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Sample records for providing similar oncological

  1. A method for analyzing the business case for provider participation in the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program and similar federally funded, provider-based research networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Kristin L; Song, Paula H; Minasian, Lori; Good, Marjorie; Weiner, Bryan J; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2012-09-01

    The Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) plays an essential role in the efforts of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to increase enrollment in clinical trials. Currently, there is little practical guidance in the literature to assist provider organizations in analyzing the return on investment (ROI), or business case, for establishing and operating a provider-based research network (PBRN) such as the CCOP. In this article, the authors present a conceptual model of the business case for PBRN participation, a spreadsheet-based tool and advice for evaluating the business case for provider participation in a CCOP organization. A comparative, case-study approach was used to identify key components of the business case for hospitals attempting to support a CCOP research infrastructure. Semistructured interviews were conducted with providers and administrators. Key themes were identified and used to develop the financial analysis tool. Key components of the business case included CCOP start-up costs, direct revenue from the NCI CCOP grant, direct expenses required to maintain the CCOP research infrastructure, and incidental benefits, most notably downstream revenues from CCOP patients. The authors recognized the value of incidental benefits as an important contributor to the business case for CCOP participation; however, currently, this component is not calculated. The current results indicated that providing a method for documenting the business case for CCOP or other PBRN involvement will contribute to the long-term sustainability and expansion of these programs by improving providers' understanding of the financial implications of participation. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  2. A Method for Analyzing the Business Case for Provider Participation in the National Cancer Institute’s Community Clinical Oncology Program and Similar Federally Funded Provider-Based Research Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Kristin L.; Song, Paula H.; Minasian, Lori; Good, Marjorie; Weiner, Bryan J.; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2011-01-01

    Background The Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) plays an essential role in the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) efforts to increase enrollment in clinical trials. There is currently little practical guidance in the literature to assist provider organizations in analyzing the return on investment (ROI), or business case, for establishing and operating a provider-based research network (PBRN) such as the CCOP. This paper presents a conceptual model of the business case for PBRN participation and provides a spreadsheet-based tool and advice for evaluating the business case for provider participation in a CCOP organization. Methods A comparative, case-study approach was used to identify key components of the business case for hospitals attempting to support a CCOP research infrastructure. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with providers and administrators. Key themes were identified and used to develop the financial analysis tool. Results Key components of the business case include CCOP start-up costs, direct revenue from the NCI CCOP grant, direct expenses required to maintain the CCOP research infrastructure, and incidental benefits, most notably downstream revenues from CCOP patients. The value of incidental benefits is recognized as an important contributor to the business case for CCOP participation, but is not currently calculated. Conclusions Providing a method for documenting the business case for CCOP or other PBRN involvement will contribute to the long-term sustainability and expansion of these programs by improving providers’ understanding of the financial implications of participation. PMID:22213241

  3. Provider volume and outcomes for oncological procedures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, S D

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Oncological procedures may have better outcomes if performed by high-volume providers. METHODS: A review of the English language literature incorporating searches of the Medline, Embase and Cochrane collaboration databases was performed. Studies were included if they involved a patient cohort from 1984 onwards, were community or population based, and assessed health outcome as a dependent variable and volume as an independent variable. The studies were also scored quantifiably to assess generalizability with respect to any observed volume-outcome relationship and analysed according to organ system; numbers needed to treat were estimated where possible. RESULTS: Sixty-eight relevant studies were identified and a total of 41 were included, of which 13 were based on clinical data. All showed either an inverse relationship, of variable magnitude, between provider volume and mortality, or no volume-outcome effect. All but two clinical reports revealed a statistically significant positive relationship between volume and outcome; none demonstrated the opposite. CONCLUSION: High-volume providers have a significantly better outcome for complex cancer surgery, specifically for pancreatectomy, oesphagectomy, gastrectomy and rectal resection.

  4. Comparison of Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) Measure Adherence Between Oncology Fellows, Advanced Practice Providers, and Attending Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jason; Zhang, Tian; Shah, Radhika; Kamal, Arif H; Kelley, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Quality improvement measures are uniformly applied to all oncology providers, regardless of their roles. Little is known about differences in adherence to these measures between oncology fellows, advance practice providers (APP), and attending physicians. We investigated conformance across Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) measures for oncology fellows, advance practice providers, and attending physicians at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center (DVAMC). Using data collected from the Spring 2012 and 2013 QOPI cycles, we abstracted charts of patients and separated them based on their primary provider. Descriptive statistics and the chi-square test were calculated for each QOPI measure between fellows, advanced practice providers (APPs), and attending physicians. A total of 169 patients were reviewed. Of these, 31 patients had a fellow, 39 had an APP, and 99 had an attending as their primary oncology provider. Fellows and attending physicians performed similarly on 90 of 94 QOPI metrics. High-performing metrics included several core QOPI measures including documenting consent for chemotherapy, recommending adjuvant chemotherapy when appropriate, and prescribing serotonin antagonists when prescribing emetogenic chemotherapies. Low-performing metrics included documentation of treatment summary and taking action to address problems with emotional well-being by the second office visit. Attendings documented the plan for oral chemotherapy more often (92 vs. 63%, P=0.049). However, after the chart audit, we found that fellows actually documented the plan for oral chemotherapy 88% of the time (p=0.73). APPs and attendings performed similarly on 88 of 90 QOPI measures. The quality of oncology care tends to be similar between attendings and fellows overall; some of the significant differences do not remain significant after a second manual chart review, highlighting that the use of manual data collection for QOPI analysis is an imperfect system, and there may

  5. Smoking Cessation Counseling Beliefs and Behaviors of Outpatient Oncology Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danhauer, Suzanne C.; Tooze, Janet A.; Blackstock, A. William; Spangler, John; Thomas, Leslie; Sutfin, Erin L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Many cancer patients continue to smoke after diagnosis, increasing their risk for treatment complications, reduced treatment efficacy, secondary cancers, and reduced survival. Outpatient oncology providers may not be using the “teachable moment” of cancer diagnosis to provide smoking cessation assistance. Providers and Methods. Physicians and midlevel providers (n = 74) who provide outpatient oncology services completed an online survey regarding smoking cessation counseling behaviors, beliefs, and perceived barriers. Outpatient medical records for 120 breast, lung, head and neck, colon, prostate, and acute leukemia cancer patients were reviewed to assess current smoking cessation assessment and intervention documentation practices. Results. Providers reported commonly assessing smoking in new patients (82.4% frequently or always), but rates declined at subsequent visits for both current smokers and recent quitters. Rates of advising patients to quit smoking were also high (86.5% frequently or always), but oncology setting. PMID:22334454

  6. Falls in Older Adults With Cancer: Evaluation by Oncology Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerard, Emily J; Deal, Allison M; Williams, Grant R; Jolly, Trevor A; Nyrop, Kirsten A; Muss, Hyman B

    2015-11-01

    Falls in older adults are common. Screening for falls is quick, simple, and important because falls increase the risk of morbidity and mortality in older patients with cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate oncology providers' recognition of and response to falls in older patients with cancer. From a sample of older patients with cancer who completed a geriatric assessment blinded to oncology providers, we identified patients who self-reported falls within the past 6 months. Their history and physical and/or clinic notes completed by an oncology provider were reviewed for the following: documentation of falls, gait assessment, referral to geriatrics or physical and/or occupational therapy, and measurement of 25-hydroxy vitamin D level. In our sample of older patients with cancer who reported at least one recent fall (N = 125), the average age was 72 years (range, 65 to 93 years), 78% were female, and 62% had a breast cancer diagnosis. Chart reviews showed that 13 (10%) had falls documented, 25 (20%) had a gait assessment, eight (6%) were referred, and 21 (17%) had vitamin D level measured. We found that only 10% of older patients with cancer who self-reported a recent fall had appropriate medical record documentation. Oncologists are often the primary care providers for older patients and are largely unfamiliar with the frequency and impact of falls in this population. There is a need to increase awareness of falls prevalence and consequences among oncology providers in order to provide timely interventions to reduce the risks associated with falls. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  7. Work-related stress and reward: an Australian study of multidisciplinary pediatric oncology healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, M J; Mukherjee, S; Williams, L K; DeGraves, S; Jackson, M; McCarthy, M C

    2015-11-01

    Managing staff stress and preventing long-term burnout in oncology staff are highly important for both staff and patient well-being. Research addressing work-related stress in adult oncology is well documented; however, less is known about this topic in the pediatric context. This study examined sources of work-related stress and reward specific to multidisciplinary staff working in pediatric oncology in Australia. Participants were 107 pediatric oncology clinicians, including medical, nursing, and allied health staff from two Australian pediatric oncology centers. Participants completed an online survey using two newly developed measures: the work stressors scale-pediatric oncology and the work rewards scale-pediatric oncology. The most commonly reported sources of both stress and reward are related to patient care and interactions with children. Results indicated that levels of work-related stress and reward were similar between the professional disciplines and between the two hospitals. Regression analyses revealed no demographic or organizational factors that were associated with either stress or reward. Work-related stress and reward are not mutually exclusive; particular situations and events can be simultaneously stressful and rewarding for healthcare providers. Although patient care and interactions with children was found to be the most stressful aspect of working in this speciality, it was also the greatest source of reward. Results are discussed in relation to workplace approaches to staff well-being and stress reduction. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Safe Implementation of Computerized Provider Order Entry for Adult Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D B; Kaemingk, D; Frieze, D; Hendrie, P; Payne, T H

    2015-01-01

    Oncology has lagged in CPOE adoption due to the narrow therapeutic index of chemotherapy drugs, individualized dosing based on weight and height, regimen complexity, and workflows that include hard stops where safety checks are performed and documented. We sought to establish CPOE for chemotherapy ordering and administration in an academic teaching institution using a commercially available CPOE system. A commercially available CPOE system was implemented throughout the hospital. A multidisciplinary team identified key safety gaps that required the development of a customized complex order display and a verification documentation workflow. Staff reported safety events were monitored for two years and compared to the year prior to go live. A workflow was enabled to capture real-time provider verification status during the time from ordering to the administration of chemotherapy. A customized display system was embedded in the EMR to provide a single screen view of the relevant parameters of chemotherapy doses including current and previous patient measurements of height and weight, dose adjustments, provider verifications, prior chemotherapy regimens, and a synopsis of the standard regimen for reference. Our system went live with 127 chemotherapy plans and has been expanded to 189. Staff reported safety events decreased following implementation, particularly in the area of prescribing and transcribing by the second year of use. We observed reduced staff reported safety events following implementation of CPOE for inpatient chemotherapy using an electronic verification workflow and an embedded custom clinical decision support page. This implementation demonstrates that CPOE can be safely used for inpatient chemotherapy, even in an extremely complex environment.

  9. The role of Advanced Practice Providers in interdisciplinary oncology care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Rae Brana; McCoy, Kimberly

    2016-06-01

    Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) and Physician Assistants (PAs), generally referred to as Advanced Practice Providers (APPs), are fundamental to interdisciplinary oncology care. As the projected demand for oncology services is anticipated to outpace the supply of oncologists, APPs will become increasingly vital in the delivery of oncology care and services. The training, education, and scope of practice for APPs gives the interdisciplinary care team professionals that deliver high-quality clinical services and provide valuable contributions and leadership to health care quality improvement initiatives. Optimizing the integration of APPs in oncology care offers immense advantages towards improvement of clinical outcomes.

  10. The importance of pharmacist providing patient education in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Mia; Williams, Felecia

    2015-02-01

    The world's increasing diversity requires health care professionals to adjust delivery methods of teaching to accommodate different cultural values and beliefs. The ability to communicate effectively across languages and various cultural practices directly affects patient education outcomes. Pharmacist should be aware of varying modalities and considerations when counseling a patient diagnosed with cancer and undergoing chemotherapy. In more recent years, the medical profession has seen an increase in patient outcomes due to using the multidisciplinary team approach and has benefited by implementing Medication Therapy Management (MTM) programs at various institutions. For the clinical pharmacist, this would mean documentation for these services should be precise and accurate based on the specific patients needs. There are several factors involved in the care and therapy of the patient with cancer. Clinical oncology pharmacist should be aware of the ever-changing role in oncology and be able to implement new practices at their facility for better patient outcomes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Documenting coordination of cancer care between primary care providers and oncology specialists in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, Melissa C; Vukmirovic, Marija; Tomasone, Jennifer R; Grunfeld, Eva; Urquhart, Robin; O'Brien, Mary Ann; Walker, Melanie; Webster, Fiona; Fitch, Margaret

    2016-10-01

    To report on the findings of the CanIMPACT (Canadian Team to Improve Community-Based Cancer Care along the Continuum) Casebook project, which systematically documented Canadian initiatives (ie, programs and projects) designed to improve or support coordination and continuity of cancer care between primary care providers (PCPs) and oncology specialists. Pan-Canadian environmental scan. Canada. Individuals representing the various initiatives provided data for the analysis. Initiatives included in the Casebook met the following criteria: they supported coordination and collaboration between PCPs and oncology specialists; they were related to diagnosis, treatment, survivorship, or personalized medicine; and they included breast or colorectal cancer or both. Data were collected on forms that were compiled into summaries (ie, profiles) for each initiative. Casebook initiatives were organized based on the targeted stage of the cancer care continuum, jurisdiction, and strategy (ie, model of care or type of intervention) employed. Thematic analysis identified similarities and differences among employed strategies, the level of primary care engagement, implementation barriers and facilitators, and initiative evaluation. The CanIMPACT Casebook profiles 24 initiatives. Eleven initiatives targeted the survivorship stage of the cancer care continuum and 15 focused specifically on breast or colorectal cancer or both. Initiative teams implemented the following strategies: nurse patient navigation, multidisciplinary care teams, electronic communication or information systems, PCP education, and multicomponent initiatives. Initiatives engaged PCPs at various levels. Implementation barriers included lack of care standardization across jurisdictions and incompatibility among electronic communication systems. Implementation facilitators included having clinical and program leaders publicly support the initiative, repurposing existing resources, receiving financial support, and

  12. Providing grief resolution as an oncology nurse retention strategy: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Lori

    2012-12-01

    Oncology nurses play a pivotal role in optimizing care provided to patients at the end of life (EOL). Although oncology nurses commonly provide EOL care and witness deaths of patients that they have maintained long-standing relationships with, they are frequently excluded from grief resolution endeavors. With a worldwide shortage of oncology nurses, retention is paramount to ensuring that the care patients with cancer receive is not jeopardized. Various strategies were identified to resolve grief and increase nurse retention, including creating supportive work environments, debriefing with colleagues, providing EOL and grief education, and altering patient care assignments. Future research on emerging technologies and their effects on oncology nurse coping and retention strategies also was suggested.

  13. Oncology and Palliative Medicine: Providing Comprehensive Care for Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Laura; Green, Alva Roche; Malhotra, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Despite the evidence for the fundamental need for palliative medicine services in the practice of oncology, integration of these medical specialties remains a clinical challenge. We reviewed the current literature regarding the practice of palliative medicine in the field of oncology, examining randomized clinical trials of palliative medicine services in advanced cancer, models of palliative medicine delivery, studies of cost effectiveness, and national palliative medicine practice and referral guidelines. In this review, we describe the role of palliative medicine in oncology, including the timing of palliative medicine consultation, models of care delivery, and improvements in patient outcomes. Randomized controlled trials and national guidelines support early referral of patients with cancer to palliative medicine. Palliative medicine has a fundamental role in symptom management, distress relief, family and caregiver support, and advance care planning. Integration of palliative medicine in oncology improves patient outcomes and decreases healthcare costs. Early involvement of palliative medicine after the cancer diagnosis is supported by national guidelines, but barriers include variable referral patterns among oncologists and the need for an expanded palliative medicine workforce. Palliative medicine has a wide-ranging role in the spectrum of comprehensive cancer care-from patient diagnosis to survivorship. The entire multidisciplinary care team has a role in providing palliative care in inpatient and outpatient settings. An effective palliative medicine and oncology collaboration improves patient care and quality of life, has broad research and guideline support, and is cost effective.

  14. The need to educate primary care physicians to provide oncologic services: a changing focus.

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    Rafla, S; Khafif, R; Ross, P; McGroarty, K

    1997-01-01

    The traditional role of primary care physicians (PCPs) in cancer care has been primarily cancer detection, and their training and education were similarly oriented. Propelled by the changing health care delivery system, this role is now expanding substantially. A survey of 31 health maintenance organizations active in the New York market area was performed. The HMOs were grouped into three main categories according to method of payment of the physician. Patient care responsibilities vary depending on the method of payment but stay constant within the group. Of 19 HMOs that responded to the survey, 13 had shifted much of the responsibilities for diagnosis and treatment decisions to the PCP. A national survey of all academic radiation oncology program directors in the United States, as well as training programs of primary care physicians, showed a unanimous lack of educational or training programs or opportunities to familiarize the PCP with radiation oncology as a therapeutic discipline and with its after-therapy requirements. This deficiency extended also to multimodality training and other aspects. The internal medicine programs surveyed scored only an average of 1.25 out of a possible 5 in education areas directly related to oncology training. These programs comprised 78% of the residents of all programs surveyed. The information gathered from these surveys reveals a shift towards mandating the provision of oncologic services by PCPs, who have inadequate training in oncology, with no system in place to remedy the deficiencies except on-the-job training. The inevitability of the changing role of the PCP must be accompanied by either an expansion of residency programs to encompass training in important aspects of oncology care or expansion and formalization of continuing education programs to achieve the same objective.

  15. Factors Predicting Oncology Care Providers' Behavioral Intention to Adopt Clinical Decision Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfenden, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to examine the predictors of user behavioral intention on the decision of oncology care providers to adopt or reject the clinical decision support system. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) formed the foundation of the research model and survey instrument. The…

  16. Integrating Palliative Care in Oncology: The Oncologist as a Primary Palliative Care Provider

    OpenAIRE

    Rangachari, Deepa; Smith, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The provision of comprehensive cancer care in an increasingly complex landscape necessitates that oncology providers familiarize themselves with the application of palliative care. Palliative care is a learnable skill. Recent endeavors in this arena have demonstrated that providing palliative care is part and parcel with providing compassionate and high-quality cancer care, specifically as it pertains to physical and emotional outcomes for patients and their caregivers alike. The basic tenets...

  17. Patient satisfaction with inpatient care provided by the Sydney Gynecological Oncology Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Arora

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Vivek Arora, Shannon Philp, Kathryn Nattress, Selvan Pather, Christopher Dalrymple, Kenneth Atkinson, Sofia Smirnova, Stephen Cotterell, Jonathan CarterSydney Gynecological Oncology Group, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, University of Sydney, Sydney, AustraliaPurpose: Patient satisfaction with the provision of hospital oncology services can have a significant impact on their overall treatment experience.Aims: To assess patient satisfaction with the inpatient hospital services in the gynecological oncology setting using the IN-PATSAT32 questionnaire developed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC.Methods: A modified version of the IN-PATSAT32 questionnaire with additional 16 items was administered to 52 adult surgical inpatients admitted with the Sydney Gynecological Oncology Group. All participants were provided with an information leaflet regarding the survey and written consent obtained.Results: A high response rate (100% from patients with varied social, ethnic, and educational backgrounds confirmed the acceptability of the survey. Standard of medical care provided, frequency of doctors’ visits, exchange of information with doctors, friendliness of the staff, and state of the room ranked highly (>95% on the patient satisfaction scales. Problems were identified with ease of access to and within the hospital, quality of food, and exchange of information with other hospital staff.Conclusions: Overall the satisfaction with inpatient care was rated very highly in most areas. Deficiencies in certain elements of provision of medical care to the patients were identified and steps have been taken to improve upon these shortcomings.Keywords: patient satisfaction, EORTC, IN-PATSAT32, gynecological oncology, survey

  18. Oncology healthcare providers' knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors regarding LGBT health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Gina; Sanchez, Julian A; Lancaster, Johnathan M; Wilson, Lauren E; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Schabath, Matthew B

    2016-10-01

    There are limited data on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) healthcare experiences and interactions with the providers. This study assessed knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors of oncology providers regarding LGBT health. A 32-item web-based survey was emailed to 388 oncology providers at a single institution. The survey assessed: demographics, knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors. 108 providers participated in the survey (28% response rate). LGBT cultural competency at the institution. Results from the open comments section identified multiple misconceptions. This study revealed knowledge gaps about LGBT health risks. Cultural competency training may aid oncology providers to understand the need to inquire about patients' gender identity and sexual orientation. Health care providers who incorporate the routine collection of gender identity and sexual orientation (SOGI) in their patient history taking may improve patient care by offering tailored education and referrals. While identifying as LGBT does not in itself increase risk for adverse health outcomes, this population tends to have increased risk behaviors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Palliative Oncologic Care Curricula for Providers in Resource-Limited and Underserved Communities: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Melody J; Su, David; Deboer, Rebecca; Garcia, Michael; Tahir, Peggy; Anderson, Wendy; Kinderman, Anne; Braunstein, Steve; Sherertz, Tracy

    2017-12-20

    Familiarity with principles of palliative care, supportive care, and palliative oncological treatment is essential for providers caring for cancer patients, though this may be challenging in global communities where resources are limited. Herein, we describe the scope of literature on palliative oncological care curricula for providers in resource-limited settings. A systematic literature review was conducted using PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Med Ed Portal databases, and gray literature. All available prospective cohort studies, case reports, and narratives published up to July 2017 were eligible for review. Fourteen articles were identified and referenced palliative care education programs in Argentina, Uganda, Kenya, Australia, Germany, the USA, or multiple countries. The most common teaching strategy was lecture-based, followed by mentorship and experiential learning involving role play and simulation. Education topics included core principles of palliative care, pain and symptom management, and communication skills. Two programs included additional topics specific to the underserved or American Indian/Alaskan Native community. Only one program discussed supportive cancer care, and no program reported educational content on resource-stratified decision-making for palliative oncological treatment. Five programs reported positive participant satisfaction, and three programs described objective metrics of increased educational or research activity. There is scant literature on effective curricula for providers treating cancer patients in resource-limited settings. Emphasizing supportive cancer care and palliative oncologic treatments may help address gaps in education; increased outcome reporting may help define the impact of palliative care curriculum within resource-limited communities.

  20. Adequacy of published oncology randomized controlled trials to provide therapeutic details needed for clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Jennifer M; Leather, Helen; Walden, Edmund O; LaPlant, Kourtney D; George, Thomas J

    2010-05-19

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) improve clinical care through evidence-based results. Guidelines exist for RCT result reporting, but specific details of therapeutic administration promote clinical application and reproduction of the trial design. We assess the reporting methodology in RCTs published in major oncology journals. Ten essential elements of RCT reporting were identified and included drug name, dose, route, cycle length, maximum number of cycles, premedication, growth factor support, patient monitoring parameters, and dosing adjustments for hematologic and organ-specific toxicity. All therapy-based oncology RCTs published between 2005 and 2008 in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), Journal of Clinical Oncology (JCO), Journal of the National Cancer Institute (JNCI), Blood, and Cancer were analyzed for inclusion of these 10 elements. Of 339 identified articles, 262 were included in the final analysis (165 from JCO, 31 from NEJM, 27 from Cancer, 20 from JNCI, and 19 from Blood). Premedication, growth factor support, and dose adjustments for toxicities were each reported less than half of the time. Only 30 articles (11%) met the main objective of complete data reporting (ie, all 10 essential elements) and was highest in JNCI (5/20; 25%), followed by Cancer (5/27; 18%), JCO (18/165; 11%), Blood (1/19; 5%), and NEJM (1/31; 3%). The presence of an online appendix did not substantially improve complete reporting. RCTs published in major oncology journals do not consistently report essential therapeutic details necessary for translation of the trial findings to clinical practice. Potential solutions to improve reporting include modification of submission guidelines, use of online appendices, and providing open access to trial protocols.

  1. Patient–provider communication data: linking process and outcomes in oncology care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Sheldon L

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Lisa Kennedy Sheldon1,2, Fangxin Hong3,4, Donna Berry4,51University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston, MA, USA; 2St Joseph Hospital, Nashua, NH, USA; 3Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Boston, MA, USA; 4Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Phyllis F Cantor Center for Research in Nursing and Patient Care Services, Boston, MA, USA; 5Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAOverview: Patient–provider communication is vital to quality patient care in oncology settings and impacts health outcomes. Newer communication datasets contain patient symptom reports, real-time audiofiles of visits, coded communication data, and visit outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to: (1 review the complex communication processes during patient–provider interaction during oncology care; (2 describe methods of gathering and coding communication data; (3 suggest logical approaches to analyses; and (4 describe one new dataset that allows linking of patient symptoms and communication processes with visit outcomes.Challenges: Patient–provider communication research is complex due to numerous issues, including human subjects’ concerns, methods of data collection, numerous coding schemes, and varying analytic techniques.Data collection and coding: Coding of communication data is determined by the research question(s and variables of interest. Subsequent coding and timestamping the behaviors provides categorical data and determines the interval between and patterns of behaviors.Analytic approaches: Sequential analyses move from descriptive statistics to explanatory analyses to direct analyses and conditional probabilities. In the final stage, explanatory modeling is used to predict outcomes from communication elements. Examples of patient and provider communication in the ambulatory oncology setting are provided from the new Electronic Self Report Assessment-Cancer II dataset.Summary: More complex communication data sets provide

  2. Integrating palliative care in oncology: the oncologist as a primary palliative care provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangachari, Deepa; Smith, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    The provision of comprehensive cancer care in an increasingly complex landscape necessitates that oncology providers familiarize themselves with the application of palliative care. Palliative care is a learnable skill. Recent endeavors in this arena have demonstrated that providing palliative care is part and parcel with providing compassionate and high-quality cancer care, specifically as it pertains to physical and emotional outcomes for patients and their caregivers alike. The basic tenets of providing palliative care emphasize: frequent and honest communication, routine and systematic symptom assessment, integration of spiritual assessments, and early integration of specialized hospice and palliative care resources as a patient's circumstances evolve. This article will endeavor to review and synthesize recent developments in the palliative care literature, specifically as they pertain to the oncologist as a primary palliative care provider.

  3. The Oncology Family App: Providing Information and Support for Families Caring for Their Child With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Penelope J; Fielden, Philippa E; Bradford, Natalie K

    2017-11-01

    The Oncology Family App supports families across the vast state of Queensland, Australia, with easy access to vital information, including management plans for a deteriorating child, patient specific information and other resources. This article describes the development and evaluation of this mobile app. The app was developed and tested in collaboration with parents, caregivers, and clinicians and released in November 2015. This first version featured "Statewide Hospital Contacts," including phone numbers, links to Google maps, and 24-hour emergency contacts with click to call functionality; "When to Call" describing symptoms to look out for in a deteriorating child; "Blood Results Table"; and "Information" listing recommended websites, health care team contacts, appointments, and notes. The app was evaluated through interviews with parents, caregivers and patients and download metrics. Six months after the app release, 68% of the 38 parents and caregivers surveyed had downloaded the app. The most used modules were "Blood Results Table," "When to Call," and "Statewide Hospital Contacts," but families reported using all features available. Families were enthusiastic about the support the app provided and gave useful feedback to direct future development. Using mobile health technology to support families is a novel, but rapidly growing concept. Family and caregiver feedback showed that the Oncology Family App was an efficient and convenient way to provide much needed information. A new version of the app is under development and evaluation of outcomes will be ongoing.

  4. Challenges Persist Under Americans With Disabilities Act Amendments Act: How Can Oncology Providers Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Michael; Gehrke, Amanda K; McMahon, Brian T; McMahon, Megan C

    2017-06-01

    To determine whether the Amendments to the hallmark Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA; effective January 2009), which provide increased access to the antidiscrimination laws for many with chronic illness, are related to changes in workplace discrimination allegations in individuals with a history of cancer. Information collected by the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission was used to compare allegations of discrimination and their merit before (2001 to 2008) and after (2009 to 2011) implementation of the Amendments Act. Allegations related to terms of employment (eg, promotions, wages) were more likely to be filed (odds ratio [OR], 1.34; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.61) and determined to have merit (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.77) after implementation of the Amendments Act. Allegations related to workplace relations (eg, harassment, discipline, discharge) were also more likely to be filed post Amendments Act (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.23 to 1.78), although the merit of this complaint remained stable. Filing of all other allegations of discrimination (ie, hiring, reasonable accommodation, and termination) and their merit remained unchanged post Amendments Act. Despite the implementation of the Amendments Act, discrimination allegations in those with a history of cancer persisted or in certain areas increased. Although prevention of workplace discrimination rests primarily with employers, the oncology care team is uniquely qualified to provide information related to residual symptoms and function that can facilitate more personalized solutions to workplace discrimination, such as successful workplace accommodations. Information is provided that can assist the oncology team in their efforts to improve work outcomes.

  5. Towards culturally competent paediatric oncology care. A qualitative study from the perspective of care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suurmond, J; Lieveld, A; van de Wetering, M; Schouten-van Meeteren, A Y N

    2017-03-28

    In order to gain more insight on the influence of ethnic diversity in paediatric cancer care, the perspectives of care providers were explored. Semi-structured interviews were conducted among 12 paediatric oncologists and 13 nurses of two different paediatric oncology wards and were analysed using a framework method. We found that care providers described the contact with Turkish and Moroccan parents as more difficult. They offered two reasons for this: (1) language barriers between care provider and parents hindered the exchange of information; (2) cultural barriers between care provider and parents about sharing the diagnosis and palliative perspective hindered communication. Care providers reported different solutions to deal with these barriers, such as using an interpreter and improving their cultural knowledge about their patients. They, however, were not using interpreters sufficiently and were unaware of the importance of eliciting parents' perspectives. Communication techniques to overcome dilemmas between parents and care providers were not used and care providers were unaware of stereotypes and prejudice. Care providers should be offered insight in cultural barriers they are unaware of. Training in cultural competence might be a possibility to overcome manifest barriers. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Brief Training on Patient Anger Increases Oncology Providers' Self-Efficacy in Communicating With Angry Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhart, James I; Sanchez Varela, Veronica; Burns, John W

    2017-09-01

    Anger is a common reaction to pain and life-limiting and life-threatening illness, is linked to higher levels of pain, and may disrupt communication with medical providers. Anger is understudied compared with other emotions in mental health and health care contexts, and many providers have limited formal training in addressing anger. The objective of this study was to assess if a brief provider training program is a feasible method for increasing providers' self-efficacy in responding to patient anger. Providers working in stem cell transplant and oncology units attending a brief training session on responding to patient anger. The program was informed by cognitive behavioral models of anger and included didactics, discussion, and experiential training on communication and stress management. Provider-rated self-efficacy was significantly higher for nine of 10 skill outcomes (P didactics, and experiential exercises can support provider awareness of anger, shape adaptive communication, and foster stress management skills. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. LGBT Cultural Competence and Interventions to Help Oncology Nurses and Other Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radix, Asa; Maingi, Shail

    2018-02-01

    To define and give an overview of the importance of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) cultural competency and offer some initial steps on how to improve the quality of care provided by oncology nurses and other health care professionals. A review of the existing literature on cultural competency. LGBT patients experience cancer and several other diseases at higher rates than the rest of the population. The reasons for these health care disparities are complex and include minority stress, fear of discrimination, lower rates of insurance, and lack of access to quality, culturally competent care. Addressing the health care disparities experienced by LGBT individuals and families requires attention to the actual needs, language, and support networks used by patients in these communities. Training on how to provide quality care in a welcoming and non-judgmental way is available and can improve health equity. Health care professionals and institutions that acquire cultural competency training can improve the overall health of LGBT patients who currently experience significant health care disparities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Physical activity communication between oncology providers and patients with early-stage breast, colon, or prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyrop, Kirsten A; Deal, Allison M; Williams, Grant R; Guerard, Emily J; Pergolotti, Mackenzi; Muss, Hyman B

    2016-02-01

    National guidelines recommend that patients with a cancer diagnosis engage in regular physical activity to reduce cancer-related fatigue, maintain quality of life and physical function, and improve overall prognosis and survival. This study investigates oncology provider communications about physical activity during routine clinic visits with patients with early-stage breast, colon, or prostate cancer. This study used a retrospective chart review for documentation of inquiries or recommendations pertaining to physical activity in clinician notes and after-visit patient summaries. In a 1-month period, 55 oncology providers had 361 encounters (clinic visits) with early-stage cancer patients. Thirty-five percent of these encounters included a provider communication about "physical activity," "exercise," or "activity." Encounters with a medical oncologist resulted in a physical activity communication 55% of the time, whereas encounters with other clinician specialties did so 20% of the time (P oncology providers to have physical activity communications during routine clinic visits; however, the frequency of physical activity communications varies among providers. Interventions are needed to remind and encourage all oncology providers to encourage their patients with early-stage cancer to be physically active. . © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  9. Cancer and the LGBTQ Population: Quantitative and Qualitative Results from an Oncology Providers' Survey on Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamargo, Christina L; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Sanchez, Julian A; Schabath, Matthew B

    2017-10-07

    Despite growing social acceptance, the LGBTQ population continues to face barriers to healthcare including fear of stigmatization by healthcare providers, and providers' lack of knowledge about LGBTQ-specific health issues. This analysis focuses on the assessment of quantitative and qualitative responses from a subset of providers who identified as specialists that treat one or more of the seven cancers that may be disproportionate in LGBTQ patients. A 32-item web-based survey was emailed to 388 oncology providers at a single institution. The survey assessed: demographics, knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors. Oncology providers specializing in seven cancer types had poor knowledge of LGBTQ-specific health needs, with fewer than half of the surveyed providers (49.5%) correctly answering knowledge questions. Most providers had overall positive attitudes toward LGBTQ patients, with 91.7% agreeing they would be comfortable treating this population, and would support education and/or training on LGBTQ-related cancer health issues. Results suggest that despite generally positive attitudes toward the LGBTQ population, oncology providers who treat cancer types most prevalent among the population, lack knowledge of their unique health issues. Knowledge and practice behaviors may improve with enhanced education and training on this population's specific needs.

  10. Moral distress in nurses providing direct care on inpatient oncology units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirilla, Janet

    2014-10-01

    Moral distress is defined as knowing the right thing to do when policy constraints do not allow for appropriate choices. The purpose of the current study was to explore the existence of moral distress in oncology nurses with a cross-sectional survey completed by nurses working on inpatient units at a midwestern cancer hospital. Investigators distributed the Moral Distress Scale-Revised to all direct care staff nurses. The main research variables were moral distress, level of education, age, and type of unit. Most of the 73 nurses had low to moderate scores, and two had high scores. No significant correlations were observed among age or years of experience. Type of unit and level of moral distress were correlated, and an inverse relationship between level of education and moral distress was found. Moral distress exists in nurses who work on oncology units irrespective of experience in oncology or the specific unit. Nurses must be aware of the existence of moral distress and finds ways to reduce potential emotional problems.

  11. Oncology nursing: educating advanced practice nurses to provide culturally competent care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Theresa Pluth; Phillips, Janice; Delengowski, Anne; Griffiths, Margaret; Purnell, Larry

    2011-01-01

    More than 37 million persons or 12.4% of the U.S. population are older than 65 years. These numbers are expected to reach 71.5 million (20% of the population) by 2030. This older population is becoming more racially and ethnically diverse as the overall minority and culturally diverse populations increase. Although the incidence and mortality rates from several major cancers have declined due to advances in cancer care, these advances have lagged among the underserved and more vulnerable racially and culturally diverse populations. Moreover, the disparity between the gender and the racial mix of nurses and the overall population continues to widen. Thus, a growing need for professional nurses and advanced practice nurses with formal educational preparation in all areas of oncology nursing exists. This article (a) highlights significant cancer disparities among diverse populations, (b) describes how cultural belief systems influence cancer care and decision making, and (c) explicates the need to prepare advanced practice nurses for careers that include cancer care of diverse and vulnerable populations through formal oncology educational programs. The "Top 10" reasons for becoming an advanced practice nurse specializing in the oncologic care of patients from diverse and underserved populations are presented. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A review of cost communication in oncology: Patient attitude, provider acceptance, and outcome assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Chien, Chun-Ru

    2017-05-15

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology released its first guidance statement on the cost of cancer care in August 2009, affirming that patient-physician cost communication is a critical component of high-quality care. This forward-thinking recommendation has grown increasingly important in oncology practice today as the high costs of cancer care impose tremendous financial burden to patients, their families, and the health care system. For the current review, a literature search was conducted using the PubMed and Web of Science databases to identify articles that covered 3 topics related to patient-physician cost communication: patient attitude, physician acceptance, and the associated outcomes; and 15 articles from 12 distinct studies were identified. Although most articles that addressed patient attitude suggested that cost communication is desired by >50% of patients in the respective study cohorts, only communication. When asked about whether cost communication actually took place in their practice, percentages reported by physicians varied widely from 60%. The data suggested that cost communication was associated with improved patient satisfaction, lower out-of-pocket expenses, and a higher likelihood of medication nonadherence; none of the studies established causality. Both patients and physicians expressed a strong need for accurate, accessible, and transparent information about the cost of cancer care. Cancer 2017;123:928-39. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  13. An exploratory typology of provider responses that encourage and discourage conversation about complementary and integrative medicine during routine oncology visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Christopher J; Ho, Evelyn Y; Trupin, Laura; Dohan, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    To characterize how providers respond to patient mentions of complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) during routine oncology visits. Ethnographic methods were used over a two and a half year period with 82 advanced cancer patients and their providers across four oncology clinics. Participant observation fieldnotes were analyzed using Discourse Analysis. CIM was mentioned in 78/229 (34%) of the total observed visits. Patients initiated talk about CIM (76%) more than providers (24%). Patients mentioning CIM may indicate a preference for or interest in non-pharmacological adjunctive treatment options. Providers' responses inhibited further talk in 44% of observations and promoted talk in 56% of observations. How providers respond may indicate their willingness to discuss a range of treatment options and to collaboratively engage in treatment decision-making. Provider responses that inhibited CIM conversation passed on the opportunity to discuss patient preferences, and responses that promoted further conversation helped counsel patients about appropriate CIM use. Promoting discussion did not require additional time or extensive knowledge about CIM. Providers can facilitate high quality communication without endorsing CIM to help patients make treatment decisions and to evaluate CIM appropriateness in response to patient values and preferences. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. The Polaris Oncology Survivorship Transition (POST) System: A Patient- and Provider-Driven Cancer Survivorship Planning Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hea, Erin; Wu, Juliet; Dietzen, Laura; Harralson, Tina; Boudreaux, Edwin D

    2016-11-01

    It is strongly recommended that individuals ending treatment for cancer have a "survivorship plan," and new standards require survivorship planning for accreditation, However, a comprehensive plan is often neglected. To present the development and field test results of a web-based, breast cancer survivorship care planning system. The Polaris Oncology Survivorship Transition (POST) blends input from the electronic health record (EHR), oncology care providers (OCPs), and patients to create a survivorship care plan (SCP). The content of the POST program was created with the assistance of end-user input (patients, oncologists, and primary care providers (PCPs)) and the full program was piloted on women ending treatment for breast cancer. This paper presents the pilot study that field-tested the POST In a clinical setting. Patients were recruited from outpatient care clinics and chemotherapy units in a comprehensive care center. The study included 25 women ending treatment for breast cancer in the past year, 4 OCPs, and PCPs. Patients received the POST computeπzed assessment and a tailored SCP. The POST assists providers in crafting efficient and comprehensive SCPs and was rated highly satisfactory by all end-users. The POST program can be used as a cancer survivorship planning program to assist OCPs in care planning for their patients ending treatment for breast cancer. This study provides support for Incorporating computerized SCP programs into clinical practice. Use of the POST in clinical practice has the potential to improve survivorship planning.

  15. New advanced technologies to provide decentralised and secure access to medical records: case studies in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantin, Catherine; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Allaert, François André; Fassa, Maniane; Bourquard, Karima; Boire, Jean-Yves; de Vlieger, Paul; Maigne, Lydia; Breton, Vincent

    2009-08-07

    The main problem for health professionals and patients in accessing information is that this information is very often distributed over many medical records and locations. This problem is particularly acute in cancerology because patients may be treated for many years and undergo a variety of examinations. Recent advances in technology make it feasible to gain access to medical records anywhere and anytime, allowing the physician or the patient to gather information from an "ephemeral electronic patient record". However, this easy access to data is accompanied by the requirement for improved security (confidentiality, traceability, integrity, ...) and this issue needs to be addressed. In this paper we propose and discuss a decentralised approach based on recent advances in information sharing and protection: Grid technologies and watermarking methodologies. The potential impact of these technologies for oncology is illustrated by the examples of two experimental cases: a cancer surveillance network and a radiotherapy treatment plan. It is expected that the proposed approach will constitute the basis of a future secure "google-like" access to medical records.

  16. Oncology providers' evaluation of the use of an automatically generated cancer survivorship care plan: longitudinal results from the ROGY Care trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaije, Kim A H; Ezendam, Nicole P M; Vos, M Caroline; Pijnenborg, Johanna M A; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V; Kruitwagen, Roy F P M

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies have merely investigated oncology providers' a priori attitudes toward SCPs. The purpose of the current study was to longitudinally evaluate oncology providers' expectations and actual experiences with the use of an automatically generated Survivorship Care Plan (SCP) in daily clinical practice. Between April 2011 and October 2012, the participating oncology providers (i.e., gynecologists, gynecologic oncologists, oncology nurses) provided usual care or SCP care to 222 endometrial and 85 ovarian cancer patients included in the Registrationsystem Oncological GYnecology (ROGY) Care trial. All (n = 43) oncology providers in both arms were requested to complete a questionnaire before and after patient inclusion regarding their expectations and evaluation of SCP care. Before patient inclusion, 38 (88%; 21 SCP, 17 usual care), and after patient inclusion, 35 (83%; 20 SCP, 15 usual care) oncology providers returned the questionnaire. After patient inclusion, oncology providers were generally satisfied with the SCP (M = 7.1, SD = 1.3, with 1 = not at all-10 = very much) and motivated to keep using the SCP (M = 7.9, SD = 1.5). Most providers (64%) encountered barriers. Twenty-five percent felt they used more time for consultations (M = 7.3 min, SD = 4.6). However, self-reported consultation time did not differ between before (M = 21.8 min, SD = 11.6) and after patient inclusion (M = 18.7, SD = 10.6; p = 0.22) or between SCP care (M = 18.5, SD = 10.3) and usual care (M = 22.0, SD = 12.2; p = 0.21). Oncology providers using the SCP were generally satisfied and motivated to keep using the SCP. However, the findings of the current study suggest that even when the SCP can be generated automatically, oncology providers still have difficulties with finding the time to discuss the SCP with their patients. If SCP care is indeed effective, overcoming the perceived barriers is needed before

  17. Oncology nursing in Cuba: report of the delegation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Lisa Kennedy; Leonard, Kathleen; Gross, Anne; Hartnett, Erin; Poage, Ellen; Squires, Jennifer; Ullemeyer, Vicki; Schueller, Mary; Stary, Susan; Miller, Mary Alice

    2012-08-01

    In December 2011, the first delegation of oncology nurses from the United States visited Havana, Cuba. The delegation included oncology nurses, educators, and leaders from across America and provided opportunities to learn about the healthcare system, cancer, and oncology nursing in Cuba. Delegation members attended lectures, toured facilities, and enjoyed Cuban culture. This exchange highlighted the similarities in cancer care and oncology nursing between countries and opened doors for future collaborations.

  18. Esomeprazole administered through a nasogastric tube provides bioavailability similar to oral dosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sostek, M B; Chen, Y; Skammer, W; Winter, H; Zhao, J; Andersson, T

    2003-09-15

    To determine if nasogastric tube administration of the enteric-coated pellets from an opened esomeprazole capsule provides bioavailability similar to oral dosing with the intact capsule. A randomized, single-centre, open-label, two-period crossover pharmacokinetic study consisting of two 5-day dosing periods separated by a 7- to 14-day washout period was conducted. Healthy subjects between the ages of 18 and 50 years received esomeprazole 40 mg once daily either orally as an intact capsule, or as a suspension of the enteric-coated pellets from an opened capsule in water through a nasogastric tube. In 47 evaluable subjects, the 90% confidence intervals were 0.87-1.08 and 0.93-1.25 for the geometric mean of the ratio of nasogastric tube administration relative to administration of the intact capsule for the area under the plasma concentration-time curve and for maximum plasma concentration, respectively, on day 1, demonstrating bioequivalence. Oral and nasogastric administration also demonstrated similar bioavailabilities on day 5. Esomeprazole was well tolerated regardless of the mode of administration. Nasogastric tube administration of the enteric-coated pellets from an opened esomeprazole 40 mg capsule provides bioavailability similar to oral dosing. Administration of the contents of an opened esomeprazole 40 mg capsule in water through a nasogastric tube is a practical alternative for patients with feeding tubes who require effective gastric acid suppression, but cannot swallow an oral preparation.

  19. Providing oral care in haematological oncology patients: nurses' knowledge and skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potting, Carin M J; Mank, Arno; Blijlevens, Nicole M A; Donnelly, J Peter; van Achterberg, Theo

    2008-09-01

    In the international literature, the most commonly recommended intervention for managing oral mucositis is good oral care, assuming that nurses have sufficient knowledge and skills to perform oral care correctly. The aim of the present study was to investigate if knowledge and skills about oral care improve when education in oral care is provided to nurses in charge of patients who are at risk of oral mucositis. This intervention study consists of a baseline test on the knowledge and skills of nurses of the haematology wards of two different hospitals. Oral care education sessions were given in one hospital and follow-up tests were performed in both hospitals. Nursing records were examined and observations of nurses performing oral care were made at baseline as well as at follow-up. The results show significant differences in the scores for knowledge and skills before and after the education, whereas there was no difference in scores at the two points in time for the comparison hospital, where no education had taken place. The records test showed no differences at baseline or follow-up for the two groups. Observations showed that nurses who followed the education session implemented the oral care protocol considerably better than those who did not attended. Education in oral care has a positive influence on the knowledge and skills of nurses who care for patient at risk of oral mucositis, but not on the quality of oral care documentation.

  20. Oncology care provider perspectives on exercise promotion in people with cancer: an examination of knowledge, practices, barriers, and facilitators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadler, Michelle; Bainbridge, Daryl; Tomasone, Jennifer; Cheifetz, Oren; Juergens, Rosalyn A; Sussman, Jonathan

    2017-07-01

    Despite the reported benefits of physical activity in alleviating the impact of cancer and its treatments, oncology care providers (OCPs) are not routinely discussing exercise with their patients, suggesting a knowledge to action gap. We sought to determine OCP's knowledge, beliefs, barriers, and facilitators to exercise discussion. A survey was administered to OCPs at the cancer center in Hamilton, Ontario. Questions comprised of demographics, knowledge and beliefs regarding exercise guidelines, and barriers and facilitators to exercise discussion. Analysis of survey responses was descriptive. Pearson's chi-squared test was used to examine select associations. There were 120 respondents (61% response rate) representing a diversity of professions. Approximately, 80% of OCPs were not aware of any exercise guidelines in cancer and self-reported poor knowledge on when, how, and which patients to refer to exercise programs. OCPs who reported meeting Canada's Physical Activity guidelines were significantly more likely to identify correct guidelines (p = 0.023) and to report good knowledge on how to provide exercise counseling (p = 0.014). Across OCP groups, barriers to exercise discussion included poor knowledge, lack of time, and safety concerns. Most felt that educational sessions and having an exercise specialist on the clinical team would be beneficial. OCPs have low knowledge regarding exercise counseling, but believe that discussing exercise is a multidisciplinary task and expressed a desire for further training. Interventions will require a multi-pronged approach including education for OCPs and guidance on assessment for exercise safety.

  1. Time to market and patient access to new oncology products in Italy: a multistep pathway from European context to regional health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, P; Mennini, F S; Siviero, P D; Rasi, G

    2010-10-01

    The main purpose of this study was to identify each sequential phase followed by an oncology product, from European assessment until to patient access in each Italian region (IR). A panel of oncology products approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in the period 2006-2008 was considered. The explored sequential phases included the times to market for: the EMA; pharmaceutical companies; the Italian Medicines Agency (Agenzia Italiana del Farmaco, AIFA); and IRs as final providers of health care. The IR's time to market was also analyzed by a Cox regression model. The overall mean time required before patients access was 2.3 years. EMA accounted for the greater proportion of time (31.8%), followed by AIFA (28.2%). However, the duration for both pharmaceutical companies and IRs was associated with the highest variability. An oncology product authorized with a risk-sharing agreement showed an early access in the IRs. On the contrary, the introduction in IRs having a compulsory formulary was delayed. Both a high forecast of economic impact and a high oncology product price can also delay the patient access. The process before patient access to an oncology product is time and cost consuming. This study identifies the main predictors that affect the missing overlap between market and patient access in Italy.

  2. Global curriculum in surgical oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Are, C; Berman, R S; Wyld, L; Cummings, C; Lecoq, C; Audisio, R A

    2016-06-01

    The significant global variations in surgical oncology training paradigms can have a detrimental effect on tackling the rising global cancer burden. While some variations in training are essential to account for the differences in types of cancer and biology, the fundamental principles of providing care to a cancer patient remain the same. The development of a global curriculum in surgical oncology with incorporated essential standards could be very useful in building an adequately trained surgical oncology workforce, which in turn could help in tackling the rising global cancer burden. The leaders of the Society of Surgical Oncology and European Society of Surgical Oncology convened a global curriculum committee to develop a global curriculum in surgical oncology. A global curriculum in surgical oncology was developed to incorporate the required domains considered to be essential in training a surgical oncologist. The curriculum was constructed in a modular fashion to permit flexibility to suit the needs of the different regions of the world. Similarly, recognizing the various sociocultural, financial and cultural influences across the world, the proposed curriculum is aspirational and not mandatory in intent. A global curriculum was developed which may be considered as a foundational scaffolding for training surgical oncologists worldwide. It is envisioned that this initial global curriculum will provide a flexible and modular scaffolding that can be tailored by individual countries or regions to train surgical oncologists in a way that is appropriate for practice in their local environment. Copyright © 2016 Society of Surgical Oncology, European Society of Surgical Oncology. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Structural similarities between brain and linguistic data provide evidence of semantic relations in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen E Crangle

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new method of analysis by which structural similarities between brain data and linguistic data can be assessed at the semantic level. It shows how to measure the strength of these structural similarities and so determine the relatively better fit of the brain data with one semantic model over another. The first model is derived from WordNet, a lexical database of English compiled by language experts. The second is given by the corpus-based statistical technique of latent semantic analysis (LSA, which detects relations between words that are latent or hidden in text. The brain data are drawn from experiments in which statements about the geography of Europe were presented auditorily to participants who were asked to determine their truth or falsity while electroencephalographic (EEG recordings were made. The theoretical framework for the analysis of the brain and semantic data derives from axiomatizations of theories such as the theory of differences in utility preference. Using brain-data samples from individual trials time-locked to the presentation of each word, ordinal relations of similarity differences are computed for the brain data and for the linguistic data. In each case those relations that are invariant with respect to the brain and linguistic data, and are correlated with sufficient statistical strength, amount to structural similarities between the brain and linguistic data. Results show that many more statistically significant structural similarities can be found between the brain data and the WordNet-derived data than the LSA-derived data. The work reported here is placed within the context of other recent studies of semantics and the brain. The main contribution of this paper is the new method it presents for the study of semantics and the brain and the focus it permits on networks of relations detected in brain data and represented by a semantic model.

  4. A pilot training programme for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to lesbian, gay and bisexual patients in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reygan, Finn C G

    2012-05-09

    OBJECTIVE: The international literature points to the specific cancer risks and palliative care needs of lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) populations. However, with the exception of a programme in the USA, there is a lack of training internationally for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to LGB patients. In Ireland, a training project funded by the Irish Cancer Society, the Irish Hospice Foundation and the Health Service Executive developed a training pilot programme for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to LGB patients. METHODS: Over 200 (N = 201) oncology and palliative care staff participated in 17 brief, 50-min trainings in pilot sites. Evaluation of the training included self-report questionnaires at the end of each training and an evaluation interview with one participant from each of the four sites. RESULTS: The majority of participants reported that they would recommend the training to their colleagues, were interested in further training in the area and found the training useful for their practice. They also reported becoming more familiar with LGB-related language and terminology, became more knowledgeable of LGB health issues and reported becoming more confident in providing care to LGB patients. CONCLUSIONS: Recommendations are that the training be made available across the health services in Ireland and included in postgraduate courses for trainee health and social care professionals. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Single-site laparoscopic colorectal surgery provides similar lengths of hospital stay and similar costs compared with standard laparoscopy: results of a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David B; Berg, Arthur; Messaris, Evangelos

    2014-04-01

    The present study sought to compare the length of stay (LOS) and hospital costs for elective single-site (SSL) and standard laparoscopic (SDL) colorectal resections performed at a tertiary referral center. An IRB-approved, retrospective cohort study of all elective SDL and SSL colorectal resections performed from 2008 to 2012 was undertaken. Patient charges and inflation adjusted hospital costs (US dollars) were compared with costs subcategorized by operating room expense, room and board, and pharmacy and radiology utilization. A total of 149 SDL and 111 SSL cases were identified. Compared with SSL, SDL surgeries were associated with longer median operative times (SSL: 153 min vs. SDL: 189 min, p = 0.001); however, median operating room costs were similar (p > 0.05). Median postoperative LOS was similar for both groups (SSL: 3 days; SDL: 4 days; p > 0.05). There was no difference between SSL and SDL with respect to either total patient charges (SSL: $34,847 vs. SDL: $38,306; p > 0.05) or hospital costs (SSL: $13,051 vs. SDL: $12,703; p > 0.05). Median costs during readmission were lower for SSL patients (SSL: $3,625 vs. SDL: $6,203, p = 0.04). SSL provides similar LOS as well as similar costs to both patients and hospitals compared with SDL, making it a cost-feasible alternative.

  6. Oncology Advanced Practitioners Bring Advanced Community Oncology Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Wendy H

    2016-01-01

    Oncology care is becoming increasingly complex. The interprofessional team concept of care is necessary to meet projected oncology professional shortages, as well as to provide superior oncology care. The oncology advanced practitioner (AP) is a licensed health care professional who has completed advanced training in nursing or pharmacy or has completed training as a physician assistant. Oncology APs increase practice productivity and efficiency. Proven to be cost effective, APs may perform varied roles in an oncology practice. Integrating an AP into an oncology practice requires forethought given to the type of collaborative model desired, role expectations, scheduling, training, and mentoring.

  7. Acute oncological emergencies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gabriel, J

    2012-01-01

    The number of people receiving systemic anti-cancer treatment and presenting at emergency departments with treatment-related problems is rising. Nurses will be the first point of contact for most patients and need to be able to recognise oncological emergencies to initiate urgent assessment of patients and referral to the acute oncology team so that the most appropriate care can be delivered promptly. This article discusses the role of acute oncology services, and provides an overview of the most common acute oncological emergencies.

  8. Could lymphatic mapping and sentinel node biopsy provide oncological providence for local resectional techniques for colon cancer? A review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leroy Joel

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endoscopic resectional techniques for colon cancer are undermined by their inability to determine lymph node status. This limits their application to only those lesions at the most minimal risk of lymphatic dissemination whereas their technical capacity could allow intraluminal or even transluminal address of larger lesions. Sentinel node biopsy may theoretically address this breach although the variability of its reported results for this disease is worrisome. Methods Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were interrogated back to 1999 to identify all publications concerning lymphatic mapping for colon cancer with reference cross-checking for completeness. All reports were examined from the perspective of in vivo technique accuracy selectively in early stage disease (i.e. lesions potentially within the technical capacity of endoscopic resection. Results Fifty-two studies detailing the experiences of 3390 patients were identified. Considerable variation in patient characteristics as well as in surgical and histological quality assurances were however evident among the studies identified. In addition, considerable contamination of the studies by inclusion of rectal cancer without subgroup separation was frequent. Indeed such is the heterogeneity of the publications to date, formal meta-analysis to pool patient cohorts in order to definitively ascertain technique accuracy in those with T1 and/or T2 cancer is not possible. Although lymphatic mapping in early stage neoplasia alone has rarely been specifically studied, those studies that included examination of false negative rates identified high T3/4 patient proportions and larger tumor size as being important confounders. Under selected circumstances however the technique seems to perform sufficiently reliably to allow it prompt consideration of its use to tailor operative extent. Conclusion The specific question of whether sentinel node biopsy can augment the oncological

  9. The business case for provider participation in clinical trials research: an application to the National Cancer Institute's community clinical oncology program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Paula H; Reiter, Kristin L; Weiner, Bryan J; Minasian, Lori; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2013-01-01

    Provider-based research networks (PBRNs) make clinical trials available in community-based practice settings, where most people receive their care, but provider participation requires both financial and in-kind contributions. The aim of this study was to explore whether providers believe there is a business case for participating in PBRNs and what factors contribute to the business case. We use a multiple case study methodology approach to examine the National Cancer Institute's community clinical oncology program, a long-standing federally funded PBRN. Interviews with 41 key informants across five sites, selected on the basis of organizational maturity, were conducted using a semistructured interview guide. We analyzed interview transcripts using an iterative, deductive process to identify themes and subthemes in the data. We found that a business case for provider participation in PBRNs may exist if both direct and indirect financial benefits are identified and included in the analysis and if the time horizon is long enough to allow those benefits to be realized. We identified specific direct and indirect financial benefits that were perceived as important contributors to the business case and the perceived length of time required for a positive return to accrue. As the lack of a business case may result in provider reluctance to participate in PBRNs, knowledge of the benefits we identified may be crucial to encouraging and sustaining participation, thereby preserving patient access to innovative community-based treatments. The results are also relevant to federally funded PBRNs outside of oncology or to providers considering participation in any clinical trials research.

  10. Surveillance and beliefs about follow-up care among long-term breast cancer survivors: a comparison of primary care and oncology providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risendal, Betsy C; Sedjo, Rebecca L; Giuliano, Anna R; Vadaparampil, Susan; Jacobsen, Paul B; Kilbourn, Kristin; Barón, Anna; Byers, Tim

    2016-02-01

    Delivery of follow-up care to breast cancer survivors is an important public health issue due to their increasing number and the anticipated shortage of oncology providers. This study evaluated adherence to American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)-recommended surveillance tests in a bi-ethnic cohort of long-term breast cancer survivors. Women (n = 298) in Arizona and Colorado who had previously participated in a population-based study of breast cancer were enrolled into a follow-up survey approximately 6 years post-diagnosis. ASCO-recommended surveillance (mammogram, clinical breast, and physical exam), other non-recommended tests (e.g. tumor markers, imaging scans), and patients' beliefs were compared by provider type using multivariate logistic regression. No significant differences in patient self-report of physical exam or mammography prevalence by provider type was observed after adjustment for covariates. Receipt of surveillance tests not recommended by ASCO was higher among survivors who saw an oncologist (tumor marker tests: OR = 3.0, 95 % CI 1.5-5.8; and other blood tests: OR = 2.0, 95 % CI 1.1-3.5) as compared to those who routinely see a primary care physician. These observed differences persisted after adjustment for age, stage, lapse in insurance, education, or ethnicity. Although overutilization of non-recommended tests was observed among women who saw an oncologist, the majority of breast cancer survivors received ASCO-recommended surveillance regardless of provider type. Most breast cancer survivors receive recommended surveillance tests, whether their care is managed by a primary care physician or an oncologist, but some women receive unnecessary testing. Women should talk with their providers about tests recommended based on their past breast cancer diagnosis.

  11. Native and non-native plants provide similar refuge to invertebrate prey, but less than artificial plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart M C Grutters

    Full Text Available Non-native species introductions are widespread and can affect ecosystem functioning by altering the structure of food webs. Invading plants often modify habitat structure, which may affect the suitability of vegetation as refuge and could thus impact predator-prey dynamics. Yet little is known about how the replacement of native by non-native vegetation affects predator-prey dynamics. We hypothesize that plant refuge provisioning depends on (1 the plant's native status, (2 plant structural complexity and morphology, (3 predator identity, and (4 prey identity, as well as that (5 structurally similar living and artificial plants provide similar refuge. We used aquatic communities as a model system and compared the refuge provided by plants to macroinvertebrates (Daphnia pulex, Gammarus pulex and damselfly larvae in three short-term laboratory predation experiments. Plant refuge provisioning differed between plant species, but was generally similar for native (Myriophyllum spicatum, Ceratophyllum demersum, Potamogeton perfoliatus and non-native plants (Vallisneria spiralis, Myriophyllum heterophyllum, Cabomba caroliniana. However, plant refuge provisioning to macroinvertebrate prey depended primarily on predator (mirror carp: Cyprinus carpio carpio and dragonfly larvae: Anax imperator and prey identity, while the effects of plant structural complexity were only minor. Contrary to living plants, artificial plant analogues did improve prey survival, particularly with increasing structural complexity and shoot density. As such, plant rigidity, which was high for artificial plants and one of the living plant species evaluated in this study (Ceratophyllum demersum, may interact with structural complexity to play a key role in refuge provisioning to specific prey (Gammarus pulex. Our results demonstrate that replacement of native by structurally similar non-native vegetation is unlikely to greatly affect predator-prey dynamics. We propose that

  12. Value Frameworks for the Patient-Provider Interaction: A Comparison of the ASCO Value Framework Versus NCCN Evidence Blocks in Determining Value in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah-Manek, Bijal; Galanto, Joseph S; Nguyen, Huong; Ignoffo, Robert

    2017-06-01

    To address the rising concern about oncology drug costs, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) recently developed unique tools to help providers and patients make informed decisions about the value of an anticancer regimen. The ASCO Value Framework (AVF) allows users to generate a net health benefit (NHB) score along with drug acquisition costs for oncology regimens that have been compared in a prospective randomized clinical trial. In contrast, the NCCN Evidence Blocks (NEB) derives ratings from an expert panel assessment in the categories of efficacy, safety, quality and consistency of evidence, and affordability. To compare the results of the AVF and NEB by applying each tool to the same clinical scenarios. We evaluated 2 regimens using the AVF and NEB scores: (1) enzalutamide for treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and (2) nivolumab versus docetaxel in treatment of advanced squamous and nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Enzalutamide generated a total NHB score of 44.8 (range 0-180) for use before chemotherapy and 70.8 for use after chemotherapy with a monthly cost of $8,495 in the AVF. The NEB scored enzalutamide 4 (very effective) for efficacy, 4 (occasionally toxic) for safety, and 2 (expensive) for affordability in the no visceral metastases block. It scored 3 (moderately effective) for efficacy, 4 for safety, and 2 for affordability in the visceral metastases block. Nivolumab in advanced nonsquamous NSCLC scored 36.0 and 73.2 in advanced squamous NSCLC, with a monthly cost of $7,010 in the AVF. The NEB gave nivolumab a score of 4 for efficacy and safety and 1 (very expensive) for affordability in the NEB in advanced nonsquamous and advanced squamous NSCLC. The AVF and NEB are novel tools that take different approaches in assessing the value of an oncology treatment regimen. From this study, it is clear that the findings generated by these tools are

  13. Establishing a Global Radiation Oncology Collaboration in Education (GRaCE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turner, Sandra; Eriksen, Jesper G; Trotter, Theresa

    2015-01-01

    Representatives from countries and regions world-wide who have implemented modern competency-based radiation- or clinical oncology curricula for training medical specialists, met to determine the feasibility and value of an ongoing international collaboration. In this forum, educational leaders...... with similar goals, would provide a valuable vehicle to ensure training program currency, through sharing of resources and expertise, and enhance high quality radiation oncology education. Potential projects for the Global Radiation Oncology Collaboration in Education (GRaCE) were agreed upon...

