WorldWideScience

Sample records for providing online access

  1. Demonstrate provider accessibility with desktop and online services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    It's available on personal computers with a CD or through Internet access. Assess instantly the accessibility of your provider network or the most promising areas to establish a health service with new GIS tools.

  2. Another Look at "SourceOECD": Providing Access to Online Publications through the Library Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragains, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    "SourceOECD," the online/print subscription service of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, is examined. Solutions for providing access in library online catalogs are described, as are recent technical improvements to the online subscription service.

  3. POPcorn: An Online Resource Providing Access to Distributed and Diverse Maize Project Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Ethalinda K S; Birkett, Scott M; Braun, Bremen L; Kodavali, Sateesh; Jennewein, Douglas M; Yilmaz, Alper; Antonescu, Valentin; Antonescu, Corina; Harper, Lisa C; Gardiner, Jack M; Schaeffer, Mary L; Campbell, Darwin A; Andorf, Carson M; Andorf, Destri; Lisch, Damon; Koch, Karen E; McCarty, Donald R; Quackenbush, John; Grotewold, Erich; Lushbough, Carol M; Sen, Taner Z; Lawrence, Carolyn J

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the online resource presented here, POPcorn (Project Portal for corn), is to enhance accessibility of maize genetic and genomic resources for plant biologists. Currently, many online locations are difficult to find, some are best searched independently, and individual project websites often degrade over time-sometimes disappearing entirely. The POPcorn site makes available (1) a centralized, web-accessible resource to search and browse descriptions of ongoing maize genomics projects, (2) a single, stand-alone tool that uses web Services and minimal data warehousing to search for sequence matches in online resources of diverse offsite projects, and (3) a set of tools that enables researchers to migrate their data to the long-term model organism database for maize genetic and genomic information: MaizeGDB. Examples demonstrating POPcorn's utility are provided herein.

  4. Online Professional Development for Child Care Providers: Do They Have Appropriate Access to and Comfort with the Internet?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay E. Wright

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With the expansion of online trainings today, Extension professionals have an opportunity to reach child care providers in more convenient ways. However, having convenient, reliable Internet access can be a barrier to online training for some child care providers, especially those with limited financial resources. This study investigated child care providers’ ability to access online training through convenient, reliable Internet access by asking 494 child care providers in Georgia about their access to and comfort with the Internet. Participants completed a brief 12-question survey that included questions about their Internet access and use for both personal and professional purposes (i.e., whether or not they have Internet access, where they have access, how often they use it, and how comfortable they feel using it. The majority of child care providers reported having Internet access (89.68% and feeling comfortable using the Internet (68.62%, and therefore, have the technological resources to participate in online professional development.

  5. Providing the Public with Online Access to Large Bibliographic Data Bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firschein, Oscar; Summit, Roger K.

    DIALOG, an interactive, computer-based information retrieval language, consists of a series of computer programs designed to make use of direct access memory devices in order to provide the user with a rapid means of identifying records within a specific memory bank. Using the system, a library user can be provided access to sixteen distinct and…

  6. Beyond the Repository: A Mixed Method Approach to Providing Access to Collections Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Brian Wade

    2013-01-01

    After providing access to over 100 video interviews conducted by a professor with notable entertainers and personalities from film through an institutional repository, an experiment was conducted to discover whether a larger audience could be gained by adding a subset of 32 of these videos to YouTube. The results, over 400,000 views, indicate that…

  7. Giving rheumatology patients online home access to their electronic medical record (EMR): advantages, drawbacks and preconditions according to care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vaart, Rosalie; Drossaert, Constance H C; Taal, Erik; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2013-09-01

    Technology enables patients home access to their electronic medical record (EMR), via a patient portal. This study aims to analyse (dis)advantages, preconditions and suitable content for this service, according to rheumatology health professionals. A two-phase policy Delphi study was conducted. First, interviews were performed with nurses/nurse practitioners (n = 9) and rheumatologists (n = 13). Subsequently, collected responses were quantified, using a questionnaire among the interviewees. The following advantages of patient home access to the EMR were reported: (1) enhancement of patient participation in treatment, (2) increased knowledge and self-management, (3) improved patient-provider interaction, (4) increased patient safety, and (5) better communication with others. Foreseen disadvantages of the service included: (1) problems with interpretation of data, (2) extra workload, (3) a change in consultation content, and (4) disturbing the patient-provider interaction. Also, the following preconditions emerged from the data: (1) optimal security, (2) no extra record, but a patient-accessible section, (3) no access to clinical notes, and (4) a lag time on the release of lab data. Most respondents reported that data on diagnosis, medication, treatment plan and consultations could be released to patients. On releasing more complex data, such as bodily examinations, lab results and radiological images the opinions differed considerably. Providing patients home access to their medical record might be a valuable next step into patient empowerment and in service towards the patient, provided that security is optimal and content and presentation of data are carefully considered.

  8. Accessibility of MOOCs: Understanding the Provider Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesto, Francisco; McAndrew, Patrick; Minocha, Shailey; Coughlan, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs) have become an accepted way to make learning opportunities available at large scale and with low cost to the learner. However, only if these are made accessible will they be able to offer flexibility of learning and benefits to all, irrespective of disability. Experience in providing accessible online learning…

  9. Online Access Patterns and Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Butrous

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper follows accessing patterns of five cohorts of postgraduate students enrolled in a core unit within a master of business administration (MBA program. The unit is designed to provide numerous opportunities for student participation in Discussion Boards using Blackboard technology. Discussion Boards create numerous opportunities for interaction amongst online learners to share and exchange their experiences, creating a sense of a virtual community. Relationships between accessing patterns for each week of the semester for each student are explored in relation to their performance using course statistics generated by the Blackboard technology. Close examination of the significant differences in access patterns to the course window and its components of communication, content, and student areas reveal middle of the semester (week 7 as the common critical point that differentiates high achieving students from low achieving students. Identifying critical points provides the faculty staff member an opportunity to introduce intervention strategies in order to improve the learning experience of all the students.

  10. Giving rheumatology patients online home access to their electronic medical record (EMR): advantages, drawbacks and preconditions according to care providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, R.; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Taal, Erik; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2013-01-01

    Technology enables patients home access to their electronic medical record (EMR), via a patient portal. This study aims to analyse (dis)advantages, preconditions and suitable content for this service, according to rheumatology health professionals. A two-phase policy Delphi study was conducted.

  11. An Investigation of the Effectiveness of an Online Catalog in Providing Bibliographic Access to Children in a Public Library Setting. Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Leslie; And Others

    This study evaluated the use of an online catalog by 33 children in the fourth, sixth, and eighth grades. As a basis of comparison, the children's ability to use the card catalog was also evaluated. Touch screen terminals were used to access a CLSI catalog. A specific set of tests was developed to determine if children have the necessary…

  12. Providing researchers with online access to NHLBI biospecimen collections: The results of the first six years of the NHLBI BioLINCC program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffen, Carol A; Wagner, Elizabeth L; Adams, John T; Hitchcock, Denise M; Welniak, Lisbeth A; Brennan, Sean P; Carroll, Leslie E

    2017-01-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), within the United States' National Institutes of Health (NIH), established the Biologic Specimen and Data Repository Information Coordinating Center (BioLINCC) in 2008 to develop the infrastructure needed to link the contents of the NHLBI Biorepository and the NHLBI Data Repository, and to promote the utilization of these scientific resources by the broader research community. Program utilization metrics were developed to measure the impact of BioLINCC on Biorepository access by researchers, including visibility, program efficiency, user characteristics, scientific impact, and research types. Input data elements were defined and are continually populated as requests move through the process of initiation through fulfillment and publication. This paper reviews the elements of the tracking metrics which were developed for BioLINCC and reports the results for the first six on-line years of the program.

  13. Online Access Patterns and Students' Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Butrous

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper follows accessing patterns of five cohorts of postgraduate students enrolled in a core unit within a master of business administration (MBA program. The unit is designed to provide numerous opportunities for student participation in Discussion Boards using Blackboard technology. Discussion Boards create numerous opportunities for interaction amongst online learners to share and exchange their experiences, creating a sense of a virtual community. Relationships between accessing patterns for each week of the semester for each student are explored in relation to their performance using course statistics generated by the Blackboard technology. Close examination of the significant differences in access patterns to the course window and its components of communication, content, and student areas reveal middle of the semester (week 7 as the common critical point that differentiates high achieving students from low achieving students. Identifying critical points provides the faculty staff member an opportunity to introduce intervention strategies in order to improve the learning experience of all the students.

  14. Patients’ Online Access to Their Primary Care Electronic Health Records and Linked Online Services: Implications for Research and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freda Mold

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Online access to medical records and linked services, including requesting repeat prescriptions and booking appointments, enables patients to personalize their access to care. However, online access creates opportunities and challenges for both health professionals and their patients, in practices and in research. The challenges for practice are the impact of online services on workload and the quality and safety of health care. Health professionals are concerned about the impact on workload, especially from email or other online enquiry systems, as well as risks to privacy. Patients report how online access provides a convenient means through which to access their health provider and may offer greater satisfaction if they get a timely response from a clinician. Online access and services may also result in unforeseen consequences and may change the nature of the patient-clinician interaction. Research challenges include: (1 Ensuring privacy, including how to control inappropriate carer and guardian access to medical records; (2 Whether online access to records improves patient safety and health outcomes; (3 Whether record access increases disparities across social classes and between genders; and (4 Improving efficiency. The challenges for practice are: (1 How to incorporate online access into clinical workflow; (2 The need for a business model to fund the additional time taken. Creating a sustainable business model for a safe, private, informative, more equitable online service is needed if online access to records is to be provided outside of pay-for-service systems.

  15. Patients' Online Access to Their Primary Care Electronic Health Records and Linked Online Services: Implications for Research and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold, Freda; de Lusignan, Simon

    2015-12-04

    Online access to medical records and linked services, including requesting repeat prescriptions and booking appointments, enables patients to personalize their access to care. However, online access creates opportunities and challenges for both health professionals and their patients, in practices and in research. The challenges for practice are the impact of online services on workload and the quality and safety of health care. Health professionals are concerned about the impact on workload, especially from email or other online enquiry systems, as well as risks to privacy. Patients report how online access provides a convenient means through which to access their health provider and may offer greater satisfaction if they get a timely response from a clinician. Online access and services may also result in unforeseen consequences and may change the nature of the patient-clinician interaction. Research challenges include: (1) Ensuring privacy, including how to control inappropriate carer and guardian access to medical records; (2) Whether online access to records improves patient safety and health outcomes; (3) Whether record access increases disparities across social classes and between genders; and (4) Improving efficiency. The challenges for practice are: (1) How to incorporate online access into clinical workflow; (2) The need for a business model to fund the additional time taken. Creating a sustainable business model for a safe, private, informative, more equitable online service is needed if online access to records is to be provided outside of pay-for-service systems.

  16. Patients’ Online Access to Their Primary Care Electronic Health Records and Linked Online Services: Implications for Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold, Freda; de Lusignan, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Online access to medical records and linked services, including requesting repeat prescriptions and booking appointments, enables patients to personalize their access to care. However, online access creates opportunities and challenges for both health professionals and their patients, in practices and in research. The challenges for practice are the impact of online services on workload and the quality and safety of health care. Health professionals are concerned about the impact on workload, especially from email or other online enquiry systems, as well as risks to privacy. Patients report how online access provides a convenient means through which to access their health provider and may offer greater satisfaction if they get a timely response from a clinician. Online access and services may also result in unforeseen consequences and may change the nature of the patient-clinician interaction. Research challenges include: (1) Ensuring privacy, including how to control inappropriate carer and guardian access to medical records; (2) Whether online access to records improves patient safety and health outcomes; (3) Whether record access increases disparities across social classes and between genders; and (4) Improving efficiency. The challenges for practice are: (1) How to incorporate online access into clinical workflow; (2) The need for a business model to fund the additional time taken. Creating a sustainable business model for a safe, private, informative, more equitable online service is needed if online access to records is to be provided outside of pay-for-service systems. PMID:26690225

  17. Strategic Access: Government/Defense Online Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Eileen

    1987-01-01

    This overview of the available government and defense online databases divides them into the categories of research and development and market intelligence and describes the contents of each database. A listing of the online producers and providers, starting dates of files, and update frequency is provided. (CLB)

  18. Providing Data Access for Interdisciplinary Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, R. P.; Couch, A.

    2012-12-01

    Developing an interdisciplinary understanding of human and environmental interactions with water requires access to a variety of data kinds collected by various organizations. The CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System (HIS) is a standards-based, services-oriented architecture designed for time-series data. Such data represents an important type of data in water studies. Through the efforts of HIS, a standard transmission language, WaterML2, has been adopted by the Open Geospatial Consortium and is under consideration by the World Meteorologic Organization as an international standards. Web services have also been developed to retrieve data and metadata. HIS is completed with a metadata catalog, hosted by San Diego Supercomputing Center, which indexes more than 20 million time series provided from over 90 different services. This catalog is supported through a hierarchically organized controlled vocabulary that is open for community input and mediation. Data publishers include federal agencies, universities, state agencies, and non-profit organizations such as watershed associations. Accessing data from such a broad spectrum of sources through a uniform service standard promises to truly transform the way in which hydrologic research is done. CUAHSI HIS is a large-scale prototype at this time, but a proposal is under consideration by the National Science Foundation to operationalize HIS through a data facility, tentatively called the CUAHSI Water Data Center. Establishing HIS is an important step to enable research into human-environment interactions with water, but it is only one step. Other data structures will need to be made accessible and interoperable to support this research. Some data—such as two-dimensional GIS coverages—already have widely used standards for transmission and sharing. The US Federal government has long operated a clearinghouse for federal geographic data that is now being augmented with other services such as ArcGIS OnLine. Other data

  19. Metadata and Providing Access to e-Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileiou, Magdalini; Rowley, Jennifer; Hartley, Richard

    2013-01-01

    In the very near future, students are likely to expect their universities to provide seamless access to e-books through online library catalogues and virtual learning environments. A paradigm change in terms of the format of books, and especially textbooks, which could have far-reaching impact, is on the horizon. Based on interviews with a number…

  20. Accessible online health promotion information for persons with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Zimmerman, Vanessa; Frain, Marita; DeSilets, Lynore; Duffin, Janice

    2004-01-31

    Online health promotion materials have great potential to reach persons with disabilities and provide valuable information to this vulnerable population. While health promotion efforts are important for everyone, they are crucial for individuals with disabilities. Yet information needed to support these efforts is often presented in such a way that its access is limited or its content is inappropriate for this population. Whether designing or selecting online materials for individuals with disabilities, nurses can benefit from knowledge about strategies to make web sites more accessible or to assess the accessibility of existing web sites. The task of providing health promotion information to women with disabilities was undertaken as part of the "Health Promotion for Women with Disabilities Project" at Villanova University's College of Nursing. A web site was created as one method of providing information. This paper presents strategies that are used to make this site accessible.

  1. Patients’ online access to their electronic health records and linked online services: a systematic interpretative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lusignan, Simon; Mold, Freda; Sheikh, Aziz; Majeed, Azeem; Wyatt, Jeremy C; Quinn, Tom; Cavill, Mary; Gronlund, Toto Anne; Franco, Christina; Chauhan, Umesh; Blakey, Hannah; Kataria, Neha; Barker, Fiona; Ellis, Beverley; Koczan, Phil; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; McCarthy, Mary; Jones, Simon; Rafi, Imran

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effect of providing patients online access to their electronic health record (EHR) and linked transactional services on the provision, quality and safety of healthcare. The objectives are also to identify and understand: barriers and facilitators for providing online access to their records and services for primary care workers; and their association with organisational/IT system issues. Setting Primary care. Participants A total of 143 studies were included. 17 were experimental in design and subject to risk of bias assessment, which is reported in a separate paper. Detailed inclusion and exclusion criteria have also been published elsewhere in the protocol. Primary and secondary outcome measures Our primary outcome measure was change in quality or safety as a result of implementation or utilisation of online records/transactional services. Results No studies reported changes in health outcomes; though eight detected medication errors and seven reported improved uptake of preventative care. Professional concerns over privacy were reported in 14 studies. 18 studies reported concern over potential increased workload; with some showing an increase workload in email or online messaging; telephone contact remaining unchanged, and face-to face contact staying the same or falling. Owing to heterogeneity in reporting overall workload change was hard to predict. 10 studies reported how online access offered convenience, primarily for more advantaged patients, who were largely highly satisfied with the process when clinician responses were prompt. Conclusions Patient online access and services offer increased convenience and satisfaction. However, professionals were concerned about impact on workload and risk to privacy. Studies correcting medication errors may improve patient safety. There may need to be a redesign of the business process to engage health professionals in online access and of the EHR to make it friendlier and provide equity of

  2. Patients' online access to their electronic health records and linked online services: a systematic interpretative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lusignan, Simon; Mold, Freda; Sheikh, Aziz; Majeed, Azeem; Wyatt, Jeremy C; Quinn, Tom; Cavill, Mary; Gronlund, Toto Anne; Franco, Christina; Chauhan, Umesh; Blakey, Hannah; Kataria, Neha; Barker, Fiona; Ellis, Beverley; Koczan, Phil; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; McCarthy, Mary; Jones, Simon; Rafi, Imran

    2014-09-08

    To investigate the effect of providing patients online access to their electronic health record (EHR) and linked transactional services on the provision, quality and safety of healthcare. The objectives are also to identify and understand: barriers and facilitators for providing online access to their records and services for primary care workers; and their association with organisational/IT system issues. Primary care. A total of 143 studies were included. 17 were experimental in design and subject to risk of bias assessment, which is reported in a separate paper. Detailed inclusion and exclusion criteria have also been published elsewhere in the protocol. Our primary outcome measure was change in quality or safety as a result of implementation or utilisation of online records/transactional services. No studies reported changes in health outcomes; though eight detected medication errors and seven reported improved uptake of preventative care. Professional concerns over privacy were reported in 14 studies. 18 studies reported concern over potential increased workload; with some showing an increase workload in email or online messaging; telephone contact remaining unchanged, and face-to face contact staying the same or falling. Owing to heterogeneity in reporting overall workload change was hard to predict. 10 studies reported how online access offered convenience, primarily for more advantaged patients, who were largely highly satisfied with the process when clinician responses were prompt. Patient online access and services offer increased convenience and satisfaction. However, professionals were concerned about impact on workload and risk to privacy. Studies correcting medication errors may improve patient safety. There may need to be a redesign of the business process to engage health professionals in online access and of the EHR to make it friendlier and provide equity of access to a wider group of patients. A1 SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION NUMBER: PROSPERO

  3. How Online Access Changed Amateur Video Editing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugster Benjamin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital technology has often been discussed in relation to how it changed either the production or the reception of audiovisual cultures. This paper will consider a combination of both as a crucial part in understanding strategies of inter- and transmedial amateur creativity. Based on an experimental ethnography of the online video subgenre/subculture “YouTubePoop,” the paper will elaborate on the connection between the individual experience and the creation of digital media. The loose collective of independent amateurs behind the YouTubePoop videos makes use of already existing audiovisual material ranging from television shows to videos of other YouTube users. The re-created remixes and mash-ups are characterized by their random selection of original material and their nonsensical humour. Hence, the rapid montage of this heterogeneous content is just as much part of the intensified aesthetic expressiveness as are the applied special effects available in the digital video editing software. Both aspects highlight the strong interdependence of the rapid accessibility of online content and digital technology and the new aesthetic expressions they are fostering. The paper will show how the experience and navigation of digital interfaces (editing software, media players, or homepages affect the design and practice of these video-remixes. This will open the discussion about intertextual strategies of media appropriation to an aesthetic and praxeological analysis of media interaction.

  4. Levels of Interaction Provided by Online Distance Education Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhih, Mohammed; Ossiannilsson, Ebba; Berigel, Muhammet

    2017-01-01

    Interaction plays a significant role to foster usability and quality in online education. It is one of the quality standard to reveal the evidence of practice in online distance education models. This research study aims to evaluate levels of interaction in the practices of distance education centres. It is aimed to provide online distance…

  5. Access to the Online Planetary Research Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneken, E. A.; Accomazzi, A.; Kurtz, M. J.; Grant, C. S.; Thompson, D.; Di Milia, G.; Bohlen, E.; Murray, S. S.

    2009-12-01

    The SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) provides various free services for finding, accessing, and managing bibliographic data, including a basic search form, the myADS notification service, and private library capabilities (a useful tool for building bibliographies), plus access to scanned pages of published articles. The ADS also provides powerful search capabilities, allowing users to find e.g. the most instructive or most important articles on a given subject . For the Planetary Sciences, the citation statistics of the ADS have improved considerably with the inclusion of the references from Elsevier journals, including Icarus, Planetary and Space Science, and Earth and Planetary Science Letters. We currently have about 78 journals convering the planetary and space sciences (Advances in Space Research, Icarus, Solar Physics, Astrophusics and Space Science, JGRE, Meteoritics, to name a few). Currently, this set of journals represents about 180,000 articles and 1.1 million references. Penetration into the Solar Physics, Planetary Sciences and Geophysics community has increased significantly. During the period 2004-2008, user access to JGR and Icarus increased by a factor of 4.4, while e.g. access to the Astrophysical Journal "only" increased by a factor of 1.8.

  6. Mastery with Meaning: Access to Mathematics Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Paul; Ellis, Wade; Oien, Janet; Benoit, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Mastery approaches with online Internet platforms have been shown to alleviate many students' deficiencies and open the door to higher mathematics. This paper details some current programs using online learning for precalculus courses, and detail how the research affected the design, development, and implementation of a new online approach…

  7. Auditing the Accessibility of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesto, Francisco; McAndrew, Patrick; Minocha, Shailey; Coughlan, Tim

    2017-01-01

    The outcome from the research being reported in this paper is the design of an accessibility audit to evaluate Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) for accessibility and to arrive at solutions and adaptations that can meet user needs. This accessibility audit includes expert-based heuristic evaluations and user-based evaluations of the MOOC platforms and individual courses.

  8. The Debate on the Moral Responsibilities of Online Service Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddeo, Mariarosaria; Floridi, Luciano

    2016-12-01

    Online service providers (OSPs)-such as AOL, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, and Twitter-significantly shape the informational environment (infosphere) and influence users' experiences and interactions within it. There is a general agreement on the centrality of OSPs in information societies, but little consensus about what principles should shape their moral responsibilities and practices. In this article, we analyse the main contributions to the debate on the moral responsibilities of OSPs. By endorsing the method of the levels of abstract (LoAs), we first analyse the moral responsibilities of OSPs in the web (LoAIN). These concern the management of online information, which includes information filtering, Internet censorship, the circulation of harmful content, and the implementation and fostering of human rights (including privacy). We then consider the moral responsibilities ascribed to OSPs on the web (LoAON) and focus on the existing legal regulation of access to users' data. The overall analysis provides an overview of the current state of the debate and highlights two main results. First, topics related to OSPs' public role-especially their gatekeeping function, their corporate social responsibilities, and their role in implementing and fostering human rights-have acquired increasing relevance in the specialised literature. Second, there is a lack of an ethical framework that can (a) define OSPs' responsibilities, and (b) provide the fundamental sharable principles necessary to guide OSPs' conduct within the multicultural and international context in which they operate. This article contributes to the ethical framework necessary to deal with (a) and (b) by endorsing a LoA enabling the definition of the responsibilities of OSPs with respect to the well-being of the infosphere and of the entities inhabiting it (LoAFor).

  9. Heterogeneity of publicly accessible online critical values for therapeutic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colt M McClain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Critical values are reported to clinicians when laboratory values are life threatening and require immediate attention. To date no definitive critical value limit recommendations have been produced regarding therapeutic drug monitoring. Some laboratories choose to publish critical value lists online. These publicly available values may be accessed and potentially utilized by laboratory staff, patient care providers, and patients. Materials and Methods: A web-based search of laboratories associated with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education pathology residency programs was initiated to determine which therapeutic drugs had critical values and to examine the degree of variation in published critical values for these institutions. Results: Of the 107 institutions with university-based pathology training programs, 36 had published critical values online for review. Thirteen therapeutic drugs were investigated and the number of institutions reporting critical value limits for the drug, as well as the median, range, standard deviation, and the coefficient of variation of critical value concentration limits for each drug were determined. A number of the online critical value limits were deemed to be erroneous, most likely due to incorrectly listed units of measurement. Conclusions: There was a large degree of heterogeneity with regard to the chosen critical value limits for therapeutic drugs. This wide variance in critical values appears to be greater than that observed in interassay proficiency testing. Institutions should reexamine the rationale for their current critical value parameters and ensure that critical value limits and associated units are accurately published online.

  10. Evidence-based medicine for all: what we can learn from a programme providing free access to an online clinical resource to health workers in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtis, Yannis K; Rosenberg, Julie; Bhandari, Sudip; Wachter, Keri; Teichman, Marie; Beauvais, Sophie; Weintraub, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly changing landscape of medical knowledge and guidelines requires health professionals to have immediate access to current, reliable clinical resources. Access to evidence is instrumental in reducing diagnostic errors and generating better health outcomes. UpToDate, a leading evidence-based clinical resource is used extensively in the USA and other regions of the world and has been linked to lower mortality and length of stay in US hospitals. In 2009, the Global Health Delivery Project collaborated with UpToDate to provide free subscriptions to qualifying health workers in resource-limited settings. We evaluated the provision of UpToDate access to health workers by analysing their usage patterns. Since 2009, ∼2000 individual physicians and healthcare institutions from 116 countries have received free access to UpToDate through our programme. During 2013-2014, users logged into UpToDate ∼150 000 times; 61% of users logged in at least weekly; users in Africa were responsible for 54% of the total usage. Search patterns reflected local epidemiology with 'clinical manifestations of malaria' as the top search in Africa, and 'management of hepatitis B' as the top search in Asia. Our programme demonstrates that there are barriers to evidence-based clinical knowledge in resource-limited settings we can help remove. Some assumed barriers to its expansion (poor internet connectivity, lack of training and infrastructure) might pose less of a burden than subscription fees.

  11. How Online Access Changed Amateur Video Editing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benjamin Eugster

    2014-01-01

    .... Based on an experimental ethnography of the online video subgenre/subculture “YouTubePoop,” the paper will elaborate on the connection between the individual experience and the creation of digital media...

  12. Seeking health information online: does limited healthcare access matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Bhandari, Neeraj; Shi, Yunfeng; Jung, Kyoungrae

    2014-01-01

    Consumers facing barriers to healthcare access may use online health information seeking and online communication with physicians, but the empirical relationship has not been sufficiently analyzed. Our study examines the association of barriers to healthcare access with consumers’ health-related information searching on the internet, use of health chat groups, and email communication with physicians, using data from 27 210 adults from the 2009 National Health Interview Survey. Individuals wit...

  13. Access Patterns of Online Materials in a Blended Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asarta, Carlos J.; Schmidt, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Patterns in student accesses of online materials and their effects upon student performance in a blended course are examined. Our blended course is an introductory business and economic statistics course where lectures are only available online while the traditional class period is used for complementary learning activities. Timing, volumes,…

  14. Patients’ online access to their electronic health records and linked online services: a systematic review in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold, Freda; de Lusignan, Simon; Sheikh, Aziz; Majeed, Azeem; Wyatt, Jeremy C; Quinn, Tom; Cavill, Mary; Franco, Christina; Chauhan, Umesh; Blakey, Hannah; Kataria, Neha; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Ellis, Beverley

    2015-01-01

    Background Online access to medical records by patients can potentially enhance provision of patient-centred care and improve satisfaction. However, online access and services may also prove to be an additional burden for the healthcare provider. Aim To assess the impact of providing patients with access to their general practice electronic health records (EHR) and other EHR-linked online services on the provision, quality, and safety of health care. Design and setting A systematic review was conducted that focused on all studies about online record access and transactional services in primary care. Method Data sources included MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EPOC, DARE, King’s Fund, Nuffield Health, PsycINFO, OpenGrey (1999–2012). The literature was independently screened against detailed inclusion and exclusion criteria; independent dual data extraction was conducted, the risk of bias (RoB) assessed, and a narrative synthesis of the evidence conducted. Results A total of 176 studies were identified, 17 of which were randomised controlled trials, cohort, or cluster studies. Patients reported improved satisfaction with online access and services compared with standard provision, improved self-care, and better communication and engagement with clinicians. Safety improvements were patient-led through identifying medication errors and facilitating more use of preventive services. Provision of online record access and services resulted in a moderate increase of e-mail, no change on telephone contact, but there were variable effects on face-to-face contact. However, other tasks were necessary to sustain these services, which impacted on clinician time. There were no reports of harm or breaches in privacy. Conclusion While the RoB scores suggest many of the studies were of low quality, patients using online services reported increased convenience and satisfaction. These services positively impacted on patient safety, although there were variations of

  15. Patients' online access to their electronic health records and linked online services: a systematic review in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold, Freda; de Lusignan, Simon; Sheikh, Aziz; Majeed, Azeem; Wyatt, Jeremy C; Quinn, Tom; Cavill, Mary; Franco, Christina; Chauhan, Umesh; Blakey, Hannah; Kataria, Neha; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Ellis, Beverley

    2015-03-01

    Online access to medical records by patients can potentially enhance provision of patient-centred care and improve satisfaction. However, online access and services may also prove to be an additional burden for the healthcare provider. To assess the impact of providing patients with access to their general practice electronic health records (EHR) and other EHR-linked online services on the provision, quality, and safety of health care. A systematic review was conducted that focused on all studies about online record access and transactional services in primary care. Data sources included MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EPOC, DARE, King's Fund, Nuffield Health, PsycINFO, OpenGrey (1999-2012). The literature was independently screened against detailed inclusion and exclusion criteria; independent dual data extraction was conducted, the risk of bias (RoB) assessed, and a narrative synthesis of the evidence conducted. A total of 176 studies were identified, 17 of which were randomised controlled trials, cohort, or cluster studies. Patients reported improved satisfaction with online access and services compared with standard provision, improved self-care, and better communication and engagement with clinicians. Safety improvements were patient-led through identifying medication errors and facilitating more use of preventive services. Provision of online record access and services resulted in a moderate increase of e-mail, no change on telephone contact, but there were variable effects on face-to-face contact. However, other tasks were necessary to sustain these services, which impacted on clinician time. There were no reports of harm or breaches in privacy. While the RoB scores suggest many of the studies were of low quality, patients using online services reported increased convenience and satisfaction. These services positively impacted on patient safety, although there were variations of record access and use by specific ethnic and socioeconomic groups

  16. African Journals Online: Open Access Titles

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Applied Zoology and Environmental Biology View Journal | Current Issue | Register This Journal is .... Issue | Register This Journal is Open Access. International Journal of Biological and Chemical Sciences ... Issue | Register This Journal is Open Access. Internet Journal of Medical Update - EJOURNAL

  17. JSTOR: Providing New Access to Old Research

    OpenAIRE

    K.M. Guthrie

    1998-01-01

    Much has transpired in a short period of time. The JSTOR database now includes well over two million pages from 47 core journals in 11 academic disciplines. Additional journal content is being digitized at a rate of approximately 100,000 pages per month. More than 250 libraries in the United States and Canada have become participating institutions, providing support for the creation, maintenance and growth of this database. Outside of North America, we have recently announced the establishmen...

  18. Online Information Resources Availability and Accessibility: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Researchers from developing countries have been facing problems in accessing scientific literature emanating from their own countries and beyond for many years. This scenario has partly been attributed by constraints related to the inability of institutions from least developed nations to pay subscription for published ...

  19. Regional Disparities in Online Map User Access Volume and Determining Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R.; Yang, N.; Li, R.; Huang, W.; Wu, H.

    2017-09-01

    The regional disparities of online map user access volume (use `user access volume' in this paper to indicate briefly) is a topic of growing interest with the increment of popularity in public users, which helps to target the construction of geographic information services for different areas. At first place we statistically analysed the online map user access logs and quantified these regional access disparities on different scales. The results show that the volume of user access is decreasing from east to the west in China as a whole, while East China produces the most access volume; these cities are also the crucial economic and transport centres. Then Principal Component Regression (PCR) is applied to explore the regional disparities of user access volume. A determining model for Online Map access volume is proposed afterwards, which indicates that area scale is the primary determining factor for regional disparities, followed by public transport development level and public service development level. Other factors like user quality index and financial index have very limited influence on the user access volume. According to the study of regional disparities in user access volume, map providers can reasonably dispatch and allocate the data resources and service resources in each area and improve the operational efficiency of the Online Map server cluster.

  20. Integrating ArcGIS Online with GEOSS Data Access Broker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchi, Roberto; Hogeweg, Marten

    2014-05-01

    ). The synergistic efforts will include: 1) Providing the GEOSS community with access to Esri GIS community content, expertise and technology through the GEOSS DAB, as well as to collaboration tools via the ArcGIS platform. 2) Encouraging the Esri GIS community to participate as contributors and users of GEOSS. 3) Supporting the extension of GEOSS to include ArcGIS Online publicly-available data. 4) Collaboration on outreach to both the GIS and GEO communities on effective use of GEOSS, particularly for environmental decision-making. 5) Collaboration on the evolution of GEOSS as an open and interoperable platform in conjunction with the GEOSS community. Protocols such as OPenDAP and formats such as netCDF will play a critical role. This talk will present the initial results of the collaboration which includes the integration of ArcGIS Online in the GEOSS DAB.

