Developmental approaches to instruction, which make the relationship between the abstract and the concrete a central focus of students' learning activity, provide educators with a unique opportunity to strengthen students' coordination of theory and evidence. Therefore, developmental approaches may be a useful instructional response to documented science achievement gaps for linguistically diverse students. However, if we are to leverage the potential of developmental instruction to improve the science achievement of linguistically diverse students, we need more information on the intersection of developmental science instruction and linguistically diverse learning contexts. This manuscript style dissertation uses discourse analysis to investigate the language used in interaction during developmental teaching-learning in three linguistically diverse third grade classrooms. The first manuscript asks how language was used to construct ascension from the abstract to the concrete. The second manuscript asks how students' non-English home languages were useful (or not) for meeting the learning goals of the developmental instructional program. The third manuscript asks how students' interlocutors may influence student choice to use an important discourse practice--justification--during the developmental teaching-learning activity. All three manuscripts report findings relevant to the instructional decisions that teachers need to make when implementing developmental instruction in linguistically diverse contexts.

  15. Cultural dimensions of learning: Addressing the challenges of multicultural instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Parrish

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The growing multicultural nature of education and training environments makes it critical that instructors and instructional designers, especially those working in online learning environments, develop skills to deliver culturally sensitive and culturally adaptive instruction. This article explores research into cultural differences to identify those dimensions of culture that are most likely to impact instructional situations. It presents these in the cultural dimensions of learning framework (CDLF, which describes a set of eight cultural parameters regarding social relationships, epistemological beliefs, and temporal perceptions, and illustrates their spectrums of variability as they might be exhibited in instructional situations. The article also explores the literature on instructional design and culture for guidelines on addressing the cross-cultural challenges faced by instructional providers. It suggests that these challenges can be overcome through increased awareness, culturally sensitive communication, modified instructional design processes, and efforts to accommodate the most critical cultural differences. Finally, it describes the use of the CDLF questionnaire as a tool to illuminate the range of preferences existing among learners and to discover the potential range of strategies and tactics that might be useful for a given set of learners.

  16. How faculty learn about and implement research-based instructional strategies: The case of Peer Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Dancy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Preparing and Supporting University Physics Educators.] The lack of knowledge about how to effectively spread and sustain the use of research-based instructional strategies is currently a significant barrier to the improvement of undergraduate physics education. In this paper we address this lack of knowledge by reporting on an interview study of 35 physics faculty, of varying institution types, who were self-reported users of, former users of, or knowledgeable nonusers of the research-based instructional strategy Peer Instruction. Interview questions included in this analysis focused on the faculty’s experiences, knowledge, and use of Peer Instruction, along with general questions about current and past teaching methods used by the interviewee. The primary findings include the following: (i Faculty self-reported user status is an unreliable measure of their actual practice. (ii Faculty generally modify specific instructional strategies and may modify out essential components. (iii Faculty are often unaware of the essential features of an instructional strategy they claim to know about or use. (iv Informal social interactions provide a significant communication channel in the dissemination process, in contrast to the formal avenues of workshops, papers, websites, etc., often promoted by change agents, and (v experience with research-based strategies as a graduate student or through curriculum development work may be highly impactful. These findings indicate that educational transformation can be better facilitated by improving communication with faculty, supporting effective modification by faculty during implementation, and acknowledging and understanding the large impact of informal social interactions as a mode of dissemination.

  17. How faculty learn about and implement research-based instructional strategies: The case of Peer Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancy, Melissa; Henderson, Charles; Turpen, Chandra

    2016-06-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Preparing and Supporting University Physics Educators.] The lack of knowledge about how to effectively spread and sustain the use of research-based instructional strategies is currently a significant barrier to the improvement of undergraduate physics education. In this paper we address this lack of knowledge by reporting on an interview study of 35 physics faculty, of varying institution types, who were self-reported users of, former users of, or knowledgeable nonusers of the research-based instructional strategy Peer Instruction. Interview questions included in this analysis focused on the faculty's experiences, knowledge, and use of Peer Instruction, along with general questions about current and past teaching methods used by the interviewee. The primary findings include the following: (i) Faculty self-reported user status is an unreliable measure of their actual practice. (ii) Faculty generally modify specific instructional strategies and may modify out essential components. (iii) Faculty are often unaware of the essential features of an instructional strategy they claim to know about or use. (iv) Informal social interactions provide a significant communication channel in the dissemination process, in contrast to the formal avenues of workshops, papers, websites, etc., often promoted by change agents, and (v) experience with research-based strategies as a graduate student or through curriculum development work may be highly impactful. These findings indicate that educational transformation can be better facilitated by improving communication with faculty, supporting effective modification by faculty during implementation, and acknowledging and understanding the large impact of informal social interactions as a mode of dissemination.