  14. The Chitranjan Ranawat Award: Periarticular injections and femoral & sciatic blocks provide similar pain relief after TKA: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangehl, Mark J; Clarke, Henry D; Hentz, Joseph G; Misra, Lopa; Blocher, Joshua L; Seamans, David P

    2015-01-01

    Two of the more common methods of pain management after TKA are peripheral nerve blocks and intraarticular/periarticular injections. However, we are not aware of any study directly comparing the commonly used combination of a continuous femoral block given with a single-shot sciatic block with that of a periarticular injection after TKA. This randomized clinical trial compared a combined femoral and sciatic nerve block with periarticular injection as part of a multimodal pain protocol after total knee arthroplasty with respect to (1) pain; (2) narcotic use; (3) quadriceps function and length of stay; and (4) peripheral nerve complications. One hundred sixty patients completed randomization into two treatment arms: (1) peripheral nerve blocks (PNB; n=79) with an indwelling femoral nerve catheter and a single shot sciatic block; or (2) periarticular injection (PAI; n=81) using ropivacaine, epinephrine, ketorolac, and morphine. All patients received standardized general anesthesia and oral medications. The primary outcome was postoperative pain, on a 0 to 10 scale, measured on the afternoon of postoperative day 1 (POD 1). Secondary outcomes were narcotic use, quadriceps function, length of stay, and peripheral nerve complications. Mean pain scores on the afternoon of POD 1 were not different between groups (PNB group: 2.9 [SD 2.4]; PAI group: 3.0 [SD 2.2]; 95% confidence interval, -0.8 to 0.6; p=0.76). Mean pain scores taken at three times points on POD 1 were also similar between groups. Hospital length of stay was shorter for the PAI group (2.44 days [SD 0.65] versus 2.84 days [SD 1.34] for the PNB group; p=0.02). Narcotic consumption was higher the day of surgery for the PAI group (PAI group: 11.7 mg morphine equivalents [SD 13.1]; PNB group: 4.6 mg [SD 9.1]; pblocks. Periarticular injections provide adequate pain relief, are simple to use, and avoid the potential complications associated with nerve blocks. Level I, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for

  15. Computational oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefor, Alan T

    2011-08-01

    Oncology research has traditionally been conducted using techniques from the biological sciences. The new field of computational oncology has forged a new relationship between the physical sciences and oncology to further advance research. By applying physics and mathematics to oncologic problems, new insights will emerge into the pathogenesis and treatment of malignancies. One major area of investigation in computational oncology centers around the acquisition and analysis of data, using improved computing hardware and software. Large databases of cellular pathways are being analyzed to understand the interrelationship among complex biological processes. Computer-aided detection is being applied to the analysis of routine imaging data including mammography and chest imaging to improve the accuracy and detection rate for population screening. The second major area of investigation uses computers to construct sophisticated mathematical models of individual cancer cells as well as larger systems using partial differential equations. These models are further refined with clinically available information to more accurately reflect living systems. One of the major obstacles in the partnership between physical scientists and the oncology community is communications. Standard ways to convey information must be developed. Future progress in computational oncology will depend on close collaboration between clinicians and investigators to further the understanding of cancer using these new approaches.

  16. Regulatory and clinical considerations for biosimilar oncology drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Charles L; Chen, Brian; Hermanson, Terhi; Wyatt, Michael D; Schulz, Richard M; Georgantopoulos, Peter; Kessler, Samuel; Raisch, Dennis W; Qureshi, Zaina P; Lu, Z Kevin; Love, Bryan L; Noxon, Virginia; Bobolts, Laura; Armitage, Melissa; Bian, John; Ray, Paul; Ablin, Richard J; Hrushesky, William J; Macdougall, Iain C; Sartor, Oliver; Armitage, James O

    2015-01-01

    Biological oncology products are integral to cancer treatment, but their high costs pose challenges to patients, families, providers, and insurers. The introduction of biosimilar agents—molecules that are similar in structure, function, activity, immunogenicity, and safety to the original biological drugs—provide opportunities both to improve healthcare access and outcomes, and to reduce costs. Several international regulatory pathways have been developed to expedite entry of biosimilars into global marketplaces. The first wave of oncology biosimilar use was in Europe and India in 2007. Oncology biosimilars are now widely marketed in several countries in Europe, and in Australia, Japan, China, Russia, India, and South Korea. Their use is emerging worldwide, with the notable exception of the USA, where several regulatory and cost barriers to biosimilar approval exist. In this Review, we discuss oncology biosimilars and summarise their regulatory frameworks, clinical experiences, and safety concerns. PMID:25456378

  17. A Similarity-Ranking Method on Semantic Computing for Providing Information-Services in Station-Concierge System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoki Yokoyama

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of smartphones and wireless broadband networks have been progressing as a new Railway infomration environment. According to the spread of such devices and information technology, various types of information can be obtained from databases connected to the Internet. One scenario of obtaining such a wide variety of information resources is in the phase of user’s transportation. This paper proposes an information provision system, named the Station Concierge System that matches the situation and intention of passengers. The purpose of this system is to estimate the needs of passengers like station staff or hotel concierge and to provide information resources that satisfy user’s expectations dynamically. The most important module of the system is constructed based on a new information ranking method for passenger intention prediction and service recommendation. This method has three main features, which are (1 projecting a user to semantic vector space by using her current context, (2 predicting the intention of a user based on selecting a semantic vector subspace, and (3 ranking the services by a descending order of relevant scores to the user’ intention. By comparing the predicted results of our method with those of two straightforward computation methods, the experimental studies show the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method. Using this system, users can obtain transit information and service map that dynamically matches their context.

  18. Flat and complex temperate reefs provide similar support for fish: Evidence for a unimodal species-habitat relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Avery B; Pickering, Emily A; Adler, Alyssa M; Taylor, J Christopher; Peterson, Charles H

    2017-01-01

    Structural complexity, a form of habitat heterogeneity, influences the structure and function of ecological communities, generally supporting increased species density, richness, and diversity. Recent research, however, suggests the most complex habitats may not harbor the highest density of individuals and number of species, especially in areas with elevated human influence. Understanding nuances in relationships between habitat heterogeneity and ecological communities is warranted to guide habitat-focused conservation and management efforts. We conducted fish and structural habitat surveys of thirty warm-temperate reefs on the southeastern US continental shelf to quantify how structural complexity influences fish communities. We found that intermediate complexity maximizes fish abundance on natural and artificial reefs, as well as species richness on natural reefs, challenging the current paradigm that abundance and other fish community metrics increase with increasing complexity. Naturally occurring rocky reefs of flat and complex morphologies supported equivalent abundance, biomass, species richness, and community composition of fishes. For flat and complex morphologies of rocky reefs to receive equal consideration as essential fish habitat (EFH), special attention should be given to detecting pavement type rocky reefs because their ephemeral nature makes them difficult to detect with typical seafloor mapping methods. Artificial reefs of intermediate complexity also maximized fish abundance, but human-made structures composed of low-lying concrete and metal ships differed in community types, with less complex, concrete structures supporting lower numbers of fishes classified largely as demersal species and metal ships protruding into the water column harboring higher numbers of fishes, including more pelagic species. Results of this study are essential to the process of evaluating habitat function provided by different types and shapes of reefs on the seafloor

  19. Flat and complex temperate reefs provide similar support for fish: Evidence for a unimodal species-habitat relationship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avery B Paxton

    Full Text Available Structural complexity, a form of habitat heterogeneity, influences the structure and function of ecological communities, generally supporting increased species density, richness, and diversity. Recent research, however, suggests the most complex habitats may not harbor the highest density of individuals and number of species, especially in areas with elevated human influence. Understanding nuances in relationships between habitat heterogeneity and ecological communities is warranted to guide habitat-focused conservation and management efforts. We conducted fish and structural habitat surveys of thirty warm-temperate reefs on the southeastern US continental shelf to quantify how structural complexity influences fish communities. We found that intermediate complexity maximizes fish abundance on natural and artificial reefs, as well as species richness on natural reefs, challenging the current paradigm that abundance and other fish community metrics increase with increasing complexity. Naturally occurring rocky reefs of flat and complex morphologies supported equivalent abundance, biomass, species richness, and community composition of fishes. For flat and complex morphologies of rocky reefs to receive equal consideration as essential fish habitat (EFH, special attention should be given to detecting pavement type rocky reefs because their ephemeral nature makes them difficult to detect with typical seafloor mapping methods. Artificial reefs of intermediate complexity also maximized fish abundance, but human-made structures composed of low-lying concrete and metal ships differed in community types, with less complex, concrete structures supporting lower numbers of fishes classified largely as demersal species and metal ships protruding into the water column harboring higher numbers of fishes, including more pelagic species. Results of this study are essential to the process of evaluating habitat function provided by different types and shapes of

  20. Biosimilars: Considerations for Oncology Nurses
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizgirda, Vida; Jacobs, Ira

    2017-04-01

    Biosimilars are developed to be highly similar to and treat the same conditions as licensed biologics. As they are approved and their use becomes more widespread, oncology nurses should be aware of their development and unique considerations. This article reviews properties of biosimilars; their regulation and approval process; the ways in which their quality, safety, and efficacy are evaluated; their postmarketing safety monitoring; and their significance to oncology nurses and oncology nursing.
. A search of PubMed and regulatory agency websites was conducted for references related to the development and use of biosimilars in oncology. 
. Because biologics are large, structurally complex molecules, biosimilars cannot be considered generic equivalents to licensed biologic products. Consequently, regulatory approval for biosimilars is different from approval for small-molecule generics. Oncology nurses are in a unique position to educate themselves, other clinicians, and patients and their families about biosimilars to ensure accurate understanding, as well as optimal and safe use, of biosimilars.

  1. [Galen's oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigliani, R

    1995-10-01

    "Claudius Galenus" is the Author of "De tumoribus praeter naturam". The book was studied on the original Greek text with Latin version edited by K.G. Kühn ("Opera omnia Claudii Galeni": VII, 705-732). This Galen's clinical and pathological oncology was examined as far as categorization, classification, morphology, etiology, pathogenesis, morphogenesis, topography, behaviour (with related therapeutic and prognostic implications) and terminology are concerned. Problems, aspects and concepts, more or less clarified by Galen, were extensively discussed with special reference to the Galen's scientific knowledge and compared with the modern oncology.

  2. Oncologic outcome and morbidity

    OpenAIRE

    Musik, Thabea

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Compared to laparotomic surgery, laparoscopically assisted radical vaginal hysterectomy (LARVH) offers a decreased blood-loss during surgery and faster convalescence of the patient post-operatively while at the same time delivering similar oncologic results. However, there is no data on outcome and toxicity of LARVH followed by (chemo)radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 55 patients (age: 28-78 years, median: 48 years; BMI:...

  3. Cardio-oncology: the Nuclear Option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Jorge A; Russell, Raymond R

    2017-04-01

    Cardio-oncology focuses increased effort to decrease cancer treatment-related cardiotoxicity while continuing to improve outcomes. We sought to synthesize the latest in nuclear cardiology as it pertains to the assessment of left ventricular function in preventative guidelines and comparison to other modalities, novel molecular markers of pre-clinical cardiotoxicity, and its role in cardiac amyloid diagnosis. Planar ERNA (equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography) provides a reliable and proven means of monitoring and preventing anthracycline cardiotoxicity, and SPECT ERNA using solid-state gamma cameras may provide reproducible assessments of left ventricular function with reduced radiation exposure. While certain chemotherapeutics have vascular side effects, the use of stress perfusion imaging has still not been adequately studied for routine use. Similarly, markers of apoptosis, inflammation, and sympathetic nerve dysfunction are promising, but are still not ready for uniform usage. SPECT tracers can assist in nonbiopsy diagnosis of cardiac amyloid. Nuclear cardiology is a significant contributor to the multimodality approach to cardio-oncology.

  4. Practising oncology via telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, G C; Allen, A

    1997-01-01

    Although there are increasing numbers of telemedicine programmes in the USA, few have offered teleoncology services, so that the role of telemedicine in the practice of clinical oncology has yet to be fully defined. Telemedicine has been used successfully for direct patient care in Kansas. It is also a method of providing supportive care for the cancer patient, including assessments of pain and nutrition. In addition, televised tumour conferences and nursing education courses can help smaller communities develop a level of expertise that allows patients to be treated locally. Telemedicine may well be used in future for access to national and international cancer experts, and for participation in new cancer treatment protocols through cooperative group trials. When practising oncology via telemedicine, there are unique problems, including issues regarding technology (interactive video and radiograph review) and practice (patient/oncologist preferences and doctor-patient communication). Very little has been published in the area of tele-oncology so far, and studies concerning its efficacy, cost-effectiveness and the best organizational structure are still in progress. However, telemedicine appears to be a useful technique in the practice of oncology.

  5. Exercise Promotion in Geriatric Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhenn, Peggy S; Bryant, Ashley Leak; Mustian, Karen M

    2016-09-01

    Evidence of the benefits of exercise for people with cancer from diagnosis through survivorship is growing. However, most cancers occur in older adults and little exercise advice is available for making specific recommendations for older adults with cancer. Individualized exercise prescriptions are safe, feasible, and beneficial for the geriatric oncology population. Oncology providers must be equipped to discuss the short- and long-term benefits of exercise and assist older patients in obtaining appropriate exercise prescriptions. This review provides detailed information about professionals and their roles as it relates to functional assessment, intervention, and evaluation of the geriatric oncology population. This review addresses the importance of functional status assessment and appropriate referrals to other oncology professionals.

  6. Short-arm human centrifugation with 0.4g at eye and 0.75g at heart level provides similar cerebrovascular and cardiovascular responses to standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Nandu; Bruner, Michelle; Xu, Da; Bareille, Marie-Pierre; Beck, Arnaud; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut; Blaber, Andrew P

    2015-07-01

    Orthostatic intolerance continues to be a problem with astronauts upon return to Earth as a result of cerebral and cardiovascular adaptations to weightlessness. We tested the hypothesis that artificial gravity from a short-arm human centrifuge (SAHC) could provide cerebral and cardiovascular stimuli similar to upright posture and thereby serve as a suitable countermeasure. We compared cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses before, during, and after exposure to hyper-G with that of standing in healthy young participants. The head was positioned such that the middle cerebral artery (MCA) was 0.46 m from the center of rotation. Two levels of hyper-G that provided 1g and 2g at foot level were investigated. Continuous blood pressure, heart rate, calf blood volume, MCA mean blood flow velocity (MFV) and end-tidal CO2 were measured. Blood pressure at the level of the MCA (BP-MCA) and MFV was reduced during stand and at 2g. The relationship between MFV and BP-MCA at 2g was different from supine and similar to standing, while 1g centrifugation was not different from supine. The cardiovascular system was also not different from supine at 1g but was similarly challenged in 2g compared to stand. Our data suggest that short-arm centrifugation 2g at the feet, with the head offset 0.5 m from the center, provides similar cardiovascular and cerebral responses to standing. This supports the hypothesis that passive 2g SAHC exposure at the feet could be used as a countermeasure for in-flight cardiovascular and cerebrovascular deconditioning.

  7. Surgical Protocol Violations in Children with Renal Tumors Provides an Opportunity to Improve Pediatric Cancer Care: A Report from the Children's Oncology Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Peter F.; Hamilton, Thomas E.; Gow, Kenneth; Barnhart, Douglas; Ferrer, Fernando; Kandel, Jessica; Glick, Richard; Dasgupta, Roshni; Naranjo, Arlene; He, Ying; Perlman, Elizabeth J.; Kalapurakal, John A.; Khanna, Geetika; Dome, Jeffrey S.; Geller, James; Mullen, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of surgical protocol violations (SPV) among children undergoing surgery for renal tumors who were enrolled on the Children's Oncology Group (COG) renal tumor biology and classification study AREN03B2. Methods AREN03B2 opened in February 2006 and as of March 31, 2013, there were 3664 eligible patients. The surgical review forms for 3536 patients with unilateral disease were centrally reviewed for SPVs. The frequency, type, number of violations, institutional prevalence, and quartiles for SPVs were assessed. Results Of the 3536 patients, there were a total of 505 with at least one SPV (564 total SPVs reported), for an overall incidence of 14.28%. The types of SPVs included a lack of lymph node sampling in 365 (64.7%), avoidable spill in 61 (10.8%), biopsy immediately before nephrectomy in 89 (15.8%), an incorrect abdominal incision in 32 (5.7%), and unnecessary resection of organs in 17 (3.0%). The SPVs occurred in 163/215 participating institutions (75.8%). For centers with at least 1 SPV, the mean number of SPVs reported was 3.10 ± 2.39 (mean ± standard deviation). The incidence of protocol violation per institution ranged from 0 to 67%. Centers with an average of ≤1 case/year had an incidence of SPVs of 12.2 ± 3.8%, those with an average of >1 to 0.05). Conclusion SPVs that potentially result in additional exposure to chemotherapy and radiation therapy are not uncommon in children undergoing resection of renal malignancies. PMID:27229358

  8. Palliative Care: Delivering Comprehensive Oncology Nursing Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Constance

    2015-11-01

    To describe palliative care as part of comprehensive oncology nursing care. A review of the palliative care, oncology, and nursing literature over the past 10 years. Palliative care is mandated as part of comprehensive cancer care. A cancer diagnosis often results in distress in the physical, psychosocial, spiritual, and emotional domains of care. Oncology nurses are essential in providing palliative care from diagnosis to death to patients with cancer. They address the myriad aspects of cancer. With palliative care skills and knowledge, oncology nurses can provide quality cancer care. There are many opportunities in which oncology nurses can promote palliative care. Oncology nurses must obtain knowledge and skills in primary palliative care to provide comprehensive cancer care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Encyclopedia of radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, Luther W. [Drexel Univ. College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Yaeger, Theodore E. (eds.) [Wake Forest Univ. School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-02-01

    The simple A to Z format provides easy access to relevant information in the field of radiation oncology. Extensive cross references between keywords and related articles enable efficient searches in a user-friendly manner. Fully searchable and hyperlinked electronic online edition. The aim of this comprehensive encyclopedia is to provide detailed information on radiation oncology. The wide range of entries are written by leading experts. They will provide basic and clinical scientists in academia, practice and industry with valuable information about the field of radiation oncology. Those in related fields, students, teachers, and interested laypeople will also benefit from the important and relevant information on the most recent developments. Please note that this publication is available as print only or online only or print + online set. Save 75% of the online list price when purchasing the bundle. For more information on the online version please type the publication title into the search box above, then click on the eReference version in the results list.

  10. Nursing 436A: Pediatric Oncology for Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Cynthia L.

    A description is provided of "Pediatric Oncology for Nurses," the first in a series of three courses offered to fourth-year nursing students in pediatric oncology. The first section provides a course overview, discusses time assignments, and describes the target student population. Next, a glossary of terms, and lists of course goals, long-range…

  11. Integrative oncology: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Gary; Cassileth, Barrie

    2014-01-01

    Integrative oncology, the diagnosis-specific field of integrative medicine, addresses symptom control with nonpharmacologic therapies. Known commonly as "complementary therapies" these are evidence-based adjuncts to mainstream care that effectively control physical and emotional symptoms, enhance physical and emotional strength, and provide patients with skills enabling them to help themselves throughout and following mainstream cancer treatment. Integrative or complementary therapies are rational and noninvasive. They have been subjected to study to determine their value, to document the problems they ameliorate, and to define the circumstances under which such therapies are beneficial. Conversely, "alternative" therapies typically are promoted literally as such; as actual antitumor treatments. They lack biologic plausibility and scientific evidence of safety and efficacy. Many are outright fraudulent. Conflating these two very different categories by use of the convenient acronym "CAM," for "complementary and alternative therapies," confuses the issue and does a substantial disservice to patients and medical professionals. Complementary and integrative modalities have demonstrated safety value and benefits. If the same were true for "alternatives," they would not be "alternatives." Rather, they would become part of mainstream cancer care. This manuscript explores the medical and sociocultural context of interest in integrative oncology as well as in "alternative" therapies, reviews commonly-asked patient questions, summarizes research results in both categories, and offers recommendations to help guide patients and family members through what is often a difficult maze. Combining complementary therapies with mainstream oncology care to address patients' physical, psychologic and spiritual needs constitutes the practice of integrative oncology. By recommending nonpharmacologic modalities that reduce symptom burden and improve quality of life, physicians also enable

  12. Sublingual tacrolimus administration provides similar drug exposure to per-oral route employing lower doses in liver transplantation: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solari, S; Cancino, A; Wolff, R; Norero, B; Vargas, J I; Barrera, F; Guerra, J F; Martínez, J; Jarufe, N; Soza, A; Arrese, M; Benitez, C

    2017-05-01

    Per-oral tacrolimus administration is not always practicable. Sublingual administration is a potential alternative, but its feasibility and effectiveness compared with oral route has not been established. To compare tacrolimus drug exposure after sublingual and oral administration in liver transplant recipients. Experimental, open-label, non-randomised, cross-over study. Tacrolimus exposure was evaluated in 32 liver transplant recipients receiving oral administration. 12 h tacrolimus area-under-the-curve (AUC0-12 h ) was calculated using tacrolimus blood concentrations at 0-0.5-1-2-4-6-8-12 hrs post-dose. Recipients were switched to sublingual administration, and dose was adjusted to reach similar trough levels, new AUC0-12 h was calculated. Correlation between AUC0-12 h and trough levels was determined for both oral and sublingual phases. Similar trough levels were accomplished with oral and sublingual administration (6.68 ± 2 ng/mL vs. 6.62 ± 1.9 ng/mL (P = 0.8)). Although concentration 2 h post dose was higher in oral phase (15.36 ± 7.14 vs. 13.18 ± 5.64, P = 0.015), AUC0-12 h was similar in both phases (116.6 ± 34.6 vs. 111.5 ± 36.93 ng/mL* h, P = 0.19). Daily dose of tacrolimus required in sublingual phase was 37% lower than that used in oral phase (P tacrolimus when employing sublingual route. Good correlation between AUC0-12 h and trough levels was observed in sublingual phase (r2 = 0.74). Twenty-two recipients were maintained on sublingual administration after the end of study (mean follow-up: 18.7 ± 5.8 months). No difference in liver function tests or rejection rates was found during follow-up period. Sublingual administration of tacrolimus is feasible and provides similar drug exposure compared with oral administration. In our study, at long-term follow-up, sublingual administration was not associated with liver transplant rejection. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Geriatric Oncology Program Development and Gero-Oncology Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mary Pat; DeDonato, Dana Marcone; Kutney-Lee, Ann

    2016-02-01

    To provide a critical analysis of current approaches to the care of older adults with cancer, outline priority areas for geriatric oncology program development, and recommend strategies for improvement. Published articles and reports between 1999 and 2015. Providing an interdisciplinary model that incorporates a holistic geriatric assessment will ensure the delivery of patient-centered care that is responsive to the comprehensive needs of older patients. Nursing administrators and leaders have both an opportunity and responsibility to shape the future of geriatric oncology. Preparations include workforce development and the creation of programs that are designed to meet the complex needs of this population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 3D-2D image registration for target localization in spine surgery: investigation of similarity metrics providing robustness to content mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, T; Uneri, A; Ketcha, M D; Reaungamornrat, S; Kleinszig, G; Vogt, S; Aygun, N; Lo, S-F; Wolinsky, J-P; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-04-21

    In image-guided spine surgery, robust three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D-2D) registration of preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative radiographs can be challenged by the image content mismatch associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation and implants as well as soft-tissue resection or deformation. This work investigates image similarity metrics in 3D-2D registration offering improved robustness against mismatch, thereby improving performance and reducing or eliminating the need for manual masking. The performance of four gradient-based image similarity metrics (gradient information (GI), gradient correlation (GC), gradient information with linear scaling (GS), and gradient orientation (GO)) with a multi-start optimization strategy was evaluated in an institutional review board-approved retrospective clinical study using 51 preoperative CT images and 115 intraoperative mobile radiographs. Registrations were tested with and without polygonal masks as a function of the number of multistarts employed during optimization. Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) and assessment of failure modes (PDE  >  30 mm) that could impede reliable vertebral level localization. With manual polygonal masking and 200 multistarts, the GC and GO metrics exhibited robust performance with 0% gross failures and median PDE registration to fail at a rate of >14%; however, GO maintained robustness with a 0% gross failure rate. Overall, the GI, GC, and GS metrics were susceptible to registration errors associated with content mismatch, but GO provided robust registration (median PDE  =  5.5 mm, 2.6 mm IQR) without manual masking and with an improved runtime (29.3 s). The GO metric improved the registration accuracy and robustness in the presence of strong image content mismatch. This capability could offer valuable assistance and decision support in spine level localization in a manner consistent with

  15. 3D-2D image registration for target localization in spine surgery: investigation of similarity metrics providing robustness to content mismatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Ketcha, M. D.; Reaungamornrat, S.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Aygun, N.; Lo, S.-F.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    In image-guided spine surgery, robust three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D-2D) registration of preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative radiographs can be challenged by the image content mismatch associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation and implants as well as soft-tissue resection or deformation. This work investigates image similarity metrics in 3D-2D registration offering improved robustness against mismatch, thereby improving performance and reducing or eliminating the need for manual masking. The performance of four gradient-based image similarity metrics (gradient information (GI), gradient correlation (GC), gradient information with linear scaling (GS), and gradient orientation (GO)) with a multi-start optimization strategy was evaluated in an institutional review board-approved retrospective clinical study using 51 preoperative CT images and 115 intraoperative mobile radiographs. Registrations were tested with and without polygonal masks as a function of the number of multistarts employed during optimization. Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) and assessment of failure modes (PDE  >  30 mm) that could impede reliable vertebral level localization. With manual polygonal masking and 200 multistarts, the GC and GO metrics exhibited robust performance with 0% gross failures and median PDE  14% however, GO maintained robustness with a 0% gross failure rate. Overall, the GI, GC, and GS metrics were susceptible to registration errors associated with content mismatch, but GO provided robust registration (median PDE  =  5.5 mm, 2.6 mm IQR) without manual masking and with an improved runtime (29.3 s). The GO metric improved the registration accuracy and robustness in the presence of strong image content mismatch. This capability could offer valuable assistance and decision support in spine level localization in a manner consistent with clinical workflow.

  16. Nanotechnology in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Andrew Z; Tepper, Joel E

    2014-09-10

    Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on atomic and molecular scales, is a relatively new branch of science. It has already made a significant impact on clinical medicine, especially in oncology. Nanomaterial has several characteristics that are ideal for oncology applications, including preferential accumulation in tumors, low distribution in normal tissues, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and clearance, that differ from those of small molecules. Because these properties are also well suited for applications in radiation oncology, nanomaterials have been used in many different areas of radiation oncology for imaging and treatment planning, as well as for radiosensitization to improve the therapeutic ratio. In this article, we review the unique properties of nanomaterials that are favorable for oncology applications and examine the various applications of nanotechnology in radiation oncology. We also discuss the future directions of nanotechnology within the context of radiation oncology. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  17. Neuro-Oncology Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BTTC are experts in their respective fields. Neuro-Oncology Clinical Fellowship This is a joint program with ... can increase survival rates. Learn more... The Neuro-Oncology Branch welcomes Dr. Mark Gilbert as new Branch ...

  18. The use of biosimilar medicines in oncology - position statement of the Brazilian Society of Clinical Oncology (SBOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, G S; Sternberg, C; Lopes, G; Chammas, R; Gifoni, M A C; Gil, R A; Araujo, D V

    2018-01-11

    A biosimilar is a biologic product that is similar to a reference biopharmaceutical product, the manufacturing process of which hinders the ability to identically replicate the structure of the original product, and therefore, it cannot be described as an absolute equivalent of the original medication. The currently available technology does not allow for an accurate copy of complex molecules, but it does allow the replication of similar molecules with the same activity. As biosimilars are about to be introduced in oncology practice, these must be evaluated through evidence-based medicine. This manuscript is a position paper, where the Brazilian Society of Clinical Oncology (SBOC) aims to describe pertinent issues regarding the approval and use of biosimilars in oncology. As a working group on behalf of SBOC, we discuss aspects related to definition, labeling/nomenclature, extrapolation, interchangeability, switching, automatic substitution, clinical standards on safety and efficacy, and the potential impact on financial burden in healthcare. We take a stand in favor of the introduction of biosimilars, as they offer a viable, safe, and cost-effective alternative to the biopharmaceutical products currently used in cancer. We hope this document can provide valuable information to support therapeutic decisions that maximize the clinical benefit for the thousands of cancer patients in Brazil and can contribute to expedite the introduction of this new drug class in clinical practice. We expect the conveyed information to serve as a basis for further discussion in Latin America, this being the first position paper issued by a Latin American Oncology Society.

  19. Oncology Nursing Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 21st Century Nursing Leadership , and navigate through the issues of nursing practice that matter most. New to Oncology? Here's ... Nurse Quality-of-Life Issues Quality-of-Life Issues—Oncology ... in Oncology Nursing: Highlights from the ONS 41st Annual Congress Certification ...

  20. PET/MR in oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balyasnikova, Svetlana; Löfgren, Johan; de Nijs, Robin

    2012-01-01

    of the challenges inherent in this new technology, but focus on potential applications for simultaneous PET/MR in the field of oncology. Methods and tracers for use with the PET technology will be familiar to most readers of this journal; thus this paper aims to provide a short and basic introduction to a number...... be applied together with PET increasing the amount of information about the tissues of interest. The potential clinical benefit of applying PET/MR in staging, radiotherapy planning and treatment evaluation in oncology, as well as the research perspectives for the use of PET/MR in the development of new...

  1. Reconstruction of Peripelvic Oncologic Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichman, Katie E; Matros, Evan; Disa, Joseph J

    2017-10-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Understand the anatomy of the peripelvic area. 2. Understand the advantages and disadvantages of performing peripelvic reconstruction in patients undergoing oncologic resection. 3. Select the appropriate local, pedicled, or free-flap reconstruction based on the location of the defect and donor-site characteristics. Peripelvic reconstruction most commonly occurs in the setting of oncologic ablative surgery. The peripelvic area contains several distinct reconstructive regions, including vagina, vulva, penis, and scrotum. Each area provides unique reconstructive considerations. In addition, prior or future radiation therapy or chemotherapy along with cancer cachexia can increase the complexity of reconstruction.

  2. Nanotechnology in Radiation Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Andrew Z.; Tepper, Joel E.

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on atomic and molecular scales, is a relatively new branch of science. It has already made a significant impact on clinical medicine, especially in oncology. Nanomaterial has several characteristics that are ideal for oncology applications, including preferential accumulation in tumors, low distribution in normal tissues, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and clearance, that differ from those of small molecules. Because these properties are also well suited for applications in radiation oncology, nanomaterials have been used in many different areas of radiation oncology for imaging and treatment planning, as well as for radiosensitization to improve the therapeutic ratio. In this article, we review the unique properties of nanomaterials that are favorable for oncology applications and examine the various applications of nanotechnology in radiation oncology. We also discuss the future directions of nanotechnology within the context of radiation oncology. PMID:25113769

  3. Surgical Oncology Nursing: Looking Back, Looking Forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Patrick C; Selanders, Louise

    2017-02-01

    To provide a historical perspective in the development of oncology nursing and surgical oncology as critical components of today's health care system. Review of the literature and Web sites of key organizations. The evolution of surgical oncology nursing has traversed a historical journey from that of a niche subspecialty of nursing that had very little scientific underpinning, to a highly sophisticated discipline within a very short time. Nursing continues to contribute its expertise to the encyclopedic knowledge base of surgical oncology and cancer care, which have helped improve the lives of countless patients and families who have had to face the difficulties of this diagnosis. An understanding of the historical context for which a nursing specialty such as surgical oncology nursing evolves is critical to gaining an appreciation for the contributions of nursing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Models of Care in Geriatric Oncology Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhenn, Peggy S; Perrin, Sylvie; McCarthy, Alexandra L

    2016-02-01

    To review models of care for older adults with cancer, with a focus on the role of the oncology nurse in geriatric oncology care. International exemplars of geriatric oncology nursing care are discussed. Published peer reviewed literature, Web-based resources, professional society materials, and the authors' experience. Nursing care for older patients with cancer is complex and requires integrating knowledge from multiple disciplines that blend the sciences of geriatrics, oncology, and nursing, and which recognizes the dimensions of quality of life. Oncology nurses can benefit from learning key skills of comprehensive geriatric screening and assessment to improve the care they provide for older adults with cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular radio-oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Michael; Krause, Mechthild; Cordes, Nils (eds.) [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital

    2016-07-01

    This book concisely reviews our current understanding of hypoxia, molecular targeting, DNA repair, cancer stem cells, and tumor pathophysiology, while also discussing novel strategies for putting these findings into practice in daily clinical routine. Radiotherapy is an important part of modern multimodal cancer treatment, and the past several years have witnessed not only substantial improvements in radiation techniques and the use of new beam qualities, but also major strides in our understanding of molecular tumor biology and tumor radiation response. Against this backdrop, the book highlights recent efforts to identify reasonable and clinically applicable biomarkers using broad-spectrum tissue microarrays and high-throughput systems biology approaches like genomics and epigenomics. In particular, it describes in detail how such molecular information is now being exploited for diagnostic imaging and imaging throughout treatment using the example of positron emission tomography. By discussing all these issues in the context of modern radiation oncology, the book provides a broad, up-to-date overview of the molecular aspects of radiation oncology that will hopefully foster its further optimization.

  6. Naturopathic Oncology Modified Delphi Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jacob; Hodsdon, Wendy; Schor, Jacob; McKinney, Neil; Rubin, Daniel; Seely, Dugald; Parmar, Gurdev; Birdsall, Tim; Alschuler, Lise; Lamson, Davis; Birdsall, Shauna; Zwickey, Heather

    2016-03-01

    Naturopathic oncology is a relatively new and emerging field capable of providing professional integrative or alternative services to cancer patients. Foundational research is critical to identify topics in the clinical and research development of naturopathic oncology for future growth of the field. This study implements a modified Delphi protocol to develop expert consensus regarding ethics, philosophy, and research development in naturopathic oncology. The modified protocol implements a nomination process to select a panel of 8 physicians and to assist in question formulation. The protocol includes an in-person discussion of 6 questions with multiple iterations to maintain the concept of the Delphi methodology as well as a postdiscussion consensus survey. The protocol identified, ranked, and established consensus for numerous themes per question. Underlying key topics include integration with conventional medicine, evidence-based medicine, patient education, patient safety, and additional training requirements for naturopathic oncologists. The systematic nomination and questioning of a panel of experts provides a foundational and educational resource to assist in clarification of clinical ethics, philosophy, and research development in the emerging field of naturopathic oncology. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. An interprofessionally developed geriatric oncology curriculum for hematology–oncology fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Ahmed; Hughes, Caren; Karuturi, Meghan; Reyes, Connie; Yorio, Jeffrey; Holmes, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Objective Because the cancer population is aging, interprofessional education incorporating geriatric principles is essential to providing adequate training for oncology fellows. We report the targeted needs assessment, content, and evaluation tools for our geriatric oncology curriculum at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Methods A team comprising a geriatrician, a medical oncologist, an oncology PharmD, an oncology advanced nurse practitioner, and two oncology chief fellows developed the geriatric oncology curriculum. First, a general needs assessment was conducted by reviewing the literature and medical societies’ publications and by consulting experts. A targeted needs assessment was then conducted by reviewing the fellows’ evaluations of the geriatric oncology rotation and by interviewing fellows and recently graduated oncology faculty. Results Geriatric assessment, pharmacology, and psychosocial knowledge skills were the three identified areas of educational need. Curriculum objectives and an evaluation checklist were developed to evaluate learners in the three identified areas. The checklist content was validated by consulting experts in the field. Online materials, including a curriculum, a geriatric pharmacology job aid, and pharmacology cases, were also developed and delivered as part of the curriculum. Conclusion An interprofessional team approach was a successful method for identifying areas of learners’ educational needs, which in turn helped us develop an integrated geriatric oncology curriculum. The curriculum is currently being piloted and evaluated. PMID:25487037

  8. An interprofessionally developed geriatric oncology curriculum for hematology-oncology fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Ahmed; Hughes, Caren; Karuturi, Meghan; Reyes, Connie; Yorio, Jeffrey; Holmes, Holly

    2015-03-01

    Because the cancer population is aging, interprofessional education incorporating geriatric principles is essential to providing adequate training for oncology fellows. We report the targeted needs assessment, content, and evaluation tools for our geriatric oncology curriculum at MD Anderson Cancer Center. A team comprising a geriatrician, a medical oncologist, an oncology PharmD, an oncology advanced nurse practitioner, and two oncology chief fellows developed the geriatric oncology curriculum. First, a general needs assessment was conducted by reviewing the literature and medical societies' publications and by consulting experts. A targeted needs assessment was then conducted by reviewing the fellows' evaluations of the geriatric oncology rotation and by interviewing fellows and recently graduated oncology faculty. Geriatric assessment, pharmacology, and psychosocial knowledge skills were the three identified areas of educational need. Curriculum objectives and an evaluation checklist were developed to evaluate learners in the three identified areas. The checklist content was validated by consulting experts in the field. Online materials, including a curriculum, a geriatric pharmacology job aid, and pharmacology cases, were also developed and delivered as part of the curriculum. An interprofessional team approach was a successful method for identifying areas of learners' educational needs, which in turn helped us develop an integrated geriatric oncology curriculum. The curriculum is currently being piloted and evaluated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Safety and efficacy of biosimilars in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellekens, Huub; Smolen, Josef S; Dicato, Mario; Rifkin, Robert M

    2016-11-01

    Biosimilars are considered to be one of the solutions to combat the substantially increasing costs of cancer treatment, and its imminent introduction is expected to expand affordability worldwide. However, biosimilar monoclonal antibodies provide many challenges compared with first-generation biosimilars, growth factors, and hormones, because they have shown only a modest clinical effect, and are often used in combination with other more toxic therapies, making it difficult to design studies that allow appropriate efficacy and safety assessments compared with the original products. The value of comparative clinical trials for showing clinical equivalence of biosimilars that demonstrate a high degree of similarity in physical, chemical, structural, and biological characteristics with the original product is increasingly being questioned, and advances in analytical methods that provide robust non-clinical data might reduce the need for extensive clinical comparisons. In this Series paper, the third of three papers on drug safety in oncology, we review the safety and efficacy of biosimilars in oncology, assessing biosimilar monoclonal antibodies in relation to first-generation biosimilars, the issues surrounding interchangeability and extrapolation of biosimilars to other disease and patient indications, and reassessing the safety approval pathway in light of 10 years worth of biosimilar experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A survey of evidence in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine oncology manuscripts from 1999 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahora, A; Khanna, C

    2010-01-01

    To survey and monitor trends in evidence for oncology manuscripts published in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (JVIM) between 1999 and 2007 based on an evidence-based medicine (EBM) standard. All veterinary oncology-related articles published in JVIM and 7 other high-impact journals from 1999 to 2007 were collected by database searches. Relevant manuscripts then were characterized including investigator affiliation, subject matter investigated, retrospective or prospective study design, manuscript type, and classifications of manuscripts using an EBM standard. A total of 172 relevant veterinary oncology manuscripts were identified in JVIM between 1999 and 2007. The proportion of oncology manuscripts published each year rose with the total number of manuscripts published in JVIM (mean, 13%; range, 8-15%). The author affiliations and subject matter were similar during this evaluation period. Case series represented the most common manuscript type (40%). With the exception of a progressive increase in prospective manuscripts and a reduction in case reports, no significant changes in the classification of manuscripts using EBM standards were seen. During this same period, veterinary oncology manuscripts published in 7 high-impact journals were associated with higher standards of evidence including prospective studies and randomized trials. The standards of evidence for veterinary oncology manuscripts published in JVIM have remained static between 1999 and 2007. This survey provides an informative benchmark for the state of evidence in previous JVIM oncology manuscripts and may be useful in identifying specific opportunities that may raise the standards of evidence in future publications in JVIM.

  11. Increasing access to sexual health care for rural and regional young people: Similarities and differences in the views of young people and service providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Karen; Harvey, Caroline; Matich, Paula; Page, Priscilla; Jukka, Clare; Hollins, Jane; Larkins, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to describe the views of sexual health service providers on access issues for young people and consider them together with the views of young people themselves. A cross-sectional mixed-methods study design involving semi-structured interviews with health service providers and an electronic survey with young people. Four towns in rural and regional Queensland, Australia. A total of 32 service providers: 9 sexual health nurses, 8 general practitioners, 6 school-based youth health nurses, 5 sexual health educators, 2 Australian Aboriginal health workers and 2 youth workers. There were 391 young people who participated in the Young People's Survey. Themes generated from interviews with service providers and quantitative data from young people addressing access to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services for rural and regional young people. Service providers frequently identified structural barriers, confidentiality and lack of awareness of SRH services as barriers for young people seeking SRH care. Young people also reported that structural factors such as transport, cost and service operating hours were important; however, they placed greater value on personal attributes of service providers, particularly welcoming and non-judgemental attitudes. Health service policy and training focused on attitudinal qualities of individual service providers may improve access to SRH services for young people. Selective staff recruitment and professional development are important to increase sensitivity to youth issues. Promotion of non-judgemental and confidential care may also improve access for youth. © 2015 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  12. Advances in oncologic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towbin, Alexander J; Trout, Andrew T; Roebuck, Derek J

    2014-12-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been an increased reliance on radiologic imaging to diagnose and stage malignancies. This increased reliance on imaging has occurred because the quality of imaging has improved markedly. Currently, modalities such as MRI and CT allow the radiologist to obtain highly detailed images of the human body with a resolution of less than 1mm. More recently, researchers have shifted their focus from anatomic imaging to functional imaging. This burgeoning field of radiology strives to provide quantitative information regarding the behavior of tumors (or other pathology) to deliver patients and clinicians with prognostic information regarding the disease process. The purpose of this article is to describe the recent advances in pediatric oncologic imaging. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Palliative care and oncology: integration leads to better care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dennis, Kristopher; Librach, S Lawrence; Chow, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The timely integration of palliative care services into standard oncology care is essential to providing comprehensive individualized care for patients with advanced and incurable cancer and their families...

  14. National Study of Burnout and Career Satisfaction Among Physician Assistants in Oncology: Implications for Team-Based Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetzlaff, Eric Daniel; Hylton, Heather Marie; DeMora, Lyudmila; Ruth, Karen; Wong, Yu-Ning

    2017-11-30

    A high rate of burnout has been reported in oncology physicians. Physician assistants (PAs) may also face similar risks of burnout. We sought to measure the personal and professional characteristics associated with burnout and career satisfaction and the potential impact on the oncology PA workforce. A national survey of PAs in oncology was completed by using the Maslach Burnout Inventory from September 2015 to January 2016. In all, 855 PAs were contacted and 250 submitted complete surveys (response rate, 29.2%). Respondents were representative of PAs in oncology with a mean age of 41.8 years, females (88.8%), academic practice (55.2%), urban location (61.2%), outpatient (74.4%), medical oncology (75.2%), worked 41 to 50 hours per week (52.8%), and had a mean of 9.6 years as a PA in oncology. Burnout was reported in 34.8% of PAs, 30.4% reported high emotional exhaustion, 17.6% reported high depersonalization, and 19.6% reported a low sense of personal accomplishment. In multivariable analysis, age, time spent on indirect patient care, oncology subspecialty, and relationship with collaborating physician were factors associated with burnout. Career and specialty satisfaction was high (86.4% and 88.8%, respectively). In the next 2 years, only 3.6% of PAs plan to pursue a different career or specialty and only 2.0% plan to retire. Despite high career and specialty satisfaction, burnout is reported in one third of PAs in oncology. Further exploration of the relationship between PAs and collaborating physicians may provide insight on methods to decrease burnout. Negligible short-term attrition of the current oncology PA workforce is anticipated.

  15. Critical Lessons From High-Value Oncology Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blayney, Douglas W; Simon, Melora K; Podtschaske, Beatrice; Ramsey, Scott; Shyu, Margaret; Lindquist, Craig; Milstein, Arnold

    2018-02-01

    Cancer care is expensive. Cancer care provided by practice organizations varies in total spending incurred by patients and payers during treatment episodes and in quality of care, and this unnecessary variation contributes to the high cost. To use the variation in total spending and quality of care to assess oncology practice attributes distinguishing "high value" that may be tested and adopted by others to produce similar results. "Positive deviance" was used in this exploratory mixed-methods (quantitative and qualitative) analysis of interview results. To quantify value, oncology practices located near the US Pacific Northwest and Midwest with low mean insurer-allowed spending were identified. Among those, practices with high quality were selected. A team then conducted site visits to interview practice personnel from June 2, 2015, through October 3, 2015, and to probe for attributes of high-value care. A qualitative analysis of their interview results was performed, and a panel of experienced oncologists was convened to review attributes occurring uniquely or frequently in low-spending practices for their contribution to value improvement and ease of implementation. Four positive deviant (ie, low-spending) oncology practices and 3 oncology practices that ranked near the middle of the spending distribution were studied. Thematic saturation in a qualitative analysis of high-value care attributes. From the 7 oncology practices studied, 13 attributes within the following 5 themes emerged: treatment planning and goal setting, services supporting the patient journey, technical support and physical layout, care team organization and function, and external context. Five attributes (ie, conservative use of imaging, early discussion of treatment limitations and consequences, single point of contact, maximal use of registered nurses for interventions, and a multicomponent health care system) most sharply distinguished the high-value practice sites. The expert oncologist

  16. Cancer Patients and Oncology Nursing: Perspectives of Oncology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Aim: Burnout and exhaustion is a frequent problem in oncology nursing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the aspects of oncology nurses about their profession in order to enhance the standards of oncology nursing. Materials and Methods: This survey was conducted with 70 oncology nurses working at ...

  17. The Evolution of Gero-Oncology Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Stewart M; Bryant, Ashley Leak; Puts, Martine

    2016-02-01

    This article summarizes the evolution of gero-oncology nursing and highlights key educational initiatives, clinical practice issues, and research areas to enhance care of older adults with cancer. Peer-reviewed literature, position statements, clinical practice guidelines, Web-based materials, and professional organizations' resources. Globally, the older adult cancer population is rapidly growing. The care of older adults with cancer requires an understanding of their diverse needs and the intersection of cancer and aging. Despite efforts to enhance competence in gero-oncology and to develop a body of evidence, nurses and health care systems remain under-prepared to provide high-quality care for older adults with cancer. Nurses must take a leadership role in integrating gerontological principles into oncology settings. Working closely with interdisciplinary team members, nurses should utilize available resources and continue to build evidence through gero-oncology nursing research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Board-Certified Oncology Pharmacists: Their Potential Contribution to Reducing a Shortfall in Oncology Patient Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignoffo, Robert; Knapp, Katherine; Barnett, Mitchell; Barbour, Sally Yowell; D'Amato, Steve; Iacovelli, Lew; Knudsen, Jasen; Koontz, Susannah E; Mancini, Robert; McBride, Ali; McCauley, Dayna; Medina, Patrick; O'Bryant, Cindy L; Scarpace, Sarah; Stricker, Steve; Trovato, James A

    2016-04-01

    With an aging US population, the number of patients who need cancer treatment will increase significantly by 2020. On the basis of a predicted shortage of oncology physicians, nonphysician health care practitioners will need to fill the shortfall in oncology patient visits, and nurse practitioners and physician assistants have already been identified for this purpose. This study proposes that appropriately trained oncology pharmacists can also contribute. The purpose of this study is to estimate the supply of Board of Pharmacy Specialties-certified oncology pharmacists (BCOPs) and their potential contribution to the care of patients with cancer through 2020. Data regarding accredited oncology pharmacy residencies, new BCOPs, and total BCOPs were used to estimate oncology residencies, new BCOPs, and total BCOPs through 2020. A Delphi panel process was used to estimate patient visits, identify patient care services that BCOPs could provide, and study limitations. By 2020, there will be an estimated 3,639 BCOPs, and approximately 62% of BCOPs will have completed accredited oncology pharmacy residencies. Delphi panelists came to consensus (at least 80% agreement) on eight patient care services that BCOPs could provide. Although the estimates given by our model indicate that BCOPs could provide 5 to 7 million 30-minute patient visits annually, sensitivity analysis, based on factors that could reduce potential visit availability resulted in 2.5 to 3.5 million visits by 2020 with the addition of BCOPs to the health care team. BCOPs can contribute to a projected shortfall in needed patient visits for cancer treatment. BCOPs, along with nurse practitioners and physician assistants could substantially reduce, but likely not eliminate, the shortfall of providers needed for oncology patient visits. Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. PET/MR in oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balyasnikova, Svetlana; Löfgren, Johan; de Nijs, Robin

    2012-01-01

    After more than 20 years of research, a fully integrated PET/MR scanner was launched in 2010 enabling simultaneous acquisition of PET and MR imaging. Currently, no clinical indication for combined PET/MR has been established, however the expectations are high. In this paper we will discuss some...... of the challenges inherent in this new technology, but focus on potential applications for simultaneous PET/MR in the field of oncology. Methods and tracers for use with the PET technology will be familiar to most readers of this journal; thus this paper aims to provide a short and basic introduction to a number...... be applied together with PET increasing the amount of information about the tissues of interest. The potential clinical benefit of applying PET/MR in staging, radiotherapy planning and treatment evaluation in oncology, as well as the research perspectives for the use of PET/MR in the development of new...

  20. PET/MR in oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balyasnikova, Svetlana; Löfgren, Johan; de Nijs, Robin

    2012-01-01

    be applied together with PET increasing the amount of information about the tissues of interest. The potential clinical benefit of applying PET/MR in staging, radiotherapy planning and treatment evaluation in oncology, as well as the research perspectives for the use of PET/MR in the development of new......After more than 20 years of research, a fully integrated PET/MR scanner was launched in 2010 enabling simultaneous acquisition of PET and MR imaging. Currently, no clinical indication for combined PET/MR has been established, however the expectations are high. In this paper we will discuss some...... of the challenges inherent in this new technology, but focus on potential applications for simultaneous PET/MR in the field of oncology. Methods and tracers for use with the PET technology will be familiar to most readers of this journal; thus this paper aims to provide a short and basic introduction to a number...

  1. The Teachable Moment After Cancer Diagnosis: Perceptions From Oncology Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvinen, Kristina; Bruner, Brenda; Truant, Tracy

    2015-11-01

    To determine oncology nurses' perspectives of the receptiveness of survivors to receiving health behavior guidance, with secondary purposes to (a) explore other elements of oncology nurses' perceptions of the teachable moment and (b) examine differences in outcomes between American and Canadian nurses
. Cross-sectional survey.
 In- and outpatient oncology nursing departments in the United States and Canada. 310 members of the Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology (CANO/ACIO) and the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) who currently care for patients
. Oncology nurses recruited through emails distributed through the CANO/ACIO and ONS Listservs completed online investigator-developed surveys. Measures related to oncology nurses' perceptions of survivors' receptiveness to health behavior change counseling and the teachable moment (i.e., general receptiveness, perceived benefits, guidance and referral seeking, long- and short-term effectiveness, best time, and best resources). Oncology nurses reported that survivors were receptive to receiving guidance on health behaviors, particularly during teachable moments after diagnosis and during treatment. They also perceived that a fairly low percentage of survivors asked for guidance about health behavior change; relatively few made improvements to their health behaviors.
 Survivors are reported to be interested in receiving guidance concerning health behavior change during key teachable moments. Oncology nurses may need to initiate conversations with survivors, offer education regarding the benefits of positive health behavior change, and provide ongoing support throughout the cancer trajectory. Oncology nurses may use findings from the current study to guide their health behavior change counseling with survivors
.

  2. Generalities of the oncological pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah María Regueira Betancourt

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer pain can be caused by a malignant tumor, by the therapy used to treat it, or by both causes. It begins with an acute onset that goes towards healing or chronicity. Together with the manifestations of a chronic pain, acute episodes may appear. A bibliographic study was carried out on the oncological pain, using the resources available in the Infomed network, specifically Ebsco, The Cochrane Librery, PubMed, Hinari and SciELO, by means of which the following databases were accessed: MEDLINE, AcademicSearch Premier and MedicLatina. The presence of pain in an oncological process is variable and it depends on the type and extension of the disease, as well as on each person's own individual tolerance. The terminal intense oncological pain is a circumstance both foreseeable and necessarily avoidable. Its relief is a priority in the cancer program of the World Health Organization. To know the classification of pain, its causes, the assessment scales and the way in which it may be described provides a comprehensive treatment for cancer pain. It also helps to optimize the comprehensive care to the patients suffering from this condition and improve their quality of life.

  3. Establishing an international baseline for medication safety in oncology: Findings from the 2012 ISMP International Medication Safety Self Assessment® for Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenall, Julie; Shastay, Ann; Vaida, Allen J; U, David; Johnson, Philip E; O'Leary, Joe; Chambers, Carole

    2015-02-01

    In 2012, the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) and the Institute for Safe Medication Practices Canada (ISMP Canada) collaborated with an international panel of oncology practitioners to develop the ISMP International Medication Safety Self Assessment® for Oncology. This self-assessment was designed to assist oncology practitioners in hospitals, ambulatory care centers, and office practice settings throughout the world to evaluate safe practices related to medication use in the oncology setting and to identify opportunities for improvement. The self-assessment consists of 175 items organized into 10 key elements subdivided into 18 core characteristics of safe medication use. Assessment results were submitted via a secure online portal. The online program allows participants to print and graph their results and to compare their findings with those of similar organizations both nationally and internationally. Complimentary access to the self-assessment was made available for a seven-month "snapshot" period in 2012. A total of 352 organizations from 13 countries submitted assessment results. Key opportunities for improvement were identified in five areas: implementation of the World Health Organization recommendations for management of vinCRIStine and other vinca alkaloids, safe management of oral chemotherapy, labeling of distal ends of intravenous tubing, implementation of technology-based safeguards, and patient education. This international snapshot provides important data about the level of implementation of system-based safeguards in oncology practice, key improvement opportunities, and represents a baseline for future improvement efforts. A collaborative approach to identifying vulnerabilities and developing solutions for safe medication use in oncology will enhance the care of patients with cancer internationally. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  4. Comparative oncology: Integrating human and veterinary medicine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cancer constitutes the major health problem both in human and veterinary medicine. Comparative oncology as an integrative approach offers to learn more about naturally occurring cancers across different species. Canine models have many advantages as they experience spontaneous disease, have many genes similar ...

  5. Global geriatric oncology: Achievements and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; de Glas, Nienke A; Hsu, Tina; Kanesvaran, Ravindran; Steer, Christopher; Navarrete-Reyes, Ana Patricia; Battisti, Nicolo Matteo Luca; Chavarri-Guerra, Yanin; O'Donovan, Anita; Avila-Funes, Jose Alberto; Hurria, Arti

    2017-09-01

    The aging of the population is a global challenge. The number of older adults is rapidly growing, leading to an increase in the prevalence of noncommunicable diseases associated with aging, such as cancer. Worldwide, older adults account for approximately half of all cancer cases, and this proportion is projected to increase globally. Furthermore, the majority of older adults live in less developed regions, where health systems are generally ill-equipped to provide care for complex chronic conditions. Worldwide, there is paucity of geriatric training, and most of the oncology workforce lacks the skills and knowledge to provide comprehensive care for older patients. Various initiatives aimed at providing adequate clinical care for older adults, increasing the geriatric skills and knowledge of healthcare professionals, and developing geriatric oncology research, have been successfully implemented. However, most developments in geriatric oncology have taken place in high-income countries, and there are still large inequalities in the availability of clinical, educational, and research initiatives across different regions of the world. This article provides an overview of geriatric oncology initiatives in Asia, Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Latin America, and the United States and Canada. Understanding the achievements and challenges of geriatric oncology around the world, and fostering international collaboration in research and training are essential for improving the care of all older adults with cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Micronutrients in Oncological Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröber, Uwe; Holzhauer, Peter; Kisters, Klaus; Holick, Michael F; Adamietz, Irenäus A

    2016-03-12

    Nutritional supplements are widely used among patients with cancer who perceive them to be anticancer and antitoxicity agents. Depending on the type of malignancy and the gender 30%-90% of the cancer patients supplement their diets with antioxidant and immuno-stabilizing micronutrients, such as selenium, vitamin C, and vitamin D, often without the knowledge of the treating physician. From the oncological viewpoint, there are justifiable concerns that dietary supplements decrease the effectiveness of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recent studies, however, have provided increasing evidence that treatment is tolerated better-with an increase in patient compliance and a lower rate of treatment discontinuations-when micronutrients, such as selenium, are added as appropriate to the patient's medication. Nutritional supplementation tailored to an individual's background diet, genetics, tumor histology, and treatments may yield benefits in subsets of patients. Clinicians should have an open dialogue with patients about nutritional supplements. Supplement advice needs to be individualized and come from a credible source, and it is best communicated by the physician.

  7. Micronutrients in Oncological Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Gröber

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional supplements are widely used among patients with cancer who perceive them to be anticancer and antitoxicity agents. Depending on the type of malignancy and the gender 30%–90% of the cancer patients supplement their diets with antioxidant and immuno-stabilizing micronutrients, such as selenium, vitamin C, and vitamin D, often without the knowledge of the treating physician. From the oncological viewpoint, there are justifiable concerns that dietary supplements decrease the effectiveness of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recent studies, however, have provided increasing evidence that treatment is tolerated better—with an increase in patient compliance and a lower rate of treatment discontinuations—when micronutrients, such as selenium, are added as appropriate to the patient’s medication. Nutritional supplementation tailored to an individual’s background diet, genetics, tumor histology, and treatments may yield benefits in subsets of patients. Clinicians should have an open dialogue with patients about nutritional supplements. Supplement advice needs to be individualized and come from a credible source, and it is best communicated by the physician.

  8. Subspecialist training in surgical gynecological oncology in the nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen, Sofie L; Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Salvesen, Helga B

    2011-01-01

    To survey the centers that can provide subspecialty surgical training and education in gynecological oncology in the Nordic countries we developed an online questionnaire in cooperation with the Nordic Society of Gynecological Oncology. The link to the survey was mailed to 22 Scandinavian...... (74%) centers were interested in being listed for exchange of fellows. Our data show a large Nordic potential and interest in improving the gynecologic oncology standards and can be used to enhance the awareness of gynecological oncology training in Scandinavia and to facilitate the exchange...

  9. Quantitatively and qualitatively augmenting medical student knowledge of oncology and radiation oncology: an update on the impact of the oncology education initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Ariel E; Handal, Roxane; Daniels, Janeen; Levin-Epstein, Rebecca; Denunzio, Nicholas J; Dillon, Johanne; Shaffer, Kitt; Bishop, Pauline Mulleady

    2012-02-01

    The Oncology Education Initiative was established in 2007 in an effort to advance oncology and radiation oncology education at the undergraduate level. As a continuation of the initiative, the aim of this study was to determine whether these structured didactics would continue to increase overall medical student knowledge about oncologic topics. Preclerkship and postclerkship tests examining concepts in general oncology, radiation oncology, breast cancer, and prostate cancer were administered. The 21-question, multiple-choice examination was administered at the beginning and end of the radiology clerkship, during which a 1.5-hour didactic session was given by an attending radiation oncologist. Changes in individual question responses, student responses, and overall categorical responses were analyzed. All hypothesis tests were two tailed with a significance level of .05. In the 2009-2010 academic year, 155 third-year and fourth-year students had average examination score improvements from 62% to 68.9% (P < .0001). Every topic (100%) showed improvement in scores, with the largest absolute improvement seen in the radiation oncology category, which increased from 56.5% to 71.8% (P < .0001). As the year proceeded, average examination scores increased among third-year students and decreased among fourth-year students. In the successive years since its inception, the Oncology Education Initiative continues to show a significant improvement in medical students' knowledge of cancer. The initiative has also succeeded in providing radiation oncology education to all graduating medical students at the authors' institution. Dedicated oncology education in the undergraduate medical curriculum provides students with a better understanding of multidisciplinary oncology management. Copyright © 2012 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Exercise-based oncology rehabilitation: leveraging the cardiac rehabilitation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittus, Kim L; Lakoski, Susan G; Savage, Patrick D; Kokinda, Nathan; Toth, Michael; Stevens, Diane; Woods, Kimberly; OʼBrien, Patricia; Ades, Philip A

    2015-01-01

    The value of exercise and rehabilitative interventions for cancer survivors is increasingly clear, and oncology rehabilitation programs could provide these important interventions. However, a pathway to create oncology rehabilitation has not been delineated. Community-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs staffed by health care professionals with experience in providing rehabilitation and secondary prevention services to individuals with coronary heart disease are widely available and provide a potential model and location for oncology rehabilitation programs. Our purpose was to outline the rehabilitative needs of cancer survivors and demonstrate how oncology rehabilitation can be created using a CR model. We identify the impairments associated with cancer and its therapy that respond to rehabilitative interventions. Components of the CR model that would benefit cancer survivors are described. An example of an oncology rehabilitation program using a CR model is presented. Cancer survivors have impairments associated with cancer and its therapy that improve with rehabilitation. Our experience demonstrates that effective rehabilitation services can be provided utilizing an existing CR infrastructure. Few adjustments to current CR models would be needed to provide oncology rehabilitation. Preliminary evidence suggests that cancer survivors participating in an oncology rehabilitation program experience improvements in psychological and physiologic parameters. Utilizing the CR model of rehabilitative services and disease management provides a much needed mechanism to bring oncology rehabilitation to larger numbers of cancer survivors.

  11. Integrating Geriatrics Into Oncology Ambulatory Care Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overcash, Janine

    2015-08-01

    Geriatric oncology offers specialized care that incorporates comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) and multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) with oncology care. Geriatric syndromes, comorbidities, and caregiver concerns are relevant to the oncology assessment in older adult patients to make treatment decisions, which should be based not on age but on health and functional status, as well as on life expectancy. Developing a geriatric oncology ambulatory care clinic (GOACC) requires numerous resources and entails planning for longer patient encounter times, devising collaboration strategies with community care providers, and establishing dedicated time for team members. The purpose of this article is to provide information regarding the construction and sustainability of a GOACC. A comprehensive review of literature published from 1991-2015 was conducted using the following key words. Oncology primary care nurses and advanced practice nurses have a large role in the development and maintenance of GOACCs. Managing comorbidities, identifying patients who likely would benefit from a CGA, providing caregiver support, conducting a CGA, and creating an MDT are core elements of developing a sustainable GOACC.

  12. Robot-assisted surgery in gynecological oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Steffen E; Mosgaard, Berit J; Rosendahl, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Robot-assisted surgery has become more widespread in gynecological oncology. The purpose of this systematic review is to present current knowledge on robot-assisted surgery, and to clarify and discuss controversies that have arisen alongside the development and deployment. MATERIAL...... AND METHODS: A database search in PubMed and EMBASE was performed up until 4 March 2016. The search strategy was developed in collaboration with an information specialist, and by application of the PRISMA guidelines. Human participants and English language were the only restrictive filters applied. Selection...... was performed by screening of titles and abstracts, and by full text scrutiny. From 2001 to 2016, a total of 76 references were included. RESULTS: Robot-assisted surgery in gynecological oncology has increased, and current knowledge supports that the oncological safety is similar, compared with previous...

  13. Constipation in paediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwood, Karen

    2006-02-01

    Constipation is a common problem encountered by many children during treatment for childhood cancer. It can be distressing and impact on the quality of life for the child. However, the advice and information they and their families receive can vary enormously. The clinical practice group (a subgroup of the paediatric oncology nurses forum (PONF)) decided to examine the management of constipation throughout the paediatric oncology units in the UK. This paper presents the findings and the subsequent action taken and highlights the need for further work.