  1. 論線上目錄之主題檢索 Subject Access in Online Catalog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yueh Tsay

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available 無This paper first (describes the current clevelopments of online catalog subject access. In particular, it emphasizes the application of DDC, LCC and LCSH for retrieving subject information through online catalogs. Subsequently, studies in the literature on enhancements to the above subject searching as well as keywords or phrases extracted from the bibliographic record are discussed. Finally, an overall pictures of online catalog which is under the Internet environment and some directions in which the future online catalog should evolve are provided.

  2. An Assessment of Online Public Access Catalogue (OPAC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An Assessment of Online Public Access Catalogue (OPAC) Utilization in Two Selected University Libraries in Lagos State, Nigeria. ... It was found out that the computerized catalogue is a very important service for any library system, because this has helped the users in their information seeking. Some problems faced with ...

  3. Incremental Costs of Library Service Policies for Online Catalog Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Raymond G., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Presents a model that calculates the conditions under which a library may adopt a highly service-oriented online catalog access policy at minimum additional cost. The use of arrival rates, service rates, and queueing calculations to arrive at a cost-effective policy is explained. (Author/CLB)

  4. Who knows television? Online access and the gatekeepers of knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordegraaf, J.

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the implications of online access to television archival material and the knowledge it represents. I discuss the impact of digitisation on the TV archive, and ask how that affects the role of the archivist as a gatekeeper to its knowledge. I argue that far from being a

  5. Seeking health information online: does limited healthcare access matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Neeraj; Shi, Yunfeng; Jung, Kyoungrae

    2014-01-01

    Consumers facing barriers to healthcare access may use online health information seeking and online communication with physicians, but the empirical relationship has not been sufficiently analyzed. Our study examines the association of barriers to healthcare access with consumers' health-related information searching on the internet, use of health chat groups, and email communication with physicians, using data from 27,210 adults from the 2009 National Health Interview Survey. Individuals with financial barriers to healthcare access, difficulty getting timely appointments with doctors, and conflicts in scheduling during clinic hours are more likely to search for general health information online than those without these access barriers. Those unable to get timely appointments with physicians are more likely to participate in health chat groups and email physicians. The internet may offer a low-cost source of health information and could help meet the heightened demand for health-related information among those facing access barriers to care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Online Public Access Catalog: The Google Maps of the Library World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kieren

    2011-01-01

    What do Google Maps and a library's Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC) have in common? Google Maps provides users with all the information they need for a trip in one place; users can get directions and find out what attractions, hotels, and restaurants are close by. Librarians must find the ultimate OPAC that will provide, in one place, all the…

  7. Providing Access to Electronic Information Resources in Further Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banwell, Linda; Ray, Kathryn; Coulson, Graham; Urquhart, Christine; Lonsdale, Ray; Armstrong, Chris; Thomas, Rhian; Spink, Sin; Yeoman, Alison; Fenton, Roger; Rowley, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    This article aims to provide a baseline for future studies on the provision and support for the use of digital or electronic information services (EIS) in further education. The analysis presented is based on a multi-level model of access, which encompasses access to and availability of information and communication technology (ICT) resources,…

  8. THE EFFECT OF MOTIVATION ON PURCHASING INTENTION OF ONLINE GAMES AND VIRTUAL ITEMS PROVIDED BY ONLINE GAME PROVIDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sisca Stefany

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of online games is so high that leads many companies to compose games. To increase competitiveness, extra service is needed for the customers. Before giving service, online games provider has to know what factor that motivates player to buy online games and virtual items that are presented in order to increase competitiveness. The research is done by using case of online games perfect world, where the area of respondents is Jakarta and the age ranges between 15 to 24. This research involves survey for 186 respondents in which 30 respondents are for pilot test while 156 are for actual test. The data processing is used SEM which the measurement variables consist of effort expectancy, performance expectancy, perceived value, enjoyment story, enjoyment length, enjoyment graphic, enjoyment control, customization, purchase intention and actual purchase behavior. The result of research shows that motivation factor that has high effect to purchase intention is perceived value, enjoyment story, enjoyment length, enjoyment control and customization. While, purchase intention affects actual purchase behavior significantly

  9. Sci-Hub provides access to nearly all scholarly literature

    OpenAIRE

    Himmelstein, Daniel S.; Romero, Ariel R.; McLaughlin, Stephen R.; Tzovaras, Bastian Greshake; Greene, Casey S.

    2017-01-01

    The website Sci-Hub provides access to scholarly literature via full text PDF downloads. The site enables users to access articles that would otherwise be paywalled. Since its creation in 2011, Sci-Hub has grown rapidly in popularity. However, until now, the extent of Sci-Hub’s coverage was unclear. As of March 2017, we find that Sci-Hub’s database contains 68.9% of all 81.6 million scholarly articles, which rises to 85.2% for those published in toll access journals. Coverage varies by discip...

  10. Access to finance from different finance provider types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wulandari, Eliana; Meuwissen, Miranda P.M.; Karmana, Maman H.; Oude Lansink, Alfons G.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Analysing farmer knowledge of the requirements of finance providers can provide valuable insights to policy makers about ways to improve farmers’ access to finance. This study compares farmer knowledge of the requirements to obtain finance with the actual requirements set by different finance

  11. Hand Society and Matching Program Web Sites Provide Poor Access to Information Regarding Hand Surgery Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Richard M; Klifto, Christopher S; Naik, Amish A; Sapienza, Anthony; Capo, John T

    2016-08-01

    The Internet is a common resource for applicants of hand surgery fellowships, however, the quality and accessibility of fellowship online information is unknown. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the accessibility of hand surgery fellowship Web sites and to assess the quality of information provided via program Web sites. Hand fellowship Web site accessibility was evaluated by reviewing the American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH) on November 16, 2014 and the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) fellowship directories on February 12, 2015, and performing an independent Google search on November 25, 2014. Accessible Web sites were then assessed for quality of the presented information. A total of 81 programs were identified with the ASSH directory featuring direct links to 32% of program Web sites and the NRMP directory directly linking to 0%. A Google search yielded direct links to 86% of program Web sites. The quality of presented information varied greatly among the 72 accessible Web sites. Program description (100%), fellowship application requirements (97%), program contact email address (85%), and research requirements (75%) were the most commonly presented components of fellowship information. Hand fellowship program Web sites can be accessed from the ASSH directory and, to a lesser extent, the NRMP directory. However, a Google search is the most reliable method to access online fellowship information. Of assessable programs, all featured a program description though the quality of the remaining information was variable. Hand surgery fellowship applicants may face some difficulties when attempting to gather program information online. Future efforts should focus on improving the accessibility and content quality on hand surgery fellowship program Web sites.

  12. The Difficulties of Online Learning for Indigenous Australian Students Living in Remote Communities--It's an Issue of Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Sarah G.; Keating, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Online learning and new technologies are driving a trend in worldwide education that is not only gaining momentum, it is becoming a juggernaut. While the positives for online learning are clear and are often being touted by Universities and Vocational Education and Training providers as a panacea for educational access, what is not clear is the…

  13. Bring Your Own Device - Providing Reliable Model of Data Access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stąpór Paweł

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a model of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD as a model network, which provides the user reliable access to network resources. BYOD is a model dynamically developing, which can be applied in many areas. Research network has been launched in order to carry out the test, in which as a service of BYOD model Work Folders service was used. This service allows the user to synchronize files between the device and the server. An access to the network is completed through the wireless communication by the 802.11n standard. Obtained results are shown and analyzed in this article.

  14. Old maps online: enabling global access to historical mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Southall, Humphrey; Pridal, P.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last thirty years, map libraries worldwide have scanned some hundreds of thousands of historical maps from their collections, and most are viewable online via the world-wide web. However, maps remain difficult to access because they are individually hard to find: a user needing a map of a given location needs to know which library or libraries to search, and library search interfaces generally require knowledge of map titles: there has been no “Google for old maps”. We review previou...

  15. Adapting online learning resources for all: planning for professionalism in accessibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick McAndrew

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Online resources for education offer opportunities for those with disabilities but also raise challenges on how to best adjust resources to accommodate accessibility. Automated reconfiguration could in principle remove the need for expensive and time-consuming discussions about adaptation. On the other hand, human-based systems provide much needed direct support and can help understand options and individual circumstances. A study was carried out within an EU-funded accessibility project at The Open University (OU in parallel with studies at three other European universities. The study combined focus groups, user-testing, management consultation and student survey data to help understand ways forward for accessibility. The results reinforce a holistic view of accessibility, based on three factors: positioning the university as a positive provider to disabled students; developing processes, systems and services to give personal help; and planning online materials which include alternatives. The development of a model that helps organisations incorporate professionalism in accessibility is described, though challenges remain. For example, a recurrent difficulty in providing adequate self-description of accessibility needs implies that a completely automated solution may not be attainable. A more beneficial focus, therefore, may be to develop systems that support the information flow required by the human “in the loop.”

  16. Internet access and investment incentives for broadband service providers

    OpenAIRE

    Baranes, Edmond; Poudou, Jean-Christophe

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies a model of the Internet broadband market as a platform in order to show how di¤erent pricing schemes from the so-called "net neutrality " can increase economic e¢ ciency by allowing more investment of access providers and enhancing consumers surplus and social welfare. We show that departing from the "net neutrality", where at rates are used, introducing termination fees can increase incentives to invest for the ISP and enhance social surplus. Keywords : Network neutrality,...

  17. Expanding rural access to mental health care through online postgraduate nurse practitioner education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kverno, Karan; Kozeniewski, Kate

    2016-12-01

    Workforce shortages in mental health care are especially relevant to rural communities. People often turn to their primary care providers for mental healthcare services, yet primary care providers indicate that more education is needed to fill this role. Rural primary care nurse practitioners (NPs) are ideal candidates for educational enhancement. Online programs allow NPs to continue living and working in their communities while developing the competencies to provide comprehensive and integrated mental healthcare services. This article presents a review of current online postgraduate psychiatric mental health NP (PMHNP) options. Website descriptions of online PMHNP programs were located using keywords: PMHNP or psychiatric nurse practitioner, postgraduate or post-master's, and distance or online. Across the United States, 15 online postgraduate certificate programs were located that are designed for primary care NPs seeking additional PMHNP specialization. For rural primary care NPs who are ready, willing, and able, a postgraduate PMHNP specialty certificate can be obtained online in as few as three to four semesters. The expected outcome is a cadre of dually credentialed NPs capable of functioning in an integrated role and of increasing rural access to comprehensive mental healthcare services. ©2016 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  18. Children’s Environmental Health: Online Resources for Healthcare Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Free online resources, many produced in the North American Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit (PEHSU) network, covering general information, air quality, asthma, climate change, lead, mercury, mold, pesticides, and water.

  19. A free-access online key to identify Amazonian ferns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Zuquim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available There is urgent need for more data on species distributions in order to improve conservation planning. A crucial but challenging aspect of producing high-quality data is the correct identification of organisms. Traditional printed floras and dichotomous keys are difficult to use for someone not familiar with the technical jargon. In poorly known areas, such as Amazonia, they also become quickly outdated as new species are described or ranges extended. Recently, online tools have allowed developing dynamic, interactive, and accessible keys that make species identification possible for a broader public. In order to facilitate identifying plants collected in field inventories, we developed an internet-based free-access tool to identify Amazonian fern species. We focused on ferns, because they are easy to collect and their edaphic affinities are relatively well known, so they can be used as an indicator group for habitat mapping. Our key includes 302 terrestrial and aquatic entities mainly from lowland Amazonian forests. It is a free-access key, so the user can freely choose which morphological features to use and in which order to assess them. All taxa are richly illustrated, so specimens can be identified by a combination of character choices, visual comparison, and written descriptions. The identification tool was developed in Lucid 3.5 software and it is available at http://keyserver.lucidcentral.org:8080/sandbox/keys.jsp.

  20. A free-access online key to identify Amazonian ferns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuquim, Gabriela; Tuomisto, Hanna; Prado, Jefferson

    2017-01-01

    There is urgent need for more data on species distributions in order to improve conservation planning. A crucial but challenging aspect of producing high-quality data is the correct identification of organisms. Traditional printed floras and dichotomous keys are difficult to use for someone not familiar with the technical jargon. In poorly known areas, such as Amazonia, they also become quickly outdated as new species are described or ranges extended. Recently, online tools have allowed developing dynamic, interactive, and accessible keys that make species identification possible for a broader public. In order to facilitate identifying plants collected in field inventories, we developed an internet-based free-access tool to identify Amazonian fern species. We focused on ferns, because they are easy to collect and their edaphic affinities are relatively well known, so they can be used as an indicator group for habitat mapping. Our key includes 302 terrestrial and aquatic entities mainly from lowland Amazonian forests. It is a free-access key, so the user can freely choose which morphological features to use and in which order to assess them. All taxa are richly illustrated, so specimens can be identified by a combination of character choices, visual comparison, and written descriptions. The identification tool was developed in Lucid 3.5 software and it is available at http://keyserver.lucidcentral.org:8080/sandbox/keys.jsp.

  1. Providing Internet Access to High-Resolution Mars Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2008-01-01

    The OnMars server is a computer program that provides Internet access to high-resolution Mars images, maps, and elevation data, all suitable for use in geographical information system (GIS) software for generating images, maps, and computational models of Mars. The OnMars server is an implementation of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) server. Unlike other Mars Internet map servers that provide Martian data using an Earth coordinate system, the OnMars WMS server supports encoding of data in Mars-specific coordinate systems. The OnMars server offers access to most of the available high-resolution Martian image and elevation data, including an 8-meter-per-pixel uncontrolled mosaic of most of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Observer Camera Narrow Angle (MOCNA) image collection, which is not available elsewhere. This server can generate image and map files in the tagged image file format (TIFF), Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), 8- or 16-bit Portable Network Graphics (PNG), or Keyhole Markup Language (KML) format. Image control is provided by use of the OGC Style Layer Descriptor (SLD) protocol. The OnMars server also implements tiled WMS protocol and super-overlay KML for high-performance client application programs.

  2. Providing Internet Access to High-Resolution Lunar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2008-01-01

    The OnMoon server is a computer program that provides Internet access to high-resolution Lunar images, maps, and elevation data, all suitable for use in geographical information system (GIS) software for generating images, maps, and computational models of the Moon. The OnMoon server implements the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) server protocol and supports Moon-specific extensions. Unlike other Internet map servers that provide Lunar data using an Earth coordinate system, the OnMoon server supports encoding of data in Moon-specific coordinate systems. The OnMoon server offers access to most of the available high-resolution Lunar image and elevation data. This server can generate image and map files in the tagged image file format (TIFF) or the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), 8- or 16-bit Portable Network Graphics (PNG), or Keyhole Markup Language (KML) format. Image control is provided by use of the OGC Style Layer Descriptor (SLD) protocol. Full-precision spectral arithmetic processing is also available, by use of a custom SLD extension. This server can dynamically add shaded relief based on the Lunar elevation to any image layer. This server also implements tiled WMS protocol and super-overlay KML for high-performance client application programs.

  3. Provider barriers to family planning access in urban Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumlinson, Katherine; Okigbo, Chinelo C; Speizer, Ilene S

    2015-08-01

    A better understanding of the prevalence of service provider-imposed barriers to family planning can inform programs intended to increase contraceptive use. This study, based on data from urban Kenya, describes the frequency of provider self-reported restrictions related to clients' age, parity, marital status, and third-party consent, and considers the impact of facility type and training on restrictive practices. Trained data collectors interviewed 676 service providers at 273 health care facilities in five Kenyan cities. Service providers were asked questions about their background and training and were also asked about age, marital, parity, or consent requirements for providing family planning services. More than half of providers (58%) reported imposing minimum age restrictions on one or more methods. These restrictions were commonly imposed on clients seeking injectables, a popular method in urban Kenya, with large numbers refusing to offer injectables to women younger than 20 years. Forty-one percent of providers reported that they would not offer one or more methods to nulliparous women and more than one in four providers reported that they would not offer the injectable to women without at least one child. Providers at private facilities were significantly more likely to impose barriers, across all method types, and those without in-service training on family planning provision had a significantly higher prevalence of imposing parity, marital, and consent barriers across most methods. Programs need to address provider-imposed barriers that reduce access to contraceptive methods particularly among young, lower parity, and single women. Promising strategies include targeting private facility providers and increasing the prevalence of in-service training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The SOOS Data Portal, providing access to Southern Oceans data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Roger; Finney, Kim; Blain, Peter; Taylor, Fiona; Newman, Louise; Meredith, Mike; Schofield, Oscar

    2013-04-01

    The Southern Ocean Observing System (SOOS) is an international initiative to enhance, coordinate and expand the strategic observations of the Southern Oceans that are required to address key scientific and societal challenges. A key component of SOOS will be the creation and maintenance of a Southern Ocean Data Portal to provide improved access to historical and ongoing data (Schofield et al., 2012, Eos, Vol. 93, No. 26, pp 241-243). The scale of this effort will require strong leveraging of existing data centres, new cyberinfrastructure development efforts, and defined data collection, quality control, and archiving procedures across the international community. The task of assembling the SOOS data portal is assigned to the SOOS Data Management Sub-Committee. The information infrastructure chosen for the SOOS data portal is based on the Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN, http://portal.aodn.org.au). The AODN infrastructure is built on open-source tools and the use of international standards ensures efficiency of data exchange and interoperability between contributing systems. OGC standard web services protocols are used for serving of data via the internet. These include Web Map Service (WMS) for visualisation, Web Feature Service (WFS) for data download, and Catalogue Service for Web (CSW) for catalogue exchange. The portal offers a number of tools to access and visualize data: - a Search link to the metadata catalogue enables search and discovery by simple text search, by geographic area, temporal extent, keyword, parameter, organisation, or by any combination of these, allowing users to gain access to further information and/or the data for download. Also, searches can be restricted to items which have either data to download, or attached map layers, or both - a Map interface for discovery and display of data, with the ability to change the style and opacity of layers, add additional data layers via OGC Web Map Services, view animated timeseries datastreams

  5. Internet skill-related problems in accessing online health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Deursen, Alexander J A M

    2012-01-01

    Despite the amount of health information available online, there are several barriers that limit the Internet from being adopted as a source of health information. The purpose of this study was to identify individual skill-related problems that users experience when accessing the Internet for health information and services. Between November 2009 and February 2010, 88 subjects participated in a performance test in which participants had to complete health-related assignments on the Internet. Subjects were randomly selected from a telephone book. A selective quota sample was used and was divided over equal subsamples of gender, age, and education. Each subject was required to complete nine assignments on the Internet. The general population experiences many Internet skill-related problems, especially those related to information and strategic Internet skills. Aging and lower levels of education seemed to contribute to the amount of operational and formal skill-related problems experienced. Saving files, bookmarking websites, and using search engines were troublesome for these groups of people. With respect to information skills, the higher the level of educational attainment, the less problems the participants experienced. Although younger subjects experienced far less operational and formal skill-related problems, it was revealed that older subjects were less likely to select and use irrelevant search results and unreliable sources. Concerning the strategic Internet skills it was revealed that older subjects were less likely to make inappropriate decisions based on information gathered. The amount of online health-related information and services is consistently growing; however, it appears that the general population experiences many skill-related problems, particularly those related to information and strategic Internet skills, and they become very important when it comes to health. These skills are also problematic for younger generations who are often seen as

  6. Patterns of Student Enrolment and Attrition in Australian Open Access Online Education: A Preliminary Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenland, Steven J.; Moore, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Swinburne University of Technology has experienced tremendous growth in open access online learning and as such is typical of the many Australian institutions that have ventured into online tertiary education. While research in online education continues to expand, comparatively little investigates students' enrolment and attrition. This research…

  7. 'Quality signposting': the role of online information prescription in providing patient information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, Liz; Sen, Barbara

    2011-03-01

      Information prescriptions (IPs) are part of a Department of Health (DH) initiative to improve patient care. IPs aim to meet health information needs by providing personalised, high quality patient information about conditions and treatment.   This paper identifies current online IP provision and evaluates a sample of IP websites against the original DH aims of IP provision; British Medical Association usability criteria; and information seeking vignettes.   Five UK and one international IP website were randomly selected as a sample. Two checklists designed to appraise the websites were used to review each IP provider. Two patient information seeking vignettes were developed to enable the websites to be assessed from a patient-centred perspective.   Information prescriptions currently vary in content, accessibility and quality. National IP websites score more highly than local IP websites, which are often weak on content for specific conditions and poorly designed but strong on signposting to local services.   Guidelines for IP provision need to be improved to ensure higher quality, more easily accessible information is available. A synthesis of expertise included in national and local websites would improve usability for patients. IP websites should conform to standards of web design and accessibility. © 2010 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2010 Health Libraries Group.

  8. Technical Evaluation Report 32: Using Internet Audio to Enhance Online Accessibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Matula Schwartz

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available What constitutes online accessibility? Vanderheiden, Harkins and Barnicle (2002 indicate that accessibility involves the ability to use online content without vision, without hearing, without pointing or manipulation, and without speech by persons with cognitive limitations, with language disabilities, with low vision and limited or no hearing, and with alternative languages.

  9. How live online communication can facilitate collaborative learning by providing a space for shared knowledge construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    to the oral and written communication channels of the system, leaving the students with only the possibility to listen. It is a somewhat limiting view that leads to a superficial use of the system. Furthermore, this view brings with it a very narrow definition of the learning process which becomes an exchange......Fast net connections are rapidly becoming available to people and organizations around the world. At the same time, prices on computers and related equipment is dropping. This has paved the way for web conference systems that provide users with easy access to live online communication but that also...... limited to physical class rooms, but can go global via virtual class rooms that can be created in the available web conference system. Most web conference systems provide presentation functions enabling users to show slides, share files and engage in oral and visual communication with the other...

  10. Trust-Based Access Control Model from Sociological Approach in Dynamic Online Social Network Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungjoo

    2014-01-01

    There has been an explosive increase in the population of the OSN (online social network) in recent years. The OSN provides users with many opportunities to communicate among friends and family. Further, it facilitates developing new relationships with previously unknown people having similar beliefs or interests. However, the OSN can expose users to adverse effects such as privacy breaches, the disclosing of uncontrolled material, and the disseminating of false information. Traditional access control models such as MAC, DAC, and RBAC are applied to the OSN to address these problems. However, these models are not suitable for the dynamic OSN environment because user behavior in the OSN is unpredictable and static access control imposes a burden on the users to change the access control rules individually. We propose a dynamic trust-based access control for the OSN to address the problems of the traditional static access control. Moreover, we provide novel criteria to evaluate trust factors such as sociological approach and evaluate a method to calculate the dynamic trust values. The proposed method can monitor negative behavior and modify access permission levels dynamically to prevent the indiscriminate disclosure of information. PMID:25374943

  11. Trust-Based Access Control Model from Sociological Approach in Dynamic Online Social Network Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungsoo Baek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been an explosive increase in the population of the OSN (online social network in recent years. The OSN provides users with many opportunities to communicate among friends and family. Further, it facilitates developing new relationships with previously unknown people having similar beliefs or interests. However, the OSN can expose users to adverse effects such as privacy breaches, the disclosing of uncontrolled material, and the disseminating of false information. Traditional access control models such as MAC, DAC, and RBAC are applied to the OSN to address these problems. However, these models are not suitable for the dynamic OSN environment because user behavior in the OSN is unpredictable and static access control imposes a burden on the users to change the access control rules individually. We propose a dynamic trust-based access control for the OSN to address the problems of the traditional static access control. Moreover, we provide novel criteria to evaluate trust factors such as sociological approach and evaluate a method to calculate the dynamic trust values. The proposed method can monitor negative behavior and modify access permission levels dynamically to prevent the indiscriminate disclosure of information.

  12. Underage access to online alcohol marketing content: a YouTube case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Adam E; Johnson, Emily; Rabre, Alexander; Darville, Gabrielle; Donovan, Kristin M; Efunbumi, Orisatalabi

    2015-01-01

    With the proliferation of the Internet and online social media use, alcohol advertisers are now marketing their products through social media sites such as YouTube, Facebook and Twitter. As a result, new recommendations have been made by the Federal Trade Commission concerning the self-regulation of digital marketing strategies, including content management on social and digital media sites. The current study sought to determine whether alcohol companies were implementing the self-imposed mandates that they have developed for online marketing. Specifically, we examined whether alcohol companies were implementing effective strategies that would prevent persons under the minimum legal drinking age in the USA from accessing their content on YouTube. We assessed 16 alcohol brands (beer and liquor) associated with the highest prevalence of past 30 day underage alcohol consumption in the USA. Fictitious YouTube user profiles were created and assigned the ages of 14, 17 and 19. These profiles then attempted to access and view the brewer-sponsored YouTube channels for each of the 16 selected brands. Every underage profile, regardless of age, was able to successfully subscribe to each of the 16 (100%) official YouTube channels. On average, two-thirds of the brands' channels were successfully viewed (66.67%). Alcohol industry provided online marketing content is predominantly accessible to underage adolescents. Thus, brewers are not following some of the self-developed and self-imposed mandates for online advertising by failing to implement effective age-restriction measures (i.e. age gates). © The Author 2014. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  13. Exploring the value of peer feedback in online learning for the provider

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijke Kral; Gino Camp; Esther van Popta; Robert Jan Simons; Rob L. Martens

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews studies of peer feedback from the novel perspective of the providers of that feedback. The possible learning benefits of providing peer feedback in online learning have not been extensively studied. The goal of this study was therefore to explore the process of providing online

  14. Accessibility and preferred use of online Web applications among WIC participants with Internet access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensley, Robert J; Hovis, Amanda; Horton, Karissa D; Loyo, Jennifer J; Bensley, Kara M; Phillips, Diane; Desmangles, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the current technology use of clients in the western Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) region and the preferences these current clients have for using new technologies to interact with WIC. Cross-sectional convenience sample for online survey of WIC clients over 2 months in 2011. A weighted sample of 8,144 participants showed that the majority of WIC clients have access to the Internet using a computer or mobile phone. E-mail, texting, and Facebook were technologies most often used for communication. Significant differences (P < .05) existed between age groups and Facebook use, education level and technology use for education delivery, and education level and use of video chat. Technologies should be considered for addressing WIC clients' needs, including use of text messaging and smartphone apps for appointments, education, and other WIC services; online scheduling and nutrition education; and a stronger Facebook presence for connecting with WIC clients and breastfeeding support. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Free Access to Point of Care Resource Results in Increased Use and Satisfaction by Rural Healthcare Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Alcock

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Eldredge, J. D., Hall, L. J., McElfresh, K. R., Warner, T. D., Stromberg, T. L., Trost, J. T., & Jelinek, D. A. (2016. Rural providers’ access to online resources: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of the Medical Library Association, 104(1, 33-41. http://dx.doi.org/10.3163/1536-5050.104.1.005 Objective – To determine whether free access to the point of care (PoC resource Dynamed or the electronic book collection AccessMedicine was more useful to rural health care providers in answering clinical questions in terms of usage and satisfaction. Design – Randomized controlled trial. Setting – Rural New Mexico. Subjects – Twenty-eight health care providers (physicians, nurses, physician assistants, and pharmacists with no reported access to PoC resources, (specifically Dynamed and AccessMedicine or electronic textbook collections prior to enrollment.

  16. Implementation of online suicide-specific training for VA providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Elizabeth; York, Janet; Magruder, Kathryn; Yeager, Derik; Knapp, Rebecca; De Santis, Mark L; Burriss, Louisa; Mauldin, Mary; Sulkowski, Stan; Pope, Charlene; Jobes, David A

    2014-10-01

    Due to the gap in suicide-specific intervention training for mental health students and professionals, e-learning is one solution to improving provider skills in the Veterans Affairs (VA) health system. This study focused on the development and evaluation of an equivalent e-learning alternative to the Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality (CAMS) in-person training approach at a Veteran Health Affairs medical center. The study used a multicenter, randomized, cluster, and three group design. the development of e-CAMS was an iterative process and included pilot testing. Eligible and consenting mental health providers, who completed a CAMS pre-survey, were randomized. Provider satisfaction was assessed using the standard VA evaluation of training consisting of 20 items. Two post training focus groups, divided by learning conditions, were conducted to assess practice adoption using a protocol focused on experiences with training and delivery of CAMS. A total of 215 providers in five sites were randomized to three conditions: 69 to e-learning, 70 to in-person, 76 to the control. The providers were primarily female, Caucasian, midlife providers. Based on frequency scores of satisfaction items, both learning groups rated the trainings positively. In focus groups representing divided by learning conditions, participants described positive reactions to CAMS training and similar individual and institutional barriers to full implementation of CAMS. This is the first evaluation study of a suicide-specific e-learning training within the VA. The e-CAMS appears equivalent to the in-person CAMS in terms of provider satisfaction with training and practice adoption, consistent with other comparisons of training deliveries across specialty areas. Additional evaluation of provider confidence and adoption and patient outcomes is in progress. The e-CAMS has the potential to provide ongoing training for VA and military mental health providers and serve as a tutorial for

  17. Large scale access tests and online interfaces to ATLAS conditions databases

    CERN Document Server

    Amorim, A; Pereira, P; Simões, J; Soloviev, I; Burckhart, D; Schmitt, J V D; Caprini, M; Kolos, S

    2008-01-01

    The access of the ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system to the ATLAS Conditions Databases sets strong reliability and performance requirements on the database storage and access infrastructures. Several applications were developed to support the integration of Conditions database access with the online services in TDAQ, including the interface to the Information Services (IS) and to the TDAQ Configuration Databases.

  18. What Type of Knowledge Provides Valid Housing Standards Addressing Accessibility?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helle, Tina; Brandt, Åse; Iwarsson, Susanne

    Objective The overarching aim was to contribute to the advancement of the validity of the housing standards addressing accessibility. The specific aim was to explore the use of an activity-based approach to examine the validity of a set of housing standards. State of the art Housing standards...... with functional limitations and dependence on mobility devices to have access to housing design features as a means to be able to interact with the environment to perform a range of everyday activities in the dwelling. However, in a comprehensive literature review in search of scientific publications...... with a potential to inform housing standards addressing accessibility that accommodate adult people with physical functional limitations using/not using mobility devices (Helle et al., 2011), it was found that the existing knowledge: • Derived from the field of anthropometry and ergonomics • Focused on isolated...

  19. Online reprint request: Search, access, read, and update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanthraj Garehatty

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Online reprint request (ORR is the standard protocol to obtain the reprints (e-print/hard copy using the internet (author′s e-mail address when the required literature is not available. The problem of higher cost of surface mail for the author and the reader, as well as the time taken to receive postal reprints, is overcome by ORR. This technique has its limitation in message failure, expiration of mail (e-mail decay, or journal not providing author′s e-mail address. This article analyzes the available practical solution to overcome these barriers. This process facilitates the exchange of scientific information. In e-mail decay, reprint request can be sent in the following order: a search and send to author′s latest e-mail address, b co-author′s latest or affiliated institution′s e-mail address, c postal reprint request providing the requestor′s e-mail address. This protocol can be practiced when library facilities or required literature is not available. Literature can be pooled and used for residency teaching programs, like group discussions, journal clubs, and e-learning exercises (teleeducation, to update the recent advances for practice and research.

  20. Online Music Symbol Retrieval from the Access Angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henigman, Barbara; Burbank, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses results of a survey of music technical services librarians that investigated retrieval problems with the symbols for sharp and flat in music notation in online catalogs. Comparisons are made with an earlier study of online catalog vendors, and a list of institutions surveyed and the questionnaire used are appended. (LRW)

  1. Technological advancements and Internet sexuality: does private access to the Internet influence online sexual behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneback, Kristian; Månsson, Sven-Axel; Ross, Michael W

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether demographic characteristics and sexual behavior online and offline were associated with private, respectively, nonprivate access to the Internet in a Web sample of people who use the Internet for sexual purposes. A total of 1,913 respondents completed an online questionnaire about Internet sexuality, and 1,614 reported using the Internet for sexual purposes. The majority of these respondents reported having access to an Internet-connected computer no one else had access to (62 percent women and 70 percent men). The results showed that it is possible to differentiate between those who have access to an Internet-connected computer no one else has access to and those who have shared access to an Internet-connected computer. Not only did they differ in demographic characteristics, but also in the sexual activities they engaged in on the Internet. Different patterns were found for women and men. For example, men who had private access to Internet-connected computers were more likely than those who had shared access to seek information about sexual issues. Thus, having access to Internet computers no one else has access to may promote sexual knowledge and health for men. The results of this study along with the technological development implies that in future research, attention should be paid to where and how people access the Internet in relation to online behavior in general and online sexual behavior in particular.