  18. Why and How Teachers Transform Their Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Barbara J.

    In his 2011 book The highly qualified teacher: What is teacher quality and how do we measure it? Strong argues that as a profession, education has struggled to measure teacher quality and therefore cannot provide a proven system to consistently develop high-quality teachers. In order to move toward an operational definition of teacher quality, Kennedy, in her 2008 journal article entitled "Contributions of qualitative research to research on teacher qualifications" suggests that the causal mechanisms of the development of teachers who are identified as high-quality teachers must be researched, documented, and then used in teacher preparation and development. Instructional ability is a key component of teacher effectiveness. This case study examines instructional transformations made by four teachers to explore why and how teachers make transformations in their teaching. The overarching conclusion of the study is the importance of student-centeredness as a component of teacher effectiveness.

  19. Embedding Affective Learning Outcomes in Library Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellysa Stern Cahoy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available While information literacy in higher education has long been focused on cognitive learning outcomes, attention must be paid to students’ affective, emotional needs throughout the research process. This article identifies models for embedding affective learning outcomes within information literacy instruction, and provides strategies to help librarians discover, articulate, and address students’ self-efficacy, motivation, emotions and attitudes. Worksheets to assist in creating affective learning outcomes are included to bring structure to an area of learning that is often challenging to articulate and measure. Also included in the article are the results of a recent survey of instruction librarians’ familiarity and inclusion of affective learning outcomes within teaching and learning initiatives.

  20. Effective Classroom Instruction: Implications of Child Characteristics by Reading Instruction Interactions on First Graders' Word Reading Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Carol McDonald; Morrison, Frederick J; Schatschneider, Christopher; Toste, Jessica; Lundblom, Erin; Crowe, Elizabeth C; Fishman, Barry

    2011-07-01

    Too many children fail to learn how to read proficiently with serious consequences for their overall well-being and long term success in school. This may be because providing effective instruction is more complex than many of the current models of reading instruction portray; there are child characteristic by instruction (CXI) interactions. Here we present efficacy results for a randomized control field trial of the Individualizing Student Instruction (ISI) intervention, which relies on dynamic system forecasting intervention models to recommend amounts of reading instruction for each student, taking into account CXI interactions that consider his or her vocabulary and reading skills. The study, conducted in seven schools with 25 teachers and 396 first graders, revealed that students in the ISI intervention classrooms demonstrated significantly greater reading skill gains by spring than did students in control classrooms. Plus, they were more likely to receive differentiated reading instruction based on CXI interaction guided recommended amounts than were students in control classrooms. The precision with which students received the recommended amounts of each type of literacy instruction, the distance from recommendation, also predicted reading outcomes.

  1. Effective Classroom Instruction: Implications of Child Characteristics by Reading Instruction Interactions on First Graders’ Word Reading Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Frederick J.; Schatschneider, Christopher; Toste, Jessica; Lundblom, Erin; Crowe, Elizabeth C; Fishman, Barry

    2011-01-01

    Too many children fail to learn how to read proficiently with serious consequences for their overall well-being and long term success in school. This may be because providing effective instruction is more complex than many of the current models of reading instruction portray; there are child characteristic by instruction (CXI) interactions. Here we present efficacy results for a randomized control field trial of the Individualizing Student Instruction (ISI) intervention, which relies on dynamic system forecasting intervention models to recommend amounts of reading instruction for each student, taking into account CXI interactions that consider his or her vocabulary and reading skills. The study, conducted in seven schools with 25 teachers and 396 first graders, revealed that students in the ISI intervention classrooms demonstrated significantly greater reading skill gains by spring than did students in control classrooms. Plus, they were more likely to receive differentiated reading instruction based on CXI interaction guided recommended amounts than were students in control classrooms. The precision with which students received the recommended amounts of each type of literacy instruction, the distance from recommendation, also predicted reading outcomes. PMID:22229058

  2. Reading instruction in science: Teachers' practices, beliefs, & self-efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Christina M.