  14. Female Representation in the Academic Oncology Physician Workforce: Radiation Oncology Losing Ground to Hematology Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Awad A; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Holliday, Emma B; Chapman, Christina H; Jagsi, Reshma; Thomas, Charles R; Deville, Curtiland

    2017-05-01

    Our purpose was to assess comparative female representation trends for trainees and full-time faculty in the academic radiation oncology and hematology oncology workforce of the United States over 3 decades. Simple linear regression models with year as the independent variable were used to determine changes in female percentage representation per year and associated 95% confidence intervals for trainees and full-time faculty in each specialty. Peak representation was 48.4% (801/1654) in 2013 for hematology oncology trainees, 39.0% (585/1499) in 2014 for hematology oncology full-time faculty, 34.8% (202/581) in 2007 for radiation oncology trainees, and 27.7% (439/1584) in 2015 for radiation oncology full-time faculty. Representation significantly increased for trainees and full-time faculty in both specialties at approximately 1% per year for hematology oncology trainees and full-time faculty and 0.3% per year for radiation oncology trainees and full-time faculty. Compared with radiation oncology, the rates were 3.84 and 2.94 times greater for hematology oncology trainees and full-time faculty, respectively. Despite increased female trainee and full-time faculty representation over time in the academic oncology physician workforce, radiation oncology is lagging behind hematology oncology, with trainees declining in recent years in radiation oncology; this suggests a de facto ceiling in female representation. Whether such issues as delayed or insufficient exposure, inadequate mentorship, or specialty competitiveness disparately affect female representation in radiation oncology compared to hematology oncology are underexplored and require continued investigation to ensure that the future oncologic physician workforce reflects the diversity of the population it serves. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Female Representation in the Academic Oncology Physician Workforce: Radiation Oncology Losing Ground to Hematology Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Awad A. [Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center University of Miami Health System, Miami, Florida (United States); Hwang, Wei-Ting [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Holliday, Emma B. [Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chapman, Christina H.; Jagsi, Reshma [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Deville, Curtiland, E-mail: cdeville@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: Our purpose was to assess comparative female representation trends for trainees and full-time faculty in the academic radiation oncology and hematology oncology workforce of the United States over 3 decades. Methods and Materials: Simple linear regression models with year as the independent variable were used to determine changes in female percentage representation per year and associated 95% confidence intervals for trainees and full-time faculty in each specialty. Results: Peak representation was 48.4% (801/1654) in 2013 for hematology oncology trainees, 39.0% (585/1499) in 2014 for hematology oncology full-time faculty, 34.8% (202/581) in 2007 for radiation oncology trainees, and 27.7% (439/1584) in 2015 for radiation oncology full-time faculty. Representation significantly increased for trainees and full-time faculty in both specialties at approximately 1% per year for hematology oncology trainees and full-time faculty and 0.3% per year for radiation oncology trainees and full-time faculty. Compared with radiation oncology, the rates were 3.84 and 2.94 times greater for hematology oncology trainees and full-time faculty, respectively. Conclusion: Despite increased female trainee and full-time faculty representation over time in the academic oncology physician workforce, radiation oncology is lagging behind hematology oncology, with trainees declining in recent years in radiation oncology; this suggests a de facto ceiling in female representation. Whether such issues as delayed or insufficient exposure, inadequate mentorship, or specialty competitiveness disparately affect female representation in radiation oncology compared to hematology oncology are underexplored and require continued investigation to ensure that the future oncologic physician workforce reflects the diversity of the population it serves.

  16. Nanomedicine in veterinary oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Yin; Rodriguez, Carlos O; Li, Yuanpei

    2015-08-01

    Nanomedicine is an interdisciplinary field that combines medicine, engineering, chemistry, biology and material sciences to improve disease management and can be especially valuable in oncology. Nanoparticle-based agents that possess functions such as tumor targeting, imaging and therapy are currently under intensive investigation. This review introduces the basic concept of nanomedicine and the classification of nanoparticles. Because of their favorable pharmacokinetics, tumor targeting properties, and resulting superior efficacy and toxicity profiles, nanoparticle-based agents can overcome several limitations associated with conventional diagnostic and therapeutic protocols in veterinary oncology. The two most important tumor targeting mechanisms (passive and active tumor targeting) and their dominating factors (i.e. shape, charge, size and nanoparticle surface display) are discussed. The review summarizes published clinical and preclinical studies that utilize different nanoformulations in veterinary oncology, as well as the application of nanoparticles for cancer diagnosis and imaging. The toxicology of various nanoformulations is also considered. Given the benefits of nanoformulations demonstrated in human medicine, nanoformulated drugs are likely to gain more traction in veterinary oncology. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. National Survey Among Radiation Oncology Residents Related to Their Needs in Geriatric Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifer, Rachel; Bristow, Bonnie; Puts, Martine; Alibhai, Shabbir; Cao, Xingshan; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Giuliani, Meredith; Hsu, Tina; Trudeau, Maureen; Mehta, Rajin; Menjak, Ines; Norris, Mireille; Liu, Barbara; Gallant, Francois; Szumacher, Ewa

    2017-06-24

    Currently, there is no formal curriculum addressing geriatric oncology within Canadian radiation oncology (RO) residency programs. Knowledge related to geriatric medicine may help radiation oncologists modify RT based on frailty status and geriatric considerations. Understanding specific learning needs allow program coordinators to align the current curriculum with residents' geriatric oncology learning needs. The purpose of this study is to determine the geriatric oncology educational needs of the Canadian RO residents and to inform Canadian RO residency training. A cross-sectional survey, with Likert, multiple choice, and open-ended questions, was pretested and distributed electronically by program directors to Canadian RO residents over 6 weeks. Responses were analyzed with descriptive statistics and common themes. One-hundred and thirty-five Canadian RO residents were contacted and 63 responded (47%). Half (49%) lacked confidence managing the elderly with multiple comorbidities, polypharmacy, functional and cognitive impairment, and challenging social circumstances;73% agreed additional training would be helpful. Forty-four percent lacked confidence regarding psychogeriatric referrals, fall prevention, palliative and hospice care, and community resources preventing re-hospitalization; 63% agreed additional training would be helpful. Seventy-six percent believed discussion groups, continuing education, geriatric oncology electives, and journal clubs would provide learning opportunities. Seventy-one percent agreed integrating geriatric assessment into RO curricula would improve care. Seventy-nine percent believed geriatric oncology principles have not been adequately integrated into radiation oncology curricula. There are significant gaps specific to geriatric assessment and management of older cancer patients in the current Canadian RO curricula. Most residents agreed that it is important to integrate geriatric oncology training to improve and personalize the

  18. American Society of Clinical Oncology National Census of Oncology Practices: Preliminary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Gaetano J.; Hanley, Amy; Hagerty, Karen; Kurup, Anupama; Neuss, Michael N.; Mulvey, Therese M.

    2013-01-01

    In response to reports of increasing financial and administrative burdens on oncology practices and a lack of systematic information related to these issues, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) leadership started an effort to collect key practice-level data from all oncology practices in the United States. The result of the effort is the ASCO National Census of Oncology Practices (Census) launched in June 2012. The initial Census work involved compiling an inventory of oncology practices from existing lists of oncology physicians in the United States. A comprehensive, online data collection instrument was developed, which covered a number of areas, including practice characteristics (staffing configuration, organizational structure, patient mix and volume, types of services offered); organizational, staffing, and service changes over the past 12 months; and an assessment of the likelihood that the practice would experience organizational, staffing, and service changes in the next 12 months. More than 600 practices participated in the Census by providing information. In this article, we present preliminary highlights from the data gathered to date. We found that practice size was related to having experienced practice mergers, hiring additional staff, and increasing staff pay in the past 12 months, that geographic location was related to having experienced hiring additional staff, and that practices in metropolitan areas were more likely to have experienced practice mergers in the past 12 months than those in nonmetropolitan areas. We also found that practice size and geographic location were related to higher likelihoods of anticipating practice mergers, sales, and purchases in the future. PMID:23633966

  19. The Evolution of Gero-Oncology Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Stewart M.; Bryant, Ashley Leak; Puts, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This article summarizes the evolution of gero-oncology nursing and highlights key educational initiatives, clinical practice issues, and research areas to enhance care of older adults with cancer. Data Sources Peer-reviewed literature, position statements, clinical practice guidelines, web-based materials, and professional organizations’ resources. Conclusion Globally, the older adult cancer population is rapidly growing. The care of older adults with cancer requires an understanding of their diverse needs and the intersection of cancer and aging. Despite efforts to enhance competence in gerooncology and to develop a body of evidence, nurses and healthcare systems remain under-prepared to provide high quality care for older adults with cancer. Implications for Nursing Practice Nurses need to take a leadership role in integrating gerontological principles into oncology settings. Working closely with interdisciplinary team members, nurses should utilize available resources and continue to build evidence through gero-oncology nursing research. PMID:26830263

  20. The Danish Neuro-Oncology Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steinbjørn

    2016-01-01

    advantage of reporting indicators is the related multidisciplinary discussions giving a better understanding of what actually is going on, thereby facilitating the work on adjusting the national guidelines in the Danish Neuro-Oncology Group. CONCLUSION: The establishment of DNOR has optimized the quality...... in handling primary brain tumor patients in Denmark by reporting indicators and facilitating a better multidisciplinary collaboration at a national level. DNOR provides a valuable resource for research.......AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Neuro-Oncology Registry (DNOR) was established by the Danish Neuro-Oncology Group as a national clinical database. It was established for the purpose of supporting research and development in adult patients with primary brain tumors in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: DNOR has...

  1. Integrative oncology in Indian subcontinent: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Ananthalakshmi; Janardhanan, Sunitha; Jeevakarunyam, Sathiyajeeva; Jeddy, Nadheem; Eagappan, Senthil

    2015-03-01

    Integrative oncology is a combination of one where complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) with conventional cancer treatment modalities is used to manage symptoms, control side-effects and improve the state of mental wellbeing. The ancient Indian medicinal approach in cancer treatment and management has a wide array of herbs and practices. There is an increasing demand for traditional and natural medicine by the cancer patients. The conventional oncologic surgeons and physicians should be aware of the role of cCAM that are available in Indian subcontinent and provide a treatment that focuses on the physical and mental state of wellness in combating cancer.

  2. Molecular imaging in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schober, Otmar; Riemann, Burkhard (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2013-02-01

    Considers in detail all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. Examines technological issues and probe design. Discusses preclinical studies in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. Presents current clinical use of PET/CT, SPECT/CT, and optical imagingWritten by acknowledged experts. The impact of molecular imaging on diagnostics, therapy, and follow-up in oncology is increasing significantly. The process of molecular imaging includes key biotarget identification, design of specific molecular imaging probes, and their preclinical evaluation, e.g., in vivo using small animal studies. A multitude of such innovative molecular imaging probes have already entered clinical diagnostics in oncology. There is no doubt that in future the emphasis will be on multimodality imaging in which morphological, functional, and molecular imaging techniques are combined in a single clinical investigation that will optimize diagnostic processes. This handbook addresses all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. The first section is devoted to technology and probe design, and examines a variety of PET and SPECT tracers as well as multimodality probes. Preclinical studies are then discussed in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. In the third section, diverse clinical applications are presented, and the book closes by looking at future challenges. This handbook will be of value to all who are interested in the revolution in diagnostic oncology that is being brought about by molecular imaging.

  3. Robotic surgery in gynecologic oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandera, Christina A; Magrina, Javier F

    2009-02-01

    Robotic surgery is rapidly taking the place of laparoscopy in many gynecologic oncology practices. Numerous practitioners have published their experience with this new technology. A review of their findings is timely and relevant. The majority of case series of robotic surgery for hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy show that the procedure is feasible and at least comparable to laparoscopic surgery. Similarly, case series of robotic radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer also compare favorably to laparoscopic surgery. Less common procedures such as robotic trachelectomy, parametrectomy, and retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy have also been described. Numerous patient and practitioner advantages are discussed in this review. Robotic surgery is a minimally invasive alternative to laparoscopy for the surgical treatment of endometrial cancer and cervical cancer. Its role in ovarian cancer is just starting to be explored.

  4. Medical oncology, history and its future in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzania, Mehrzad; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Asvadi Kermani, Iraj; Ashrafi, Farzaneh; Allahyari, Abolghasem; Rostami, Nematollah; Razavi, Seyed Mohsen; Ramzi, Mani; Nemanipour, Gholamreza

    2015-11-01

    Systemic therapy is one of the cornerstones of cancer treatment. In 1972, following representations by American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) recognized medical oncology as a new subspecialty of internal medicine. Subspecialty of Hematology and Medical Oncology was emerged in Iran in 1983. In the past, modern medical treatments and education were started in Dar Al-fonun school and then in Tehran University; now six universities in Iran are training in Subspecialty of Hematology and Medical Oncology. There are also ten active hematopoietic stem cell transplantation centers, thirty-one provincial medical schools use their specialized services. Future goals for Hematology and Medical Oncology in Iran include expansion and reinforcement of multidisciplinary teams across the country, early detection and prevention of cancer, providing educational program and conducting cancer researches. To achieve these goals, it is necessary to establish Cancer Hospitals in each province that link together through a network.

  5. Student Perspectives on Oncology Curricula at United States Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeley, Brandon C; Golden, Daniel W; Brower, Jeffrey V; Braunstein, Steve E; Hirsch, Ariel E; Mattes, Malcolm D

    2017-08-07

    Delivering a cohesive oncology curriculum to medical students is challenging due to oncology's multidisciplinary nature, predominantly outpatient clinical setting, and lack of data describing effective approaches to teaching it. We sought to better characterize approaches to oncology education at US medical schools by surveying third and fourth year medical students who serve on their institution's curriculum committee. We received responses from students at 19 schools (15.2% response rate). Key findings included the following: (1) an under-emphasis of cancer in the curriculum relative to other common diseases; (2) imbalanced involvement of different clinical subspecialists as educators; (3) infrequent requirements for students to rotate through non-surgical oncologic clerkships; and (4) students are less confident in their knowledge of cancer treatment compared to basic science/natural history or workup/diagnosis. Based on these findings, we provide several recommendations to achieve robust multidisciplinary curriculum design and implementation that better balances the clinical and classroom aspects of oncology education.

  6. Contemporary Trends in Radiation Oncology Resident Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Vivek [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Burt, Lindsay [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Gimotty, Phyllis A. [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ojerholm, Eric, E-mail: eric.ojerholm@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that recent resident research productivity might be different than a decade ago, and to provide contemporary information about resident scholarly activity. Methods and Materials: We compiled a list of radiation oncology residents from the 2 most recent graduating classes (June 2014 and 2015) using the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology annual directories. We queried the PubMed database for each resident's first-authored publications from postgraduate years (PGY) 2 through 5, plus a 3-month period after residency completion. We abstracted corresponding historical data for 2002 to 2007 from the benchmark publication by Morgan and colleagues (Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2009;74:1567-1572). We tested the null hypothesis that these 2 samples had the same distribution for number of publications using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. We explored the association of demographic factors and publication number using multivariable zero-inflated Poisson regression. Results: There were 334 residents publishing 659 eligible first-author publications during residency (range 0-17; interquartile range 0-3; mean 2.0; median 1). The contemporary and historical distributions were significantly different (P<.001); contemporary publication rates were higher. Publications accrued late in residency (27% in PGY-4, 59% in PGY-5), and most were original research (75%). In the historical cohort, half of all articles were published in 3 journals; in contrast, the top half of contemporary publications were spread over 10 journals—most commonly International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (17%), Practical Radiation Oncology (7%), and Radiation Oncology (4%). Male gender, non-PhD status, and larger residency size were associated with higher number of publications in the multivariable analysis. Conclusion: We observed an increase in first-author publications during training compared with historical data from the mid-2000s. These

  7. Contemporary Trends in Radiation Oncology Resident Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vivek; Burt, Lindsay; Gimotty, Phyllis A; Ojerholm, Eric

    2016-11-15

    To test the hypothesis that recent resident research productivity might be different than a decade ago, and to provide contemporary information about resident scholarly activity. We compiled a list of radiation oncology residents from the 2 most recent graduating classes (June 2014 and 2015) using the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology annual directories. We queried the PubMed database for each resident's first-authored publications from postgraduate years (PGY) 2 through 5, plus a 3-month period after residency completion. We abstracted corresponding historical data for 2002 to 2007 from the benchmark publication by Morgan and colleagues (Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2009;74:1567-1572). We tested the null hypothesis that these 2 samples had the same distribution for number of publications using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. We explored the association of demographic factors and publication number using multivariable zero-inflated Poisson regression. There were 334 residents publishing 659 eligible first-author publications during residency (range 0-17; interquartile range 0-3; mean 2.0; median 1). The contemporary and historical distributions were significantly different (Presearch (75%). In the historical cohort, half of all articles were published in 3 journals; in contrast, the top half of contemporary publications were spread over 10 journals-most commonly International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (17%), Practical Radiation Oncology (7%), and Radiation Oncology (4%). Male gender, non-PhD status, and larger residency size were associated with higher number of publications in the multivariable analysis. We observed an increase in first-author publications during training compared with historical data from the mid-2000s. These contemporary figures may be useful to medical students considering radiation oncology, current residents, training programs, and prospective employers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Therapeutic Aggressiveness and Liquid Oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barón Duarte, F J; Rodríguez Calvo, M S; Amor Pan, J R

    2017-01-01

    Aggressiveness criteria proposed in the scientific literature a decade ago provide a quality judgment and are a reference in the care of patients with advanced cancer, but their use is not generalized in the evaluation of Oncology Services. In this paper we analyze the therapeutic aggressiveness, according to standard criteria, in 1.001 patients with advanced cancer who died in our Institution between 2010 and 2013. The results seem to show that aggressiveness at the end of life is present more frequently than experts recommend. About 25% of patients fulfill at least one criterion of aggressiveness. This result could be explained by a liquid Oncology which does not prioritize the patient as a moral subject in the clinical appointment. Medical care is oriented to necessities and must be articulated in a model focused on dignity and communication. Its implementation through Advanced Care Planning, consideration of patient's values and preferences, and Limitation of therapeutic effort are ways to reduce aggressiveness and improve clinical practice at the end of life. We need to encourage synergic and proactive attitudes, adding the best of cancer research with the best clinical care for the benefit of human being, moral subject and main goal of Medicine.

  9. [Introduction to geriatric oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedding, U; Höffken, K

    2002-01-01

    The demographic changes will result in a profound increase of the number of elderly people within the next years. As a consequence of the age dependent increase of the incidence and mortality rate of cancer these changes will bring an increase in the number of elderly people with cancer. There is a number of differences between young and old patients diagnosed with cancer. This must result in an adaption of standardised oncological procedures, mainly designed for younger patients, to the special situation of elderly patients. The differences between young and old patients with cancer may be depicted by a structured geriatric assessment. Suggestions for the structure of such an assessment exist. Ongoing clinical trials have to demonstrate, whether or not the inclusion of a geriatric oncological assessment in the decision making process will result in an improvement of treatment results in elderly cancer patients diagnosed with cancer.

  10. Exploring oncology nurses' grief: A self-study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa C Barbour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncology nursing, like many other nursing fields, often provides nurses with the opportunity to get to know their patients and their families well. This familiarity allows oncology nurses to show a level of compassion and empathy that is often helpful to the patient and their family during their struggle with cancer. However, this familiarity can also lead to a profound sense of grief if the patient loses that struggle. This self-study provided me the opportunity to systematically explore my own experience with grief as an oncology nurse, helping me to identify specific stressors and also sources of stress release.

  11. Pediatric oncology in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebudi, Rejin

    2012-03-01

    The survival of children with cancer has increased dramatically in the last decades, as a result of advances in diagnosis, treatment and supportive care. Each year in Turkey, 2500-3000 new childhood cancer cases are expected. According to the Turkish Pediatric Oncology Group and Turkish Pediatric Hematology Societies Registry, about 2000 new pediatric cancer cases are reported each year. The population in Turkey is relatively young. One fourth of the population is younger than 15 years of age. According to childhood mortality, cancer is the fourth cause of death (7.2%) after infections, cardiac deaths and accidents. The major cancers in children in Turkey are leukemia (31%), lymphoma (19%), central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms (13%), neuroblastomas (7%), bone tumors (6.1%), soft tissue sarcomas (6%), followed by renal tumors, germ cell tumors, retinoblastoma, carcinomas-epithelial neoplasms, hepatic tumors and others. Lymphomas rank second in frequency as in many developing countries in contrast to West Europe or USA, where CNS neoplasms rank second in frequency. The seven-year survival rate in children with malignancies in Turkey is 65.8%. The history of modern Pediatric Oncology in Turkey dates back to the 1970's. Pediatric Oncology has been accepted as a subspecialty in Turkey since 1983. Pediatric Oncologists are all well trained and dedicated. All costs for the diagnosis and treatment of children with cancer is covered by the government. Education and infrastructure for palliative care needs improvement.

  12. Creating a Culture of Professional Development for Oncology Nursing in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myungsun Yi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of professional development of oncology nursing in Asia is growing along with growth in the cancer burden and disparity in cancer incidence and mortality between more- and less-developed regions, the latter of which includes most Asian countries. This paper proposes ways to advance the oncology nursing in terms of education, practice, and research in Asia. It also describes major challenges expected in developing and implementing a unique professional role for oncology nurses in Asia. This study will provide insights for Asian oncology nurses in developing culturally sensitive oncology nursing practices with limited health care resources.

  13. Creating a Culture of Professional Development for Oncology Nursing in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Myungsun

    2016-01-01

    The importance of professional development of oncology nursing in Asia is growing along with growth in the cancer burden and disparity in cancer incidence and mortality between more- and less-developed regions, the latter of which includes most Asian countries. This paper proposes ways to advance the oncology nursing in terms of education, practice, and research in Asia. It also describes major challenges expected in developing and implementing a unique professional role for oncology nurses in Asia. This study will provide insights for Asian oncology nurses in developing culturally sensitive oncology nursing practices with limited health care resources. PMID:27981133

  14. Creating a Culture of Professional Development for Oncology Nursing in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Myungsun

    2016-01-01

    The importance of professional development of oncology nursing in Asia is growing along with growth in the cancer burden and disparity in cancer incidence and mortality between more- and less-developed regions, the latter of which includes most Asian countries. This paper proposes ways to advance the oncology nursing in terms of education, practice, and research in Asia. It also describes major challenges expected in developing and implementing a unique professional role for oncology nurses in Asia. This study will provide insights for Asian oncology nurses in developing culturally sensitive oncology nursing practices with limited health care resources.

  15. Physical Activity Promotion, Beliefs, and Barriers Among Australasian Oncology Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Justin W L; Pühringer, Petra; Olsen, Alicia; Sargeant, Sally; Jones, Lynnette M; Climstein, Mike

    2017-03-01

    To describe the physical activity (PA) promotion practices, beliefs, and barriers of Australasian oncology nurses and gain preliminary insight into how PA promotion practices may be affected by the demographics of the nurses.
. Cross-sectional survey.
. Australia and New Zealand.
. 119 registered oncology nurses.
. Self-reported online survey completed once per participant.
. Questions assessed the PA promotion beliefs (e.g., primary healthcare professionals responsible for PA promotion, treatment stage), PA benefits (e.g., primary benefits, evidence base), and PA promotion barriers of oncology nurses.
. Oncology nurses believed they were the major providers of PA advice to their patients. They promoted PA prior to, during, and post-treatment. The three most commonly cited benefits of PA for their patients were improved quality of life, mental health, and activities of daily living. Lack of time, lack of adequate support structures, and risk to patient were the most common barriers to PA promotion. Relatively few significant differences in the oncology nurses' PA promotion practices, beliefs, and barriers were observed based on hospital location or years of experience.
. Despite numerous barriers, Australasian oncology nurses wish to promote PA to their patients with cancer across multiple treatment stages because they believe PA is beneficial for their patients.
. Hospitals may need to better support oncology nurses in promoting PA to their patients and provide better referral pathways to exercise physiologists and physiotherapists.

  16. The experiential world of the Oncology nurse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia le Roux

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In her experiential world, the oncology nurse experiences unique, challenging and rewarding relationships in a multidimensional, dynamic way. The aim of this study was to describe, from her viewpoint and perspective, how she experiences and reacts to this world. Through this study the researcher wants the oncology nurse’s voice to be heard, the richness of her story acknowledged and the derived data to be applied to the benefit of the field of oncology. In-depth, unstructured phenomenological interviews provided the saturated data from which the uniqueness of the world of the oncology nurse unfolded as the uniqueness of the oncology patients and their world emerged clearly. Findings show that the oncology nurse, attending to the cancer patients and their family, experiences many different relationships. The uniqueness of the oncology nurse-patient relationship is described as unlike any other nurse-patient relationship. The challenging interpersonal relationships with management and other members of the multiprofessional team, as experienced from the perspective of the oncology nurse, are also highlighted. Furthermore, a unifying intrapersonal relationship with the self was identified. This enables the oncology nurse to be both on the giving and receiving end of the intensely emotional environment she works in, explaining, at least partly, the high job satisfaction that permeated the interviews in this study. Recommendations for nursing practice, education and research were formulated. Opsomming In haar leefwêreld ondervind onkologieverpleegkundige unieke, uitdagende en belonende verhoudinge op ‘n multidimensionele en dinamiese wyse. Die doel van hierdie studie was om ‘n beskrywing van die onkologieverpleegkundige se ervarings van en reaksie op haar leefwêreld vanuit haar oogpunt en perspektief. Deur middel van hierdie studie wil die navorser die stem van die onkologieverpleegkundige gehoor laat word, die rykdom van haar verhaal

  17. The experiential world of the Oncology nurse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalena van Rooyen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In her experiential world, the oncology nurse experiences unique, challenging and rewarding relationships in a multidimensional, dynamic way. The aim of this study was to describe, from her viewpoint and perspective, how she experiences and reacts to this world. Through this study the researcher wants the oncology nurse’s voice to be heard, the richness of her story acknowledged and the derived data to be applied to the benefit of the field of oncology. In-depth, unstructured phenomenological interviews provided the saturated data from which the uniqueness of the world of the oncology nurse unfolded as the uniqueness of the oncology patients and their world emerged clearly. Findings show that the oncology nurse, attending to the cancer patients and their family, experiences many different relationships. The uniqueness of the oncology nurse-patient relationship is described as unlike any other nurse-patient relationship. The challenging interpersonal relationships with management and other members of the multiprofessional team, as experienced from the perspective of the oncology nurse, are also highlighted. Furthermore, a unifying intrapersonal relationship with the self was identified. This enables the oncology nurse to be both on the giving and receiving end of the intensely emotional environment she works in, explaining, at least partly, the high job satisfaction that permeated the interviews in this study. Recommendations for nursing practice, education and research were formulated. Opsomming In haar leefwêreld ondervind onkologieverpleegkundige unieke, uitdagende en belonende verhoudinge op ‘n multidimensionele en dinamiese wyse. Die doel van hierdie studie was om ‘n beskrywing van die onkologieverpleegkundige se ervarings van en reaksie op haar leefwêreld vanuit haar oogpunt en perspektief. Deur middel van hierdie studie wil die navorser die stem van die onkologieverpleegkundige gehoor laat word, die rykdom van haar verhaal erken en

  18. Ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Luz, Kely Regina; Vargas, Mara Ambrosina de Oliveira; Schmidtt, Pablo Henrique; Barlem, Edison Luiz Devos; Tomaschewski-Barlem, Jamila Geri; da Rosa, Luciana Martins

    2015-01-01

    To know the ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses. Descriptive and exploratory study with a qualitative approach, performed in inpatient units and in chemotherapy out-patients units that provide assistance to oncological patients in two capitals in the South region of Brazil. Eighteen nurses participated in this study, selected by snowball sampling type. For data collection, semi-structured interviews were carried out, which were recorded and transcribed, and then analyzed by thematic analysis. Two categories were established: when informing or not becomes a dilemma - showing the main difficulties related to oncological treatment information regarding health staff, health system, and infrastructure; to invest or not - dilemmas related to finitude - showing situations of dilemmas related to pain and confrontation with finitude. For the effective confrontation of the ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses to occur, it is important to invest in the training of these professionals, preparing them in an ethical and human way to act as lawyers of the patient with cancer, in a context of dilemmas related mainly to the possibility of finitude.

  19. Ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kely Regina da Luz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to know the ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses. Method: descriptive and exploratory study with a qualitative approach, performed in inpatient units and in chemotherapy out-patients units that provide assistance to oncological patients in two capitals in the South region of Brazil. Eighteen nurses participated in this study, selected by snowball sampling type. For data collection, semi-structured interviews were carried out, which were recorded and transcribed, and then analyzed by thematic analysis. Results: two categories were established: when informing or not becomes a dilemma - showing the main difficulties related to oncological treatment information regarding health staff, health system, and infrastructure; to invest or not - dilemmas related to finitude - showing situations of dilemmas related to pain and confrontation with finitude. Conclusion: for the effective confrontation of the ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses to occur, it is important to invest in the training of these professionals, preparing them in an ethical and human way to act as lawyers of the patient with cancer, in a context of dilemmas related mainly to the possibility of finitude.

  20. Cancer Patients and Oncology Nursing: Perspectives of Oncology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-10-26

    Oct 26, 2017 ... Cancer patients and oncology nursing: Perspectives of oncology nurses in ... burnout, they are insufficient in managing work stress and giving psychological ... problems.[2] A research on exhaustion in 1970s revealed the concept of burnout by Freudenberg,[3] and after introduction of this novel concept, ...

  1. Palliative surgical oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Nader N; Bellavance, Emily; Keay, Timothy

    2011-04-01

    Palliative surgical oncology is a relatively new concept, but builds on a long tradition in surgery. As the field of palliative medicine grows and becomes its own specialty, surgeons have been receiving some specialized training in palliative care; devising specific palliative surgical procedures; and reevaluating the ethics of their interactions with patients, especially for the selection of palliative surgical procedures. This is leading to a new form of surgical practice in which the emphasis is on relief of present or anticipated symptoms, even if the interventions do not prolong a patient's life span. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Medicinal cannabis in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Frederike K; de Jong, Floris A; Mathijssen, Ron H J; Erkens, Joëlle A; Herings, Ron M; Verweij, Jaap

    2007-12-01

    In The Netherlands, since September 2003, a legal medicinal cannabis product, constituting the whole range of cannabinoids, is available for clinical research, drug development strategies, and on prescription for patients. To date, this policy, initiated by the Dutch Government, has not yet led to the desired outcome; the amount of initiated clinical research is less than expected and only a minority of patients resorts to the legal product. This review aims to discuss the background for the introduction of legal medicinal cannabis in The Netherlands, the past years of Dutch clinical experience in oncology practice, possible reasons underlying the current outcome, and future perspectives.

  3. Genome-wide comparative analysis reveals similar types of NBS genes in hybrid Citrus sinensis genome and original Citrus clementine genome and provides new insights into non-TIR NBS genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunsheng; Zhou, Lijuan; Li, Dazhi; Dai, Liangying; Lawton-Rauh, Amy; Srimani, Pradip K; Duan, Yongping; Luo, Feng

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we identified and compared nucleotide-binding site (NBS) domain-containing genes from three Citrus genomes (C. clementina, C. sinensis from USA and C. sinensis from China). Phylogenetic analysis of all Citrus NBS genes across these three genomes revealed that there are three approximately evenly numbered groups: one group contains the Toll-Interleukin receptor (TIR) domain and two different Non-TIR groups in which most of proteins contain the Coiled Coil (CC) domain. Motif analysis confirmed that the two groups of CC-containing NBS genes are from different evolutionary origins. We partitioned NBS genes into clades using NBS domain sequence distances and found most clades include NBS genes from all three Citrus genomes. This suggests that three Citrus genomes have similar numbers and types of NBS genes. We also mapped the re-sequenced reads of three pomelo and three mandarin genomes onto the C. sinensis genome. We found that most NBS genes of the hybrid C. sinensis genome have corresponding homologous genes in both pomelo and mandarin genomes. The homologous NBS genes in pomelo and mandarin suggest that the parental species of C. sinensis may contain similar types of NBS genes. This explains why the hybrid C. sinensis and original C. clementina have similar types of NBS genes in this study. Furthermore, we found that sequence variation amongst Citrus NBS genes were shaped by multiple independent and shared accelerated mutation accumulation events among different groups of NBS genes and in different Citrus genomes. Our comparative analyses yield valuable insight into the structure, organization and evolution of NBS genes in Citrus genomes. Furthermore, our comprehensive analysis showed that the non-TIR NBS genes can be divided into two groups that come from different evolutionary origins. This provides new insights into non-TIR genes, which have not received much attention.

  4. Genome-wide comparative analysis reveals similar types of NBS genes in hybrid Citrus sinensis genome and original Citrus clementine genome and provides new insights into non-TIR NBS genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunsheng Wang

    Full Text Available In this study, we identified and compared nucleotide-binding site (NBS domain-containing genes from three Citrus genomes (C. clementina, C. sinensis from USA and C. sinensis from China. Phylogenetic analysis of all Citrus NBS genes across these three genomes revealed that there are three approximately evenly numbered groups: one group contains the Toll-Interleukin receptor (TIR domain and two different Non-TIR groups in which most of proteins contain the Coiled Coil (CC domain. Motif analysis confirmed that the two groups of CC-containing NBS genes are from different evolutionary origins. We partitioned NBS genes into clades using NBS domain sequence distances and found most clades include NBS genes from all three Citrus genomes. This suggests that three Citrus genomes have similar numbers and types of NBS genes. We also mapped the re-sequenced reads of three pomelo and three mandarin genomes onto the C. sinensis genome. We found that most NBS genes of the hybrid C. sinensis genome have corresponding homologous genes in both pomelo and mandarin genomes. The homologous NBS genes in pomelo and mandarin suggest that the parental species of C. sinensis may contain similar types of NBS genes. This explains why the hybrid C. sinensis and original C. clementina have similar types of NBS genes in this study. Furthermore, we found that sequence variation amongst Citrus NBS genes were shaped by multiple independent and shared accelerated mutation accumulation events among different groups of NBS genes and in different Citrus genomes. Our comparative analyses yield valuable insight into the structure, organization and evolution of NBS genes in Citrus genomes. Furthermore, our comprehensive analysis showed that the non-TIR NBS genes can be divided into two groups that come from different evolutionary origins. This provides new insights into non-TIR genes, which have not received much attention.

  5. Ovarian response to controlled ovarian stimulation for fertility preservation before oncology treatment: A retrospective cohort of 157 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsampras, Nikolaos; Roberts, Stephen A; Gould, Della; Fitzgerald, Cheryl T

    2017-11-23

    This is a retrospective cohort study aiming to examine the response of oncology patients undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) for fertility preservation and to review the incidence of short-term complications. The study group consisted by all oncology patients undergoing ovarian stimulation for fertility preservation (n = 157) between April 2009 and April 2016. Patients undergoing COS for IVF/ICSI for male factor only infertility in the same time period (n = 2,128) provided a comparator group. Oncology patients underwent COS to retrieve eggs for storage and future use. The cancer patients had a very similar distribution of oocyte yield to the comparator group. Those with ovarian cancer did have significantly lower oocyte recovery than those with other cancers (age-adjusted difference 7, 95% CI: 2-12). None of the patients in the study group were admitted with ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome or any other complication of COS or oocyte retrieval. This is one of the largest reported cohorts of patients treated for fertility preservation before oncology treatment. Our data have demonstrated a good response to stimulation, offering a reasonable chance of pregnancy in the future. In contrast to previous studies, we have demonstrated a similar number of oocytes retrieved to that of women undergoing IVF/ICSI treatment for male factor infertility. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Judgments of brand similarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijmolt, THA; Wedel, M; Pieters, RGM; DeSarbo, WS

    This paper provides empirical insight into the way consumers make pairwise similarity judgments between brands, and how familiarity with the brands, serial position of the pair in a sequence, and the presentation format affect these judgments. Within the similarity judgment process both the

  7. Oncology in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eav, S; Schraub, S; Dufour, P; Taisant, D; Ra, C; Bunda, P

    2012-01-01

    Cambodia, a country of 14 million inhabitants, was devastated during the Khmer Rouge period and thereafter. The resources of treatment are rare: only one radiotherapy department, renovated in 2003, with an old cobalt machine; few surgeons trained to operate on cancer patients; no hematology; no facilities to use intensive chemotherapy; no nuclear medicine department and no palliative care unit. Cervical cancer incidence is one of the highest in the world, while in men liver cancer ranks first (20% of all male cancers). Cancers are seen at stage 3 or 4 for 70% of patients. There is no prevention program - only a vaccination program against hepatitis B for newborns - and no screening program for cervical cancer or breast cancer. In 2010, oncology, recognized as a full specialty, was created to train the future oncologists on site at the University of Phnom Penh. A new National Cancer Center will be built in 2013 with modern facilities for radiotherapy, medical oncology, hematology and nuclear medicine. Cooperation with foreign countries, especially France, and international organizations has been established and is ongoing. Progress is occurring slowly due to the shortage of money for Cambodian institutions and the lay public. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. The psychosocial work environment among physicians employed at Danish oncology departments in 2009. A nationwide cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Christian Nicolaj; Eriksen, Jesper Grau

    2013-01-01

    Working as a physician at an oncology department has some distinctive characteristics that may lead to a stressful work environment. The present study was conducted to provide a nationwide description of the work conditions of all oncologists in Denmark. By comparing the results of the present...... study with those of a similar study carried out in 2006, the aim was furthermore to elucidate changes in the psychosocial work environment over time....

  9. Developing a Comprehensive Cardio-Oncology Program at a Cancer Institute: The Moffitt Cancer Center Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradley, Michael G.; Brown, Allen C.; Shields, Bernadette; Viganego, Federico; Damrongwatanasuk, Rongras; Patel, Aarti A.; Hartlage, Gregory; Roper, Natalee; Jaunese, Julie; Roy, Larry; Ismail-Khan, Roohi

    2017-01-01

    Cardio-oncology is a multidisciplinary field focusing on the management and prevention of cardiovascular complications in cancer patients and survivors. While the initial focus of this specialty was on heart failure associated with anthracycline use, novel anticancer agents are increasingly utilized and are associated with many other cardiotoxicities including hypertension, arrhythmias and vascular disease. Since its inception, the field has developed at a rapid pace with the establishment of programs at many major academic institutions and community practices. Given the complexities of this patient population, it is important for providers to possess knowledge of not only cardiovascular disease but also cancer subtypes and their specific therapeutics. Developing a cardio-oncology program at a stand-alone cancer center can present unique opportunities and challenges when compared to those affiliated with other institutions including resource allocation, cardiovascular testing availability and provider education. In this review, we present our experiences establishing the cardio-oncology program at Moffitt Cancer Center and provide guidance to those individuals interested in developing a program at a similar independent cancer institution. PMID:28781723

  10. Developing a Comprehensive Cardio-Oncology Program at a Cancer Institute: The Moffitt Cancer Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradley, Michael G; Brown, Allen C; Shields, Bernadette; Viganego, Federico; Damrongwatanasuk, Rongras; Patel, Aarti A; Hartlage, Gregory; Roper, Natalee; Jaunese, Julie; Roy, Larry; Ismail-Khan, Roohi

    2017-06-14

    Cardio-oncology is a multidisciplinary field focusing on the management and prevention of cardiovascular complications in cancer patients and survivors. While the initial focus of this specialty was on heart failure associated with anthracycline use, novel anticancer agents are increasingly utilized and are associated with many other cardiotoxicities including hypertension, arrhythmias and vascular disease. Since its inception, the field has developed at a rapid pace with the establishment of programs at many major academic institutions and community practices. Given the complexities of this patient population, it is important for providers to possess knowledge of not only cardiovascular disease but also cancer subtypes and their specific therapeutics. Developing a cardio-oncology program at a stand-alone cancer center can present unique opportunities and challenges when compared to those affiliated with other institutions including resource allocation, cardiovascular testing availability and provider education. In this review, we present our experiences establishing the cardio-oncology program at Moffitt Cancer Center and provide guidance to those individuals interested in developing a program at a similar independent cancer institution.

  11. What makes oncology nursing special? Walking the road together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberman, M R; Germino, B B; Maliski, S; Stafford-Fox, V; Rice, K

    1994-09-01

    To identify the factors that influence oncology nurses' decisions to enter nursing and specialize in oncology and to describe the role dimensions of oncology nursing practice. Multi-institutional, descriptive, qualitative. Six sites in different regions of the United States; rural and urban cancer and noncancer centers. 38 oncology nurses (mean age = 35 years; average time in nursing = 10 years and in oncology = 7 years; 47% bachelor's degree in nursing, 29% diploma, 13% associate degree in nursing, and 11% master's prepared). Phenomenological; content analysis of interviews. Life events, career decision-making, personal and professional rewards, role dimensions of practice, caring behaviors. Nurses said that their decisions to specialize in oncology were based on family experiences with cancer, the challenges of administering sophisticated cancer therapies, and influential role models. They reported that professional rewards are derived from valuing each patients as a 'whole person' and providing family-centered care. Nurses find that personal rewards and career survivorship are embedded in several ongoing discoveries: work offers a unique laboratory for learning about life in general, distancing maneuvers are necessary for self-preservation, and the fuzzy boundary between work and personal life must be constantly renegotiated. Oncology nurses find the best in the worst of situations, live fully the cancer experience by embracing their patients' heartaches and triumphs, share a collective sense of pride in their specialty, and report a high level of job satisfaction. Caring for the dying person with cancer is the most difficult aspect of oncology nursing practice and being with--being present in the moment, no matter what the outcome--is the most rewarding and ubiquitous caring behavior of oncology nurses.

  12. Paediatric oncology research nursing: improving the service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beane, Carol; Auld, Liz

    This article focuses on a paediatric oncology research nursing team, who highlighted potential gaps in their service provision because of the fact that both team members were part time. It discusses the processes undertaken once issues that were essential to maintain the smooth running of the service were highlighted. In today's climate of clinical governance, which facilitates the improvement and maintenance of high standards of patient care, nurses are required to demonstrate evidence of providing a high-quality service. By producing new documentation and consequently two standards, the oncology research team provided evidence of its endeavour to not only deliver a high level of care to children and families partaking in research studies, but also show written evidence of so doing. This evidence could be audited as a way of measuring service provision, to allow the team to make further developments and changes.

  13. Improving patient safety in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendee, William R; Herman, Michael G

    2011-01-01

    Beginning in the 1990s, and emphasized in 2000 with the release of an Institute of Medicine report, healthcare providers and institutions have dedicated time and resources to reducing errors that impact the safety and well-being of patients. But in January 2010 the first of a series of articles appeared in the New York Times that described errors in radiation oncology that grievously impacted patients. In response, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and the American Society of Radiation Oncology sponsored a working meeting entitled "Safety in Radiation Therapy: A Call to Action." The meeting attracted 400 attendees, including medical physicists, radiation oncologists, medical dosimetrists, radiation therapists, hospital administrators, regulators, and representatives of equipment manufacturers. The meeting was cohosted by 14 organizations in the United States and Canada. The meeting yielded 20 recommendations that provide a pathway to reducing errors and improving patient safety in radiation therapy facilities everywhere.

  14. A system of tele-oncology at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics and regional oncology affiliate institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitt, J A

    1998-01-01

    Collaborative associations between academic medical centers and community hospitals can use telemedicine to promote and enhance cancer treatment and clinical research. It is expensive to duplicate communications technology at all sites, but it is possible to share technologies using telemedicine. This paper describes a system in evolution that provides regional oncology services at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics and regional oncology affiliates. The system requires integrated hardware and software to provide Internet access, videoconferencing, and data transmission. This system is comprised of several forms of technology that promote education and training, continuing medical education, patient evaluation and protocol eligibility, data transfer for radiation therapy treatment planning, and clinical and technologic quality assurance and peer review programs for medical oncology and radiation oncology.

  15. Medical practices and cancer care networks: examples in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Chauvin, Franck; Lurkin, Antoine; Ducimetière, Françoise; Jacquin, Jean Philippe; Agostini, Cécile; Pouchard, Isabelle; Meyer, Bernard; Farsi, Fadila; Castel, Patrick; Perrier, Lionel; Philip, Thierry

    2006-02-01

    Understanding medical practices or the whys and wherefores of care decision-making is among the major objectives of medical, economic and sociological research in the current political environment. Although variations of medical practice have long been known to exist, causes and deciding factors remain obscure. This is one of the reasons why medical auditing became widely used in the past years. Using methods similar to those of clinical research, we will explore existing medical practices and their implications, with the aim to propose possible improvements. Elaborating clinical practice guidelines and promoting cancer network activities might prove promising and have a significant impact on clinical practice. This article provides a state-of-the-art overview of the subject, notably in the domain of oncology where substantial advances are being made.

  16. The Integration of Emotional, Immunological and Communication Responses to Medical Oncology Surveillance Appointments During Breast Cancer Survivorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingley, Catherine; Donaldson, Gary

    2017-01-01

    uncertainty and anxiety related to the fear of cancer recurrence associated with routinely scheduled medical oncology visits. Women also experienced alterations in immune responses to the stress of a routine medical oncology visit. The interaction between women and their oncology providers has the theoretical potential to allay both emotional and physiological responses to this stressor, contributing to the well-being and quality of life for older long-term breast cancer survivors Implications for Practice Because not all women respond in a similar fashion to an upcoming medical oncology surveillance visit there is a need to determine who may be most at risk for more acute alterations in immunity related to the fear of cancer recurrence that is inherent in ongoing surveillance after treatment for breast cancer. When the meaning of symptoms is understood, and existing symptoms are not erroneously attributed to breast cancer recurrence, quality of life is enhanced and women can move forward in their lives without significant emotional distress1. Further, immediate answers to questions, thus resolving concerns and uncertainty about symptoms, may potentially avoid prolonged immune status changes that can result from worrying about and waiting for discussions of concerns until the next office appointment. This could be facilitated by nurse operated telephone based “help lines” where women could call in without fear of “bothering the doctor”. The goal here would be to provide immediate reassurance rather than let women worry for prolonged periods of time while waiting for their next (often annual) medical oncology appointment. PMID:27088607

  17. Multicriteria decision analysis in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adunlin, Georges; Diaby, Vakaramoko; Montero, Alberto J; Xiao, Hong

    2015-12-01

    There has been a growing interest in the development and application of alternative decision-making frameworks within health care, including multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA). Even though the literature includes several reviews on MCDA methods, applications of MCDA in oncology are lacking. The aim of this paper is to discuss a rationale for the use of MCDA in oncology. In this context, the following research question emerged: How can MCDA be used to develop a clinical decision support tool in oncology? In this paper, a brief background on decision making is presented, followed by an overview of MCDA methods and process. The paper discusses some applications of MCDA, proposes research opportunities in the context of oncology and presents an illustrative example of how MCDA can be applied to oncology. Decisions in oncology involve trade-offs between possible benefits and harms. MCDA can help analyse trade-off preferences. A wide range of MCDA methods exist. Each method has its strengths and weaknesses. Choosing the appropriate method varies depending on the source and nature of information used to inform decision making. The literature review identified eight studies. The analytical hierarchy process (AHP) was the most often used method in the identified studies. Overall, MCDA appears to be a promising tool that can be used to assist clinical decision making in oncology. Nonetheless, field testing is desirable before MCDA becomes an established decision-making tool in this field. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Mathematical oncology 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Gandolfi, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    With chapters on free boundaries, constitutive equations, stochastic dynamics, nonlinear diffusion–consumption, structured populations, and applications of optimal control theory, this volume presents the most significant recent results in the field of mathematical oncology. It highlights the work of world-class research teams, and explores how different researchers approach the same problem in various ways. Tumors are complex entities that present numerous challenges to the mathematical modeler. First and foremost, they grow. Thus their spatial mean field description involves a free boundary problem. Second, their interiors should be modeled as nontrivial porous media using constitutive equations. Third, at the end of anti-cancer therapy, a small number of malignant cells remain, making the post-treatment dynamics inherently stochastic. Fourth, the growth parameters of macroscopic tumors are non-constant, as are the parameters of anti-tumor therapies. Changes in these parameters may induce phenomena that a...

  19. Subspecialist training in surgical gynecologic oncology in the Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonsen, Sofie L; Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Salvesen, Helga B; Auranen, Annika; Salvarsdottir, Anna; Høgdall, Claus

    2011-08-01

    To survey the centers that can provide subspecialty surgical training and education in gynecological oncology in the Nordic countries, we developed an online questionnaire in co-operation with the Nordic Society of Gynecological Oncology. The link to the survey was mailed to 22 Scandinavian gynecological centers in charge of surgical treatment of cancer patients. Twenty (91%) centers participated. Four centers reported to be accredited European subspecialty training centers, a further six were interested in being accredited, and 11 centers were accredited by the respective National Board. Fourteen (74%) centers were interested in being listed for exchange of fellows. Our data show a large Nordic potential and interest in improving the gynecologic oncology standards and can be used to enhance the awareness of gynecologic oncology training in Scandinavia and to facilitate the exchange of fellows between Nordic countries. © 2011 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2011 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  20. Palliative care in paediatric oncology in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Tuani Magalhães; Silva, Liliane Faria da; Santo, Fátima Helena Espírito; Moraes, Juliana Rezende Montenegro Medeiros de; Pacheco, Sandra Teixeira de Araújo

    2017-05-04

    To identify and understand the view of students regarding palliative care in paediatric oncology during a graduate programme. Exploratory research with a qualitative approach conducted in a school of nursing in Rio de Janeiro. Data were collected from September to November 2014, through semi-structured interviews with 20 students enrolled in the last period of a graduate programme. The data were subjected to thematic analysis. The results produced two thematic units: the (un)preparedness of nursing students regarding palliative care in paediatric oncology and how the subject of palliative care in paediatric oncology is approached in the graduate programme. The students mentioned difficulties in providing this care and their lack of exposure to the topic during their graduate studies. They stated strategies to prepare for the provision of care, and talked about how the subject should be addressed in their curricular programme. It is necessary to expand discussions on palliative care in paediatric oncology during the nurses' graduate programme.

  1. Global Health in Radiation Oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodin, Danielle; Yap, Mei Ling; Grover, Surbhi

    2017-01-01

    programs. However, formalized training and career promotion tracks in global health within radiation oncology have been slow to emerge, thereby limiting the sustained involvement of students and faculty, and restricting opportunities for leadership in this space. We examine here potential structures...... and benefits of formalized global health training in radiation oncology. We explore how defining specific competencies in this area can help trainees and practitioners integrate their activities in global health within their existing roles as clinicians, educators, or scientists. This would also help create...... and funding models might be used to further develop and expand radiation oncology services globally....

  2. New Similarity Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdani, Hossein; Ortiz-Arroyo, Daniel; Kwasnicka, Halina

    2016-01-01

    spaces, in addition to their similarity in the vector space. Prioritized Weighted Feature Distance (PWFD) works similarly as WFD, but provides the ability to give priorities to desirable features. The accuracy of the proposed functions are compared with other similarity functions on several data sets......In data science, there are important parameters that affect the accuracy of the algorithms used. Some of these parameters are: the type of data objects, the membership assignments, and distance or similarity functions. This paper discusses similarity functions as fundamental elements in membership...... assignments. The paper introduces Weighted Feature Distance (WFD), and Prioritized Weighted Feature Distance (PWFD), two new distance functions that take into account the diversity in feature spaces. WFD functions perform better in supervised and unsupervised methods by comparing data objects on their feature...

  3. Value: A Framework for Radiation Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teckie, Sewit; McCloskey, Susan A.; Steinberg, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    In the current health care system, high costs without proportional improvements in quality or outcome have prompted widespread calls for change in how we deliver and pay for care. Value-based health care delivery models have been proposed. Multiple impediments exist to achieving value, including misaligned patient and provider incentives, information asymmetries, convoluted and opaque cost structures, and cultural attitudes toward cancer treatment. Radiation oncology as a specialty has recently become a focus of the value discussion. Escalating costs secondary to rapidly evolving technologies, safety breaches, and variable, nonstandardized structures and processes of delivering care have garnered attention. In response, we present a framework for the value discussion in radiation oncology and identify approaches for attaining value, including economic and structural models, process improvements, outcome measurement, and cost assessment. PMID:25113759

  4. The semantic similarity ensemble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ballatore

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Computational measures of semantic similarity between geographic terms provide valuable support across geographic information retrieval, data mining, and information integration. To date, a wide variety of approaches to geo-semantic similarity have been devised. A judgment of similarity is not intrinsically right or wrong, but obtains a certain degree of cognitive plausibility, depending on how closely it mimics human behavior. Thus selecting the most appropriate measure for a specific task is a significant challenge. To address this issue, we make an analogy between computational similarity measures and soliciting domain expert opinions, which incorporate a subjective set of beliefs, perceptions, hypotheses, and epistemic biases. Following this analogy, we define the semantic similarity ensemble (SSE as a composition of different similarity measures, acting as a panel of experts having to reach a decision on the semantic similarity of a set of geographic terms. The approach is evaluated in comparison to human judgments, and results indicate that an SSE performs better than the average of its parts. Although the best member tends to outperform the ensemble, all ensembles outperform the average performance of each ensemble's member. Hence, in contexts where the best measure is unknown, the ensemble provides a more cognitively plausible approach.

  5. Standardizing naming conventions in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santanam, Lakshmi; Hurkmans, Coen; Mutic, Sasa; van Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine; Brame, Scott; Straube, William; Galvin, James; Tripuraneni, Prabhakar; Michalski, Jeff; Bosch, Walter

    2012-07-15

    The aim of this study was to report on the development of a standardized target and organ-at-risk naming convention for use in radiation therapy and to present the nomenclature for structure naming for interinstitutional data sharing, clinical trial repositories, integrated multi-institutional collaborative databases, and quality control centers. This taxonomy should also enable improved plan benchmarking between clinical institutions and vendors and facilitation of automated treatment plan quality control. The Advanced Technology Consortium, Washington University in St. Louis, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, and the Clinical Trials RT QA Harmonization Group collaborated in creating this new naming convention. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements guidelines have been used to create standardized nomenclature for target volumes (clinical target volume, internal target volume, planning target volume, etc.), organs at risk, and planning organ-at-risk volumes in radiation therapy. The nomenclature also includes rules for specifying laterality and margins for various structures. The naming rules distinguish tumor and nodal planning target volumes, with correspondence to their respective tumor/nodal clinical target volumes. It also provides rules for basic structure naming, as well as an option for more detailed names. Names of nonstandard structures used mainly for plan optimization or evaluation (rings, islands of dose avoidance, islands where additional dose is needed [dose painting]) are identified separately. In addition to its use in 16 ongoing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group advanced technology clinical trial protocols and several new European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer protocols, a pilot version of this naming convention has been evaluated using patient data sets with varying treatment sites. All structures in these data sets were satisfactorily identified using this

  6. Similarity Measure of Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Labriji

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The topic of identifying the similarity of graphs was considered as highly recommended research field in the Web semantic, artificial intelligence, the shape recognition and information research. One of the fundamental problems of graph databases is finding similar graphs to a graph query. Existing approaches dealing with this problem are usually based on the nodes and arcs of the two graphs, regardless of parental semantic links. For instance, a common connection is not identified as being part of the similarity of two graphs in cases like two graphs without common concepts, the measure of similarity based on the union of two graphs, or the one based on the notion of maximum common sub-graph (SCM, or the distance of edition of graphs. This leads to an inadequate situation in the context of information research. To overcome this problem, we suggest a new measure of similarity between graphs, based on the similarity measure of Wu and Palmer. We have shown that this new measure satisfies the properties of a measure of similarities and we applied this new measure on examples. The results show that our measure provides a run time with a gain of time compared to existing approaches. In addition, we compared the relevance of the similarity values obtained, it appears that this new graphs measure is advantageous and  offers a contribution to solving the problem mentioned above.

  7. The American Society for Radiation Oncology's 2015 Core Physics Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burmeister, Jay, E-mail: burmeist@karmanos.org [Department of Oncology, Karmanos Cancer Center/Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Chen, Zhe [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Chetty, Indrin J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Dieterich, Sonja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California – Davis, Sacramento, California (United States); Doemer, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Dominello, Michael M. [Department of Oncology, Karmanos Cancer Center/Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Howell, Rebecca M. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); McDermott, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Nalichowski, Adrian [Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Prisciandaro, Joann [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ritter, Tim [VA Ann Arbor Healthcare and the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Smith, Chadd [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Schreiber, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Shafman, Timothy [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, Florida (United States); Sutlief, Steven [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California – San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Xiao, Ying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Physics Core Curriculum Subcommittee (PCCSC) has updated the recommended physics curriculum for radiation oncology resident education to improve consistency in teaching, intensity, and subject matter. Methods and Materials: The ASTRO PCCSC is composed of physicists and physicians involved in radiation oncology residency education. The PCCSC updated existing sections within the curriculum, created new sections, and attempted to provide additional clinical context to the curricular material through creation of practical clinical experiences. Finally, we reviewed the American Board of Radiology (ABR) blueprint of examination topics for correlation with this curriculum. Results: The new curriculum represents 56 hours of resident physics didactic education, including a 4-hour initial orientation. The committee recommends completion of this curriculum at least twice to assure both timely presentation of material and re-emphasis after clinical experience. In addition, practical clinical physics and treatment planning modules were created as a supplement to the didactic training. Major changes to the curriculum include addition of Fundamental Physics, Stereotactic Radiosurgery/Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy, and Safety and Incidents sections, and elimination of the Radiopharmaceutical Physics and Dosimetry and Hyperthermia sections. Simulation and Treatment Verification and optional Research and Development in Radiation Oncology sections were also added. A feedback loop was established with the ABR to help assure that the physics component of the ABR radiation oncology initial certification examination remains consistent with this curriculum. Conclusions: The ASTRO physics core curriculum for radiation oncology residents has been updated in an effort to identify the most important physics topics for preparing residents for careers in radiation oncology, to reflect changes in technology and practice since

  8. People with stroke spend more time in active task practice, but similar time in walking practice, when physiotherapy rehabilitation is provided in circuit classes compared to individual therapy sessions: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Coralie; Hillier, Susan; Kaur, Gurpreet; Hundertmark, Laura

    2014-03-01

    Do people with stroke spend more time in active task practice during circuit class therapy sessions versus individual physiotherapy sessions? Do people with stroke practise different tasks during circuit class therapy sessions versus individual physiotherapy sessions? Prospective, observational study. Twenty-nine people with stroke in inpatient rehabilitation settings. Individual therapy sessions and circuit class therapy sessions provided within a larger randomised controlled trial. Seventy-nine therapy sessions were video-recorded and the footage was analysed for time spent engaged in various categories of activity. In a subsample of 28 videos, the number of steps taken by people with stroke per therapy session was counted. Circuit class therapy sessions were of a longer duration (mean difference 38.0minutes, 95% CI 29.9 to 46.1), and participants spent more time engaged in active task practice (mean difference 23.8minutes, 95% CI 16.1 to 31.4) compared with individual sessions. A greater percentage of time in circuit class therapy sessions was spent practising tasks in sitting (mean difference 5.3%, 95% CI 2.4 to 8.2) and in sit-to-stand practice (mean difference 2.7%, 95% CI 1.4 to 4.1), and a lower percentage of time in walking practice (mean difference 19.1%, 95% CI 10.0 to 28.1) compared with individual sessions. PARTICIPANTS took an average of 371 steps (SD 418) during therapy sessions and this did not differ significantly between group and individual sessions. People with stroke spent more time in active task practice, but a similar amount of time in walking practice when physiotherapy was offered in circuit class therapy sessions versus individual therapy sessions. There is a need for effective strategies to increase the amount of walking practice during physiotherapy sessions for people after stroke. Copyright © 2014 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Oncologic gynecology and the Internet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizler, Robert; Bielanów, Tomasz; Kulikiewicz, Krzysztof

    2002-11-01

    The strategy of World Wide Web searching for medical sites was presented in this article. The "deep web" and "surface web" resources were searched. The 10 best sites connected with the gynecological oncology, according to authors' opinion, were presented.

  10. Oncology information on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yasushi; Nagase, Takahide

    2012-05-01

    Owing to new developments in Internet technologies, the amount of available oncology information is growing. Both patients and caregivers are increasingly using the Internet to obtain medical information. However, while it is easy to provide information, ensuring its quality is always a concern. Thus, many instruments for evaluating the quality of health information have been created, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. The increasing importance of online search engines such as Google warrants the examination of the correlation between their rankings and medical quality. The Internet also mediates the exchange of information from one individual to another. Mailing lists of advocate groups and social networking sites help spread information to patients and caregivers. While text messages are still the main medium of communication, audio and video messages are also increasing rapidly, accelerating the communication on the Internet. Future health information developments on the Internet include merging patients' personal information on the Internet with their traditional health records and facilitating the interaction among patients, caregivers and health-care providers. Through these developments, the Internet is expected to strengthen the mutually beneficial relationships among all stakeholders in the field of medicine.

  11. Oncology Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Cancer Pain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriary, Shahdad; Shiryazdi, Seyed Mostafa; Shiryazdi, Seyed Ali; Arjomandi, Amir; Haghighi, Fatemeh; Vakili, Fariba Mir; Mostafaie, Naiemeh

    2015-01-01

    Oncology nurses play a crucial role in cancer pain management and must be highly informed to ensure their effective practice in the cancer setting. The aim of this study was to determine the baseline level of knowledge and attitudes of oncology nurses regarding cancer pain management. A cross-sectional survey research design was employed. The sample comprised 58 cancer nurses working in Shahid Sadoughi hospital, Yazd, Iran. The ''Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain'' (NKAS) tool and a demographic form were utilized to ascertain the knowledge and attitudes of oncology nurses working in oncology settings. The average correct response rate for oncology nurses was 66.6%, ranging from 12.1% to 94.8%. The nurses mean score on the knowledge and attitudes survey regarding pain management was 28.5%. Results revealed that the mean percentage score overall was 65.7%. Only 8.6% of nurse participants obtained a passing score of 75% or greater. Widespread knowledge deficits and poor attitudes were noted in this study, particularly regard pharmacological management of pain. The present study provides important information about knowledge deficits in pain management among oncology nurses and limited training regarding pain management. Our results support the universal concern of inadequate knowledge and attitudes of nurses regarding cancer pain. It is suggested educational and quality improvement initiatives in pain management could enhance nurses knowledge in the area of pain and possibly improve practice.

  12. Lymphoscintigraphy in oncology: a rediscovered challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes Olmos, R.A.; Hoefnagel, C.A. [Netherlands Cancer Inst., Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Nieweg, O.E.; Jansen, L.; Rutgers, E.J.T.; Kroon, B.B.R. [Netherlands Cancer Inst., Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Surgery; Borger, J. [Netherlands Cancer Inst., Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Horenblas, S. [Netherlands Cancer Inst., Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Urology

    1999-04-01

    The validation of the sentinel node concept in oncology has led to the rediscovery of lymphoscintigraphy. By combining preoperative lymphatic mapping with intraoperative probe detection this nuclear medicine procedure is being increasingly used to identify and detect the sentinel node in melanoma, breast cancer, and in other malignancies such as penile cancer and vulvar cancer. In the past lymphoscintigraphy has been widely applied for various indications in oncology, and in the case of the internal mammary lymph-node chain its current use in breast cancer remains essential to adjust irradiation treatment to the individual findings of each patient. In another diagnostic area, lymphoscintigraphy is also useful to document altered drainage patterns after surgery and/or radiotherapy; its use in breast cancer patients with upper limb oedema after axillary lymph-node dissection or in melanoma patients with lower-extremity oedema after groin dissection can provide information for physiotherapy or reconstructive surgery. Finally, the renewed interest in lymphoscintigraphy in oncology has led not only to the rediscovery of findings from old literature reports, but also to a discussion about methodological aspects such as tracer characteristics, image acquisition or administration routes, as well as to discussion on the study of migration patterns of radiolabelled colloid particles in the context of cancer dissemination. All this makes the need for standardized guidelines for lymphoscintigraphy mandatory. (orig.) With 10 figs., 1 tab., 56 refs.