  2. Public reaction to direct-to-consumer online genetic tests: Comparing attitudes, trust and intentions across commercial and conventional providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley, Christine; Nicol, Dianne; Otlowski, Margaret; Chalmers, Don

    2015-08-01

    The success of personalised medicine depends upon the public's embracing genetic tests. Tests that claim to predict an individual's future health can now be accessed via online companies outside of conventional health regulations. This research assessed the extent to which the public embrace direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic tests relative to those obtained by a conventional medical practitioner (MP). It also examined the reasons for differences across providers using a randomised experimental telephone survey of 1000 Australians. Results suggest that people were significantly less likely to approve of, and order a DTC genetic test administered by a company compared to a MP because they were less trusting of companies' being able to protect their privacy and provide them with access to genetic expertise and counselling. Markets for DTC genetic tests provided by companies would therefore significantly increase if trust in privacy protection and access to expertise are enhanced through regulation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. How and Why To Free All Refereed Research From Access- and Impact-Barriers Online, Now

    CERN Document Server

    Harnad, S; Brody, T

    2001-01-01

    Researchers publish their findings in order to make an impact on research, not in order to sell their words. Access-tolls are barriers to research impact. Authors can now free their refereed research papers from all access tolls immediately by self-archiving them on-line in their own institution's Eprint Archives. Free eprints.org software creates Archives compliant with the Open Archives Initiative metadata-tagging Protocol OAI 1.0. These distributed institutional Archives are interoperable and can hence be harvested into global "virtual" archives, citation-linked and freely navigable by all. Self-archiving should enhance research productivity and impact as well as providing powerful new ways of monitoring and measuring it.

  4. News from the Library: Scientific American and Nature increasingly accessible online!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2011-01-01

    Since a few weeks, the CERN Library has been offering online access to "Scientific American" and "Nature" within a longer timespan. This is part of a long-term plan to extend our e-collections in order to include prestigious scientific journals from the beginning of publication.   CERN users can browse and read the complete archives of "Scientific American" since 1845. Among the many interesting articles now readable online, you can find Einstein's account of research on a generalized theory of gravitation. A small, though important addition to the Library's online collections: "Nature" online is now reaching back to 1987. You can now read online the "Nature" news column reporting about the first anti-atom discovered at CERN. We plan to further expand online access to "Nature", but in the meantime you can rely on the Library's paper collection...

  5. News from the Library: Scientific American and Nature increasingly accessible online!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2012-01-01

    Since a few weeks, the CERN Library has been offering online access to "Scientific American" and "Nature" within a longer timespan. This is part of a long-term plan to extend our e-collections in order to include prestigious scientific journals from the beginning of publication.   CERN users can browse and read the complete archives of "Scientific American" since 1845. Among the many interesting articles now readable online, you can find Einstein's account of research on a generalized theory of gravitation. A small, though important addition to the Library's online collections: "Nature" online is now reaching back to 1987. You can now read online the "Nature" news column reporting about the first anti-atom discovered at CERN. We plan to further expand online access to "Nature", but in the meantime you can rely on the Library's paper collection...

  6. E-health: potential benefits and challenges in providing and accessing sexual health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minichiello, Victor; Rahman, Saifur; Dune, Tinashe; Scott, John; Dowsett, Gary

    2013-08-30

    E-health has become a burgeoning field in which health professionals and health consumers create and seek information. E-health refers to internet-based health care and information delivery and seeks to improve health service locally, regionally and worldwide. E-sexual health presents new opportunities to provide online sexual health services irrespective of gender, age, sexual orientation and location. The paper used the dimensions of the RE-AIM model (reach, efficacy, adoption, implementation and maintenance) as a guiding principle to discuss potentials of E-health in providing and accessing sexual health services. There are important issues in relation to utilising and providing online sexual health services. For healthcare providers, e-health can act as an opportunity to enhance their clients' sexual health care by facilitating communication with full privacy and confidentiality, reducing administrative costs and improving efficiency and flexibility as well as market sexual health services and products. Sexual health is one of the common health topics which both younger and older people explore on the internet and they increasingly prefer sexual health education to be interactive, non-discriminate and anonymous. This commentary presents and discusses the benefits of e-sexual health and provides recommendations towards addressing some of the emerging challenges. The provision of sexual health services can be enhanced through E-health technology. Doing this can empower consumers to engage with information technology to enhance their sexual health knowledge and quality of life and address some of the stigma associated with diversity in sexualities and sexual health experiences. In addition, e-sexual health may better support and enhance the relationship between consumers and their health care providers across different locations. However, a systematic and focused approach to research and the application of findings in policy and practice is required to ensure that

  7. Online access to advertising films and tv-commercials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenalt, Maria Hvid

    2010-01-01

    film and TV-commercials, why the collection is important, and how it became available online to students and researchers. The process presents a number of challenges including copyright and technical issues. The scalable and integrated service may be used for other audiovisual collections in the future....

  8. Providers of Free MOOC's Now Charge Employers for Access to Student Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    The author describes how providers of free online courses are officially in the headhunting business, bringing in revenue by selling to employers information about high-performing students who might be a good fit for open jobs. Coursera, which works with high-profile colleges to provide massive open online courses, or MOOC's, announced its…

  9. Pitfalls, Potentials, and Ethics of Online Survey Research: LGBTQ and Other Marginalized and Hard-to-Access Youths

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInroy, Lauren B.

    2016-01-01

    Online research methodologies may serve as an important mechanism for population-focused data collection in social work research. Online surveys have become increasingly prevalent in research inquiries with young people and have been acknowledged for their potential in investigating understudied and marginalized populations and subpopulations, permitting increased access to communities that tend to be less visible—and thus often less studied—in offline contexts. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) young people are a socially stigmatized, yet digitally active, youth population whose participation in online surveys has been previously addressed in the literature. Many of the opportunities and challenges of online survey research identified with LGBTQ youths may be highly relevant to other populations of marginalized and hard-to-access young people, who are likely present in significant numbers in the online environment (for example, ethnoracialized youths and low-income youths). In this article, the utility of online survey methods with marginalized young people is discussed, and recommendations for social work research are provided. PMID:27257362

  10. MULTIPLE ACCESS POINTS WITHIN THE ONLINE CLASSROOM: WHERE STUDENTS LOOK FOR INFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John STEELE

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of information placement within the confines of the online classroom architecture. Also reviewed was the impact of other variables such as course design, teaching presence and student patterns in looking for information. The sample population included students from a major online university in their first year course sequence. Students were tasked with completing a survey at the end of the course, indicating their preference for accessing information within the online classroom. The qualitative data indicated that student preference is to receive information from multiple access points and sources within the online classroom architecture. Students also expressed a desire to have information delivered through the usage of technology such as email and text messaging. In addition to receiving information from multiple sources, the qualitative data indicated students were satisfied overall, with the current ways in which they received and accessed information within the online classroom setting. Major findings suggest that instructors teaching within the online classroom should have multiple data access points within the classroom architecture. Furthermore, instructors should use a variety of communication venues to enhance the ability for students to access and receive information pertinent to the course.

  11. a survey on the use of online public access catalogue among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-01

    Feb 1, 2018 ... This will justify the implementation of the service. Keywords: Online Public Access Catalogue (OPAC), WINNOPAC, University of Education, Winneba,. Osagyefo Library, Academic Libraries. INTRODUCTION. The fundamental aim of all libraries including academic libraries is to facilitate access to.

  12. The Healthy Web--Access to Online Health Information for Individuals with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Brian; Evans, R. R.; Cellitti, M. A.; Smith, K. Hogan; O'Neal, Marcia R.; Firsing, S. L., III; Chandan, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The Internet can be an invaluable resource for obtaining health information by people with disabilities. Although valid and reliable information is available, previous research revealed barriers to accessing health information online. Health education specialists have the responsibilities to insure that it is accessible to all users.…

  13. Evaluation of an Online Instructional Database Accessed by QR Codes to Support Biochemistry Practical Laboratory Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Tor; Melling, Louise; Shaw, Kirsty J.

    2016-01-01

    An online instructional database containing information on commonly used pieces of laboratory equipment was created. In order to make the database highly accessible and to promote its use, QR codes were utilized. The instructional materials were available anytime and accessed using QR codes located on the equipment itself and within undergraduate…

  14. 48 CFR 552.238-70 - Identification of Electronic Office Equipment Providing Accessibility for the Handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Electronic Office Equipment Providing Accessibility for the Handicapped. 552.238-70 Section 552.238-70... Equipment Providing Accessibility for the Handicapped. As prescribed in 538.273(a)(1), insert the following clause: Identification of Electronic Office Equipment Providing Accessibility for the Handicapped (SEP...

  15. Increasing Access to Health Care Providers with Nurse Practitioner Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Del Marjorie

    2014-01-01

    Emergency department visits increased from 102.8 million to 136.1 million in 2009, resulting in crowding and increased wait times, affecting U.S. hospitals' ability to provide safe, timely patient care resulting in dangerous delays and serious health problems shown by research. The purpose of this project was to determine if competencies developed…

  16. Cell phone internet access, online sexual solicitation, partner seeking, and sexual risk behavior among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Eric; Winetrobe, Hailey; Holloway, Ian W; Montoya, Jorge; Plant, Aaron; Kordic, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    Online partner seeking is associated with sexual risk behavior among young adults (specifically men who have sex with men), but this association has yet to be explored among a probability sample of adolescents. Moreover, cell phone internet access and sexual risk taking online and offline have not been explored. A probability sample (N = 1,831) of Los Angeles Unified School District high school students was collected in 2011. Logistic regression models assessed relationships between specific sexual risk behaviors (online sexual solicitation, seeking partners online, sex with internet-met partners, condom use) and frequency of internet use, internet access points, and demographics. Students with cell phone internet access were more likely to report being solicited online for sex, being sexually active, and having sex with an internet-met partner. Bisexual-identifying students reported higher rates of being approached online for sex, being sexually active, and not using condoms at last sex. Gay, lesbian, and questioning (GLQ) students were more likely to report online partner seeking and unprotected sex at last sex with an internet-met partner. Additionally, having sex with an internet-met partner was associated with being male, online sexual solicitation, and online partner seeking. Internet- and school-based sexual health programs should incorporate safety messages regarding online sexual solicitation, seeking sex partners online, and engaging in safer sex practices with all partners. Programs must target adolescents of all sexual identities, as adolescents may not yet be "out," and bisexual and GLQ adolescents are more likely to engage in risky sex behaviors.

  17. Toward Emotionally Accessible Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaire, Garron; Iniesto, Francisco; Rienties, Bart

    2017-01-01

    This paper outlines an approach to evaluating the emotional content of three Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) using the affective computing approach of prosody detection on two different text-to-speech voices in conjunction with human raters judging the emotional content of course text. The intent of this work is to establish the potential variation on the emotional delivery of MOOC material through synthetic voice.

  18. Does the order of presentation and number of online resources affect the frequency of access by learners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, Steven; Murton, Samantha

    2012-09-01

    Provision of web-based resources is a valuable addition to face-to-face teaching in a blended learning environment. To understand how both order of presentation and number of online resources impacts on the frequency of access by learners in postgraduate vocational training in general practice. Information was collected on how many times individual online resources were accessed. Data regarding access rates for 15 separate topics used in postgraduate general practice vocational training were aggregated. Analysis was on the basis of order of presentation where the mean of percentages of hits by order of presentation with standard deviations was calculated. The first four listed resources were accessed at a higher rate than the remainder of the resources. All resources after the first four were accessed at a relatively uniform low rate. It would appear that providing more than four resources per topic is associated with learner overload. The number of online resources to support face-to-face teaching should be limited to four. Resource material needs to be carefully considered in terms of how it adds educational value. The ability of resource material to present a different perspective on a topic and adherence to both curriculum and assessment objectives are important considerations.

  19. Internet access and attitudes toward online personal health information among detained youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Gregory L; Longhurst, Christopher A; Anoshiravani, Arash

    2012-11-01

    To assess Internet access and usage patterns among high-risk youth involved in the juvenile justice system, and to determine if health information technology tools might play a useful role in more actively engaging this population in their health care. A sample of 79 youth between the ages of 13 and 18 years old underwent a structured interview while detained in a large, Northern California juvenile detention facility. After an institutional review board-approved assent/consent process, youth discussed their typical Internet use when not detained, as well as their attitudes toward online access to their personal health information (PHI). Detained youth from predominantly underserved, minority communities, reported high levels of access to the Internet while outside of the detention setting, with 97% reporting using the Internet at least once per month and 87% at least weekly. Furthermore, 90% of these youth expressed interest in accessing their PHI online and sharing it with either parents or physicians. Detained adolescents describe unexpectedly high usage of the Internet and online resources when they are outside of the juvenile hall setting. These youth show an interest in, and may benefit from, accessing their PHI online. Further studies are needed to understand the potential health benefits that may be realized by engaging this population through online tools.

  20. Online Access to Advertising Films and TV-Commercials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Hvid Stenalt

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The audiovisual cultural heritage is a valuable collection that both reflects contemporary developments in the 20th century and at the same time is a source material for research. The purpose of this paper is to describe how the State and University Library established a digital archive for Danish film and TV-commercials, why the collection is important, and how it became available online to students and researchers. The process presents a number of challenges including copyright and technical issues. The scalable and integrated service may be used for other audiovisual collections in the future.

  1. The Use of Online Citizen-Science Projects to Provide Experiential Learning Opportunities for Nonmajor Science Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna M. Kridelbaugh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Citizen science is becoming even more accessible to the general public through technological advances in the development of mobile applications, facilitating information dissemination and data collection. With the advent of “big data,” many citizen-science projects designed to help researchers sift through piles of research data now exist entirely online, either in the form of playing a game or via other digital avenues. Recent trends in citizen science have also focused on “crowdsourcing” solutions from the general public to help solve societal issues, often requiring nothing more than brainstorming and a computer to submit ideas. Online citizen science thus provides an excellent platform to expand the accessibility of experiential learning opportunities for a broad range of nonmajor science students at institutions with limited resources (e.g., community colleges. I created an activity for a general microbiology lecture to engage students in hands-on experiences via participation in online citizen-science projects. The objectives of the assignment were for students to: 1 understand that everyone can be a scientist; 2 learn to be creative and innovative in designing solutions to health and science challenges; and 3 further practice science communication skills with a written report. This activity is designed for introductory science courses with nonmajor science students who have limited opportunities to participate in undergraduate research experiences.

  2. Research and Practice in K-12 Online Learning: A Review of Open Access Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy S. Cavanaugh

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The literature related to online learning programs for K-12 students dates to the mid-1990s and builds upon a century of research and practice from K-12 distance education. While K-12 online learning programs have evolved and grown over the past decade, the amount of published research on virtual schooling practice and policy is limited. The current literature includes practitioner reports and experimental and quasi-experimental studies, both published and unpublished. This paper reviews open access literature in K-12 online learning and reports on a structured content analysis of the documents. Themes in the literature include steady growth and a focus on the benefits, challenges, and broad effectiveness of K-12 online learning. In addition, newly developed standards for K-12 online learning are emerging in descriptions of effective practices.

  3. Web-accessible molecular modeling with Rosetta: The Rosetta Online Server that Includes Everyone (ROSIE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Rocco; Lyskov, Sergey; Das, Rhiju; Meiler, Jens; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2017-09-28

    The Rosetta molecular modeling software package provides a large number of experimentally validated tools for modeling and designing proteins, nucleic acids, and other biopolymers, with new protocols being added continually. While freely available to academic users, external usage is limited by the need for expertise in the Unix command line environment. To make Rosetta protocols available to a wider audience, we previously created a web server called Rosetta Online Server that Includes Everyone (ROSIE), which provides a common environment for hosting web-accessible Rosetta protocols. Here we describe a simplification of the ROSIE protocol specification format, one that permits easier implementation of Rosetta protocols. Whereas the previous format required creating multiple separate files in different locations, the new format allows specification of the protocol in a single file. This new, simplified protocol specification has more than doubled the number of Rosetta protocols available under ROSIE. These new applications include pKa determination, lipid accessibility calculation, ribonucleic acid redesign, protein-protein docking, protein-small molecule docking, symmetric docking, antibody docking, cyclic toxin docking, critical binding peptide determination, and mapping small molecule binding sites. ROSIE is freely available to academic users at http://rosie.rosettacommons.org. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  4. Increasing access to Higher Education: A study of the diffusion of online teaching among 913 college faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Shea

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Online learning environments provide an unprecedented opportunity to increase student access to higher education. Accomplishing this much needed goal requires the active participation and cooperation of university faculty from a broad spectrum of institutional settings. Although online learning has seen rapid growth in recent years, it remains a relatively small percentage of the entire curriculum of higher education today. As a relatively recent development, online teaching can be viewed through the lens of diffusion of innovation research. This paper reports on research from 913 professors from community colleges, four-year colleges, and university centers in an attempt to determine potential barriers to the continued growth in adoption of online teaching in higher education. It is concluded through factor and regression analysis that four variables are significantly associated with faculty satisfaction and their likelihood, therefore, to adopt or continue online teaching – these include levels of interaction in their online course, technical support, a positive learning experience in developing and teaching the course, and the discipline area in which they taught. Recommendations for institutional policy, faculty development, and further research are included.

  5. Relevance of Subject Descriptions in an Online Public Access Catalogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Klemen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose:  The aim of the article is to identify the relevance of subject headings in the online library catalogue (OPAC and to verify the hypothesis that the database structure and the search language is more in favour of natural and technology sciences researchers than to researchers in the field of humanities.    Methodology/approach:  The study was held in a controlled environment. It took place between autumn 2009 and spring 2010. 13 undergraduate and 7 graduate students of chemistry and psychology participated. A stratified sample was used. Data were collected by the system log. We also recorded the entire screen imageand sound. Participants also answered a survey questionnaire. Content analysis was carried out. Linking of the identified categories and the theoretical framework of the research context followed.  Results:  The survey results showed no significant difference between the information seekers of the scientific fields considered. However, they showed the importance of the user's knowledge of information systems and the availability of resources. A lack of confidence in these results, the strong influence of internet search engine Google, and the lack of awareness on the existence of subject headings were identified. Consequently, it was impossible to test the hypothesis.   Research limitation:  Unrepresentative sampling, inability to generalize the findings.

  6. Large scale access tests and online interfaces to ATLAS conditions databases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, A; Lopes, L; Pereira, P; Simoes, J [SIM and FCUL, University of Lisbon, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Soloviev, I [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St Petersburg, PNPI (Russian Federation); Burckhart, D [CERN - Geneva (Switzerland); Schmitt, J V D [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Garching (Germany); Caprini, M [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN/HH Bucharest), Magurele (Romania); Kolos, S [University of California, Irvine, California 92697-4575 (United States)], E-mail: Antonio.Amorim@sim.fc.ul.pt

    2008-07-01

    The access of the ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system to the ATLAS Conditions Databases sets strong reliability and performance requirements on the database storage and access infrastructures. Several applications were developed to support the integration of Conditions database access with the online services in TDAQ, including the interface to the Information Services (IS) and to the TDAQ Configuration Databases. The information storage requirements were the motivation for the ONline A Synchronous Interface to COOL (ONASIC) from the Information Service (IS) to LCG/COOL databases. ONASIC avoids the possible backpressure from Online Database servers by managing a local cache. In parallel, OKS2COOL was developed to store Configuration Databases into an Offline Database with history record. The DBStressor application was developed to test and stress the access to the Conditions database using the LCG/COOL interface while operating in an integrated way as a TDAQ application. The performance scaling of simultaneous Conditions database read accesses was studied in the context of the ATLAS High Level Trigger large computing farms. A large set of tests were performed involving up to 1000 computing nodes that simultaneously accessed the LCG central database server infrastructure at CERN.

  7. Implementation the NASA Planetary Data System PDS4 Providing Access to LADEE Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Reta F.; Huber , Lyle; Neakrase, Lynn; Reese, Shannon; Crichton, Daniel; Hardman, Sean; Delory, Gregory; Neese, Carol

    2014-11-01

    The NASA Planetary Data System (PDS) is responsible for archiving all planetary data acquired by robotic missions, and observational campaigns with ground/space-based observatories. PDS has moved to version 4 of its archive system. PDS4 uses XML to enhance search and retrieval capabilities. Although the efforts are system wide, the Atmospheres Node has acted as the lead node and is presenting a preliminary users interface for retrieval of LADEE data. LADEE provides the first opportunity to test out the end-to-end process of archiving data from an active mission into the new PDS4 architecture. The limited number of instruments, with simple data structures, is an ideal test of PDS4. XML uses schema (analogous to blueprints) to control the structure of the corresponding XML labels. In the case of PDS4, these schemas allow management of the labels and their content by forcing validation dictated by the underlying Information Model (IM). The use of a central IM is a vast improvement over PDS3 because of the uniformity it provides across all nodes. PDS4 has implemented a product-centric approach for archiving data and supplemental documentation. Another major change involves the Central Registry, where all products are registered and accessible to search engines. Under PDS4, documents, data, and other ancillary data are all products that are registered in the system. Together with the XML implementation, the Registry allows the search routines to be more complex and inclusive than they have been in the past. For LADEE, the PDS nodes and LADEE instrument teams worked together to identify data products that LADEE would produce. Documentation describing instruments and data products were produced by the teams and peer reviewed by PDS. XML label templates were developed by the PDS and provided to the instrument teams to integrate into their pipelines. Data from the primary mission (100 days) have been certified and harvested into the registry and are accessible through the

  8. Access Control in the ATLAS TDAQ Online Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Leahu, Marius Constantin; Stoichescu, D A; Lehmann Miotto, G

    ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus) is a general-purpose detector for studying high-energy particle interactions: it is the largest particle detector experiment at CERN and it is built around one of the interaction points of the proton beams accelerated by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The detector generates an impressive amount of raw data: 64 TB per second as a result of 40 MHz proton-proton collision rate with 1.6 MB data for each such event. The handling of such data rate is managed by a three levels Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system, which filters out the events not relevant from physics research point of view and selects in the end in the order of 1000 events per second to be stored for offline analyses. This system comprises a significant number of hardware devices, software applications and human personnel to supervise the experiment operation. Their protection against damages as a result of misuse and their optimized exploitation by avoiding the conflicting accesses to resources are key requ...

  9. Development of an online information and support resource for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients considering surgery: perspectives of health care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas David

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis who are considering spinal surgery face a major decision that requires access to in-depth information and support. Unfortunately, most online resources provide incomplete and inconsistent information and minimal social support. The aim of this study was to develop an online information and support resource for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS patients considering spinal surgery. Prior to website development, a user-based needs assessment was conducted. The needs assessment involved a total of six focus groups with three stakeholder groups: (1 post-operative AIS patients or surgical candidates (10-18 years (n = 11, (2 their parents (n = 6 and (3 health care providers (n = 11. This paper reports on the findings from focus groups with health care providers. Methods Focus group methodology was used to invite a range of perspectives and stimulate discussion. During audio-recorded focus groups, an emergent table of website content was presented to participants for assessment of relevance, viability and comprehensiveness in targeting global domains of need. Specifically, effective presentation of content, desired aspects of information and support, and discussions about the value of peer support and the role of health professionals were addressed. Focus group transcripts were then subject to content analysis through a constant comparative review and analysis. Results Two focus groups were held with health care providers, consisting of 5 and 6 members respectively. Clinicians provided their perceptions of the information and support needs of surgical patients and their families and how this information and support should be delivered using internet technology. Health care providers proposed four key suggestions to consider in the development of this online resource: (1 create the website with the target audience in mind; (2 clearly state the purpose of the website and organize website content

  10. Development of an online information and support resource for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients considering surgery: perspectives of health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macculloch, Radha; Nyhof-Young, Joyce; Nicholas, David; Donaldson, Sandra; Wright, James G

    2010-06-29

    Adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis who are considering spinal surgery face a major decision that requires access to in-depth information and support. Unfortunately, most online resources provide incomplete and inconsistent information and minimal social support. The aim of this study was to develop an online information and support resource for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients considering spinal surgery. Prior to website development, a user-based needs assessment was conducted. The needs assessment involved a total of six focus groups with three stakeholder groups: (1) post-operative AIS patients or surgical candidates (10-18 years) (n = 11), (2) their parents (n = 6) and (3) health care providers (n = 11). This paper reports on the findings from focus groups with health care providers. Focus group methodology was used to invite a range of perspectives and stimulate discussion. During audio-recorded focus groups, an emergent table of website content was presented to participants for assessment of relevance, viability and comprehensiveness in targeting global domains of need. Specifically, effective presentation of content, desired aspects of information and support, and discussions about the value of peer support and the role of health professionals were addressed. Focus group transcripts were then subject to content analysis through a constant comparative review and analysis. Two focus groups were held with health care providers, consisting of 5 and 6 members respectively. Clinicians provided their perceptions of the information and support needs of surgical patients and their families and how this information and support should be delivered using internet technology. Health care providers proposed four key suggestions to consider in the development of this online resource: (1) create the website with the target audience in mind; (2) clearly state the purpose of the website and organize website content to support the user; (3) offer a

  11. Increasing Accessibility: Using Universal Design Principles to Address Disability Impairments in the Online Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Candice N.; Heiselt, April K.

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing number of students enrolling in distance education, there is a need to consider the accessibility of course materials in online learning environments. Four major groups of disabilities: mobility, auditory, visual, and cognitive are explored as they relate to their implementation into instructional design and their impact on…

  12. Internet skill-related problems in accessing online health information and services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deursen, Alexander Johannes Aloysius Maria

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Despite the amount of health information available online, there are several barriers that limit the Internet from being adopted as a source of health information. The purpose of this study was to identify individual skill-related problems that users experience when accessing the Internet

  13. Computer self efficacy as correlate of on-line public access ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of Online Public Access Catalogue (OPAC) by students has a lot of advantages and computer self-efficacy is a factor that could determine its effective utilization. Little appears to be known about colleges of education students‟ use of OPAC, computer self-efficacy and the relationship between OPAC and computer ...

  14. Cell Division, a new open access online forum for and from the cell cycle community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaldis Philipp

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cell Division is a new, open access, peer-reviewed online journal that publishes cutting-edge articles, commentaries and reviews on all exciting aspects of cell cycle control in eukaryotes. A major goal of this new journal is to publish timely and significant studies on the aberrations of the cell cycle network that occur in cancer and other diseases.

  15. Towards a Next Generation Universally AccessibleOnline Shopping-for-Apparel’ System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Borum, Nanna; Christiansen, Line Gad

    2013-01-01

    of online shopping for apparel where conclusions point to the need for adaptive user interface improvements. Unforeseen was that wheelchair-bound public especially responded positively to the potentials for the concept due to their limited mobility in shopping and this accessibility aspect can...

  16. Web-Based Online Public Access Catalogues of IIT Libraries in India: An Evaluative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhusudhan, Margam; Aggarwal, Shalini

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to examine the various features and components of web-based online public access catalogues (OPACs) of IIT libraries in India with the help of a specially designed evaluation checklist. Design/methodology/approach: The various features of the web-based OPACs in six IIT libraries (IIT Delhi, IIT Bombay, IIT…

  17. Online accesses to medical research articles on publication predicted citations up to 15 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perneger, Thomas V

    2015-12-01

    To examine whether the number of early online accesses to medical research articles predicts citations in the scientific literature over time. Cohort study of research articles published in the BMJ between January and June 1999. The number of online assesses within 1 week of publication was examined in relation to citation counts in 1999-2004, 2004-2009, and 2009-2014. The 148 included articles were accessed on average 691 times up publication, and each was cited on average 33 times in 1999-2004, 32 times in 2004-2009, and 26 times in 2009-2014. The logarithm of accesses predicted the logarithm of citations for all three subsequent periods, but the association weakened over time (correlation with citations in 1999-2004: 0.54, 2004-2009: 0.49, 2009-2014: 0.39; all P research article, reflected by online accesses within a week of publication, predicts citations up to 15 years later. This strengthens the validity of online usage as a measure of the scientific merit of publications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. People's Collection Wales: Online Access to the Heritage of Wales from Museums, Archives and Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedd, Lucy A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The People's Collection Wales aims to collect, interpret, distribute and discuss Wales' cultural heritage in an online environment. Individual users or local history societies are able to create their own digital collections, contribute relevant content, as well as access digital resources from heritage institutions. This paper aims to…

  19. Student Access of Supplemental Multimedia and Success in an Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathan B.

    2013-01-01

    Institutions are developing online courses that contain rich multimedia, but research shows there is little difference in student achievement when these types of materials are included. However, many studies report the results of the presence, not the access, of multimedia learning objects. In addition, they do not categorize the multimedia as…

  20. From Information to Knowledge Online Access to Legal Information Methodologies, Trends and Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Biasiotti, MA

    2011-01-01

    Access to accurate legal information is of great importance. Certainty of the law, creating the conditions necessary to equality and fairness in a legal system and improving the functioning of democratic institutions, depends upon it. Citizens have a right to information about the laws which govern their conduct and governments have an obligation to enable access to the law by means of all available and practicable tools. This book presents papers delivered at the workshop 'From Information to Knowledge - Online Access to Legal Information', held in Florence, Italy, in May 2011. This workshop

  1. The NASA Astrophysics Data System Free Access to the Astronomical Literature On-Line and through Email

    CERN Document Server

    Eichhorn, G; Grant, C S; Kurtz, M J; Murray, S S

    2001-01-01

    The Astrophysics Data System (ADS) provides access to the astronomical literature through the World Wide Web. It is a NASA funded project and access to all the ADS services is free to everybody world-wide.The ADS Abstract Service allows the searching of four databases with abstracts in Astronomy, Instrumentation, Physics/Geophysics, and the LANL Preprints with a total of over 2.2 million references. The system also provides access to reference and citation information, links to on-line data, electronic journal articles, and other on-line information. The ADS Article Service contains the articles for most of the astronomical literature back to volume 1. It contains the scanned pages of all the major journals (Astrophysical Journal, Astronomical Journal, Astronomy & Astrophysics, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, and Solar Physics), as well as most smaller journals back to volume 1. The ADS can be accessed through any web browser without signup or login. Alternatively an email interface is ...

  2. Increasing the Impact of High-Resolution Lidar Topography Through Online Data Access and Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, C. J.; Nandigam, V.; Baru, C.; Arrowsmith, R.

    2013-12-01

    Topography data acquired with lidar (light detection and ranging) technology are revolutionizing the way we study the Earth's surface and overlying vegetation. These data, collected from satellite, airborne, tripod, or mobile-mounted scanners have emerged as a fundamental tool for research on topics including earthquake hazards, hillslope processes, and cyrosphere change. The U.S. National Science Foundation-funded OpenTopography (OT) Facility (http://www.opentopography.org) is a web-based system designed to democratize access to earth science-oriented lidar topography data. OT provides free, online access to lidar data in a number of forms, including the point cloud and associated geospatial-processing tools for customized analysis. The point cloud data are co-located with on-demand processing tools to generate digital elevation models, and derived products and visualizations which allow users to quickly access data in a format appropriate for their scientific application. The OT system is built using a service-oriented architecture (SOA) that leverages cyberinfrastructure resources at the San Diego Supercomputer Center at the University of California San Diego to allow users, regardless of expertise, to access these massive lidar datasets and derived raster data products for use in research and teaching. OT hosts over 600 billion lidar returns covering more than 120,000 km2. These data are provided by a variety of partners under joint agreements and memoranda of understanding with OT. Partners include national facilities such as the NSF-funded National Center for Airborne Lidar Mapping (NCALM), as well as non-governmental organizations and local, state, and federal agencies. OT has become a hub for high-resolution topography resources. Datasets hosted by other organizations, as well as lidar-specific software, can be registered into the OT catalog, providing users a 'one-stop shop' for such information. OT is also a partner on the NASA Lidar Access System (NLAS

  3. Communication at an online infertility expert forum: provider responses to patients' emotional and informational cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, J W M; van Oers, A M; Faber, M J; Cohlen, B J; Nelen, W L D M; Kremer, J A M; van Dulmen, A M

    2015-01-01

    Online patient-provider communication has become increasingly popular in fertility care. However, it is not known to what extent patients express cues or concerns and how providers respond. In this study, we investigated cues and responses that occur in online patient-provider communication at an infertility-specific expert forum. We extracted 106 threads from the multidisciplinary expert forum of two Dutch IVF clinics. We performed the following analyses: (1) thematic analysis of patients' questions; and (2) rating patients' emotional and informational cues and subsequent professionals' responses using an adaptation of the validated Medical Interview Aural Rating Scale. Frequencies of themes, frequencies of cues and responses, and sequences (what cue is followed by what response) were extracted. Sixty-five infertile patients and 19 providers participated. The most common themes included medication and lifestyle. Patients gave more informational than emotional cues (106 versus 64). Responses to informational cues were mostly adequate (61%). The most common response to emotional cues was empathic acknowledgment (72%). Results indicate that an online expert forum could have a positive effect on patient outcomes, which should guide future research. Offering infertile patients an expert forum to communicate with providers can be a promising supplement to usual care in both providing information and addressing patients' concerns.