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS, 2010) and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS, 2013) call on science teachers to play a stronger role in helping students learn from informational science texts. Curriculum implementation efforts aimed at addressing these new standards should build on what teachers are already doing to help students with reading in their classrooms and the pedagogical issues that they feel are important to science learning. However, few current studies have gathered these important insights from science teachers. Aiming to fill this gap in the literature, this study attempted to describe middle school science teachers' current practices, beliefs, and self-efficacy regarding reading and reading instruction in their classrooms. A conceptual model hypothesizing that self-efficacy mediates the relationship between teachers' beliefs about how important reading instruction is to science learning and how often they provide reading instruction in their science classes was also tested. Participants (N = 247) reported that students regularly engaged in reading-related tasks in science class. Somer's D correlation analyses highlighted positive associations between the frequency with which teachers reported that students engaged in various reading-related tasks and the frequency with which they reported providing reading instruction for those tasks, suggesting that students tended to receive explicit instruction or coaching for the reading-related tasks they engaged in most often. Middle school science teachers also expressed positive beliefs about the importance of reading-related tasks and explicit instruction or coaching for reading in science and tended to take on responsibility for helping students become better readers of science texts. Last, a path analysis confirmed that the association between teachers' beliefs and practices was mediated through teachers' self-efficacy (beta = .07, p self-efficacy can influence teacher practice: even if

  3. Preservice Teachers' TPACK: Using Technology to Support Inquiry Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeng, Jennifer L.; Mulvey, Bridget K.; Smetana, Lara K.; Bell, Randy L.

    2013-12-01

    This investigation provides detailed descriptions of preservice secondary science teachers' technology-enhanced inquiry instruction and their developing TPACK. Prior to student teaching, 27 preservice teachers were introduced to general guidelines for integrating technology to support reform-based science instruction. This instruction was in the context of a 2-year Master of Teaching program. Of the 27 preservice teachers, 26 used technology for inquiry instruction during student teaching. Our goals were to describe how these 26 preservice science teachers: (1) used educational technologies to support students' investigations and (2) demonstrated their developing TPACK through technology-enhanced inquiry instruction. Multiple data sources (observations, lesson plans, interviews, and reflections) allowed for characterization of participants' technology integration to support inquiry instruction and their decision-making related to the use of technology to support inquiry. Results indicated that participants incorporated technologies appropriate to the content and context to facilitate non-experimental and experimental inquiry experiences. Participants developing TPACK was evidenced by their selective and appropriate use of technology. Appropriate technology use for inquiry included the following: (1) to present an engaging introduction, (2) to facilitate data collection, (3) to facilitate data analysis, and (4) to facilitate communication and discussion of results. These results suggest that using digital images to facilitate whole-class inquiry holds considerable promise as a starting point for teachers new to inquiry instruction. Results of the present study may inform science teacher educators' development of content-specific, technology-enhanced learning opportunities that: prepare preservice teachers for the responsibility of supporting inquiry instruction with technology, facilitate the transition to student-centered instruction, and support TPACK development.

  4. The Characteristics of Ernst Meyer's Group Instruction in Relation to Frontal Instruction

    OpenAIRE

    吉田, 茂孝

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to clarify the characteristics of Ernst Meyer's group instruction in relation to frontal instruction. In this paper, the following three points are analyzed. (1) In the historical development of German didactics, how Ernst Meyer's group instruction is positioned is clarified. (2) Ernst Meyer's frontal instruction and the form of his instruction are clarified, and the position of Ernst Meyer's group instruction in the theory of the instructional form is analyzed. (...

  5. Instructional technology adoption of medical faculty in teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayim, Neşe; Yıldırım, Soner; Saka, Osman

    2005-01-01

    Despite large investment by higher education institutions in technology for faculty and student use, instructional technology is not being integrated into instructions in the higher education institutions, including medical education institutions. While diffusion of instructional technologies has been reached a saturation point with early adopters of technology, it has remained limited among mainstream faculty. This study explored technology adoption patterns and perceptions of medical faculty about barriers and incentives to technology adoption in teaching.Complete data was obtained from 155 participants by using survey methodology and analyzed on the basis of theories of diffusion of innovation.Findings provided evidence for limited adoption of relatively new tools associated with instruction into mainstream faculty. Inadequate hardware for students and faculty, lack of reward structure, insufficient traing oppurtunites were identified as major barriers to faculty technology adoption.