  13. The Danish Neuro-Oncology Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen S

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Steinbjørn Hansen Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark Aim of database: The Danish Neuro-Oncology Registry (DNOR was established by the Danish Neuro-Oncology Group as a national clinical database. It was established for the purpose of supporting research and development in adult patients with primary brain tumors in Denmark. Study population: DNOR has registered clinical data on diagnostics and treatment of all adult patients diagnosed with glioma since January 1, 2009, which numbers approximately 400 patients each year. Main variables: The database contains information about symptoms, presurgical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI characteristics, performance status, surgical procedures, residual tumor on postsurgical MRI, postsurgical complications, diagnostic and histology codes, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Descriptive data: DNOR publishes annual reports on descriptive data. During the period of registration, postoperative MRI is performed in a higher proportion of the patients (Indicator II, and a higher proportion of patients have no residual tumor after surgical resection of the primary tumor (Indicator IV. Further data are available in the annual reports. The indicators reflect only minor elements of handling brain tumor patients. Another advantage of reporting indicators is the related multidisciplinary discussions giving a better understanding of what actually is going on, thereby facilitating the work on adjusting the national guidelines in the Danish Neuro-Oncology Group. Conclusion: The establishment of DNOR has optimized the quality in handling primary brain tumor patients in Denmark by reporting indicators and facilitating a better multidisciplinary collaboration at a national level. DNOR provides a valuable resource for research. Keywords: brain neoplasms, brain cancer, glioma, clinical quality indicators

  14. [Economic limits in oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellriegel, K P

    2000-12-01

    Economic aspects require consideration even in oncology. However, they have to be seen in context with open questions concerning especially the evaluation of therapeutic effectiveness, of methodology, and particularly of ethics. Medical procedures and achievements should primarily be measured against objective results, against effectiveness and benefits. Consequently, the suitability of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies has to be evaluated. Overall objective of medical achievements should be their optimalization, not their maximization. For a physician being aware of his responsibility, the optimal care for his patients always has highest priority. Medical guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up are the basis for effective and economic patient care. They have to undergo economic evaluation and permanent updating. For systematic collection, documentation and evaluation, the clinical register is the appropriate instrument. For the assessment of medical care, a continuous monitoring of its processes has to be established. The documentation of medical care processes should lead to sustainable cost reductions together with an optimalization of the quality of care.

  15. Selective Thoracic Fusion Provides Similar Health-Related Quality of Life but Can Cause More Lumbar Disc and Facet Joint Degeneration: A Comparison of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Patients With Normal Population 10 Years After Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enercan, Meric; Kahraman, Sinan; Cobanoglu, Mutlu; Yilar, Sinan; Gokcen, Bahadir Huseyin; Karadereler, Selhan; Mutlu, Ayhan; Ulusoy, Levent Onur; Ozturk, Cagatay; Erturer, Erden; Gebes, Elif; Sanli, Tunay; Alanay, Ahmet; Hamzaoglu, Azmi

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the long-term behavior of the lumbar curve in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis treated with selective thoracic fusion and to assess the clinical and radiologic outcomes in this fusion group compared with an age- and gender-matched group. Selective thoracic fusion for the treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) preserves lumbar motion segments but leaves a residual deformity. By avoiding fusion of the lumbar spine, a greater mobility may be preserved, which may be an advantage in long-term follow-up in terms of degenerative changes in unfused segments. Group A included 25 AIS patients with mean a age of 23.8 years and a mean 11.4 years of follow-up. Group B included 30 age- and gender-matched subjects without any deformity. Preoperative, postoperative, and follow-up radiographs were reviewed. All patients had MRIs taken at the final follow-up in order to evaluate disc degeneration (DD) and facet joint degeneration (FJD) at the unfused lumbar spine. Clinical evaluation was done by using Scoliosis Research Society-22R, Oswestry Disability Index, and numerical rating scale. Sagittal and coronal balance and lowest instrumented vertebra disc angulation were stable over time. Mean grading of lumbar DD was 2.16 (2-4) in Group A and 1.86 (1-3) in Group B. Lumbar FJDs were 2.05 (1-4) in Group A and 1.60 (1-3) in Group B. There was significant difference between the two groups for DD except for the L4-L5 level (p = .26). FJD was significantly higher in the L1-L2 and L2-L3 levels (L1-L2, p = .002, L2-L3, p = .002) but not for the other levels. Outcome scores were similar without significant differences between the two groups (p > .05). Selective thoracic fusion provides satisfactory outcomes at more than 10 years of follow-up. Our study demonstrated a moderate increase in the rate of disc degeneration in the unfused segments. Facet joint degeneration was significant at the upper two levels adjacent to the lowest instrumented vertebra

  16. [Safety and quality assurance management in radiation oncology "what is the role for qualiticians?": example of the Centre Alexis Vautrin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigle, D; Sobczyk, C; Androni, M-L; Peiffert, D; Beckendorf, V; Marchesi, V; Buchheit, I; Noel, A

    2009-10-01

    Since 2007, the Centre Alexis-Vautrin Cancer Institute in Nancy began its safety and quality assurance management policy in the department of radiation oncology. This development induced a collaborative workflow between the quality unit and the department of radiation oncology, with a definition of the responsibilities. The quality unit provides its methodology for the quality assurance, the professionals of the radiation oncology department their expertise. In parallel, a quality referee was nominated in the radiation oncology department to implement the projects for improvement, linked with the quality assurance unit, and under the control of the radiation oncology department staff.

  17. A Survey of Medical Oncology Training in Australian Medical Schools: Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Mathew; Prawira, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Background Oncology is a rapidly evolving field with continuous advancements in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Therefore, it is important that medical students are provided with the knowledge and experience required to care for oncology patients and enable them to diagnose and manage toxicities of novel therapeutic agents. Objective This study was performed to understand the medical students’ perspective of the oncology education provided in universities across Australia and identify areas of education that could potentially be modified or improved to ultimately attract more students to a career in oncology. Methods This pilot cross-sectional study consisted of an 18-question survey that was submitted online to medical students in their final year and interns rotating to the Tamworth Hospital. Results The survey was completed by 94 fifth-year medical students and interns. Oncology was taught both theoretically and clinically for 68% (63/93) of participants, and 48% (44/92) had an exclusive oncology rotation. Both theoretical and clinical oncology assessments were conducted for only 21% (19/92) of participants. Overall, 42% (38/91) of participants were satisfied with their oncology education, and 78% (40/51) were dissatisfied with the number of oncology teaching hours. The importance of a career in oncology was rated as low by 46% (41/90) of participants. Conclusions This pilot study indicates that there are potential areas to improve oncology teaching in Australian universities. The majority of surveyed students were dissatisfied with the number of teaching hours they receive in oncology. More global assessment of students and/or interns from other Australian institutes may yield further useful information. PMID:29233799

  18. Establishment of the Asia Oncology Nursing Society (AONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuko Onishi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past several years, whenever an informal group of Asian oncology nurses gathered, they talked about their mutual desire to create an organization closer to their homes that would be similar to the European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS. They saw this as a means for more of their colleagues to learn about the latest in cancer nursing and to have a time and place to network among themselves. This message continued to gain strength whenever these nurses met at other international meetings such as the International Conference on Cancer Nursing (ICCN, the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC and the Oncology Nursing Society in US. A definite and planned step toward forming an Asian organization as the first meeting was taken on June 24 2011 when several Asian nurses were attending a MASCC meeting in Greece. The second meeting was held in Prague, Czech Republic, in conjunction with the 17 th ICCN meeting on September 10 2012, where the participants of the meeting included 21 oncology nurses from Asian countries. Finally, the first official meeting of the board directors from nine countries was held on November 21 2013 in Bangkok, Thailand. Now, and in the future, sharing and collaborating in the practice, education and research for oncology nursing in Asia is needed.

  19. Establishment of the Asia Oncology Nursing Society (AONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuko Onishi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past several years, whenever an informal group of Asian oncology nurses gathered, they talked about their mutual desire to create an organization closer to their homes that would be similar to the European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS. They saw this as a means for more of their colleagues to learn about the latest in cancer nursing and to have a time and place to network among themselves. This message continued to gain strength whenever these nurses met at other international meetings such as the International Conference on Cancer Nursing (ICCN, the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC and the Oncology Nursing Society in US. A definite and planned step toward forming an Asian organization as the first meeting was taken on June 24 2011 when several Asian nurses were attending a MASCC meeting in Greece. The second meeting was held in Prague, Czech Republic, in conjunction with the 17 th ICCN meeting on September 10 2012, where the participants of the meeting included 21 oncology nurses from Asian countries. Finally, the first official meeting of the board directors from nine countries was held on November 21 2013 in Bangkok, Thailand. Now, and in the future, sharing and collaborating in the practice, education and research for oncology nursing in Asia is needed.

  20. Payment Reform: Unprecedented and Evolving Impact on Gynecologic Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, Sachin M.; Patel, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    With the signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act in April 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is now positioned to drive the development and implementation of sweeping changes to how physicians and hospitals are paid for the provision of oncology-related services. These changes will have a long-lasting impact on the sub-specialty of gynecologic oncology, regardless of practice structure, physician employment and compensation model, or local insurance market. Recently, commercial payers have piloted various models of payment reform via oncology-specific clinical pathways, oncology medical homes, episode payment arrangements, and accountable care organizations. Despite the positive results of some pilot programs, adoption remains limited. The goals are to eliminate unnecessary variation in cancer treatment, provide coordinated patient-centered care, while controlling costs. Yet, meaningful payment reform in oncology remains elusive. As the largest payer for oncology services in the United States, CMS has the leverage to make cancer services more value based. Thus far, the focus has been around pricing of physician-administered drugs with recent work in the area of the Oncology Medical Home. Gynecologic oncology is a unique sub-specialty that blends surgical and medical oncology, with treatment that often involves radiation therapy. This forward-thinking, multidisciplinary model works to keep the patient at the center of the care continuum and emphasizes care coordination. Because of the breadth and depth of gynecologic oncology, this sub-specialty has both the potential to be disrupted by payment reform as well as potentially benefit from the aspects of reform that can align incentives appropriately to improve coordination. Although the precise future payment models are unknown at this time, focused engagement of gynecologic oncologists and the full care team is imperative to assure that the practice remains patient centered

  1. The Future of Gero-Oncology Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Sarah H

    2016-02-01

    To project the future of gero-oncology nursing as a distinct specialty, framed between analysis of current challenges and explication of prospective solutions. Peer-reviewed literature, policy directives, web-based resources, and author expertise. Oncology nursing faces several challenges in meeting the needs of older people living with cancer. Realigning cancer nursing education, practice, and research to match demographic and epidemiological realities mandates redesign. Viewing geriatric oncology as an optional sub-specialty limits oncology nursing, where older people represent the majority of oncology patients and cancer survivors. The future of gero-oncology nursing lies in transforming oncology nursing itself. Specific goals to achieve transformation of oncology nursing into gero-oncology nursing include assuring integrated foundational aging and cancer content across entry-level nursing curricula; assuring a gero-competent oncology nursing workforce with integrated continuing education; developing gero-oncology nurse specialists in advanced practice roles; and cultivating nurse leadership in geriatric oncology program development and administration along with expanding the scope and sophistication of gero-oncology nursing science. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Voices from the Margins: Reflections of an Oncology Chaplain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eselun Bcc, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Michael Eselun, BCC, who serves as the oncology chaplain for the Simms-Mann/UCLA Center for Integrative Oncology, recently gave a lecture as part of the Insights Into Cancer lecture series at UCLA called 'Cancer: "It Could Be Worse" - A Spiritual Ponzi Scheme?'. Michael has written a personal reflection to provide a fuller context for his chaplaincy, as he views it, and to provide some background to the lecture. A link to a video of the lecture is included. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Pediatric Oncology Branch - Support Services | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Support Services As part of the comprehensive care provided at the NCI Pediatric Oncology Branch, we provide a wide range of services to address the social, psychological, emotional, and practical facets of pediatric cancer and to support patients and families while they are enrolled in clinical research protocols.

  4. The clinical and phylogenetic investigation for a nosocomial outbreak of respiratory syncytial virus infection in an adult hemato-oncology unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeya, Daijiro; Kinjo, Takeshi; Parrott, Gretchen Lynn; Uehara, Ayako; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Nahar, Saifun; Nakachi, Sawako; Nakamatsu, Masashi; Maeshiro, Sakuko; Haranaga, Shusaku; Tateyama, Masao; Tomoyose, Takeaki; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Horii, Toshihiro; Fujita, Jiro

    2017-08-01

    Although many reports have already shown RSV outbreaks among hemato-oncology patients, genomic studies detecting similar RSV strains prior to an outbreak in the hospital are rare. In 2014, the University of the Ryukyus hospital hemato-oncology unit experienced, and successfully managed, a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) nosocomial outbreak. During the outbreak investigation, genotyping and phylogenetic analysis was used to identify a potential source for the outbreak. Nasopharyngeal swabs were tested for RSV using three tests: (1) rapid antigen test (RAT); (2) reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR); or (3) quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR); a positive PCR reaction was considered a confirmed case of RSV. Phylogenetic analysis of the G protein was performed for outbreak and reference samples from non-outbreak periods of the same year. In total, 12 confirmed cases were identified, including 8 hemato-oncology patients. Patient samples were collected weekly, until all confirmed RSV cases returned RSV negative test results. Median time of suspected viral shedding was 16 days (n = 5, range: 8-37 days). Sensitivity and specificity of the RAT compared with RT-qPCR were 30% and 91% (n = 42). Phylogenetic analysis revealed nine genetically identical strains; eight occurring during the outbreak time period and one strain was detected 1 month prior. A genetically similar RSV detected 1 month before is considered one potential source of this outbreak. As such, healthcare providers should always enforce standard precautions, especially in the hemato-oncology unit. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Development of a Post-Master's Fellowship Program in Oncology Nursing Education. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegele, Dorothy; Henderson, Billie

    A one-year Post-Master's Fellowship in Oncology Nursing Education for nurse educators was developed through the collaboration of San Jose State University (California) and University of Alabama at Birmingham. The project was designed to: develop or update undergraduate/graduate oncology nursing programs; provide continuing education for practicing…

  6. Frontiers of biostatistical methods and applications in clinical oncology

    CERN Document Server

    Crowley, John

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the state of the art of biostatistical methods and their applications in clinical oncology. Many methodologies established today in biostatistics have been brought about through its applications to the design and analysis of oncology clinical studies. This field of oncology, now in the midst of evolution owing to rapid advances in biotechnologies and cancer genomics, is becoming one of the most promising disease fields in the shift toward personalized medicine. Modern developments of diagnosis and therapeutics of cancer have also been continuously fueled by recent progress in establishing the infrastructure for conducting more complex, large-scale clinical trials and observational studies. The field of cancer clinical studies therefore will continue to provide many new statistical challenges that warrant further progress in the methodology and practice of biostatistics. This book provides a systematic coverage of various stages of cancer clinical studies. Topics from modern cancer clinical ...

  7. American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Learn More Explore career opportunities in pediatric hematology/oncology Visit the ASPHO Career Center. Learn More Join ... Privacy Policy » © The American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

  8. Geriatric oncology in the Netherlands: a survey of medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, J M; Smorenburg, C H; Schiphorst, A H; van Rixtel, B; Portielje, J E A; Hamaker, M E

    2014-11-01

    To identify ways to improve cancer care for older patients, we set out to examine how older patients in the Netherlands are currently being evaluated prior to oncological treatment and to explore the potential obstacles in the incorporation of a geriatric evaluation, using a web-based survey sent to Dutch medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists. The response rate was 34% (183 out of 544). Two-thirds of respondents reported that a geriatric evaluation was being used, although primarily on an ad hoc basis only. Most respondents expressed a desire for a routine evaluation or more intensive collaboration with the geriatrician and 86% of respondents who were not using a geriatric evaluation expressed their interest to do so. The most important obstacles were a lack of time or personnel and insufficient availability of a geriatrician to perform the assessment. Thus, over 30% of oncology professionals in the Netherlands express an interest in geriatric oncology. Important obstacles to a routine implementation of a geriatric evaluation are a lack of time, or insufficient availability of geriatricians; this could be overcome with policies that acknowledge that quality cancer care for older patients requires the investment of time and personnel. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. 76 FR 61713 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of..., are in late stage development for an adult oncology indication, or in late stage development in...

  10. 77 FR 57095 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... plans for four products that are in development for an adult oncology indication. The subcommittee will...

  11. 75 FR 66773 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... were either recently approved by FDA or, are in late stage development for an adult oncology indication...

  12. [Vitamins and Minerals in Oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holch, Julian Walter; Michl, Marlies; Heinemann, Volker; Erickson, Nicole

    2017-06-01

    The use of vitamins and minerals to prevent cancer as well as their supportive use in oncological patients is widespread and often occurs without the knowledge of the treating physician. Beyond general recommendations with regard to a balanced and healthy diet, no evidence exists supporting the use of vitamins and minerals in the prevention of cancer. Furthermore, the diet of oncological patients should contain vitamins and minerals of the same quantity as for healthy individuals. In particular, there is currently no rationale for a high-dosage administration of antioxidants. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Effects of a sexual health care nursing record on the attitudes and practice of oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dukyoo; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2016-10-01

    A nursing record focused on sexual health care for patients with cancer could encourage oncology nurses to provide sexual health care for oncology patients in a simple and effective manner. However, existing electronic information systems focus on professional use and not sexual health care, which could lead to inefficiencies in clinical practice. To examine the effects of a sexual health care nursing record on the attitudes and practice of oncology nurses. Twenty-four full-time registered nurses caring for oncology patients were randomly assigned to the intervention and control groups in Korea. The researchers developed a sexual health care record and applied it to the intervention group for one month. Data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney U test and chi-square test. Content analysis was used to analyze interviews. Oncology nurses using the sexual health care record had significantly higher levels of sexual health care practice at 4 weeks post-intervention as compared to those who provided usual care to patients with cancer. A sexual health care record may have the potential to facilitate oncology nurses' practice of sexual health care. This study highlighted the importance of using SHC records with oncology patients to improve nursing practice related to sexuality issues. A nursing record focused on SHC for patients with cancer could make it easier and more effective for oncology nurses to provide such care to their patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization and application of UV detector spore films: the sensitivity curve of a new detector system provides good similarity to the action spectrum for UV-induced erythema in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintern, L E; Furusawa, Y; Fukutsu, K; Holtschmidt, H

    1997-01-01

    The UV action spectra of two different biologically weighting UV photofilms (spore films), produced with Bacillus subtilis spores (wild-type and DNA repair-deficient strains), were determined at the Okasaki large spectrograph (OLS) within the level of wavelength range 254-400 nm. The action spectrum of the mutant strain film was modified with a cut-off filter, yielding a sensitivity curve similar to the action spectrum for erythemal induction in human skin. The detector system was tested in a field study and in a study using lamps with different UV spectral compositions. The system demonstrated its applicability over the spectral region lambda = 290 nm to the visible light. The system could be calibrated to give the minimal erythemal dose.

  15. Development of the Moffitt Cancer Network as a Telemedicine and Teleconferencing Educational Tool for Health Care Providers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krischer, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    The Moffitt Cancer Network's (MCN) goal is to provide up-to-date oncology related information, resources, and education to oncology health care providers and researchers for the prevention and cure of cancer...

  16. Development of the Moffitt Cancer Network as a Telemedicine and Teleconferencing Educational Tool for Health Care Providers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krischer, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    The Moffitt Cancer Network's (MCN) goal is to provide up-to-date oncology related information, resources, and education to oncology health care providers and researchers for the prevention and cure of cancer...

  17. Cancer rehabilitation from the perspectives of oncology nurses in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, HeeKyung; Park, Yeon-Hwan

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the perception of oncology nurses and how it is related to cancer rehabilitation in Korea. A qualitative study with three focus groups consisting of 6-8 Korean oncology nurses (n = 21) was conducted. The interviews were thematically analyzed. Two main themes for the attributes of cancer rehabilitation were "comprehensive activities of nurses" and "active involvement of survivors." Six subthemes from the oncology nurses' care experiences were identified: "incorporating partnership and sharing feelings," "fulfilling individualized needs," "providing timely and practical support," "enhancing internal strength with optimistic mindset," "regaining functional independence," and "getting family members in." The findings suggest that oncology nurses can play a key role in rehabilitation for cancer survivors. Nursing interventions focused on comprehensive activities of nurses as well as active involvement of survivors can be effective in enhancing cancer survivors' strength and resilience in order to lead a healthy life. Oncology nurses need to be taught a psychosocial intervention based on individualized assessment and family partnership for cancer survivors. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Sedation practices for Australian and New Zealand paediatric oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, C; Downie, P; Chalkiadis, G; Camilleri, S; Monagle, P; Waters, K

    2002-04-01

    Paediatric oncology patients often require repeated bone marrow aspirates and lumbar punctures. These procedures commonly require sedation and analgesia. The Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists and the American Academy of Pediatrics have published guidelines that provide recommendations on monitoring and staffing requirements during sedation of paediatric patients. A survey was conducted of the oncology units in Australia and New Zealand in order to compare current practices with published guidelines. Telephone interviews were conducted with nursing or medical staff members. Fourteen oncology units collectively perform approximately 130 procedures each week, of which 74% are performed under general anaesthesia. Of the remainder, most are performed using conscious sedation. Most units adhere to published recommendations regarding equipment and staffing during procedures performed under sedation. Only a minority of units follow guidelines regarding documentation; fasting requirements; observation and documentation of vital signs during and after the procedure; and obtaining informed consent for procedures performed using sedation. Sedation practices among paediatric oncology units in Australia and New Zealand vary. None of the units fully adhere to published guidelines on childhood sedation. Paediatric oncology units should be familiar with the content of these guidelines and make an informed decision as to their usefulness, both in directing best clinical practice, and in supporting current practice in the event of medico-legal challenge.

  19. Nutrition in oncology: the case of micronutrients (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ströhle, Alexander; Zänker, Kurt; Hahn, Andreas

    2010-10-01

    In the course of cancer disease, many oncological patients develop tumor-associated malnutrition characterized by an insufficient supply of macro- and micronutrients. The inadequate nutritional status and the cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome related to it are clinically relevant, as the response to antineoplastic measures, such as radiation and chemotherapy, is diminished, their side effects aggravated and the patient's quality of life and prognosis negatively affected. Therefore, the supportive nutrition care of oncological patients is of central importance. In this context, vitamins, minerals and long-chain omega -3 fatty acids are becoming more and more relevant in oncology although the benefit of such supplements is discussed controversially. Starting from a description of the etiopathogenesis and the pathophysiological consequences of cancer-associated malnutrition, the present study provides an overview of the importance of micronutrients for oncological patients. In the case of reduced food intake and/or inappropriate food choice the use of a multi-vitamin-multimineral supplement administered in physiological doses, i.e. nutrient quantities approximately corresponding to the recommended daily allowances, can be generally recommended. However, to enhance postoperative wound healing, it seems that cancer patients require higher amounts of micronutrients than healthy individuals. Because vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in oncological patients, improvement of vitamin D status is of special interest.

  20. Oncological emergencies for the internist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An oncologic emergency is defined as any acute, potentially life-threatening event, either directly or indirectly related to a patient′s cancer (ca or its treatment. It requires rapid intervention to avoid death or severe permanent damage. Most oncologic emergencies can be classified as metabolic, hematologic, structural, or side effects from chemotherapy agents. Tumor lysis syndrome is a metabolic emergency that presents as severe electrolyte abnormalities. The condition is treated with aggressive hydration, allopurinol or urate oxidase to lower uric acid levels. Hypercalcemia of malignancy is treated with aggressive rehydration, furosemide, and intravenous (IV bisphosphonates. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone should be suspected if a patient with ca presents with normovolemic hyponatremia. This metabolic condition usually is treated with fluid restriction and furosemide. Febrile neutropenia is a hematologic emergency that usually requires inpatient therapy with broad-spectrum antibiotics, although outpatient therapy may be appropriate for low-risk patients. Hyperviscosity syndrome usually is associated with Waldenstrφm′s macroglobulinemia, which is treated with plasmapheresis and chemotherapy. Structural oncologic emergencies are caused by direct compression of surrounding structures or by metastatic disease. Superior vena cava syndrome is the most common structural oncological emergency. Treatment options include chemotherapy, radiation, and IV stenting. Epidural spinal cord compression can be treated with dexamethasone, radiation, or surgery. Malignant pericardial effusion, which often is undiagnosed in ca patients, can be treated with pericardiocentesis or a pericardial window procedure.

  1. Telemedicine in oncology: European perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Telemedicine in oncology or teleoncology integrates many so far well-known telemedicine elements such as teleconsultation, telesupport, telesurgery and telerobotics, teleeducation, and many others and is integral part of many disciplines such as internal medicine, surgery, dermatology, but also dentistry and psychooncology/psychiatry. Changes in ICT, new developments in oncology, the need to think and work interdisciplinarily, geographic and economic challenges as well as the transgression of sectoral boundaries as elements of modern teleoncology. Whereas the northern parts of Europe show a well-developed telemedicine infrastructure with a growing tendency to incorporate teleoncology for documentation, data analysis and quality assurance, in more southern countries this process is still underway and often marked by project status. Modern technology using xDSL and other terrestrial network lines but also satellite connectivity is at hand to cover a wide variety of telemedicine applications and services from which teleoncology benefits. More and more specifically designed software applications can be used to assess the medical workflow of an oncological patient and determine a life-long oncological electronic patient record. The trend, however, goes to the systemic integration of single applications and services into clinical information systems with a telemedicine approach. Although past evaluations of telemedicine applications and services have shown very positive results, only the right financial funding determines their survival and wide-spread usability in daily routine medical use. Formerly identifiable barriers for this use nowadays can be overcome more easily.

  2. Important advances in oncology 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 15 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Immunoglobulin and T-Cell Receptor Genes Reveal the Clonality, Lineage, and Translocations of Lymphoid Neoplasms; Patterns of Proto-Oncogene Expression: A Novel Approach to the Development of Tumor Markers; and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Oncology.

  3. Frontiers in robot-assisted retroperitoneal oncological surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Wesley W; Gorin, Michael A; Pierorazio, Phillip M; Allaf, Mohamad E

    2017-12-01

    Robot assistance has been rapidly adopted by urological surgeons and has become particularly popular for oncological procedures involving the retroperitoneal space. The wide dissemination of robot assistance probably reflects the limited amount of operating space available within the retroperitoneum and the advantages provided by robot-assisted approaches, including 3D imaging, wristed instrumentation and the shorter learning curve compared with that associated with the equivalent laparoscopic techniques. Surgical procedures that have traditionally been performed using an open or laparoscopic approach, such as partial nephrectomy, radical nephrectomy, retroperitoneal lymph node dissection, nephroureterectomy and adrenalectomy, are now often being performed using robot assistance. The frontiers of robot-assisted retroperitoneal oncological surgery are constantly expanding, with an emphasis on maintaining oncological and functional outcomes, while minimizing the level of surgical invasiveness.

  4. [Music therapy in oncology--concepts and review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jens-Peter; Brandt, Kerstin; Weis, Joachim

    2004-12-01

    The following article is addresses the applications and functions of music therapy in the acute and rehabilitative phases of treatment of adult cancer patients. It is based on a literature review with a focus on the state of empirical research in the oncology sector of music therapy and consequences for the concepts of music therapy. First the basic aspects of music therapy treatment are explained to clarify the different research methods and to examine the special demands of oncology patients. Furthermore, a brief summary of the approaches of music therapy research in the most renowned educational institutions in Germany are outlined. The results of the studies and case histories are summarized and evaluated and provide the basis for the conclusions and recommendations for the music therapeutic practice in oncology.

  5. Using big data for quality assessment in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughman, James R; Chen, Ronald C

    2016-05-01

    There is increasing attention in the US healthcare system on the delivery of high-quality care, an issue central to oncology. In the report 'Crossing the Quality Chasm', the Institute of Medicine identified six aims for improving healthcare quality: safe, effective, patient-centered, timely, efficient and equitable. This article describes how current big data resources can be used to assess these six dimensions, and provides examples of published studies in oncology. Strengths and limitations of current big data resources for the evaluation of quality of care are also discussed. Finally, this article outlines a vision where big data can be used not only to retrospectively assess the quality of oncologic care, but help physicians deliver high-quality care in real time.

  6. Machine learning in radiation oncology theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    El Naqa, Issam; Murphy, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    ​This book provides a complete overview of the role of machine learning in radiation oncology and medical physics, covering basic theory, methods, and a variety of applications in medical physics and radiotherapy. An introductory section explains machine learning, reviews supervised and unsupervised learning methods, discusses performance evaluation, and summarizes potential applications in radiation oncology. Detailed individual sections are then devoted to the use of machine learning in quality assurance; computer-aided detection, including treatment planning and contouring; image-guided rad

  7. Communication Skills Training in Pediatric Oncology: Moving Beyond Role Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feraco, Angela M; Brand, Sarah R; Mack, Jennifer W; Kesselheim, Jennifer C; Block, Susan D; Wolfe, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    Communication is central to pediatric oncology care. Pediatric oncologists disclose life-threatening diagnoses, explain complicated treatment options, and endeavor to give honest prognoses, to maintain hope, to describe treatment complications, and to support families in difficult circumstances ranging from loss of function and fertility to treatment-related or disease-related death. However, parents, patients, and providers report substantial communication deficits. Poor communication outcomes may stem, in part, from insufficient communication skills training, overreliance on role modeling, and failure to utilize best practices. This review summarizes evidence for existing methods to enhance communication skills and calls for revitalizing communication skills training within pediatric oncology. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Cardio-oncology: The Role of Big Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandawat, Anant; Williams, Andrew E; Francis, Sanjeev A

    2017-04-01

    Despite its challenges, a "big data" approach offers a unique opportunity within the field of cardio-oncology. A pharmacovigilant approach using large data sets can help characterize cardiovascular toxicities of the rapidly expanding armamentarium of targeted therapies. Creating a broad coalition of data sharing can provide insights into the incidence of cardiotoxicity and stimulate research into the underlying mechanisms. Population health necessitates the use of big data and can help inform public health interventions to prevent both cancer and cardiovascular disease. As a relatively new discipline, cardio-oncology is poised to take advantage of big data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [NEURO-ONCOLOGY A NEW FIELD IN DAVIDOFF CANCER CENTER AT RABIN MEDICAL CENTER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Limon, Dror; Abu-Shkara, Ramez; Siegal, Tali

    2017-08-01

    Neuro-oncology is a subspecialty attracting physicians from medical disciplines such as neurology, neurosurgery, pediatrics, oncology, and radiotherapy. It deals with diagnosis and management of primary brain tumors, as well as metastatic and non-metastatic neurological manifestations that frequently affect cancer patients including brain metastases, paraneoplastic syndromes and neurological complications of cancer treatment. A neuro-oncology unit was established in Davidoff Cancer Center at Rabin Medical Center. It provides a multidisciplinary team approach for management of brain tumors and services, such as expert outpatient clinics and inpatient consultations for the departments of oncology, hematology, bone marrow transplantation and other departments in the Rabin Medical Center. In addition, expert consultation is frequently provided to other hospitals that treat cancer patients with neurological manifestations. The medical disciplines that closely collaborate for the daily management of neuro-oncology patients include radiotherapy, hematology, oncology, neuro-surgery, neuro-radiology and neuro-pathology. The neuro-oncology center is also involved in clinical and laboratory research conducted in collaboration with researchers in Israel and abroad. The new service contributes substantially to the improved care of cancer patients and to the advance of research topics in the field of neuro-oncology.

  10. [Glamour and poverty of oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorlícek, J

    2004-10-01

    The problematics of oncology is staying at the fore of the health problems in our republic. Every third of us falls ill with malignant tumour and every fourth dies of it. There were 37,000 malignant tumours diagnosed in our republic in 1977, in 1999 it was 59,500 and the amount is expected to increase up to 70,000 in 2004. Our results regarding the relative 5-year survival of the patients with all the oncologic diagnoses from 15 to 44 years are below European average. The most frequent tumour is lung cancer and bronchial cancer in males, breast cancer in females and the most frequent malignant tumour in both sexes is the colorectal cancer, the absolute rate of which has unambiguously the leading position. Czech republic stands at the forefront in Europe as for the incidence of all the tumours except the skin tumours. Among all the European males it is just Czech males who have a large probability of colorectal cancer. Moreover, regarding malignant renal cancer our republic is in the first position in both males and females. What do these epidemiologic dates imply? The risk of the development of malignant disease imminently endangers each of us. For Czech republic the malignant disease constitutes a big load as personal hardship and disability, increased need for hospital bed capacities and consequent increased economic costs. In 2003, the Czech oncologic society of Czech medical company of J. E. Purkyne created the National oncologic programme (NOP) of the Czech republic. Further there are named its aims, strategy and tasks. In the conclusion we mention what is the "glamour" and the "poverty" of oncology.

  11. Apps for Radiation Oncology. A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero, J J; Oton, L F; Oton, C A

    2017-02-01

    Software applications executed on a smart-phone or mobile device ("Apps") are increasingly used by oncologists in their daily work. A comprehensive critical review was conducted on Apps specifically designed for Radiation Oncology, which aims to provide scientific support for these tools and to guide users in choosing the most suited to their needs. A systematic search was conducted in mobile platforms, iOS and Android, returning 157 Apps. Excluding those whose purpose did not match the scope of the study, 31 Apps were methodically analyzed by the following items: Objective Features, List of Functionalities, Consistency in Outcomes and Usability. Apps are presented in groups of features, as Dose Calculators (7 Apps), Clinical Calculators (4), Tools for Staging (7), Multipurpose (7) and Others (6). Each App is presented with the list of attributes and a brief comment. A short summary is provided at the end of each group. There are numerous Apps with useful tools at the disposal of radiation oncologists. The most advisable Apps do not match the more expensive. Three all-in-one apps seem advisable above all: RadOnc Reference (in English), Easy Oncology (in German) and iOncoR (in Spanish). Others recommendations are suggested for specific tasks: dose calculators, treatment-decision and staging. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Apps for Radiation Oncology. A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.J. Calero

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Software applications executed on a smart-phone or mobile device (“Apps” are increasingly used by oncologists in their daily work. A comprehensive critical review was conducted on Apps specifically designed for Radiation Oncology, which aims to provide scientific support for these tools and to guide users in choosing the most suited to their needs. Material and methods: A systematic search was conducted in mobile platforms, iOS and Android, returning 157 Apps. Excluding those whose purpose did not match the scope of the study, 31 Apps were methodically analyzed by the following items: Objective Features, List of Functionalities, Consistency in Outcomes and Usability. Results: Apps are presented in groups of features, as Dose Calculators (7 Apps, Clinical Calculators (4, Tools for Staging (7, Multipurpose (7 and Others (6. Each App is presented with the list of attributes and a brief comment. A short summary is provided at the end of each group. Discussion and Recommendations: There are numerous Apps with useful tools at the disposal of radiation oncologists. The most advisable Apps do not match the more expensive. Three all-in-one apps seem advisable above all: RadOnc Reference (in English, Easy Oncology (in German and iOncoR (in Spanish. Others recommendations are suggested for specific tasks: dose calculators, treatment-decision and staging.

  13. [Geriatric intervention in oncology for elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Jean, O; LeGuen, J

    2015-10-01

    Half of all cancers occur in patients older than 70 years. National cancer plans in France promote the emergence of geriatric oncology, whose aim is that every elder cancer patient receives a pertinent treatment, according to his frailty. Geriatric intervention has been evaluated in various conditions or patients since 30 years. Meta-analysis has shown the benefits on autonomy and mortality. But benefits are related to the organization of geriatric care, especially when integrated care is provided. Literature on geriatric oncology is relatively poor. But it is certain that a geriatric comprehensive assessment provided a lot of important information for the care of cancer patients, leading to a modification of cancer treatment in many cases. Randomized trials will soon begin to evaluate the benefits of geriatric integrated care for elder cancer patients, in terms of mortality and quality of life. Actually, in oncogeriatic coordination units, pilot organizations are developed for the satisfaction of patients and professionals. Copyright © 2015 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Methodological considerations in quantification of oncological FDG PET studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriens, D.; Visser, E.P.; Geus-Oei, L.F. de; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: This review aims to provide insight into the factors that influence quantification of glucose metabolism by FDG PET images in oncology as well as their influence on repeated measures studies (i.e. treatment response assessment), offering improved understanding both for clinical practice and

  15. Evolution of health technology assessment: best practices of the pan-Canadian Oncology Drug Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocchi A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Angela Rocchi,1 Isabelle Chabot,2 Judith Glennie3 1Athena Research Inc., Burlington, ON, 2EvAccess Inc., Vaudreuil-Dorion, QC, 3JL Glennie Consulting Inc., Aurora, ON, Canada Background: In 2007, Canada chose to develop a separate and distinct path for oncology drug health technology assessment (HTA. In 2013, the decision was made to transfer the pan-Canadian Oncology Drug Review (pCODR to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH, to align the pCODR and CADTH Common Drug Review processes while building on the best practices of both. The objective of this research was to conduct an examination of the best practices established by the pCODR. Methods: A qualitative research approach was taken to assess the policies, processes, and practices of the pCODR, based on internationally accepted best practice “principles” in HTA, with a particular focus on stakeholder engagement. Publicly available information regarding the approach of the pCODR was used to gauge the agency's performance against these principles. In addition, stakeholder observations and real-world experiences were gathered through key informant interviews to be inclusive of perspectives from patient advocacy groups, provincial and/or cancer agency decision-makers, community and academic oncologists, industry, expert committee members, and health economists. Results: This analysis indicated that, through the pCODR, oncology stakeholders have had a voice in and have come to trust the quality and relevance of oncology HTA as a vital tool to ensure the best decisions for Canadians with cancer and their health care system. It could be expected that adoption of the principles and processes of the pCODR would bring a similar level of engagement and trust to other HTA organizations in Canada and elsewhere. Conclusion: The results of this research led to recommendations for improvement and potential extrapolation of these best practices to other HTA organizations

  16. Oncological Outcome of Oncoplastic Breast Surgery: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massoome Najafi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS has gained widespread acceptance during the last two decades as an integral component of breast cancer surgery. OBS combines oncological principles of breast cancer surgery with plastic surgery techniques to provide the best cosmetic results without compromising oncological outcome of breast cancer treatment and it has opened up the possibility to perform breast conservation in large tumors.The purpose of this review is assessment of the oncological outcome of OBS in the treatment of breast cancer. We performed an extensive search of PubMed for articles published on oncological results and safety of OBS. There are few randomized clinical trials (RCTs comparing the results of OBS with standard breast conservation techniques; however, based on the results of several prospective studies, it can be concluded that in terms of oncological outcome, OBS is at least as safe as standard techniques for breast conservation.

  17. Oncology Nurses' Use of the Internet for Continuing Education: A Survey of Oncology Nursing Society Congress Attendees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Susan C.; Baird, Susan B.

    1999-01-01

    A survey to determine whether oncology nurses (n=670) use the Internet and for what purpose revealed that they use it for drug information, literature searches, academic information, patient education, and continuing education. Results suggest that continuing-education providers should pursue the Internet as a means of meeting the need for quick,…

  18. Tracking the 2015 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium: bridging cancer biology to clinical gastrointestinal oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprile G

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Aprile,1 Francesco Leone,2,3 Riccardo Giampieri,4 Mariaelena Casagrande,1 Donatella Marino,2,3 Luca Faloppi,4 Stefano Cascinu,4 Gianpiero Fasola,1 Mario Scartozzi5,6 1Department of Oncology, University and General Hospital, Udine, Italy; 2Medical Oncology Department, University of Turin, 3Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo, Turin, Italy; 4Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Ospedali Riuniti, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; 5Medical Oncology Department, University of Cagliari, 6General Hospital, Cagliari, Italy Abstract: The 2015 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium (San Francisco, CA, USA; January 15–17 is the world-class conference co-sponsored by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Society for Radiation Oncology, the American Gastroenterological Association Institute, and the Society of Surgical Oncology, in which the most innovative research results in digestive tract oncology are presented and discussed. In its twelfth edition, the meeting has provided new insights focusing on the underpinning biology and clinical management of gastrointestinal malignancies. More than 3,400 health care professionals gathered from all over the world to share their experiences on how to bridge the recent novelties in cancer biology with everyday medical practice. In this article, the authors report on the most significant advances, didactically moving on three different anatomic tracks: gastroesophageal malignancies, pancreatic and biliary cancers, and colorectal adenocarcinomas. Keywords: colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, ramucirumab, pembrolizumab, target therapy, onartuzumab, AMG 337

  19. Perceptions, attitudes, and experiences of hematology/oncology fellows toward incorporating geriatrics in their training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiore, Ronald J; Gorawara-Bhat, Rita; Levine, Stacie K; Dale, William

    2014-01-01

    The aging of the U.S. population continues to highlight emerging issues in providing care generally for older adults and specifically for older adults with cancer. The majority of patients with cancer in the U.S. are currently 65 years of age or older; therefore, training and research in geriatrics and geriatric oncology are viewed to be integral in meeting the needs of this vulnerable population. Yet, the ways to develop and integrate best geriatrics training within the context of hematology/oncology fellowship remain unclear. Toward this end, the current study seeks to evaluate the prior and current geriatric experiences and perspectives of hematology/oncology fellows. To gain insight into these experiences, focus groups of hematology/oncology fellows were conducted. Emergent themes included: 1) perceived lack of formal geriatric oncology didactics among fellows; 2) a considerable amount of variability exists in pre-fellowship geriatric experiences; 3) shared desire to participate in a geriatric oncology-based clinic; 4) differences across training levels in confidence in managing older adults with cancer; and 5) identification of specific criteria on how best to approach older adults with cancer in a particular clinical scenario. The present findings will help guide future studies in evaluating geriatrics among hematology/oncology fellows across institutions. They will also have implications in the development of geriatrics curricula and competencies specific to hematology/oncology training. © 2013.

  20. Selection of oncology medicines in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazargani, Y T; de Boer, A; Schellens, J H M; Leufkens, H G M; Mantel-Teeuwisse, A K

    2014-01-01

    High cancer mortality rates in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) have raised concerns regarding access to oncology medicines. Essential medicines are those which satisfy the primary health care needs and provide a basis for public procurement or reimbursement decisions in LMICs. We explored selection of oncology medicines in LMICs through investigating national essential medicines lists (NEMLs) for cancer treatments. Recently updated NEMLs were retrieved for 76 countries. Oncology medicines were classified based on therapeutic categories. Countries were clustered based on geographic regions, income levels and burden of cancer (mortality and morbidity). Indicators of frequency (number of medicines), diversity (number of therapeutic (sub)categories) and more importantly absence were measured and compared across countries using parametric and nonparametric tests. The overall median number of oncology medicines on NEMLs was 16 (interquartile range = 23) chosen predominantly from subcategories of 'antineoplastic agents', with substantial variation across regions and income groups. Five countries did not select any oncology medicine and 68% did not have any 'hormones and related agents' on their NEMLs. Newer technologies like targeted therapies were infrequently incorporated. The cluster of countries suffering most from the burden of cancer selected more essential oncology medicines and diversified further. The observed selection of oncology essential medicines can reflect insufficiencies and inequalities in access to cancer treatments at least in the public sector of LMICs. Further resources need to be allocated from governments and international organizations to tackle the problem of access to oncology medicines in these countries.

  1. [Strategies for improving care of oncologic patients: SHARE Project results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reñones Crego, María de la Concepción; Fernández Pérez, Dolores; Vena Fernández, Carmen; Zamudio Sánchez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Cancer treatment is a major burden for the patient and its family that requires an individualized management by healthcare professionals. Nurses are in charge of coordinating care and are the closest healthcare professionals to patient and family; however, in Spain, there are not standard protocols yet for the management of oncology patients. The Spanish Oncology Nursing Society developed between 2012 and 2014 the SHARE project, with the aim of establishing strategies to improve quality of life and nursing care in oncology patients. It was developed in 3 phases. First, a literature search and review was performed to identify nursing strategies, interventions and tools to improve cancer patients' care. At the second stage, these interventions were agreed within a group of oncology nursing experts; and at the third phase, a different group of experts in oncology care categorized the interventions to identify the ones with highest priority and most feasible to be implemented. As a result, 3 strategic actions were identified to improve nursing care during cancer treatment: To provide a named nurse to carry out the follow up process by attending to the clinic or telephonic consultation, develop therapeutic education with adapted protocols for each tumor type and treatment and ensure specific training for nurses on the management of the cancer patients. Strategic actions proposed in this paper aim to improve cancer patients' healthcare and quality of life through the development of advanced nursing roles based on a higher level of autonomy, situating nurses as care coordinators to assure an holistic care in oncology patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Reorganisation of Oncologic Care in Greece: A Proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouilides Christos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is becoming a major public health issue as patients enjoy longer survivals than ever before due to the introduction innovative but expensive drugs in the clinic. In addition, the ageing of the population in Greece is expected to increase the absolute incidence of cancer. The National Health System should rapidly and efficiently adapt to the new challenges, including increased pharmaceutical costs. Resources ought to be allocated rationally and efficiently while maintaining adequate coverage for the insured population. Economising due to large-scale operations should be pursued by the governmental single payor (EOPYY, so that affordable coverage remains feasible. Establishment of mechanisms to deal with new and very costly drugs should be put in place. The major changes in anchor oncologic hospitals are needed in order to play a role as regional leaders in oncologic care, including merging of similar divisions, subspecialisation of services and promotion of clinical research. These major centres could coordinate a host of satellite oncology services in other urban hospitals and in the provinces. In addition, joint operations in training and patient care should be pursued with major private centres, without mutual mistrust or obsolete inflexibilities. The current financial crisis represents an excellent opportunity for revisioning and restructuring oncologic care in Greece, taking into account the societal needs and based on flexibility and efficiency.

  3. Navigation in musculoskeletal oncology: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Vernon Morris

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Navigation in surgery has increasingly become more commonplace. The use of this technological advancement has enabled ever more complex and detailed surgery to be performed to the benefit of surgeons and patients alike. This is particularly so when applying the use of navigation within the field of orthopedic oncology. The developments in computer processing power coupled with the improvements in scanning technologies have permitted the incorporation of navigational procedures into day-to-day practice. A comprehensive search of PubMed using the search terms “navigation”, “orthopaedic” and “oncology” yielded 97 results. After filtering for English language papers, excluding spinal surgery and review articles, this resulted in 38 clinical studies and case reports. These were analyzed in detail by the authors (GM and JS and the most relevant papers reviewed. We have sought to provide an overview of the main types of navigation systems currently available within orthopedic oncology and to assess some of the evidence behind its use.

  4. Nuclear medical oncology; Nuklearmedizinische Onkologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Bernd J.; Buck, Andreas K.; Schwaiger, Markus (eds.) [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik

    2007-07-01

    Modern nuclear oncology is based on molecular imaging techniques and radiotherapy. The book is aimed to integrate efficiently nuclear medical diagnostics and therapy into oncologic patient management. The book covers the following topics: Chapter 1: basics: instrumentation (SPECT, PET, PET/CT), digital image processing, radiopharmaceuticals, radiation protection, nuclear medical dosimetry, radiotherapy planning. Chapter 2: diagnostics: PET and PET/CT, skeleton metastases diagnostics, lymphoma diagnostics in case of mammary carcinomas and malign melanoma, MIBG (metaiodobenzylguanidin) diagnostics. Chapter 3: therapy: Radiotherapy of thyroid carcinomas, radioimmunotherapy of malign melanomas and in haematology, MIBG therapy, radiotherapy of neuroendocrine tumors, radiotherapy of skeleton metastases, intercavitary and locoregional therapy, 32{sup 3}2 phosphor therapy of polycythaemia vera.

  5. [Comorbidity oriented oncology - an overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanek, Ralph; Wuensch, Michael; Edlinger, Roland; Hammerl-Ferrari, Bernhard; Kramer, Ludwig; Geissler, Klaus

    2010-04-01

    Increasing life expectancy results in an increased number of elderly cancer patients. Comorbidities and functional impairment influence the patient's course of disease and the choice of antineoplastic treatment. The Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) supports the appraisal of the patient's individual health characteristics, especially due to the fact that chronologic age does not always correlate with the patient's health. Next to the appraisal of comorbidities and functional impairment, nutritional state, cognitive impairment, psychological state, social support, quality of life and the patient's medication are recorded. The Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) recommends the CGA in cancer patients older than seventy years. While planning a systemic antineoplastic therapy, renal, hepatic, cardiac and bone marrow insufficiencies have to be considered. Renal and hepatic impairment often cause in dose reduced antineoplastic treatment, whereas in patients with cardiac insufficiency liposomale substances and in patients with decreased bone marrow function growth factors are available. Additionally to the oncological treatment, an early involvement of palliative care specialists should be considered.

  6. A model for rural oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heifetz, Laurence J; Christensen, Scott D; Devere-White, Ralph W; Meyers, Fredrick J

    2011-05-01

    Small rural hospitals in the United States have had challenging issues developing sustainable oncology programs. This is a report on the development of a successful rural oncology program. In 2006, the Tahoe Forest Health System in Truckee, CA, a remote mountain resort town, started a cancer program that was focused on addressing patient and family fears that are common to all cancer patients but more frightening in the rural setting. Four years later, it is a thriving program with significant community support, a creative academic affiliation, and a central focus of the future of the hospital. The Tahoe Forest Cancer Center developed a sustainable model for high quality cancer care that overcomes geographic, cultural and financial barriers. This structure may serve as a model for national rural health care.

  7. Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Endometrial Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Evidence-Based Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Larissa A; Bohlke, Kari; Powell, Matthew A; Fader, Amanda N; Franklin, Gregg E; Lee, Larissa J; Matei, Daniela; Coallier, Lourie; Wright, Alexi A

    2015-09-10

    To provide guidance on the role of adjuvant radiation therapy in the treatment of endometrial cancer. "The Role of Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Endometrial Cancer: An ASTRO Evidence-Based Guideline" by Klopp et al, published in 2014 in Practical Radiation Oncology, was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) guideline content and recommendations were further reviewed by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Endorsement Panel. The ASCO Endorsement Panel determined that the recommendations from the ASTRO guideline are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. ASCO endorsed the ASTRO guideline with several qualifying statements. Surveillance without adjuvant radiation therapy is a reasonable option for women without residual disease in the hysterectomy specimen and for women with grade 1 or 2 cancer and Endorsement Panel added qualifying statements to the ASTRO recommendations to provide stronger statements in favor of chemotherapy (with or without radiation therapy). © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  8. Telemedicine in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle-Lindrud, Susan

    2016-02-01

    For patients who have difficulty traveling to a clinic or doctor's office because of living in a remote location or lack of transportation, increasing opportunities exist to access health care remotely. Telemedicine is a growing field that has potential benefits for patients, providers, and the healthcare system.
.

  9. Comparison of experienced burnout symptoms in specialist oncology nurses working in hospital oncology units or in hospices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostacoli, Luca; Cavallo, Marco; Zuffranieri, Marco; Negro, Manuela; Sguazzotti, Erica; Picci, Rocco Luigi; Tempia, Patrizia; La Ciura, Pietro; Furlan, Pier Maria

    2010-12-01

    This study aimed to clarify the differential contributions of situational and individual factors to burnout symptoms experienced by two independent groups of specialist oncology nurses working in oncology hospital units or in hospices. The study involved a group of specialist oncology nurses working in hospital oncology units (n = 59) and a group of specialist oncology nurses working in hospices (n = 33). Participants were invited to provide demographic data, and indicate the clinical setting in which they worked and their work experience; the Italian versions of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) (a measure of burnout symptoms), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) (a measure of anxiety and depression), and the Attachment Style Questionnaire (ASQ) (a measure of relational style) were then administered. The two groups of nurses were well matched for age, work experience, and levels of anxiety and depression. Regarding their relational style, the two groups only differed significantly on two subscales of the ASQ (i.e. "Confidence" and "Relationships as Secondary"). The two groups significantly differed in the levels of all burnout symptoms investigated (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal achievement), with nurses working in hospital units showing higher levels of burnout symptoms. Interestingly, multivariate regression analyses showed that the institutional factor (clinical setting in which nurses worked) clearly emerged as the only factor that influenced the level of all burnout symptoms, whereas the contribution of individual factors was less significant. These findings help to clarify the differential contributions of institutional and individual factors to burnout symptoms in specialist oncology nurses, and corroborate the need for interventions to contain nurses' burnout symptoms.

  10. Perspectives on making big data analytics work for oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Naqa, Issam

    2016-12-01

    Oncology, with its unique combination of clinical, physical, technological, and biological data provides an ideal case study for applying big data analytics to improve cancer treatment safety and outcomes. An oncology treatment course such as chemoradiotherapy can generate a large pool of information carrying the 5Vs hallmarks of big data. This data is comprised of a heterogeneous mixture of patient demographics, radiation/chemo dosimetry, multimodality imaging features, and biological markers generated over a treatment period that can span few days to several weeks. Efforts using commercial and in-house tools are underway to facilitate data aggregation, ontology creation, sharing, visualization and varying analytics in a secure environment. However, open questions related to proper data structure representation and effective analytics tools to support oncology decision-making need to be addressed. It is recognized that oncology data constitutes a mix of structured (tabulated) and unstructured (electronic documents) that need to be processed to facilitate searching and subsequent knowledge discovery from relational or NoSQL databases. In this context, methods based on advanced analytics and image feature extraction for oncology applications will be discussed. On the other hand, the classical p (variables)≫n (samples) inference problem of statistical learning is challenged in the Big data realm and this is particularly true for oncology applications where p-omics is witnessing exponential growth while the number of cancer incidences has generally plateaued over the past 5-years leading to a quasi-linear growth in samples per patient. Within the Big data paradigm, this kind of phenomenon may yield undesirable effects such as echo chamber anomalies, Yule-Simpson reversal paradox, or misleading ghost analytics. In this work, we will present these effects as they pertain to oncology and engage small thinking methodologies to counter these effects ranging from

  11. Using the New ASCO Clinical Practice Guideline for Palliative Care Concurrent With Oncology Care Using the TEAM Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cardinale B; Phillips, Tanyanika; Smith, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    Palliative care alongside usual oncology care is now recommended by ASCO as the standard of care for any patient with advanced cancer on the basis of multiple randomized trials that show better results with concurrent care than with usual oncology care. Some benefits include better quality of life, better symptom management, reduced anxiety and depression, less caregiver distress, more accordance of care with the wishes of the patient, and less aggressive end-of-life care. Several studies show a survival advantage of several months, and many show considerable cost savings: better care at an affordable cost. However, there are not enough palliative care specialists available, so oncologists must practice exemplary primary palliative care. Protocols used in the clinical trials, similar to those designed for new chemotherapy agents, help oncologists use the TEAM approach of extra time, typically an hour a month spent with the palliative care team; education, especially about prognostic awareness and realistic options, which include formal setting of goals of care and discussion of advance directives; formal assessments for symptoms and for spiritual and psychosocial health; and management by an interdisciplinary team. These are all potentially accomplished by an oncology practice to replicate the services provided by concurrent palliative care.

  12. EPEC-O Self-Study - Plenary 1 - Gaps in Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The first plenary of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study Original Version provides background for the curriculum and identifies gaps in current and desired comprehensive cancer care.

  13. [Definition and outline on geriatric oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terret, C; Droz, J-P

    2009-11-01

    Geriatric oncology is the concept for management of elderly cancer patients. It is an equal approach of the health status problems and of cancer in a patient considered as a whole. Therefore it is not a subspecialty but a practice which can be translated in the elderly cancer patient's care. The treatment of cancer is based on the same principles than this of younger patients; recommendations used are those of the scientific oncological societies. Health problems of elderly patients are screened by specific tools. Patients without major health problems are managed by the oncological team in the routine; those for whom screening have demonstrated problems are first evaluated in the geriatrics setting and then oncological decisions are adapted to the patient situation. Decisions are made in specific geriatric oncology conferences. Specific clinical trials are required to build an Evidence Based Medicine background. Geriatric oncology teaching programs are warranted. (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of the Key Fields and Their Key Technical Points of Oncology by Patent Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Zhang

    Full Text Available This paper aims to identify the key fields and their key technical points of oncology by patent analysis.Patents of oncology applied from 2006 to 2012 were searched in the Thomson Innovation database. The key fields and their key technical points were determined by analyzing the Derwent Classification (DC and the International Patent Classification (IPC, respectively. Patent applications in the top ten DC occupied 80% of all the patent applications of oncology, which were the ten fields of oncology to be analyzed. The number of patent applications in these ten fields of oncology was standardized based on patent applications of oncology from 2006 to 2012. For each field, standardization was conducted separately for each of the seven years (2006-2012 and the mean of the seven standardized values was calculated to reflect the relative amount of patent applications in that field; meanwhile, regression analysis using time (year and the standardized values of patent applications in seven years (2006-2012 was conducted so as to evaluate the trend of patent applications in each field. Two-dimensional quadrant analysis, together with the professional knowledge of oncology, was taken into consideration in determining the key fields of oncology. The fields located in the quadrant with high relative amount or increasing trend of patent applications are identified as key ones. By using the same method, the key technical points in each key field were identified. Altogether 116,820 patents of oncology applied from 2006 to 2012 were retrieved, and four key fields with twenty-nine key technical points were identified, including "natural products and polymers" with nine key technical points, "fermentation industry" with twelve ones, "electrical medical equipment" with four ones, and "diagnosis, surgery" with four ones.The results of this study could provide guidance on the development direction of oncology, and also help researchers broaden innovative ideas and

  15. Identification of the Key Fields and Their Key Technical Points of Oncology by Patent Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Chen, Juan; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to identify the key fields and their key technical points of oncology by patent analysis. Patents of oncology applied from 2006 to 2012 were searched in the Thomson Innovation database. The key fields and their key technical points were determined by analyzing the Derwent Classification (DC) and the International Patent Classification (IPC), respectively. Patent applications in the top ten DC occupied 80% of all the patent applications of oncology, which were the ten fields of oncology to be analyzed. The number of patent applications in these ten fields of oncology was standardized based on patent applications of oncology from 2006 to 2012. For each field, standardization was conducted separately for each of the seven years (2006-2012) and the mean of the seven standardized values was calculated to reflect the relative amount of patent applications in that field; meanwhile, regression analysis using time (year) and the standardized values of patent applications in seven years (2006-2012) was conducted so as to evaluate the trend of patent applications in each field. Two-dimensional quadrant analysis, together with the professional knowledge of oncology, was taken into consideration in determining the key fields of oncology. The fields located in the quadrant with high relative amount or increasing trend of patent applications are identified as key ones. By using the same method, the key technical points in each key field were identified. Altogether 116,820 patents of oncology applied from 2006 to 2012 were retrieved, and four key fields with twenty-nine key technical points were identified, including "natural products and polymers" with nine key technical points, "fermentation industry" with twelve ones, "electrical medical equipment" with four ones, and "diagnosis, surgery" with four ones. The results of this study could provide guidance on the development direction of oncology, and also help researchers broaden innovative ideas and discover new

  16. Paediatric radiation oncology in the care of childhood cancer: A position paper by the International Paediatric Radiation Oncology Society (PROS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Freeman, Carolyn; Marcus, Karen; Claude, Line; Dieckmann, Karin; Halperin, Edward; Esiashvili, Natia; Paulino, Arnold; Mahajan, Anita; Seiersen, Klaus; Ahern, Verity; Ricardi, Umberto; Carrie, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Paediatric malignancies are a challenge for the radiation oncologist due to their rarity, the great variety of histological types, and the complexity of treatment concepts that evolve over time. The Paediatric Radiation Oncology Society (PROS) is the only internationally operating society for paediatric radiation oncology. The objectives of PROS are to set a world-wide standard of excellence with respect to radiation oncology aspects in curing children and adolescents with cancer, to provide a forum for communication between radiation oncologists, and to exchange information with all professionals involved in the management of paediatric and adolescent cancer. Challenges include the need to promote education and support practice in low and middle income countries (LMIC) as well as the cost and availability of modern treatment technologies for all but most especially these countries. Collaborations with other societies that include for example the education programmes provided jointly with ESTRO, and the upgraded technical platform of the PROS web site offer new possibilities to enhance the efficacy of PROS in education and support of paediatric radiation oncology practice world-wide. PROS has made an important contribution to the management of childhood malignancies over the past decade and new and developing collaborations between PROS and other societies or organizations will ultimately lead to a reduction in world-wide health care inequalities. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Assessment of Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies in Oncology: Summary of the Oncology Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, James N.; Jacobson, Joseph O.; Vogel, Wendy H.; Griffith, Niesha; Wariabharaj, Darshan; Garg, Rekha; Zon, Robin; Stephens, Cyntha L.; Bialecki, Alison M.; Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Allen, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    To address oncology community stakeholder concerns regarding implementation of the Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS) program, ASCO sponsored a workshop to gather REMS experiences from representatives of professional societies, patient organizations, pharmaceutical companies, and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Stakeholder presentations and topical panel discussions addressed REMS program development, implementation processes, and practice experiences, as well as oncology drug safety processes. A draft REMS decision tool prepared by the ASCO REMS Steering Committee was presented for group discussion with facilitated, goal-oriented feedback. The workshop identified several unintended consequences resulting from current oncology REMS: (1) the release of personal health information to drug sponsors as a condition for gaining access to a needed drug; (2) risk information that is not tailored—and therefore not accessible—to all literacy levels; (3) exclusive focus on drug risk, thereby affecting patient-provider treatment discussion; (4) REMS elements that do not consider existing, widely practiced oncology safety standards, professional training, and experience; and (5) administrative burdens that divert the health care team from direct patient care activities and, in some cases, could limit patient access to important therapies. Increased provider and professional society participation should form the basis of ongoing and future REMS standardization discussions with the FDA to work toward overall improvement of risk communication. PMID:23814522

  18. Robotics in urologic oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Saurabh; Gautam, Gagan

    2015-01-01

    Robotic surgery was initially developed to overcome problems faced during conventional laparoscopic surgeries and to perform telesurgery at distant locations. It has now established itself as the epitome of minimally invasive surgery (MIS). It is one of the most significant advances in MIS in recent years and is considered by many as a revolutionary technology, capable of influencing the future of surgery. After its introduction to urology, robotic surgery has redefined the management of urological malignancies. It promises to make difficult urological surgeries easier, safer and more acceptable to both the surgeon and the patient. Robotic surgery is slowly, but surely establishing itself in India. In this article, we provide an overview of the advantages, disadvantages, current status, and future applications of robotic surgery for urologic cancers in the context of the Indian scenario.

  19. Graduate education in oncology nursing for minorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houldin, Arlene D; Reville, Barbara; Boland, Barbara A; Jacobs, Linda A; Hayes, Sandra L

    2002-01-01

    Cancer statistics reveal disturbing morbidity and mortality rates among minorities, especially African Americans. A program to recruit and train minority nurses as Oncology Advanced Practice Nurses was developed at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. Since 1992, 30 African American, five Asian/Pacific Islander, and five Hispanic nurses have been supported during advanced oncology nursing study. Graduates have assumed positions of clinical and academic leadership in oncology nursing. This project strengthened the ability of a graduate program in oncology nursing to respond to needs related to the education of minority students and to the care of minority populations with cancer.

  20. Impact of industry collaboration on randomised controlled trials in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, Anne; Yang, Annie; Roper, Nitin; Whitaker, Evans; Korenstein, Deborah

    2017-02-01

    Industry funders can simply provide money or collaborate in trial design, analysis or reporting of clinical trials. Our aim was to assess the impact of industry collaboration on trial methodology and results of randomised controlled trials (RCT). We searched PubMed for oncology RCTs published May 2013 to December 2015 in peer-reviewed journals with impact factor > 5 requiring reporting of funder role. Two authors extracted methodologic (primary end-point; blinding of the patient, clinician and outcomes assessor; and analysis) and outcome data. We used descriptive statistics and two-sided Fisher exact tests to compare characteristics of trials with collaboration, with industry funding only, and without industry funding. We included 224 trials. Compared to those without industry funding, trials with collaboration used more placebo control (RR 3·59, 95% CI [1·88-6·83], p industry collaboration were more likely to use some high-quality methods than those without industry funding, with similar rates of positive results. Our findings suggest that collaboration is not associated with trial outcomes and that mandatory disclosure of funder roles may mitigate bias. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. What does it mean to be an oncology nurse? Reexamining the life cycle concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Marlene Z; Ferrell, Betty R; Vrabel, Mark; Visovsky, Constance; Schaefer, Brandi

    2010-09-01

    To summarize the current research pertaining to the concepts initially examined by the Oncology Nursing Society Life Cycle of the Oncology Nurse Task Force and related projects completed in 1994. Published articles on the 21 concepts from the Oncology Nursing Society Life Cycle of the Oncology Nurse Task Force work. Research published in English from 1995-2009 was obtained from PubMed, CINAHL(R), PsycINFO, ISI Science, and EBSCO Health Source(R): Nursing/Academic Edition databases. Most of the concepts identified from the Oncology Nursing Society Life Cycle of the Oncology Nurse Task Force have been examined in the literature. Relationships and witnessing suffering were common concepts among studies of the meaning of oncology nursing. Nurses provide holistic care, and not surprisingly, holistic interventions have been found useful to support nurses. Interventions included storytelling, clinical support of nurses, workshops to find balance in lives, and dream work. Additional support comes from mentoring. The research identified was primarily descriptive, with very few interventions reported. Findings have been consistent over time in diverse countries. This review indicates that although the healthcare system has changed significantly in 15 years, nurses' experiences of providing care to patients with cancer have remained consistent. The need for interventions to support nurses remains.