  4. Internet access and online cancer information seeking among Latino immigrants from safety net clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selsky, Claire; Luta, George; Noone, Anne-Michelle; Huerta, Elmer E; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S

    2013-01-01

    Internet use is widespread, but little is known about Internet use for cancer information among Latinos, especially those who rely on safety net clinics. The authors investigated access to and intended use of the Internet for cancer information among low income, immigrant Latinos predominately from Central and South America. A cross-sectional study of 1,273 Latinos 21 years and older attending safety net clinics or health fairs was conducted from June 2007 to November 2008. The authors used logistic regression models to evaluate associations of age, acculturation, psychosocial factors and other covariates with Internet access and intended use of the Internet for cancer information among those with access. Of the sample, 44% reported Internet access. Higher information self-efficacy and greater trust in the Internet were independently associated with Internet access (p = .05 and p access, 53.8% reported they intended to seek cancer help online if they needed information. Those with younger age and higher acculturation, education and self-efficacy had higher odds of intended Internet use for cancer information, considering covariates. In addition, those with high (vs. low) perceived risk of cancer (OR = 1.76; 95% CI [1.14, 2.73]; p = .01) and higher levels of trust in online health information (OR = 1.47 per one-point increase; 95% [CI 1.19, 1.82]; p = .0004) were more likely to intend to seek cancer information online. These findings that Internet access is fairly high in the immigrant Latino population and that the Internet is a trusted source of cancer information suggest that the Internet may be a channel for cancer control interventions.

  5. Secure Access Control and Large Scale Robust Representation for Online Multimedia Event Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changyu; Li, Huiling

    2014-01-01

    We developed an online multimedia event detection (MED) system. However, there are a secure access control issue and a large scale robust representation issue when we want to integrate traditional event detection algorithms into the online environment. For the first issue, we proposed a tree proxy-based and service-oriented access control (TPSAC) model based on the traditional role based access control model. Verification experiments were conducted on the CloudSim simulation platform, and the results showed that the TPSAC model is suitable for the access control of dynamic online environments. For the second issue, inspired by the object-bank scene descriptor, we proposed a 1000-object-bank (1000OBK) event descriptor. Feature vectors of the 1000OBK were extracted from response pyramids of 1000 generic object detectors which were trained on standard annotated image datasets, such as the ImageNet dataset. A spatial bag of words tiling approach was then adopted to encode these feature vectors for bridging the gap between the objects and events. Furthermore, we performed experiments in the context of event classification on the challenging TRECVID MED 2012 dataset, and the results showed that the robust 1000OBK event descriptor outperforms the state-of-the-art approaches. PMID:25147840

  6. Providing Social Enterprises with Better Access to Public Procurement : The Development of Supportive Legal Frameworks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Argyrou, A.

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the issue of social enterprises gaining access to public procurement processes and contracts at the EU and national level. It primarily examines the opportunities for social enterprises to access public procurement contracts provided for in the Public Procurement Directive

  7. A systematic analysis of online marketing materials used by providers of expanded carrier screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokoshvili, Davit; Borry, Pascal; Vears, Danya F

    2017-12-14

    PurposeExpanded carrier screening (ECS) for a large number of recessive disorders is available to prospective parents through commercial providers. This study aimed to analyze the content of marketing materials on ECS providers' websites.MethodsTo identify providers of ECS tests, we undertook a comprehensive online search, reviewed recent academic literature on commercial carrier screening, and consulted with colleagues familiar with the current ECS landscape. The identified websites were archived in April 2017, and inductive content analysis was performed on website text, brochures and educational materials, and video transcripts.ResultsWe identified 18 ECS providers, including 16 commercial genetic testing companies. Providers typically described ECS as an important family planning tool. The content differed in both the tone used to promote ECS and the accuracy and completeness of the test information provided. We found that most providers offered complimentary genetic counseling to their consumers, although this was often optional, limited to the posttest context, and, in some cases, appeared to be available only to test-positive individuals.ConclusionThe quality of ECS providers' websites could be improved by offering more complete and accurate information about ECS and their tests. Providers should also ensure that all carrier couples receive posttest genetic counseling to inform their subsequent reproductive decision making.Genet Med advance online publication, 14 December 2017; doi:10.1038/gim.2017.222.

  8. Practical Strategies for Making Online Library Services and Instruction Accessible to All Patrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Christina C.

    2013-01-01

    Providing accessible library services and instruction to distance users with disabilities can seem daunting. This article, which grew out of a webinar presented by the author to the Health Science Special Interest Group of ACRL, provides practical strategies to help content creators utilize built-in accessibility features and provides a resources…

  9. Sophisticated Online Learning Scheme for Green Resource Allocation in 5G Heterogeneous Cloud Radio Access Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Alqerm, Ismail

    2018-01-23

    5G is the upcoming evolution for the current cellular networks that aims at satisfying the future demand for data services. Heterogeneous cloud radio access networks (H-CRANs) are envisioned as a new trend of 5G that exploits the advantages of heterogeneous and cloud radio access networks to enhance spectral and energy efficiency. Remote radio heads (RRHs) are small cells utilized to provide high data rates for users with high quality of service (QoS) requirements, while high power macro base station (BS) is deployed for coverage maintenance and low QoS users service. Inter-tier interference between macro BSs and RRHs and energy efficiency are critical challenges that accompany resource allocation in H-CRANs. Therefore, we propose an efficient resource allocation scheme using online learning, which mitigates interference and maximizes energy efficiency while maintaining QoS requirements for all users. The resource allocation includes resource blocks (RBs) and power. The proposed scheme is implemented using two approaches: centralized, where the resource allocation is processed at a controller integrated with the baseband processing unit and decentralized, where macro BSs cooperate to achieve optimal resource allocation strategy. To foster the performance of such sophisticated scheme with a model free learning, we consider users\\' priority in RB allocation and compact state representation learning methodology to improve the speed of convergence and account for the curse of dimensionality during the learning process. The proposed scheme including both approaches is implemented using software defined radios testbed. The obtained results and simulation results confirm that the proposed resource allocation solution in H-CRANs increases the energy efficiency significantly and maintains users\\' QoS.

  10. Access to Radiology Reports via an Online Patient Portal: Experiences of Referring Physicians and Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henshaw, Dan; Okawa, Grant; Ching, Karen; Garrido, Terhilda; Qian, Heather; Tsai, Joanne

    2015-06-01

    Few organizations have reported providing radiology reports to patients via an electronic health record patient portal. The authors describe the process of manual release of reports made by referring physicians, and patients' and referring physicians' experiences during the first year that release through the portal was available. A survey of 508 patients assessed perceived accessibility and importance of portal-released radiology reports, and communications with referring physicians before and after the release. A survey of 48 referring physicians and a group interview assessed the utility of releasing reports, preferences regarding automatic release, and workload impact. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and qualitative methods. A total of 74% (377) of patients found reports easy to access, and 88% (446) reported that the ability to do so was important. In all, 49% (250) of patients were contacted by their referring physician before report release, and 25% (156) contacted their physician for more information after viewing a report. Of the referring physicians, 88% (42) found that releasing reports to patients was useful. Auto-release of x-ray reports, with a 1-week delay, was preferred by 58% (28), but they were more reluctant to auto-release CT and MRI reports. A total of 86% (41) of referring physicians reported that follow-up emails, telephone calls, and office visits were unchanged or had decreased. Referring-physician release of radiology reports via the online portal is important to patients, useful to referring physicians, and does not affect referring-physician workloads. A delay between reporting results to referring physicians and releasing them to patients allows time for needed physician-patient communication. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. OpenTopography: Enabling Online Access to High-Resolution Lidar Topography Data and Processing Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Christopher; Nandigam, Viswanath; Baru, Chaitan; Arrowsmith, J. Ramon

    2013-04-01

    High-resolution topography data acquired with lidar (light detection and ranging) technology are revolutionizing the way we study the Earth's surface and overlying vegetation. These data, collected from airborne, tripod, or mobile-mounted scanners have emerged as a fundamental tool for research on topics ranging from earthquake hazards to hillslope processes. Lidar data provide a digital representation of the earth's surface at a resolution sufficient to appropriately capture the processes that contribute to landscape evolution. The U.S. National Science Foundation-funded OpenTopography Facility (http://www.opentopography.org) is a web-based system designed to democratize access to earth science-oriented lidar topography data. OpenTopography provides free, online access to lidar data in a number of forms, including the raw point cloud and associated geospatial-processing tools for customized analysis. The point cloud data are co-located with on-demand processing tools to generate digital elevation models, and derived products and visualizations which allow users to quickly access data in a format appropriate for their scientific application. The OpenTopography system is built using a service-oriented architecture (SOA) that leverages cyberinfrastructure resources at the San Diego Supercomputer Center at the University of California San Diego to allow users, regardless of expertise level, to access these massive lidar datasets and derived products for use in research and teaching. OpenTopography hosts over 500 billion lidar returns covering 85,000 km2. These data are all in the public domain and are provided by a variety of partners under joint agreements and memoranda of understanding with OpenTopography. Partners include national facilities such as the NSF-funded National Center for Airborne Lidar Mapping (NCALM), as well as non-governmental organizations and local, state, and federal agencies. OpenTopography has become a hub for high-resolution topography

  12. OneGeology: Making the World’s Geological Map Data Accessible Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, H.; Jackson, I.; Robida, F.; Thorleifson, H.

    2009-12-01

    successful launch, OneGeology participants have continued working both to increase national participation and content, and to put in place a more formal governance structure to oversee the long term evolution of the initiative. OneGeology is an example of collaboration in action and is both multilateral and multinational. In 2007, a group of motivated geoscientists and data managers identified an opportunity and took the initiative to engage their peers to work in concert to achieve a shared objective. OneGeology has facilitated collaborative development of an Internet site that provides unprecedented online access to global geological map data.

  13. Association of mandated language access programming and quality of care provided by mental health agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Sean R; Snowden, Lonnie

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the association between language access programming and quality of psychiatric care received by persons with limited English proficiency (LEP). In 1999, the California Department of Mental Health required county Medicaid agencies to implement a "threshold language access policy" to meet the state's Title VI obligations. This policy required Medi-Cal agencies to provide language access programming, including access to interpreters and translated written material, to speakers of languages other than English if the language was spoken by at least 3,000, or 5%, of the county's Medicaid population. Using a longitudinal study design with a nonequivalent control group, this study examined the quality of care provided to Spanish speakers with LEP and a severe mental illness before and after implementation of mandatory language access programming. Quality was measured by receipt of at least two follow-up medication visits within 90 days or three visits within 180 days of an initial medication visit over a period of 38 quarter-years. On average, only 40% of Spanish-speaking clients received at least three medication follow-up visits within 180 days. In multivariate analyses, language access programming was not associated with receipt of at least two medication follow-up visits within 90 days or at least three visits within 180 days. This study found no evidence that language access programming led to increased rates of follow-up medication visits for clients with LEP.

  14. Legal, Practical, and Ethical Considerations for Making Online Patient Portals Accessible for All.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, Courtney R; Fruchterman, Jim; Youdelman, Mara; Schillinger, Dean

    2017-10-01

    Largely driven by the financial incentives of the HITECH Act's Meaningful Use program as part of federal US health care reform, access to portal Web sites has rapidly expanded, allowing many patients to view their medical record information online. Despite this expansion, there is little attention paid to the accessibility of portals for more vulnerable patient populations-especially patients with limited health literacy or limited English proficiency, and individuals with disabilities. We argue that there are potential legal mandates for improving portal accessibility (e.g., the Civil Rights and the Rehabilitation Acts), as well as ethical considerations to prevent the exacerbation of existing health and health care disparities. To address these legal, practical, and ethical considerations, we present standards and broad recommendations that could greatly improve the reach and impact of portal Web sites.

  15. LBVS: an online platform for ligand-based virtual screening using publicly accessible databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Minghao; Liu, Zhihong; Yan, Xin; Ding, Qianzhi; Gu, Qiong; Xu, Jun

    2014-11-01

    Abundant data on compound bioactivity and publicly accessible chemical databases increase opportunities for ligand-based drug discovery. In order to make full use of the data, an online platform for ligand-based virtual screening (LBVS) using publicly accessible databases has been developed. LBVS adopts Bayesian learning approach to create virtual screening models because of its noise tolerance, speed, and efficiency in extracting knowledge from data. LBVS currently includes data derived from BindingDB and ChEMBL. Three validation approaches have been employed to evaluate the virtual screening models created from LBVS. The tenfold cross validation results of twenty different LBVS models demonstrate that LBVS achieves an average AUC value of 0.86. Our internal and external testing results indicate that LBVS is predictive for lead identifications. LBVS can be publicly accessed at http://rcdd.sysu.edu.cn/lbvs.

  16. The availability and consistency of dengue surveillance data provided online by the World Health Organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Ruberto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of high quality disease surveillance data has become increasingly important for public health action against new threats. In response, countries have developed a wide range of disease surveillance systems enabled by technological advancements. The heterogeneity and complexity of country data systems have caused a growing need for international organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO to coordinate the standardization, integration, and dissemination of country disease data at the global level for research and policy. The availability and consistency of currently available disease surveillance data at the global level are unclear. We investigated this for dengue surveillance data provided online by the WHO.We extracted all dengue surveillance data provided online by WHO Headquarters and Regional Offices (RO's. We assessed the availability and consistency of these data by comparing indicators within and between sources. We also assessed the consistency of dengue data provided online by two example countries (Brazil and Indonesia. Data were available from WHO for 100 countries since 1955 representing a total of 23 million dengue cases and 82 thousand deaths ever reported to WHO. The availability of data on DengueNet and some RO's declined dramatically after 2005. Consistency was lacking between sources (84% across all indicators representing a discrepancy of almost half a million cases. Within sources, data at high spatial resolution were often incomplete.The decline of publicly available, integrated dengue surveillance data at the global level will limit opportunities for research, policy, and advocacy. A new financial and operational framework will be necessary for innovation and for the continued availability of integrated country disease data at the global level.

  17. The availability and consistency of dengue surveillance data provided online by the World Health Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruberto, Irene; Marques, Ernesto; Burke, Donald S; Van Panhuis, Willem G

    2015-04-01

    The use of high quality disease surveillance data has become increasingly important for public health action against new threats. In response, countries have developed a wide range of disease surveillance systems enabled by technological advancements. The heterogeneity and complexity of country data systems have caused a growing need for international organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO) to coordinate the standardization, integration, and dissemination of country disease data at the global level for research and policy. The availability and consistency of currently available disease surveillance data at the global level are unclear. We investigated this for dengue surveillance data provided online by the WHO. We extracted all dengue surveillance data provided online by WHO Headquarters and Regional Offices (RO's). We assessed the availability and consistency of these data by comparing indicators within and between sources. We also assessed the consistency of dengue data provided online by two example countries (Brazil and Indonesia). Data were available from WHO for 100 countries since 1955 representing a total of 23 million dengue cases and 82 thousand deaths ever reported to WHO. The availability of data on DengueNet and some RO's declined dramatically after 2005. Consistency was lacking between sources (84% across all indicators representing a discrepancy of almost half a million cases). Within sources, data at high spatial resolution were often incomplete. The decline of publicly available, integrated dengue surveillance data at the global level will limit opportunities for research, policy, and advocacy. A new financial and operational framework will be necessary for innovation and for the continued availability of integrated country disease data at the global level.

  18. Creating an open access cal/val repository via the LACO-Wiki online validation platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perger, Christoph; See, Linda; Dresel, Christopher; Weichselbaum, Juergen; Fritz, Steffen

    2017-04-01

    There is a major gap in the amount of in-situ data available on land cover and land use, either as field-based ground truth information or from image interpretation, both of which are used for the calibration and validation (cal/val) of products derived from Earth Observation. Although map producers generally publish their confusion matrices and the accuracy measures associated with their land cover and land use products, the cal/val data (also referred to as reference data) are rarely shared in an open manner. Although there have been efforts in compiling existing reference datasets and making them openly available, e.g. through the GOFC/GOLD (Global Observation for Forest Cover and Land Dynamics) portal or the European Commission's Copernicus Reference Data Access (CORDA), this represents a tiny fraction of the reference data collected and stored locally around the world. Moreover, the validation of land cover and land use maps is usually undertaken with tools and procedures specific to a particular institute or organization due to the lack of standardized validation procedures; thus, there are currently no incentives to share the reference data more broadly with the land cover and land use community. In an effort to provide a set of standardized, online validation tools and to build an open repository of cal/val data, the LACO-Wiki online validation portal has been developed, which will be presented in this paper. The portal contains transparent, documented and reproducible validation procedures that can be applied to local as well as global products. LACO-Wiki was developed through a user consultation process that resulted in a 4-step wizard-based workflow, which supports the user from uploading the map product for validation, through to the sampling process and the validation of these samples, until the results are processed and a final report is created that includes a range of commonly reported accuracy measures. One of the design goals of LACO-Wiki has been

  19. An exploratory curriculum analysis of thirteen virtual schools, online homeschools and online curriculum providers' science curriculum from kindergarten through twelfth grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dussy L.

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe and examine various Internet-based science curricula in terms of their educational value and comprehensiveness. Thirteen online homeschool providers' science curricula were analyzed through an examination of the content and organization of instruction and through a comparison with the seven National Science Education Standards (NSES) in order to assess the pedagogical and developmental appropriateness of online science curriculum, to find the ideological perspectives exhibited by each curriculum, and to identify implications for the future of homeschooling regarding children who use an online science curriculum as the basis of their science education. The results reveal that only a few online schools incorporate all seven NSES in their science curriculum; most online schools' content and instruction have a traditional/behavioral perspective; and the Systematizer theoretical perspective was prevalent in online schools' science curricula. This study investigates the issue of whether online homeschooling can accurately be termed homeschooling. A discussion of education and schooling according to Holt (1976), Illich (1972), and Moore and Moore (1975) explore this issue. The findings from this discussion suggest that the online homeschool movement may be an undiscovered form of "schooling" and that parents, educators, researchers, curriculum developers, and specialists should be aware of the implications online homeschooling has on homeschooling's philosophy of education.

  20. US university response to H1N1: a study of access to online preparedness and response information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Rachel D; Bayles, Brett R

    2012-03-01

    The recent outbreaks of severe acute respiratory syndrome, H5N1 (avian influenza), and, most recently, the novel H1N1 influenza pandemic of 2009 have raised awareness of the danger of new and emerging infections. Preparedness and response plans for such outbreaks are crucial, and given the centrality of the Internet as a source of information on university and college campuses, such plans should be made available at pandemic-dedicated university Web sites. The information on these sites must be comprehensive, accessible, and tailored to the specific circumstances of individual schools. An Internet-based search was conducted in September 2009 to evaluate university Web sites for influenza-specific information in a sample of 51 universities. Web sites were assessed by applying a set of key words and a list of 10 indicators used as measures of accessibility and comprehensiveness. Of the 51 universities evaluated, only 9 (17.6%) either had no influenza Web site or had a university influenza preparedness plan with no dedicated Web site. Only 6 (14.3%) of the schools with influenza specific Web sites had information for parents, with 23 (54.8%) providing information specifically for faculty and staff, and 24 (57.1%) providing information specifically to students. We found no guidelines for maximizing the access to and effectiveness of online pandemic communications at institutions of higher learning. Until such time as appropriate guidelines are developed, university authorities must carefully assess their needs, taking into account local, national, and international public health circumstances and resources; ease of access; comprehensiveness; and appropriately tailored strategies in their online communications. Copyright © 2012 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Equity of access to primary healthcare for vulnerable populations: the IMPACT international online survey of innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Lauralie; Furler, John; Densley, Konstancja; Haggerty, Jeannie; Russell, Grant; Levesque, Jean-Frederic; Gunn, Jane

    2016-04-12

    Improving access to primary healthcare (PHC) for vulnerable populations is important for achieving health equity, yet this remains challenging. Evidence of effective interventions is rather limited and fragmented. We need to identify innovative ways to improve access to PHC for vulnerable populations, and to clarify which elements of health systems, organisations or services (supply-side dimensions of access) and abilities of patients or populations (demand-side dimensions of access) need to be strengthened to achieve transformative change. The work reported here was conducted as part of IMPACT (Innovative Models Promoting Access-to-Care Transformation), a 5-year Canadian-Australian research program aiming to identify, implement and trial best practice interventions to improve access to PHC for vulnerable populations. We undertook an environmental scan as a broad screening approach to identify the breadth of current innovations from the field. We distributed a brief online survey to an international audience of PHC researchers, practitioners, policy makers and stakeholders using a combined email and social media approach. Respondents were invited to describe a program, service, approach or model of care that they considered innovative in helping vulnerable populations to get access to PHC. We used descriptive statistics to characterise the innovations and conducted a qualitative framework analysis to further examine the text describing each innovation. Seven hundred forty-four responses were recorded over a 6-week period. 240 unique examples of innovations originating from 14 countries were described, the majority from Canada and Australia. Most interventions targeted a diversity of population groups, were government funded and delivered in a community health, General Practice or outreach clinic setting. Interventions were mainly focused on the health sector and directed at organisational and/or system level determinants of access (supply-side). Few innovations

  2. Spatial Access to Primary Care Providers in Appalachia: Evaluating Current Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, Joseph; Marshall, Vince; Tan, Xi; Camacho, Fabian T; Anderson, Roger T; Balkrishnan, Rajesh

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this research was to examine spatial access to primary care physicians in Appalachia using both traditional access measures and the 2-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method. Spatial access to care was compared between urban and rural regions of Appalachia. The study region included Appalachia counties of Pennsylvania, Ohio, Kentucky, and North Carolina. Primary care physicians during 2008 and total census block group populations were geocoded into GIS software. Ratios of county physicians to population, driving time to nearest primary care physician, and various 2SFCA approaches were compared. Urban areas of the study region had shorter travel times to their closest primary care physician. Provider to population ratios produced results that varied widely from one county to another because of strict geographic boundaries. The 2SFCA method produced varied results depending on the distance decay weight and variable catchment size techniques chose. 2SFCA scores showed greater access to care in urban areas of Pennsylvania, Ohio, and North Carolina. The different parameters of the 2SFCA method-distance decay weights and variable catchment sizes-have a large impact on the resulting spatial access to primary care scores. The findings of this study suggest that using a relative 2SFCA approach, the spatial access ratio method, when detailed patient travel data are unavailable. The 2SFCA method shows promise for measuring access to care in Appalachia, but more research on patient travel preferences is needed to inform implementation. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. E-health: potential benefits and challenges in providing and accessing sexual health services

    OpenAIRE

    Minichiello, Victor; Rahman, Saifur; Dune, Tinashe; Scott, John; Dowsett, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Background E-health has become a burgeoning field in which health professionals and health consumers create and seek information. E-health refers to internet-based health care and information delivery and seeks to improve health service locally, regionally and worldwide. E-sexual health presents new opportunities to provide online sexual health services irrespective of gender, age, sexual orientation and location. Discussion The paper used the dimensions of the RE-AIM model (reach, efficacy, ...

  4. Democratizing education? Examining access and usage patterns in massive open online courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, John D; Reich, Justin

    2015-12-04

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) are often characterized as remedies to educational disparities related to social class. Using data from 68 MOOCs offered by Harvard and MIT between 2012 and 2014, we found that course participants from the United States tended to live in more-affluent and better-educated neighborhoods than the average U.S. resident. Among those who did register for courses, students with greater socioeconomic resources were more likely to earn a certificate. Furthermore, these differences in MOOC access and completion were larger for adolescents and young adults, the traditional ages where people find on-ramps into science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) coursework and careers. Our findings raise concerns that MOOCs and similar approaches to online learning can exacerbate rather than reduce disparities in educational outcomes related to socioeconomic status. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Providing Access and Visualization to Global Cloud Properties from GEO Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, T.; Nguyen, L.; Minnis, P.; Spangenberg, D.; Palikonda, R.; Ayers, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Providing public access to cloud macro and microphysical properties is a key concern for the NASA Langley Research Center Cloud and Radiation Group. This work describes a tool and method that allows end users to easily browse and access cloud information that is otherwise difficult to acquire and manipulate. The core of the tool is an application-programming interface that is made available to the public. One goal of the tool is to provide a demonstration to end users so that they can use the dynamically generated imagery as an input into their own work flows for both image generation and cloud product requisition. This project builds upon NASA Langley Cloud and Radiation Group's experience with making real-time and historical satellite cloud product imagery accessible and easily searchable. As we see the increasing use of virtual supply chains that provide additional value at each link there is value in making satellite derived cloud product information available through a simple access method as well as allowing users to browse and view that imagery as they need rather than in a manner most convenient for the data provider. Using the Open Geospatial Consortium's Web Processing Service as our access method, we describe a system that uses a hybrid local and cloud based parallel processing system that can return both satellite imagery and cloud product imagery as well as the binary data used to generate them in multiple formats. The images and cloud products are sourced from multiple satellites and also "merged" datasets created by temporally and spatially matching satellite sensors. Finally, the tool and API allow users to access information that spans the time ranges that our group has information available. In the case of satellite imagery, the temporal range can span the entire lifetime of the sensor.

  6. Providing Access to Unique Information Sources: A Reusable Platform for Publishing Bibliographic Databases on the Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantz, Ronald C.

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of digital library projects at Rutgers University focuses on publishing bibliographic databases on the Web to provide access to information sources not likely to be published elsewhere. Describes the reusable technology platform concept, bibliographic platform architecture, metadata approach, data entry, and managing the process.…

  7. The Changing Role of Community Networks in Providing Citizen Access to the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Thomas P.; Trotter, David Mitchell

    1999-01-01

    Examines the changing role of community network associations or freenets in providing Internet access by examining the case of the Calgary Community Network Association (CCNA) in Alberta, Canada. Discusses the withdrawal of states from the telecommunications field, priorities of the Canadian government, and the role of the private sector.…

  8. Does the edge effect impact on the measure of spatial accessibility to healthcare providers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Kihal, Wahida; Le Meur, Nolwenn; Souris, Marc; Deguen, Séverine

    2017-12-11

    Spatial accessibility indices are increasingly applied when investigating inequalities in health. Although most studies are making mentions of potential errors caused by the edge effect, many acknowledge having neglected to consider this concern by establishing spatial analyses within a finite region, settling for hypothesizing that accessibility to facilities will be under-reported. Our study seeks to assess the effect of edge on the accuracy of defining healthcare provider access by comparing healthcare provider accessibility accounting or not for the edge effect, in a real-world application. This study was carried out in the department of Nord, France. The statistical unit we use is the French census block known as 'IRIS' (Ilot Regroupé pour l'Information Statistique), defined by the National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies. The geographical accessibility indicator used is the "Index of Spatial Accessibility" (ISA), based on the E2SFCA algorithm. We calculated ISA for the pregnant women population by selecting three types of healthcare providers: general practitioners, gynecologists and midwives. We compared ISA variation when accounting or not edge effect in urban and rural zones. The GIS method was then employed to determine global and local autocorrelation. Lastly, we compared the relationship between socioeconomic distress index and ISA, when accounting or not for the edge effect, to fully evaluate its impact. The results revealed that on average ISA when offer and demand beyond the boundary were included is slightly below ISA when not accounting for the edge effect, and we found that the IRIS value was more likely to deteriorate than improve. Moreover, edge effect impact can vary widely by health provider type. There is greater variability within the rural IRIS group than within the urban IRIS group. We found a positive correlation between socioeconomic distress variables and composite ISA. Spatial analysis results (such as Moran's spatial

  9. Online marketing. A ground to exploit and grow the accessing of European funds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Anamaria-Cătălina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Accessing European funds is very controversial at this moment because of its enormous benefits for the country development. A very important aspect regarding the image of a country is represented by the tourism, and European funds offer an opportunity for raising the potential of a country by coordinating the tourism activities. Tourism planning also has a big impact its advantages being very resourceful due to a responsible funds allocation. In this paper, we have been analyzing a few European funded project – POSDRU 2007-2013 for the development regions. The future direction in developing projects in the field of tourism is to follow very carefully the objectives of the implemented projects and to plan all the activities in a balanced manner. The paper also shows how online communication can contribute to facilitate the access of the European funds and a better implementation and develop of the projects.

  10. Computer use, internet access, and online health searching among Harlem adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohall, Alwyn T; Nye, Andrea; Moon-Howard, Joyce; Kukafka, Rita; Dye, Bonnie; Vaughan, Roger D; Northridge, Mary E

    2011-01-01

    Computer use, Internet access, and online searching for health information were assessed toward enhancing Internet use for health promotion. Cross-sectional random digit dial landline phone survey. Eight zip codes that comprised Central Harlem/Hamilton Heights and East Harlem in New York City. Adults 18 years and older (N=646). Demographic characteristics, computer use, Internet access, and online searching for health information. Frequencies for categorical variables and means and standard deviations for continuous variables were calculated and compared with analogous findings reported in national surveys from similar time periods. Among Harlem adults, ever computer use and current Internet use were 77% and 52%, respectively. High-speed home Internet connections were somewhat lower for Harlem adults than for U.S. adults overall (43% vs. 68%). Current Internet users in Harlem were more likely to be younger, white vs. black or Hispanic, better educated, and in better self-reported health than non-current users (pInternet affected the way they eat (47%) or exercise (44%). Many Harlem adults currently use the Internet to search for health information. High-speed connections and culturally relevant materials may facilitate health information searching for underserved groups. Copyright © 2011 by American Journal of Health Promotion, Inc.

  11. FRAMES-2.0 Software System: Providing Password Protection and Limited Access to Models and Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whelan, Gene; Pelton, Mitch A.

    2007-08-09

    One of the most important concerns for regulatory agencies is the concept of reproducibility (i.e., reproducibility means credibility) of an assessment. One aspect of reproducibility deals with tampering of the assessment. In other words, when multiple groups are engaged in an assessment, it is important to lock down the problem that is to be solved and/or to restrict the models that are to be used to solve the problem. The objective of this effort is to provide the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with a means to limit user access to models and to provide a mechanism to constrain the conceptual site models (CSMs) when appropriate. The purpose is to provide the user (i.e., NRC) with the ability to “lock down” the CSM (i.e., picture containing linked icons), restrict access to certain models, or both.

  12. Going "social" to access experimental and potentially life-saving treatment: an assessment of the policy and online patient advocacy environment for expanded access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Tim K; Schoenfeld, Virginia J

    2016-02-02

    Social media is fundamentally altering how we access health information and make decisions about medical treatment, including for terminally ill patients. This specifically includes the growing phenomenon of patients who use online petitions and social media campaigns in an attempt to gain access to experimental drugs through expanded access pathways. Importantly, controversy surrounding expanded access and "compassionate use" involves several disparate stakeholders, including patients, manufacturers, policymakers, and regulatory agencies-all with competing interests and priorities, leading to confusion, frustration, and ultimately advocacy. In order to explore this issue in detail, this correspondence article first conducts a literature review to describe how the expanded access policy and regulatory environment in the United States has evolved over time and how it currently impacts access to experimental drugs. We then conducted structured web searches to identify patient use of online petitions and social media campaigns aimed at compelling access to experimental drugs. This was carried out in order to characterize the types of communication strategies utilized, the diseases and drugs subject to expanded access petitions, and the prevalent themes associated with this form of "digital" patient advocacy. We find that patients and their families experience mixed results, but still gravitate towards the use of online campaigns out of desperation, lack of reliable information about treatment access options, and in direct response to limitations of the current fragmented structure of expanded access regulation and policy currently in place. In response, we discuss potential policy reforms to improve expanded access processes, including advocating greater transparency for expanded access programs, exploring use of targeted economic incentives for manufacturers, and developing systems to facilitate patient information about existing treatment options. This includes

  13. Access to finance from different finance provider types: Farmer knowledge of the requirements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Wulandari

    Full Text Available Analysing farmer knowledge of the requirements of finance providers can provide valuable insights to policy makers about ways to improve farmers' access to finance. This study compares farmer knowledge of the requirements to obtain finance with the actual requirements set by different finance provider types, and investigates the relation between demographic and socioeconomic factors and farmer knowledge of finance requirements. We use a structured questionnaire to collect data from a sample of finance providers and farmers in Java Island, Indonesia. We find that the most important requirements to acquire finance vary among different finance provider types. We also find that farmers generally have little knowledge of the requirements, which are important to each type of finance provider. Awareness campaigns are needed to increase farmer knowledge of the diversity of requirements among the finance provider types.