  6. Measurement control workshop instructional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, Philip [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Crawford, Cary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McGinnis, Brent [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Insolves LLC, Piketon, OH (United States)

    2014-04-01

    A workshop to teach the essential elements of an effective nuclear materials control and accountability (MC&A) programs are outlined, along with the modes of Instruction, and the roles and responsibilities of participants in the workshop.

  7. Intelligent Tools and Instructional Simulations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murray, William R; Sams, Michelle; Belleville, Michael

    2001-01-01

    This intelligent tools and instructional simulations project was an investigation into the utility of a knowledge-based performance support system to support learning and on-task performance for using...

  8. Zoology by Self-Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Keith; Hammond, Roger

    1976-01-01

    A historical account is given of how a conventional university first-year undergraduate course in zoology has been replaced by a self-instructional one. Advantages and problems are weighed, and successful student achievement and interest are described. (LBH)

  9. Hypermedia Environments and Adaptive Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, Pat-Anthony

    1999-01-01

    Reviews relevant professional literature concerning hypermedia environments and adaptive instruction for online learning for distance education and continuing education. Highlights include aptitude-treatment interaction; cognitive processes; navigational paths; log files; and intelligent tutors. Contains 125 references. (LRW)

  10. Designing Instruction for Distance Learning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Main, Robert

    1998-01-01

    .... While distance learning has been demonstrated to be an effective and efficient tool for increased access it also requires greater emphasis on instructional design and instructor training to obtain satisfactory results...

  11. Climate Change Misconceptions: Can Instruction Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCuin, J. L.; Hayhoe, K.; Hayhoe, D.

    2014-12-01

    Public understanding of climate change is fraught with misconceptions. In some cases, these may arise due to the complexity of the topic: the difference between personal experience of short-term weather events, for example, as compared to long-term analysis of a climate trend. In others, myths may be deliberately introduced: that climate has ceased to change, or that changes have been proven to be due to natural causes. Whatever their origin, these misconceptions hold powerful implications for education on climate change and related science topics. Conceptual change theory demonstrates how pre-existing misconceptions persist under regular instruction and interfere with student acquisition of correct concepts. Here, we assess the extent to which incorporating corrective instruction on misconceptions related to the greenhouse effect and on the role of human activities in climate change affects student acquisition and retention of key scientific concepts. We investigate the efficacy of this approach using two reading passages: one that simply discusses the science, and another that provides both science and misconceptions-related information. Study subjects were drawn from a first year Atmospheric Sciences course at a large public university, yielding 197 students who successfully completed the pretest, instructional treatment, immediate posttest, delayed posttest, and a background survey. While both treatments produced significant gains in the posttest and delayed posttest overall, only the treatment that directly targeted misconceptions produced long-term gains on misconception-related questions. Our results support the conceptual change model's basic claim that misconceptions may persist through concept-based instruction, but may be uprooted by even a relatively brief reading passage that addresses them directly. However, our results also contain a striking anomaly: for questions involving the phrase "global warming," misconceptions-based instruction did not

  12. Internet-based instruction in college teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flickinger, Kathleen Anne

    Distance education and Internet instruction are increasingly being used in college science teaching. In an effort to reach more students, Iowa State University's Human Anatomy and Physiology course was offered via Internet as well as via traditional lecture format. To assess the educational ramifications of this offering, three studies were conducted. In the first study, a collective case study approach was utilized to describe the learning environment created by an Internet-based college science course. In this study, three students were followed as they worked their way through the course. Collective case study methodologies were used to provide a rich description of the learning environment experienced by these students. Motivation, computer savvy, and academic and personal self-confidence appeared to impact the satisfaction level of the students enrolled in the class. To evaluate the effectiveness of the learning environment offered through the Internet-based science course, a quantitative comparison study was undertaken. In this study a comparison of achievement scores and study habits between students enrolled in the Internet-based class and those enrolled in the traditional section was made. Results from this study indicated that content understanding and retention did not appear to be effected by the type of instruction. Desirable study habits were reportedly used more frequently in the Internet section of the class than in the traditional class. To complete the description of the Internet course experience, a qualitative examination of Internet instructors' time commitment and level of teaching satisfaction was conducted. Data for this study consisted of interviews and researcher observations. Instructor time-on-task was initially quite high, and remained above the average spent on average face-to-face instruction in subsequent semesters. Additionally the role of the faculty member changed dramatically, causing some lessening of job satisfaction. Taken as