  2. Patient-Reported Outcomes and Survivorship in Radiation Oncology: Overcoming the Cons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Arthur K.; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Movsas, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although patient-reported outcomes (PROs) have become a key component of clinical oncology trials, many challenges exist regarding their optimal application. The goal of this article is to methodically review these barriers and suggest strategies to overcome them. This review will primarily focus on radiation oncology examples, will address issues regarding the “why, how, and what” of PROs, and will provide strategies for difficult problems such as methods for reducing missing data. This review will also address cancer survivorship because it closely relates to PROs. Methods Key articles focusing on PROs, quality of life, and survivorship issues in oncology trials are highlighted, with an emphasis on radiation oncology clinical trials. Publications and Web sites of various governmental and regulatory agencies are also reviewed. Results The study of PROs in clinical oncology trials has become well established. There are guidelines provided by organizations such as the US Food and Drug Administration that clearly indicate the importance of and methodology for studying PROs. Clinical trials in oncology have repeatedly demonstrated the value of studying PROs and suggested ways to overcome some of the key challenges. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) has led some of these efforts, and their contributions are highlighted. The current state of cancer survivorship guidelines is also discussed. Conclusion The study of PROs presents significant benefits in understanding and treating toxicities and enhancing quality of life; however, challenges remain. Strategies are presented to overcome these hurdles, which will ultimately improve cancer survivorship. PMID:25113760

  3. 78 FR 25304 - Siemens Medical Solutions, USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems (Radiation Oncology), Including On...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ... Employment and Training Administration Siemens Medical Solutions, USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems (Radiation Oncology), Including On-Site Leased Workers From Source Right Solutions, Concord, California, Now Located... 5, 2012, applicable to workers of Siemens Medical Solutions, USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems...

  4. 76 FR 58520 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of...

  5. Augmented reality in laparoscopic surgical oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolau, Stéphane; Soler, Luc; Mutter, Didier; Marescaux, Jacques

    2011-09-01

    Minimally invasive surgery represents one of the main evolutions of surgical techniques aimed at providing a greater benefit to the patient. However, minimally invasive surgery increases the operative difficulty since the depth perception is usually dramatically reduced, the field of view is limited and the sense of touch is transmitted by an instrument. However, these drawbacks can currently be reduced by computer technology guiding the surgical gesture. Indeed, from a patient's medical image (US, CT or MRI), Augmented Reality (AR) can increase the surgeon's intra-operative vision by providing a virtual transparency of the patient. AR is based on two main processes: the 3D visualization of the anatomical or pathological structures appearing in the medical image, and the registration of this visualization on the real patient. 3D visualization can be performed directly from the medical image without the need for a pre-processing step thanks to volume rendering. But better results are obtained with surface rendering after organ and pathology delineations and 3D modelling. Registration can be performed interactively or automatically. Several interactive systems have been developed and applied to humans, demonstrating the benefit of AR in surgical oncology. It also shows the current limited interactivity due to soft organ movements and interaction between surgeon instruments and organs. If the current automatic AR systems show the feasibility of such system, it is still relying on specific and expensive equipment which is not available in clinical routine. Moreover, they are not robust enough due to the high complexity of developing a real-time registration taking organ deformation and human movement into account. However, the latest results of automatic AR systems are extremely encouraging and show that it will become a standard requirement for future computer-assisted surgical oncology. In this article, we will explain the concept of AR and its principles. Then, we

  6. Integration of Oncology and Palliative Care: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Jung; Park, Ji Chan; Zhang, Yi; Strasser, Florian; Cherny, Nathan; Kaasa, Stein; Davis, Mellar P.; Bruera, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Background. Both the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the European Society for Medical Oncology strongly endorse integrating oncology and palliative care (PC); however, a global consensus on what constitutes integration is currently lacking. To better understand what integration entails, we conducted a systematic review to identify articles addressing the clinical, educational, research, and administrative indicators of integration. Materials and Methods. We searched Ovid MEDLINE and Ovid EMBase between 1948 and 2013. Two researchers independently reviewed each citation for inclusion and extracted the indicators related to integration. The inter-rater agreement was high (κ = 0.96, p care, PC units, and inpatient consultation teams in integration, respectively. Process indicators of integration include interdisciplinary PC teams (n = 72), simultaneous care approach (n = 71), routine symptom screening (n = 25), PC guidelines (n = 33), care pathways (n = 11), and combined tumor boards (n = 10). A total of 66 articles (65%) mentioned early involvement of PC, 18 (18%) provided a specific timing, and 28 (28%) discussed referral criteria. A total of 45 articles (45%), 20 articles (20%), and 66 articles (65%) discussed 8, 4, and 9 indicators related to the educational, research, and administrative aspects of integration, respectively. Conclusion. Integration was a heterogeneously defined concept. Our systematic review highlighted 38 clinical, educational, research, and administrative indicators. With further refinement, these indicators may facilitate assessment of the level of integration of oncology and PC. PMID:25480826

  7. The Integration of Emotional, Physiologic, and Communication Responses to Medical Oncology Surveillance Appointments During Breast Cancer Survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Margaret F; Dingley, Catherine; Donaldson, Gary

    Breast cancer survivors regularly interact with providers during routine surveillance medical oncology visits, discussing uncertainty and anxiety about potential cancer recurrence for many years after treatment. Physiologic alteration can also occur as a stress response, triggered by an upcoming surveillance visit. Survivor-provider communication can theoretically allay emotional distress. The aim of this study was to evaluate associations between emotional (uncertainty, anxiety, concerns about recurrence) and physiologic responses (cytokine levels, lymphocyte counts), and survivor-provider communication (women's plans for their visit, negotiation of decision-making roles). Twenty-seven community-dwelling breast cancer survivors participated. Blood specimens, and self-reported data focusing on the previous month, were collected immediately before and the morning after a regularly scheduled medical oncology visit. Global concerns about cancer recurrence and acute anxiety and uncertainty were associated with changes in immune status before and after the visit. Postvisit natural killer cells increased in 70% of women, and uncertainty/anxiety decreased. Thirty-three percent of women reported a previous minor illness. Most women had a visit plan; 66% successfully negotiated decision-making roles with providers. Triggered by an upcoming medical oncology visit, women experience uncertainty, anxiety, and altered immunity, potentially placing them at risk of disease exacerbations. Not all women respond similarly to a routine surveillance visit; thus, providers must determine who may be at increased risk of emotional distress and physiologic alteration. Survivor-provider communication facilitates immediate resolution of concerns. Explanations of symptom meaning reduce anxiety and uncertainty and by extension may help resolve immune alteration. Between visits, this could be done by nurse-operated telephone-based "help lines."

  8. The Association of Oncology Social Work's Project to Assure Quality Cancer Care (APAQCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebrack, Brad; Kayser, Karen; Oktay, Julianne; Sundstrom, Laura; Mayer Sachs, Alison

    2017-12-04

    In 2014, the Association for Oncology Social Work (AOSW) established A Project to Assure Quality Cancer Care (APAQCC), a group of oncology social workers representing sixty-five Commission on Cancer (CoC)-accredited cancer programs across the US (including two in Canada). Its aims were (1) to examine the capacity of cancer programs to provide quality psychosocial support services, and (2) to evaluate the implementation of distress screening. The purpose of this paper is to describe how this collaborative research program was created and implemented under the auspices of AOSW, and to report on its impact on the oncology social workers who participated.

  9. Music therapy services in pediatric oncology: a national clinical practice review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucquet, Belinda; Leung, Maggie

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a national clinical practice review conducted in Australia of music therapy services in pediatric oncology hospitals. Literature specifically related to music therapy and symptom management in pediatric oncology is reviewed. The results from a national benchmarking survey distributed to all music therapists working with children with cancer in Australian pediatric hospitals are discussed. Patient and family feedback provided from a quality improvement activity conducted at a major pediatric tertiary hospital is summarized, and considerations for future growth as a profession and further research is proposed. © 2014 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

  10. Partial laryngectomy in glottic cancer: complications and oncological results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graciano, Agnaldo José; Sonagli, Marina; da Silva, Ana Gabriela Clemente; Fischer, Carlos Augusto; Chone, Carlos Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with laryngeal carcinoma present tumors in the glottis that can be treated by different treatment modalities. Some authors consider open partial laryngectomy as obsolete, while others still deem this as a viable and cost-efficient option. To compare the oncological and functional results of a series of patients undergoing partial laryngectomy vs. external radiotherapy for the treatment of glottic cancer. Historical cohort study with a series of glottic carcinoma patients undergoing partial laryngectomy or external radiotherapy during a period of ten years. Sixty-two patients with glottic carcinoma were included. Group A comprised those submitted to partial laryngectomy (n=30), and Group B, those who underwent radiotherapy (n=32). They were homogeneous in the comparison of mean age, 56.4 vs. 60.4 years (p=0.12) and distribution in pathological stage (p=0.91). With regard to oncological outcome, there were no differences in distant metastasis rates, or second primary tumor between groups (p=1.0), as well as in disease-free time, laryngeal rescue-free time, and overall five-year survival. Severe complication rates were also similar between groups. Open partial laryngectomy had complication rates and oncological results similar to those of radiotherapy for patients with glottic carcinomas and should still be considered among the main available therapeutic options. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. [Burn out syndrome in oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraub, Simon; Marx, E

    2004-09-01

    SEPS or burnout syndrome was described among health care workers. Oncology care givers--physicians and nurses--can be concerned. Burnout is a chronical stress reaction. Emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation are more prevalent than low personal accomplishment. Burnout is essentially assessed by questionnaires. Oncologists report an higher level of burnout, than AIDS medical or palliative care staff. Causes of burn out are numerous: insufficient personal time, sense of failure,... followed by poorly management and difficulties in staff or institution relationships. Prevention and therapy of burn out can be considered on three levels: personal, (psychotherapy, advices on health way of life), team (improvement in communication) and institution (support meetings and talking groups).

  12. Introduction to veterinary clinical oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Veterinary clinical oncology involves a multidisciplinary approach to the recognition and management of spontaneously occurring neoplasms of domestic animals. This requires some knowledge of the causes, incidence, and natural course of malignant disease as it occurs in domestic species. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with the more common neoplastic problems you will encounter in practice, so that you can offer your clients an informed opinion regarding prognosis and possible therapeutic modalities. A major thrust will be directed toward discussing and encouraging treatment/management of malignant disease. Multimodality therapy will be stressed. 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  13. Low-value practices in oncology contributing to financial toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, Bishal

    2017-01-01

    Financial toxicity of cancer treatment is now a well-recognised problem in cancer medicine leading to patient bankruptcy and even poor survival, including in high-income countries and countries with public health care systems. Many oncologists, despite acknowledging the severity of financial toxicity as a problem, resign the responsibility of reducing the costs of cancer treatment to the government, industry, and oncology societies. However, an oncologist can play an important role in reducing the costs of cancer treatment because all cancer treatment decisions are made between the oncologist and the patient. In this article, I point out a few examples of low value practices from various oncology disciplines that we oncologists can easily replace or abandon in our practice and contribute to lessening the financial toxicities to patients and society. As these examples suggest, reducing cost does not necessarily mean compromising efficacy. We should continuously keep looking for other similar cost-saving strategies in our practice.

  14. Possibly impossible patients: management of difficult behavior in oncology outpatients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peteet, John R; Meyer, Fremonta L; Miovic, Michael K

    2011-01-01

    .... We offer oncology clinicians guidance in dealing with difficult outpatients by discussing the differential diagnosis and multidisciplinary management of treatment-disrupting behavior in the ambulatory oncology...

  15. Regional cancer centre demonstrates voluntary conformity with the national Radiation Oncology Practice Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manley, Stephen, E-mail: stephen.manley@ncahs.health.nsw.gov.au; Last, Andrew; Fu, Kenneth; Greenham, Stuart; Kovendy, Andrew; Shakespeare, Thomas P [North Coast Cancer Institute, Lismore, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Radiation Oncology Practice Standards have been developed over the last 10 years and were published for use in Australia in 2011. Although the majority of the radiation oncology community supports the implementation of the standards, there has been no mechanism for uniform assessment or governance. North Coast Cancer Institute's public radiation oncology service is provided across three main service centres on the north coast of NSW. With a strong focus on quality management, we embraced the opportunity to demonstrate conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards. The Local Health District's Clinical Governance units were engaged to perform assessments of our conformity with the standards and this was signed off as complete on 16 December 2013. The process of demonstrating conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards has enhanced the culture of quality in our centres. We have demonstrated that self-assessment utilising trained auditors is a viable method for centres to demonstrate conformity. National implementation of the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards will benefit individual centres and the broader radiation oncology community to improve the service delivered to our patients.

  16. Mastering Resilience in Oncology: Learn to Thrive in the Face of Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlubocky, Fay J; Rose, Miko; Epstein, Ronald M

    2017-01-01

    Oncology clinician burnout has become a noteworthy issue in medical oncology directly affecting the quality of patient care, patient satisfaction, and overall organizational success. Due to the increasing demands on clinical time, productivity, and the evolving medical landscape, the oncology clinician is at significant risk for burnout. Long hours in direct care with seriously ill patients/families, limited control over daily responsibilities, and endless electronic documentation, place considerable professional and personal demands on the oncologist. As a result, the oncology clinician's wellness is adversely impacted. Physical/emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and feelings of ineffectiveness evolve as core signs of burnout. Unaddressed burnout may affect cancer clinician relationships with their patients, the quality of care delivered, and the overall physical and emotional health of the clinician. Oncology clinicians should be encouraged to build upon their strengths, thrive in the face of adversity and stress, and learn to positively adapt to the changing cancer care system. Fostering individual resilience is a key protective factor against the development of and managing burnout. Empowering clinicians at both the individual and organizational level with tailored resilience strategies is crucial to ensuring clinician wellness. Resilience interventions may include: burnout education, work-life balance, adjustment of one's relationship to work, mindful practice, and acceptance of the clinical work environment. Health care organizations must act to provide institutional solutions through the implementation of: team-based oncology care, communication skills training, and effective resiliency training programs in order to mitigate the effects of stress and prevent burnout in oncology.

  17. A Window Into Clinical Next-Generation Sequencing-Based Oncology Testing Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Rakesh; Bartley, Angela N; Bridge, Julia A; Jennings, Lawrence J; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Kim, Annette; Lazar, Alexander J; Lindeman, Neal I; Moncur, Joel; Rai, Alex J; Routbort, Mark J; Vasalos, Patricia; Merker, Jason D

    2017-12-01

    - Detection of acquired variants in cancer is a paradigm of precision medicine, yet little has been reported about clinical laboratory practices across a broad range of laboratories. - To use College of American Pathologists proficiency testing survey results to report on the results from surveys on next-generation sequencing-based oncology testing practices. - College of American Pathologists proficiency testing survey results from more than 250 laboratories currently performing molecular oncology testing were used to determine laboratory trends in next-generation sequencing-based oncology testing. - These presented data provide key information about the number of laboratories that currently offer or are planning to offer next-generation sequencing-based oncology testing. Furthermore, we present data from 60 laboratories performing next-generation sequencing-based oncology testing regarding specimen requirements and assay characteristics. The findings indicate that most laboratories are performing tumor-only targeted sequencing to detect single-nucleotide variants and small insertions and deletions, using desktop sequencers and predesigned commercial kits. Despite these trends, a diversity of approaches to testing exists. - This information should be useful to further inform a variety of topics, including national discussions involving clinical laboratory quality systems, regulation and oversight of next-generation sequencing-based oncology testing, and precision oncology efforts in a data-driven manner.

  18. Addressing changed sexual functioning in cancer patients: A cross-sectional survey among Dutch oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krouwel, E M; Nicolai, M P J; van Steijn-van Tol, A Q M J; Putter, H; Osanto, S; Pelger, R C M; Elzevier, H W

    2015-12-01

    In most types of cancer, the disease and its treatment can result in altered sexual function (SF). Oncology nurses are strategically placed to address SF since they have frequent patient interaction. Our aim was to establish their knowledge about and attitudes to SF in oncology care and identify their perceived barriers to addressing the subject. A 37-item questionnaire was administered during the 2012 Dutch Oncology Nursing Congress and mailed to 241 Dutch oncology nursing departments. The majority of 477 nurses (87.6%) agreed that discussing SF is their responsibility. Discussing SF routinely is performed by 33.4% of these nurses, consultations mainly consisted of mentioning treatment side-effects affecting SF (71.3%). There were significant differences depending on experience, knowledge, age, academic degree and department policy. Nurses ≤44 years old (p oncology experience (p = 0.001), insufficient knowledge (p oncology nurses consider counselling on sexual issues to be an important responsibility, in line with discussing other side-effects caused by the disease or its treatment. Nevertheless, cancer patients may not routinely be receiving a sexual health evaluation by oncology nurses. Results emphasize the potential benefit of providing knowledge, including practical training and a complete department protocol. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Comprehensive Definition for Integrative Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Claudia M; Balneaves, Lynda G; Cardoso, Maria J; Cohen, Lorenzo; Greenlee, Heather; Johnstone, Peter; Kücük, Ömer; Mailman, Josh; Mao, Jun J

    2017-11-01

    Integrative oncology, which is generally understood to refer to the use of a combination of complementary medicine therapies in conjunction with conventional cancer treatments, has been defined in different ways, but there is no widely accepted definition. We sought to develop and establish a consensus for a comprehensive definition of the field of integrative oncology. We used a mixed-methods approach that included a literature analysis and a consensus procedure, including an interdisciplinary expert panel and surveys, to develop a comprehensive and acceptable definition for the term "integrative oncology." The themes identified in the literature and from the expert discussion were condensed into a two-sentence definition. Survey respondents had very positive views on the draft definition, and their comments helped to shape the final version. The final definition for integrative oncology is: "Integrative oncology is a patient-centered, evidence-informed field of cancer care that utilizes mind and body practices, natural products, and/or lifestyle modifications from different traditions alongside conventional cancer treatments. Integrative oncology aims to optimize health, quality of life, and clinical outcomes across the cancer care continuum and to empower people to prevent cancer and become active participants before,during, and beyond cancer treatment." This short and comprehensive definition for the term integrative oncology will facilitate a better understanding and communication of this emerging field. This definition will also drive focused and cohesive effort to advance the field of integrative oncology.

  20. Adverse event development in clinical oncology trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walraven, I.; Aaronson, N.; Sonke, J.-J.; Verheij, M.; Belderbos, J.

    Gita Thanarajasingam and colleagues' Article1 in The Lancet Oncology reports on a novel longitudinal approach for adverse event analysis and reporting. Comprehensive adverse event reporting in clinical oncology trials is essential to monitor tolerability of new cancer treatments. In view of the

  1. Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

  2. The IR Evolution in Oncology: Tools, Treatments, and Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baere, Thierry de, E-mail: thierry.debaere@gustaveroussy.fr [Gustave Roussy Cancer Center, Department of Interventional Radiology (France)

    2017-01-15

    Early focus of interventional oncologists was developing tools and imaging guidance, performing “procedures” acting as a skillful technician without knowledge of clinical patient outcomes, beyond post-treatment image findings. Interventional oncologists must deliver “treatments” and not “procedures”, and focus on clinically relevant outcomes, provide clinical continuity of care, which means stand at multidisciplinary tumor boards, see patients in consultation before treatment and for follow-up. Interventional oncologists have fought for the same “market” with surgery in a head to head, bloody competition called red ocean strategy in marketing terms, resulting in many aborted trials. Wide adoption of interventional oncology is facing the challenge to build evidence with overall survival as endpoint in randomized trials while the benefits of a treatment on overall survival are diluted by the effects of possible/inevitable subsequent therapies. Because interventional oncology is a disruptive force in medicine achieving same results as others (surgery) using different, less invasive approaches, patients where surgery is irrelevant can be target with a blue ocean strategy (to propose treatment where there is no competition). Recently interventional oncology has been included in the ESMO guidelines for colorectal cancer with oligometastatic disease with both surgical resection, and thermal ablation classified in the same category called “local ablative treatments”. Interventional oncologists have to shape the future by publications in oncologic journal, by being active members of oncology scientific societies, and use modern public megaphone (blog, video sharing, …) to disseminate information and let society know that interventional is not a me-too product but a disruptive treatment.

  3. Big data in oncologic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regge, Daniele; Mazzetti, Simone; Giannini, Valentina; Bracco, Christian; Stasi, Michele

    2017-06-01

    Cancer is a complex disease and unfortunately understanding how the components of the cancer system work does not help understand the behavior of the system as a whole. In the words of the Greek philosopher Aristotle "the whole is greater than the sum of parts." To date, thanks to improved information technology infrastructures, it is possible to store data from each single cancer patient, including clinical data, medical images, laboratory tests, and pathological and genomic information. Indeed, medical archive storage constitutes approximately one-third of total global storage demand and a large part of the data are in the form of medical images. The opportunity is now to draw insight on the whole to the benefit of each individual patient. In the oncologic patient, big data analysis is at the beginning but several useful applications can be envisaged including development of imaging biomarkers to predict disease outcome, assessing the risk of X-ray dose exposure or of renal damage following the administration of contrast agents, and tracking and optimizing patient workflow. The aim of this review is to present current evidence of how big data derived from medical images may impact on the diagnostic pathway of the oncologic patient.

  4. Defining High-Quality Palliative Care in Oncology Practice: An American Society of Clinical Oncology/American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine Guidance Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Kathleen E; McNiff, Kristen; Buss, Mary K; Kamal, Arif; Lupu, Dale; Abernethy, Amy P; Broder, Michael S; Shapiro, Charles L; Acheson, Anupama Kurup; Malin, Jennifer; Evans, Tracey; Krzyzanowska, Monika K

    2016-09-01

    Integrated into routine oncology care, palliative care can improve symptom burden, quality of life, and patient and caregiver satisfaction. However, not all oncology practices have access to specialist palliative medicine. This project endeavored to define what constitutes high-quality primary palliative care as delivered by medical oncology practices. An expert steering committee outlined 966 palliative care service items, in nine domains, each describing a candidate element of primary palliative care delivery for patients with advanced cancer or high symptom burden. Using modified Delphi methodology, 31 multidisciplinary panelists rated each service item on three constructs: importance, feasibility, and scope within medical oncology practice. Panelists endorsed the highest proportion of palliative care service items in the domains of End-of-Life Care (81%); Communication and Shared Decision Making (79%); and Advance Care Planning (78%). The lowest proportions were in Spiritual and Cultural Assessment and Management (35%) and Psychosocial Assessment and Management (39%). In the largest domain, Symptom Assessment and Management, there was consensus that all symptoms should be assessed and managed at a basic level, with more comprehensive management for common symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dyspnea, and pain. Within the Appropriate Palliative Care and Hospice Referral domain, there was consensus that oncology practices should be able to describe the difference between palliative care and hospice to patients and refer patients appropriately. This statement describes the elements comprising high-quality primary palliative care for patients with advanced cancer or high symptom burden, as delivered by oncology practices. Oncology providers wishing to enhance palliative care delivery may find this information useful to inform operational changes and quality improvement efforts. Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  5. Similarity transformations of MAPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen Allan T.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the notion of similar Markovian Arrival Processes (MAPs and show that the event stationary point processes related to two similar MAPs are stochastically equivalent. This holds true for the time stationary point processes too. We show that several well known stochastical equivalences as e.g. that between the H 2 renewal process and the Interrupted Poisson Process (IPP can be expressed by the similarity transformations of MAPs. In the appendix the valid region of similarity transformations for two-state MAPs is characterized.

  6. E-learning programs in oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degerfält, Jan; Sjöstedt, Staffan; Fransson, Per

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: E-learning is an established concept in oncological education and training. However, there seems to be a scarcity of long-term assessments of E-learning programs in oncology vis-á-vis their structural management and didactic value. This study presents descriptive, nationwide data from...... 2005 to 2014. E-learning oncology programs in chemotherapy, general oncology, pain management, palliative care, psycho-social-oncology, and radiotherapy, were reviewed from our databases. Questionnaires of self-perceived didactic value of the programs were examined 2008-2014. RESULTS: The total number...... of trainees were 4693, allocated to 3889 individuals. The trainees included medical doctors (MDs; n = 759), registered nurses (RNs; n = 2359), radiation therapy technologists (n = 642), and, social and health care assistants (SHCAs; n = 933). The E-learning covered 29 different program classifications...

  7. Psychological interventions helping pediatric oncology patients cope with medical procedures: a nurse-centered approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Aurélie G; Henrich, Christopher C

    2013-12-01

    This study explored whether psychological interventions are currently used by pediatric oncology nurses to help children cope with their treatment and, if so, which interventions were considered by oncology nurses to be the most effective. A web-based survey was developed to assess pediatric oncology nurses' impressions of psychological care for pediatric patients during their medical treatment. A sample of 88 pediatric oncologic nurses from twelve leading pediatric oncology departments in the US participated in the survey. The closed questions were analyzed through quantitative methods with statistics. The open questions were examined through qualitative methods with report narratives and discourse analysis. Pediatric oncology nurses identified three psychological interventions to reduce suffering: educating children by explaining the procedure; providing emotional support to children by listening, answering children's worries, or holding their hands; and distracting children through passive and active forms. The survey further showed that nurses spent on average 3 h per day providing emotional support, would be willing to be trained in additional interventions (93%), and could devote at least 10 min per treatment to provide support (77%). This work demonstrates the central role nurses play as emotional support caregivers. Since nurses would be willing to provide emotional support during treatments, training may be an approach to incorporate the use of psychological interventions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. ONCOLOGY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012, at the Combined Breast Cancer Clinic at Groote Schuur Hospital. Patients with a ... This may frequently be the first time that the patient has a clinical breast examination, a discussion on breast awareness and risk factors with the ... patients (52%) were noted to have isolated microcalcifications. The average size of the ...

  9. Voluntary Informed Consent in Paediatric Oncology Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekking, Sara A S; Van Der Graaf, Rieke; Van Delden, Johannes J M

    2016-07-01

    In paediatric oncology, research and treatments are often closely combined, which may compromise voluntary informed consent of parents. We identified two key scenarios in which voluntary informed consent for paediatric oncology studies is potentially compromised due to the intertwinement of research and care. The first scenario is inclusion by the treating paediatric oncologist, the second scenario concerns treatments confined to the research context. In this article we examine whether voluntary informed consent of parents for research is compromised in these two scenarios, and if so whether this is also morally problematic. For this, we employ the account of voluntary consent from Nelson and colleagues, who assert that voluntary consent requires substantial freedom from controlling influences. We argue that, in the absence of persuasion or manipulation, inclusion by the treating physician does not compromise voluntariness. However, it may function as a risk factor for controlling influence as it narrows the scope within which parents make decisions. Furthermore, physician appeal to reciprocity is not controlling as it constitutes persuasion. In addition, framing information is a form of informational manipulation and constitutes a controlling influence. In the second scenario, treatments confined to the research context qualify as controlling if the available options are restricted through manipulation of options. Although none of the influences is morally problematic in itself, a combination of influences may create morally problematic instances of involuntary informed consent. Therefore, safeguards should be implemented to establish an optimal environment for parents to provide voluntary informed consent in an integrated research-care context. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Caring for head and neck oncology patients. Does social support lead to better quality of life?

    OpenAIRE

    Mathieson, C. M.; Logan-Smith, L. L.; Phillips, J.; MacPhee, M.; Attia, E. L.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether social support contributes to better quality of life and psychological state of head and neck oncology patients. DESIGN: A structured questionnaire, administered orally to patients face-to-face, with specific questions about demographic and medical information and social support and two standardized scales; a cancer-specific quality of life scale and a depression scale. SETTING: Head and Neck Oncology Clinic, an institutional referral centre providing ambulator...

  11. Evolution of health technology assessment: best practices of the pan-Canadian Oncology Drug Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchi, Angela; Chabot, Isabelle; Glennie, Judith

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, Canada chose to develop a separate and distinct path for oncology drug health technology assessment (HTA). In 2013, the decision was made to transfer the pan-Canadian Oncology Drug Review (pCODR) to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH), to align the pCODR and CADTH Common Drug Review processes while building on the best practices of both. The objective of this research was to conduct an examination of the best practices established by the pCODR. A qualitative research approach was taken to assess the policies, processes, and practices of the pCODR, based on internationally accepted best practice "principles" in HTA, with a particular focus on stakeholder engagement. Publicly available information regarding the approach of the pCODR was used to gauge the agency's performance against these principles. In addition, stakeholder observations and real-world experiences were gathered through key informant interviews to be inclusive of perspectives from patient advocacy groups, provincial and/or cancer agency decision-makers, community and academic oncologists, industry, expert committee members, and health economists. This analysis indicated that, through the pCODR, oncology stakeholders have had a voice in and have come to trust the quality and relevance of oncology HTA as a vital tool to ensure the best decisions for Canadians with cancer and their health care system. It could be expected that adoption of the principles and processes of the pCODR would bring a similar level of engagement and trust to other HTA organizations in Canada and elsewhere. The results of this research led to recommendations for improvement and potential extrapolation of these best practices to other HTA organizations worldwide, along with suggestions for continued evolution of the pCODR in conjunction with its integration into the CADTH. It is clear that the transition of the pCODR to CADTH provides an opportunity for practices initiated by the pCODR to

  12. Information Needs of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgical Oncology Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Jacqueline; Kacikanis, Anna; Nyhof-Young, Joyce; Gallinger, Steven; Ruthig, Elke

    2017-09-01

    A marked knowledge gap exists concerning the information needs of hepato-pancreato-biliary (HPB) surgical oncology patients. We investigated the comprehensive information needs of this patient population, including the type and amount of information desired, as well as the preferred method of receiving information. A questionnaire was administered to patients being treated surgically for cancers of the liver, pancreas, gallbladder, or bile ducts at Toronto General Hospital, part of the University Health Network, in Toronto, Canada. The questionnaire examined patients' information needs across six domains of information: medical, practical, physical, emotional, social, and spiritual. Among 36 respondents, the importance of information and amount of information desired differed significantly by domain (both p information in the medical and physical domains as most important, though they also desired specific items of information from the emotional, practical, and social domains. Patients' overwhelming preference was to receive information via a one-on-one consultation with a healthcare provider. It is important for healthcare providers working with HPB surgical oncology patients to be comprehensive when providing information related to patients' cancer diagnosis, prognosis, associated symptoms, and side effects of treatment. Certain emotional, practical, and social issues (e.g., fears of cancer recurrence, drug coverage options, relationship changes) should be addressed as well. Face-to-face interactions should be the primary mode of delivering information to patients. Our findings are being used to guide the training of healthcare providers and the development of educational resources specific to HPB surgical oncology patients.

  13. Similarity after Goodman

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Decock, L.B.; Douven, I.

    2011-01-01

    In a famous critique, Goodman dismissed similarity as a slippery and both philosophically and scientifically useless notion. We revisit his critique in the light of important recent work on similarity in psychology and cognitive science. Specifically, we use Tversky's influential set-theoretic

  14. The science of patient safety: implications for oncology nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Carol A

    2013-12-01

    Patient safety is one of the most frequent terms used in health care today. Patients and their families are, first and foremost, focused on receiving effective and safe care, and oncology nurses strive to incorporate clinical evidence into day-to-day practice. This article provides a road map on how to incorporate emerging patient safety science into daily clinical practice to best serve patients and their families.

  15. Music therapy in pediatric oncology: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Russell E

    2006-01-01

    The review of literature provides an overview of both qualitative and quantitative research studies in the area of pediatric oncology music therapy. A total of 12 studies were reviewed. Eight used qualitative and four used quantitative research methods. All articles were published in peer-reviewed journals. This review summarizes the use of music therapy in treating the physical, emotional , social, and developmental needs of children undergoing curative and palliative treatment for cancer.

  16. Self-Similar Isentropic Implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, M.; Amable, L.

    1980-07-01

    The self-similar compression of an isentropic spherical gas pellet Is analyzed for large values of the ratio of the final to initial densities. An asymptotic analysis provides the solution corresponding to a prescribed value of the final density when it is high. In addition an approximate solution is given when the specific heat ratio is not constant. The time evolution of the pressure on the outer surface leading to the self-similar solutions, is calculated for large density ratios. (Author)

  17. The Impact of Massed and Spaced-Out Curriculum in Oncology Knowledge Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecilio-Fernandes, Dario; Aalders, Wytze S; de Vries, Jakob; Tio, René A

    2017-02-13

    Starting in 2009, cancer has been the leading cause of death in the Netherlands. Oncology is therefore an important part of the medical curriculum in undergraduate education. It is crucial that medical students know about cancer, since doctors will encounter many cases of oncology. We have compared the influence that teaching oncology has when spread over a 3-year curriculum versus concentrated in one semester. The participants comprised 525 medical students from one medical school with comprehensive integrated curricula. Of those, 436 followed the massed curriculum, with oncology concentrated in one semester. The remaining 89 students followed a spaced-out curriculum, in which oncology was spread out over 3 years. To measure students' knowledge, we used their progress test results from 2009 to 2012. All questions about oncology were categorized and selected. Because of our unbalanced sample and missing data and to reduce the chances for a type II error, we compared the growth of oncology questions using mixed effect models. A cubic growth model with an unstructured covariance matrix fitted our data best. At the start, students in the spaced-out curriculum scored higher on oncology questions. The initial growth was faster for the spaced-out curriculum students, whereas the acceleration over time was slower compared to the massed curriculum students. At the end of the growth curve, the knowledge of the massed curriculum students increased faster. In the last test, the massed curriculum students outperformed those in the spaced-out curriculum. The way students acquired and applied their knowledge was similar in both curricula. It seems, however, that students benefitted more from massed than spaced-out education, which may be due to the comprehensive integrated teaching involved.

  18. Oncology payment reform to achieve real health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Mark B; Thoumi, Andrea I

    2015-05-01

    Cancer care is transforming, moving toward increasingly personalized treatment with the potential to save and improve many more lives. Many oncologists and policymakers view current fee-for-service payments as an obstacle to providing more efficient, high-quality cancer care. However, payment reforms create new uncertainties for oncologists and may be challenging to implement. In this article, we illustrate how accountable care payment reforms that directly align payments with quality and cost measures are being implemented and the opportunities and challenges they present. These payment models provide more flexibility to oncologists and other providers to give patients the personalized care they need, along with more accountability for demonstrating quality improvements and overall cost or cost growth reductions. Such payment reforms increase the importance of person-level quality and cost measures as well as data analysis to improve measured performance. We describe key features of quality and cost measures needed to support accountable care payment reforms in oncology. Finally, we propose policy recommendations to move incrementally but fundamentally to payment systems that support higher-value care in oncology. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. Additive Similarity Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattath, Shmuel; Tversky, Amos

    1977-01-01

    Tree representations of similarity data are investigated. Hierarchical clustering is critically examined, and a more general procedure, called the additive tree, is presented. The additive tree representation is then compared to multidimensional scaling. (Author/JKS)

  20. Gender similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Janet Shibley

    2014-01-01

    Whether men and women are fundamentally different or similar has been debated for more than a century. This review summarizes major theories designed to explain gender differences: evolutionary theories, cognitive social learning theory, sociocultural theory, and expectancy-value theory. The gender similarities hypothesis raises the possibility of theorizing gender similarities. Statistical methods for the analysis of gender differences and similarities are reviewed, including effect sizes, meta-analysis, taxometric analysis, and equivalence testing. Then, relying mainly on evidence from meta-analyses, gender differences are reviewed in cognitive performance (e.g., math performance), personality and social behaviors (e.g., temperament, emotions, aggression, and leadership), and psychological well-being. The evidence on gender differences in variance is summarized. The final sections explore applications of intersectionality and directions for future research.

  1. AMCP Partnership Forum: Driving Value and Outcomes in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Innovation in cancer treatment has provided a wealth of recently available therapeutic agents and a healthy drug pipeline that promises to change the way we approach this disease and the lives of those affected in the years to come. However, the majority of these new agents, many of which are targeted to specific genomic features of various tumors, may challenge the health care system's ability to afford cancer care. This innovation drives the need to focus on the value of the treatments provided to patients with cancer and on methods to optimize the efficiency of the dollars we spend, in addition to the clinical value itself. The Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy (AMCP) convened a Partnership Forum to address how to improve value and outcomes in cancer care. In this multistakeholder forum, several areas were addressed: current methods for assessing the value of oncology products, the need for balancing population management with precision medicine, and the outlook for value-based contracting for oncology medications in managed care settings. Participants recommended ways in which stakeholders can work toward solutions in these areas. The forum brought together stakeholders from health plans, integrated delivery systems, pharmacy benefit managers, clinical practice, biopharmaceutical industry, and laboratory companies. Also participating were representatives from trade and professional associations. During this 1.5-day forum, participants identified current challenges, readiness, and ways to address value and improve outcomes in cancer therapy. Some of the challenges identified include choosing a viable (and practical) outcome target for value-based contracting in oncology, the development and use of value frameworks and clinical pathways, managing cancer diagnostics, utilization of alternative payment systems, moving from a large evidence base to a small clinical trial base in considering targeted treatments, and lack of best practices in value-based payment

  2. Outlook of the process of storage of oncology drugs from the logistic operator in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Vicente Sánchez-Calvera

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article mainly on the problem of  storage of oncology drugs, which is an important element in the supply chain, applied in the context of warehouse management of oncology drugs, in the logistics operator and providers of health services institutions (IPS for its acronym in Spanish of Bogotá DC and in the contex of a macro project "Methodological proposal for the definition of policies , rules of negotation and coordination in supply management of oncology drugs in Colombia," funded by Colciencias and the Universidad Nacional of Colombia. This article presents the current situation of oncology drugs, marking a characterization, diagnosis and identification and startegies evaluated under different scenarios. Finally, it is presented a proposal of improvement applied tranversely to storage processes including labels such as just in Time and the application of information and communication technologies (ICT.

  3. Toward a Broader Role for Occupational Therapy in Supportive Oncology Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duker, Leah I. Stein

    2016-01-01

    Supportive care in oncology helps people cope with cancer and its psychological, physical, and emotional side effects. However, cancer survivors report dissatisfaction with supportive care and a need for more psychosocial and self-management services. Occupational therapy practitioners represent an integral part of the supportive care team because their scope of practice emphasizes function. Through a focus on function, practitioners address the full spectrum of physical and psychosocial care. Currently, conceptualizations of occupational therapy for cancer survivors often focus solely on physical interventions and, therefore, do not represent the unique involvement of the profession in supportive oncology care. We advocate for a focused framework for occupational therapy practitioners in oncology as experts in function and providers of both physical and psychosocial treatments. Barriers to a focus on function are identified, and strategies are suggested for expanding involvement for the profession in supportive oncology care. PMID:27295001

  4. Design Challenges of an Episode-Based Payment Model in Oncology: The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Oncology Care Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Ronald M; Muldoon, L Daniel; Schumacher, Heidi K; Strawbridge, Larisa M; York, Andrew W; Mortimer, Laura K; Falb, Alison F; Cox, Katherine J; Bazell, Carol; Lukens, Ellen W; Kapp, Mary C; Rajkumar, Rahul; Bassano, Amy; Conway, Patrick H

    2017-07-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services developed the Oncology Care Model as an episode-based payment model to encourage participating practitioners to provide higher-quality, better-coordinated care at a lower cost to the nearly three-quarter million fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries with cancer who receive chemotherapy each year. Episode payment models can be complex. They combine into a single benchmark price all payments for services during an episode of illness, many of which may be delivered at different times by different providers in different locations. Policy and technical decisions include the definition of the episode, including its initiation, duration, and included services; the identification of beneficiaries included in the model; and beneficiary attribution to practitioners with overall responsibility for managing their care. In addition, the calculation and risk adjustment of benchmark episode prices for the bundle of services must reflect geographic cost variations and diverse patient populations, including varying disease subtypes, medical comorbidities, changes in standards of care over time, the adoption of expensive new drugs (especially in oncology), as well as diverse practice patterns. Other steps include timely monitoring and intervention as needed to avoid shifting the attribution of beneficiaries on the basis of their expected episode expenditures as well as to ensure the provision of necessary medical services and the development of a meaningful link to quality measurement and improvement through the episode-based payment methodology. The complex and diverse nature of oncology business relationships and the specific rules and requirements of Medicare payment systems for different types of providers intensify these issues. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services believes that by sharing its approach to addressing these decisions and challenges, it may facilitate greater understanding of the model within the oncology

  5. [Treatment Refusal in Pediatric Oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špótová, A; Husáková, K; Hrašková, A; Mikesková, M; Puškáčová, J; Hederová, S; Jamárik, M; Rabenseifertová, E; Jalovecká, Z; Kolenová, A; Šubová, Z

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric oncologists are often faced with situations in which parents or guardians refuse recommended treatment for curable childhood cancer. Deciding how to proceed in such situations is an ethical dilemma. The aim of this article is to consider optimal approaches when parents are strongly against oncological treatment, potentially compromising their childrens rights for health care and to the chance for cure. In this paper, we report two cases of treatment refusal from our department and the impact of such decisions on the children themselves. Case no. 1 describes a child with retinoblastoma whose parents refused standard treatment in order to seek alternative treatment abroad. Case no. 2 describes a patient with a primary lymphoma of bone who received treatment by a court order after parental refusal. When parents refuse a treatment for potentially curable cancer, the medical team often focuses on the certainty of death without treatment. In the background, there is a smaller but still significant risk that - even if the treatment is eventually accepted or compelled - the child will still die from treatment-related complications or refractory disease, possibly with considerable suffering. The reasons for refusing a treatment vary. The entire medical team is tasked with trying to respectfully understand the reasoning behind the parents unwillingness to accept the treatment, in order to address all possible misunderstandings and to propose solutions that could be acceptable for the parents. In some situations however, it is necessary to resolve the dilemma by legal means in order to protect the life of the child.Key words: oncology - ethics - decision making - treatment refusal - legal guardians The authors declare they have no potential conflicts of interest concerning drugs, products, or services used in the study. The Editorial Board declares that the manuscript met the ICMJE recommendation for biomedical papers.Submitted: 7. 8. 2017Accepted: 7. 9. 2017.

  6. A scoping review of the nurse practitioner workforce in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Lorinda A; Hunt, Lauren; Cataldo, Janine

    2016-08-01

    The quality of cancer care may be compromised in the near future because of work force issues. Several factors will impact the oncology health provider work force: an aging population, an increase in the number of cancer survivors, and expansion of health care coverage for the previously uninsured. Between October 2014 and March 2015, an electronic literature search of English language articles was conducted using PubMed(®) , the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Sciences (CINAHL(®) ), Web of Science, Journal Storage (JSTOR(®) ), Google Scholar, and SCOPUS(®) . Using the scoping review criteria, the research question was identified "How much care in oncology is provided by nurse practitioners (NPs)?" Key search terms were kept broad and included: "NP" AND "oncology" AND "workforce". The literature was searched between 2005 and 2015, using the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 29 studies were identified, further review resulted in 10 relevant studies that met all criteria. Results demonstrated that NPs are utilized in both inpatient and outpatient settings, across all malignancy types and in a variety of roles. Academic institutions were strongly represented in all relevant studies, a finding that may reflect the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty work hour limitations. There was no pattern associated with state scope of practice and NP representation in this scoping review. Many of the studies reviewed relied on subjective information, or represented a very small number of NPs. There is an obvious need for an objective analysis of the amount of care provided by oncology NPs. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Burnout in United States Academic Chairs of Radiation Oncology Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusano, Aaron S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Thomas, Charles R., E-mail: thomasch@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Knight Cancer Institute/Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Bonner, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); DeWeese, Theodore L. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Formenti, Silvia C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University, New York, New York (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Mittal, Bharat B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Ilinois (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine the self-reported prevalence of burnout in chairs of academic radiation oncology departments, to identify factors contributing to burnout, and to compare the prevalence of burnout with that seen in other academic chair groups. Methods and Materials: An anonymous online survey was administered to the membership of the Society of Chairs of Academic Radiation Oncology Programs (SCAROP). Burnout was measured with the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS). Results: Questionnaires were returned from 66 of 87 chairs (76% response rate). Seventy-nine percent of respondents reported satisfaction with their current positions. Common major stressors were budget deficits and human resource issues. One-quarter of chairs reported that it was at least moderately likely that they would step down in the next 1 to 2 years; these individuals demonstrated significantly higher emotional exhaustion. Twenty-five percent of respondents met the MBI-HSS criteria for low burnout, 75% for moderate burnout, and none for high burnout. Group MBI-HSS subscale scores demonstrated a pattern of moderate emotional exhaustion, low depersonalization, and moderate personal accomplishment, comparing favorably with other specialties. Conclusions: This is the first study of burnout in radiation oncology chairs with a high response rate and using a validated psychometric tool. Radiation oncology chairs share similar major stressors to other chair groups, but they demonstrate relatively high job satisfaction and lower burnout. Emotional exhaustion may contribute to the anticipated turnover in coming years. Further efforts addressing individual and institutional factors associated with burnout may improve the relationship with work of chairs and other department members.

  8. Promoting the Appropriate Use of Advanced Radiation Technologies in Oncology: Summary of a National Cancer Policy Forum Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Grace L; Ganz, Patricia A; Bekelman, Justin E; Chmura, Steven J; Dignam, James J; Efstathiou, Jason A; Jagsi, Reshma; Johnstone, Peter A; Steinberg, Michael L; Williams, Stephen B; Yu, James B; Zietman, Anthony L; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Tina Shih, Ya-Chen

    2017-03-01

    discussed challenges were provided. Discussions of "value" have increased as a priority in the radiation oncology community. Practitioners in the radiation oncology community can play a critical role in promoting a value-oriented framework to approach radiation oncology treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement Update: Genetic and Genomic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Mark E; Bradbury, Angela R; Arun, Banu; Domchek, Susan M; Ford, James M; Hampel, Heather L; Lipkin, Stephen M; Syngal, Sapna; Wollins, Dana S; Lindor, Noralane M

    2015-11-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has long affirmed that the recognition and management of individuals with an inherited susceptibility to cancer are core elements of oncology care. ASCO released its first statement on genetic testing in 1996 and updated that statement in 2003 and 2010 in response to developments in the field. In 2014, the Cancer Prevention and Ethics Committees of ASCO commissioned another update to reflect the impact of advances in this area on oncology practice. In particular, there was an interest in addressing the opportunities and challenges arising from the application of massively parallel sequencing-also known as next-generation sequencing-to cancer susceptibility testing. This technology introduces a new level of complexity into the practice of cancer risk assessment and management, requiring renewed effort on the part of ASCO to ensure that those providing care to patients with cancer receive the necessary education to use this new technology in the most effective, beneficial manner. The purpose of this statement is to explore the challenges of new and emerging technologies in cancer genetics and provide recommendations to ensure their optimal deployment in oncology practice. Specifically, the statement makes recommendations in the following areas: germline implications of somatic mutation profiling, multigene panel testing for cancer susceptibility, quality assurance in genetic testing, education of oncology professionals, and access to cancer genetic services. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  10. Factors influencing job satisfaction of oncology nurses over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Greta; Olson, Karin; Raymond-Seniuk, Christy; Lo, Eliza; Masaoud, Elmabrok; Bakker, Debra; Fitch, Margaret; Green, Esther; Butler, Lorna; Conlon, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we tested a structural equation model to examine work environment factors related to changes in job satisfaction of oncology nurses between 2004 and 2006. Relational leadership and good physician/nurse relationships consistently influenced perceptions of enough RNs to provide quality care, and freedom to make patient care decisions, which, in turn, directly influenced nurses' job satisfaction over time. Supervisor support in resolving conflict and the ability to influence patient care outcomes were significant influences on job satisfaction in 2004, whereas, in 2006, a clear philosophy of nursing had a greater significant influence. Several factors that influence job satisfaction of oncology nurses in Canada have changed over time, which may reflect changes in work environments and work life. These findings suggest opportunities to modify work conditions that could improve nurses' job satisfaction and work life.

  11. Enhancing collaborative leadership in palliative social work in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Barbara; Phillips, Farya; Head, Barbara Anderson; Hedlund, Susan; Kalisiak, Angela; Zebrack, Brad; Kilburn, Lisa; Otis-Green, Shirley

    2014-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) Report-Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Meeting Psychosocial Health Needs-provided recommendations for meeting the palliative care needs of our growing population of older Americans. The IOM report highlights the demand for social work leadership across all aspects of the health care delivery system. Social workers are core interdisciplinary members of the health care team and it is important for them to be well prepared for collaborative leadership roles across health care settings. The ExCEL in Social Work: Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership education project was created as a direct response to the 2008 IOM Report. This article highlights a sampling of palliative care projects initiated by outstanding oncology social work participants in the ExCEL program. These projects demonstrate the leadership of social workers in palliative care oncology.

  12. Chemical probes targeting epigenetic proteins: Applications beyond oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackloo, Suzanne; Brown, Peter J; Müller, Susanne

    2017-05-04

    Epigenetic chemical probes are potent, cell-active, small molecule inhibitors or antagonists of specific domains in a protein; they have been indispensable for studying bromodomains and protein methyltransferases. The Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC), comprising scientists from academic and pharmaceutical laboratories, has generated most of the current epigenetic chemical probes. Moreover, the SGC has shared about 4 thousand aliquots of these probes, which have been used primarily for phenotypic profiling or to validate targets in cell lines or primary patient samples cultured in vitro. Epigenetic chemical probes have been critical tools in oncology research and have uncovered mechanistic insights into well-established targets, as well as identify new therapeutic starting points. Indeed, the literature primarily links epigenetic proteins to oncology, but applications in inflammation, viral, metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases are now being reported. We summarize the literature of these emerging applications and provide examples where existing probes might be used.

  13. Paediatric oncology nurse education: the development of a national framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Deborah

    2004-07-01

    It is recognized that there is a need for specialist nursing courses in a range of paediatric nursing specialities. Paediatric oncology nurses are facing challenges with clinical advances and the need for specialized care. At present there are no available courses in Scotland offering preparation for nurses working in a paediatric oncology setting. This project, supported by Macmillan Cancer Relief, addresses this deficit by developing a comprehensive framework for a small and widely dispersed speciality. Information on the needs and expectations of nurses and service managers in this field was obtained through postal questionnaires and focus groups. Due to the need for collaboration between higher educational institutions and service colleagues the views of educators were also established through questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. Problematic practice issues were cited and these issues were further discussed and recognized as the main educational needs. Availability and accessibility of education were of great importance. The framework developed aims to provide ongoing opportunities for continuing professional development within this speciality. Development of the educational framework is required to provide a course accessible to a wide geographical area of nurses. A National Framework for Paediatric Oncology Nurse Education was developed in response to views of experts working in the field, to the views of other stakeholders and to what is known about needs and preferences of children with cancer and their families.

  14. A Primer on Health Economic Evaluations in Thoracic Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Melanie D; Atherly, Adam J; Bocsi, Gregary T; Camidge, D Ross

    2016-08-01

    There is growing interest for economic evaluation in oncology to illustrate the value of multiple new diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. As these analyses have started to move from specialist publications into mainstream medical literature, the wider medical audience consuming this information may need additional education to evaluate it appropriately. Here we review standard practices in economic evaluation, illustrating the different methods with thoracic oncology examples where possible. When interpreting and conducting health economic studies, it is important to appraise the method, perspective, time horizon, modeling technique, discount rate, and sensitivity analysis. Guidance on how to do this is provided. To provide a method to evaluate this literature, a literature search was conducted in spring 2015 to identify economic evaluations published in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology. Articles were reviewed for their study design, and areas for improvement were noted. Suggested improvements include using more rigorous sensitivity analyses, adopting a standard approach to reporting results, and conducting complete economic evaluations. Researchers should design high-quality studies to ensure the validity of the results, and consumers of this research should interpret these studies critically on the basis of a full understanding of the methodologies used before considering any of the conclusions. As advancements occur on both the research and consumer sides, this literature can be further developed to promote the best use of resources for this field. Copyright © 2016 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Similarity or difference?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Anders Ryom

    2013-01-01

    While the organizational structures and strategies of public organizations have attracted substantial research attention among public management scholars, little research has explored how these organizational core dimensions are interconnected and influenced by pressures for similarity....... In this paper I address this topic by exploring the relation between expenditure strategy isomorphism and structure isomorphism in Danish municipalities. Different literatures suggest that organizations exist in concurrent pressures for being similar to and different from other organizations in their field...... of action. It is theorized that to meet this challenge organizations may substitute increased similarity on one core dimension for increased idiosyncrasy on another, but only after a certain level of isomorphism is reached. Results of quantitative analyses support this theory and show that an inverse U...

  16. Oncology providers’ perspectives on endocrine therapy prescribing and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wheeler SB

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie B Wheeler,1,2 Megan C Roberts,1 Diane Bloom,1 Katherine E Reeder-Hayes,2,3 Maya Espada,1 Jeffrey Peppercorn,4 Carol E Golin,5,6 Jo Anne Earp2,5 1Department of Health Policy and Management, 2Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, 3Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, 4Division of Hematology/Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, 5Department of Health Behavior, 6Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Purpose: Adjuvant endocrine therapy (ET can reduce the risk of recurrence among females with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Overall, initiation and adherence to ET are suboptimal, though reasons are not well described. The study’s objective was to better understand ET decision making, prescribing, and patient management from oncology providers’ perspectives.Methods: Using purposive sampling, we recruited oncology providers who saw five or more breast cancer patients per week (n=20. We conducted 30–45-minute telephone interviews, using a semistructured guide to elicit perspectives on ET use. We used thematic content analysis to systematically identify categories of meaning and double-coded transcripts using Atlas.ti.Results: Providers recommend ET to all eligible patients except those with contraindications or other risk factors. Providers base their ET prescribing decisions on the patient’s menopausal status, side effects, and comorbidities. ET is typically discussed multiple times: at the onset of breast cancer treatment and in more detail after other treatment completion. Providers felt that the associated recurrence risk reduction is the most compelling argument for patients during ET decision making. While providers rarely perceived noninitiation as a problem, nonadherence was prevalent, often due to unresolvable side effects.Conclusion: From the clinicians’ perspectives, side effects from

  17. Self-similar aftershock rates

    CERN Document Server

    Davidsen, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    In many important systems exhibiting crackling noise --- intermittent avalanche-like relaxation response with power-law and, thus, self-similar distributed event sizes --- the "laws" for the rate of activity after large events are not consistent with the overall self-similar behavior expected on theoretical grounds. This is in particular true for the case of seismicity and a satisfying solution to this paradox has remained outstanding. Here, we propose a generalized description of the aftershock rates which is both self-similar and consistent with all other known self-similar features. Comparing our theoretical predictions with high resolution earthquake data from Southern California we find excellent agreement, providing in particular clear evidence for a unified description of aftershocks and foreshocks. This may offer an improved way of time-dependent seismic hazard assessment and earthquake forecasting.

  18. [Palliative geriatrics. What are the differences between oncologic and non-oncologic palliative geriatric inpatients?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genz, H; Jenetzky, E; Hauer, K; Oster, P; Pfisterer, M H-D

    2010-12-01

    Analysis of differences between oncologic and non-oncologic patients in the first German hospital-based special care unit for palliative geriatrics. Systematic analysis of patients' records according to a standardized protocol. A total of 217 patients from a hospital-based special care unit for palliative geriatrics (56.7% women, 43.4% men) were included over a retrospective period of 1.5 years. Patients were categorized as non-oncologic (53.4%, n=116) or oncologic (46.5%, n=101). Non-oncologic patients were older than oncologic patients (84.0 vs. 76.8 years, p=0.02), and showed a higher degree of functional dependence (pfeeding (31% vs. 9%, p=0.001). Oncologic patients experienced more often symptoms of pain, constipation, agitation, diarrhea, vomiting, and nausea. There are clinically relevant differences between oncologic and non-oncologic palliative geriatric inpatients regarding the constellation of symptoms, care, mortality, and the prevalence of concerns about hydration and feeding. These differences ought to be taken into account for further education, as well as further improvement of the healthcare system, to enable an appropriate standard of palliative care for geriatric patients.

  19. Incremental Similarity and Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole E.; Hedevang, Emil; Schmiegel, Jürgen

    This paper discusses the mathematical representation of an empirically observed phenomenon, referred to as Incremental Similarity. We discuss this feature from the viewpoint of stochastic processes and present a variety of non-trivial examples, including those that are of relevance for turbulence...

  20. Pediatric oncology and the future of oncological imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Stephan D

    2011-05-01

    The future of pediatric oncology will be influenced by changes in drug design and treatment strategy, with genomic medicine and molecular-based diagnostics and therapeutics playing increasingly important roles. The role of imaging as a means of measuring response to therapy has also evolved, with the development of new technologies and higher sensitivity means of detecting tumors. Conventional anatomical imaging techniques are being increasingly supplemented with functional techniques, including FDG-PET imaging and diffusion-weighted MR imaging. The risk-adapted treatment regimens of the past, which led to improved event-free and overall survival in many pediatric cancers, have paved the way for new response-based treatment paradigms. Response-based approaches seek to identify patients with a high likelihood of cure, treating them less aggressively, while those not responding to therapy are identified early and redirected into more aggressive therapeutic regimens. These advances will require concurrent development of imaging biomarkers as surrogates of early response to therapy. Incorporating these techniques into new response-directed treatment algorithms will be crucial as personalized medicine and molecular-targeted, tumor-specific therapies gain acceptance for the treatment of children with cancer.

  1. Rationale for Cardio-Oncology Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhola, Lara F; Villarraga, Hector R

    2017-07-01

    With the rapidly rising number of patients surviving cancer, often in the setting of new or pre-existing cardiovascular disease and risk factors, a need has arisen for a specialty within the realm of cardiovascular care that can evaluate and manage these patients along with our colleagues in oncology and hematology. By the same token, all health care providers involved in the care of cancer patients with heart disease must be fully aware of the impact of adverse cardiovascular effects on the survival of these patients. Collaboration is required to mitigate the effect of cardiovascular toxicity associated with these necessary life-saving cancer therapies. The cardio-oncologist plays a pivotal role in bridging the 2 specialties, by creating a comprehensive plan to address the comorbidities as well as to provide guidance on the optimal choice of therapy. In this 3-part review, we will outline: a) the significant impact of cancer therapies on the cardiovascular health of patients with cancer and cancer survivors, b) the advantage of a multidisciplinary team in addressing these cardiovascular complications, and c) the delivery of clinical care to patients with cancer and heart disease. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Communication skills training for oncology professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissane, David W; Bylund, Carma L; Banerjee, Smita C; Bialer, Philip A; Levin, Tomer T; Maloney, Erin K; D'Agostino, Thomas A

    2012-04-10

    To provide a state-of-the-art review of communication skills training (CST) that will guide the establishment of a universal curriculum for fellows of all cancer specialties undertaking training as oncology professionals today. Extensive literature review including meta-analyses of trials, conceptual models, techniques, and potential curricula provides evidence for the development of an appropriate curriculum and CST approach. Examples from the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center CST program are incorporated. A core curriculum embraces CST modules in breaking bad news and discussing unanticipated adverse events, discussing prognosis, reaching a shared treatment decision, responding to difficult emotions, coping with survivorship, running a family meeting, and transitioning to palliative care and end of life. Achievable outcomes are growth in clinician's self-efficacy, uptake of new communication strategies and skills, and transfer of these strategies and skills into the clinic. Outcomes impacting patient satisfaction, improved adaptation, and enhanced quality of life are still lacking. Future communication challenges include genetic risk communication, concepts like watchful waiting, cumulative radiation risk, late effects of treatment, discussing Internet information and unproven therapies, phase I trial enrollment, and working as a multidisciplinary team. Patient benefits, such as increased treatment adherence and enhanced adaptation, need to be demonstrated from CST.

  3. Dental approach in the pediatric oncology patient: characteristics of the population treated at the dentistry unit in a pediatric oncology brazilian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Camila; Vizeu, Heloisa; Soares-Júnior, Luis Alberto; Fava, Marcelo; Filho, Vicente Odone

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this paper was to characterize the population seen at the dentistry unit of the hematology-oncology service of the Oncology-Hematology Service, Instituto da Criança at the Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo. Oral problems resulting from cancer therapy increase the risk of infection, length of hospital stay, treatment cost and negative impact on the course and prognosis of the disease. Of the 367 medical records of cancer patients seen from November 2007 until December 2008: 186 with a cancer diagnosis and complete clinical data were selected, while 20 with a cancer diagnosis and incomplete records were excluded; 161 medical records with only hematological diagnosis were also excluded. The following characteristics were assessed: ethnicity, gender, age, diagnosis and characteristics of the neoplasm, cancer therapy status and performed dental procedures. Review of 1,236 visits indicated that 54% (n=100) of the patients had blood cancers, 46% (n=86) had solid tumors and 63% were undergoing anticancer therapy. The proportion of males (52.7%) in the study population was slightly greater. The most common cancer was acute lymphocytic leukemia (32.2%). Cancer occurred more often among those patients aged 5 to 9 years. The most common dental procedures were restorative treatment, preventive treatment and removal of infectious foci. The characteristics of the studied population were similar to those of the general Brazilian and global populations, especially regarding gender and diagnosis distributions. The aim of implementation of the dentistry unit was to maintain good oral health and patients' quality of life, which is critical to provide oral care and prevent future oral problems.

  4. Dental approach in the pediatric oncology patient: characteristics of the population treated at the dentistry unit in a pediatric oncology brazilian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Carrillo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The objective of this paper was to characterize the population seen at the dentistry unit of the hematology-oncology service of the Oncology-Hematology Service, Instituto da Criança at the Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo. Oral problems resulting from cancer therapy increase the risk of infection, length of hospital stay, treatment cost and negative impact on the course and prognosis of the disease. METHOD: Of the 367 medical records of cancer patients seen from November 2007 until December 2008: 186 with a cancer diagnosis and complete clinical data were selected, while 20 with a cancer diagnosis and incomplete records were excluded; 161 medical records with only hematological diagnosis were also excluded. The following characteristics were assessed: ethnicity, gender, age, diagnosis and characteristics of the neoplasm, cancer therapy status and performed dental procedures. RESULTS: Review of 1,236 visits indicated that 54% (n=100 of the patients had blood cancers, 46% (n=86 had solid tumors and 63% were undergoing anticancer therapy. The proportion of males (52.7% in the study population was slightly greater. The most common cancer was acute lymphocytic leukemia (32.2%. Cancer occurred more often among those patients aged 5 to 9 years. The most common dental procedures were restorative treatment, preventive treatment and removal of infectious foci. CONCLUSION: The characteristics of the studied population were similar to those of the general Brazilian and global populations, especially regarding gender and diagnosis distributions. The aim of implementation of the dentistry unit was to maintain good oral health and patients' quality of life, which is critical to provide oral care and prevent future oral problems.

  5. [Interests of applied anthropology to oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soum-Pouyalet, Fanny; Hubert, Annie; Dilhuydy, Jean-Marie

    2008-01-01

    From now on the introduction of social and human sciences studies in the field of oncology has not always been conclusive. This article aims to analyze the bounds that border the meeting and the understanding between physicians, patients and anthropologists. It also treats the problems due to the introduction of applied anthropology in the field of oncology and points up the interests and practical contributions that this disciplinary bring and could bring.