  14. Access to finance from different finance provider types: Farmer knowledge of the requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuwissen, Miranda P. M.; Karmana, Maman H.; Oude Lansink, Alfons G. J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Analysing farmer knowledge of the requirements of finance providers can provide valuable insights to policy makers about ways to improve farmers’ access to finance. This study compares farmer knowledge of the requirements to obtain finance with the actual requirements set by different finance provider types, and investigates the relation between demographic and socioeconomic factors and farmer knowledge of finance requirements. We use a structured questionnaire to collect data from a sample of finance providers and farmers in Java Island, Indonesia. We find that the most important requirements to acquire finance vary among different finance provider types. We also find that farmers generally have little knowledge of the requirements, which are important to each type of finance provider. Awareness campaigns are needed to increase farmer knowledge of the diversity of requirements among the finance provider types. PMID:28877174

  15. Access to finance from different finance provider types: Farmer knowledge of the requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulandari, Eliana; Meuwissen, Miranda P M; Karmana, Maman H; Oude Lansink, Alfons G J M

    2017-01-01

    Analysing farmer knowledge of the requirements of finance providers can provide valuable insights to policy makers about ways to improve farmers' access to finance. This study compares farmer knowledge of the requirements to obtain finance with the actual requirements set by different finance provider types, and investigates the relation between demographic and socioeconomic factors and farmer knowledge of finance requirements. We use a structured questionnaire to collect data from a sample of finance providers and farmers in Java Island, Indonesia. We find that the most important requirements to acquire finance vary among different finance provider types. We also find that farmers generally have little knowledge of the requirements, which are important to each type of finance provider. Awareness campaigns are needed to increase farmer knowledge of the diversity of requirements among the finance provider types.

  16. The efficacy of online communication platforms for plastic surgeons providing extended disaster relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Kenneth L; Avashia, Yash J; Dayicioglu, Deniz; DeGennaro, Vincent A; Thaller, Seth R

    2014-04-01

    Immediately after the January 2010 earthquake in Haiti, plastic surgeons provided disaster relief services through the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine for 5 months. To improve surgical care and promote awareness of plastic surgery's role in humanitarian assistance, an online communication platform (OCP) was initiated. An OCP is a Web-based application combining Web blogging, picture uploading, news posting, and private messaging systems into a single platform. The purpose of this study was to analyze the use of OCP during disaster relief. Surgeries performed during the period from January 13 to May 28, 2010, were documented. The OCP was established with 4 priorities: ease of use, multimedia integration, organization capabilities, and security. Web traffic was documented. A 17-question survey was administered to 18 plastic surgeons who used the OCP after 1 year to assess their attitudes and perceptions. From January 13 to May 28, 2010, 413 operations were performed at the field hospital. Of the overall number of procedures, 46.9% were performed by plastic surgery teams. In a year, beginning from January 12, 2011, the OCP had 1117 visits with 530 absolute unique visitors. Of 17 plastic surgeons, 71% responded that the OCP improved follow-up and continuity of care by debriefing rotating plastic surgery teams. One hundred percent claimed that the OCP conveyed the role of plastic surgeons with the public. Results demonstrate the necessity of OCP during disaster relief. Online communication platform permitted secure exchange of surgical management details, follow-up, photos, and miscellaneous necessary recommendations. Posted experiences and field hospital progress assisted in generating substantial awareness regarding the significant role and contribution played by plastic surgeons in disaster relief.

  17. Googling Concussion Care: A Critical Appraisal of Online Concussion Healthcare Providers and Practices in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael J; Ritchie, Lesley; Selci, Erin; Chu, Stephanie; McDonald, Patrick; Russell, Kelly

    2017-03-01

    Concussion is an emerging public health concern, but care of patients with a concussion is presently unregulated in Canada. Independent, blinded Google Internet searches were conducted for the terms "concussion" and "concussion clinic" and each of the Canadian provinces and territories. The first 10 to 15 concussion healthcare providers per province were identified. A critical appraisal of healthcare personnel and services offered on the provider's Web site was conducted. Fifty-eight concussion healthcare providers were identified using this search methodology. Only 40% listed the presence of an on-site medical doctor (M.D.) as a member of the clinical team. Forty-seven percent of concussion healthcare providers advertised access to a concussion clinic, program, or center on their Web site. Professionals designated as team leaders, directors, or presidents among concussion clinics, programs, and centers included a neuropsychologist (15%), sports medicine physician (7%), neurologist (4%), and neurosurgeon (4%). Services offered by providers included baseline testing (67%), physiotherapy (50%), and hyperbaric oxygen therapy (2%). This study indicates that there are numerous concussion healthcare providers in Canada offering diverse services with clinics operated by professionals with varying levels of training in traumatic brain injury. In some cases, the practices of these concussion clinics do not conform to current expert consensus guidelines.

  18. Providing access to research data, publications and current research information at Data Archiving and Networked Services - DANS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, E.M.S.; Doorn, P.K.

    2014-01-01

    Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS) promotes sustained access to digital research data in the Netherlands. Researchers can deposit their data through the online archiving system EASY. Via the portal NARCIS the research data are shown in context, namely in relation to publications, and other

  19. The association between patient activation and accessing online health information: results from a national survey of US adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Samuel G; Pandit, Anjali; Rush, Steven R; Wolf, Michael S; Simon, Carol

    2015-12-01

    There are increasing opportunities for the public to access online health information, but attitudinal barriers to use are less well-known. Patient activation is associated with key health outcomes, but its relationship with using online health information is not known. We examined the relationship between patient activation and the likelihood of accessing a range of different types of online health information in a nationally representative US sample. Cross-sectional nationally representative survey. Data were from an online (n = 2700) and random digit dial telephone survey (n = 700) of US adults (total n = 3400). Respondent characteristics and the Patient Activation Measure. Self-reported access of five types of online health information in the past 12 months (online medical records, cost estimation tools, quality comparison tools, health information about a specific condition, preventive health information). Approximately, one-fifth of the sample had accessed their medical record (21.6%), treatment cost estimation tools (17.3%) and hospital and physician quality comparison tools (21.8%). Nearly half of the sample had accessed information about medical conditions or treatments (48.3%) or preventive health and well-being (45.9%). In multivariable analyses adjusted for participant characteristics, respondents with greater patient activation were more likely to have accessed all types of health information other than cost estimation tools. Activated people are more likely to make use of online heath information. Increasing patient activation could improve the public's ability to participate in health care and personal health self-management by encouraging health information seeking. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Evaluating the impact of patients' online access to doctors' visit notes: designing and executing the OpenNotes project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leveille Suzanne G

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Providers and policymakers are pursuing strategies to increase patient engagement in health care. Increasingly, online sections of medical records are viewable by patients though seldom are clinicians' visit notes included. We designed a one-year multi-site trial of online patient accessible office visit notes, OpenNotes. We hypothesized that patients and primary care physicians (PCPs would want it to continue and that OpenNotes would not lead to significant disruptions to doctors' practices. Methods/Design Using a mixed methods approach, we designed a quasi-experimental study in 3 diverse healthcare systems in Boston, Pennsylvania, and Seattle. Two sites had existing patient internet portals; the third used an experimental portal. We targeted 3 key areas where we hypothesized the greatest impacts: beliefs and attitudes about OpenNotes, use of the patient internet portals, and patient-doctor communication. PCPs in the 3 sites were invited to participate in the intervention. Patients who were registered portal users of participating PCPs were given access to their PCPs' visit notes for one year. PCPs who declined participation in the intervention and their patients served as the comparison groups for the study. We applied the RE-AIM framework to our design in order to capture as comprehensive a picture as possible of the impact of OpenNotes. We developed pre- and post-intervention surveys for online administration addressing attitudes and experiences based on interviews and focus groups with patients and doctors. In addition, we tracked use of the internet portals before and during the intervention. Results PCP participation varied from 19% to 87% across the 3 sites; a total of 114 PCPs enrolled in the intervention with their 22,000 patients who were registered portal users. Approximately 40% of intervention and non-intervention patients at the 3 sites responded to the online survey, yielding a total of approximately 38

  1. Subcutaneous placement of lap band port without fascial fixation provides safe and durable access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkary, Ehab; Olgers, Forrest

    2014-11-01

    Laparoscopic adjustable gastric band access port has been routinely sutured to the anterior fascia of the abdominal wall using nonabsorbable sutures. We present our technique demonstrating that nonfascial fixation with using a mesh allows for a safe and durable placement of the port in the superficial subcutaneous tissue. Retrospective chart review included 102 consecutive patients who had Lap band surgery performed by single surgeon (EA) from June 2011 until April 2013. The port was sutured to a piece of polypropylene mesh and tunneled in the subcutaneous tissue away from the incision. Patients' demographics were analyzed as well as the following parameters: OR time for port placement, follow-up, port complications requiring revision, difficult access facilitated by fluoroscopy imaging, port infection, and skin erosion. The study included 102 consecutive patients (23 males and 79 females), mean age was 49 years old, mean weight was 284.7 lb, mean height was 66.2 in., and mean body mass index (BMI) was 46.3 kg/m(2). The average operative time for port placement was 4 min, mean follow-up was 12 months, port complications occurred in 2 % of the patients while fluoroscopy for difficult port access was required in 3 %. No cases of port infections or skin erosions occurred. Superficial subcutaneous placement of Lap Band Port using mesh fixation without anchoring the port to the fascia provides safe and durable access. Deep incisions to secure the port directly to the fascia might not be necessary.

  2. On-Demand Grades: The Effect of Online Grade Book Access on Student Mastery and Performance Goal Orientations, Grade Orientation, Academic Self Efficacy, and Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldow, Adam Lowell

    2010-01-01

    With the widespread growth of broadband Internet access, teachers, and in many cases, schools and school districts are transitioning from traditional paper-based grade books to student accessible online (Web-based) grade books. Online grade books offer students 24/7, on demand access to grades and various other student data, and have the potential…

  3. Contraceptive service provider imposed restrictions to contraceptive access in Urban Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandt, Hilary M; Speizer, Ilene S; Corroon, Meghan

    2017-04-17

    Health service providers can restrict access to contraceptives through their own imposed biases about method appropriateness. In this study, provider biases toward contraceptive service provision among urban Nigerian providers was assessed. Health providers working in health facilities, as well as pharmacists and patent medical vendors (PMV), in Abuja, Benin City, Ibadan, Ilorin, Kaduna, and Zaria, were surveyed in 2011 concerning their self-reported biases in service provision based on age, parity, and marital status. Minimum age bias was the most common bias while minimum parity was the least common bias reported by providers. Condoms were consistently provided with the least amount of bias, followed by provision of emergency contraception (EC), pills, injectables, and IUDs. Experience of in-service training for health facility providers was associated with decreased prevalence of marital status bias for the pill, injectable, and IUD; however, training experience did not, or had the opposite effect on, pharmacists and PMV operator's reports of service provision bias. Provider imposed eligibility barriers in urban study sites in Nigeria were pervasive - the most prevalent restriction across method and provider type was minimum age. Given the large and growing adolescent population - interventions aimed at increasing supportive provision of contraceptives to youth in this context are urgently needed. The results show that the effect of in-service training on provider biases was limited. Future efforts to address provider biases in contraceptive service provision, among all provider types, must find creative ways to address this critical barrier to increased contraceptive use.

  4. Accessing maternal and child health services in Melbourne, Australia: Reflections from refugee families and service providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riggs Elisha

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Often new arrivals from refugee backgrounds have experienced poor health and limited access to healthcare services. The maternal and child health (MCH service in Victoria, Australia, is a joint local and state government operated, cost-free service available to all mothers of children aged 0–6 years. Although well-child healthcare visits are useful in identifying health issues early, there has been limited investigation in the use of these services for families from refugee backgrounds. This study aims to explore experiences of using MCH services, from the perspective of families from refugee backgrounds and service providers. Methods We used a qualitative study design informed by the socioecological model of health and a cultural competence approach. Two geographical areas of Melbourne were selected to invite participants. Seven focus groups were conducted with 87 mothers from Karen, Iraqi, Assyrian Chaldean, Lebanese, South Sudanese and Bhutanese backgrounds, who had lived an average of 4.7 years in Australia (range one month-18 years. Participants had a total of 249 children, of these 150 were born in Australia. Four focus groups and five interviews were conducted with MCH nurses, other healthcare providers and bicultural workers. Results Four themes were identified: facilitating access to MCH services; promoting continued engagement with the MCH service; language challenges; and what is working well and could be done better. Several processes were identified that facilitated initial access to the MCH service but there were implications for continued use of the service. The MCH service was not formally notified of new parents arriving with young children. Pre-arranged group appointments by MCH nurses for parents who attended playgroups worked well to increase ongoing service engagement. Barriers for parents in using MCH services included access to transportation, lack of confidence in speaking English and making

  5. Examining the accessibility of high-quality physical activity behaviour change support freely available online for men with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Camille E; Gelder, Charlotte; Binnewerg, Lena; McIntosh, Megan; Turnbull, Deborah

    2018-02-01

    While the internet is considered a promising avenue for providing physical activity support to prostate cancer survivors, little is known about the accessibility of quality websites in the real world. This work aimed to explore what websites prostate cancer survivors are likely to find when seeking physical activity support online and to evaluate their quality using evidenced-based criteria. A search strategy was developed in consultation with prostate cancer survivors (n = 44) to reflect the most common ways they are likely to search the internet. The search was then conducted by a single reviewer, and identified websites were assessed for quality by two reviewers using an evidence-based quality assessment tool developed for this study. Discrepancies were resolved by a third reviewer. Of the 45 identified websites, 13 (29%) received a high quality rating, 22 (49%) received a moderate rating and 10 (22%) received a low quality rating. Higher-quality websites tended to have a .org or .gov domain and tended to be located using searches specific to prostate cancer or prostate cancer and exercise. Very few websites contained complete information regarding the physical activity guidelines for cancer survivors, and no websites provided comprehensive behaviour change support. There are some good-quality physical activity websites accessible to men with prostate cancer. However, they may be difficult to find and/or require updating to include complete recommendations and more behaviour change support. Efforts to improve physical activity information online and strategies to direct prostate cancer survivors to higher-quality websites and support services are needed to ensure safety and efficacy.

  6. The Online Learning Definitions Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Association for K-12 Online Learning, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The mission of the International Association for K-12 Online Learning (iNACOL) is to ensure all students have access to a world-class education and quality online learning opportunities that prepare them for a lifetime of success. "The Online Learning Definitions Project" is designed to provide states, districts, online programs, and…

  7. Listeners use speaker identity to access representations of spatial perspective during online language comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryskin, Rachel A; Wang, Ranxiao Frances; Brown-Schmidt, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about how listeners represent another person's spatial perspective during language processing (e.g., two people looking at a map from different angles). Can listeners use contextual cues such as speaker identity to access a representation of the interlocutor's spatial perspective? In two eye-tracking experiments, participants received auditory instructions to move objects around a screen from two randomly alternating spatial perspectives (45° vs. 315° or 135° vs. 225° rotations from the participant's viewpoint). Instructions were spoken either by one voice, where the speaker's perspective switched at random, or by two voices, where each speaker maintained one perspective. Analysis of participant eye-gaze showed that interpretation of the instructions improved when each viewpoint was associated with a different voice. These findings demonstrate that listeners can learn mappings between individual talkers and viewpoints, and use these mappings to guide online language processing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of Access to Online Databases on Document Delivery Services within Iranian Academic Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Zahedi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the impact of access to online databases on the document delivery services in Iranian Academic Libraries, within the framework of factors such as number of orders lodged over the years studied and their trends, expenditures made by each university, especially those universities and groups that had the highest number of orders. This investigation was carried out through a survey and by calling on the library document supply unit in universities as well as in-person interview with librarians in charge. The study sample was confined to the universities of Shiraz, Tehran and Tarbiyat Modaress along with their faculties. Findings indicate that the rate of document requests in various universities depends on the target audience, capabilities, students’ familiarity as well as mode of document delivery services..

  9. The role of provider-patient communication and trust in online sources in Internet use for health-related activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jiran; Shim, Minsun

    2010-01-01

    Provider-patient communication is an important factor influencing patients' satisfaction and health outcomes. This study draws upon the uses and gratification theory to examine how individuals' perception of communication with healthcare providers is associated with their Internet use for health-related activities. Using the data from the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS), we found that as individuals perceived their communication with providers to be less patient-centered, they were more likely to engage in various types of online health activities, such as using websites for healthy lifestyles, searching for healthcare providers, and seeking health information. Trust in online health information was also found to be a significant predictor of online health activities. The results of this study emphasized the important role of provider-patient communication in motivating individuals to turn to the Internet for health purposes.

  10. Patient Access to Online Radiology Reports: Frequency and Sociodemographic Characteristics Associated with Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Randy C; Hippe, Daniel S; Elmore, Joann G; Wang, Carolyn L; Payne, Thomas H; Lee, Christoph I

    2016-09-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the frequency with which patients viewed their online radiology reports in relation to clinical and laboratory notes and identify sociodemographic factors associated with report viewing. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 129,419 patients who had online patient portal access in our large health system in 2014. We determined whether patients viewed their radiology reports, laboratory reports, and clinical notes. We also collected patient sociodemographic information including gender, age, primary spoken language, race/ethnicity, and insurance status. We performed multivariate analyses to determine significant associations between viewing of radiology reports and viewing of other types of clinical reports and patient characteristics. Of 61,131 patients with at least one radiology report available, 31,308 (51.2%) viewed them. Patients who also viewed laboratory reports or clinical notes were significantly more likely to view their radiology reports (P characteristics of traditionally underserved patient populations. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fundamentals of Providing Negotiation Advice Online : the Need for Developing BATNAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, B.R.; Leenes, R.E.; Zeleznikow, J.; Zeleznikow, J.; Lodder, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    However, in order to determine BATNAs online, we need a proper understanding of exactly what is a BATNA. This paper argues that current understanding of what comprises BATNAs is insufficient for the intended purposes.

  12. SciELO, Scientific Electronic Library Online, a Database of Open Access Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghini, Rogerio

    2013-01-01

    This essay discusses SciELO, a scientific journal database operating in 14 countries. It covers over 1000 journals providing open access to full text and table sets of scientometrics data. In Brazil it is responsible for a collection of nearly 300 journals, selected along 15 years as the best Brazilian periodicals in natural and social sciences.…

  13. The Digital Health Divide: Evaluating Online Health Information Access and Use among Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Amanda K.; Bernhardt, Jay M.; Dodd, Virginia; Vollrath, Morgan W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Innovations in health information technology (HIT) provide opportunities to reduce health care spending, improve quality of care, and improve health outcomes for older adults. However, concerns relating to older adults' limited access and use of HIT, including use of the Internet for health information, fuel the digital health divide…

  14. 41 CFR 102-79.95 - Who is responsible for the costs associated with providing access to antenna sites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... providing access to antenna sites? The telecommunications service provider is responsible for any reasonable... support of constructing new and improving existing telecommunication infrastructures provided that such installation does not negatively impact on the Government. ...

  15. The accessibility, readability, and quality of online resources for gender affirming surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Christina R; Ricci, Joseph A; Lee, Michelle; Tobias, Adam M; Medalie, Daniel A; Lee, Bernard T

    2017-09-01

    The transgender population is disproportionally affected by health disparities related to access to care. In many communities, transgender specialists are geographically distant and locally available medical professionals may be unfamiliar with unique needs of transgender patients. As a result, use of Internet resources for information about gender affirming surgery is particularly important. This study simulates a patient search for online educational material about gender affirming surgery and evaluates the accessibility, readability, and quality of the information. An Internet search for the term "transgender surgery" was performed, and the first 10 relevant hits were identified. Readability was assessed using 10 established tests: Coleman-Liau, Flesch-Kincaid, FORCAST, Fry, Gunning Fog, New Dale-Chall, New Fog Count, Raygor Estimate, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook, and Flesch Reading Ease. Quality was assessed using Journal of the American Medical Association criteria and the DISCERN instrument. Review of 69 results was required to identify 10 sites with relevant patient information. There were 97 articles collected; overall mean reading level was 14.7. Individual Web site reading levels ranged from 12.0 to 17.5. All articles and Web sites exceeded the recommended sixth grade level. Quality ranged from 0 to 4 (Journal of the American Medical Association) and 35 to 79 (DISCERN) across Web sites. Web sites with relevant patient information about gender affirming surgery were difficult to identify from search results. The content of these sites universally exceeded the recommended reading level. A wide range of Web site quality was noted, and this may further complicate successful navigation. Barriers in access to appropriately written patient information on the Internet may contribute to disparities in referral, involvement, satisfaction, and outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. AGRIS: providing access to agricultural research data exploiting open data on the web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celli, Fabrizio; Malapela, Thembani; Wegner, Karna; Subirats, Imma; Kokoliou, Elena; Keizer, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    AGRIS is the International System for Agricultural Science and Technology. It is supported by a large community of data providers, partners and users. AGRIS is a database that aggregates bibliographic data, and through this core data, related content across online information systems is retrieved by taking advantage of Semantic Web capabilities. AGRIS is a global public good and its vision is to be a responsive service to its user needs by facilitating contributions and feedback regarding the AGRIS core knowledgebase, AGRIS's future and its continuous development. Periodic AGRIS e-consultations, partner meetings and user feedback are assimilated to the development of the AGRIS application and content coverage. This paper outlines the current AGRIS technical set-up, its network of partners, data providers and users as well as how AGRIS's responsiveness to clients' needs inspires the continuous technical development of the application. The paper concludes by providing a use case of how the AGRIS stakeholder input and the subsequent AGRIS e-consultation results influence the development of the AGRIS application, knowledgebase and service delivery.

  17. The IRIS Data Management Center: Providing Efficient Access to GSN data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, T. K.; Benson, R. B.

    2004-05-01

    The IRIS Data Management Center (DMC) in Seattle, Washington is the host of the largest seismological database of its kind in the world. The Global Seismic Network (GSN) lies at the center of the DMC holdings. The DMC relies heavily upon a petabyte mass storage system for waveform storage and Oracle for its relational data base infrastructure. During the past several years, emphasis has been placed upon the development and implementation of robust and effective technologies that allow access to the information at the IRIS DMC in a variety of ways. This talk will highlight the general structure of the IRIS DMC and the method we use to manage the gigabytes of information in Oracle as well more than 100 terabytes of time series data we have in our mass storage systems. An overview will be given of the methods through which users can access the information in our relational database systems as well as the mass storage systems in order to conduct their research using GSN and other data. A discussion of three distinctly different approaches will be presented. These include an email-based method, a web-based method as well as a multi-tier distributed computing environment we call the Data Handling Interface (DHI). The DHI is based upon Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) and provides direct connections between client applications, normally provided by IRIS, and data center servers established at several data centers within the United States. The DHI presently supports the distribution of information about seismic events, information about the seismic stations that record the time series and finally the time series (seismograms) themselves. The system is capable of transmitting seismic waveform data in real time. Waveform data and all associated metadata are available through this interface allowing direct access to information at the DMC within client applications running on a users workstation.

  18. Breast reconstruction post mastectomy- Let's Google it. Accessibility, readability and quality of online information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Noel P; Lang, Bronagh; Angelov, Sophia; McGarrigle, Sarah A; Boyle, Terence J; Al-Azawi, Dhafir; Connolly, Elizabeth M

    2017-04-01

    This study evaluated the readability, accessibility and quality of information pertaining to breast reconstruction post mastectomy on the Internet in the English language. Using the Google © search engine the keywords "Breast reconstruction post mastectomy" were searched for. We analyzed the top 75 sites. The Flesch Reading Ease Score and Gunning Fog Index were calculated to assess readability. Web site quality was assessed objectively using the University of Michigan Consumer Health Web site Evaluation Checklist. Accessibility was determined using an automated accessibility tool. In addition, the country of origin, type of organisation producing the site and presence of Health on the Net (HoN) Certification status was recorded. The Web sites were difficult to read and comprehend. The mean Flesch Reading Ease scores were 55.5. The mean Gunning Fog Index scores was 8.6. The mean Michigan score was 34.8 indicating weak quality of websites. Websites with HoN certification ranked higher in the search results (p = 0.007). Website quality was influenced by organisation type (p information on breast reconstruction post mastectomy and procedures is poorly written and we suggest that Webpages providing information must be made more readable and accessible. We suggest that health professionals should recommend Web sites that are easy to read and contain high-quality surgical information. Medical information on the Internet should be readable, accessible, reliable and of a consistent quality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A modified transmission tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) setup provides access to opaque samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Richter, Marc; Knebel, Detlef; Jähnke, Torsten; Jankowski, Tilo; Stock, Erik; Deckert, Volker

    2014-01-01

    The combination of scanning probe microscopy and Raman spectroscopy enables chemical characterization of surfaces at highest spatial resolution. This so-called tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) can be employed for a variety of samples where a label-free characterization or identification of constituents on the nanometer scale is pursued. Present TERS setup geometries are always a compromise for specific dedicated applications and show different advantages and disadvantages: Transmission back-reflection setups, when using immersion objectives with a high numerical aperture, intrinsically provide the highest collection efficiency but cannot be applied for opaque samples. Those samples demand upright setups, at the cost of lower collection efficiency, even though very efficient systems using a parabolic mirror for illumination and collection have been demonstrated. In this contribution it is demonstrated that the incorporation of a dichroic mirror to a transmission TERS setup provides easy access to opaque samples without further modification of the setup.

  20. [Dentistry and healthcare legislation 7. The duty to provide care: availability and accessibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brands, W G; van der Ven, J M; Eijkman, M A J

    2013-12-01

    Dentists have a duty to provide care. This duty, which interestingly enough has a limited legal basis, is for the most part given form by jurisprudence. In that process, the disciplinary judge and the grievance committees pay attention especially to 2 rules of conduct and 1 regulation governing practice. In practice, it appears to be the case that rules of conduct and regulations do not always provide an unambiguous guide. The domain within which dentists operate is striking. The availability and the accessibility of dentists are not always harmonious with the personal perception of a patient. It is sometimes difficult to find a proper balance between what is a dentist is able to manage and what a patient wants.

  1. Employment-Driven Online Student Attrition and the Assessment Policy Divide: An Australian Open-Access Higher Education Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Catherine; Greenland, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Two hundred and twenty-six qualitative interviews with students studying at Australia's largest online tertiary education organisation, Open Universities Australia (OUA), found that failure to complete assessments due to unexpected and unavoidable employment commitments was the standout reason for dropping out of its open-access courses. The…

  2. Predicting Social Networking Site Use and Online Communication Practices among Adolescents: The Role of Access and Device Ownership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew P. Cingel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Given adolescents' heavy social media use, this study examined a number of predictors of adolescent social media use, as well as predictors of online communication practices. Using data collected from a national sample of 467 adolescents between the ages of 13 and 17, results indicate that demographics, technology access, and technology ownership are related to social media use and communication practices. Specifically, females log onto and use more constructive com-munication practices on Facebook compared to males. Additionally, adolescents who own smartphones engage in more constructive online communication practices than those who share regular cell phones or those who do not have access to a cell phone. Overall, results imply that ownership of mobile technologies, such as smartphones and iPads, may be more predictive of social networking site use and online communication practices than general ownership of technology.

  3. Predicting Social Networking Site Use and Online Communication Practices among Adolescents: The Role of Access and Device Ownership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew P. Cingel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Given adolescents' heavy social media use, this study examined a number of predictors of adolescent social media use, as well as predictors of online communication practices. Using data collected from a national sample of 467 adolescents between the ages of 13 and 17, results indicate that demographics, technology access, and technology ownership are related to social media use and communication practices. Specifically, females log onto and use more constructive communication practices on Facebook compared to males. Additionally, adolescents who own smartphones engage in more constructive online communication practices than those who share regular cell phones or those who do not have access to a cell phone. Overall, results imply that ownership of mobile technologies, such as smartphones and iPads, may be more predictive of social networking site use and online communication practices than general ownership of technology.

  4. Setting-up a European Cross-Provider Data Collection on Open Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalz, Marco; Kreijns, Karel; Walhout, Jaap; Castaño-Munoz, Jonatan; Espasa, Anna; Tovar, Edmundo

    2015-01-01

    While MOOCS have emerged as a new form of open online education around the world, research is stilling lagging behind to come up with a sound theoretical basis that can cover the impact of socio-economic background variables, ICT competences, prior experiences and lifelong learning profile, variance in intentions, environmental influences, outcome…

  5. Patient and provider perspectives on Bedsider.org, an online contraceptive information tool, in a low income, racially diverse clinic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressel, Gregory M; Lundsberg, Lisbet S; Illuzzi, Jessica L; Danton, Cheryl M; Sheth, Sangini S; Xu, Xiao; Gariepy, Aileen

    2014-12-01

    To explore patient and provider perspectives regarding a new Web-based contraceptive support tool. We conducted a qualitative study at an urban Medicaid-based clinic among sexually active women interested in starting a new contraceptive method, clinic providers and staff. All participants were given the opportunity to explore Bedsider, an online contraceptive support tool developed for sexually active women ages 18-29 by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy and endorsed by the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Focus groups were conducted separately among patient participants and clinic providers/staff using open-ended structured interview guides to identify specific themes and key concepts related to use of this tool in an urban clinic setting. Patient participants were very receptive to this online contraceptive support tool, describing it as trustworthy, accessible and empowering. In contrast, clinic providers and staff had concerns regarding the Website's legitimacy, accessibility, ability to empower patients and applicability, which limited their willingness to recommend its use to patients. Contrasting opinions regarding Bedsider may point to a potential disconnect between how providers and patients view contraception information tools. Further qualitative and quantitative studies are needed to explore women's perspectives on contraceptive education and counseling and providers' understanding of these perspectives. This study identifies a contrast between how patients and providers in an urban clinic setting perceive a Web-based contraceptive tool. Given a potential patient-provider discrepancy in preferred methods and approaches to contraceptive counseling, additional research is needed to enhance this important arena of women's health care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Providing Access to Census-based Interaction Data in the UK: That's WICID!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Stillwell

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The Census Interaction Data Service (CIDS is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council in the UK to provide access for social science researchers and students to the detailed migration and journey-to-work statistics that are collected by the national statistical agencies. These interaction data sets are known collectively as the Special Migration Statistics (SMS and the Special Workplace Statistics (SWS. This paper outlines how problems of user access to these data have been tackled through the development of a web-based system known as WICID (Web-based Interface to Census Interaction Data. The paper illustrates various interface features including some of the query building facilities that enable users to extract counts of flows of particular groups of individuals between selected origin and destination areas. New tools are outlined for assisting area selection using digital maps of census geographies, for planning output and for adding value to the data through analysis. Mapping of flows of migrants between London boroughs and the rest of the UK demonstrates the value of the data. The paper begins with a summary of the data sets that are contained within the system and an outline of the system architecture.

  7. Evolution of Network Access Points (NAPs and agreements among Internet Service Providers (ISPs in South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Beltrán

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta los aspectos principales del desarrollo histórico y de asuntos actuales en el mercado suramericano de acceso a Internet: los acuerdos de interconexión para el intercambio de tráfico local y regional en Suramérica, los incentivos que tienen los proveedores de acceso a Internet para mantener o modificar la naturaleza de los acuerdos y los métodos de recuperación de costos en los puntos de intercambio de tráfico. El artículo también identifica algunas amenazas a la estabilidad de los puntos de intercambio de tráfico y las ilustra con dos casos. / This paper presents the main aspects of the historical development and the current issues at stake in the South American Internet access market: the interconnection schemes for the exchange of local and regional traffic in the South American region, the incentives Internet access providers have for keeping or modifying the nature of the agreements, and the cost recovery methods at the traffic exchange points. Some threats to the stability of the scheme for domestic traffic exchange adopted throughout the region are also identified and subsequently illustrated with country-cases.

  8. Patterns in Patient Access and Utilization of Online Medical Records: Analysis of MyChart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redelmeier, Donald A; Kraus, Nicole C

    2018-02-06

    Electronic patient portals provide a new method for sharing personal medical information with individual patients. Our aim was to review utilization patterns of the largest online patient portal in Canada's largest city. We conducted a 4-year time-trend analysis of aggregated anonymous utilization data of the MyChart patient portal at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Ontario, Canada, from January 1, 2012, through December 31, 2015. Prespecified analyses examined trends related to day (weekend vs weekday), season (July vs January), year (2012 vs 2015), and an extreme adverse weather event (ice storm of December 20-26, 2013). Primary endpoints included three measures of patient portal activity: registrations, logins, and pageviews. We identified 32,325 patients who registered for a MyChart account during the study interval. Time-trend analysis showed no sign of attenuating registrations over time. Logins were frequent, averaged 734 total per day, and showed an increasing trend over time. Pageviews mirrored logins, averaged about 3029 total per day, and equated to about 5 pageviews during the average login. The most popular pageviews were clinical notes, followed by laboratory results and medical imaging reports. All measures of patient activity were lower on weekends compared to weekdays (Pmalware attack, or software failure occurred during the study. Online patient portals can provide a popular and reliable system for distributing personal medical information to active patients and may merit consideration for hospitals.

  9. Online genetic counseling from the providers' perspective : counselors' evaluations and a time and cost analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, Ellen; Birnie, Erwin; Ranchor, Adelita V.; van Langen, Irene M.