  13. Open Textbooks for Instructional Designers

    OpenAIRE

    Ernst, David

    2015-01-01

    Join a fellow instructional designer, Dr. Dave Ernst, now Chief Information Officer of the College of Education and Human Development at University of Minnesota, in exploring possibilities for incorporating open educational resources in your instructional design philosophy and work. Learn how you can make a difference by supporting faculty exploring or interested in developing or redesigning their courses. Discussion topics include: Open and OER - what it is and what it isn't; how to attribut...

  14. Achieving science, math and reading literacy for all: The role of inquiry-based science instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Man

    With the enactment of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, educators and policy makers have been seeking effective strategies to improve students' science, mathematics and reading achievement. One of the primary teaching strategies recommended by reform-oriented organizations, such as the National Research Council (1996), is to utilize inquiry-based science instruction. In this study, I examined the effects of inquiry-based science instruction and traditional science instruction on student achievement across science, mathematics and reading. I also compared the effects of inquiry-based science instruction and traditional science instruction on student achievement. Using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999---a large, national data sample---a series of structural equation modeling analyses were performed. Results indicated that inquiry-based science instruction was associated with significant, positive gains not only in science achievement, but also in mathematics and reading achievement. The positive relationship between inquiry instruction and student achievement was found above and beyond the contributions of traditional science instruction, which generally showed no significant relationship to student achievement. Findings support the theoretical position that inquiry-based science instruction can have robust benefits across the curriculum. This study contributes to the dialogue on effective instructional methods to achieve science, mathematics and reading literacy for all. Overall, this study provides cautious support for the idea that student achievement can be promoted by supporting and encouraging teachers to implement inquiry-based science instruction.

  15. HyperDesigning: an instructional design model applied to the development of a HyperCard computer assisted instruction on intramuscular injection sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedge, K S

    1994-01-01

    As more instructional software is designed by faculty, it becomes increasingly important, as well as time efficient, that faculty approach development of software from an instructional design perspective. Today, faculty can select among emerging technologies, and the future will undoubtedly present even more options. Educators who want to design their own computer assisted instruction (CAI) programs are frequently left to their own devices for instructional design. Instructional design models can provide helpful guidelines for selection and development of relevant programs. This article outlines the development of a faculty-designed software program using the Seels and Glasgow model of instructional design. The Seels and Glasgow model employs the essential components of analysis, design, development, implementation, evaluation, and diffusion with iterative intermediary steps.

  16. Intelligent Instructional Systems in Military Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, J.D.; Zdybel, Frank

    Intelligent instructional systems can be distinguished from more conventional approaches by the automation of instructional interaction and choice of strategy. This approach promises to reduce the costs of instructional materials preparation and to increase the adaptability and individualization of the instruction delivered. Tutorial simulation…

  17. Instructional Technology Must Contribute to Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenda, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Those involved in instructional technology in higher education are urged to view instructional technology as a means of improving academic productivity. Instructional technology has been used for over forty years to analyze instructional problems and design solutions that reduce costs and improve learning outcomes. The Pew Program in Course…

  18. Changing Student Teachers' Views of Comprehension Instruction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reasons seem to include a lack of proper teacher training in comprehension instruction, teachers remaining unconvinced about the value of strategy instruction, and concerns that strategy instruction is time consuming and difficult to learn and teach. This article reports on the effect of a reading comprehension instruction ...

  19. Professional Development: Identifying Effective Instructional Coaching Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, Gina

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the instructional coaching activities most used by instructional coaches in southeast Texas school districts and to test if there was a relationship between the use of instructional coaching and perceived improvement in the instructional practices of teachers and student achievement. The participants for…

  20. Improving Instructional Assistant Effectiveness in Inclusive Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Kimberly Beth

    2010-01-01

    As of 2007, 718,119 instructional assistants were employed in the United States (National Center for Education Statistics, 2009b). Of those instructional assistants, 373,466 were classified as full-time special education instructional assistants (Data Accountability Center, 2009a). As the employment of instructional assistants continues to grow,…