  6. Communication problems on an oncology ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Valck, C; Van de Woestijne, K P

    1996-11-01

    Within the field of oncology, the communication of an unfavourable diagnosis is regarded as a stressful event that affects all members of the oncology team, as well as the patient. In this exploratory study we found that the communication problems between doctors, patients and nursing staff were related to insufficient information exchange. A psychosocial registration sheet was developed in order to improve communication on the ward. The effects of the new approach are briefly commented upon.

  7. American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 263: Standardizing Nomenclatures in Radiation Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Charles S; Moran, Jean M; Bosch, Walter; Xiao, Ying; McNutt, Todd; Popple, Richard; Michalski, Jeff; Feng, Mary; Marks, Lawrence B; Fuller, Clifton D; Yorke, Ellen; Palta, Jatinder; Gabriel, Peter E; Molineu, Andrea; Matuszak, Martha M; Covington, Elizabeth; Masi, Kathryn; Richardson, Susan L; Ritter, Timothy; Morgas, Tomasz; Flampouri, Stella; Santanam, Lakshmi; Moore, Joseph A; Purdie, Thomas G; Miller, Robert C; Hurkmans, Coen; Adams, Judy; Jackie Wu, Qing-Rong; Fox, Colleen J; Siochi, Ramon Alfredo; Brown, Norman L; Verbakel, Wilko; Archambault, Yves; Chmura, Steven J; Dekker, Andre L; Eagle, Don G; Fitzgerald, Thomas J; Hong, Theodore; Kapoor, Rishabh; Lansing, Beth; Jolly, Shruti; Napolitano, Mary E; Percy, James; Rose, Mark S; Siddiqui, Salim; Schadt, Christof; Simon, William E; Straube, William L; St James, Sara T; Ulin, Kenneth; Yom, Sue S; Yock, Torunn I

    2018-03-15

    A substantial barrier to the single- and multi-institutional aggregation of data to supporting clinical trials, practice quality improvement efforts, and development of big data analytics resource systems is the lack of standardized nomenclatures for expressing dosimetric data. To address this issue, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 263 was charged with providing nomenclature guidelines and values in radiation oncology for use in clinical trials, data-pooling initiatives, population-based studies, and routine clinical care by standardizing: (1) structure names across image processing and treatment planning system platforms; (2) nomenclature for dosimetric data (eg, dose-volume histogram [DVH]-based metrics); (3) templates for clinical trial groups and users of an initial subset of software platforms to facilitate adoption of the standards; (4) formalism for nomenclature schema, which can accommodate the addition of other structures defined in the future. A multisociety, multidisciplinary, multinational group of 57 members representing stake holders ranging from large academic centers to community clinics and vendors was assembled, including physicists, physicians, dosimetrists, and vendors. The stakeholder groups represented in the membership included the AAPM, American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), NRG Oncology, European Society for Radiation Oncology (ESTRO), Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG), Children's Oncology Group (COG), Integrating Healthcare Enterprise in Radiation Oncology (IHE-RO), and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine working group (DICOM WG); A nomenclature system for target and organ at risk volumes and DVH nomenclature was developed and piloted to demonstrate viability across a range of clinics and within the framework of clinical trials. The final report was approved by AAPM in October 2017. The approval process included review by 8 AAPM committees, with additional review by ASTRO

  8. Cancer patient-centered home care: a new model for health care in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tralongo P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Tralongo1, Francesco Ferraù2, Nicolò Borsellino3, Francesco Verderame4, Michele Caruso5, Dario Giuffrida6, Alfredo Butera7, Vittorio Gebbia81Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Sanitaria Provinciale, Siracusa; 2Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale San Vincenzo, Taormina; 3Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale Buccheri La Ferla, Palermo; 4Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale Giovanni Paolo II, Sciacca; 5Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Humanitas, Catania; 6Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Oncologico del Mediterraneo, Catania; 7Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale San Giovanni di Dio, Agrigento; 8Medical Oncology Unit, Dipartimento Oncologico, La Maddalena, Università degli Studi, Palermo, ItalyAbstract: Patient-centered home care is a new model of assistance, which may be integrated with more traditional hospital-centered care especially in selected groups of informed and trained patients. Patient-centered care is based on patients' needs rather than on prognosis, and takes into account the emotional and psychosocial aspects of the disease. This model may be applied to elderly patients, who present comorbid diseases, but it also fits with the needs of younger fit patients. A specialized multidisciplinary team coordinated by experienced medical oncologists and including pharmacists, psychologists, nurses, and social assistance providers should carry out home care. Other professional figures may be required depending on patients' needs. Every effort should be made to achieve optimal coordination between the health professionals and the reference hospital and to employ shared evidence-based guidelines, which in turn guarantee safety and efficacy. Comprehensive care has to be easily accessible and requires a high level of education and knowledge of the disease for both the patients and their caregivers. Patient-centered home care represents an important tool to improve quality of life and help cancer patients while also being cost effective.Keywords: cancer, home care

  9. Exercise therapy in oncology rehabilitation in Australia: A mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennett, Amy M; Peiris, Casey L; Shields, Nora; Morgan, Delwyn; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2017-10-01

    Oncology rehabilitation improves outcomes for cancer survivors but little is known about program availability in Australia. The aims of this study were: to describe oncology rehabilitation programs in Australia: determine whether the exercise component of programs is consistent with guidelines: and to explore barriers and facilitators to program implementation. A sequential, explanatory mixed-methods study was completed in two phases: (1) a survey of Australian oncology rehabilitation programs; and (2) purposively sampled follow-up semistructured interviews with senior clinicians working in oncology rehabilitation who were involved with exercise prescription. Hospitals and/or cancer centers from 42 public hospital health networks (representing 163 hospitals) and 39 private hospitals were contacted to identify 31 oncology rehabilitation programs. All 31 surveys were returned (100% response rate). Programs were typically multidisciplinary, ran twice weekly, provided education and exercise and included self-management strategies. Exercise prescription and progression was patient centered and included a combination of resistance and aerobic training supplemented by balance, pelvic floor, and core stability exercises. Challenges to implementation included a lack of awareness of programs in the community and organizational barriers such as funding. Strong links with oncologists facilitated program referrals. Despite evidence to support oncology rehabilitation, there are few programs in Australia and there are challenges that limit it becoming part of standard practice. Programs that exist are multidisciplinary with a focus on exercise with the majority of programs following a cardiac rehabilitation model of care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. A national survey of restorative consultants' treatment provision for head and neck oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, G; Barclay, S C; Owens, J S; Alani, A

    2014-11-01

    To investigate current UK practices in the treatment of head and neck oncology patients by consultants in restorative dentistry. A postal questionnaire requesting details of surgical and restorative head and neck oncology care from diagnosis to oral rehabilitation was circulated to all 315 consultants in restorative dentistry in the UK. If a reply was not received within 12 weeks a follow up was sent. One hundred and thirty-two (43%) completed questionnaires were returned. On average 46% of respondents treated head and neck oncology patients, this varied with geographical location. Sixty percent of consultants' weekly workload was less than 25% oncology related, while 13% indicated more than 75%. Of the cohort providing oncology care only 12% thought there was always time for dental screening pre-radiotherapy, furthermore 67% had difficulty liaising with primary care. Within the UK great variety existed between attendance at multidisciplinary team meetings, dental care professional support, and provision of dental implant reconstruction including timing, manufacturer, operator, and funding. Significant variation in dental input into head and neck oncology patients' pathways exists, most notably with pre-radiotherapy screening. This study highlights a change in trend for patient rehabilitation with dental implants, and an increase to 52% of restorative dentistry consultants' attendance during a multidisciplinary team meeting.

  11. A survey of the educational environment for oncologists as perceived by surgical oncology professionals in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Are Chandrakanth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current educational environment may need enhancement to tackle the rising cancer burden in India. The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of Surgical Oncologists to identify their perceptions of the current state of Oncology education in India. Methods An Institutional Review Board approved questionnaire was developed to target the audience of the 2009 annual meeting of the Indian Association of Surgical Oncology in India. The survey collected demographic information and asked respondents to provide their opinions about Oncology education in India. Results A total of 205 out of 408 attendee's participated in the survey with a 42.7% response rate. The majority of respondents felt that Oncology education was poor to fair during medical school (75%, residency (56% and for practicing physicians (71%. The majority of participants also felt that the quality of continuing medical education was poor and that minimal emphasis was placed on evidence based medicine. Conclusions The results of our survey demonstrate that the majority of respondents feel that the current educational environment for Oncology in India should be enhanced. The study identified perceptions of several gaps and needs, which can be the targets for implementing measures to enhance the training of Oncology professionals.

  12. Development and implementation of an interdisciplinary oncology program in a community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Clement; Collins, Angela; Cui, Nancy

    2011-09-15

    The development and implementation of an interdisciplinary oncology program in a community hospital are described. Before the program was established, clinical pharmacists responsible for order entry and verification did not have a defined structure and resource to effectively communicate with medical oncologists and nurses on patient care issues and oncology drug information. The practice model did not meet practice needs, departmental safety, quality, or cost-saving goals. An interdisciplinary team was established to determine where current processes and procedures were needed to decrease errors and improve efficiency associated with chemotherapy services. Three stages of practice development were planned, and an interdisciplinary oncology program involving nursing and pharmacy team members and medical oncologists was established. Standardized order forms, various pharmacy collaborative agreements, protocols, improved oncology nursing and pharmacy processes, and established standards in order writing, dispensing, administration, and monitoring were developed. An oncology pharmacist specialist position was requested, and this pharmacist played an essential role in helping the hospital realize significant cost savings and improve the quality of care provided to patients receiving chemotherapy services. Data were collected for 96 chemotherapy orders before program implementation and for 75 orders after program implementation, and a 45% reduction in total error related to chemotherapy drugs was observed (p cause of errors was missing information, typically an omitted duration or frequency, dose, route, or premedication (63% of all errors documented). The development and implementation of an interdisciplinary oncology program resulted in decreased medication-error rates, expanded pharmacy services, and cost savings.

  13. Phase 3 Oncology Clinical Trials in South Africa: Experimentation or Therapeutic Misconception?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malan, Tina; Moodley, Keymanthri

    2016-02-01

    Although clinical research in oncology is vital to improve current understanding of cancer and to validate new treatment options, voluntary informed consent is a critical component. Oncology research participants are a particularly vulnerable population; hence, therapeutic misconception often leads to ethical and legal challenges. We conducted a qualitative study administering semi-structured questionnaires on 29 adult, Phase 3, oncology clinical trial participants at three different private oncology clinical trial sites in South Africa. A descriptive content analysis was performed to identify perceptions of these participants regarding Phase 3 clinical trials. We found that most participants provided consent to be included in the trial for self-benefit. More than half of the participants had a poor understanding of Phase 3 clinical trials, and almost half the participants believed the clinical trial did not pose any significant risk to them. The word "hope" was used frequently by participants, displaying clear optimism with regard to the clinical trial and its outcome. This indicated that therapeutic misconception does occur in the South African oncology research setting and has the potential to lead to underestimation of the risks of a Phase 3 clinical trial. Emphasizing the experimental nature of a clinical trial during the consent process is critical to address therapeutic misconception in oncology research. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Exploring resilience in paediatric oncology nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Melissa; Hutton, Alison; King, Lindy

    2013-01-01

    Resilience has been suggested as an important coping strategy for nurses working in demanding settings, such as paediatric oncology. This qualitative study explored paediatric oncology nurses' perceptions of their development of resilience and how this resilience underpinned their ability to deal with work-related stressors. Five paediatric oncology nurses were interviewed about their understanding of the concept of resilience, their preferred coping mechanisms, and their day-today work in paediatric oncology. Using thematic analysis, the interviews were subsequently grouped together into seventeen initial themes. These themes were then grouped into seven major aspects that described how the participants perceived resilience underpinned their work. These "seven aspects of forming resilience" contributed to an initial understanding of how paediatric oncology nurses develop resilience in the face of their personal and professional challenges. Several key strategies derived from the findings, such as improved rostering, support to a nurse's friend and family, and a clinical support nursing role, could be implemented at an organizational level to support resilience development within the paediatric oncology setting.

  15. Recommendations for the implementation of distress screening programs in cancer centers: report from the American Psychosocial Oncology Society (APOS), Association of Oncology Social Work (AOSW), and Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) joint task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirl, William F; Fann, Jesse R; Greer, Joseph A; Braun, Ilana; Deshields, Teresa; Fulcher, Caryl; Harvey, Elizabeth; Holland, Jimmie; Kennedy, Vicki; Lazenby, Mark; Wagner, Lynne; Underhill, Meghan; Walker, Deborah K; Zabora, James; Zebrack, Bradley; Bardwell, Wayne A

    2014-10-01

    In 2015, the American College of Surgeons (ACoS) Commission on Cancer will require cancer centers to implement screening programs for psychosocial distress as a new criterion for accreditation. A joint task force from the American Psychosocial Oncology Society, the Association of Oncology Social Work, and the Oncology Nursing Society developed consensus-based recommendations to guide the implementation of this requirement. In this review, the authors provide recommendations regarding each of the 6 components necessary to meet the ACoS standard: 1) inclusion of psychosocial representation on the cancer committee, 2) timing of screening, 3) method/mode of screening, 4) tools for screening, 5) assessment and referral, and 6) documentation. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  16. The impact of physician posture during oncology patient encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arjun; Harris, Samar; Naina, Harris V

    2015-06-01

    Non-verbal communication is an important component of the physician-patient interaction. Oncology patients face specific emotional and psychological issues requiring additional physician emotional support. Multiple studies in oncology patients have revealed that patients perceive physicians seated during the medical interview to be more compassionate, caring, and likely to spend more time with the patients. These are all associated with improved patient outcomes. Barriers to sitting may be due to those imposed by time, space, and reduced perceived benefit of sitting by the physician. Although a sitting posture alone is unlikely to compensate for poor communication skills, assessing patient preference to physician posture, and following their preference, can be a simple way of improving communication, and thus patient outcomes, especially in oncology patients. The widespread introduction of the electronic medical record (EMR) system over the last decade has added a "third wheel" to the original dyadic physician-patient relationship. Physician posture and eye gaze towards to the EMR and its components has a deleterious effect on communication. Appropriate training and sensitization in this regard should be provided for physicians.

  17. A framework for prescription in exercise-oncology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasso, John P; Eves, Neil D; Christensen, Jesper F; Koelwyn, Graeme J; Scott, Jessica; Jones, Lee W

    2015-06-01

    The field of exercise-oncology has increased dramatically over the past two decades, with close to 100 published studies investigating the efficacy of structured exercise training interventions in patients with cancer. Of interest, despite considerable differences in study population and primary study end point, the vast majority of studies have tested the efficacy of an exercise prescription that adhered to traditional guidelines consisting of either supervised or home-based endurance (aerobic) training or endurance training combined with resistance training, prescribed at a moderate intensity (50-75% of a predetermined physiological parameter, typically age-predicted heart rate maximum or reserve), for two to three sessions per week, for 10 to 60 min per exercise session, for 12 to 15 weeks. The use of generic exercise prescriptions may, however, be masking the full therapeutic potential of exercise treatment in the oncology setting. Against this background, this opinion paper provides an overview of the fundamental tenets of human exercise physiology known as the principles of training, with specific application of these principles in the design and conduct of clinical trials in exercise-oncology research. We contend that the application of these guidelines will ensure continued progress in the field while optimizing the safety and efficacy of exercise treatment following a cancer diagnosis. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Society of Sarcopenia, Cachexia and Wasting Disorders.

  18. A framework for prescription in exercise-oncology research†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasso, John P; Eves, Neil D; Christensen, Jesper F; Koelwyn, Graeme J; Scott, Jessica; Jones, Lee W

    2015-01-01

    The field of exercise-oncology has increased dramatically over the past two decades, with close to 100 published studies investigating the efficacy of structured exercise training interventions in patients with cancer. Of interest, despite considerable differences in study population and primary study end point, the vast majority of studies have tested the efficacy of an exercise prescription that adhered to traditional guidelines consisting of either supervised or home-based endurance (aerobic) training or endurance training combined with resistance training, prescribed at a moderate intensity (50–75% of a predetermined physiological parameter, typically age-predicted heart rate maximum or reserve), for two to three sessions per week, for 10 to 60 min per exercise session, for 12 to 15 weeks. The use of generic exercise prescriptions may, however, be masking the full therapeutic potential of exercise treatment in the oncology setting. Against this background, this opinion paper provides an overview of the fundamental tenets of human exercise physiology known as the principles of training, with specific application of these principles in the design and conduct of clinical trials in exercise-oncology research. We contend that the application of these guidelines will ensure continued progress in the field while optimizing the safety and efficacy of exercise treatment following a cancer diagnosis. PMID:26136187

  19. [Minimally Invasive Surgery in Pediatric Oncology. Tertiary center experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Chacón Villalba, J; Rodríguez Caraballo, L; Marco Macián, A; Segarra Llido, V; Vila Carbó, J J

    2015-07-20

    To describe our experience using Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) techniques in tertiary center with specific oncological pediatric surgery unit. Retrospective review of patients undergoing MIS techniques in pediatric oncology surgery unit between January 2011 and December 2014. MIS procedures were considered made by both techniques such as laparoscopy and thoracoscopy with both diagnostic and therapeutic intent. 4 procedures were diagnostic and the rest were therapeutic: During the study, 56 procedures were performed by MIS. By type of technique, 13 were thoracoscopic (7 metastasectomies, 6 thoracic masses) and 43 laparoscopic (3 hepatic masses, 3 pancreatic masses 7 abdominal masses, 2 ovarian masses, 2 typhlitis 1 splenic mass and 25 oophorectomy for ovarian cryopreservation). In 5 cases (2 thoracic masses 1 pancreatic mass abdominal masses) conversion to open surgery to complete the procedure (2 for caution in the absence of vascular control bleeding 1 and 2 for lack of space) was necessary. In all cases safety principles of oncological surgery were respected. Providing an adecuate selection of patiens, MIS techniques are safe, reproducible and fulfill the objectives of quality of cancer surgery.

  20. POLYPHARMACY AND POTENTIALLY INAPPROPRIATE MEDICATION USE IN GERIATRIC ONCOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manvi; Loh, Kah Poh; Nightingale, Ginah; Mohile, Supriya G.; Holmes, Holly M.

    2016-01-01

    Polypharmacy is a highly prevalent problem in older persons, and is challenging to assess and improve due to variations in definitions of the problem and the heterogeneous methods of medication review and reduction. The purpose of this review is to summarize evidence regarding the prevalence and impact of polypharmacy in geriatric oncology patients and to provide recommendations for assessment and management. Polypharmacy has somewhat variably been incorporated into geriatric assessment studies in geriatric oncology, and polypharmacy has not been consistently evaluated as a predictor of negative outcomes in patients with cancer. Once screened, interventions for polypharmacy are even more uncertain. There is a great need to create standardized interventions to improve polypharmacy in geriatrics, and particularly in geriatric oncology. The process of deprescribing is aimed at reducing medications for which real or potential harm outweighs benefit, and there are numerous methods to determine which medications are candidates for deprescribing. However, deprescribing approaches have not been evaluated in older patients with cancer. Ultimately, methods to identify polypharmacy will need to be clearly defined and validated, and interventions to improve medication use will need to be based on clearly defined and standardized methods. PMID:27498305

  1. Industry progress report on neuro-oncology: a biotech update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Jessica S; Banu, Matei A; Ray, Ashley; Kesavabhotla, Kartik; Boockvar, John A

    2013-04-01

    With steadily rising revenue and large numbers of clinical trials utilizing novel treatment strategies, the field of neuro-oncology is at the core of the growing cancer therapy industry. In June 2012, the Weill Cornell Brain and Tumor Center hosted the first Brain Tumor Biotech Summit as a forum for fostering and encouraging collaboration between researches and investors to accelerate novel treatments for brain cancer. This event brought together neuro-oncologists, neurosurgeons, academicians, entrepreneurs, non-profits, CEOs and investors in an attempt to bring innovative treatments and concepts to the fore. Specific subjects presented at the meeting included new surgical devices and delivery techniques, targeted therapeutics, immunotherapy, and stem cell biology. The mission of the summit was to provide opportunities for researchers in neuro-oncology to directly interact with leaders from the investment community with insight into the commercial aspects of our work. Our shared goal is to shorten the time for basic science ideas to be translated into the clinical setting. The following serves as a progress report on the biotech industry in neuro-oncology, as presented at the Brain Tumor Biotech Summit.

  2. Radiation oncology: An Irish hospitals approach to supporting patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Caragh [Cork University Hospital (Ireland)], E-mail: caragh.miller@tcd.ie

    2009-02-15

    Despite advances in medical technology, cancer is still one of the leading causes of death globally, leaving many patients to deal with the emotional and psychological aspects associated with cancer and its treatment [Department of Health and Children. A strategy for cancer control in Ireland. National Cancer Forum. Dublin; 2006]. The recognition and management of psychological conditions are an integral part of comprehensive cancer care. As a result, the Health Services Executive as part of the continuing expansion of Cork Radiation Oncology Department created the role of Information and Support Radiation Therapist. This post was specially created during June 2005 to facilitate the smooth entry into the treatment for patients and family members experiencing radiotherapy for the first time. Working alongside the oncology nurses and other health professionals the Information and Support Radiation Therapist aims to provide vital education/information and support to patients and their families. The provision of this new service for patients enables departments to adopt a holistic approach to treatment. This research identifies the cancer services and psychological support services in Ireland. Up-to-date audits of the new patient services established in the Cork Radiation Oncology Department and their psychological contribution towards cancer development and treatment are also discussed.

  3. The impact of qualitative research on gynaecologic oncology guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    How, Jeffrey Andrew; Abitbol, Jeremie; Lau, Susie; Gotlieb, Walter Henri; Abenhaim, Haim Arie

    2015-02-01

    Inherent in the care provided to patients with cancer is an important psychosocial element which has been explored scientifically through qualitative research. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the availability of qualitative research in gynaecologic oncology and to measure its integration in gynaecologic oncology practice guidelines. We searched Medline, CINHAL, Scopus, and Web of Science databases to identify the availability of qualitative research conducted in the past 20 years on the three most prevalent gynaecologic cancers: endometrial, ovarian, and cervical cancer. National and international practice guidelines on management of gynaecologic cancers were selected using the National Guideline Clearinghouse website, the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada website, and the Standards and Guidelines Evidence directory of cancer guidelines. Bibliometric analysis was used to determine the frequency of qualitative references cited in these guidelines. One hundred thirteen qualitative research papers on gynaecologic cancers were identified focusing on psychological impacts, social dynamics, and doctor-patient interactions during cancer treatment and recovery. Among the 15 national and international clinical practice guidelines identified on management of gynaecologic cancer, there were a total of 2272 references, and of these only three references citing qualitative research were identified (0.1%) in only one of the 15 practice guidelines. Although qualitative research is being carried out in gynaecologic oncology, its integration into clinical practice guidelines is essentially absent. Efforts to narrow the gap between qualitative research and clinical practice are essential in ensuring a comprehensive approach to the treatment of patients with gynaecologic cancer.

  4. Asociación de Hemato-Oncología Pediátrica de Centro América (AHOPCA): a model for sustainable development in pediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Ronald D; Antillón Klussmann, Federico; Baez, Fulgencio; Bonilla, Miguel; Moreno, Belgica; Navarrete, Marta; Nieves, Rosa; Peña, Armando; Conter, Valentino; De Alarcón, Pedro; Howard, Scott C; Ribeiro, Raul C; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Biondi, Andrea; Velez, George; Tognoni, Gianni; Cavalli, Franco; Masera, Giuseppe

    2014-02-01

    Bridging the survival gap for children with cancer, between those (the great majority) in low and middle income countries (LMIC) and their economically advantaged counterparts, is a challenge that has been addressed by twinning institutions in high income countries with centers in LMIC. The long-established partnership between a Central American consortium--Asociación de Hemato-Oncología Pediátrica de Centro América (AHOPCA)--and institutions in Europe and North America provides a striking example of such a twinning program. The demonstrable success of this endeavor offers a model for improving the health outcomes of children with cancer worldwide. As this remarkable enterprise celebrates its 15th anniversary, it is appropriate to reflect on its origin, subsequent growth and development, and the lessons it provides for others embarking on or already engaged in similar journeys. Many challenges have been encountered and not all yet overcome. Commitment to the endeavor, collaboration in its achievements and determination to overcome obstacles collectively are the hallmarks that stamp AHOPCA as a particularly successful partnership in advancing pediatric oncology in the developing world. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. New science-based endpoints to accelerate oncology drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelloff, Gary J; Sigman, Caroline C

    2005-03-01

    Although several new oncology drugs have reached the market, more than 80% of drugs for all indications entering clinical development do not get marketing approval, with many failing late in development often in Phase III trials, because of unexpected safety issues or difficulty determining efficacy, including confounded outcomes. These factors contribute to the high costs of oncology drug development and clearly show the need for faster, more cost-effective strategies for evaluating oncology drugs and better definition of patients who will benefit from treatment. Remarkable advances in the understanding of neoplastic progression at the cellular and molecular levels have spurred the discovery of molecularly targeted drugs. This progress along with advances in imaging and bioassay technologies are the basis for describing and evaluating new biomarker endpoints as well as for defining other biomarkers for identifying patient populations, potential toxicity, and providing evidence of drug effect and efficacy. Definitions and classifications of these biomarkers for use in oncology drug development are presented in this paper. Science-based and practical criteria for validating biomarkers have been developed including considerations of mechanistic plausibility, available methods and technology, and clinical feasibility. New promising tools for measuring biomarkers have also been developed and are based on genomics and proteomics, direct visualisation by microscopy (e.g., confocal microscopy and computer-assisted image analysis of cellular features), nanotechnologies, and direct and remote imaging (e.g., fluorescence endoscopy and anatomical, functional and molecular imaging techniques). The identification and evaluation of potential surrogate endpoints and other biomarkers require access to and analysis of large amounts of data, new technologies and extensive research resources. Further, there is a requirement for a convergence of research, regulatory and drug developer

  6. Early phase Technology Assessment of nanotechnology in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retèl, Valesca P; Hummel, Marjan J M; van Harten, Willem H

    2008-01-01

    To perform early Technology Assessment (TA) of nanotechnology in oncology. The possibilities of nanotechnology for detection (imaging), diagnosis and treatment of cancer are subject of different research programs where major investments are concerned. As a range of bio- nanotechnologies is expected to enter the oncology field it is relevant to consider the various aspects involved in especially early TA. This article provides two cases of early assessment of (predecessors of) nanotechnologies: Microarray Analysis and Photodynamic Therapy implementation, which methodology can be extrapolated to other nanotechnologies in oncology. Constructive Technology Assessment (CTA) is used for the introduction of technologies that are still in a dynamic phase of development or in an early stage of diffusion. The selection of studied aspects in CTA is based on: clinical aspects (safety, efficacy, and effectiveness), economic (cost-effectiveness), patient related (QoL, ethical/juridical and psychosocial), organizational aspects (diffusion and adoption) and scenario drafting. The features of the technology and the phase of implementation are decisive for choices and timing of the specific aspects to be studied. A framework was drafted to decide on the relevant aspects. In the first case, early implementation of Microarray Analysis; clinical effectiveness, logistics, patient centeredness and scenario drafting were given priority. Related to the diffusion-phase of Photodynamic Therapy however other aspects were evaluated, such as early cost-effectiveness analysis for possible reimbursement. Often CTA will result in a mixed method design. Especially scenario drafting is a powerful instrument to predict possible developments that can be anticipated upon in the assessment. CTA is appropriate for the study of early implementation of new technologies in oncology. In early TA small series often necessitate a mix of quantitative and qualitative methods. The features of nanotechnology

  7. Radical cystectomy with orthotopic neobladder for invasive bladder cancer: a critical analysis of long-term oncological, functional, and quality of life results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagele, Udo; Anastasiadis, Aristotelis G; Stenzl, Arnulf; Kuczyk, Markus

    2012-12-01

    The present contribution analyses long-term data regarding oncological, functional, and quality of life aspects of patients subjected to cystectomy due to malignancy with subsequent orthotopic bladder substitution. A literature search was conducted to review literature published from 1887 until today. Oncological aspects, special considerations on female patients, quality of life, geriatric patients, and impact of minimally invasive surgery were also addressed and discussed. After more than three decades, orthotopic bladder substitution subsequent to radical cystectomy has stood the test of time by providing adequate long-term survival and low local recurrence rates. Compared to radical cystectomy, neither radiation nor chemotherapy, nor a combination of both, offer similar long-term results. Orthotopic bladder substitution does not compromise oncological outcome and can be performed with excellent results regarding functional and quality of life issues. Chronological age is generally not a contraindication for cystectomy. Orthotopic bladder substitution should be the diversion of choice both in men and in women, whenever possible. For orthotopic urinary diversion, a careful patient selection considering tumor extent, patient motivation, preoperative sphincter function, other local and systemic adverse confounding factors, and overall life expectancy must be taken into account. Minimally invasive techniques are promising concepts for the future, awaiting confirmation in larger patient cohorts.

  8. Comprehensive geriatric assessment and its clinical impact in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Huub A A M; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L G; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M; Machteld Wymenga, A N

    2007-10-01

    toxicity, similar to depressive symptoms and polypharmacy. Overall, CGA implements/collects information additional to chronological age and Performance Score. So far in oncology there are no prognostic validation studies reported using geriatric syndromes or information based on CGA in its decision making strategies.

  9. Stress and burnout in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kash, K M; Holland, J C; Breitbart, W; Berenson, S; Dougherty, J; Ouellette-Kobasa, S; Lesko, L

    2000-11-01

    This article identifies the professional stressors experienced by nurses, house staff, and medical oncologists and examines the effect of stress and personality attributes on burnout scores. A survey was conducted of 261 house staff, nurses, and medical oncologists in a cancer research hospital, and oncologists in outside clinical practices. It measured burnout, psychological distress, and physical symptoms. Each participant completed a questionnaire that quantified life stressors, personality attributes, burnout, psychological distress, physical symptoms, coping strategies, and social support. The results showed that house staff experienced the greatest burnout. They also reported greater emotional exhaustion, a feeling of emotional distance from patients, and a poorer sense of personal accomplishment. Negative work events contributed significantly to level of burnout; however, having a "hardy" personality helped to alleviate burnout. Nurses reported more physical symptoms than house staff and oncologists. However, they were less emotionally distant from patients. Women reported a lower sense of accomplishment and greater distress. The four most frequent methods of relaxing were talking to friends, using humor, drinking coffee or eating, and watching television. One unexpected finding was that the greater the perception of oneself as religious, the lower the level of burnout. Thus, while the rewards of working in oncology are usually sufficient to keep nurses and doctors in the field, they also experience burnout symptoms that vary by gender and personal attributes. House staff are most stressed and report the greatest and most severe symptoms of stress. Interventions are needed that address the specific problems of each group.

  10. Meeting report on the first Sino-Dutch symposium on oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. Peppelenbosch (Maikel)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractOn October 31, 2015, the first Sino-Dutch symposium on oncology was organized in Guangzhou (China). The symposium revealed similarities between Chinese and Dutch efforts to improve the care of tumor patients and to create enhanced insight into the nature of cancers. In particular, it

  11. Hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline endorsement of the familial risk-colorectal cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Elena M; Mangu, Pamela B; Gruber, Stephen B; Hamilton, Stanley R; Kalady, Matthew F; Lau, Michelle Wan Yee; Lu, Karen H; Roach, Nancy; Limburg, Paul J

    2015-01-10

    To provide recommendations on prevention, screening, genetics, treatment, and management for people at risk for hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) syndromes. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. The Familial Risk-Colorectal Cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline published in 2013 on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Guidelines Working Group in Annals of Oncology was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists, with content and recommendations reviewed by an ASCO endorsement panel. The ASCO endorsement panel determined that the recommendations of the ESMO guidelines are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. The ASCO panel endorsed the ESMO guidelines and added a few qualifying statements. Approximately 5% to 6% of patient cases of CRC are associated with germline mutations that confer an inherited predisposition for cancer. The possibility of a hereditary cancer syndrome should be assessed for every patient at the time of CRC diagnosis. A diagnosis of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, or another genetic syndrome can influence clinical management for patients with CRC and their family members. Screening for hereditary cancer syndromes in patients with CRC should include review of personal and family histories and testing of tumors for DNA mismatch repair deficiency and/or microsatellite instability. Formal genetic evaluation is recommended for individuals who meet defined criteria. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  12. More Similar Than Different

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mogens Jin

    2015-01-01

    What role do employee features play into the success of different personnel management practices for serving high performance? Using data from a randomized survey experiment among 5,982 individuals of all ages, this article examines how gender conditions the compliance effects of different...... incentive treatments—each relating to the basic content of distinct types of personnel management practices. The findings show that males and females are more similar than different in terms of the incentive treatments’ effects: Significant average effects are found for three out of five incentive...

  13. Interpreting the economic literature in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grusenmeyer, Patrick A; Wong, Yu-Ning

    2007-01-10

    New treatment options provide hope for patients with localized and advanced cancer. However, these advances are associated with cost, both in terms of treatment-related expenditures and effects on quality of life. It is important that patients, physicians, insurers, and policymakers understand the relationship between costs and outcomes of new cancer treatments. Various methods of cost analysis can provide a structured manner to assess cost. Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) compares the cost of the intervention with the effect, resulting in a cost per effect (eg, cost per year of life gained) that can be compared across interventions. In this article, we review three recent CEAs in the oncology literature, including chemoprevention in breast cancer, adjuvant endocrine therapy in early-stage breast cancer, and salvage chemotherapy in advanced ovarian cancer. The important elements of CEA, including the recommendations of the US Public Health Service Panel on Cost Effectiveness in Health and Medicine as they relate to cancer treatments, are discussed. Many well-done CEAs in cancer treatment have been performed during the last decade. As with clinical trials, the rigor and methods of the analysis are critical to the reliability of the results. Therapies with high cost and small incremental improvement in survival and/or quality of life may find it difficult to meet the societal thresholds for what is considered cost effective. CEA is a method to assess the cost and effect of cancer treatments, providing important insights into the best use (ie, obtaining the most value for) of health care expenditures. As the literature indicates, one must be cognizant of the fact that there can be extraordinary costs associated with some newer cancer therapies that provide small incremental clinical benefit. Better understanding of the cancer economic literature can help lead to an informed dialogue on the health policy implications of resource allocation in cancer care.

  14. Hematology-Oncology Fellows' Training in Geriatrics and Geriatric Oncology: Findings From an American Society of Clinical Oncology-Sponsored National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiore, Ronald J; Dale, William; Hurria, Arti; Klepin, Heidi D; Chapman, Andrew; Dotan, Efrat; Mohile, Supriya G; Naeim, Arash; Gajra, Ajeet; Buss, Mary K

    2017-11-01

    Older adults compose the majority of patients with cancer in the United States; however, it is unclear how well geriatrics or geriatric oncology training is being incorporated into hematology-oncology (hem-onc) fellowships. A convenience sample of hem-onc fellows completed a (written or electronic) survey assessing their education, clinical experiences, and perceived proficiency in geriatric oncology during training; knowledge base in geriatric oncology; confidence in managing older adults with cancer; and general attitudes toward geriatric oncology principles. Forty-five percent of respondents (N = 138) were female, 67% were based in the United States, and most (60%) were past their first year of training. Most fellows rated geriatric oncology as important or very important (84%); however, only 25% reported having access to a geriatric oncology clinic and more than one half (53%) reported no lectures in geriatric oncology. Fellows reported fewer educational experiences in geriatric oncology than in nongeriatric oncology. For example, among procedure-based activities, 12% learned how to perform a geriatric assessment but 78% learned how to perform a bone marrow biopsy ( P geriatric oncology. The high value fellows place on geriatric oncology suggests that they would be receptive to additional training in this area.

  15. Theranostic applications of antibodies in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleuren, Emmy D G; Versleijen-Jonkers, Yvonne M H; Heskamp, Sandra; van Herpen, Carla M L; Oyen, Wim J G; van der Graaf, Winette T A; Boerman, Otto C

    2014-06-01

    Targeted therapies, including antibodies, are becoming increasingly important in cancer therapy. Important limitations, however, are that not every patient benefits from a specific antibody therapy and that responses could be short-lived due to acquired resistance. In addition, targeted therapies are quite expensive and are not completely devoid of side-effects. This urges the need for accurate patient selection and response monitoring. An important step towards personalizing antibody treatment could be the implementation of theranostics. Antibody theranostics combine the diagnostic and therapeutic potential of an antibody, thereby selecting those patients who are most likely to benefit from antibody treatment. This review focuses on the clinical application of theranostic antibodies in oncology. It provides detailed information concerning the suitability of antibodies for theranostics, the different types of theranostic tests available and summarizes the efficacy of theranostic antibodies used in current clinical practice. Advanced theranostic applications, including radiolabeled antibodies for non-invasive functional imagining, are also addressed. Finally, we discuss the importance of theranostics in the emerging field of personalized medicine and critically evaluate recent data to determine the best way to apply antibody theranostics in the future. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Familial cancer in an oncology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, W A; Lynch, H T; Recabaren, J A; Organ, C H; Mailliard, J A; Black, L E; Follett, K L; Lynch, J

    1981-05-01

    Knowledge of cancer genetics provides the physician with a powerful tool for the recognition of patients who might profit from highly targeted cancer surveillance/management programs. Family history was evaluated by registered nurses on 565 consecutively ascertained patients with verified cancer from Creighton's Oncology Clinic. This initial assessment yielded 199 (35.5%) families with two more family members with cancer (all sites) within an informative nuclear component, which constituted parents, grandparents, aunts/uncles, siblings, and children. One or more of the operational criteria for cancer familiality, namely vertical transmission of cancer, bilaterality, and/or multiple primaries, early age of onset, and three or more site specific cancers, were found on physician review in 171 (30.5%) of the families. This group was referred for comprehensive cancer genetic evaluation consisting of pedigree extension and tumor verification through all second degree, and when possible, third degree relatives. It was determined that approximately 4% of the total clinic population demonstrated findings compatible with hereditary cancer syndromes. Its universal extension in clinical practice is advocated because of the potential yield from meticulous surveillance for cancer of highly targeted organs in such high-risk kindreds, as well as the economy and general case of obtaining detailed family history by registered nurses. The physician is able, therefore, to devote his primary effort toward pedigree analysis and syndrome identification.

  17. Mobile Apps in Oncology: A Survey on Health Care Professionals' Attitude Toward Telemedicine, mHealth, and Oncological Apps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kerstin A; Vogel, Marco Me; Schmidt-Graf, Friederike; Combs, Stephanie E

    2016-11-24

    Mobile apps are an evolving trend in the medical field. To date, few apps in an oncological context exist. The aim was to analyze the attitude of health care professionals (HCPs) toward telemedicine, mHealth, and mobile apps in the field of oncology. We developed and conducted an online survey with 24 questions evaluating HCPs' general attitude toward telemedicine and patients using medical mobile apps. Specific questions on the possible functionality for patients and the resulting advantages and disadvantages for both the patients' and HCPs' daily clinical routine were evaluated. A total of 108 HCPs completed the survey. In all, 88.9% (96/108) considered telemedicine useful and 84.3% (91/108) supported the idea of an oncological app complementing classical treatment. Automatic reminders, timetables, and assessment of side effects and quality of life during therapy were rated as the most important functions. In contrast, uncertainty regarding medical responsibility and data privacy were reasons mostly named by critics. Most (64.8%, 70/108) were in favor of an alert function due to data input needing further clarification, and 94% (66/70) were willing to contact the patient after a critical alert. In all, 93.5% (101/108) supported the idea of using the collected data for scientific research. Moreover, 75.0% (81/108) believed establishing a mobile app could be beneficial for the providing hospital. A majority of HCPs are in favor of telemedicine and the use of oncological apps by patients. Assessing side effects can lead to quicker response and thus lower inconvenience for patients. Clinical data, such as life quality and treatment satisfaction, could be used to evaluate and improve the therapy workflow. Eventually, a mobile app would enhance the patients' relationship to their treating department because they are in permanent contact.

  18. Early Integration of Palliative Care in Oncology Practice: Results of the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM) Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagonel, Vittorina; Torta, Riccardo; Franciosi, Vittorio; Brunello, Antonella; Biasco, Guido; Cattaneo, Daniela; Cavanna, Luigi; Corsi, Domenico; Farina, Gabriella; Fioretto, Luisa; Gamucci, Teresa; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Magarotto, Roberto; Maltoni, Marco; Mastromauro, Cataldo; Melotti, Barbara; Meriggi, Fausto; Pavese, Ida; Piva, Erico; Sacco, Cosimo; Tonini, Giuseppe; Trentin, Leonardo; Ermacora, Paola; Varetto, Antonella; Merlin, Federica; Gori, Stefania; Cascinu, Stefano; Pinto, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early integration of palliative care in oncology practice (“simultaneous care”, SC) has been shown to provide better care resulting in improved quality-of-life and also survival. We evaluated the opinions of Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM) members. Patients and methods: A 37-item questionnaire was delivered to 1119 AIOM members. Main areas covered were: social, ethical, relational aspects of disease and communication, training, research, organizational and management models in SC. Three open questions explored the definition of Quality of Life, Medical Oncologist and Palliative Care. Results: Four hundred and forty-nine (40.1%) medical oncologists returned the questionnaires. Forty-nine percent stated they address non-curability when giving a diagnosis of metastatic tumor, and 43% give the information only to patients who clearly ask for it. Fifty-five percent say the main formative activity in palliative medicine came from attending meetings and 90% agree that specific palliative care training should be part of the core curriculum in oncology. Twenty-two percent stated they consulted guidelines for symptom management, 45% relied upon personal experience and 26% make a referral to a palliative care specialist. Seventy-four percent were in favor of more research in palliative medicine. An integration between Units of Oncology and Palliative Care Services early in the course of advanced disease was advocated by 86%. Diverse and multifaceted definitions were given for the concepts of Quality of Life, Palliative Care and Medical Oncologist. Conclusion: SC is felt as an important task, as well as training of medical oncologists in symptom management and research in this field. PMID:27877212

  19. Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group: Development of the Assessment of New Radiation Oncology Technology and Treatments (ANROTAT) Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchesne, Gillian M; Grand, Mel; Kron, Tomas; Haworth, Annette; Corry, June; Jackson, Michael; Ng, Michael; Besuijen, Deidre; Carter, Hannah E; Martin, Andrew; Schofield, Deborah; Gebski, Val; Torony, Joan; Kovacev, Olga; Amin, Rowena; Burmeister, Bryan

    2015-06-01

    The study aim was to develop a generic framework to derive the parameters to populate health-economic models for the rapid evaluation of new techniques and technologies in radiation oncology. A draft framework was developed through horizon scanning for relevant technologies, literature review to identify framework models, and a workshop program with radiation oncology professionals, biostatisticians, health economists and consumers to establish the Framework's structure. It was tested using four clinical protocols, comparing intensity modulated with 3D conformal therapy (post-prostatectomy, anal canal and nasopharynx) and image-guided radiation therapy techniques with off-line review of portal imaging (in the intact prostate). The draft generic research framework consisted of five sequential stages, each with a number of components, and was assessed as to its suitability for deriving the evidence needed to populate the decision-analytic models required for the health-economic evaluations. A final Framework was established from this experience for use by future researchers to provide evidence of clinical efficacy and cost-utility for other novel techniques. The four clinical treatment sites tested during the project were considered suitable to use in future evaluations. Development of a generic research framework to predict early and long-term clinical outcomes, combined with health-economic data, produced a generally applicable method for the rapid evaluation of new techniques and technologies in radiation oncology. Its application to further health technology assessments in the radiation oncology sector will allow further refinement and support its generalisability. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  20. Music therapy: a valuable adjunct in the oncology setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Emily M; Mahon, Suzanne M

    2011-08-01

    Music therapy is the supervised and therapeutic use of music by a credentialed therapist to promote positive clinical outcomes. It can be a valuable form of complementary medicine in the oncology setting to decrease patient stress and anxiety, relieve pain and nausea, provide distraction, alleviate depression, and promote the expression of feelings. The music therapist assesses the patient and consults other members of the multidisciplinary team to create a therapeutic treatment plan. Music therapists design music sessions based on patients' needs and their intended therapeutic goals. Patients can participate actively or passively in individual or group sessions. Only a credentialed music therapist can provide safe and beneficial music therapy interventions.

  1. Medicare Provider Data - Hospice Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Hospice Utilization and Payment Public Use File provides information on services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by hospice providers. The Hospice PUF...

  2. Frailty and cancer: Implications for oncology surgery, medical oncology, and radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethun, Cecilia G; Bilen, Mehmet A; Jani, Ashesh B; Maithel, Shishir K; Ogan, Kenneth; Master, Viraj A

    2017-09-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The concept of frailty has become increasingly recognized as one of the most important issues in health care and health outcomes and is of particular importance in patients with cancer who are receiving treatment with surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Because both cancer itself, as well as the therapies offered, can be significant additional stressors that challenge a patient's physiologic reserve, the incidence of frailty in older patients with cancer is especially high-it is estimated that over one-half of older patients with cancer have frailty or prefrailty. Defining frailty can be challenging, however. Put simply, frailty is a state of extreme vulnerability to stressors that leads to adverse health outcomes. In reality, frailty is a complex, multidimensional, and cyclical state of diminished physiologic reserve that results in decreased resiliency and adaptive capacity and increased vulnerability to stressors. In addition, over 70 different measures of frailty have been proposed. Still, it has been demonstrated that frail patients are at increased risk of postoperative complications, chemotherapy intolerance, disease progression, and death. Although international standardization of frailty cutoff points are needed, continued efforts by oncology physicians and surgeons to identify frailty and promote multidisciplinary decision making will help to develop more individualized management strategies and optimize care for patients with cancer. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:362-377. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  3. Conversation level syntax similarity metric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghrati, Reihane; Hoover, Joe; Johnson, Kate M; Garten, Justin; Dehghani, Morteza

    2017-07-11

    The syntax and semantics of human language can illuminate many individual psychological differences and important dimensions of social interaction. Accordingly, psychological and psycholinguistic research has begun incorporating sophisticated representations of semantic content to better understand the connection between word choice and psychological processes. In this work we introduce ConversAtion level Syntax SImilarity Metric (CASSIM), a novel method for calculating conversation-level syntax similarity. CASSIM estimates the syntax similarity between conversations by automatically generating syntactical representations of the sentences in conversation, estimating the structural differences between them, and calculating an optimized estimate of the conversation-level syntax similarity. After introducing and explaining this method, we report results from two method validation experiments (Study 1) and conduct a series of analyses with CASSIM to investigate syntax accommodation in social media discourse (Study 2). We run the same experiments using two well-known existing syntactic metrics, LSM and Coh-Metrix, and compare their results to CASSIM. Overall, our results indicate that CASSIM is able to reliably measure syntax similarity and to provide robust evidence of syntax accommodation within social media discourse.

  4. Similar or different?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornér, Solveig; Pyhältö, Kirsi; Peltonen, Jouni

    2018-01-01

    experienced by PhD students within the same discipline. This study explores the support experiences of 381 PhD students within the humanities and social sciences from three research-intensive universities in Denmark (n=145) and Finland (n=236). The mixed methods design was utilized. The data were collected...... counter partners, whereas the Finnish students perceived lower levels of instrumental support than the Danish students. The findings imply that seemingly similar contexts hold valid differences in experienced social support and educational strategies at the PhD level.......Previous research has identified researcher community and supervisory support as key determinants of the doctoral journey contributing to students’ persistence and robustness. However, we still know little about cross-cultural variation in the researcher community and supervisory support...

  5. Quality-of-life outcomes in patients with gynecologic cancer referred to integrative oncology treatment during chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Samuels, Noah; Schiff, Elad; Raz, Orit Gressel; Sharabi, Ilanit Shalom; Lavie, Ofer

    2015-12-01

    Integrative oncology incorporates complementary medicine (CM) therapies in patients with cancer. We explored the impact of an integrative oncology therapeutic regimen on quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes in women with gynecological cancer undergoing chemotherapy. A prospective preference study examined patients referred by oncology health care practitioners (HCPs) to an integrative physician (IP) consultation and CM treatments. QOL and chemotherapy-related toxicities were evaluated using the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) and Measure Yourself Concerns and Wellbeing (MYCAW) questionnaire, at baseline and at a 6-12-week follow-up assessment. Adherence to the integrative care (AIC) program was defined as ≥ 4 CM treatments, with ≤ 30 days between each session. Of 128 patients referred by their HCP, 102 underwent IP consultation and subsequent CM treatments. The main concerns expressed by patients were fatigue (79.8%), gastrointestinal symptoms (64.6%), pain and neuropathy (54.5 %), and emotional distress (45.5%). Patients in both AIC (n = 68) and non-AIC (n = 28) groups shared similar demographic, treatment, and cancer-related characteristics. ESAS fatigue scores improved by a mean of 1.97 points in the AIC group on a scale of 0-10 and worsened by a mean of 0.27 points in the non-AIC group (p = 0.033). In the AIC group, MYCAW scores improved significantly (p < 0.0001) for each of the leading concerns as well as for well-being, a finding which was not apparent in the non-AIC group. An IP-guided CM treatment regimen provided to patients with gynecological cancer during chemotherapy may reduce cancer-related fatigue and improve other QOL outcomes.

  6. Knowledge, Perceived Ability and Practice Behaviors Regarding Oral Health among Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Antiana D; Iida, Hiroko; Patton, Lauren L; Wilder, Rebecca S

    2015-08-01

    Oral complications are common in children undergoing head and neck radiation and chemotherapy. The purpose of this study is to examine the knowledge, perceived ability and practice behaviors of pediatric oncology and hematology nurses in assisting with the various oral health care needs of pediatric oncology patients and to identify pediatric oncology nurses' previous training/education, practice types and other demographic characteristics that are related to their oral health competencies. A survey of a convenience sample of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology Nurses was conducted during the Association of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology Nurses' (APHON) 36(th) Annual Conference and Exhibit. Descriptive analysis and the exploratory factor analyses were performed using SAS version 9.2 (SAS Institute, Inc., Cary, NC). Among the 300 surveys that were distributed, 235 surveys were completed (78% response rate) by pediatric oncology or hematology nurses who provide direct patient care in the U.S. Approximately 75% reported receiving less than 3 hours of oral health related education/training. Sixty percent did not have a clinical requirement regarding the assessment of the teeth and gums during their nursing school education. Bivariate analyses indicated that nurses who had clinical requirements regarding oral health assessment during nursing education/training presented greater overall oral health competencies including having greater confidence in examining oral complications than those who did not. Pediatric oncology nurses' knowledge, perceived ability and practice in assisting patient's oral hygiene care, preventing and managing oral complications vary by topic and might reflect their educational preparedness. This study may provide valuable information pertaining to the need and opportunity for interprofessional oral health care education and collaboration with nursing and dental professionals, in order to increase access to comprehensive oral care for pediatric

  7. Psycho-oncology: Searching for practical wisdom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butlin, Helen

    2015-10-01

    The debate is vigorous in psycho-oncology about whether spiritual, existential, and psychosocial are the most comprehensive terms for academic research discourses investigating meaning and purpose. A call-to-action email from the International Society of Psycho-Oncology included the term soul. The current essay highlights the historical and contemporary uses of "soul" to suggest that the re-emergent soul signifies a tacit quest for an "intangible" that seems missing in current constructs of clinical domains reflected in the vigor of the debates. It is suggested that the re-emergence of the pre-Medieval meaning(s) of the notion of soul affirms a growing need for integrative paradigms on "being human" to guide psycho-oncology practitioners and their research. As a paradigmatic example, a clinical support group entitled Soul Medicine is described as employing the term soul to open up the more marginal discourses about experiences of illness arising from philosophical reflection, arts, humanities, and spirituality within a clinical oncology context. A link between soul and wisdom is suggested for further exploration with the view that phronesis ("the virtue of practical wisdom"), an emerging concept in health professional education research, is of ultimate value to the people psycho-oncology seeks to serve. This group holds that garnering wisdom from the expertise of those living with cancer should be a central aim of our field.

  8. 2016 Updated American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards, Including Standards for Pediatric Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuss, Michael N; Gilmore, Terry R; Belderson, Kristin M; Billett, Amy L; Conti-Kalchik, Tara; Harvey, Brittany E; Hendricks, Carolyn; LeFebvre, Kristine B; Mangu, Pamela B; McNiff, Kristen; Olsen, MiKaela; Schulmeister, Lisa; Von Gehr, Ann; Polovich, Martha

    2016-12-01

    Purpose To update the ASCO/Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards and to highlight standards for pediatric oncology. Methods The ASCO/ONS Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards were first published in 2009 and updated in 2011 to include inpatient settings. A subsequent 2013 revision expanded the standards to include the safe administration and management of oral chemotherapy. A joint ASCO/ONS workshop with stakeholder participation, including that of the Association of Pediatric Hematology Oncology Nurses and American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, was held on May 12, 2015, to review the 2013 standards. An extensive literature search was subsequently conducted, and public comments on the revised draft standards were solicited. Results The updated 2016 standards presented here include clarification and expansion of existing standards to include pediatric oncology and to introduce new standards: most notably, two-person verification of chemotherapy preparation processes, administration of vinca alkaloids via minibags in facilities in which intrathecal medications are administered, and labeling of medications dispensed from the health care setting to be taken by the patient at home. The standards were reordered and renumbered to align with the sequential processes of chemotherapy prescription, preparation, and administration. Several standards were separated into their respective components for clarity and to facilitate measurement of adherence to a standard. Conclusion As oncology practice has changed, so have chemotherapy administration safety standards. Advances in technology, cancer treatment, and education and training have prompted the need for periodic review and revision of the standards. Additional information is available at http://www.asco.org/chemo-standards .

  9. Geriatric oncology: comparing health related quality of life in head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Augusta P; Gonçalves, Joaquim; Sequeira, Teresa; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Lopes, Carlos; Monteiro, Eurico; Pimentel, Francisco L

    2011-01-13

    Population ageing is increasing the number of people annually diagnosed with cancer worldwide, once most types of tumours are age-dependent. High-quality healthcare in geriatric oncology requires a multimodal approach and should take into account stratified patient outcomes based on factors other than chronological age in order to develop interventions able to optimize oncology care.This study aims to evaluate the Health Related Quality of Life in head and neck cancer patients and compare the scores in geriatric and younger patients. Two hundred and eighty nine head and neck cancer patients from the Oncology Portuguese Institute participated in the Health Related Quality of Life assessment. Two patient groups were considered: the geriatric (≥ 65 years old, n = 115) and the younger (45-60 years old, n= 174). The EORTC QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-H&N35 questionnaires were used. Head and neck cancer patients were mostly males, 77.4% within geriatric group and 91.4% among younger patients group.The most frequent tumour locations were similar in both groups: larynx, oral cavity and oropharynx - base of the tongue.At the time of diagnosis, most of younger male patients were at disease stage III/IV (55.9%) whereas the majority of younger female patients were at disease stage I/II (83.4%). The geriatric patient distribution was found to be similar in any of the four disease stages and no gender differences were observed.We found that age (geriatrics scored generally worse), gender (females scored generally worse), and tumour site (larynx tumours denounce more significant problems between age groups) clearly influences Health Related Quality of Life perceptions. Geriatric oncology assessments signalize age-independent indicators that might guide oncologic geriatric care optimization. Decision-making in geriatric oncology must be based on tumour characteristics and chronological age but also on performance status evaluation, co-morbidity, and patient reported outcomes assessment.

  10. Place and provision of palliative care for children with progressive cancer: a study by the Paediatric Oncology Nurses' Forum/United Kingdom Children's Cancer Study Group Palliative Care Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Jan; Thompson, Anne; Collins, Gary S; Childs, Margaret; Hain, Richard

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and show effectiveness of the outreach team model of palliative care (PC) in allowing home death for children with incurable cancer. Over 7 months, 185 children from 22 United Kingdom oncology centers were recruited to a prospective questionnaire survey. One hundred sixty-four children from 22 centers died (median age, 8.7 years; 88 boys, 76 girls). One hundred twenty-six families completed two or more questionnaires. One hundred twenty (77%) of 155 with complete data died at home. Preference for home death was recorded in 90 (68%) of 164 and 132 (80%) 164 at study entry and last month of life, respectively. Death occurred in preferred place for 84 (80%) of 105 with recorded preference at entry. Forty-one (25%) of 164 and 68 (41.5%) of 164 needed no outpatient or inpatient hospital visits, respectively. A named individual provided on-call PC advice by phone or home visit in 22 (100%) and 18 (82%) of 22 oncology centers, respectively. As PC progressed, involvement of oncologist and social worker appeared less, whereas pediatric oncology outreach nurse specialists (POONSs) remained prominent. Preference for home death expressed by families in our study is similar to others, but the proportion of children actually able to die there is higher. Home death is facilitated by this model. Key components are POONSs, pediatric palliative and/or oncology specialist, and general practitioner. Professional roles change during PC and after death. An ongoing role for the oncology team in bereavement support is highlighted.

  11. On the Way to New Horizons: Telemedicine in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlag

    1997-01-01

    created, which the user may explore and liberally interact with. The perfect simulation of realistic settings offers a method of training that may be extended to the field of oncology, as it has been known for a comparatively long period of time from flight simulators in space and air technology. In contrast, medical training is currently achieved mainly by "training-on-the-job." There is well-proven and widely acknowledged certainty of the tremendous influence that the number of surgical interventions-in other words, the training skills of the surgeon-has on the success of a diagnostic or therapeutic intervention. Previously, the subjective experience of the physician acquired from earlier cases determined his efficiency to a large extent. It was, in addition, influenced essentially by perception, "performance on the day" and personal attitude. The goal must be to strengthen the objective criteria as the basis for consistent decision-making processes and clear instructions for therapy. Strict quality management as practiced in air technology has clearly led to a reduction in accidents, and, accordingly, a similar effect is imaginable in oncology with continuous training using VR simulators, leading to improved therapeutic outcome. Other possibilities for use are principally implied and similarly useful for medical school and postgraduate training. The idea of computer-guided medical procedures or medical robots is therefore no longer a mere utopia. Telepresence, telerobotic and VR techniques should, in principle, effectively support the physician in diagnostic processes and therapy. The responsibility for coordination and sensible use of new technological developments will still remain with the physician, such as improving and simplifying medical procedures. Technology should be used according to the situation, not to adapt the patient to a technocratic environment, but to emphasize human treatment of the individual patient. From the opinion of the telephone being a

  12. Integration of a clinical pharmacist into the hematology-oncology clinics at an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valgus, John M; Faso, Aimee; Gregory, Kelly M; Jarr, Sandra; Savage, Scott; Caiola, Stephen; Walko, Christine M; Kim, Jiyeun; Bernard, Stephen A

    2011-04-01

    The development, implementation, and early experience with a program providing clinical pharmacist services at the hematology-oncology clinics of a university teaching hospital are described. With funding from a university research grant and other sources, a pharmacist was hired to launch a new program addressing four goals identified in a needs assessment: (1) improved management of supportive care, (2) enhanced education of patients receiving complicated chemotherapy regimens, (3) improved efficiency in the chemotherapy infusion unit, and (4) development of an experiential learning opportunity for pharmacy students and residents. The pharmacist hired to lead the ongoing program was a state-approved clinical pharmacist practitioner (CPP) who had authority to prescribe with physician oversight under established protocols. An oncology supportive care consultation service implemented by the CPP in collaboration with a nurse and a physician served 89 new patients in its first 18 months of operation; during that period the CPP made 186 interventions and wrote 136 prescriptions. The CPP also established a chemotherapy counseling service that provided more than 900 bill-able patient education sessions over 18 months. In addition, the CPP launched an effort to increase use of a rituximab rapid-infusion protocol among eligible patients. The creation of the new oncology pharmacist position has given dozens of pharmacy students and residents a new opportunity for interaction with oncology clinic patients and other health care team members. Integration of the services of a CPP into the hematology-oncology clinics has helped achieve goals set by physician, nursing, and pharmacy leaders.

  13. Palliative care communication in oncology nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Joy; Ferrell, Betty; Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Ragan, Sandra L

    2013-04-01

    Oncology nurses consistently exhibit distress when communicating about end-of-life topics with patients and families. Poor communication experiences and processes correlate with emotional distress, moral distress, and work-related stress. The National Consensus Project (NCP) for Quality Palliative Care developed clinical practice guidelines to establish quality standards for the practice of palliative care. NCP's guidelines are expressly intended as an interdisciplinary document and are representative of the inherent interdisciplinary nature of palliative care. Communication's value to palliative and oncology nursing is unique because those two specialties include a high frequency of challenging interactions for patients, families, and healthcare professionals. The COMFORT communication curriculum, a holistic model for narrative clinical communication in practice developed for use in early palliative care, is posed as a resource for oncology nurses with a series of practice case examples presented against the backdrop of NCP's eight domains of quality palliative care.

  14. [Bipolar disorders in oncology: Characteristics and management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Michel; Kotecki, Nuria

    2017-05-01

    Bipolar disorders belong to the spectrum of mood disorders and represent a serious psychiatric comorbidity. Behaviors adopted by bipolar patients can foster cancer occurrence but also impact its management, especially during acute depressive or manic episode. Oncologists must adapt their protocols in order to obtain the best compliance for treatment and avoid any possible mood destabilization, with the inherent risk of suicidal attempt. Potential interactions between mood-stabilizing agents (lithium, divalproate, atypical antipsychotics, and anticonvulsivants) and oncologic treatment (chemotherapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, corticotherapy) will be particularly watched. To do so, a closely collaboration with the oncopsychiatrist but also with the referent or liaison psychiatry team is necessary during the patient's oncologic care. Some clinical vignettes will illustrate the modalities of care of bipolar disorders in oncology. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Integrated biophotonics in endoscopic oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muguruma, Naoki; DaCosta, Ralph S.; Wilson, Brian C.; Marcon, Norman E.

    2009-02-01

    endoscopic diagnosis is likely to be impacted by a combination of biomarkers and technology, and 'endoscopic molecular imaging' should be defined as "visualization of molecular characteristics with endoscopy". These innovations will allow us not only to locate a tumor or dysplastic lesion but also to visualize its molecular characteristics (e.g., DNA mutations and polymorphisms, gene and/or protein expression), and the activity of specific molecules and biological processes that affect tumor behavior and/or its response to therapy. In the near future, these methods should be promising technologies that will play a central role in gastrointestinal oncology.