    Telemedicine applications are increasingly being introduced in patient care in various disciplines, including clinical genetics, mainly to increase access to care and to reduce time and costs for patients and professionals. Most telegenetics reports describe applications in large geographical areas,

  10. Biological approaches for addressing the grand challenge of providing access to clean drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. National Academy of Engineering (NAE) recently published a document presenting "Grand Challenges for Engineering". This list was proposed by leading engineers and scientists from around the world at the request of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF). Fourteen topics were selected for these grand challenges, and at least seven can be addressed using the tools and methods of biological engineering. Here we describe how biological engineers can address the challenge of providing access to clean drinking water. This issue must be addressed in part by removing or inactivating microbial and chemical contaminants in order to properly deliver water safe for human consumption. Despite many advances in technologies this challenge is expanding due to increased pressure on fresh water supplies and to new opportunities for growth of potentially pathogenic organisms. PMID:21453515

  11. Primary Health Care Providers' Perspectives: Facilitating Older Patients' Access to Community Support Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploeg, Jenny; Denton, Margaret; Hutchison, Brian; McAiney, Carrie; Moore, Ainsley; Brazil, Kevin; Tindale, Joseph; Wu, Amina; Lam, Annie

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the study examined in this article was to understand how non-physician health care professionals working in Canadian primary health care settings facilitate older persons' access to community support services (CSSs). The use of CSSs has positive impacts for clients, yet they are underused from lack of awareness. Using a qualitative description approach, we interviewed 20 health care professionals from various disciplines and primary health care models about the processes they use to link older patients to CSSs. Participants collaborated extensively with interprofessional colleagues within and outside their organizations to find relevant CSSs. They actively engaged patients and families in making these linkages and ensured follow-up. It was troubling to find that they relied on out-of-date resources and inefficient search strategies to find CSSs. Our findings can be used to develop resources and approaches to better support primary health care providers in linking older adults to relevant CSSs.

  12. The new transnational payments law and global consumer trade : Online platforms as providers of private legal orders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janczuk, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    This article uses the example of one of the best-known global payment systems provided by an online platform, PayPal, to analyze the role of private legal orders in creating new markets beyond jurisdictional borders. It shows that a relatively uniform legal order reduces risks involved in

  13. The Effectiveness of Instructor Personalized and Formative Feedback Provided by Instructor in an Online Setting: Some Unresolved Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planar, Dolors; Moya, Soledad

    2016-01-01

    Formative feedback has great potential for teaching and learning in online undergraduate programmes. There is a large number of courses where the main source of feedback is provided by the instructor. This is particularly seen in subjects where assessments are designed based on specific activities which are the same for all students, and where the…

  14. Student Access to Online Interaction Technologies: The Impact on Grade Delta Variance and Student Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revels, Mark; Ciampa, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Online learning has significantly changed the educational landscape in recent years, offering advantages to both schools as well as students. Despite the fact that some faculty members are not supportive of online learning, researchers have demonstrated that the quality of online learning to be as effective as classroom learning. It has been…

  15. The climate4impact platform: Providing, tailoring and facilitating climate model data access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagé, Christian; Pagani, Andrea; Plieger, Maarten; Som de Cerff, Wim; Mihajlovski, Andrej; de Vreede, Ernst; Spinuso, Alessandro; Hutjes, Ronald; de Jong, Fokke; Bärring, Lars; Vega, Manuel; Cofiño, Antonio; d'Anca, Alessandro; Fiore, Sandro; Kolax, Michael

    2017-04-01

    One of the main objectives of climate4impact is to provide standardized web services and tools that are reusable in other portals. These services include web processing services, web coverage services and web mapping services (WPS, WCS and WMS). Tailored portals can be targeted to specific communities and/or countries/regions while making use of those services. Easier access to climate data is very important for the climate change impact communities. To fulfill this objective, the climate4impact (http://climate4impact.eu/) web portal and services has been developed, targeting climate change impact modellers, impact and adaptation consultants, as well as other experts using climate change data. It provides to users harmonized access to climate model data through tailored services. It features static and dynamic documentation, Use Cases and best practice examples, an advanced search interface, an integrated authentication and authorization system with the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF), a visualization interface with ADAGUC web mapping tools. In the latest version, statistical downscaling services, provided by the Santander Meteorology Group Downscaling Portal, were integrated. An innovative interface to integrate statistical downscaling services will be released in the upcoming version. The latter will be a big step in bridging the gap between climate scientists and the climate change impact communities. The climate4impact portal builds on the infrastructure of an international distributed database that has been set to disseminate the results from the global climate model results of the Coupled Model Intercomparison project Phase 5 (CMIP5). This database, the ESGF, is an international collaboration that develops, deploys and maintains software infrastructure for the management, dissemination, and analysis of climate model data. The European FP7 project IS-ENES, Infrastructure for the European Network for Earth System modelling, supports the European

  16. Metaboli-Net: online groupware system providing counseling guidance for patients with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwata, Shigeki; Taniguchi, Shin-ichi; Kato, Atsuko; Inoue, Kazuoki; Yamamoto, Naoya; Ohkura, Tsuyoshi; Teramoto, Kei; Shigemasa, Chiaki; Kondoh, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    This study presented a newly developed online groupware system, Metaboli-Net, to yield counseling guidance on diet and exercise to patients with metabolic syndrome. A distinctive feature adopted in the system to maintain the retention rate of patients was the social network service (SNS) that enables the patients to share their dietary and relevant health information with other participants in the same group on the network. A pilot study was conducted to prove the effectiveness of the system in improving the patient's lifestyle and dietary health awareness. SNS also contributed to the participant's adherence to intervention programs.

  17. Robotics and telecommunication systems to provide better access to ultrasound expertise in the OR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, L; Papaspyropoulos, V

    2000-01-01

    Surgery has begun to evolve as a result of the intense use of technological innovations. The result of this is better services for patients and enormous opportunities for the producers of biomedical instruments. The surgeon and the technologist are fast becoming allies in applying the latest developments of robotics, image treatment, simulation, sensors and telecommunications to surgery, in particular to the emerging field of minimally-invasive surgery. Ultrasonography is at present utilised both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in various fields. Intraoperative US examination can be of primary importance, especially when dealing with space-occupying lesions. The widening use of minimally-invasive surgery has furthered the development of US for use during this type of surgery. The success of a US examination requires not only a correct execution of the procedure, but also a correct interpretation of the images. We describe two projects that combine robotics and telecommunication systems to provide better access to US expertise in the operating room. The Midstep project has as its object the realisation of two robotic arms, one for the distant control of the US probe during laparoscopic surgery and the second to perform tele-interventional US. The second project, part of the Strategic CNR Project-'Robotics in Surgery', involves the realisation of a common platform for tracking and targeting surgical instruments in video-assisted surgery.

  18. Providing Open-Access Know How for Directors of Quantitative and Mathematics Support Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schuckers

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this editorial is to introduce the quantitative literacy community to the newly published A Handbook for Directors of Quantitative and Mathematics Centers. QMaSCs (pronounced “Q-masks” can be broadly defined as centers that have supporting students in quantitative fields of study as part of their mission. Some focus only on calculus or mathematics; others concentrate on numeracy or quantitative literacy, and some do all of that. A QMaSC may be embedded in a mathematics department, or part of a learning commons, or a stand-alone center. There are hundreds of these centers in the U.S. The new handbook, which is the outgrowth of a 2013 NSF-sponsored, national workshop attended by 23 QMaSC directors from all quarters of the U.S., is available open access on the USF Scholar Commons and in hard copy from Amazon.com. This editorial by the handbook’s editors provides background and overview of the 20 detailed chapters on center leadership and management; community interactions; staffing, hiring and training; center assessment; and starting a center; and then a collection of ten case studies from research universities, four-year state colleges, liberal arts colleges, and a community college. The editorial ends by pointing out the need and potential benefits of a professional organization for QMaSC directors.

  19. Accessing sexual health information online: use, motivations and consequences for youth with different sexual orientations

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Kimberly J; Ybarra, Michele L.; Korchmaros, Josephine D.; Joseph G. Kosciw

    2013-01-01

    We examine reasons why youth of different sexual orientations look for sexual health information online, and what, if anything, they do with it. The Teen Health and Technology study involved online surveys of 5542 Internet users, ages 13 through 18 in the United States. Searching for sexual health information online was reported frequently and varied significantly by sexual orientation: from 19% of heterosexual youth to 78% of gay/lesbian/queer youth. The most common reasons youth look for se...

  20. Predicting social networking site use and online communication practices among adolescents: the role of Access and device ownership

    OpenAIRE

    Drew P. Cingel; Lauricella, Alexis R.; Ellen Wartella; Annie Conway

    2014-01-01

    Given adolescents' heavy social media use, this study examined a number of predictors of adolescent social media use, as well as predictors of online communication practices. Using data collected from a national sample of 467 adolescents between the ages of 13 and 17, results indicate that demographics, technology access, and technology ownership are related to social media use and communication practices. Specifically, females log onto and use more constructive com-munication practices on Fa...

  1. Predicting social networking site use and online communication practices among adolescents: the role of Access and device ownership

    OpenAIRE

    Drew P. Cingel; Lauricella, Alexis R.; Ellen Wartella; Annie Conway

    2013-01-01

    Given adolescents' heavy social media use, this study examined a number of predictors of adolescent social media use, as well as predictors of online communication practices. Using data collected from a national sample of 467 adolescents between the ages of 13 and 17, results indicate that demographics, technology access, and technology ownership are related to social media use and communication practices. Specifically, females log onto and use more constructive communication practices on Fac...

  2. Providing Online Wave Data For the DanWEC Test Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavelle, John; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    that this document describes will allow developers to access the processed data from the buoy located near Hanstholm, data from the weather station at Hanstholm harbour and the water level in the harbour. As wave energy devices are dependent on the sea condition, the wave parameters are necessary for characterizing......DANWEC will enable wave energy developers located at Hanstholm to share resources, in order to encrease the rate of development of their devices while reducing costs. Hanstholm is located on the north west coast of Denmark; the location of the buoy is shown in figur 1. The website...

  3. CHORUS – providing a scalable solution for public access to scholarly research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Ratner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available CHORUS (Clearinghouse for the Open Research of the United States offers an open technology platform in response to the public access requirements of US federal funding agencies, researchers, institutions and the public. It is focused on five principal sets of functions: 'identification', 'preservation', 'discovery', 'access', and 'compliance' . CHORUS facilitates public access to peer-reviewed publications, after a determined embargo period (where applicable, for each discipline and agency. By leveraging existing tools such as CrossRef, FundRef and ORCID, CHORUS allows a greater proportion of funding to remain focused on research. CHORUS identifies articles that report on federally funded research and enables a reader to access the ‘best available version’ free of charge, via the publisher. It is a scalable solution that offers maximum efficiency for all parties by automating as much of the process as is possible. CHORUS launched in pilot phase in September 2013, and the production phase will begin in early 2014.

  4. Fast Facts about Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Association for K-12 Online Learning, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This report explores the latest data concerning online and blended learning, enrollment, access, courses, and key policies indicators. It also reviews online learning statistics, trends, policy issues, and iNACOL strategic priorities. This report provides a snapshot view of state funding models for both full-time and supplemental online learning…

  5. Copyright in the age of online access : Alternative compensation systems in EU copyright law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Miranda Branco Tomé Quintais, J.P.

    2017-01-01

    The large majority of the EU population uses the Internet. For many individuals, their online acts of enjoyment and expression are restricted by copyright. For users and rights holders alike, the existing model of exclusivity with enforcement is problematic. Online enforcement is either impossible

  6. Multiple Access Points within the Online Classroom: Where Students Look for Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, John; Nordin, Eric J.; Larson, Elizabeth; McIntosh, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of information placement within the confines of the online classroom architecture. Also reviewed was the impact of other variables such as course design, teaching presence and student patterns in looking for information. The sample population included students from a major online university in…

  7. Impact of the 'Providing Access to Continued Education' Programme on Repeat Teenage Pregnancy in the Bahamas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakharkar, V P; Frankson, M A; Sakharkar, P R

    2015-05-15

    To determine the relationship of determinants such as age, ethnicity, education and sexual behaviour with repeat teenage pregnancy and to determine the impact of 'Providing Access to Continued Education' (PACE) programme in reducing repeat teenage pregnancy amongst its participants in The Bahamas. This retrospective cohort study included 397 attendees of the Adolescent Health Centre (AHC). Eighty-eight out of 139 registered participants completed the PACE programme. Data on age, ethnicity, education, sexual behaviour and repeat pregnancy in two years were analysed for descriptive statistics, and association of demographic characteristics and participation in the PACE programme with repeat pregnancy using the Chi-squared test. Mean age of participants was 16.4 ± 1.1 years; median school grade and mean grade point average (GPA) was 11 and 1.97 ± 0.7, respectively. The mean age at the first sexual activity was 14.9 ± 1.2 years. The mean age and number of sexual partners were 21 ± 4.3 years and 2 ± 1, respectively. Overall, repeat pregnancy rate was 39%: 37.4% amongst PACE registered and 31.8% amongst PACE completed mothers. No significant difference was observed in repeat pregnancy between registered and non-registered as well as those who completed the programme and those who did not. The odds ratio of 0.525 suggested that completion of the PACE programme had a moderate protective effect on reducing repeat pregnancy. Age, ethnicity, education and sexual behaviour showed no association with repeat pregnancy. The PACE programme did not reduce repeat pregnancy rate significantly. However, completion of the programme offered a moderate protection.

  8. Online social network use by health care providers in a high traffic patient care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Erik; Light, Jennifer; Paradise Black, Nicole; Thompson, Lindsay

    2013-05-17

    The majority of workers, regardless of age or occupational status, report engaging in personal Internet use in the workplace. There is little understanding of the impact that personal Internet use may have on patient care in acute clinical settings. The objective of this study was to investigate the volume of one form of personal Internet use-online social networking (Facebook)-generated by workstations in the emergency department (ED) in contrast to measures of clinical volume and severity. The research team analyzed anonymous network utilization records for 68 workstations located in the emergency medicine department within one academic medical center for 15 consecutive days (12/29/2009 to 1/12/2010). This data was compared to ED work index (EDWIN) data derived by the hospital information systems. Health care workers spent an accumulated 4349 minutes (72.5 hours) browsing Facebook, staff cumulatively visited Facebook 9369 times and spent, on average, 12.0 minutes per hour browsing Facebook. There was a statistically significant difference in the time spent on Facebook according to time of day (19.8 minutes per hour versus 4.3 minutes per hour, P<.001). There was a significant, positive correlation between EDWIN scores and time spent on Facebook (r=.266, P<.001). Facebook use constituted a substantive percentage of staff time during the 15-day observation period. Facebook use increased with increased patient volume and severity within the ED.

  9. APLIKASI ONLINE PUBLIC ACCESS CATALOQUE (OPAC BERBASIS ANDROID SEBAGAI SARANA TEMU KEMBALI INFORMASI DI PERPUSTAKAAN UNIVERSITAS PENDIDIKAN GANESHA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putu Tika Parmawati

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengembangkan perangkat lunak aplikasi Online Public Access Cataloque (OPAC berbasis android. Jenis penelitian ini merupakan Research and Development (R & D dengan metode pengembangan menggunakan model prototyping. Pengembangan sistem informasi layanan audio visual berbasis video streaming dengan enam tahap, yaitu : 1 Tahap pengumpulan kebutuhan dan perbaikan, 2 Tahap perancangan desain cepat (desain awal, 3 Tahap membangun prototipe, 4 Tahap evaluasi prototype, 5 Tahap perbaikan prototype, dan 6 Tahap rekayasa produk. Penentuan tingkat kelayakan aplikasi Online Public Access Cataloque (OPAC berbasis android berdasarkan uji validasi ahli bidang teknologi informasi dan uji coba terbatas pada pengguna. Hasil uji coba sebagai berikut : 1 Pengembangan aplikasi Online Public Access Cataloque (OPAC berbasis android sudah sesuai dengan spesifikasi yang telah ditentukan sebagai aplikasi penelusuran informasi koleksi buku teks umum secara online melalui smartphone. 2 Indikator penilaian dari program ini adalah kebenaran atau ketepatan operasional sistem, ketegaran, keterluasan, keterpakaian ulang, efisiensi atau kinerja, portabilitas, integritas, modularitas, keterbacaan mendapat kualifikasi cukup baik, sedangkan verifikasi mendapat kualifikasi baik. 3 Secara umum dari hasil penilaian tersebut aplikasi OPAC berbasis android ini cukup layak untuk digunakan sebagai alternatif pelengkap pemberian layanan penelusuran informasi koleksi buku teks umum di Perpustakaan Undiksha. Kata Kunci: OPAC, android, dan temu kembali informasi Abstract Aim of this study to develop the software of Online Public Access Cataloque (OPAC based on android. Research and Development (R & D design was applied in this study which was developed through prototyping models. The software was constructed through six stages, namely: 1 needs analysis and repairment, 2 rapid design (preliminary design, 3 prototypes building, 4 prototype evaluation, 5

  10. Geographic Disparities in Access to Agencies Providing Income-Related Social Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Scott R; Monuteaux, Michael C; Fleegler, Eric W

    2015-10-01

    Geographic location is an important factor in understanding disparities in access to health-care and social services. The objective of this cross-sectional study is to evaluate disparities in the geographic distribution of income-related social service agencies relative to populations in need within Boston. Agency locations were obtained from a comprehensive database of social services in Boston. Geographic information systems mapped the spatial relationship of the agencies to the population using point density estimation and was compared to census population data. A multivariate logistic regression was conducted to evaluate factors associated with categories of income-related agency density. Median agency density within census block groups ranged from 0 to 8 agencies per square mile per 100 population below the federal poverty level (FPL). Thirty percent (n = 31,810) of persons living below the FPL have no access to income-related social services within 0.5 miles, and 77 % of persons living below FPL (n = 83,022) have access to 2 or fewer agencies. 27.0 % of Blacks, 30.1 % of Hispanics, and 41.0 % of non-Hispanic Whites with incomes below FPL have zero access. In conclusion, some neighborhoods in Boston with a high concentration of low-income populations have limited access to income-related social service agencies.

  11. SciELO, Scientific Electronic Library Online, a Database of Open Access Journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogerio Meneghini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available   This essay discusses SciELO, a scientific journal database operating in 14 countries. It covers over 1000 journals providing open access to full text and table sets of scientometrics data. In Brazil it is responsible for a collection of nearly 300 journals, selected along 15 years as the best Brazilian periodicals in natural and social sciences. Nonetheless, they still are national journal in the sense that over 80% of the articles are published by Brazilian scientists. Important initiatives focused on professionalization and internationalization are considered to bring these journals to a higher level of quality and visibility. DOI: 10.18870/hlrc.v3i3.153

  12. Economic Insights into Providing Access to Improved Groundwater Sources in Remote, Low-Resource Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, A.; Lazarovitch, N.; Adar, E.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater is often the most or only feasible drinking water source in remote, low-resource areas. Yet the economics of its development have not been systematically outlined. We applied CBARWI (Cost-Benefit Analysis for Remote Water Improvements), a recently developed Decision Support System, to investigate the economic, physical and management factors related to the costs and benefits of non-networked groundwater supply in remote areas. Synthetic profiles of community water services (n = 17,962), defined across 14 parameters' values and ranges relevant to remote areas, were imputed into the decision framework, and the parameter effects on economic outcomes were investigated through regression analysis (Table 1). Several approaches were included for financing the improvements, after Abramson et al, 2011: willingness-to -pay (WTP), -borrow (WTB) and -work (WTW) in community irrigation (';water-for-work'). We found that low-cost groundwater development approaches are almost 7 times more cost-effective than conventional boreholes fitted with handpumps. The costs of electric, submersible borehole pumps are comparable only when providing expanded water supplies, and off-grid communities pay significantly more for such expansions. In our model, new source construction is less cost-effective than improvement of existing wells, but necessary for expanding access to isolated households. The financing approach significantly impacts the feasibility of demand-driven cost recovery; in our investigation, benefit exceeds cost in 16, 32 and 48% of water service configurations financed by WTP, WTB and WTW, respectively. Regressions of total cost (R2 = 0.723) and net benefit under WTW (R2 = 0.829) along with analysis of output distributions indicate that parameters determining the profitability of irrigation are different from those determining costs and other measures of net benefit. These findings suggest that the cost-benefit outcomes associated with groundwater-based water

  13. Flexible and Lightweight Access Control for Online Healthcare Social Networks in the Context of the Internet of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Qin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Online healthcare social networks (OHSNs play an essential role in sharing information among medical experts and patients who are equipped with similar experiences. To access other patients’ data or experts’ diagnosis anywhere and anytime, it is necessary to integrate the OHSN into the Internet as part of the Internet of Things (IoT. Therefore, it is crucial to design an efficient and versatile access control scheme that can grant and revoke a user to access the OHSN. In this paper, we propose novel attribute-based encryption (ABE features with user revocation and verifiable decryption outsourcing to control the access privilege of the users. The security of the proposed ABE scheme is given in the well-studied random oracle model. With the proposed ABE scheme, the malicious users can be excluded from the system and the user can offload most of the overhead in the decryption to an untrusted cloud server in a verifiable manner. An access control scheme for the OHSN has been given in the context of the IoT based on the proposed ABE scheme. The simulation demonstrates that our access control mechanism is practical.

  14. College Access and Success for Students Experiencing Homelessness: A Toolkit for Educators and Service Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukes, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This toolkit serves as a comprehensive resource on the issue of higher education access and success for homeless students, including information on understanding homeless students, assisting homeless students in choosing a school, helping homeless students pay for application-related expenses, assisting homeless students in finding financial aid…

  15. Barriers to accessing ATLS provider course for junior doctors at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sixty-two percent (65/105) of all respondents had completed their mandatory rotation in surgery. ... The primary barriers for JDs to attending ATLS training is difficulty in accessing the course due to oversubscription, financial reasons, followed by difficulty in obtaining professional development leave due to staff shortage.

  16. Challenges in Providing End-of-Life Care for People with Intellectual Disability: Health Services Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wark, Stuart; Hussain, Rafat; Müller, Arne; Ryan, Peta; Parmenter, Trevor

    2017-01-01

    Background: Increasing life expectancy for people with intellectual disability is resulting in greater need for end-of-life care services. However, limited knowledge is available regarding what barriers to accessing end-of-life care support are evident, particularly comparatively across rural and metropolitan locations. Methods: Focus group…

  17. It's the Law! A Review of the Laws that Provide Americans with Access for All

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The United States is more accessible to deaf and hard of hearing individuals and people with disabilities today than it was 50, 20, or even 10 years ago. A variety of laws ensures equality in the treatment of deaf and hard of hearing people. Communication barriers have been addressed, and wider opportunities are available in education, employment,…

  18. New advanced technologies to provide decentralised and secure access to medical records: case studies in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantin, Catherine; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Allaert, François André; Fassa, Maniane; Bourquard, Karima; Boire, Jean-Yves; de Vlieger, Paul; Maigne, Lydia; Breton, Vincent

    2009-08-07

    The main problem for health professionals and patients in accessing information is that this information is very often distributed over many medical records and locations. This problem is particularly acute in cancerology because patients may be treated for many years and undergo a variety of examinations. Recent advances in technology make it feasible to gain access to medical records anywhere and anytime, allowing the physician or the patient to gather information from an "ephemeral electronic patient record". However, this easy access to data is accompanied by the requirement for improved security (confidentiality, traceability, integrity, ...) and this issue needs to be addressed. In this paper we propose and discuss a decentralised approach based on recent advances in information sharing and protection: Grid technologies and watermarking methodologies. The potential impact of these technologies for oncology is illustrated by the examples of two experimental cases: a cancer surveillance network and a radiotherapy treatment plan. It is expected that the proposed approach will constitute the basis of a future secure "google-like" access to medical records.

  19. Accessing sexual health information online: use, motivations and consequences for youth with different sexual orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Kimberly J; Ybarra, Michele L; Korchmaros, Josephine D; Kosciw, Joseph G

    2014-02-01

    We examine reasons why youth of different sexual orientations look for sexual health information online, and what, if anything, they do with it. The Teen Health and Technology study involved online surveys of 5542 Internet users, ages 13 through 18 in the United States. Searching for sexual health information online was reported frequently and varied significantly by sexual orientation: from 19% of heterosexual youth to 78% of gay/lesbian/queer youth. The most common reasons youth look for sexual health information is for privacy and curiosity. Sexual minority youth are more likely than heterosexual youth to report that they looked for information online because they did not have anyone to ask. Once youth have the information, no differences by sexual orientation were noted as to what they did with it. Instead, seeking out the information for privacy-related reasons and having no one to ask were related to taking some action on the information received. Findings indicate that online information is most valuable to those youth who lack alternatives. Care needs to be taken to help ensure that the sexual health information online is accurate and includes topics specific to sexual minority youth.

  20. Migrant beer promoters' experiences accessing reproductive health care in Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam: lessons for planners and providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Gail C; Spitzer, Denise L; Somrongthong, Ratana; Dat, Truong Cong; Kounnavongsa, Somphone

    2015-03-01

    Migrant beer promoters in Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam were surveyed to determine their experiences in accessing reproductive health care services in the cities of Phnom Penh, Vientiane, Bangkok, and Hanoi. A total of 7 health care institutions were chosen as popular with migrant beer promoters. Staff at these institutions provided information on the institution, and 390 beer promoters were surveyed about their experiences while accessing services. There were discrepancies between findings from the staff interviews and the experiences of the beer promoters. In general, the migrant women were satisfied with the cost, location, friendliness of the health care providers, and knowledge and skills of the providers. They were less positive about confidentiality and waiting times, though many still agreed that these were not an issue. Health care planners and providers should take note of the issues affecting access to reproductive health care services for migrant women when they design and implement services. © 2012 APJPH.

  1. Comparison of adherence to chlamydia screening guidelines among Title X providers and non-Title X providers in the California Family Planning, Access, Care, and Treatment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Joan M; de Bocanegra, Heike Thiel; Hulett, Denis; Park, Hye-Youn; Darney, Philip

    2012-08-01

    Annual chlamydia screening is recommended for adolescent and young adult females and targeted screening is recommended for women ≥26 years based on risk. Although screening levels have increased over time, adherence to these guidelines varies, with high levels of adherence among Title X family planning providers. However, previous studies of provider variation in screening rates have not adjusted for differences in clinic and client population characteristics. Administrative claims from the California Family Planning, Access, Care, and Treatment (Family PACT) program were used to (1) examine clinic and client sociodemographic characteristics by provider group-Title X-funded public sector, non-Title X public sector, and private sector providers, and (2) estimate age-specific screening and differences in rates by provider group during 2009. Among 833 providers, Title X providers were more likely than non-Title X public sector providers and private sector providers to serve a higher client volume, a higher proportion of clients aged ≤25 years, and a higher proportion of African American clients. Non-Title X public providers were more likely to be located in rural areas, compared with Title X grantees and private sector providers. Title X providers had the largest absolute difference in screening rates for young females vs. older females (10.9%). Unadjusted screening rates for young clients were lower among non-Title X public sector providers (54%) compared with private sector and Title X providers (64% each). After controlling for provider group, urban location, client volume, and percent African American, private sector providers had higher screening rates than Title X and non-Title X public providers. Screening rates for females were higher among private providers compared with Title X and non-Title X public providers. However, only Title X providers were more likely to adhere to screening guidelines through high screening rates for young females and low

  2. Patients' perspectives of accessibility and digital delivery of factual content provided by official medical and surgical specialty society websites: a qualitative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ow, Darren; Wetherell, David; Papa, Nathan; Bolton, Damien; Lawrentschuk, Nathan

    2015-03-27

    Health care websites provide a valuable resource of health information to online consumers, especially patients. Official surgical and medical society websites should be a reliable first point of contact. The primary aim of this study was to quantitatively assess medical and surgical society websites for content and highlight the essential features required for a high-quality, user-friendly society website. Twenty specialty association websites from each of the regions, Australia, UK, Canada, Europe, and the USA were selected for a total of 100 websites. Medical and surgical specialities were consistent across each region. Each website was systematically and critically analysed for content and usability. The average points scored per website was 3.2 out of 10. Of the total (N=100) websites, 12 scored at least 7 out of 10 points and 2 scored 9 out of 10. As well, 35% (35.0/100) of the websites had an information tab for patients on their respective homepages while 38% (38.0/100) had download access to patient information. A minority of the websites included different forms of multimedia such as pictures and diagrams (24.0/100, 24%) and videos (18.0/100, 18%). We found that most society websites did not meet an adequate standard for delivery of information. Half of the websites were not patient accessible, with the primary focus being for health professionals. As well, most required logins for information access. Specialty health care societies should create patient-friendly websites that would be beneficial to all online consumers.

  3. Research and Teaching: Exploring the Use of an Online Quiz Game to Provide Formative Feedback in a Large-Enrollment, Introductory Biochemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Rachel; Parrish, Jonathan; Wright, Adrienne; Gnarpe, Judy; Keenan, Louanne

    2015-01-01

    In a large-enrollment, introductory biochemistry course for nonmajors, the authors provide students with formative feedback through practice questions in PDF format. Recently, they investigated possible benefits of providing the practice questions via an online game (Brainspan). Participants were randomly assigned to either the online game group…

  4. Patients, care partners, and shared access to the patient portal: online practices at an integrated health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Jennifer L; Berger, Andrea; Clarke, Deserae; Green, Jamie A; Stametz, Rebecca; Yule, Christina; Darer, Jonathan D

    2016-11-01

    To describe the characteristics and online practices of patients and "care partners" who share explicit access to a patient portal account at a large integrated health system that implemented shared access functionality in 2003. Survey of 323 patients and 389 care partners at Geisinger Health System with linked information regarding access and use of patient portal functionality. Few (0.4%) registered adult patient portal users shared access to their account. Patients varied in age (range: 18-102); more than half had a high school education or less (53.6%). Patient motivations for sharing access included: to help manage care (41.9%), for emergency reasons (29.7%), lack of technology experience (18.4%), or care partner request (10.0%). Care partners were parents (39.8%), adult children (27.9%), spouses (26.2%), and other relatives (6.1%). Patients were more likely than care partners to have inadequate health literacy (54.8% versus 8.8%, P care (53.0% versus 88.1%; P Care partners were more likely than patients to perform health management activities electronically (95.5% versus 48.4%; P access the patient portal (89.2% versus 30.3%; P Care partners used their own credentials (89.1%) and patient credentials (23.3%) to access the patient portal. Shared access is an underused strategy that may bridge patients' health literacy deficits and lack of technology experience and that helps but does not fully resolve concerns regarding patient and care partner identity credentials. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Physical Science Informatics: Providing Open Science Access to Microheater Array Boiling Experiment Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillen, John; Green, Robert D.; Henrie, Ben; Miller, Teresa; Chiaramonte, Fran

    2014-01-01

    The Physical Science Informatics (PSI) system is the next step in this an effort to make NASA sponsored flight data available to the scientific and engineering community, along with the general public. The experimental data, from six overall disciplines, Combustion Science, Fluid Physics, Complex Fluids, Fundamental Physics, and Materials Science, will present some unique challenges. Besides data in textual or numerical format, large portions of both the raw and analyzed data for many of these experiments are digital images and video, requiring large data storage requirements. In addition, the accessible data will include experiment design and engineering data (including applicable drawings), any analytical or numerical models, publications, reports, and patents, and any commercial products developed as a result of the research. This objective of paper includes the following: Present the preliminary layout (Figure 2) of MABE data within the PSI database. Obtain feedback on the layout. Present the procedure to obtain access to this database.

  6. Laws requiring health plans to provide direct access to obstetricians and gynecologists, and use of cancer screening by women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Laurence C; Chan, Jia

    2007-06-01

    Many states have passed legislation mandating that health plans provide direct access to obstetricians/gynecologists (hereinafter "ob/gyns") for women, limiting the ability of plans to require referrals or otherwise restrict access. One benefit of these laws may be improved preventive screening rates, but no literature has examined the relationship between ob/gyn direct access laws and use of breast cancer and cervical cancer screening. We use repeated cross-sections of privately insured women age 18-64 (Pap test) and 40-64 (mammography) from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System for 1996-2000, linked to data on the presence of ob/gyn direct access laws by state. Outcome measures are receipt of mammography and receipt of a Pap test within the past 2 years. Regression analyses are used to assess the relationship between the presence of ob/gyn direct access laws and screening, adjusting for a range of individual characteristics, fixed state characteristics, and time trends. We find no statistically significant relationships between the presence of an ob/gyn direct access law and receipt of either mammography or Pap test screening. We explore a range of alternate specifications and find none that yield clear evidence of a relationship. Laws requiring direct access to ob/gyns are not associated with large or consistent measurable impacts on use of cancer screening.

  7. An Evaluation of the Quality of Nursing Care Provided for Vascular Access in Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Chamanzari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Care for vascular access of patients undergoing hemodialysis is a critical issue. Inflammation and subsequent infection are the major factors which threaten patients' health and diminish effectiveness of hemodialysis. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the severity and incidence of inflammation of vascular access in hemodialysis patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 90 patients undergoing hemodialysis in Emam Reza and Montazerie Hospitals in Mashhad, June, 2014. Evaluation of inflammation severity over the course of one month (12 hemodialysis sessions was performed by means of an inflammation tool designed by the Board of Nursing. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16, and performing descriptive and Chi-square tests.  Results:The mean and standard deviation of incidence of inflammation in the first session of hemodialysis was 3.2±1.3 cases. The mean and standard deviation of the intensity of inflammation was 12.5±4.7. Conclusion: Since inflammation of vascular access in hemodialysis patients impairs their safety and health improvement, necessary measures to reduce this complication must be taken.

  8. Use of an Online Community to Provide Support to Caregivers of People With Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Pagán-Ortiz, Marta E.; Dharma E. Cortés; Rudloff, Noelle; Weitzman, Patricia; Levkoff, Sue

    2014-01-01

    One challenge faced by many family members caring for persons with dementia is lack of information about how to take care of others and themselves. This is especially important for persons from ethnic minority groups, since linguistically and culturally appropriate information is often not available. In response to these needs, we developed a website for Spanish-speaking caregivers. Cuidatecuidador.com provides bilingual information on dementia and caregiver issues. Content was developed and ...

  9. Use of a geographic information system to assess accessibility to health facilities providing emergency obstetric and newborn care in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Mahbub E; Biswas, Taposh K; Rahman, Monjur; Pasha, Kamal; Hossain, Mollah A

    2017-08-01

    To use a geographic information system (GIS) to determine accessibility to health facilities for emergency obstetric and newborn care (EmONC) and compare coverage with that stipulated by UN guidelines (5 EmONC facilities per 500 000 individuals, ≥1 comprehensive). A cross-sectional study was undertaken of all public facilities providing EmONC in 24 districts of Bangladesh from March to October 2012. Accessibility to each facility was assessed by applying GIS to estimate the proportion of catchment population (comprehensive 500 000; basic 100 000) able to reach the nearest facility within 2 hours and 1 hour of travel time, respectively, by existing road networks. The minimum number of public facilities providing comprehensive and basic EmONC services (1 and 5 per 500 000 individuals, respectively) was reached in 16 and 3 districts, respectively. However, after applying GIS, in no district did 100% of the catchment population have access to these services. A minimum of 75% and 50% of the population had accessibility to comprehensive services in 11 and 5 districts, respectively. For basic services, accessibility was much lower. Assessing only the number of EmONC facilities does not ensure universal coverage; accessibility should be assessed when planning health systems. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  10. Developing and Applying Smartphone Apps in Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Gongjun; Rawat, Danda B.; Shi, Hui; Alnusair, Awny

    2014-01-01

    Online courses provide students flexible access to class at anytime and anywhere. Most online courses currently rely on computer-based delivery. However, computers still burden instructors and students with limited mobility and flexibility. To provide more convenient access to online courses, smartphones have been increasingly adopted as a mobile…

  11. Use of an online community to provide support to caregivers of people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagán-Ortiz, Marta E; Cortés, Dharma E; Rudloff, Noelle; Weitzman, Patricia; Levkoff, Sue

    2014-01-01

    One challenge faced by many family members caring for persons with dementia is lack of information about how to take care of others and themselves. This is especially important for persons from ethnic minority groups, because linguistically and culturally appropriate information is often not available. In response to these needs, we developed a web site for Spanish-speaking caregivers. Cuidatecuidador.com provides bilingual information on dementia and caregiver issues. Content was developed and then evaluated by caregivers residing in 3 countries. Findings suggest trends that exposure to information may be related to a higher sense of mastery and a reduction of depressive symptomatology.

  12. Assessment of Web Content Accessibility Levels in Spanish Official Online Education Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig-Vila, Rosabel; Ferrández, Sergio; Ferri-Miralles, Imma

    2014-01-01

    Diversity-based designing, or the goal of ensuring that web-based information is accessible to as many diverse users as possible, has received growing international acceptance in recent years, with many countries introducing legislation to enforce it. This paper analyses web content accessibility levels in Spanish education portals according to…

  13. Geographic Accessibility - Providing government servies in an spatially equitable manner: Perspectives for Fire Station location

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Green, Cheri A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Green1_2012.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 6780 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Green1_2012.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Geographic Accessibility... - Rural 8 878 7 820 28533 Cato Ridge E - Special 45 140 6698 Craigieburn A - High 1 411 160 6698 Craigieburn B - Moderate 177 20 6698 Craigieburn C - Low 28 262 2 460 6698 Craigieburn D - Rural 25 875 10 660 6698 Craigieburn E - Special 2 203 180...

  14. Conversion of tunneled hemodialysis catheter into HeRO device can provide immediate access for hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Julio C; DeLaRosa, Jacob; Rahim, Fahim; Rahim, Naeem

    2010-11-01

    Patients with central venous occlusion who are ''tunneled catheter dependent'' are a challenge for hemodialysis access. A relatively new option for them is the hemodialysis reliable outflow (HeRO) device that can be totally implanted subcutaneously. However, patients still require a tunneled hemodialysis catheter that is used until the HeRO device is mature, 4 to 6 weeks later. Here, we describe a conversion of an existing tunneled hemodialysis catheter into a HeRO device, which was combined with a ''self-sealing'' Flixene graft. This allowed almost immediate use of the HeRO device without the need for placement of a catheter.

  15. A minority research and education information service: Design, develop, pilot test, and implement on-line access for historically black colleges and universities and government agencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodman, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    This Annual Status Report describes the design, development and implementation of the Minority On-Line Information Service (MOLIS) project by Federal Information Exchange, Inc. for the period of April 1, 1991 to March 31, 1992. Summary information detailing developments prior to this reporting period will also be included to establish a comprehensive perspective of the project. The goal of the MOLIS project, was to develop, design, pilot test on-line access to current information on minority colleges and universities and federal minority opportunities. Federal Information Exchange, Inc. (FIE), a diversified information services company recognized by researchers and educators as a leader in the field of information delivery services, was awarded a 5 year small business research grant to develop and implement MOLIS. Since April 29, 1991, the inauguration of its on-line service, MOLIS has provided current information on 138 Black and Hispanic colleges and universities -- including faculty and student profiles, financial data, research centers and equipment information, pre-college and education programs, emerging capabilities, enrollment data, administrative personnel data, and current events -- as well as minority opportunities from 8 participating federal agencies.

  16. Novel WRM-based architecture of hybrid PON featuring online access and full-fiber-fault protection for smart grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingfeng; Gan, Chaoqin; Liu, Zongkang; Yan, Yuqi; Qiao, HuBao

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, a novel architecture of hybrid PON for smart grid is proposed by introducing a wavelength-routing module (WRM). By using conventional optical passive components, a WRM with M ports is designed. The symmetry and passivity of the WRM makes it be easily integrated and very cheap in practice. Via the WRM, two types of network based on different ONU-interconnected manner can realize online access. Depending on optical switches and interconnecting fibers, full-fiber-fault protection and dynamic bandwidth allocation are realized in these networks. With the help of amplitude modulation, DPSK modulation and RSOA technology, wavelength triple-reuse is achieved. By means of injecting signals into left and right branches in access ring simultaneously, the transmission delay is decreased. Finally, the performance analysis and simulation of the network verifies the feasibility of the proposed architecture.

  17. A Survey on the Use of Online Public Access Catalogue among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates the use of Online Public Catalogue (OPAC) by undergraduate students at the Osagyefo Library in the University of Education, Winneba. The objectives of the study, among others, were to ascertain the extent to which students utilise the OPAC, their satisfaction and the challenges they encounter while ...

  18. NHS England Patient Online - Patient Access to their Medical Record in General Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Dale

    2015-10-01

    Patient Online can be promoted quickly and successfully when the clear evidence demonstrates it reduces workload. Its implementation will then result in the improved patient care and changes in behaviour necessary for the NHS National Information Board “Personalised Health and Care 2020” Implementation.

  19. Revisiting the picture-superiority effect in symbolic comparisons: do pictures provide privileged access?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrhein, Paul C; McDaniel, Mark A; Waddill, Paula

    2002-09-01

    In 4 experiments, symbolic comparisons were investigated to test semantic-memory retrieval accounts espousing processing advantages for picture over word stimuli. In Experiment 1, participants judged pairs of animal names or pictures by responding to questions probing concrete or abstract attributes (texture or size, ferocity or intelligence). Per pair, attributes were salient or nonsalient concerning their prerated relevance to animals being compared. Distance (near or far) between attribute magnitudes was also varied. Pictures did not significantly speed responding relative to words across all other variables. Advantages were found forfar attribute magnitudes (i.e., the distance effect) and salient attributes. The distance effect was much less for salient than nonsalient concrete-attribute comparisons. These results were consistently found in additional experiments with increased statistical power to detect modality effects. Our findings argue against dual-coding and some common-code accounts of conceptual attribute processing, urging reexamination of the assumption that pictures confer privileged access to long-term knowledge.

  20. Online Dutch L2 Learning in Adult Education: Educators' and Providers' Viewpoints on Needs, Advantages and Disadvantages

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paepe, Liesbeth; Zhu, Chang; Depryck, Koen

    2018-01-01

    This study critically addresses the assumptions made by educators and providers in the field of Dutch second language (L2) acquisition about the online learning of Dutch L2. These include assumptions about advantages and disadvantages of online language learning, such as flexibility, learner autonomy, enhanced opportunities for remediation and…

  1. Providing rehabilitation online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Malene; Juul, Annegrete

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – Telecare promises to deliver healthcare services more efficiently while, at the same time, improving the quality of care. The purpose of this paper is to challenge these promises by analysing the implications of introducing telecare in the rehabilitation of patients suffering from chron...

  2. Critical Analysis of the Quality, Readability, and Technical Aspects of Online Information Provided for Neck-Lifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayess, Hani; Zuliani, Giancarlo F; Gupta, Amar; Svider, Peter F; Folbe, Adam J; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Carron, Michael A

    2017-03-01

    The number of patients using the internet to obtain health information is growing. This material is unregulated and heterogeneous and can influence patient decisions. To compare the quality, readability, and technical aspects of online information about neck-lifts provided by private practice websites vs academic medical centers and reference sources. In this cross-sectional analysis conducted between November 2015 and January 2016, a Google search of the term neck-lift was performed, and the first 45 websites were evaluated. The websites were categorized as private practice vs other. Private websites (PWs) included sites created by private practice physicians. Other websites (OWs) were created by academic medical centers or reference sources. Quality, readability, and technical aspects of online websites related to neck-lifts. Quality was assessed using the DISCERN criteria and the Health on the Net principles (HONcode). Readability was assessed using 7 validated and widely used criteria. Consensus US reading grade level readability was provided by a website (readabilityformulas.com). Twelve technical aspects were evaluated based on criteria specified by medical website creators. Forty-five websites (8 OWs [18%] and 37 PWs [82%]) were analyzed. There was a significant difference in quality between OWs and PWs based on the DISCERN criteria and HONcode principles. The DISCERN overall mean (SD) scores were 2.3 (0.5) for OWs and 1.3 (0.3) for PWs (P analysis, the mean (SD) was 8.6 (1.8) (range, 5-11) for OW, and the mean (SD) was 5.8 (1.7) (range, 2-9) for PW. The mean (SD) readability consensus reading grade level scores were 11.7 (1.9) for OWs and 10.6 (1.9) for PWs. Of a total possible score of 12, the mean (SD) technical scores were 6.3 (1.8) (range, 4-9) for OWs and 6.4 (1.5) (range, 3-9) for PWs. Compared with PWs, OWs had a significantly higher quality score based on both the DISCERN criteria and HONcode principles. The mean readability for OWs and PWs was

  3. Women's access and provider practices for the case management of malaria during pregnancy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Hill

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: WHO recommends prompt diagnosis and quinine plus clindamycin for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in the first trimester and artemisinin-based combination therapies in subsequent trimesters. We undertook a systematic review of women's access to and healthcare provider adherence to WHO case management policy for malaria in pregnant women. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We searched the Malaria in Pregnancy Library, the Global Health Database, and the International Network for the Rational Use of Drugs Bibliography from 1 January 2006 to 3 April 2014, without language restriction. Data were appraised for quality and content. Frequencies of women's and healthcare providers' practices were explored using narrative synthesis and random effect meta-analysis. Barriers to women's access and providers' adherence to policy were explored by content analysis using NVivo. Determinants of women's access and providers' case management practices were extracted and compared across studies. We did not perform a meta-ethnography. Thirty-seven studies were included, conducted in Africa (30, Asia (4, Yemen (1, and Brazil (2. One- to three-quarters of women reported malaria episodes during pregnancy, of whom treatment was sought by >85%. Barriers to access among women included poor knowledge of drug safety, prohibitive costs, and self-treatment practices, used by 5%-40% of women. Determinants of women's treatment-seeking behaviour were education and previous experience of miscarriage and antenatal care. Healthcare provider reliance on clinical diagnosis and poor adherence to treatment policy, especially in first versus other trimesters (28%, 95% CI 14%-47%, versus 72%, 95% CI 39%-91%, p = 0.02, was consistently reported. Prescribing practices were driven by concerns over side effects and drug safety, patient preference, drug availability, and cost. Determinants of provider practices were access to training and facility type (public versus private. Findings were

  4. Discordant indigenous and provider frames explain challenges in improving access to arthritis care: a qualitative study using constructivist grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Wilfreda E; Coupal, Stephanie; Jones, C Allyson; Crowshoe, Lynden F J; Marshall, Deborah A; Homik, Joanne; Barnabe, Cheryl

    2014-06-11

    Access to health services is a determinant of population health and is known to be reduced for a variety of specialist services for Indigenous populations in Canada. With arthritis being the most common chronic condition experienced by Indigenous populations and causing high levels of disability, it is critical to resolve access disparities through an understanding of barriers and facilitators to care. The objective of this study was to inform future health services reform by investigating health care access from the perspective of Aboriginal people with arthritis and health professionals. Using constructivist grounded theory methodology we investigated Indigenous peoples' experiences in accessing arthritis care through the reports of 16 patients and 15 healthcare providers in Alberta, Canada. Semi-structured interviews were conducted between July 2012 and February 2013 and transcribed verbatim. The patient and provider data were first analyzed separately by two team members then brought together to form a framework. The framework was refined through further analysis following the multidisciplinary research team's discussions. Once the framework was developed, reports on the patient and provider data were shared with each participant group independently and participants were interviewed to assess validity of the summary. In the resulting theoretical framework Indigenous participants framed their experience with arthritis as 'toughing it out' and spoke of racism encountered in the healthcare setting as a deterrent to pursuing care. Healthcare providers were frustrated by high disease severity and missed appointments, and framed Indigenous patients as lacking 'buy-in'. Constraints imposed by complex healthcare systems contributed to tensions between Indigenous peoples and providers. Low specialist care utilization rates among Indigenous people cannot be attributed to cultural and social preferences. Further, the assumptions made by providers lead to stereotyping and

  5. 48 CFR 1837.203-70 - Providing contractors access to sensitive information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... submit with its proposal a preliminary analysis of possible organizational conflicts of interest that... the NASA organizational element or activity that requires specified services to be provided. (3) As... organizational conflicts of interest avoidance plan. (d) This comprehensive plan shall incorporate any previous...

  6. Nectar accessibility determines fitness, flower choice and abundance of hoverflies that provide natural pest control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, P.C.J.; Wäckers, F.L.

    2016-01-01

    1. In modern agricultural landscapes, many organisms providing ecosystem services such as pollination and natural pest control are likely constrained by shortage of nectar and/or pollen required for adult nutrition. More and more flower-rich field margin strips and other habitats are created to

  7. Providing Interactive Access to Cave Geology for All Students, Regardless of Physical Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, C. `; Stredney, D.; Hittle, B.; Irving, K.; Toomey, R. S., III; Lemon, N. N.; Price, A.; Kerwin, T.

    2013-12-01

    Based on an identified need to accommodate students with mobility impairments in field-based instructional experiences, this presentation will discuss current efforts to promote participation, broaden diversity, and impart a historical perspective in the geosciences through the use of an interactive virtual environment. Developed through the integration of emerging simulation technologies, this prototypical virtual environment is created from LIDAR data of the Historic Tour route of Mammoth Cave National Park. The educational objectives of the simulation focus on four primary locations within the tour route that provide evidence of the hydrologic impact on the cave and karst formation. The overall objective is to provide a rich experience of a geological field-based learning for all students, regardless of their physical abilities. Employing a virtual environment that interchangeably uses two and three-dimensional representation of geoscience content, this synthetic field-based cave and karst module will provide an opportunity to assess the effectiveness in engaging the student community, and its efficacy in the curriculum when used as an alternative representation of a traditional field experience. The expected outcome is that based on the level of interactivity, the simulated environment will provide adequate pedagogical representation for content transfer without the need for physical experience in the uncontrolled field environment. Additionally, creating such an environment will impact all able-bodied students by providing supplemental resources that can both precede a traditional field experience and allow for students to re-examine a field site long after a the field experience, in both current formal and informal educational settings.

  8. THE SOCIAL MEDIA IMPACT ON THE STRUCTURE OF TOURISM DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM: ANALYSIS AND CLASSIFICATION OF NEW TOURIST SERVICES PROVIDERS IN THE ENVIRONMENT «ONLINE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    José Ramón Sarmiento Guede

    2016-01-01

    .... Here, Guede identifies the new classification from a qualitative perspective of new tourist service providers in the online environment and analyzes the impact of social network on the structure...

  9. The Marine Realms Information Bank family of digital libraries: access to free online information for coastal and marine science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightsom, Frances L.; Allwardt, Alan O.

    2007-01-01

    Searching the World Wide Web for reliable information about specific topics or locations can be frustrating: too many hits, too little relevance. A well-designed digital library, offering a carefully selected collection of online resources, is an attractive alternative to web search engines. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides three digital libraries for coastal and marine science to serve the needs of a diverse audience--scientists, public servants, educators, and the public.

  10. Access to high-volume surgeons and the opportunity cost of performing radical prostatectomy by low-volume providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzi, Afsaneh; Klein, Eric A; Daneshmand, Siamak; Gill, Inderbir; Quinn, David I; Sadeghi, Sarmad

    2017-07-01

    Evidence suggests that redirecting surgeries to high-volume providers may be associated with better outcomes and significant societal savings. Whether such referrals are feasible remains unanswered. Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data, SEER 18, and US Incidence data were used to determine the geographic distribution and radical prostatectomy volume for providers. Access was defined as availability of a high-volume provider within driving distance of 100 miles. The opportunity cost was defined as the value of benefits achievable by performing the surgery by a high-volume provider that was forgone by not making a referral. The savings per referral were derived from a published Markov model for radical prostatectomy. A total of 14% of providers performed>27% of the radical prostatectomies with>30 cases per year and were designated high-volume providers. Providers with below-median volume (≤16 prostatectomies per year) performed>32% of radical prostatectomies. At least 47% of these were within a 100-mile driving distance (median = 22 miles), and therefore had access to a high-volume provider (>30 prostatectomies per year). This translated into a discounted savings of more than $24 million per year, representing the opportunity cost of not making a referral. The average volume for high- and low-volume providers was 55 and 13, respectively, resulting in an annual experience gap of 43 and a cumulative gap of 125 surgeries over 3 years. In 2014, the number of surgeons performing radical prostatectomy decreased by 5% while the number of high- and low-volume providers decreased by 25% and 11% showing a faster decline in the number of high-volume providers compared with low-volume surgeons. About half of prostatectomies performed by surgeons with below-median annual volume were within a 100-mile driving distance (median of 22 miles) of a high-volume surgeon. Such a referral may result in minimal additional costs and substantially improved outcomes. Copyright

  11. Social Media-Based Collaborative Information Access: Analysis of Online Crisis-Related Twitter Conversations

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, Camille

    2016-01-01

    The notion of implicit (or explicit) collaborative information access refers to systems and practices allowing a group of users to unintentionally (respectively intentionally) seek, share and retrieve information to achieve similar (respectively shared) information-related goals. Despite an increasing adoption in social environments, collaboration behavior in information seeking and retrieval is mainly limited to small-sized groups, generally restricted to working spaces. Much remains to be l...

  12. Design of Novel Online Access and Control Interface for Remote Experiment on DC Drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadeesh Chandra A.P

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Internet has revolutionized the way in which the information is delivered. Laboratory based courses play an important role in technical education. Automation is changing the nature of these laboratories and the system designer’s focus on Internet accessed experiments owing to the availability of several tools to integrate electronic and mechanical hardware with the World Wide Web. Stand-alone approaches in remote learning have grown tremendously in the recent years. One of the important components in remote experimentation is the integration of Virtual Instruments to perform real hardware tasks in near real-time. The paper describes a web interface to the electrical hardware and integration of LabVIEW Virtual Instruments to the remote access and control of DC Drives. Customized electrical hardware serves as the web interface, supporting various features to remotely control and measure the parameters of the electrical machine. Novel techniques have been used to interface a low power data acquisition system with the DC machine driven by the AC power supply. The system uses the client-server architecture to access the web page of the Virtual Instruments through web browser. The developed system imitates the real control of experiment hardware, but being operated remotely through Internet.

  13. Providing access to risk prediction tools via the HL7 XML-formatted risk web service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipman, Jonathan; Drohan, Brian; Blackford, Amanda; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Hughes, Kevin; Bosinoff, Phil

    2013-07-01

    Cancer risk prediction tools provide valuable information to clinicians but remain computationally challenging. Many clinics find that CaGene or HughesRiskApps fit their needs for easy- and ready-to-use software to obtain cancer risks; however, these resources may not fit all clinics' needs. The HughesRiskApps Group and BayesMendel Lab therefore developed a web service, called "Risk Service", which may be integrated into any client software to quickly obtain standardized and up-to-date risk predictions for BayesMendel tools (BRCAPRO, MMRpro, PancPRO, and MelaPRO), the Tyrer-Cuzick IBIS Breast Cancer Risk Evaluation Tool, and the Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool. Software clients that can convert their local structured data into the HL7 XML-formatted family and clinical patient history (Pedigree model) may integrate with the Risk Service. The Risk Service uses Apache Tomcat and Apache Axis2 technologies to provide an all Java web service. The software client sends HL7 XML information containing anonymized family and clinical history to a Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) server, where it is parsed, interpreted, and processed by multiple risk tools. The Risk Service then formats the results into an HL7 style message and returns the risk predictions to the originating software client. Upon consent, users may allow DFCI to maintain the data for future research. The Risk Service implementation is exemplified through HughesRiskApps. The Risk Service broadens the availability of valuable, up-to-date cancer risk tools and allows clinics and researchers to integrate risk prediction tools into their own software interface designed for their needs. Each software package can collect risk data using its own interface, and display the results using its own interface, while using a central, up-to-date risk calculator. This allows users to choose from multiple interfaces while always getting the latest risk calculations. Consenting users contribute their data for future

  14. Examining Internet Access and Social Media Application Use for Online Nutrition Education in SNAP-Ed Participants in Rural Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehmer, Emily; Smith, Sylvia; McCaffrey, Jennifer; Davis, Jeremy

    2018-01-01

    To examine Internet access and interest in receiving nutrition education via social media applications among low-income adults participating in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed). A cross-sectional survey was distributed during 25 SNAP-Ed classes throughout the 16 southernmost counties of Illinois. From 188 responses, the majority of participants had Internet access (76%). Among participants aged 18-32 years (n = 51), 92% owned a smartphone with Internet access and 57% indicated that they would use online nutrition education, with most interest in e-mail (41%), Facebook (40%), and text messaging (35%). There was little interest in using blogs, Vine, Twitter, Tumblr, and Pinterest. Overall, 49% of middle-aged adults aged 33-64 years and 87% of seniors aged ≥65 years reported they would not use online nutrition education. Results indicated similar Internet accessibility in southern Illinois among low-income populations compared with national rural rates. Interest in using online nutrition education varied among SNAP-Ed participants according to age. Young adults appeared to be the most captive audience regarding online nutrition education. Results may be useful to agencies implementing SNAP-Ed to supplement current curriculum with online nutrition education for audiences aged ≤32 years. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Partnering with community agencies to provide nursing students with cultural awareness experiences and refugee health promotion access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Catherine H

    2009-09-01

    Refugees' cultural beliefs, communication barriers, and low health literacy may lead to health disparities within the Western health care system. This article describes a teaching-learning strategy emphasizing the community partnership between a baccalaureate school of nursing, an immigrant-refugee program, and a community literacy program in a rural state. Senior community health nursing students partnered with an immigrant-refugee program and a community literacy program to provide health promotion and prevention services to recently immigrated Hmong and Russian refugees. Priority health needs were identified and culturally appropriate health promotion and prevention education modules were designed and implemented by students. Students collaborated with community agencies and businesses to increase access to health resources for these vulnerable populations. Outcomes were the provision of cultural awareness experiences for nursing students and access to health care with increased knowledge of Western health care practices and beliefs for refugees.

  16. Online 4d Reconstruction Using Multi-Images Available Under Open Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannides, M.; Hadjiprocopi, A.; Doulamis, N.; Doulamis, A.; Protopapadakis, E.; Makantasis, K.; Santos, P.; Fellner, D.; Stork, A.; Balet, O.; Julien, M.; Weinlinger, G.; Johnson, P. S.; Klein, M.; Fritsch, D.

    2013-07-01

    The advent of technology in digital cameras and their incorporation into virtually any smart mobile device has led to an explosion of the number of photographs taken every day. Today, the number of images stored online and available freely has reached unprecedented levels. It is estimated that in 2011, there were over 100 billion photographs stored in just one of the major social media sites. This number is growing exponentially. Moreover, advances in the fields of Photogrammetry and Computer Vision have led to significant breakthroughs such as the Structure from Motion algorithm which creates 3D models of objects using their twodimensional photographs. The existence of powerful and affordable computational machinery not only the reconstruction of complex structures but also entire cities. This paper illustrates an overview of our methodology for producing 3D models of Cultural Heritage structures such as monuments and artefacts from 2D data (pictures, video), available on Internet repositories, social media, Google Maps, Bing, etc. We also present new approaches to semantic enrichment of the end results and their subsequent export to Europeana, the European digital library, for integrated, interactive 3D visualisation within regular web browsers using WebGl and X3D. Our main goal is to enable historians, architects, archaeologists, urban planners and affiliated professionals to reconstruct views of historical structures from millions of images floating around the web and interact with them.

  17. An exploration of on-line access by non-traditional students in higher education: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearnley, Chris; Dunn, Ginny; Watson, Sue

    2006-07-01

    The nature of Higher Education (HE) has seen many changes throughout the last decade. The agenda for widening participation in HE has led to an increase in the number of students with a broader range of educational backgrounds. At the same time there has been a surge in the development of digitalisation and the convergence of computing and telecommunications technologies available for use in education. This paper discusses the outcomes of a case study, conducted in a School of Health Studies within a northern English University, which identified the extent to which 'non-traditional' students access on-line learning facilities, such as virtual learning environments and library networks, and what factors enhanced or formed barriers to access. 'Non-traditional' students, for the purpose of this study, were defined as mature students who were returning to higher education after a considerable break. The outcomes indicated that skill deficit is a major obstacle for many 'non-traditional' students. The paper explores this issue in depth and suggests potential ways forward for the delivery of technology supported learning for 'non-traditional' students in Higher Education.

  18. Cross-discipline investigation of the relationship between academic performance and online resource access by distance education students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Crampton

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Educational technology implementation often owes more to the technical proficiency of the teaching staff and/or the capacity of the institution than to a student outcome-centred design process. Creation of online resources takes considerable time and involves significant cost to both the institution, for devices and platforms, and to students for devices and Internet connectivity charges. Here, we present a cross-discipline investigation of student engagement with a range of simple resources. Our aim was to determining if the provision of such resources had an impact on student academic performance regardless of the students’ level of academic proficiency. This research focused on students studying first-year introductory subjects at a distance (off campus from two different faculties, Arts and Science. Analysis of the web access data from the learning management system (Sakai demonstrated that students who accessed the most resources in terms of diversity and percentage of available resources achieved higher grades. We postulate that the resources prompted students to spend more “time-on-task” and facilitate more active styles of learning. We suggest, however, that students need to be made aware of the value of the resources and how they are best used to enhance academic performance.

  19. [Strategic measures for patient safety in the National Health System: on-line training resources and access to scientific knowledge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novillo-Ortíz, D; Agra, Y; Fernández-Maíllo, M M; del Peso, P; Terol, E

    2008-12-01

    Patient safety (PS) is a priority strategy included in the Quality Plan for the Spanish National Health System and its first objective is to promote PS culture among professionals and patients. The Internet is playing a key role in the access to clinical evidence and in the training of health professionals. A multidisciplinary working group was created, who defined the criteria to help improve clinical practice in the field of patient safety, by making available and using web-based patient safety training resources and information. Taking advantage of the possibilities offered by the Internet in terms of training, two online self-training tutorials were developed on risk management, patient safety and adverse event prevention. A Newsletter was also launched, together with two specific patient safety Supplements. Moreover, to extend the reach of the PS Strategy, a patient safety web page and weblog were created, in addition to a collaborative (internal) working group tool. Excelenciaclinica.net was also developed; a meta-search engine specialized in evidence-based information for health professionals, to make it easier to access reliable and valuable information. Health professionals were also allowed to consult, free of charge, reliable health information resources, such as the GuiaSalud platform, the Cochrane Library Plus and the resources of the Joanna Briggs Institute. The involvement of health professionals in these measures and the role that these measures may be expected to play in the development of a premium-quality health service.

  20. Development of a Website Providing Evidence-Based Information About Nutrition and Cancer: Fighting Fiction and Supporting Facts Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veen, Merel Rebecca; Beijer, Sandra; Adriaans, Anika Maria Alberdina; Vogel-Boezeman, Jeanne; Kampman, Ellen

    2015-09-08

    Although widely available, the general public, cancer patients, and cancer survivors have difficulties accessing evidence-based information on nutrition and cancer. It is challenging to distinguish myths from facts, and sometimes conflicting information can be found in different places. The public and patients would benefit from evidence-based, correct, and clear information from an easily recognizable source. The aim of this project is to make scientific information available for the general public, cancer patients, and cancer survivors through a website. The aim of this paper is to describe and evaluate the development of the website as well as related statistics 1st year after its launch. To develop the initial content for the website, the website was filled with answers to frequently asked questions provided by cancer organizations and the Dutch Dietetic Oncology Group, and by responding to various fiction and facts published in the media. The website was organized into 3 parts, namely, nutrition before (prevention), during, and after cancer therapy; an opportunity for visitors to submit specific questions regarding nutrition and cancer was included. The website was pretested by patients, health care professionals, and communication experts. After launching the website, visitors' questions were answered by nutritional scientists and dieticians with evidence- or eminence-based information on nutrition and cancer. Once the website was live, question categories and website statistics were recorded. Before launch, the key areas for improvement, such as navigation, categorization, and missing information, were identified and adjusted. In the 1st year after the launch, 90,111 individuals visited the website, and 404 questions were submitted on nutrition and cancer. Most of the questions were on cancer prevention and nutrition during the treatment of cancer. The website provides access to evidence- and eminence-based information on nutrition and cancer. As can be

  1. Development of a Website Providing Evidence-Based Information About Nutrition and Cancer: Fighting Fiction and Supporting Facts Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beijer, Sandra; Adriaans, Anika Maria Alberdina; Vogel-Boezeman, Jeanne; Kampman, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Background Although widely available, the general public, cancer patients, and cancer survivors have difficulties accessing evidence-based information on nutrition and cancer. It is challenging to distinguish myths from facts, and sometimes conflicting information can be found in different places. The public and patients would benefit from evidence-based, correct, and clear information from an easily recognizable source. Objective The aim of this project is to make scientific information available for the general public, cancer patients, and cancer survivors through a website. The aim of this paper is to describe and evaluate the development of the website as well as related statistics 1st year after its launch. Methods To develop the initial content for the website, the website was filled with answers to frequently asked questions provided by cancer organizations and the Dutch Dietetic Oncology Group, and by responding to various fiction and facts published in the media. The website was organized into 3 parts, namely, nutrition before (prevention), during, and after cancer therapy; an opportunity for visitors to submit specific questions regarding nutrition and cancer was included. The website was pretested by patients, health care professionals, and communication experts. After launching the website, visitors’ questions were answered by nutritional scientists and dieticians with evidence- or eminence-based information on nutrition and cancer. Once the website was live, question categories and website statistics were recorded. Results Before launch, the key areas for improvement, such as navigation, categorization, and missing information, were identified and adjusted. In the 1st year after the launch, 90,111 individuals visited the website, and 404 questions were submitted on nutrition and cancer. Most of the questions were on cancer prevention and nutrition during the treatment of cancer. Conclusions The website provides access to evidence- and eminence

  2. The Development and Evaluation of an Online Healthcare Toolkit for Autistic Adults and their Primary Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaidis, Christina; Raymaker, Dora; McDonald, Katherine; Kapp, Steven; Weiner, Michael; Ashkenazy, Elesia; Gerrity, Martha; Kripke, Clarissa; Platt, Laura; Baggs, Amelia

    2016-10-01

    The healthcare system is ill-equipped to meet the needs of adults on the autism spectrum. Our goal was to use a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach to develop and evaluate tools to facilitate the primary healthcare of autistic adults. Toolkit development included cognitive interviewing and test-retest reliability studies. Evaluation consisted of a mixed-methods, single-arm pre/post-intervention comparison. A total of 259 autistic adults and 51 primary care providers (PCPs) residing in the United States. The AASPIRE Healthcare toolkit includes the Autism Healthcare Accommodations Tool (AHAT)-a tool that allows patients to create a personalized accommodations report for their PCP-and general healthcare- and autism-related information, worksheets, checklists, and resources for patients and healthcare providers. Satisfaction with patient-provider communication, healthcare self-efficacy, barriers to healthcare, and satisfaction with the toolkit's usability and utility; responses to open-ended questions. Preliminary testing of the AHAT demonstrated strong content validity and adequate test-retest stability. Almost all patient participants (>94 %) felt that the AHAT and the toolkit were easy to use, important, and useful. In pre/post-intervention comparisons, the mean number of barriers decreased (from 4.07 to 2.82, p communication improved (from 30.9 to 32.6, p = 0.03). Patients stated that the toolkit helped clarify their needs, enabled them to self-advocate and prepare for visits more effectively, and positively influenced provider behavior. Most of the PCPs surveyed read the AHAT (97 %), rated it as moderately or very useful (82 %), and would recommend it to other patients (87 %). The CBPR process resulted in a reliable healthcare accommodation tool and a highly accessible healthcare toolkit. Patients and providers indicated that the tools positively impacted healthcare interactions. The toolkit has the potential to reduce barriers to

  3. A Multi-Period Optimization Model for Service Providers Using Online Reservation Systems: An Application to Hotels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Xu

    Full Text Available This paper presents a multi-period optimization model for high margin and zero salvage products in online distribution channels with classifying customers based on number of products required. Taking hotel customers as an example, one is regular customers who reserve rooms for one day, and the other is long term stay (LTS customers who reserve rooms for a number of days. LTS may guarantee a specific amount of demand and generate opportunity income for a certain number of periods, meanwhile with risk of punishment incurred by overselling. By developing an operational optimization model and exploring the effects of parameters on optimal decisions, we suggest that service providers should make decisions based on the types of customers, number of products required, and duration of multi-period to reduce the loss of reputation and obtain more profit; at the same time, multi-period buying customers should buy products early. Finally, the paper conducts a numerical experiment, and the results are consistent with prevailing situations.