  16. Gender Opportunities in Psychosocial Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loscalzo, Matthew; Clark, Karen

    2018-01-01

    So much has happened since the original publication of this chapter. In some ways, the progress made in appreciating the full spectrum of sexual and gender expression has been uneven and in some nations, there has been serious regression and resulting repression. But overall, especially in the industrialized countries, there is much greater awareness of sex and gender and its importance in health and well being. In this updated chapter, we put sex and gender into a historical context that is relevant to psycho-oncology and that openly accepts that society overall, is highly conflicted when it comes to how women and men get the best out of each other, never mind how to best integrate lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) communities. With the advent of more tailored treatments and strategic medicine, sex becomes much more important as a variable and this has led to greater scientific requirements to create protocols that integrate sex into all aspects of health from prevention, diagnosis, treatment, survivorship, and death. But we still have a very far way to go. There is a serious dearth of data on sex and gender in science overall and in cancer medicine specifically. Avoidance of discussions of sex and gender in medicine reflects the larger lingering societal discomfort with any discussion that links potential sex and gender differences with superiority. The data shows that there is more intrasexual than intersexual variation in men and women. When speaking about sex and gender the literature reflects that, on average, there are many differences, and although they are small, that when taken together, the impact may be quite robust. Sex and gender differences are relevant to how individuals, couples, and families experience and cope with serious illness; however these important and obvious variables are seldom taken into account when counseling seriously ill patients and their families. Cancer is a complex disease that brings into sharp relief the

  17. The characteristics of oncology social work in Australia: Implications for workforce planning in integrated cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pockett, Rosalie; Peate, Michelle; Hobbs, Kim; Dzidowska, Monika; L Bell, Melanie; Baylock, Brandi; Epstein, Irwin

    2016-12-01

    To describe the demographics, professional characteristics, self-reported professional development needs and research involvement of oncology social workers in Australia and to describe perceived barriers to provision of quality psychosocial care. A cross-sectional online survey was administered to social workers working in the oncology field who were contacted through three professional organizations; the Australian Association of Social Workers, Oncology Social Work Australia and the Psycho-oncology Co-operative Research Group, the University of Sydney. A snowball recruitment method was adopted to maximize the sample size. Two thirds of respondents had over 10 years professional practice experience but with lesser experience in oncology settings. Twenty-eight percent had post-graduate qualifications. Professional development needs were reported as moderate or high by 68% of respondents. No association between professional needs and work setting was found. Years of experience in oncology practice and living in an urban area increased the likelihood of involvement in research. Barriers to psychosocial care included poor understandings of the social work role, time constraints and an inadequate number of social work positions. In this first Australian study of the social work oncology workforce, the results demonstrated active, well-qualified and experienced social workers providing frontline services to people with cancer and their caregivers in geographically diverse locations across Australia. Inadequate resources and a lack of integrated psychosocial care were identified as barriers to comprehensive cancer care. The need for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander social workers was identified as an urgent workforce priority. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Identifying Health Information Technology Needs of Oncologists to Facilitate the Adoption of Genomic Medicine: Recommendations From the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology Omics and Precision Oncology Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kevin S; Ambinder, Edward P; Hess, Gregory P; Yu, Peter Paul; Bernstam, Elmer V; Routbort, Mark J; Clemenceau, Jean Rene; Hamm, John T; Febbo, Phillip G; Domchek, Susan M; Chen, James L; Warner, Jeremy L

    2017-09-20

    At the ASCO Data Standards and Interoperability Summit held in May 2016, it was unanimously decided that four areas of current oncology clinical practice have serious, unmet health information technology needs. The following areas of need were identified: 1) omics and precision oncology, 2) advancing interoperability, 3) patient engagement, and 4) value-based oncology. To begin to address these issues, ASCO convened two complementary workshops: the Omics and Precision Oncology Workshop in October 2016 and the Advancing Interoperability Workshop in December 2016. A common goal was to address the complexity, enormity, and rapidly changing nature of genomic information, which existing electronic health records are ill equipped to manage. The subject matter experts invited to the Omics and Precision Oncology Workgroup were tasked with the responsibility of determining a specific, limited need that could be addressed by a software application (app) in the short-term future, using currently available genomic knowledge bases. Hence, the scope of this workshop was to determine the basic functionality of one app that could serve as a test case for app development. The goal of the second workshop, described separately, was to identify the specifications for such an app. This approach was chosen both to facilitate the development of a useful app and to help ASCO and oncologists better understand the mechanics, difficulties, and gaps in genomic clinical decision support tool development. In this article, we discuss the key challenges and recommendations identified by the workshop participants. Our hope is to narrow the gap between the practicing oncologist and ongoing national efforts to provide precision oncology and value-based care to cancer patients.

  19. Oncology of Reptiles: Diseases, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman, Jane; Devau, Michael; Wilson-Robles, Heather; Hoppes, Sharman; Rech, Raquel; Russell, Karen E; Heatley, J Jill

    2017-01-01

    Based on necropsy review, neoplasia in reptiles has a comparable frequency to that of mammals and birds. Reptile neoplasia is now more frequently diagnosed in clinical practice based on increased use of advanced diagnostic techniques and improvements in reptilian husbandry allowing greater longevity of these species. This article reviews the current literature on neoplasia in reptiles, and focuses on advanced diagnostics and therapeutic options for reptilian patientssuffering neoplastic disease. Although most applied clinical reptile oncology is translated from dog and cat oncology, considerations specific to reptilian patients commonly encountered in clinical practice (turtles, tortoises, snakes, and lizards) are presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Checkpoint inhibitors: a cutting edge in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jago, C

    2017-07-01

    The checkpoint inhibitor field, and indeed the whole of immuno-oncology, is fast-paced and fascinating, with huge clinical and commercial potential. The challenge in the coming years will be to define the best type and combination of immunotherapy, and the best target population to receive it. Keytruda's ground-breaking approval for a biomarker-based rather than location-based indication is a solid step in this direction, and is likely to be followed by other such approvals. As the field develops, it is to be hoped that immuno-oncology therapeutics will continue to deliver the significant improvements in patient outcome that have been seen so far.

  1. Fish Oncology: Diseases, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergneau-Grosset, Claire; Nadeau, Marie-Eve; Groff, Joseph M

    2017-01-01

    The scientific literature contains a wealth of information concerning spontaneous fish neoplasms, although ornamental fish oncology is still in its infancy. The occurrence of fish neoplasms has often been associated with oncogenic viruses and environmental insults, making them useful markers for environmental contaminants. The use of fish, including zebrafish, as models of human carcinogenesis has been developed and knowledge gained from these models may also be applied to ornamental fish, although more studies are required. This review summarizes information available about fish oncology pertaining to veterinary clinicians. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of music therapy in integrative oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, Lucanne

    2006-01-01

    Music therapy is an evidence-based complementary therapy that enhances quality of life in cancer patients and their caregivers. The role of music therapy in integrative oncology encompassed care and treatment of patients and family members , ongoing collaboration with the health care team, and the provision of music therapy services that may benefit the cancer center community. Clinical work includes ongoing assessment and the implementation of specific music therapy techniques aimed at reducing challenging symptoms and enhancing overall well-being and quality of life. This article outlines music therapy methods and the role that the music therapist has in integrative oncology programs.

  3. Effect of Reiki on symptom management in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Melike; Can, Gulbeyaz; Celek, Enis

    2013-01-01

    Reiki is a form of energy therapy in which the therapist, with or without light touch, is believed to access universal energy sources that can strengthen the body's ability to heal itself, reduce inflammation, and relieve pain and stress. There is currently no licensing for Reiki nor, given its apparent low risk, is there likely to be. Reiki appears to be generally safe, and serious adverse effects have not been reported. So in this article provides coverage of how to use Reiki in oncology services.

  4. Similarity measures for protein ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    a synthetic example from molecular dynamics simulations. We then apply the algorithms to revisit the problem of ensemble averaging during structure determination of proteins, and find that an ensemble refinement method is able to recover the correct distribution of conformations better than standard single....... However, instead of examining individual conformations it is in many cases more relevant to analyse ensembles of conformations that have been obtained either through experiments or from methods such as molecular dynamics simulations. We here present three approaches that can be used to compare......Analyses of similarities and changes in protein conformation can provide important information regarding protein function and evolution. Many scores, including the commonly used root mean square deviation, have therefore been developed to quantify the similarities of different protein conformations...

  5. 75 FR 81283 - Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The meeting of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory... of December 6, 2010 (75 FR 75680). On February 9, 2011, the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee was...

  6. Current status of medical oncology in Japan--reality gleaned from a questionnaire sent to designated cancer care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiguchi, Yuichi; Sekine, Ikuo; Iwasawa, Shunichiro; Kurimoto, Ryota; Sakaida, Emiko; Tamura, Kenji

    2014-07-01

    Medical oncology in Japan has a relatively short history, with specialist certification starting in 2006, resulting in 867 certified medical oncologists as of 2014. Although the national government has appointed 397 Designated Cancer Care Hospitals, little is known about the actual situations of medical oncology services at these institutions. Questionnaires regarding the presence of a medical oncology department, the number of physicians in the department, the presence of certified medical oncologists and the degree of the medical oncologists' responsibilities for drug therapies in adults with solid cancers were sent to all 397 institutions between 21 January and 1 May 2013. The response rate was 68.0%. Among the responses, 39.4% of the institutions had medical oncology departments with a median of three physicians. Most of the medical oncology departments were primarily responsible, as evaluated according to patient number, for the treatment of limited disease categories. The medical oncologists were significantly more responsible for molecular-targeted therapy than for chemotherapy in head and neck cancer or for cytokine therapy in renal cell carcinoma. The wide variety of adverse events associated with molecular-targeted therapy might have enhanced the roles of medical oncologists. As the proportion of hospitals with a medical oncology department increased according to the number of certified medical oncologists working at the institution, cultivating medical oncologists seems to be an urgent task for advancing medical oncology in Japan. The present study provides fundamental data for the future development of medical oncology in Japan. The present study is to uncover the current situation of medical oncology in Japan. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Integrating Oncology Massage Into Chemoinfusion Suites: A Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jun J; Wagner, Karen E; Seluzicki, Christina M; Hugo, Audra; Galindez, Laura K; Sheaffer, Heather; Fox, Kevin R

    2017-03-01

    This article reports on the development, implementation, and evaluation of an integrative clinical oncology massage program for patients undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer in a large academic medical center. We describe the development and implementation of an oncology massage program embedded into chemoinfusion suites. We used deidentified program evaluation data to identify specific reasons individuals refuse massage and to evaluate the immediate impact of massage treatments on patient-reported outcomes using a modified version of the Distress Thermometer delivered via iPad. We analyzed premassage and postmassage data from the Distress Thermometer using paired t test and derived qualitative data from participants who provided written feedback on their massage experiences. Of the 1,090 massages offered, 692 (63%) were accepted. We observed a significant decrease in self-reported anxiety (from 3.9 to 1.7), nausea (from 2.5 to 1.2), pain (from 3.3 to 1.9), and fatigue (from 4.8 to 3.0) premassage and postmassage, respectively (all P massage, and 649 (94%) would recommend it to another patient undergoing treatment. Spontaneous patient responses overwhelmingly endorsed the massage as relaxing. No adverse events were reported. Among the 398 patients (36%) who declined a massage, top reasons were time concerns and lack of interest. A clinical oncology massage program can be safely and effectively integrated into chemoinfusion units to provide symptom control for patients with breast cancer. This integrative approach overcomes patient-level barriers of cost, time, and travel, and addresses the institutional-level barrier of space.

  8. Resilience and burnout status among nurses working in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutluturkan, Sevinc; Sozeri, Elif; Uysal, Nese; Bay, Figen

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the resilience and burnout status of nurses working in the field of oncology. This descriptive study was conducted with 140 oncology nurses. The data were collected using a socio-demographic attributes form, Resilience Scale for Adults, and the Maslach's Burnout Inventory. Percentage ratios, mean and median values, Kruskal-Wallis test, Mann-Whitney U test, correlation analysis, and multiple stepwise linear regression analysis were used to evaluate the data. The Maslach's Burnout Inventory total median score was 49.00. The emotional exhaustion median score was 24.00, the depersonalization median score was 9.00, and the personal accomplishment median score was 16.00. The Resilience Scale for Adults total median score was 134.00. The median resilience subscale scores, such as structural style, perception of future, family cohesion, self-perception, social competence, and social resources, were 16.00, 16.00, 24.00, 25, 23, and 31, respectively. A relationship existed between emotional exhaustion and perception of future; depersonalization and structured style and self-perception; and personal accomplishment and structured style, perception of future, and self-perception. Multiple stepwise linear regression analysis revealed a significant relationship between the number of years in the field and emotional exhaustion and depersonalization scores. Moreover, a significant relationship between structured style variables and personal accomplishment scores was observed. This study demonstrated the relationship between burnout and resilience situations among the oncology nurses. The results can be used to plan individual and organizational interventions to increase resilience and reduce the experience of burnout by developing measures such as improving communication skills, providing education on stress management and coping strategies, using social resources, and organizing programs that provide psychological support.

  9. Implementation of nanoparticles in therapeutic radiation oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, Erik; Gabani, Prashant; Singh, Om V.

    2017-05-01

    Development and progress of cancer is a very complex disease process to comprehend because of the multiple changes in cellular physiology, pathology, and pathophysiology resulting from the numerous genetic changes from which cancer originates. As a result, most common treatments are not directed at the molecular level but rather at the tissue level. While personalized care is becoming an increasingly aim, the most common cancer treatments are restricted to chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery, each of which has a high likelihood of resulting in rather severe adverse side effects. For example, currently used radiation therapy does not discriminate between normal and cancerous cells and greatly relies on the external targeting of the radiation beams to specific cells and organs. Because of this, there is an immediate need for the development of new and innovative technologies that help to differentiate tumor cells and micrometastases from normal cells and facilitate the complete destruction of those cells. Recent advancements in nanoscience and nanotechnology have paved a way for the development of nanoparticles (NPs) as multifunctional carriers to deliver therapeutic radioisotopes for tumor targeted radiation therapy, to monitor their delivery, and improve the therapeutic index of radiation and tumor response to the treatment. The application of NPs in radiation therapy has aimed to improve outcomes in radiation therapy by increasing therapeutic effect in tumors and reducing toxicity on normal tissues. Because NPs possess unique properties, such as preferential accumulation in tumors and minimal uptake in normal tissues, it makes them ideal for the delivery of radiotherapy. This review provides an overview of the recent development of NPs for carrying and delivering therapeutic radioisotopes for systemic radiation treatment for a variety of cancers in radiation oncology.

  10. Immunotherapy response assessment in neuro-oncology: a report of the RANO working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Hideho; Weller, Michael; Huang, Raymond; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Gilbert, Mark R; Wick, Wolfgang; Ellingson, Benjamin M; Hashimoto, Naoya; Pollack, Ian F; Brandes, Alba A; Franceschi, Enrico; Herold-Mende, Christel; Nayak, Lakshmi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Pope, Whitney B; Prins, Robert; Sampson, John H; Wen, Patrick Y; Reardon, David A

    2015-11-01

    Immunotherapy is a promising area of therapy in patients with neuro-oncological malignancies. However, early-phase studies show unique challenges associated with the assessment of radiological changes in response to immunotherapy reflecting delayed responses or therapy-induced inflammation. Clinical benefit, including long-term survival and tumour regression, can still occur after initial disease progression or after the appearance of new lesions. Refinement of the response assessment criteria for patients with neuro-oncological malignancies undergoing immunotherapy is therefore warranted. Herein, a multinational and multidisciplinary panel of neuro-oncology immunotherapy experts describe immunotherapy Response Assessment for Neuro-Oncology (iRANO) criteria based on guidance for the determination of tumour progression outlined by the immune-related response criteria and the RANO working group. Among patients who demonstrate imaging findings meeting RANO criteria for progressive disease within 6 months of initiating immunotherapy, including the development of new lesions, confirmation of radiographic progression on follow-up imaging is recommended provided that the patient is not significantly worse clinically. The proposed criteria also include guidelines for the use of corticosteroids. We review the role of advanced imaging techniques and the role of measurement of clinical benefit endpoints including neurological and immunological functions. The iRANO guidelines put forth in this Review will evolve successively to improve their usefulness as further experience from immunotherapy trials in neuro-oncology accumulate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer: Oncology Nurses Report Attitudes and Barriers to Discussing Fertility Preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobel Murray, Alexandra; Chrisler, Joan C; Robbins, Mark L

    2016-08-01

    Fertility issues have been found to be an important topic for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer. Medical technology has made fertility preservation (FP) increasingly effective for postpubertal patients whose treatment course may inhibit their future ability to achieve biologic parenthood. Oncology providers' recommendations have been shown to vary, potentially affecting patients' decision-making processes regarding FP. This study was designed to assess oncology nurses' recommendations for patients to consider FP options and to explore what patient-related factors may influence discussion of FP with AYAs with cancer. 116 oncology nurses participated in this study and were randomized to read one of four vignettes about a patient whose proposed treatment course could affect his or her fertility. Participants' recommendations to partake in FP were analyzed to test for differences by patient age and gender. Open-ended responses to questions about their experiences as oncology nurses were analyzed descriptively. Nurses strongly recommended that all patients explore FP options before the start of treatment. Oncology nurses endorsed stronger opinions that young adult female patients should be given independent decision-making power to delay treatment for FP, compared to male and female adolescent patients and young adult male patients. Participants mentioned barriers to discussions that included concerns about exacerbating negative emotions and the decision-making capacity of young patients.

  12. Innovations for phase I dose-finding designs in pediatric oncology clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doussau, Adelaide; Geoerger, Birgit; Jiménez, Irene; Paoletti, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    Phase I oncology clinical trials are designed to identify the optimal dose that will be recommended for phase II trials. In pediatric oncology, the conduct of those trials raises specific challenges, as the disease is rare with limited therapeutic options. In addition, the tolerance profile is known from adult trials. This paper provides a review of the major recent developments in the design of these trials, inspired by the need to cope with the specific challenges of dose finding in cancer pediatric oncology. We reviewed simulation studies comparing designs dedicated to address these challenges. We also reviewed the design used in published dose-finding trials in pediatric oncology over the period 2009-2014. Three main fields of innovation were identified. First, designs that were developed in order to relax the rules for more flexible inclusions. Second, methods to incorporate data emerging from adult studies. Third, designs accounting for toxicity evaluation at repeated cycles in pediatric oncology. In addition to this overview, we propose some further directions for designing pediatric dose-finding trials. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Companion diagnostics and molecular imaging-enhanced approaches for oncology clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Heertum, Ronald L; Scarimbolo, Robert; Ford, Robert; Berdougo, Eli; O'Neal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the era of personalized medicine, diagnostic approaches are helping pharmaceutical and biotechnology sponsors streamline the clinical trial process. Molecular assays and diagnostic imaging are routinely being used to stratify patients for treatment, monitor disease, and provide reliable early clinical phase assessments. The importance of diagnostic approaches in drug development is highlighted by the rapidly expanding global cancer diagnostics market and the emergent attention of regulatory agencies worldwide, who are beginning to offer more structured platforms and guidance for this area. In this paper, we highlight the key benefits of using companion diagnostics and diagnostic imaging with a focus on oncology clinical trials. Nuclear imaging using widely available radiopharmaceuticals in conjunction with molecular imaging of oncology targets has opened the door to more accurate disease assessment and the modernization of standard criteria for the evaluation, staging, and treatment responses of cancer patients. Furthermore, the introduction and validation of quantitative molecular imaging continues to drive and optimize the field of oncology diagnostics. Given their pivotal role in disease assessment and treatment, the validation and commercialization of diagnostic tools will continue to advance oncology clinical trials, support new oncology drugs, and promote better patient outcomes.

  14. New perspectives in radiation oncology: Young radiation oncologist point of view and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis; Isa, Nicolas; Kim, Michelle M; Bourgier, Celine; Marsiglia, Hugo

    2012-09-01

    To assess the role of the young radiation oncologist in the context of important recent advancements in the field of radiation oncology, and to explore new perspectives and competencies of the young radiation oncologist. Radiation oncology is a field that has rapidly advanced over the last century. It holds a rich tradition of clinical care and evidence-based practice, and more recently has advanced with revolutionary innovations in technology and computer science, as well as pharmacology and molecular biology. Several young radiation oncologists from different countries evaluated the current status and future directions of radiation oncology. For young radiation oncologists, it is important to reflect on the current practice and future directions of the specialty as it relates to the role of the radiation oncologist in the comprehensive management of cancer patients. Radiation oncologists are responsible for the radiation treatment provided to patients and its subsequent impact on patients' quality of life. Young radiation oncologists must proactively master new clinical, biological and technical information, as well as lead radiation oncology teams consisting of physicists, dosimetrists, nurses and technicians. The role of the young radiation oncologist in the field of oncology should be proactive in developing new competencies. Above all, it is important to remember that we are dealing with the family members and loved ones of many individuals during the most difficult part of their lives.

  15. AllergoOncology - the impact of allergy in oncology: EAACI position paper

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jensen-Jarolim, E.; Bax, H. J.; Bianchini, R.; Capron, M.; Corrigan, C.; Castells, M.; Dombrowicz, D.; Daniels-Wells, T. R.; Fazekas, J.; Fiebiger, E.; Gatault, S.; Gould, H. J.; Janda, Jozef; Josephs, D. H.; Karagiannis, P.; Levi-Schaffer, F.; Meshcheryaková, A.; Mechtcheriakova, D.; Mekori, Y.; Mungenast, F.; Nigro, E. A.; Penichet, M. L.; Redegeld, F.; Saul, L.; Singer, J.; Spicer, J. F.; Siccardi, A. G.; Spillner, E.; Turner, M. C.; Untersmayr, E.; Vangelista, L.; Karagiannis, S. N.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 6 (2017), s. 866-887 ISSN 0105-4538 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : allergooncology * allergy * atopy Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 7.361, year: 2016

  16. Clinical PET/MR Imaging in Oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Andreas; Torigian, Drew A.

    2016-01-01

    . The question, therefore, arises regarding what the future clinical applications of PET/MR imaging will be. In this article, the authors discuss ways in which PET/MR imaging may be used in future applications that justify the added cost, predominantly focusing on oncologic applications. The authors suggest...

  17. Managing integrated oncology treatment in virtual networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanicki, Verena; Becker, Matthias; Böckmann, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Interdisciplinary and intersectoral coordinated healthcare management based on Clinical Practice Guidelines is essential to achieve high quality in oncological networks. The objective of our research project is to create a cookbook, which can be used by oncological networks as a template. The cookbook is based on guideline-compliant care processes. To develop these care processes, the three S3-guidelines breast, colon and prostate carcinoma have been formalized. The thus-obtained platform-independent process fragments were transformed into an underlying metamodel, which is based on HL7 and can be used for modeling clinical pathways. Additional, qualitative guided interviews were chosen to capitalize on the experts' (e.g. chief residents, resident specialists) wide knowledge and experience in oncological health care management. One of these use cases (tumor board scheduling) is developed for a healthcare management platform which is linked to a national electronic case record. The projected result of our approach is a cookbook which shows, how the treatment can be controlled by interdisciplinary and intersectoral care processes in an oncological network.

  18. Employing healthcare assistants in paediatric oncology units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Helen; Coyne, Rachel

    2009-11-01

    This article examines the potential benefits of employing healthcare assistants in paediatric oncology departments. It explores the implications for role definition, workforce planning, training, regulation, accountability and delegation. The article considers whether this alternative to employing more registered nurses is an effective initiative that can improve services for children, young people and their carers.

  19. CHONDROSARCOMA OF BONE - ONCOLOGIC AND FUNCTIONAL RESULTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANLOON, CJM; VETH, RPH; PRUSZCZYNSKI, M; WOBBES, T; LEMMENS, JAM; VANHORN, J

    1994-01-01

    A retrospective review of 27 patients (21 males and 6 females) with chondrosarcoma of bone was performed to evaluate the oncologic and functional results. The average age of the patients was 48 years (range: 17-76). The tumor sites were pelvis in 10 cases, distal femur in 2, proximal tibia in 3, rib

  20. [Analysis of hepato-digestive oncology practices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemot, Florence; Cornu, Chloé; Marterer, Justine; Thegarid, Héléne

    2014-09-01

    Help nursing students and new professionals to understand the different facets of care is at the heart of the managerial and pedagogical process coordinated by the health framework. The formalisation and use of learning situations promote the identification of opportunities for learning, modelling and the assessment of practices. Feedback from the hepato-digestive oncology service.

  1. The Cardio-oncology Program: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Care of Cancer Patients With Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Sarah; Pituskin, Edith; Paterson, D Ian

    2016-07-01

    Improved cancer survivorship has resulted in a growing number of Canadians affected by cancer and cardiovascular disease. As a consequence, cardio-oncology programs are rapidly emerging to treat cancer patients with de novo and preexisting cardiovascular disease. The primary goal of a cardio-oncology program is to preserve cardiovascular health to allow the timely delivery of cancer therapy and achieve disease-free remission. Multidisciplinary programs in oncology and cardiology have been associated with enhanced patient well-being and improved clinical outcomes. Because of the complex needs of these multisystem patients, a similar model of care is gaining acceptance. The optimal composition of the cardio-oncology team will typically involve support from cardiology, oncology, and nursing. Depending on the clinical scenario, additional consultation from dietetics, pharmacy, and social services might be required. Timely access to consultation and testing is another prerequisite for cardio-oncology programs because delays in treating cardiac complications and nonadherence to prescribed cancer therapy are each associated with poor outcomes. Recommended reasons for referral to cardio-oncology programs include primary prevention for those at high risk for cardiotoxicity and the secondary treatment of new or worsening cardiovascular disease in cancer patients and survivors. Management is multifaceted and can involve lifestyle education, pharmacotherapy, enhanced cardiovascular surveillance, and support services, such as exercise training. The lack of evidence to guide clinical decisions and recommendations in cardio-oncology is a major challenge and opportunity for health care professionals. Large multicentre prospective registries are needed to adequately power risk model calculations and generate hypotheses for novel interventions. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Outsourced similarity search on metric data assets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yiu, Man Lung; Assent, Ira; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers a cloud computing setting in which similarity querying of metric data is outsourced to a service provider. The data is to be revealed only to trusted users, not to the service provider or anyone else. Users query the server for the most similar data objects to a query example...

  3. Clinical assessment and management of the oral environment in the oncology patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, L J

    2010-06-01

    The dental care of oncology patients is an important component of general dental practice. Oncology patients have additional requirements for their outpatient care in the dental office. Intense involvement of the general dental practitioner in the patient's overall plan of care is essential so that appropriate preventive and therapeutic strategies are followed prior to chemotherapy, radiation and other medical treatments. This paper provides an overview of the role of the dental practitioner in the pre-treatment workup and post-treatment maintenance of oncology patients, and discusses the complications which occur during the intensive and in-hospital phases of care, in the context of approaches that show promise for reducing or preventing these. The role of the general dental practitioner in the maintenance of oral health for the remainder of the patient's life is stressed, with evidence-based recommendations given for optimal use of home care products which support oral health and improve quality-of-life.

  4. Evaluation of Learning in Oncology of Undergraduate Nursing with the Use of Concept Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisani, Mariane; Cohrs, Cibelli Rizzo; de Lara Soares, Mariângela Abate; Duarte, José Marcio; Mancini, Felipe; Pisa, Ivan Torres; De Domenico, Edvane Birelo Lopes

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to identify whether the use of concept mapping (CM) strategy assists a student to extend and revise their expertise in oncology and analyze the abilities developed in a student in order to go through theoretical to practical knowledge. This study is descriptive and qualitative, with 20 undergraduate students of the Undergraduate Nursing Course of Paulista School of Nursing of Federal University of São Paulo, Brazil. The critical incident technique and content analysis were used. There were 12 categories represented by facilities, difficulties, and learning applicability in oncology provided by CM strategy during the surgical and clinical nursing discipline. The graphics resource, CMapTools®, and the clinical case data arranged in mapping for resolution generated an active search and exercise of self-learning in oncology. Despite the challenges of the use of CM as a teaching strategy-pedagogical, the results suggested an increase of autonomy and clinical reasoning in nursing practice.

  5. From Patient-Specific Mathematical Neuro-Oncology to Precision Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eBaldock

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas are notoriously aggressive, malignant brain tumors that have variable response to treatment. These patients often have poor prognosis, informed primarily by histopathology. Mathematical neuro-oncology (MNO is a young and burgeoning field that leverages mathematical models to predict and quantify response to therapies. These mathematical models can form the basis of modern precision medicine approaches to tailor therapy in a patient-specific manner. Patient specific models (PSMs can be used to overcome imaging limitations, improve prognostic predictions, stratify patients and assess treatment response in silico. The information gleaned from such models can aid in the construction and efficacy of clinical trials and treatment protocols, accelerating the pace of clinical research in the war on cancer. This review focuses on the growing translation of PSM to clinical neuro-oncology. It will also provide a forward-looking view on a new era of patient-specific mathematical neuro-oncology.

  6. [Challenges for clinical trials in oncology within the scope of early benefit assessment of drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Until May 31, 2015 the German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) conducted 108 assessments for various diseases on the basis of 103 dossiers within the scope of the early benefit assessment of drugs pursuant to the Act on the Reform of the Market for Medicinal Products (AMNOG). 29 of these assessments (28 dossiers) referred to advanced stages of oncologic (including neoplastic-hematologic) diseases. In 21 of these 29 assessments (72%), IQWiG found an added benefit for at least one subpopulation or subgroup, compared to 33% with non-oncologic diseases. For oncologic diseases, the extent of benefit was classified as "major" in six assessments (21%), compared to 5% for non-oncologic disorders. In contrast, the conclusions of the oncologic studies were less certain: only one assessment provided proof (of an added benefit); for non-oncologic diseases, this was the case in eight assessments. A distinctive methodological feature of the available oncologic studies is that, as a rule, treatment switching was planned in the event of progression (normally on the basis of imaging or laboratory findings) and that shortly afterwards the follow-up of important endpoints (adverse events and patient-reported outcomes) was normally discontinued. In particular, the pre-specified option in the study protocol allowing the control group to switch treatment to the experimental intervention after progression ("protocol-permitted treatment switches") makes it extremely difficult to interpret the results beyond the outcome "progression" (or progression-free survival). This treatment switching is mostly justified by reference to ethical necessity. This, however, alleges that the experimental intervention (i. e., the new drug) is superior to the control intervention, which means that circular reasoning is unavoidable. But despite this, oncologic studies are better than their reputation. Hence, so far the results of the early benefit assessment of new drugs (regarding

  7. The American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology workforce assessment: Part 2-Implications for fellowship training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavey, P J; Hilden, J M; Matthews, D; Dandoy, C; Badawy, S M; Shah, M; Wayne, A S; Hord, J

    2018-02-01

    The American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (ASPHO) solicited information from division directors and fellowship training program directors to capture pediatric hematology/oncology (PHO) specific workforce data of 6 years (2010-2015), in response to an increase in graduating fellows during that time. Observations included a stable number of physicians and advanced practice providers (APPs) in clinical PHO, an increased proportion of APPs hired compared to physicians, and an increase in training-level first career positions. Rapid changes in the models of PHO care have significant implications to current and future trainees and require continued analysis to understand the evolving discipline of PHO. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Clinical PET/MR Imaging in Dementia and Neuro-Oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Otto M.; Marner, Lisbeth; Law, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of hybrid PET/MRI systems allows simultaneous multimodality image acquisition of high technical quality. This technique is well suited for the brain, and particularly in dementia and neuro-oncology. In routine use combinations of well-established MRI sequences and PET tracers...... provide the most optimal and clinically valuable protocols. For dementia the [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) has merit with a simultaneous four sequence MRI protocol of 20 min supported by supplementary statistical reading tools and quantitative measurements of the hippocampal volume. Clinical PET......-oncology under general anesthesia. The clinical value of adding advanced MRI sequences in multiparametric imaging setting, however, is still undocumented....

  9. Big Data and machine learning in radiation oncology: State of the art and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibault, Jean-Emmanuel; Giraud, Philippe; Burgun, Anita

    2016-11-01

    Precision medicine relies on an increasing amount of heterogeneous data. Advances in radiation oncology, through the use of CT Scan, dosimetry and imaging performed before each fraction, have generated a considerable flow of data that needs to be integrated. In the same time, Electronic Health Records now provide phenotypic profiles of large cohorts of patients that could be correlated to this information. In this review, we describe methods that could be used to create integrative predictive models in radiation oncology. Potential uses of machine learning methods such as support vector machine, artificial neural networks, and deep learning are also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Onco-epidemiology of domestic animals and targeted therapeutic attempts: perspectives on human oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cerbo, Alessandro; Palmieri, Beniamino; De Vico, Gionata; Iannitti, Tommaso

    2014-11-01

    The spontaneous tumor biology has been investigated with the support of animalists using animals as a preclinical model allowing translation of results in clinical practice. This review provides an insight into the field of comparative oncology. Evidence shows that companion animal health care is impressively growing in terms of development of new therapies and diagnostic tools, nutrition and disease prevention. However, even if most animal tumors might be a reliable model to study human carcinomas, many open questions, related to the opportunities to select and recruit new models in oncology, along with their legal and ethical implications, remain unanswered.

  11. Children’s Oncology Group’s 2013 Blueprint for Research: Nursing Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landier, Wendy; Leonard, Marcia; Ruccione, Kathleen S.

    2013-01-01

    Integration of the nursing discipline within cooperative groups conducting pediatric oncology clinical trials provides unique opportunities to maximize nursing’s contribution to clinical care, and to pursue research questions that extend beyond cure of disease to address important gaps in knowledge surrounding the illness experience. Key areas of importance to the advancement of the nursing discipline’s scientific knowledge are understanding the effective delivery of patient/family education, and reducing illness-related distress, both of which are integral to facilitating parental/child coping with the diagnosis and treatment of childhood cancer, and to promoting resilience and well-being of pediatric oncology patients and their families. PMID:23255369

  12. Integration of oncology and palliative care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, David; Kim, Yu Jung; Park, Ji Chan; Zhang, Yi; Strasser, Florian; Cherny, Nathan; Kaasa, Stein; Davis, Mellar P; Bruera, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Both the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the European Society for Medical Oncology strongly endorse integrating oncology and palliative care (PC); however, a global consensus on what constitutes integration is currently lacking. To better understand what integration entails, we conducted a systematic review to identify articles addressing the clinical, educational, research, and administrative indicators of integration. We searched Ovid MEDLINE and Ovid EMBase between 1948 and 2013. Two researchers independently reviewed each citation for inclusion and extracted the indicators related to integration. The inter-rater agreement was high (κ = 0.96, p oncology journals (59%) and in or after 2010 (64%, p oncology and PC. ©AlphaMed Press.

  13. Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetty, Indrin J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Martel, Mary K., E-mail: mmartel@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jaffray, David A. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Biophysics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Benedict, Stanley H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California – Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Berbeco, Ross [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Deye, James [Radiation Research Programs, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Jeraj, Robert [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Kavanagh, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Krishnan, Sunil [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lee, Nancy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California – Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Mankoff, David [Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, Washington (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Ollendorf, Daniel [Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); and others

    2015-11-01

    Radiation therapy is an effective, personalized cancer treatment that has benefited from technological advances associated with the growing ability to identify and target tumors with accuracy and precision. Given that these advances have played a central role in the success of radiation therapy as a major component of comprehensive cancer care, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored a workshop entitled “Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology,” which took place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, on June 13 and 14, 2013. The purpose of this workshop was to discuss emerging technology for the field and to recognize areas for greater research investment. Expert clinicians and scientists discussed innovative technology in radiation oncology, in particular as to how these technologies are being developed and translated to clinical practice in the face of current and future challenges and opportunities. Technologies encompassed topics in functional imaging, treatment devices, nanotechnology, and information technology. The technical, quality, and safety performance of these technologies were also considered. A major theme of the workshop was the growing importance of innovation in the domain of process automation and oncology informatics. The technologically advanced nature of radiation therapy treatments predisposes radiation oncology research teams to take on informatics research initiatives. In addition, the discussion on technology development was balanced with a parallel conversation regarding the need for evidence of efficacy and effectiveness. The linkage between the need for evidence and the efforts in informatics research was clearly identified as synergistic.

  14. Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, Indrin J; Martel, Mary K; Jaffray, David A; Benedict, Stanley H; Hahn, Stephen M; Berbeco, Ross; Deye, James; Jeraj, Robert; Kavanagh, Brian; Krishnan, Sunil; Lee, Nancy; Low, Daniel A; Mankoff, David; Marks, Lawrence B; Ollendorf, Daniel; Paganetti, Harald; Ross, Brian; Siochi, Ramon Alfredo C; Timmerman, Robert D; Wong, John W

    2015-11-01

    Radiation therapy is an effective, personalized cancer treatment that has benefited from technological advances associated with the growing ability to identify and target tumors with accuracy and precision. Given that these advances have played a central role in the success of radiation therapy as a major component of comprehensive cancer care, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored a workshop entitled "Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology," which took place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, on June 13 and 14, 2013. The purpose of this workshop was to discuss emerging technology for the field and to recognize areas for greater research investment. Expert clinicians and scientists discussed innovative technology in radiation oncology, in particular as to how these technologies are being developed and translated to clinical practice in the face of current and future challenges and opportunities. Technologies encompassed topics in functional imaging, treatment devices, nanotechnology, and information technology. The technical, quality, and safety performance of these technologies were also considered. A major theme of the workshop was the growing importance of innovation in the domain of process automation and oncology informatics. The technologically advanced nature of radiation therapy treatments predisposes radiation oncology research teams to take on informatics research initiatives. In addition, the discussion on technology development was balanced with a parallel conversation regarding the need for evidence of efficacy and effectiveness. The linkage between the need for evidence and the efforts in informatics research was clearly identified as synergistic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Providing culturally sensitive care to Egyptians with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, N S

    1996-01-01

    This article describes key aspects of Egyptian culture and provides intervention strategies that oncology practitioners may use to provide quality care to Egyptian immigrants and Egyptian-American oncology patients. The growing diversity of the United States population challenges oncology professionals to provide culturally appropriate care. Egyptian immigrants and Americans of Egyptian descent comprise a unique population whose cultural and religious beliefs impact on decision making and behaviors related to cancer diagnosis and treatment. This population is overwhelmingly Muslim, although a sizeable minority are members of Eastern Christian sects. Dietary restrictions, social conduct, and religious observance are among the areas that require understanding by health providers. Learning about patients' perspectives on health and illness, in light of their cultural values and beliefs, will allow health professionals to enhance the quality of assessments and interventions and provide culturally appropriate care.

  16. Evaluation of Health Economics in Radiation Oncology: A Systematic Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Timothy K.; Goodman, Chris D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Boldt, R. Gabriel [London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Warner, Andrew; Palma, David A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Rodrigues, George B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Lock, Michael I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Mishra, Mark V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Zaric, Gregory S. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Ivey Business School, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Louie, Alexander V., E-mail: Dr.alexlouie@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: Despite the rising costs in radiation oncology, the impact of health economics research on radiation therapy practice analysis patterns is unclear. We performed a systematic review of cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs) and cost-utility analyses (CUAs) to identify trends in reporting quality in the radiation oncology literature over time. Methods and Materials: A systematic review of radiation oncology economic evaluations up to 2014 was performed, using MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. The Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards guideline informed data abstraction variables including study demographics, economic parameters, and methodological details. Tufts Medical Center CEA registry quality scores provided a basis for qualitative assessment of included studies. Studies were stratified by 3 time periods (1995-2004, 2005-2009, and 2010-2014). The Cochran-Armitage trend test and linear trend test were used to identify trends over time. Results: In total, 102 articles were selected for final review. Most studies were in the context of a model (61%) or clinical trial (28%). Many studies lacked a conflict of interest (COI) statement (67%), a sponsorship statement (48%), a reported study time horizon (35%), and the use of discounting (29%). There was a significant increase over time in the reporting of a COI statement (P<.001), health care payer perspective (P=.019), sensitivity analyses using multivariate (P=.043) or probabilistic methods (P=.011), incremental cost-effectiveness threshold (P<.001), secondary source utility weights (P=.010), and cost effectiveness acceptability curves (P=.049). There was a trend toward improvement in Tuft scores over time (P=.065). Conclusions: Recent reports demonstrate improved reporting rates in economic evaluations; however, there remains significant room for improvement as reporting rates are still suboptimal. As fiscal pressures rise, we will rely on economic assessments to guide our practice decisions

  17. Considerations for Observational Research Using Large Data Sets in Radiation Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Ethics and Health Policy, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen, Aileen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen, Ronald C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Hoffman, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tina Shih, Ya-Chen [Department of Medicine, Section of Hospital Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, and Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Yu, James B. [Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The radiation oncology community has witnessed growing interest in observational research conducted using large-scale data sources such as registries and claims-based data sets. With the growing emphasis on observational analyses in health care, the radiation oncology community must possess a sophisticated understanding of the methodological considerations of such studies in order to evaluate evidence appropriately to guide practice and policy. Because observational research has unique features that distinguish it from clinical trials and other forms of traditional radiation oncology research, the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics assembled a panel of experts in health services research to provide a concise and well-referenced review, intended to be informative for the lay reader, as well as for scholars who wish to embark on such research without prior experience. This review begins by discussing the types of research questions relevant to radiation oncology that large-scale databases may help illuminate. It then describes major potential data sources for such endeavors, including information regarding access and insights regarding the strengths and limitations of each. Finally, it provides guidance regarding the analytical challenges that observational studies must confront, along with discussion of the techniques that have been developed to help minimize the impact of certain common analytical issues in observational analysis. Features characterizing a well-designed observational study include clearly defined research questions, careful selection of an appropriate data source, consultation with investigators with relevant methodological expertise, inclusion of sensitivity analyses, caution not to overinterpret small but significant differences, and recognition of limitations when trying to evaluate causality. This review concludes that carefully designed and executed studies using observational data that possess these qualities hold

  18. Considerations for observational research using large data sets in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Bekelman, Justin E; Chen, Aileen; Chen, Ronald C; Hoffman, Karen; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Smith, Benjamin D; Yu, James B

    2014-09-01

    The radiation oncology community has witnessed growing interest in observational research conducted using large-scale data sources such as registries and claims-based data sets. With the growing emphasis on observational analyses in health care, the radiation oncology community must possess a sophisticated understanding of the methodological considerations of such studies in order to evaluate evidence appropriately to guide practice and policy. Because observational research has unique features that distinguish it from clinical trials and other forms of traditional radiation oncology research, the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics assembled a panel of experts in health services research to provide a concise and well-referenced review, intended to be informative for the lay reader, as well as for scholars who wish to embark on such research without prior experience. This review begins by discussing the types of research questions relevant to radiation oncology that large-scale databases may help illuminate. It then describes major potential data sources for such endeavors, including information regarding access and insights regarding the strengths and limitations of each. Finally, it provides guidance regarding the analytical challenges that observational studies must confront, along with discussion of the techniques that have been developed to help minimize the impact of certain common analytical issues in observational analysis. Features characterizing a well-designed observational study include clearly defined research questions, careful selection of an appropriate data source, consultation with investigators with relevant methodological expertise, inclusion of sensitivity analyses, caution not to overinterpret small but significant differences, and recognition of limitations when trying to evaluate causality. This review concludes that carefully designed and executed studies using observational data that possess these qualities hold

  19. Health-related quality of life measurement in randomized clinical trials in surgical oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blazeby, Jane M.; Avery, Kerry; Sprangers, Mirjam; Pikhart, Hynek; Fayers, Peter; Donovan, Jenny

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: There is debate about the value of measuring health-related quality of life (HRQL) in clinical trials in oncology because of evidence suggesting that HRQL does not influence clinical decisions. Analysis of HRQL in surgical trials, however, may inform decision making because it provides

  20. The integration of research and care in pediatric oncology: implications for review and consent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekking, S.A.S.

    2016-01-01

    The large majority of children with cancer participate in medical research. This varies from observational studies, to laboratory research on different types of tissue, to drug research, to supportive care studies. As such, pediatric oncology is a field where treatments are often provided in the

  1. Young patients', parents', and survivors' communication preferences in paediatric oncology: results of online focus groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaanswijk, M.; Tates, K.; Dulmen, A.M. van; Hoogerbrugge, P.M.; Kamps, W.A.; Bensing, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines in paediatric oncology encourage health care providers to share relevant information with young patients and parents to enable their active participation in decision making. It is not clear to what extent this mirrors patients' and parents' preferences. This study investigated

  2. Young patients', parents', and survivors' communication preferences in paediatric oncology: using online focus groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaanswijk, M.; Tates, K.; Dulmen, S. van; Hoogerbrugge, M.; Kamps, W.A.; Bensing, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines in paediatric oncology encourage health care providers to share relevant information with young patients and parents to enable their active participation in decision making. It is not clear to what extent this mirrors patients' and parents' preferences. This study investigated

  3. [Training and action research in a short-stay geriatric oncology unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charniot, Christine; Berchouchi, Florence; Marchand, Claire; Gagnayre, Rémi; Sebbane, Georges; Pamoukdjian, Frédéric

    A participative action research project was undertaken in a geriatric oncology hospital unit. It resulted in the training of paramedical staff regarding the specific care to be provided to elderly people with cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Improving Oncology Nurses' Knowledge About Nutrition and Physical Activity for Cancer Survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, M.R. van; Hoedjes, M.; Versteegen, J.J.; Meulengraaf-Wilhelm, N. van de; Kampman, E.; Beijer, S.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To assess what percentage of oncology nurses perceived themselves as having insufficient knowledge to provide advice on nutrition and/or physical activity (PA), which characteristics were associated with nurses' perception, and whether the content and information sources differed

  5. Improving oncology nurses' knowledge about nutrition and physical activity for cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van Merel R.; Hoedjes, Meeke; Versteegen, Joline J.; Meulengraaf-Wilhelm, van de Nienke; Kampman, Ellen; Beijer, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: To assess what percentage of oncology nurses perceived themselves as having insuffcient knowledge to provide advice on nutrition and/or physical activity (PA), which characteristics were associated with nurses' perception, and whether the content and information sources

  6. Responses of advanced directives by Jehovah's Witnesses on a gynecologic oncology service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarsheth NP

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nimesh P Nagarsheth,1,2 Nikhil Gupta,3 Arpeta Gupta,4 Erin Moshier,5 Herbert Gretz,1 Aryeh Shander6 1Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, USA; 2Englewood Hospital and Medical Center, Englewood, NJ, USA; 3Department of Urology, North Shore – Long Island Jewish Health Service, New Hyde Park, NY, USA; 4Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, St Luke's Hospital of Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, 5Department of Preventive Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, USA; 6Department of Anesthesiology, Englewood Hospital and Medical Center, Englewood, NJ, USA Objectives: To review the responses of advance directives signed by Jehovah's Witness patients prior to undergoing surgery at a gynecologic oncology service. Study design: A retrospective chart review of gynecologic oncology patients undergoing surgery at a bloodless surgery center from 1998–2007 was conducted. Demographic, pathologic, and clinical data were recorded. The proportion of patients who accepted and refused various blood-derived products was determined and was compared to previously published results from a similar study of labor and delivery unit patients. Results: No gynecologic oncology patients agreed to accept transfusions of whole blood, red cells, white cells, platelets, or plasma under any circumstance, whereas 9.8% of pregnant patients accepted transfusion (P=0.0385. However, 98% of gynecologic oncology patients agreed to accept some blood products, including fractions such as albumin, immunoglobulins, and clotting factors, while only 39% of pregnant patients agreed (P<0.0001. In addition, all gynecologic oncology patients (100% accepted intraoperative hemodilution, compared to 55% of pregnant patients (P<0.0001. Conclusion: Our results confirm the commonly held belief

  7. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Newly Diagnosed, Advanced Ovarian Cancer: Society of Gynecologic Oncology and American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Alexi A; Bohlke, Kari; Armstrong, Deborah K; Bookman, Michael A; Cliby, William A; Coleman, Robert L; Dizon, Don S; Kash, Joseph J; Meyer, Larissa A; Moore, Kathleen N; Olawaiye, Alexander B; Oldham, Jessica; Salani, Ritu; Sparacio, Dee; Tew, William P; Vergote, Ignace; Edelson, Mitchell I

    2016-10-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians regarding the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and interval cytoreduction among women with stage IIIC or IV epithelial ovarian cancer. The Society of Gynecologic Oncology and the American Society of Clinical Oncology convened an Expert Panel and conducted a systematic review of the literature. Four phase III clinical trials form the primary evidence base for the recommendations. The published studies suggest that for selected women with stage IIIC or IV epithelial ovarian cancer, neoadjuvant chemotherapy and interval cytoreduction are noninferior to primary cytoreduction and adjuvant chemotherapy with respect to overall and progression-free survival and are associated with less perioperative morbidity and mortality. All women with suspected stage IIIC or IV invasive epithelial ovarian cancer should be evaluated by a gynecologic oncologist prior to initiation of therapy. The primary clinical evaluation should include a CT of the abdomen and pelvis, and chest imaging (CT preferred). Women with a high perioperative risk profile or a low likelihood of achieving cytoreduction to cancer. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/NACT-ovarian-guideline and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki. © 2016 Society of Gynecologic Oncology and American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  8. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndromes: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement of the Familial Risk–Colorectal Cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Elena M.; Mangu, Pamela B.; Gruber, Stephen B.; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Kalady, Matthew F.; Lau, Michelle Wan Yee; Lu, Karen H.; Roach, Nancy; Limburg, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To provide recommendations on prevention, screening, genetics, treatment, and management for people at risk for hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) syndromes. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. Methods The Familial Risk–Colorectal Cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline published in 2013 on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Guidelines Working Group in Annals of Oncology was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists, with content and recommendations reviewed by an ASCO endorsement panel. Results The ASCO endorsement panel determined that the recommendations of the ESMO guidelines are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. The ASCO panel endorsed the ESMO guidelines and added a few qualifying statements. Recommendations Approximately 5% to 6% of patient cases of CRC are associated with germline mutations that confer an inherited predisposition for cancer. The possibility of a hereditary cancer syndrome should be assessed for every patient at the time of CRC diagnosis. A diagnosis of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, or another genetic syndrome can influence clinical management for patients with CRC and their family members. Screening for hereditary cancer syndromes in patients with CRC should include review of personal and family histories and testing of tumors for DNA mismatch repair deficiency and/or microsatellite instability. Formal genetic evaluation is recommended for individuals who meet defined criteria. PMID:25452455

  9. Lessons learned from the science of caring: Extending the reach of psychosocial oncology: The International Psycho-Oncology Society 2016 Sutherland Award Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultz, Barry D

    2017-06-01

    In medicine, referral to a medical oncology specialty is based on recent history, physical examination, pathology, surgery reports, imaging, blood work, and the patient's vital signs. By contrast, referral to a psychosocial specialist has typically been based on the patients expressed request for psychosocial support or the health care team's observation of the patient's limited adjustment or poor coping with the diagnosis, treatment, or end-of-life distress. These observations are usually based on clinical acumen not on metrics. In psychosocial oncology, by committing to the science of caring and relying on the use of standardized tools to screen for distress, the multidisciplinary cancer care team assess, communicate, and intervene on what is measured. That is, health care providers can begin to address the patients' identified concerns. Branding distress as the 6th vital sign and incorporating screening for distress into standard cancer practice can be an effective strategy to challenging the resistance in implementation of psychosocial oncology in cancer care institutions. Accreditation agencies are endorsing the need to assess patient distress and better manage symptoms of distress as part of routine and standardized patient care. While many international organizations and societies support the importance of screening, implementing screening for distress still has a long way to go to be operationalized in many cancer care programs. Screening for distress when implemented does, however, create an opportunity for psychosocial oncology to extend its reach into cancer care programs and institutions. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. The American Society for Radiation Oncology's 2010 Core Physics Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Ying, E-mail: ying.xiao@jefferson.edu [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); De Amorim Bernstein, Karen [Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Chetty, Indrin J. [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Eifel, Patricia [M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hughes, Lesley [Cooper University Hospital, Camden, NJ (United States); Klein, Eric E. [Washington University, Saint Louis, MO (United States); McDermott, Patrick [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Prisciandaro, Joann [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Paliwal, Bhudatt [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Price, Robert A. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Palta, Jatinder R. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: In 2004, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) published its first physics education curriculum for residents, which was updated in 2007. A committee composed of physicists and physicians from various residency program teaching institutions was reconvened again to update the curriculum in 2009. Methods and Materials: Members of this committee have associations with ASTRO, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology, the American Board of Radiology (ABR), and the American College of Radiology. Members reviewed and updated assigned subjects from the last curriculum. The updated curriculum was carefully reviewed by a representative from the ABR and other physics and clinical experts. Results: The new curriculum resulted in a recommended 56-h course, excluding initial orientation. Learning objectives are provided for each subject area, and a detailed outline of material to be covered is given for each lecture hour. Some recent changes in the curriculum include the addition of Radiation Incidents and Bioterrorism Response Training as a subject and updates that reflect new treatment techniques and modalities in a number of core subjects. The new curriculum was approved by the ASTRO board in April 2010. We anticipate that physicists will use this curriculum for structuring their teaching programs, and subsequently the ABR will adopt this educational program for its written examination. Currently, the American College of Radiology uses the ASTRO curriculum for their training examination topics. In addition to the curriculum, the committee updated suggested references and the glossary. Conclusions: The ASTRO physics education curriculum for radiation oncology residents has been updated. To ensure continued commitment to a current and relevant curriculum, the subject matter will be updated again in 2 years.

  11. Clinical considerations for the development of biosimilars in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socinski, Mark A; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Jacobs, Ira; Gumbiner, Barry; MacDonald, Judith; Thomas, Dolca

    2015-01-01

    Despite availability of biologic therapies, limited patient access to many of the most-effective cancer treatments affects overall health outcomes. To address this issue, many governments have enacted legislation for the approval of biosimilars. The term "biosimilar" refers to a biologic product that is developed to be highly similar, as opposed to identical, to a licensed biologic product (the reference or innovator product), such that, per US Food and Drug administration draft guidelines, "no clinically meaningful differences [exist] between the biological product and the reference product in terms of safety, purity, and potency." This article presents some considerations about the development of biosimilars in cancer treatment through an overview of biosimilars from a clinical perspective. Topics covered include the development requirements and unique regulatory requirements for biosimilars, labeling considerations, potential limitations to the uptake of biosimilars, and review of some biosimilars in development for oncology indications.

  12. Patients' experiences of an initial consultation in oncology: knowing and not knowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furber, Lynn; Bonas, Sheila; Murtagh, Ged; Thomas, Anne

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to explore how patients experience an initial oncology consultation. This study was part of a larger mixed methods research project designed to address the issue of improving communication and enhancing patient satisfaction with oncology consultations. Interpretive phenomenological analysis was used to interpret the participants' meanings of their experiences in their initial consultation. It is an idiographic approach that focuses in depth on a small set of cases in order to explore how individuals make sense of a similar experience. This retains the complexity and diversity of experiences. In the larger study, semi-structured interviews were carried out with 36 patients as soon as possible after a consultation in oncology to explore their experiences. Five cases were selected for this study on the basis of homogeneity; they had all undergone some prior investigations of their illness, and this was their first consultation in oncology; they all provided rich accounts relating to how they had experienced the consultation. Patients' experiences of being given their diagnosis differed both between participants and within the same participant. Various defences seemed to be used in order to protect them from fully engaging with the knowledge they were given. Their accounts of what they wished to know in the consultation could be affected by a desire to protect themselves and/or family members from distress and by the practical need to know that may vary over time. The complexity of patients' needs and preferences regarding information means that the doctor's role in communicating that information in a patient-centred way is difficult. The findings are discussed in relation to open awareness theory as to how the emotional context of the consultation process affects information needs. Doctors need strategies to elicit information from patients about their needs from the consultation. This needs to be done at the start of consultations and

  13. PET in neuro-oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelcke, U; Leenders, K.L.

    This article reviews possible clinical applications of positron emission tomography (PET) in brain tumor patients. PET allows quantitative assessment of brain tumor pathophysiology and biochemistry. It therefore provides different information about tumors when compared to histological or

  14. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  15. A national study of the provision of oncology sperm banking services among Canadian fertility clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, S; Buckett, W; Campbell, S; Yanofsky, R A; Barr, R D

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey the current state of oncology sperm banking services provided by fertility clinics across Canada. A total of 78 Canadian fertility facilities were invited to complete a questionnaire related to the availability, accessibility, affordability and utilisation of sperm banking services for cancer patients. The total response rate was 59%, with 20 (69%) in vitro fertilisation clinics and 26 (53%) other fertility centres returning the survey. A total of 24 responding facilities accepted oncology sperm banking referrals. The time frame to book the first banking appointment for 19 (79%) facilities was within 2 days. Inconsistent practice was found regarding the consent process for cancer patients who are of minority age. Eight (33%) facilities did not provide any subsidy and charged a standard banking fee regardless of patients' financial situations. Overall, the utilisation of oncology sperm banking services was low despite its availability and established efficacy, suggesting that Canadian cancer patients are notably underserved. The study has highlighted some important issues for further consideration in improving access to sperm banking services for cancer patients, especially for adolescents. Better collaboration between oncology and reproductive medicine to target healthcare providers would help to improve sperm banking rates. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Pain Management and Use of Opioids in Pediatric Oncology in India: A Qualitative Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Angelini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Consumption of medical opium for pain relief in India is low, despite the country being one of the main world producers of the substance. We investigated obstacles to opioid use and physician perceptions about optimal pain management in pediatric oncology patients in India. Methods: Semistructured interviews were conducted with oncologists who work in pediatric oncology settings. A mixed sampling strategy was used, including maximum variation and confirmation and disconfirmation of cases, as well as snowball sampling. Key informants were identified. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by thematic analysis methodology. Results: Twenty-three interviews were performed across 20 Indian institutions. The main obstacles identified were lack of financial resources, inadequate education of health care providers on pain management, insufficient human resources (particularly lack of dedicated trained oncology nurses, poor access to opioids, and cultural perceptions about pain. Children from rural areas, treated in public hospitals, and from lower socioeconomic classes appear disadvantaged. A significant equality gap exists between public institutions and private institutions, which provide state-of-the-art treatment. Conclusion: The study illuminates the complexity of pain management in pediatric oncology in India, where financial constraints, lack of education, and poor access to opioids play a dominant role, but lack of awareness and cultural perceptions about pain management among health care providers and parents emerged as important contributing factors. Urgent interventions are needed to optimize care in this vulnerable population.

  17. The work place educational climate in gynecological oncology fellowships across Europe: the impact of accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piek, Jurgen; Bossart, Michaela; Boor, Klarke; Halaska, Michael; Haidopoulos, Dimitrios; Zapardiel, Ignacio; Grabowski, Jacek; Kesic, Vesna; Cibula, David; Colombo, Nicoletta; Verheijen, Rene; Manchanda, Ranjit

    2015-01-01

    A good educational climate/environment in the workplace is essential for developing high-quality medical (sub)specialists. These data are lacking for gynecological oncology training. This study aims to evaluate the educational climate in gynecological oncology training throughout Europe and the factors affecting it. A Web-based anonymous survey sent to ENYGO (European Network of Young Gynecological Oncologists) members/trainees to assess gynecological oncology training. This included sociodemographic information, details regarding training posts, and a 50-item validated Dutch Residency Educational Climate Test (D-RECT) questionnaire with 11 subscales (1-5 Likert scale) to assess the educational climate. The χ test was used for evaluating categorical variables, and the Mann-Whitney U (nonparametric) test was used for continuous variables between 2 independent groups. Cronbach α assessed the questionnaire reliability. Multivariable linear regression assessed the effect of variables on D-RECT outcome subscales. One hundred nineteen gynecological oncological fellows responded. The D-RECT questionnaire was extremely reliable for assessing the educational environment in gynecological oncology (subscales' Cronbach α, 0.82-0.96). Overall, trainees do not seem to receive adequate/effective constructive feedback during training. The overall educational climate (supervision, coaching/assessment, feedback, teamwork, interconsultant relationships, formal education, role of the tutor, patient handover, and overall consultant's attitude) was significantly better (P = 0.001) in centers providing accredited training in comparison with centers without such accreditation. Multivariable regression indicated the main factors independently associated with a better educational climate were presence of an accredited training post and total years of training. This study emphasizes the need for better feedback mechanisms and the importance of accreditation of centers for training in

  18. Guidelines for health technologies: specific guidance for oncology products in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittmann, Nicole; Evans, William K; Rocchi, Angela; Longo, Christopher J; Au, Heather-Jane; Husereau, Don; Leighl, Natasha B; Isogai, Pierre K; Krahn, Murray D; Peacock, Stuart; Marshall, Deborah; Coyle, Doug; Taylor, Suzanne C Malfair; Jacobs, Philip; Oh, Paul I

    2012-05-01

    Specific methodological challenges are often encountered during cancer-related economic evaluations. The objective of this study was to provide specific guidance to analysts on the methods for the conduct of high-quality economic evaluations in oncology by building on the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health Guidelines for the Economic Evaluation of Health Technologies (third edition). Fifteen oncologists, health economists, health services researchers, and decision makers from across Canada identified sections in Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health guidelines that would benefit from oncology-specific guidance. Fifteen sections of the guidelines were reviewed to determine whether 1) Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health guidelines were sufficient for the conduct of oncology economic evaluations without further guidance specific for oncology products or 2) additional guidance was necessary. A scoping review was conducted by using a comprehensive and replicable search to identify relevant literature to inform recommendations. Recommendations were reviewed by representatives of academia, government, and the pharmaceutical industry in an iterative and formal review of the recommendations. Major adaptations for guidance related to time horizon, effectiveness, modeling, costs, and resources were required. Recommendations around the use of final outcomes over intermediate outcomes to calculate quality-adjusted life-years and life-years gained, the type of evidence, the source of evidence, and the use of time horizon and modeling were made. This article summarizes key recommendations for the conduct of economic evaluations in oncology and describes methods required to ensure that economic assessments in oncology are conducted in a standardized manner. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Medical Student Oncology Congress: Designed and Implemented by Brazilian Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Camargo, Celeste Rodovalho Soares; Schoueri, Jean Henri Maselli; Neto, Felippe Lazar; Segalla, Paola Boaro; Del Giglio, Auro; Cubero, Daniel I G

    2017-03-30

    Oncology is an essential field of medicine; however, its teaching is occasionally underemphasized and uncoordinated during medical school. An alternative method of providing additional oncological information to medical students is through extracurricular activities, such as congresses and medical student associations. The aim of this paper is to describe a Medical Student Oncology Congress entirely designed and organized by medical students. Three medical students from oncology study and research groups identified the gap in oncology training at universities and decided to organize a congress for students. They selected representatives from 26 universities in Brazil for onsite registration and created a website for online registration and promotion of the congress. To determine the topics of the lectures, they searched the medical literature for the most commonly occurring cancers in adults and children. Extrapolating the academic content of oncology, they organized lectures by non-governmental organizations (NGOs), talks on career guidance and research in this field as well as a role-playing workshop to train future doctors on how to deliver news to patients. There were a total of 609 attendees, with 590 students from 26 different universities in Brazil. Approximately 82% were medical students, and among the participants there were also 15 medical educators. A total of 80.75% of the participants were extremely satisfied with the congress, and 99.17% would recommend it to a colleague. Most of the overall cost of the congress, 96%, was covered by registration fees. There was a 6% positive net balance, which was donated to the NGOs participating in the congress. This successful experience proves that it is possible to have a congress fully designed, organized and managed by students. It demonstrates how students can be active participants in their own education, as opposed to a classic approach through which only professors are responsible for instruction.

  20. Disparities in psychosocial cancer care: a report from the International Federation of Psycho-oncology Societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Luigi; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Odyio, Philip; Asuzu, Chioma; Ashley, Laura; Bultz, Barry; Travado, Luzia; Fielding, Richard

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the study was to understand the characteristics of the International Federation of Psycho-oncology Societies (FPOS) and possible disparities in providing psychosocial care in countries where psycho-oncology societies exist. A survey was conducted among 29 leaders of 28 countries represented within the FPOS by using a questionnaire covering (i) characteristics of the society; (ii) characteristics of the national health care system; (iii) level of implementation of psycho-oncology; and (iv) main problems of psycho-oncology in the country. Twenty-six (90%) FPOS returned the questionnaires. One-third reported to have links with and support from their government, while almost all had links with other scientific societies. The FPOS varied in their composition of members' professions. Psychosocial care provision was covered by state-funded health services in a minority of countries. Disparities between countries arose from different causes and were problematic in some parts of the world (eg, Africa and SE Asia). Elsewhere (eg, Southern Europe and Eastern Europe), austerity policies were reportedly responsible for resource shortages with negative consequences on psychosocial cancer care. Half of FPOS rated themselves to be integrated into mainstream provision of care, although lack of funding was the most common complain. The development and implementation of psycho-oncology is fragmented and undeveloped, particularly in some parts of the world. More effort is needed at national level by strong coalitions with oncology societies, better national research initiatives, cancer plans, and patient advocacy, as well as by stronger partnership with international organizations (eg, World Health Organization and Union for International Cancer Control). Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Patient-Provider Communication: the Rise of Patient Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenerette, Coretta M; Mayer, Deborah K

    2016-05-01

    To describe the changing dynamics of patient-provider communication with proposals for optimizing this important relationship. Current research, national programs and guidelines from the National Cancer Institute, the Commission on Cancer, the Institute of Medicine, and the Oncology Nursing Society. There are important opportunities to apply evidence-based strategies to optimize patient-provider communication that will result in improved health outcomes. Oncology nurses across all areas of practice, including clinical care, research, and education, can play a significant role in achieving the goal of positive health outcomes by addressing challenges that inhibit effective patient-provider communication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies in oncology: clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharwan, Helen; Groninger, Hunter

    2016-04-01

    Molecularly targeted cancer therapies, such as small-molecule kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, constitute a rapidly growing and an important part of the oncology armamentarium. Unlike conventional (cytotoxic) chemotherapeutics, targeted therapies were designed to disrupt cancer cell pathogenesis at specific biological points essential for the development and progression of the tumour. These agents were developed to disrupt specific targets with the aim of minimizing treatment burden compared with conventional chemotherapy. Nevertheless the increasingly common use of targeted therapies has revealed some unanticipated, often clinically significant toxic effects, as well as compromising effective palliative and end-of-life management approaches. Although patients and clinicians welcome improvements in cancer prognosis, these changes can also impact patient quality-of-life. Therefore, as demand for oncology expertise increases, physicians need to apprise themselves of targeted therapies and their clinical implications, including drug-specific side effects, impact on quality of life, and cost issues, especially in relation to end-of-life care. This Review provides a useful summary and guide for professionals treating patients with malignant diseases.

  3. Peer-supported storytelling for grieving pediatric oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, Catherine Fiona

    2008-01-01

    Telling stories about deceased patients to supportive peers is frequently mentioned as an activity used for meaning-making in anecdotal reports of clinical practice and the literature addressing nurses' experiences caring for dying children. This study examines peer-supported storytelling for grieving pediatric oncology nurses using a mixed methods single-group descriptive repeated measures design. Participants were 6 registered nurses from a tertiary care pediatric hospital inpatient oncology unit who self-identified as experiencing grief. Participants met in self-selected dyads for 2 storytelling sessions. Questionnaires were completed at baseline, midpoint, and study end. Sessions were audio-recorded. Participants reported (1) receiving and providing support during sessions; (2) that sessions had an impact on their grief; (3) that sessions had an impact on their meaning-making, and the explicit session focus on making sense of and identifying benefit in their experiences was particularly helpful. There was a significant positive correlation between participant report of number of special patient deaths during career and impact of sessions on grief.

  4. DIGITAL ONCOLOGY PATIENT RECORD - HETEROGENEOUS FILE BASED APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Sapundzhiev

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oncology patients need extensive follow-up and meticulous documentation. The aim of this study was to introduce a simple, platform independent file based system for documentation of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in oncology patients and test its function.Material and methods: A file-name based system of the type M1M2M3.F2 was introduced, where M1 is a unique identifier for the patient, M2 is the date of the clinical intervention/event, M3 is an identifier for the author of the medical record and F2 is the specific software generated file-name extension.Results: This system is in use at 5 institutions, where a total of 11 persons on 14 different workstations inputted 16591 entries (files for 2370. The merge process was tested on 2 operating systems - when copied together all files sort up as expected by patient, and for each patient in a chronological order, providing a digital cumulative patient record, which contains heterogeneous file formats.Conclusion: The file based approach for storing heterogeneous digital patient related information is an reliable system, which can handle open-source, proprietary, general and custom file formats and seems to be easily scalable. Further development of software for automatic checks of the integrity and searching and indexing of the files is expected to produce a more user-friendly environment

  5. Personalised medicine in veterinary oncology: one to cure just one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopfleisch, R

    2015-08-01

    The term 'personalised medicine' is frequently used when modern medicine or the future of medicine is being described. Although the term basically implies that patients are individuals and should be treated as such, its modern meaning embraces a major leap by combining diagnostics and therapy. Thus, personalised medicine as presently understood seeks mainly to improve the effectiveness of therapeutic measures by tailoring therapy protocols according to the molecular genotype and phenotype of the individual patient. This has been facilitated by the introduction of new technologies such as next generation sequencing and proteome analysis, which has demonstrated that each tumour is much more distinctive than previously thought. Nevertheless, bioinformatics and experimental assays suggest that only a restricted number of driver genes or molecular pathways contribute to the development of most tumours. So, while tumour genomes have not yet been analysed in veterinary oncology, studies focused on mRNA expression and proteomic profiles of (mainly canine) tumours have already provided clinically relevant biomarkers and gene expression patterns. These data may be the start point for personalised approaches in veterinary oncology leading to better efficacy and safety of therapeutic protocols. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Drug interactions in female oncologic inpatients: differences among databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Moriel

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to quantify drug interactions in prescriptions for women undergoing supportive therapy in an oncology setting at a women’s hospital in Brazil and compare the information provided by different databases regarding these drug interactions. A convenience sample was selected of prescriptions for patients diagnosed with breast or gynecological tumors hospitalized in the clinical oncology and surgery wards from April to June 2009. DRUGDEX/Micromedex (Thomson Micromedex was the main database used for the identification of drug interactions and was compared with two other databases: Drugs.com and Lexicomp. The search was performed by inputting all drug combinations found in the prescriptions in Micromedex and Drugs.com. All interactions identified and classified by Micromedex and/or Drugs.com as of major severity were then checked in Lexicomp. A total of 152 interactions were identified by Micromedex (61 major, 69 moderate and 22 minor. In Drugs.com, 614 interactions were identified (85 major, 464 moderate and 65 minor. Forty-four were classified as major drug interactions in at least one of the databases: 30 in Micromedex, 26 in Drugs. com and 14 in Lexicomp. The present findings reveal discrepancies among the three databases analyzed. Thus, standardization should be proposed. Moreover, both the pharmacist and multidisciplinary team should perform a critical analysis of prescriptions to promote safe practices in the use of medications and minimize potential complications caused by drug interactions.

  7. Resilience and family of oncological patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Garassi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Resilience like ability to overcome adversity and even learn and get out “strengthened” them has become, in the last decade, the focus of many studies throughout the life cycle and in different cultures. On the other hand, oncological disease was introduced globally in a high percentage of the population requiring labor and health team including psychologists for coping on the part of the patient and their family members. The authors cited in the course of this article refer to the importance of developing resilience at the personal, family and cultural level, started with the presence of trust relationships, cultivating positive emotions, the acceptance of different cycles of life and belief in a just world. These promoting resilience factors are the springs that allow the experience of oncological disease and even death and mourning as opportunities to generate personal and familiar learning. 

  8. [Geriatric assessment prior to oncological therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedding, U

    2013-06-01

    Ageing is the single most important risk factor for cancer. This is also true for most cancer diseases of the genitourinary tract. In combination with the demographic changes in Germany and most other countries, the consequence is a substantial increase in the number of elderly patients with cancer. Most therapies in oncology have a high risk for toxic side effects. Ageing is a very heterogeneous process. The chronological age of a patient insufficiently reflects the individual resources, deficits and risk factors but this can be assessed by a structured geriatric assessment. Integration of geriatric assessment into oncological treatment decisions is still low and is one of the major tasks in cancer care in the future.

  9. Neuro-oncology of CNS tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonn, J.C. [Klinikum Grosshadern, Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Westphal, M. [Universitaetskrankenhaus Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Neurochirurgische Klinik; Rutka, J.T. [Toronto Univ. Hospital for Sick Children, ON (Canada). Div. of Neurosurgery; Grossmann, S.A. (eds.) [Johns Hopkins Oncology Center Neuro-Oncology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Diagnosis and treatment modalities for neuro-oncologic diseases have made considerable advances in recent years. There is hardly a segment of the field of solid tumours that is experiencing such dynamic development with regard to basic scientific findings and clinical results. In the present book the world's leading experts have compiled the current practice-relevant knowledge of neuro-oncologic diseases. The book's clear structure and the uniform presentation of all chapters make this volume a valuable reference, especially for practice-oriented activities, allowing swift access to information about current treatment standards. Hence it will be of great value to both clinicians and researchers. (orig.)

  10. Radiation oncology a physicist's-eye view

    CERN Document Server

    Goitein, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Radiation Oncology: A Physicist's-Eye View was written for both physicists and medical oncologists with the aim of helping them approach the use of radiation in the treatment of cancer with understanding, confidence, and imagination. The book will let practitioners in one field understand the problems of, and find solutions for, practitioners in the other. It will help them to know "why" certain approaches are fruitful while, at the same time, encouraging them to ask the question "Why not?" in the face of assertions that some proposal of theirs is impractical, unreasonable, or impossible. Unlike a textbook, formal and complete developments of the topics are not among the goals. Instead, the reader will develop a foundation for understanding what the author has found to be matters of importance in radiation oncology during over thirty years of experience. Presentations cover, in largely non-technical language, the principal physical and biological aspects of radiation treatment and address practical clinical c...

  11. Psycho-Oncology: A Patient's View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Prieto, Patricia

    2018-01-01

    Culturally the most important, valued, and less stigmatized part of cancer care is the medical part: The surgeon cutting the tumors out and the oncologist leading the strategic decision-making of the medical treatments available. The least valued and stigmatized part of cancer remains the psychosocial care. This chapter describes-through the eyes of an academic, psychologist, stage IV melanoma patient, and patient advocate-how one patient navigated changing psycho-oncological needs from early stage-to-stage IV through a whole range of psychological interventions available. Her voice joins that of all cancer patients around the world whom are urgently calling for psycho-oncological care to be fully recognized as a central part of cancer treatment.

  12. Predictors of Timely Access of Oncology Services and Advanced-Stage Cancer in an HIV-Endemic Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carolyn A; Suneja, Gita; Tapela, Neo; Mapes, Abigail; Pusoentsi, Malebogo; Mmalane, Mompati; Hodgeman, Ryan; Boyer, Matthew; Musimar, Zola; Ramogola-Masire, Doreen; Grover, Surbhi; Nsingo-Bvochora, Memory; Kayembe, Mukendi; Efstathiou, Jason; Lockman, Shahin; Dryden-Peterson, Scott

    2016-06-01

    Three-quarters of cancer deaths occur in resource-limited countries, and delayed presentation contributes to poor outcome. In Botswana, where more than half of cancers arise in HIV-infected individuals, we sought to explore predictors of timely oncology care and evaluate the hypothesis that engagement in longitudinal HIV care improves access. Consenting patients presenting for oncology care from October 2010 to September 2014 were interviewed and their records were reviewed. Cox and logistic models were used to examine the effect of HIV and other predictors on time to oncology care and presentation with advanced cancer (stage III or IV). Of the 1,146 patients analyzed, 584 (51%) had HIV and 615 (54%) had advanced cancer. The initial clinic visit occurred a mean of 144 days (median 29, interquartile range 0-185) after symptom onset, but subsequent mean time to oncology care was 406 days (median 160, interquartile range 59-653). HIV status was not significantly associated with time to oncology care (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.79-1.06). However, patients who reported using traditional medicine/healers engaged in oncology care significantly faster (aHR 1.23, 95% CI 1.09-1.40) and those with advanced cancer entered care earlier (aHR 1.48, 95% CI 1.30-1.70). Factors significantly associated with advanced cancer included income oncology care was 13 months. For HIV-infected patients (51% of total), regular longitudinal contact with the health system, through quarterly doctor visits for HIV management, was not successful in providing faster linkages into oncology care. However, patients who used traditional medicine/healers engaged in cancer care faster, indicating potential for leveraging traditional healers as partners in early cancer detection. New strategies are urgently needed to facilitate diagnosis and timely treatment of cancer in low- and middle-income countries. ©AlphaMed Press.

  13. Advances in radioguided surgery in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés Olmos, Renato A; Vidal-Sicart, Sergi; Manca, Gianpiero; Mariani, Giuliano; León-Ramírez, Luisa F; Rubello, Domenico; Giammarile, Francesco

    2017-09-01

    The sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy is probably the most well-known radioguided technique in surgical oncology. Today SLN biopsy reduces the morbidity associated with lymphadenectomy and increases the identification rate of occult lymphatic metastases by offering the pathologist the lymph nodes with the highest probability of containing metastatic cells. These advantages may result in a change in clinical management both in melanoma and breast cancer patients. The SLN evaluation by pathology currently implies tumor burden stratification for further prognostic information. The concept of SLN biopsy includes pre-surgical lymphoscintigraphy as a "roadmap" to guide the surgeon toward the SLNs and to localize unpredictable lymphatic drainage patterns. In addition to planar images, SPECT/CT improves SLN detection, especially in sites closer to the injection site, providing anatomic landmarks which are helpful in localizing SLNs in difficult to interpret studies. The use of intraoperative imaging devices allows a better surgical approach and SLN localization. Several studies report the value of such devices for excision of additional sentinel nodes and for monitoring the whole procedure. The combination of preoperative imaging and radioguided localization constitutes the basis for a whole spectrum of basic and advanced nuclear medicine procedures, which recently have been encompassed under the term "guided intraoperative scintigraphic tumor targeting" (GOSTT). Excepting SLN biopsy, GOSTT includes procedures based on the detection of target lesions with visible uptake of tumor-seeking radiotracers on SPECT/CT or PET/CT enabling their subsequent radioguided excisional biopsy for diagnostic of therapeutic purposes. The incorporation of new PET-tracers into nuclear medicine has reinforced this field delineating new strategies for radioguided excision. In cases with insufficient lesion uptake after systemic radiotracer administration, intralesional injection of a tracer

  14. Oncological and functional outcome of periosteal osteosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulia, Ashish; Puri, Ajay; Pruthi, Manish; Desai, Saral

    2014-01-01

    Background: Periosteal osteosarcoma is an uncommon variant of osteosarcoma which constitutes less than 2% of all osteosarcomas. Whereas adequate surgical excision remains the cornerstone of treatment, the role of chemotherapy in this tumor is still unclear. Existing literature contains very few single center studies on the outcomes for periosteal osteosarcomas and any additional information will help in better understanding of these uncommon lesions. This study aims to evaluate the oncologic and functional outcomes of treatment of periosteal osteosarcoma treated at our institute. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of 18 cases of periosteal osteosarcoma treated between January 2001 and December 2010 was carried out. There were 12 males and 6 females. The mean age at presentation was 16.3 years (range 5-26 years). Tibia and femur were the most common sites (n = 8). 16 of 18 patients received chemotherapy, 16 had limb sparing resection, one had an amputation and one had rotationplasty. Of the 16 patients with limb salvage, conventional wide excision was done in 11 cases. In 5 cases tumor was excised with hemicortical excision. Of the 11 cases treated with wide excisions, 4 patients underwent an osteoarticular resection and in 7 patients a joint preserving segmental intercalary resection was done. Results: All patients were available for followup. Surgical margins were free in all patients. A good response to chemotherapy was seen in 4/11 cases and poor in 6/11 cases. In one case the histological response was not discernible due to predominant chondromyxoid nature of the tumor. The median followup was 61 months (range: 18-130 months). There were two local recurrences (11%) at 9 and 18 months postsurgery. Pulmonary metastasis subsequently occurred in 4 cases (22%). Fourteen patients are currently alive and continuously disease free. Disease free survival at 5 years was 77.8% and overall survival (OVS) was 83.3%. Patients without marrow involvement had a

  15. Oncological and functional outcome of periosteal osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Gulia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periosteal osteosarcoma is an uncommon variant of osteosarcoma which constitutes less than 2% of all osteosarcomas. Whereas adequate surgical excision remains the cornerstone of treatment, the role of chemotherapy in this tumor is still unclear. Existing literature contains very few single center studies on the outcomes for periosteal osteosarcomas and any additional information will help in better understanding of these uncommon lesions. This study aims to evaluate the oncologic and functional outcomes of treatment of periosteal osteosarcoma treated at our institute. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of 18 cases of periosteal osteosarcoma treated between January 2001 and December 2010 was carried out. There were 12 males and 6 females. The mean age at presentation was 16.3 years (range 5-26 years. Tibia and femur were the most common sites ( n = 8. 16 of 18 patients received chemotherapy, 16 had limb sparing resection, one had an amputation and one had rotationplasty. Of the 16 patients with limb salvage, conventional wide excision was done in 11 cases. In 5 cases tumor was excised with hemicortical excision. Of the 11 cases treated with wide excisions, 4 patients underwent an osteoarticular resection and in 7 patients a joint preserving segmental intercalary resection was done. Results: All patients were available for followup. Surgical margins were free in all patients. A good response to chemotherapy was seen in 4/11 cases and poor in 6/11 cases. In one case the histological response was not discernible due to predominant chondromyxoid nature of the tumor. The median followup was 61 months (range: 18-130 months. There were two local recurrences (11% at 9 and 18 months postsurgery. Pulmonary metastasis subsequently occurred in 4 cases (22%. Fourteen patients are currently alive and continuously disease free. Disease free survival at 5 years was 77.8% and overall survival (OVS was 83.3%. Patients without marrow

  16. Immunotherapy Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (iRANO): A Report of the RANO Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Hideho; Weller, Michael; Huang, Raymond; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Gilbert, Mark R.; Wick, Wolfgang; Ellingson, Benjamin M.; Hashimoto, Naoya; Pollack, Ian F.; Brandes, Alba A.; Franceschi, Enrico; Herold-Mende, Christel; Nayak, Lakshmi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Pope, Whitney B.; Prins, Robert; Sampson, John H.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Reardon, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy represents a promising area of therapy among neuro-oncology patients. However, early phase studies reveal unique challenges associated with assessment of radiological changes reflecting delayed responses or therapy-induced inflammation. Clinical benefit, including long-term survival and tumor regression, can still occur following initial apparent progression or appearance of new lesions. Refinement of response assessment criteria for neuro-oncology patients undergoing immunotherapy is therefore warranted. A multinational and multidisciplinary panel of neuro-oncology immunotherapy experts describes immunotherapy response assessment for neuro-oncology (iRANO) criteria that are based on guidance for determination of tumor progression outlined by the immune-related response criteria (irRC) and the response assessment in neuro-oncology (RANO) working group. Among patients who demonstrate imaging findings meeting RANO criteria for progressive disease (PD) within six months of initiating immunotherapy including the development of new lesions, confirmation of radiographic progression on follow-up imaging is recommended provided that the patient is not significantly worse clinically. The proposed criteria also include guidelines for use of corticosteroids. The role of advanced imaging techniques and measurement of clinical benefit endpoints including neurologic and immunologic functions are reviewed. The iRANO guidelines put forth herein will evolve successively to improve their utility as further experience from immunotherapy trials in neuro-oncology accumulate. PMID:26545842

  17. Use of the distress thermometer to evaluate symptoms, outcome and satisfaction in a specialist psycho-oncology service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blenkiron, Paul; Brooks, Alexander; Dearden, Richard; McVey, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommends the use of structured tools to improve holistic care for patients with cancer. The Distress Thermometer and Problem Checklist (DT) is commonly used for screening in physical health settings. However, it has not been integrated into the clinical pathway within specialist psycho-oncology services. We used the DT to examine the broad clinical effectiveness of psycho-oncology intervention and to ascertain factors from the DT linked to an improved outcome. We also evaluated patients' satisfaction with their care. We asked 111 adult outpatients referred to York Psycho-Oncology Service to complete the DT at their first appointment. Individuals offered a period of psycho-oncology care re-rated their emotional distress, problems and service satisfaction on the DT at discharge. Median distress scores decreased significantly (from 6 to 4, Wilcoxon's z = -4.83, P oncology care. It may also provide evidence to support the effectiveness of specialist psycho-oncology interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Ureteral injuries in gynecologic oncology surgery procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Đurđević Srđan; Popov Milan; Stojanović Sanja; Joksimović Nataša

    2003-01-01

    This study presents ureteral injuries in gynecologic oncology surgical procedures performed at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology in Novi Sad, in the period from 1991 to 2001. Intraoperative ureteral injuries were recorded in 4 (1%) patients, including: partial ureteral dissection bilateral ureteral ligation and complete ureteral dissection bellow the lower pole. In 3 (75%) cases, injuries were recognized immediately, and surgical reparation was performed. The patient with bilateral ...

  19. Oncology nurses awareness of drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Azize; Isik, Sevcan Avcı; Kav, Sultan; Abbasoglu, Aysel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine oncology nurses awareness of drug interactions. This descriptive study was conducted with nurses working in the oncology clinics who are a member of Oncology Nursing Association of Turkey. A total of 115 nurses (response rate %20) were responded to the online survey that consists of 28 questions. The mean age of the nurses was 33 ± 6.8. The majority of nurses work in university hospital (60%) as a clinical nurse (62.6%) and have a Bachelor Degree in Nursing (63.5%). The mean working years in oncology was 4 years. Half of them stated receiving information on drug interactions mostly through in-service education and courses/congresses in last 5 years. The majority of them (84.3%) indicated that they are considering the possibility of drug interactions when they are scheduling the medication administration time. More than half of the responders (59.1%) encountered drug interactions; however, few explored drug interactions with food, drinks, and nutritional supplements. Their practices to assess possibility of drug interactions were reviewing the drug prospectus (78.3%); consulting with their colleagues (58.3%) and searching on the available website (42.6%) and looking at the drug interaction (39.1%). More than half (65.2%) stated lack of any system to identify drug interactions in their workplace. Nearly half of them indicated to including the drug interaction into patient education mostly for food-drug (73.9%) and drug-drug (63.5%) interactions. Almost all indicated the needs for further education on drug interactions and suggested to have guideline/packet guide.

  20. [Multidisciplinary oncology teams: beware of endless discussions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giard, Raimond W M

    2010-01-01

    The continual and increasing complexity of diagnostic and treatment options in oncology demands careful communication, coordination and decision making. Cancer care could be improved by multidisciplinary teamwork. Although this sort of teamwork has many advantages in theory, we know very little about its effectiveness in practice. We have to answer questions such as how teams can accomplish their task most effectively and how we must manage organizations in such a way that team-based working contributes optimally to organizational effectiveness.

  1. Publish, not perish: Introducing Experimental Hematology & Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zihai; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen; Liu, Delong

    2012-01-01

    Abstract As a scientific discipline, medicine can only be advanced by experimentation. Experimentation could either validate or refute a hypothesis. Unfortunately, today's publication climate strongly favors publication of positive research findings, especially with clinical trials. Experimental Hematology & Oncology (eHO) is a new open access online journal that emphasizes preclinical, patient-oriented and translational aspects of research. The journal differentiates from others in the field...

  2. Oncology nurses awareness of drug interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azize Karahan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to determine oncology nurses awareness of drug interactions. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted with nurses working in the oncology clinics who are a member of Oncology Nursing Association of Turkey. A total of 115 nurses (response rate %20 were responded to the online survey that consists of 28 questions. Results: The mean age of the nurses was 33 ± 6.8. The majority of nurses work in university hospital (60% as a clinical nurse (62.6% and have a Bachelor Degree in Nursing (63.5%. The mean working years in oncology was 4 years. Half of them stated receiving information on drug interactions mostly through in-service education and courses/congresses in last 5 years. The majority of them (84.3% indicated that they are considering the possibility of drug interactions when they are scheduling the medication administration time. More than half of the responders (59.1% encountered drug interactions; however, few explored drug interactions with food, drinks, and nutritional supplements. Their practices to assess possibility of drug interactions were reviewing the drug prospectus (78.3%; consulting with their colleagues (58.3% and searching on the available website (42.6% and looking at the drug interaction (39.1%. More than half (65.2% stated lack of any system to identify drug interactions in their workplace. Nearly half of them indicated to including the drug interaction into patient education mostly for food-drug (73.9% and drug-drug (63.5% interactions. Conclusions: Almost all indicated the needs for further education on drug interactions and suggested to have guideline/packet guide.

  3. Oncologic Management of Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yacoub, George; Nagalla, Srikanth; Aklilu, Mebea

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer in females and the third most common cancer diagnosed in males. Familial CRC comprises ~20 to 30% of all CRC cases. Lynch syndrome (LS), previously called hereditary nonpolyposis CRC (HNPCC), is the most common of the hereditary CRC syndromes. In this review, the oncological management of hereditary colorectal cancer from the medical oncologist perspective is discussed with special emphasis on Lynch syndrome. Lynch syndrome is character...

  4. Importance of nutrition in pediatric oncology

    OpenAIRE

    P C Rogers

    2015-01-01

    A nutritional perspective within pediatric oncology is usually just related to the supportive care aspect during the management of the underlying malignancy. However, nutrition has a far more fundamental importance with respect to a growing, developing child who has cancer as well as viewing cancer from a nutritional cancer control perspective. Nutrition is relevant to all components of cancer control including prevention, epidemiology, biology, treatment, supportive care, rehabilitation, and...

  5. Prevalence and predictors of compassion fatigue, burnout and compassion satisfaction among oncology nurses: A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hairong; Jiang, Anli; Shen, Jie

    2016-05-01

    the variance. Personality traits of openness and conscientiousness were positively associated with compassion satisfaction, while neuroticism was a negative predictor, accounting for 24.2% and 19.8% of the variance in compassion fatigue and burnout, respectively. Oncology care has unique features, and oncology nurses may suffer from more work-related stressors compared with other types of nurses. Various predictors can influence the professional quality of life, and some of these should be considered in the Chinese nursing context. The results may provide clues to help nurse administrators identify oncology nurses' vulnerability to compassion fatigue and burnout and develop comprehensive strategies to improve their professional quality of life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. COP - Pet Owners - What is Comparative Oncology | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    What is Comparative Oncology? Cancer, in the pet population, is a spontaneous disease. Pet owners, motivated by the desire to prolong their animals' quality of life, frequently seek out the specialized care and treatment of veterinary oncologists at private referral veterinary hospitals and veterinary teaching hospitals across the country. Therapeutic modalities for veterinary cancer patients are similar to those for humans, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and biotherapy.

  7. Emotional deprivation and adaptation resources in male and female oncologic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Rousina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the investigation into gender adaptation resourses of the patients in an Oncologic Clinic. Attention was paid to similarities and differences in the mechanisms of psychological protection, of coping!reactions, of the patient`s attitude to the disease as well as to the basic emotional states in the male and female patients in order to facilitate the choice proper psychotherapeutic targets.

  8. Workplace Bullying in Radiology and Radiation Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Jay R; Harolds, Jay A; Bluth, Edward I

    2017-08-01

    Workplace bullying is common in health care and has recently been reported in both radiology and radiation oncology. The purpose of this article is to increase awareness of bullying and its potential consequences in radiology and radiation oncology. Bullying behavior may involve abuse, humiliation, intimidation, or insults; is usually repetitive; and causes distress in victims. Workplace bullying is more common in health care than in other industries. Surveys of radiation therapists in the United States, student radiographers in England, and physicians-in-training showed that substantial proportions of respondents had been subjected to workplace bullying. No studies were found that addressed workplace bullying specifically in diagnostic radiology or radiation oncology residents. Potential consequences of workplace bullying in health care include anxiety, depression, and health problems in victims; harm to patients as a result of victims' reduced ability to concentrate; and reduced morale and high turnover in the workplace. The Joint Commission has established leadership standards addressing inappropriate behavior, including bullying, in the workplace. The ACR Commission on Human Resources recommends that organizations take steps to prevent bullying. Those steps include education, including education to ensure that the line between the Socratic method and bullying is not crossed, and the establishment of policies to facilitate reporting of bullying and support victims of bullying. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [The role of emotional labour in oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szluha, Kornélia; Lazányi, Kornélia; Molnár, Péter

    2007-01-01

    Oncologists and related health care professionals (HCPs) do not only have to follow professional protocols in their everyday work, but also have to communicate proper attitudes towards patients suffering from malignant diseases. This task is often a heavier load than the implementation of professional activities themselves. The present article is based on a survey on HCP work motivation, employment parameters and correlations with emotional labour. Fifty oncology HCPs at Debrecen University Medical Health Sciences Centre volunteered to participate in this survey containing 20 simple-choice questions. More than 90 percent of HCPs make an effort to hide their emotional state, giving way to possible negative side effects. The survey showed significant differences between the level of emotional labour of those working in the field of oncology longer or shorter than ten years. Surface and deep emotional labour is more frequent among professionals already working in oncology for a longer period of time. This can serve us with explanation to the burn-out syndrome so frequent in this profession. To diminish the load of emotional labour, healthcare institutes have to aim at hiring employees that spontaneously fit the emotional and behavioural norms facing them, and do not need officially prescribed behavioural norms for everyday work. Their constant need for respect and appreciation of their values must be kept in mind, because the capability of genuine emotional labour diminishes parallel to the number of years spent in work.

  10. Mentoring medical students in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNunzio, Nick; Parekh, Arti; Hirsch, Ariel E

    2010-09-01

    Mentoring in academic medicine has been described on a multitude of levels in medical literature, but seldom with respect to medical students. In fact, although some fields have addressed mentoring in the context of medical student education, radiation oncology has yet to do so in a comprehensive fashion. Furthermore, the projected domestic and worldwide epidemiologic trends in cancer cases, coupled with the frequent use of radiation-based cancer treatment regimens, make this an opportune moment to initiate such a discussion. Herein, the authors consider mentoring in the context of radiation oncology and related fields from the perspective of a medical student. They present a paradigm for promoting mentorship through traditional classroom-based and nontraditional socially and research-based initiatives. It is the authors' hope that both radiation oncology and other specialties will benefit from the initiation of this discussion, as well as build on the suggestions detailed here as we prepare the next generation of radiation oncologists. Copyright (c) 2010 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. View and review on viral oncology research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parolin Cristina

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To date, almost one and a half million cases of cancer are diagnosed every year in the US and nearly 560,000 Americans are expected to die of cancer in the current year, more than 1,500 people a day (data from the American Cancer Society at http://www.cancer.org/. According to the World Health Organization (WHO, roughly 20% of all cancers worldwide results from chronic infections; in particular, up to 15% of human cancers is characterized by a viral aetiology with higher incidence in Developing Countries. The link between viruses and cancer was one of the pivotal discoveries in cancer research during the past Century. Indeed, the infectious nature of specific tumors has important implications in terms of their prevention, diagnosis, and therapy. In the 21st Century, the research on viral oncology field continues to be vigorous, with new significant and original studies on viral oncogenesis and translational research from basic virology to treatment of cancer. This review will cover different viral oncology aspects, starting from the history of viral oncology and moving to the peculiar features of oncogenic RNA and DNA viruses, with a special focus on human pathogens.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging based functional imaging in paediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manias, Karen A; Gill, Simrandip K; MacPherson, Lesley; Foster, Katharine; Oates, Adam; Peet, Andrew C

    2017-02-01

    Imaging is central to management of solid tumours in children. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the standard imaging modality for tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) and limbs and is increasingly used in the abdomen. It provides excellent structural detail, but imparts limited information about tumour type, aggressiveness, metastatic potential or early treatment response. MRI based functional imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion and perfusion weighted imaging, probe tissue properties to provide clinically important information about metabolites, structure and blood flow. This review describes the role of and evidence behind these functional imaging techniques in paediatric oncology and implications for integrating them into routine clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Supporting Siblings as a Standard of Care in Pediatric Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Cynthia A; Lehmann, Vicky; Long, Kristin A; Alderfer, Melissa A

    2015-12-01

    In this study, evidence is provided for supporting siblings as a standard of care in pediatric oncology. Using Medline, PsycInfo, and CINAHL, a systematic search of articles published over the past two decades about siblings of children with cancer was conducted. A total of 125 articles, which were primarily descriptive studies, were evaluated by the four investigators using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria. There is moderate-quality evidence, as well as support from community stakeholders, to justify a strong recommendation that siblings of children with cancer should be provided with psychosocial services and that parents and professionals are advised about how to meet siblings' needs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Mapping the future: towards oncology curriculum reform in undergraduate medical education at a Canadian medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Jennifer Y Y; Nyhof-Young, Joyce; Catton, Pamela; Giuliani, Meredith E

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate (1) the quantity and quality of current undergraduate oncology teaching at a major Canadian medical school; and (2) curricular changes over the past decade, to enhance local oncology education and provide insight for other educators. Relevant 2011-2012 undergraduate curricular sessions were extracted from the University of Toronto curriculum mapping database using keywords and database identifiers. Educational sessions were analyzed according to Medical Council of Canada objectives, discussion topics, instructor qualifications, teaching format, program year, and course subject. Course-related oncology research projects performed by students during 2000 to 2012 were extracted from another internal database. Elective choices of clerks during 2008-2014 were retrieved from the institution. The 2011-2012 and 2000-2001 curricula were compared using common criteria. The 2011-2012 curriculum covers 5 major themes (public health, cancer biology, diagnosis, principles of care, and therapy), which highlight 286 oncology teaching topics within 80 sessions. Genitourinary (10, 12.5%), gynecologic (8, 10.0%), and gastrointestinal cancers (7.9, 9.8%) were the most commonly taught cancers. A minority of sessions were taught by surgical oncologists (6.5, 8.1%), medical oncologists (2.5, 3.1%), and radiation oncologists (1, 1.2%). During 2000-2012, 9.0% of students (233 of 2578) opted to complete an oncology research project. During 2008-2014, oncology electives constituted 2.2% of all clerkship elective choices (209 of 9596). Compared with pre-2001 curricula, the 2012 oncology curriculum shows notable expansion in the coverage of epidemiology (6:1 increase), prevention (4:1), screening (3:1), and molecular biology (6:1). The scope of the oncology curriculum has grown over the past decade. Nevertheless, further work is needed to improve medical student knowledge of cancers, particularly those relevant to public health needs. Defining minimum curricular content

  15. Mapping the Future: Towards Oncology Curriculum Reform in Undergraduate Medical Education at a Canadian Medical School

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwan, Jennifer Y.Y. [School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Nyhof-Young, Joyce [Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Catton, Pamela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Giuliani, Meredith E., E-mail: Meredith.Giuliani@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate (1) the quantity and quality of current undergraduate oncology teaching at a major Canadian medical school; and (2) curricular changes over the past decade, to enhance local oncology education and provide insight for other educators. Methods and Materials: Relevant 2011-2012 undergraduate curricular sessions were extracted from the University of Toronto curriculum mapping database using keywords and database identifiers. Educational sessions were analyzed according to Medical Council of Canada objectives, discussion topics, instructor qualifications, teaching format, program year, and course subject. Course-related oncology research projects performed by students during 2000 to 2012 were extracted from another internal database. Elective choices of clerks during 2008-2014 were retrieved from the institution. The 2011-2012 and 2000-2001 curricula were compared using common criteria. Results: The 2011-2012 curriculum covers 5 major themes (public health, cancer biology, diagnosis, principles of care, and therapy), which highlight 286 oncology teaching topics within 80 sessions. Genitourinary (10, 12.5%), gynecologic (8, 10.0%), and gastrointestinal cancers (7.9, 9.8%) were the most commonly taught cancers. A minority of sessions were taught by surgical oncologists (6.5, 8.1%), medical oncologists (2.5, 3.1%), and radiation oncologists (1, 1.2%). During 2000-2012, 9.0% of students (233 of 2578) opted to complete an oncology research project. During 2008-2014, oncology electives constituted 2.2% of all clerkship elective choices (209 of 9596). Compared with pre-2001 curricula, the 2012 oncology curriculum shows notable expansion in the coverage of epidemiology (6:1 increase), prevention (4:1), screening (3:1), and molecular biology (6:1). Conclusions: The scope of the oncology curriculum has grown over the past decade. Nevertheless, further work is needed to improve medical student knowledge of cancers, particularly those relevant to public health

  16. The Impact of Curriculum Design in the Acquisition of Knowledge of Oncology: Comparison Among Four Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecilio-Fernandes, Dario; Aalders, Wytze S; Bremers, André J A; Tio, René A; de Vries, Jakob

    2017-04-03

    Over the past 5 years, cancer has replaced coronary heart disease as the leading cause of death in the Netherlands. It is thus paramount that medical doctors acquire a knowledge of cancer, since most of them will face many patients with cancer. Studies, however, have indicated that there is a deficit in knowledge of oncology among medical students, which may be due not only to the content but also to the structure of the curriculum. In this study, we compared students' knowledge acquisition in four different undergraduate medical programs. Further, we investigated possible factors that might influence students' knowledge growth as related to oncology. The participants comprised 1440 medical students distributed over four universities in the Netherlands. To measure students' knowledge of oncology, we used their progress test results from 2007 to 2013. The progress test consists of 200 multiple-choice questions; this test is taken simultaneously four times a year by all students. All questions regarding oncology were selected. We first compared the growth of knowledge of oncology using mixed models. Then, we interviewed the oncology coordinator of each university to arrive at a better insight of each curriculum. Two schools showed similar patterns of knowledge growth, with a slight decrease in the growth rate for one of them in year 6. The third school had a faster initial growth with a faster decrease over time compared to other medical schools. The fourth school showed a steep decrease in knowledge growth during years 5 and 6. The interviews showed that the two higher-scoring schools had a more focused semester on oncology, whereas in the others, oncology was scattered throughout the curriculum. Furthermore, the absence of a pre-internship training program seemed to hinder knowledge growth in one school. Our findings suggest that curricula have an influence on students' knowledge acquisition. A focused semester on oncology and a pre-internship preparatory training

  17. The Role of the Advanced Practice Nurse in Geriatric Oncology Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Brianna; Tarbi, Elise

    2016-02-01

    To describe how the Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) is uniquely suited to meet the needs of older adults throughout the continuum of cancer, to explore the progress that APNs have made in gero-oncology care, and make suggestions for future directions. Google Scholar, PubMed, and CINAHL. Search terms included: "gero-oncology," "geriatric oncology," "Advanced Practice Nurse," "Nurse Practitioner," "older adult," "elderly," and "cancer." Over the last decade, APNs have made advances in caring for older adults with cancer by playing a role in prevention, screening, and diagnosis; through evidence-based gero-oncology care during cancer treatment; and in designing tailored survivorship care models. APNs must combat ageism in treatment choice for older adults, standardize comprehensive geriatric assessments, and focus on providing person-centered care, specifically during care transitions. APNs are well-positioned to help understand the complex relationship between risk factors, geriatric syndromes, and frailty and translate research into practice. Palliative care must expand beyond specialty providers and shift toward APNs with a focus on early advanced care planning. Finally, APNs should continue to establish multidisciplinary survivorship models across care settings, with a focus on primary care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Application of Theranostics in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymperopoulos, Georgios; Lymperopoulos, Panagiotis; Alikari, Victoria; Dafogianni, Chrisoula; Zyga, Sofia; Margari, Nikoletta

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, due to the development of nanotechnology new horizons in treatment and diagnosis of cancer open up. Development of nano-systems for simultaneous transfer of active substances and imaging of tumor regions gathers an important amount of scientific interest. This new category of nano-systems is called Theranostics. Theranostics methods can provide multiple benefits by inserting nanoparticles into the patient and using photodynamic therapy and pave the way for personalized medicine. The objective of this paper is to study the use and application of Theranostics in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, in order to achieve personalized anticancer treatment. For this purpose, investigation of existing literature has been conducted using electronic databases, PubMed, Google Scholar and IEEE Xplore. In addition, there was a secondary research phase, using paper citations found during the first research phase. It has to be pointed out that nanoparticles are the basis of Theranostics, since, due to their properties, they provide the ability to display accurate imaging and provide diagnosis along with simultaneous treatment of diseases. Theranostics methods may be applied in treatment of esophageal cancer, prostate cancer, breast cancer, in treatment of actinic keratosis, actinic cheilitis and Bowen's disease and in treatment of basal cell epithelioma and macular degeneration. As a result, application of Theranostics can provide multiple benefits by inserting nanoparticles into the patient. This method is currently encountering many challenges, but continuation of research on the field is necessary not only for the improvement of the medical field and the healthcare techniques, but also for the creation of new treatment methods for patients with diseases that are incurable until now.

  19. Measuring and Improving Value of Care in Oncology Practices: ASCO Programs from Quality Oncology Practice Initiative to the Rapid Learning System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Joseph O; Neuss, Michael N; Hauser, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Rising cancer care costs are no longer sustainable. Medical oncologists must focus on providing the maximum value to their patients; improving short-term, intermediate and long-term outcomes; and managing overall costs. Accurate measurement of outcomes and overall cost is essential to informing providers and institutions and in the quest for continuous improvement in value. The ASCO Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) is an excellent tool for sampling processes of care in medical oncology practices. To achieve the larger goal of improving the value of cancer care, ASCO is investing in the development of a Rapid Learning System, which will leverage emerging information technologies to more accurately measure outcomes (including those reported by the patient) and costs, resulting in highly efficient, effective, and safe cancer care.

  20. Outsourced similarity search on metric data assets

    KAUST Repository

    Yiu, Man Lung

    2012-02-01

    This paper considers a cloud computing setting in which similarity querying of metric data is outsourced to a service provider. The data is to be revealed only to trusted users, not to the service provider or anyone else. Users query the server for the most similar data objects to a query example. Outsourcing offers the data owner scalability and a low-initial investment. The need for privacy may be due to the data being sensitive (e.g., in medicine), valuable (e.g., in astronomy), or otherwise confidential. Given this setting, the paper presents techniques that transform the data prior to supplying it to the service provider for similarity queries on the transformed data. Our techniques provide interesting trade-offs between query cost and accuracy. They are then further extended to offer an intuitive privacy guarantee. Empirical studies with real data demonstrate that the techniques are capable of offering privacy while enabling efficient and accurate processing of similarity queries.

  1. Safety and quality assurance management in radiation oncology, What is the role for qualiticians?: example of the Centre Alexis Vautrin; Management de la qualite et de la securite en radiotherapie. Quel role pour les qualiticiens?: exemple au centre Alexis-Vautrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aigle, D. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Unite qualite et organisation, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Sobczyk, C.; Androni, M.L.; Peiffert, D.; Beckendorf, V.; Marchesi, V.; Buchheit, I.; Noel, A. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2009-10-15

    Since 2007, the Centre Alexis-Vautrin Cancer Institute in Nancy began its safety and quality assurance management policy in the department of radiation oncology. This development induced a collaborative work flow between the quality unit and the department of radiation oncology, with a definition of the responsibilities. The quality unit provides its methodology for the quality assurance, the professionals of the radiation oncology department their expertise. In parallel, a quality referee was nominated in the radiation oncology department to implement the projects for improvement, linked with the quality assurance unit, and under the control of the radiation oncology department staff. (authors)

  2. Baccalaureate-linked oncology nursing education: McMaster University's Paediatric and Adult Oncology Nursing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    For new nursing graduates prepared as generalists, the transition from student to graduate and from new generalist graduate to experienced specialized nurse can be very anxiety-provoking. This paper discusses one program, the Oncology Nursing Program, McMaster University, designed for nurses working along the cancer continuum. Proposed by oncology nurses seeking baccalaureate-linked specialty education, the year-long program has now been in existence for 10 years. A cadre of nearly 200 graduates affirm that specialized education influences direct patient care, health care team membership, professional and personal development.

  3. Statistical issues and challenges in immuno-oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The development of immuno-oncologic agents poses unique challenges, namely that both efficacy and safety profiles differ from previously characterized cytotoxic and pathway-specific agents. In addition, exponential distribution is usually assumed in study designs with time-to-event endpoints such as overall survival or progression-free survival. This assumption might lead to wrong estimates of study duration and statistical power if the phenomena of long term survival and delayed clinical effects are present. The aim here was to evaluate the magnitude of the impact caused by the violation of this assumption, and to describe new ways of analyzing efficacy and safety of immuno-oncologic agents. Methods Monte Carlo simulation was implemented to explore the impact of long term survivors and delayed treatment effect on study power and trial duration. Scenarios with various combinations of long term and delayed treatment effects were considered. Study power and duration were evaluated based on 10000 randomly generated trial data sets. The utility of group sequential study designs was discussed. A new set of immune-related response criteria (irRC) was considered for efficacy analysis. Two new methods for identifying adverse events, termed immune-related adverse events (irAE) and immune-mediated adverse reactions (imAR) were described. The key features of the safety profiles derived using these two methods were similar. Both methods were aimed at identifying inflammatory adverse events caused by immunotherapies. Results The presence of long term survivors usually lengthened the study duration. Depending on the treatment effect post survival curve separation, delayed clinical effect in general led to a loss of power. The irRC offered a new way of identifying clinical responses. Both safety analyses demonstrated higher sensitivity of identifying adverse events of immune system origin. Conclusion This simulation study showed the importance of accounting for the

  4. Oncology nurses' narratives about ethical dilemmas and prognosis-related communication in advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennon, Susan M; Uhrich, Margaret; Lasiter, Sue; Chamness, Amy R; Helft, Paul R

    2013-01-01

    Oncology nurses routinely encounter ethical dilemmas when caring for advanced cancer patients, particularly concerning prognosis-related communications. Nurses experience uncertainty and barriers to providing quality end-of-life care; thus, more information is needed about recognizing and managing these dilemmas and to clarify their role in these situations. The purposes of this study were to (1) describe the frequency and types of ethical dilemmas experienced by oncology nurses caring for advanced cancer patients and (2) to summarize their written comments about prognosis-related communications. This was a content analysis of narrative comments provided by 137 oncology nurses who completed a mailed national survey of members of the Oncology Nursing Society. The most frequently reported ethical dilemmas encompassed uncertainties and barriers to truth telling, familial and cultural conflict, and futility. Physician-nurse teams were considered optimal for delivering prognosis-related information. Nurses offered strategies for facilitating these communications. They also expressed the need for more education about how to engage in prognosis-related discussions and for better methods for relaying this information among team members to avoid "working in the dark." Oncology nurses routinely experience ethical dilemmas, and there is a need for clarification of their role in these circumstances. Healthcare providers would benefit from interdisciplinary education about prognosis-related discussions. Attention to managing familial conflict and understanding cultural variations associated with illness, death, and dying is also needed. Findings reveal new information about ethical dilemmas encountered by nurses and strategies for improving end-of-life communications with advanced cancer patients.

  5. Clinical Trial Patient-reported Outcomes Data: Going Beyond the Label in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yanni; Krohe, Meaghan; Yaworsky, Andrew; L Shields, Alan; Mazar, Iyar; Foley, Catherine; Globe, Denise

    2016-04-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) data are increasingly being implemented in oncology clinical trial research to evaluate treatment benefit, such as disease-related symptoms, treatment-related adverse events, and health-related quality of life impacts. However, only a small amount of PRO data collected is used to support labeling claims, leaving a substantial amount of data that could be shared by sponsors to further convey treatment benefit from the patient perspective. This paper describes how pharmaceutical sponsors can realize the value of PRO data derived from oncology trials with regard to the following stakeholders: payers, health care providers (HCPs), and patient advocacy groups. Further, ideas are presented for integrating PRO data and implementing PRO assessments within oncology, by stakeholder type. Finally, a summary is provided to describe how PRO data can benefit the patient by facilitating better, more symptom-focused care and enhancing treatment decisions. With the goal of motivating further use of PRO assessments in oncology, we present examples of how payers utilize PRO data to inform reimbursement decisions (eg, PRO data inform decisions made by Germany׳s Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care and the United Kingdom׳s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence); how communication of results with patient advocacy groups can lead to a better understanding of what is important to patients; and how HCPs can use PRO instruments to inform patient treatment decisions through real-world application. Integrating PRO data can enhance health care by allowing the patient's voice to carry beyond regulatory decisions and into those made by payers and HCPs, which are crucial to quality care and assessing the value of care. Utilizing PRO assessments and communicating results to key stakeholders in the oncology space can allow sponsors to report treatment benefit and, more importantly, can provide valuable insight into the patient treatment

  6. A report on the first Asian Oncology Nursing Society conference

    OpenAIRE

    Qi Wang; Rui-Shuang Zheng; Judi Johnson

    2014-01-01

    The first Asian Oncology Nursing Society (AONS) conference was held in Thailand from November 22 to 24 2013. It was a significant milestone in the journey of the development of the AONS. The objectives of the conference were to facilitate opportunities for networking, collaboration and exchange of ideas with renowned leaders in Oncology Nursing, to facilitate sharing and collaboration of oncology nursing in Asia and to explore innovative strategies to strengthen the implementation of evidence...

  7. The pediatric hematology/oncology educational laboratory in-training examination (PHOELIX): A formative evaluation of laboratory skills for Canadian pediatric hematology/oncology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Elaine; Dix, David; Ford, Jason; Barnard, Dorothy; McBride, Eileen

    2015-11-01

    Pediatric hematologists/oncologists need to be skilled clinicians, and must also be adept and knowledgeable in relevant areas of laboratory medicine. Canadian training programs in this subspecialty have a minimum requirement for 6 months of training in acquiring "relevant laboratory diagnostic skills." The Canadian pediatric hematology/oncology (PHO) national specialty society, C17, recognized the need for an assessment method in laboratory skills for fellows graduating from PHO training programs. Canadian pediatric hematologists/oncologists were surveyed regarding what were felt to be the essential laboratory-related knowledge and skills deemed necessary for graduating pediatric hematology/oncology trainees. The PHOELIX (Pediatric hematology/oncology educational laboratory in-training examination) was then developed to provide an annual formative evaluation of laboratory skills in Canadian PHO trainees. The majority of PHO respondents (89%) felt that laboratory skills are important in clinical practice. An annual formative examination including review of glass slides was implemented starting in 2010; this provides feedback regarding knowledge of laboratory medicine to both trainees and program directors (PDs). We have successfully created a formative examination that can be used to evaluate and educate trainees, as well as provide PDs with a tool to gauge the effectiveness of their laboratory training curriculum. Feedback has been positive from both trainees and PDs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Neuro-oncology: a selected review of ASCO 2016 abstracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Marc C

    2016-10-01

    ASCO 2016, 29 May-2 June 2016, Chicago, IL, USA The largest annual clinical oncology conference the American Society of Clinical Oncology is held in the USA and gives researchers and other key opinion leaders the opportunity to present new cancer clinical trials and research data. The CNS tumors section of the American Society of Clinical Oncology 2016 covered various aspects of neuro-oncology including metastatic CNS diseases and primary brain tumors, presented via posters, oral talks and over 100 abstracts. This brief review selectively highlights presentations from this meeting in an organizational manner that reflects clinically relevant aspects of a large and multifaceted meeting.

  9. A report on the first Asian Oncology Nursing Society conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The first Asian Oncology Nursing Society (AONS conference was held in Thailand from November 22 to 24 2013. It was a significant milestone in the journey of the development of the AONS. The objectives of the conference were to facilitate opportunities for networking, collaboration and exchange of ideas with renowned leaders in Oncology Nursing, to facilitate sharing and collaboration of oncology nursing in Asia and to explore innovative strategies to strengthen the implementation of evidence-based practice in oncology nursing.

  10. A report on the first Asian Oncology Nursing Society conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The first Asian Oncology Nursing Society (AONS conference was held in Thailand from November 22 to 24 2013. It was a significant milestone in the journey of the development of the AONS. The objectives of the conference were to facilitate opportunities for networking, collaboration and exchange of ideas with renowned leaders in Oncology Nursing, to facilitate sharing and collaboration of oncology nursing in Asia and to explore innovative strategies to strengthen the implementation of evidence-based practice in oncology nursing.

  11. Perioperative Palliative Care Considerations for Surgical Oncology Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipples, Rebecca; Taylor, Richard; Kirk-Walker, Deborah; Bagcivan, Gulcan; Dionne-Odom, J Nicholas; Bakitas, Marie

    2017-02-01

    To explore the opportunities to incorporate palliative care into perioperative oncology patient management and education strategies for surgical oncology nurses. Articles related to palliative care and surgical oncology to determine the degree of integration, gaps, and implications for practice. Although evidence supports positive patient outcomes when palliative care is integrated in the perioperative period, uptake of palliative care into surgical settings is slow. Palliative care concepts are not adequately integrated into surgical and nursing education. With appropriate palliative care education and training, surgical oncology nurses will be empowered to foster surgical-palliative care collaborations to improve patient outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Why bundled payments could drive innovation: an example from interventional oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Joseph R; Jones, A Kyle; Ninan, Elizabeth P; Clarke, Ryan K; Odisio, Bruno C; Avritscher, Rony; Murthy, Ravi; Mahvash, Armeen

    2015-03-01

    Some have suggested that the current fee-for-service health care payment system in the United States stifles innovation. However, there are few published examples supporting this concept. We implemented an innovative temporary balloon occlusion technique for yttrium 90 radioembolization of nonresectable liver cancer. Although our balloon occlusion technique was associated with similar patient outcomes, lower cost, and faster procedure times compared with the standard-of-care coil embolization technique, our technique failed to gain widespread acceptance. Financial analysis revealed that because the balloon occlusion technique avoided a procedural step associated with a lucrative Current Procedural Terminology billing code, this new technique resulted in a significant decrease in hospital and physician revenue in the current fee-for-service payment system, even though the new technique would provide a revenue enhancement through cost savings in a bundled payment system. Our analysis illustrates how in a fee-for-service payment system, financial disincentives can stifle innovation and advancement of health care delivery. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  13. A successful clinical pilot registry of four radiation oncology practices in Africa and Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzima, T R; Boshoff, M; Abuidris, D; Tsikai, N; Jones, G W

    2011-01-01

    Radiation Oncology practices can exhibit heterogeneities between and sometimes within institutions. Clinical registries with scope and detail could quantify consistency and distinctives that justify difference. Retrospective, isolated clinical audits are problematic, typically because not all data are captured in charts, while useful prospective clinical registries will have to be practical, efficient and accurate. We tested feasibility of a clinical registry at a critical time-point in the patient's clinical trajectory when treating physicians could have requisite data. This was a prospective and non-randomized observational study. Four centres used a 1-page form to acquire data during a 4-month period. Patients had curative breast, rectum or prostate cancers, or were palliative. Objectives were to demonstrate form completion and to delineate patterns of disease presentation and clinical practice. The 107 cases had 99% complete data, internally consistent within cases and centres. Similar practices were seen for 22 cases with curative rectal and prostate cancer, and 34 palliative cases, but of the 51 curative breast cancer cases those in Africa were with greater Stage, underwent more extensive surgery, were less likely to receive shorter radiation schedules, and were less exposed to Taxane-based chemotherapy regimens. This study demonstrates the feasibility for a simple clinical registry requiring minimal effort by participants. A real-time pan-African registry, operating continually or in regular waves, could provide important knowledge at little cost.

  14. Initial Development of the Mental Health Assessment and Dynamic Referral for Oncology (MHADRO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreaux, Edwin D; O'Hea, Erin L; Grissom, Grant; Lord, Sherrill; Houseman, Joshua; Grana, Generosa

    2011-01-01

    The Mental Health Assessment and Dynamic Referral for Oncology (MHADRO) is a program that conducts a computerized assessment of physical, psychological, and social functioning related to oncology treatment, prints personalized summary reports for both the patient and the provider, and for those who provide consent, faxes a referral and assessment summary report to a matched mental health treatment provider (i.e., dynamic referral). The functionality, feasibility, and end user satisfaction of the MHADRO were tested in a comprehensive care center. Of the 101 participants enrolled, 61 (60%) exhibited elevated distress on at least one of the mental health indices, and, of these, 12 (20%) chose a dynamic referral for mental health services. Patients and health care providers exhibited high levels of satisfaction with the program. The MHADRO has potential for assisting in meeting the psychosocial needs faced by individuals with cancer and should be tested further for its facilitation of mental health treatment initiation.

  15. The safety of cefepime and ceftazidime in pediatric oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, James M; Frediani, Jamie; Herr, Michael; Flynn, Patricia M; Adderson, Elisabeth E

    2013-05-01

    Concern has been raised about possible increased mortality associated with the use of cefepime. There are limited data available on the pragmatic use of beta-lactam antibiotics, especially in children. This retrospective study included 532 pediatric oncology patients. The outcomes of patients treated with cefepime for suspected serious bacterial infections were compared to those of patients treated with ceftazidime. Primary outcomes included 30- and 90-day all-cause mortality. The demographic and clinical characteristics of 337 patients treated with ceftazidime were similar to those of 195 patients receiving cefepime. Thirty-day and 90-day all cause mortality rates were comparable (30-day OR for cefepime: 3.48, 95% CI 0.31-38.84, P = 0.3; 90-day OR: 0.99, 95% CI 0.29-3.42, P = 1.0). There were also no differences in infection-related mortality rates, secondary infections, or adverse drug events. Deaths occurring within 30 days of hospitalization were judged to be attributable to infection, but not the result of treatment failure or adverse drug events. Deaths occurring between 30 and 90 days were associated with progressive or new malignancy. Secondary infection was significantly associated with mortality. The use of cefepime in pediatric oncology patients is not associated with increased mortality when compared to ceftazidime, however the small number of deaths in this study limits the strength of this conclusion. Previous associations between antimicrobial therapy and increased all-cause mortality may have been confounded by patients' demographic characteristics and co-morbid conditions. All-cause mortality may be an insensitive outcome for studies examining the efficacy and safety of these agents. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Management of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in pediatric oncology patients: A North American survey of pediatric hematology/oncology and pediatric infectious disease physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Rochelle R; Egan-Sherry, Dana; Gill, Jonathan B; Roth, Michael E

    2017-12-01

    Chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia (FN) is traditionally managed with hospital admission for parenteral antibiotics until neutropenia resolves. Recent studies have explored risk stratification and the safety of managing "low-risk" patients as outpatients. Few studies have directly assessed pediatric provider preferences for managing FN. We conducted a survey of practicing US and Canadian pediatric hematology/oncology (PHO) and pediatric infectious disease (PID) physicians to assess their FN management preferences using case scenarios with varying risk profiles. Twenty-one percent (n = 186) of PHO and 32% (n = 123) of PID physicians completed the survey. Overall, both groups of providers agreed regarding which patients with FN could be managed outpatient. For a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia receiving maintenance chemotherapy with an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) of 400 cells/μl, 35% (n = 66) of PHO and 49% (n = 60) of PID physicians would consider outpatient management (P = 0.02). Of those physicians selecting inpatient management, 41% (n = 49) of PHO and 52% (n = 33) of PID physicians would be willing to discharge the patient without an increase in ANC, if afebrile with a negative blood culture (P = 0.16). For a similar patient with an ANC of 100 cells/μl, only 23% (n = 35) of PHO and 42% (n = 39) of PID physicians would consider discharge without an increase in ANC (P = 0.002). Despite the lack of established guidelines for low-risk pediatric FN, a significant proportion of North American physicians report willingness to modify traditional management. This reinforces the need for evidence-based low-risk criteria and outpatient management guidelines to optimize consistency of care for these patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Patients at the University of Mississippi Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Hanny C; Karlson, Cynthia W; Hsu, Johann H; Ostrenga, Andrew; Gordon, Catherine

    2015-11-01

    To examine the prevalence and modalities of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in children with cancer and sickle cell disease; the reasons for use of CAM; and the use of CAM before, during, and after treatment in children with cancer. This single-center, observational study administered caregivers a written questionnaire regarding the use of CAM therapies. A total of 101 caregivers completed questionnaires. Including prayer, total CAM use in oncology and sickle cell disease was 64% and 63%, respectively. Non-prayer CAM use was 30% in oncology and 23% in sickle cell disease. Of respondents who reported using any CAM, the three most commonly used types were prayer (62.3% oncology; 60.0% sickle cell disease), vitamins/minerals (14.8% oncology; 10.0% sickle cell disease), and massage (9.8% oncology; 7.5% sickle cell disease). The primary reasons for using CAM were to provide hope, to improve quality of life, and to lessen adverse effects. In oncology patients, CAM use tended to increase during treatment compared with before and after treatment. The reported prevalence of non-prayer CAM use was lower (23%-30%) in this sample than has been reported in national samples or other geographic regions of the United States. Nonetheless, participants reported many positive reasons for using CAM, including to gain hope, improve quality of life, and control pain. Thus, CAM use appears to be an important aspect of medical care for many pediatric hematology/oncology families and should be a consideration when providers are discussing treatment and quality of care with families.

  18. Puerto Rico NCI Community Oncology Research Program Minority/Underserved | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The Puerto Rico NCI Community Oncology Research Program (PRNCORP) will be the principal organization in the island that promotes cancer prevention, control and screening/post-treatment surveillance clinical trials. It will conduct cancer care delivery research and will provide access to treatment and imaging clinical trials conducted under the reorganization of the National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN). It will evaluate disparity issues and outcomes in cancer care delivery and treatments. |

  19. Basic oral care for hematology–oncology patients and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elad, Sharon; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E; Brennan, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hematology-oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients are at risk for oral complications which may cause significant morbidity and a potential risk of mortality. This emphasizes the importance of basic oral care prior to, durin...... a protocol to assist the health care provider and present a practical approach for basic oral care. Research is warranted to provide robust scientific evidence and to enhance this clinical protocol....

  20. UMLS-Interface and UMLS-Similarity : Open Source Software for Measuring Paths and Semantic Similarity

    OpenAIRE

    McInnes, Bridget T.; Pedersen, Ted; Pakhomov, Serguei V.S.

    2009-01-01

    A number of computational measures for determining semantic similarity between pairs of biomedical concepts have been developed using various standards and programming platforms. In this paper, we introduce two new open-source frameworks based on the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS). These frameworks consist of the UMLS-Similarity and UMLS-Interface packages. UMLS-Interface provides path information about UMLS concepts. UMLS-Similarity calculates the semantic similarity between UMLS con...

  1. Cardio-Oncology: How New Targeted Cancer Therapies and Precision Medicine Can Inform Cardiovascular Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellinger, Andrew M; Arteaga, Carlos L; Force, Thomas; Humphreys, Benjamin D; Demetri, George D; Druker, Brian J; Moslehi, Javid J

    2015-12-08

    Cardio-oncology (the cardiovascular care of cancer patients) has developed as a new translational and clinical field based on the expanding repertoire of mechanism-based cancer therapies. Although these therapies have changed the natural course of many cancers, several may also lead to cardiovascular complications. Many new anticancer drugs approved over the past decade are "targeted" kinase inhibitors that interfere with intracellular signaling contributing to tumor progression. Unexpected cardiovascular and cardiometabolic effects of patient treatment with these inhibitors have provided unique insights into the role of kinases in human cardiovascular biology. Today, an ever-expanding number of cancer therapies targeting novel kinases and other specific cellular and metabolic pathways are being developed and tested in oncology clinical trials. Some of these drugs may affect the cardiovascular system in detrimental ways and others perhaps in beneficial ways. We propose that the numerous ongoing oncology clinical trials are an opportunity for closer collaboration between cardiologists and oncologists to study the cardiovascular and cardiometabolic changes caused by the modulation of these pathways in patients. In this regard, cardio-oncology represents an opportunity and a novel platform for basic and translational investigation and can serve as a potential avenue for optimization of anticancer therapies and for cardiovascular research and drug discovery. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Outcomes assessment of a pharmacist-directed seamless care program in an ambulatory oncology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Scott J; Abbott, Rick; Edwards, Jonathan; LeBlanc, Michael; Dranitsaris, George; Donnan, Jennifer; Laing, Kara; Whelan, Maria A; MacKinnon, Neil J

    2014-02-01

    The primary goal of seamless care is improved patient outcomes and improved standards of care for patients with cancer. The pharmacy service of the Newfoundland Cancer Treatment and Research Foundation conducted a randomized control study that measured clinical and humanistic outcomes of a pharmacist-directed seamless care program in an ambulatory oncology clinic. This article focuses on the intervention group, particularly the identification of drug-related problems (DRPs) and utilization of health care services as well the satisfaction of 3 types of health professionals with the services provided by the pharmacist-directed seamless care program. Overall, the seamless care pharmacist (SCP) identified an average of 3.7 DRPs per intervention patient; the most common DRP reported was a patient not receiving or taking a drug therapy for which there is an indication. The SCP identified more DRPs in patients receiving adjuvant treatment compared to those receiving palliative treatment. On average, family physicians, oncology nurses, and hospital pharmacists were satisfied with the SCP intervention indicating that they agreed the information collected and distributed by the SCP was useful to them. Pharmacist-directed seamless care services in an ambulatory oncology clinic have a significant impact on clinical outcomes and processes of patient care. The presence of a SCP can help identify and resolve DRPs experienced by patients in an outpatient oncology clinic, ensuring that patients are receiving the highest standard of care.

  3. Systematic review of primary osseointegrated dental implants in head and neck oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, A J; Butterworth, C J; Rogers, S N

    2011-01-01