  4. A Multi-Period Optimization Model for Service Providers Using Online Reservation Systems: An Application to Hotels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming; Jiao, Yan; Li, Xiaoming; Cao, Qingfeng; Wang, Xiaoyang

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-period optimization model for high margin and zero salvage products in online distribution channels with classifying customers based on number of products required. Taking hotel customers as an example, one is regular customers who reserve rooms for one day, and the other is long term stay (LTS) customers who reserve rooms for a number of days. LTS may guarantee a specific amount of demand and generate opportunity income for a certain number of periods, meanwhile with risk of punishment incurred by overselling. By developing an operational optimization model and exploring the effects of parameters on optimal decisions, we suggest that service providers should make decisions based on the types of customers, number of products required, and duration of multi-period to reduce the loss of reputation and obtain more profit; at the same time, multi-period buying customers should buy products early. Finally, the paper conducts a numerical experiment, and the results are consistent with prevailing situations. PMID:26147663

  5. A Multi-Period Optimization Model for Service Providers Using Online Reservation Systems: An Application to Hotels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming; Jiao, Yan; Li, Xiaoming; Cao, Qingfeng; Wang, Xiaoyang

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-period optimization model for high margin and zero salvage products in online distribution channels with classifying customers based on number of products required. Taking hotel customers as an example, one is regular customers who reserve rooms for one day, and the other is long term stay (LTS) customers who reserve rooms for a number of days. LTS may guarantee a specific amount of demand and generate opportunity income for a certain number of periods, meanwhile with risk of punishment incurred by overselling. By developing an operational optimization model and exploring the effects of parameters on optimal decisions, we suggest that service providers should make decisions based on the types of customers, number of products required, and duration of multi-period to reduce the loss of reputation and obtain more profit; at the same time, multi-period buying customers should buy products early. Finally, the paper conducts a numerical experiment, and the results are consistent with prevailing situations.

  6. SU-E-T-571: Newly Emerging Integrated Transmission Detector Systems Provide Online Quality Assurance of External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, D; Chung, E; Hess, C; Stern, R; Benedict, S [UC Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Two newly emerging transmission detectors positioned upstream from the patient have been evaluated for online quality assurance of external beam radiotherapy. The prototype for the Integral Quality Monitor (IQM), developed by iRT Systems GmbH (Koblenz, Germany) is a large-area ion chamber mounted on the linac accessory tray to monitor photon fluence, energy, beam shape, and gantry position during treatment. The ion chamber utilizes a thickness gradient which records variable response dependent on beam position. The prototype of Delta4 Discover™, developed by ScandiDos (Uppsala, Sweden) is a linac accessory tray mounted 4040 diode array that measures photon fluence during patient treatment. Both systems are employable for patient specific QA prior to treatment delivery. Methods: Our institution evaluated the reproducibility of measurements using various beam types, including VMAT treatment plans with both the IQM ion chamber and the Delta4 Discover diode array. Additionally, the IQM’s effect on photon fluence, dose response, simulated beam error detection, and the accuracy of the integrated barometer, thermometer, and inclinometer were characterized. The evaluated photon beam errors are based on the annual tolerances specified in AAPM TG-142. Results: Repeated VMAT treatments were measured with 0.16% reproducibility by the IQM and 0.55% reproducibility by the Delta4 Discover. The IQM attenuated 6, 10, and 15 MV photon beams by 5.43±0.02%, 4.60±0.02%, and 4.21±0.03% respectively. Photon beam profiles were affected <1.5% in the non-penumbra regions. The IQM’s ion chamber’s dose response was linear and the thermometer, barometer, and inclinometer agreed with other calibrated devices. The device detected variations in monitor units delivered (1%), field position (3mm), single MLC leaf positions (13mm), and photon energy. Conclusion: We have characterized two new transmissions detector systems designed to provide in-vivo like measurements upstream

  7. The Colima Volcano Database: an online tool for a global data access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, L.; Manea, M.; Manea, V.; Norini, G.

    2009-12-01

    The Colima Volcano is currently the most active Mexican volcano. After the 1913 plinian activity, the volcano presented scattered eruptive phases that lasted few years each, but since 1991 its activity became more persistent, with vulcanian eruptions, and extrusion of lava flows and domes. During the last 15 years the volcano suffered several eruptive episodes, as in 1991, 1994, 1998-1999, 2001-2003, 2004 and 2005, with the emplacement of pyroclastic flows. During rain seasons lahars are frequently affecting several infrastructures such as bridges and electric towers. Researchers from different institutions are currently working on several key aspects of the volcano, as remote sensing, field data of old and recent volcaniclastic deposits, structural framework, monitoring (rainfall data and visual observation of lahars), and laboratory experiment (analogue models and numerical simulations). Each investigation is focused on specific processes, but it is fundamental to visualize the global status of the volcano in order to understand its behavior and to mitigate future hazards. The Colima Volcano Database represents an initiative aimed to collect, on a systematic basis, the complete set of data obtained so far on the volcano, and to continuously update the database with new data. All the information is compiled from published works and updated frequently. All maps (such as the geological map of the volcano and the hazard zonations compiled from previous works) and point data (such as stratigraphic sections, sedimentology and diagrams of rainfall intensities) can be viewed with Google Earth and is really straightforward to be access by the scientific community and the general public. In this format everyone with Internet access can view the information and zoom to the scale they wish. The WebGIS is hosted on the Computational Geodynamics Laboratory web server and it is based entirely on Open Source software. The website can be visited at: http://www.geociencias.unam.mx/colima.

  8. Internet-using men who have sex with men would be interested in accessing authorised HIV self-tests available for purchase online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greacen, Tim; Friboulet, David; Blachier, Audrey; Fugon, Lionel; Hefez, Serge; Lorente, Nicolas; Spire, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) recruited in sex venues have been shown to be interested in accessing HIV home-tests if reliable and authorised tests were available. To what extent is this true for MSM recruited online? In an online survey in French on the use of unauthorised HIV home-tests purchased online, MSM previously unaware of the existence of these tests were asked if they would be interested in accessing them if these tests were authorised. Among 5908 non-HIV positive respondents, 86.5% expressed interest. Independent variables associated with interest included: being younger, living in smaller towns, having a job but not tertiary education and living in a conventional family with one's parents or a wife and family. Interested men were also more likely to have never done the standard HIV test or not in the last year, to have casual sex partners but on average not more than once a week, to take sexual risks with these partners, to live their sex-lives with men in absolute secrecy and yet often to try to make a date to see their sex partners again. Of the 5109 respondents interested in accessing self-tests purchasable online, 4362 (85.4%) answered an open question on their reasons for being interested. Using thematic analysis, principle themes identified proved to be similar to those found in earlier studies with MSM recruited in sex venues: convenience, rapidity accessing results and privacy. In answer to a closed question, men not interested chose as reasons: satisfaction with current method, doubts about reliability, not wanting to be alone when discovering results and fear of incorrect use. In conclusion, although the online questionnaire may have introduced selection bias over-representing men already interested, many Internet-using MSM are interested in accessing self-tests available for purchase online.

  9. An Online Health Prevention Intervention for Youth with Addicted or Mentally Ill Parents: Experiences and Perspectives of Participants and Providers from a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolderink, Marla; Bindels, Jill A P M; Evers, Silvia M A A; Paulus, Aggie T G; van Asselt, Antoinette D I; van Schayck, Onno C P

    2015-12-02

    Mental illnesses affect many people around the world, either directly or indirectly. Families of persons suffering from mental illness or addiction suffer too, especially their children. In the Netherlands, 864,000 parents meet the diagnostic criteria for a mental illness or addiction. Evidence shows that offspring of mentally ill or addicted parents are at risk for developing mental disorders or illnesses themselves. The Kopstoring course is an online 8-week group course with supervision by 2 trained psychologists or social workers, aimed to prevent behavioral and psychological problems for children (aged 16 to 25 years) of parents with mental health problems or addictions. The course addresses themes such as roles in the family and mastery skills. An online randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted to assess the effectiveness of the Kopstoring course. The aim was to gain knowledge about expectations, experiences, and perspectives of participants and providers of the online Kopstoring course. A process evaluation was performed to evaluate the online delivery of Kopstoring and the experiences and perspectives of participants and providers of Kopstoring. Interviews were performed with members from both groups. Participants were drawn from a sample from the Kopstoring RCT. Thirteen participants and 4 providers were interviewed. Five main themes emerged from these interviews: background, the requirements for the intervention, experience with the intervention, technical aspects, and research aspects. Overall, participants and providers found the intervention to be valuable because it was online; therefore, protecting their anonymity was considered a key component. Most barriers existed in the technical sphere. Additional barriers existed with conducting the RCT, namely gathering informed consent and gathering parental consent in the case of minors. This study provides valuable insight into participants' and providers' experiences and expectations with the online

  10. Perspectives on providing good access to dental services for elderly people: patient selection, dentists' responsibility and budget management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grytten, Jostein; Holst, Dorthe

    2013-06-01

    To suggest a model for organizing and financing dental services for elderly people so that they have good access to services. There are few studies on how dental services for elderly people should be organized and financed. This is surprising if we take into consideration the fact that the proportion of elderly people is growing faster than any other group in the population, and that elderly people have more dental diseases and poorer access to dental services than the rest of the adult population. In several countries, dental services are characterized by private providers who often operate in a market with competition and free price-setting. Private dentists have no community responsibility, and they are free to choose which patients they treat. Literature review and critical reasoning. In order to avoid patient selection, a patient list system for elderly people is recommended, with per capita remuneration for the patients that the dentist is given responsibility for. The patient list system means that the dentist assumes responsibility for a well-defined list of elderly people. Our model will lead to greater security in the dentist/patient relationship, and patients with great treatment needs will be ensured access to dental services. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Improving Access to Online Health Information With Conversational Agents: A Randomized Controlled Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickmore, Timothy W; Utami, Dina; Matsuyama, Robin; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K

    2016-01-04

    Conventional Web-based search engines may be unusable by individuals with low health literacy for finding health-related information, thus precluding their use by this population. We describe a conversational search engine interface designed to allow individuals with low health and computer literacy identify and learn about clinical trials on the Internet. A randomized trial involving 89 participants compared the conversational search engine interface (n=43) to the existing conventional keyword- and facet-based search engine interface (n=46) for the National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials database. Each participant performed 2 tasks: finding a clinical trial for themselves and finding a trial that met prespecified criteria. Results indicated that all participants were more satisfied with the conversational interface based on 7-point self-reported satisfaction ratings (task 1: mean 4.9, SD 1.8 vs mean 3.2, SD 1.8, Phealth literacy failed to find any trials that satisfied the prespecified criteria for task 2 using the conventional search engine interface, whereas 36% (5/14) were successful at this task using the conversational interface (P=.05). Conversational agents can be used to improve accessibility to Web-based searches in general and clinical trials in particular, and can help decrease recruitment bias against disadvantaged populations.

  12. Online retailing: open all hours?

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis-Chadwick, Fiona

    2008-01-01

    Globally, online retailing has become increasingly important to retailers and consumers. In the UK, the online shopping spend has increased from 0.07% to 7% of the annual retail sales and the consumers' appetite for buying online continues to grow as the internet becomes increasingly accessible, convenient and secure. However, does the internet provide a truly comprehensive shopping experience or are there limitations? A visit to eBay can enable bargain hunters to find almost any product, but...

  13. Free Access Does Not Necessarily Encourage Practitioners to Use Online Evidence Based Information Tools. A Review of: Buchan, H., Lourey, E., D’Este, C., & Sanson-Fisher, R. (2009. Effectiveness of strategies to encourage general practitioners to accept an offer of free access to online evidence-based information: A randomised controlled trial. Implementation Science, 4, article 68.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Ganshorn

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives – To determine which strategies were most effective for encouraging general practitioners (GPs to sign up for free access to an online evidence based information resource; and to determine whether those who accepted the offer differed in their sociodemographic characteristics from those who did not.Design – Descriptive marketing research study.Setting – Australia’s public healthcare system.Subjects – 14,000 general practitioners (GPs from all regions of Australia.Methods – Subjects were randomly selected by Medicare Australia from its list of GPs that bill it for services. Medicare Australia had 18,262 doctors it deemed eligible; 14,000 of these were selected for a stratified random sample. Subjects were randomized to one of 7 groups of 2,000 each. Each group received a different letter offering two years of free access to BMJ Clinical Evidence, an evidence based online information tool. Randomization was done electronically, and the seven groups were stratified by age group, gender, and location. The interventions given to each group differed as follows:• Group 1: Received a letter offering 2 years of free access, with no further demands on the recipient.• Group 2: Received a letter offering 2 years of free access, but on the condition that they complete an initial questionnaire and another one at 12 months, as well as allowing the publisher to provide de-personalized usage data to the researchers.• Group 3: Same as Group 2, but with the additional offer of an online tutorial to assist them with using the resource.• Group 4: Same as Group 2, but with an additional pamphlet with positive testimonials about the resource from Australian medical opinion leaders.• Group 5: Same as Group 2, but with an additional offer of professional development credits towards their required annual totals.• Group 6: Same as Group 2, but with an additional offer to be entered to win a prize of $500 towards registration at a

  14. Collaboratory for Research on Electronic Work. Analysis of JSTOR: The Impact on Scholarly Practice of Access to On-Line Journal Archives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finholt, Thomas A.; Brooks, JoAnn M.

    This study reports on faculty response to the Journal STORage project (JSTOR), an online system for accessing digital back archives of core journals in history and economics. Data were collected about general journal use, Internet use, and JSTOR use via a survey administered to 160 historians and economists at the University of Michigan and at…

  15. The development of a virtual database to provide on-line access to a large archive of clinical data.

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, L. E.; Huff, S.M.; Haug, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    The archival database of the HELP Hospital Information System at LDS Hospital is too large to be stored on line. The archival data are important for clinical and research applications. Demountable disk packs have been used to store the archival database. This method of storage has four significant disadvantages. A virtual database was developed to overcome the limitations of this data-management scheme. This virtual database enables the transparent use of appropriate low-cost network-based st...

  16. Reasons military patients with primary care access leave an emergency department waiting room before seeing a provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varney, Shawn M; Vargas, Toni E; Pitotti, Rebecca L; Bebarta, Vikhyat S

    2012-10-01

    Our objective was to assess patients' understanding of emergency department (ED) wait times and why patients may leave the waiting room before seeing a provider. Survey of patients in the ED waiting room of an urban tertiary care military hospital where civilian and military patients are treated. A total of 508/517 surveys (98%) were completed. Age ranges were 18 to 35 years (49%), 36 to 60 (31%), or older than 60 (20%). Education levels were high school (20%), some college (37%), or college graduate (39%). Of 503 respondents, 125 (25%) had left an ED waiting room before seeing a provider. The reasons included excessive wait times (91%) and family responsibilities (5%). Five hundred eight reported the factors that would motivate them to wait to see the physician (not leave without being seen [LWOBS]) were the severity of illness (64%), and if they received an update of wait times (26%); 82% (391/480) understood that severely ill patients were seen first. Patients attributed long wait times to doctors and nurses caring for other patients (292/583, 50%) and insufficient physician and nurse staffing (245, 42%). Of 802 responses for ideas to improve the wait, 34% said regular updates on estimated wait times, 21% said television shows or movies to view, 20% said books and magazines to read, and 11% said computers to access. Long wait times were the primary reason that patients left before seeing a provider, despite having ready access to care. Respondents attributed long wait times to patient volume and inadequate staffing. Regular updates on wait times and material for entertainment may improve the waiting experience and reduce LWOBS.

  17. Providing the Psychosocial Benefits of Mentoring to Women in STEM: "Career"WISE as an Online Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Amy E.; Bernstein, Bianca L.; Bekki, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter outlines the psychosocial aspects of mentoring that help women combat the barriers they commonly face in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The authors describe the "Career"WISE online resilience training and how it can address the shortage of effective mentors and role models who have been shown to…

  18. A model to identify mathematics topics in MXit lingo to provide tutors quick access to supporting documentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie Butgereit

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Dr MathTM is a mobile, online tutoring system where learners can use MXitTM on their mobile phones to receive help with their mathematics homework from volunteer tutors. These conversations between learners and Dr Math are held in MXit lingo. MXit lingo is a heavily abbreviated, English-like language that is evolving between users of mobile phones that communicate using MXit. The Dr Math project has been running since January 2007 and uses volunteer tutors who are mostly university students who readily understand and use MXit lingo. However, due to the large number of simultaneous conversations that the tutors are often involved in and the diversity of topics discussed, it would often be beneficial to provide assistance regarding the mathematics topic to the tutors. This article explains how the μ model identifies the mathematics topic in the conversation. The model identifies appropriate mathematics topics in just over 75% of conversations in a corpus of conversations identified to be about mathematics topics in the school curriculum.

  19. Social uses of personal health information within PatientsLikeMe, an online patient community: what can happen when patients have access to one another's data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Jeana H; Massagli, Michael P

    2008-05-27

    This project investigates the ways in which patients respond to the shared use of what is often considered private information: personal health data. There is a growing demand for patient access to personal health records. The predominant model for this record is a repository of all clinically relevant health information kept securely and viewed privately by patients and their health care providers. While this type of record does seem to have beneficial effects for the patient-physician relationship, the complexity and novelty of these data coupled with the lack of research in this area means the utility of personal health information for the primary stakeholders-the patients-is not well documented or understood. PatientsLikeMe is an online community built to support information exchange between patients. The site provides customized disease-specific outcome and visualization tools to help patients understand and share information about their condition. We begin this paper by describing the components and design of the online community. We then identify and analyze how users of this platform reference personal health information within patient-to-patient dialogues. Patients diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) post data on their current treatments, symptoms, and outcomes. These data are displayed graphically within personal health profiles and are reflected in composite community-level symptom and treatment reports. Users review and discuss these data within the Forum, private messaging, and comments posted on each other's profiles. We analyzed member communications that referenced individual-level personal health data to determine how patient peers use personal health information within patient-to-patient exchanges. Qualitative analysis of a sample of 123 comments (about 2% of the total) posted within the community revealed a variety of commenting and questioning behaviors by patient members. Members referenced data to locate others with particular

  20. Healthcare decision-tools a growing Web trend: three-pronged public relations campaign heightens presence, recognition for online healthcare information provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Schwartz Communications, LLC, executes a successful PR campaign to position Subimo, a provider of online healthcare decision tools, as a leader in the industry that touts names such as WebMD.com and HealthGrades.com. Through a three-pronged media relations strategy, Schwartz and Subimo together branded the company as an industry thought-leader.

  1. The influence of social media and easily accessible online information on the aesthetic plastic surgery practice: literature review and our own experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montemurro, Paolo; Porcnik, Ales; Hedén, Per; Otte, Maximilian

    2015-04-01

    Patients interested in aesthetic plastic surgery procedures increasingly seek advice on social media and rely on easily accessible online information. The investigatory goal was to determine the impact of this phenomenon on the everyday aesthetic plastic surgery practice. Five hundred consecutive patients completed a questionnaire prior to their consultation with a plastic surgeon at our clinic. A questionnaire was also completed by 128 plastic surgeons practising in 19 different countries. A literature review was performed. Almost all patients (95%) used the internet to collect information prior to consultation, for 68% of them it being their first search method. Social media were used by 46% of patients and 40% of these were strongly influenced when choosing a specific doctor. The majority of plastic surgeons (85%) thought the information found on social media could lead to unrealistic expectations. However, 45% of plastic surgeons believed that their consultations became easier after the advent of social media, 29% found them more difficult. A literature review showed a high percentage of poor quality internet websites regarding plastic surgery and an increase in use of social media among plastic surgeons. The internet and social media play an important and growing role in plastic surgery. This results in more informed patients but may create unrealistic expectations. Even if the internet provides ample information, it cannot replace the face-to-face consultation, which always should remain a detailed process, covering both risks and limitations of alternative procedures. Available literature on how social media influences the medical practice is still scarce and further research is needed. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  2. Teaching Astronomy Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radnofsky, Mary L.; Bobrowsky, Matthew

    This article is intended to provide an overview of the practical, pedagogical, and philosophical considerations in designing a Web-based astronomy course, and to demonstrate the educational benefits that such online courses can afford students. Because online students need to take more responsibility for their learning, faculty must make course expectations extremely clear. Online education allows for increased student participation and equal access to college by such groups as the military, the handicapped, full-time employees, and rural and senior citizens. Teaching the sciences online--especially astronomy--gives students more time to think critically about new information. This article also includes tools, checklists, and resources helpful for introducing faculty to online course development in astronomy.

  3. Evaluation of a Statewide HIV-HCV-STD Online Clinical Education Program by Healthcare Providers - A Comparison of Nursing and Other Disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongwen; Luque, Amneris E

    2016-01-01

    The New York State HIV-HCV-STD Clinical Education Initiative (CEI) has developed a large repository of online resources and disseminated them to a wide range of healthcare providers. To evaluate the CEI online education program and in particular to compare the self-reported measures by clinicians from different disciplines, we analyzed the data from 1,558 course completions in a study period of three months. The results have shown that the overall evaluations by the clinicians were very positive. Meanwhile, there were significant differences across the clinical disciplines. In particular, physicians and nurse practitioners were the most satisfied. In contrast, pharmacists and case/care managers recorded lower than average responses. Nurses and counselors had mixed results. Nurse practitioners' responses were very similar to physicians on most measures, but significantly different from nurses in many aspects. For more effective knowledge dissemination, online education programs should consider the unique needs by clinicians from specific disciplines.

  4. Quantitative Analysis of the Usage of a Pedagogical Tool Combining Questions Listed as Learning Objectives and Answers Provided as Online Videos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odette Laneuville

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To improve the learning of basic concepts in molecular biology of an undergraduate science class, a pedagogical tool was developed, consisting of learning objectives listed at the end of each lecture and answers to those objectives made available as videos online. The aim of this study was to determine if the pedagogical tool was used by students as instructed, and to explore students’ perception of its usefulness. A combination of quantitative survey data and measures of online viewing was used to evaluate the usage of the pedagogical practice. A total of 77 short videos linked to 11 lectures were made available to 71 students, and 64 completed the survey. Using online tracking tools, a total of 7046 views were recorded. Survey data indicated that most students (73.4% accessed all videos, and the majority (98.4% found the videos to be useful in assisting their learning. Interestingly, approximately half of the students (53.1% always or most of the time used the pedagogical tool as recommended, and consistently answered the learning objectives before watching the videos. While the proposed pedagogical tool was used by the majority of students outside the classroom, only half used it as recommended limiting the impact on students’ involvement in the learning of the material presented in class.

  5. Online health information use by participants in selected senior centres in Korea: current status of internet access and health information use by Korean older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Joohyun; Gassert, Carole A; Kim, Hyun Sook

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this research was to describe how older adult internet users from senior centres in Korea accessed and used health information on the internet and the perceived barriers that prevented internet use. Increasingly, patients are using health-related information available on the internet. Internet based health information has influenced patient knowledge and expectations regarding healthcare. However, there are few studies about the use of internet for health information by older adults, and even less is known about older adults in Korea. Based on the Access to Information framework developed by McCreadie and Rice, this quantitative study with a qualitative adjunct explored the older adults' use of internet for health information. A convenience sample of 91 community-dwelling older adults in Korea was recruited from 10 randomly selected senior centres, using the modified Kaiser Family Foundation Survey as the basis for structured interview. Half of older internet users (n = 13) had used online health information and found it was helpful. Barriers to internet use were: no interest (90.8%); too complicated (75%); no experience in using internet (∼50%); too expensive (∼50%); or disability (10%). Qualitative findings revealed that the prime reason for non-use of the internet was related to literacy and level of education due to historical background. The results of quantitative and qualitative analysis supported that the internet users were relatively younger, more educated, male, had a higher income, received more support from others and all from large senior centres. This study is important because the results can provide valuable insights into the potential for health education and health communication for older adults in Korea using the internet. It could affect health promotion, policy and education for older adults in Korea. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Are people with severe mental illness ready for online interventions? Access and use of the Internet in Australian mental health service users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Neil; Foley, Fiona; Lindblom, Katrina; Lee, Stuart

    2017-06-01

    The Internet is increasingly used in mental health service delivery, but there are significant potential barriers to Internet access for persons with severe mental illness (SMI). There is a need to understand this group's access to, and confidence with using, the Internet, and current views on using online resources as part of mental healthcare. A survey was conducted of 100 consumers attending a specialist mental health service in Melbourne, Australia. Approximately three-quarters of participants had regular access to the Internet, and two-thirds used the Internet weekly or more. Half of the sample used email at least weekly, and a third were regular users of social networking sites. Internet access was often via mobile devices. Only a minority of participants used the Internet for mental health information, with video streaming and general websites accessed more often than peer forums for mental health content. Most participants were positive about their mental health worker using tablet computers with them in appointments for delivery of mental health materials. Most people with SMI are active Internet users and, therefore, able to use interventions online.

  7. A multi-step approach to improving NASA Earth Science data access and use for decision support through online and hands-on training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prados, A. I.; Gupta, P.; Mehta, A. V.; Schmidt, C.; Blevins, B.; Carleton-Hug, A.; Barbato, D.

    2014-12-01

    NASA's Applied Remote Sensing Training Program (ARSET), http://arset.gsfc.nasa.gov, within NASA's Applied Sciences Program, has been providing applied remote sensing training since 2008. The goals of the program are to develop the technical and analytical skills necessary to utilize NASA resources for decision-support, and to help end-users navigate through the vast data resources freely available. We discuss our multi-step approach to improving data access and use of NASA satellite and model data for air quality, water resources, disaster, and land management. The program has reached over 1600 participants world wide using a combined online and interactive approach. We will discuss lessons learned as well as best practices and success stories in improving the use of NASA Earth Science resources archived at multiple data centers by end-users in the private and public sectors. ARSET's program evaluation method for improving the program and assessing the benefits of trainings to U.S and international organizations will also be described.

  8. Combining the formative with the summative: the development of a two-stage online test to encourage engagement and provide personal feedback in large classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Voelkel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this action research project was to improve student learning by encouraging more “time on task” and to improve self-assessment and feedback through the introduction of weekly online tests in a Year 2 lecture module in biological sciences. Initially voluntary online tests were offered to students and those who participated achieved higher exam marks than those who did not, but completion rate was low. Making the tests compulsory led to high completion rates, but class performance decreased, indicating that using the same assessment for formative and for summative purposes is not always beneficial for learning. Finally, these problems were resolved by introducing a two-stage approach: the first stage of each test was formative and provided prompt feedback. However, students had to achieve 80% to progress to the second summative stage of the test. The two-stage online tests led to significantly improved class performance. This novel test design ensures that students go through at least two attempts and therefore fully benefit from the learning opportunities presented by the formative stage. Two-stage online tests present the opportunity to provide regular feedback in large classes and to improve performance not only of good but also of “weak” students.

  9. Assessing internet access and use in a medically underserved population: implications for providing enhanced health information services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zach, Lisl; Dalrymple, Prudence W; Rogers, Michelle L; Williver-Farr, Heather

    2012-03-01

    The relationship between health information seeking, patient engagement and health literacy is not well understood. This is especially true in medically underserved populations, which are often viewed as having limited access to health information. To improve communication between an urban health centre and the community it serves, a team of library and information science researchers undertook an assessment of patients' level and methods of access to and use of the Internet. Data were collected in 53 face-to-face anonymous interviews with patients at the centre. Interviews were tape-recorded for referential accuracy, and data were analysed to identify patterns of access and use. Seventy-two percentage of study participants reported having access to the Internet through either computers or cell phones. Barriers to Internet access were predominantly lack of equipment or training rather than lack of interest. Only 21% of those with Internet access reported using the Internet to look for health information. The findings suggest that lack of access to the Internet in itself is not the primary barrier to seeking health information in this population and that the digital divide exists not at the level of information access but rather at the level of information use. © 2011 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2011 Health Libraries Group.

  10. Graduate Business Students Perceptions of Online Learning: A Five Year Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Heidi; Waldman, Lila; Alexander, Melody; Zhao, Jensen

    2008-01-01

    This study compared graduate business students' access to online graduate programs and their perceptions relating to online learning over a five-year period. Student input was provided during 2001 and 2006. Students in 2006 had greater access to entire graduate programs being offered online than did the 2001 students. The students in 2006 felt…

  11. Estimation of the bio-accessible fraction of Cr, As, Cd and Pb in locally available bread using on-line continuous leaching method coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamsal, Ram P; Beauchemin, Diane

    2015-03-31

    A previously developed, efficient and simple on-line leaching method was used to assess the maximum bio-accessible fraction (assuming no synergistic effect from other food and beverage) of potentially toxic elements (Cr, As, Cd and Pb) in whole wheat brown and white bread samples. Artificial saliva, gastric juice and intestinal juice were successively pumped into a mini-column, packed with bread (maintained at 37 °C) connected on-line to the nebulizer of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) instrument equipped with a collision-reaction interface (CRI) using hydrogen as reaction gas to minimize carbon- and chlorine-based polyatomic interferences. In contrast to the conventional batch method to which it was compared, this approach provides real-time monitoring of potentially toxic elements that are continuously released during leaching. Mass balance for both methods was verified at the 95% confidence level. Results obtained from the whole wheat brown and white bread showed that the majority of Cr, Cd and Pb was leached by gastric juice but, in contrast, the majority of As was leached by saliva. While there was higher total content for elements in whole wheat bread than in white bread, a higher percentage of elements were bio-accessible in white bread than in whole wheat bread. Both the on-line and batch methods indicate that 40-98% of toxic elements in bread samples are bio-accessible. While comparison of total analyte concentrations with provisional tolerable daily intake values may indicate some serious health concern for children, when accounting for the bio-accessibility of these elements, bread consumption is found to be safe for all ages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Access to new medications for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis: Patient, provider and community perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Lessem

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB is on the rise, and is difficult to treat. The approval of two new drugs, bedaquiline and delamanid, and growing evidence for the use of linezolid, offer renewed hope for addressing MDR-TB. However, access to these medicines remains a significant challenge. These drugs have not been registered for TB in most settings; barriers to preapproval access persist; and high pricing and intellectual property restrictions limit access. Many unanswered research questions about optimal use of these drugs also limit access, particularly for vulnerable populations. This review outlines challenges in accessing drugs encountered from the perspective of clinicians, patients and affected communities, and offers potential solutions.

  13. Cultural transmission of tool use by Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) provides access to a novel foraging niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krützen, Michael; Kreicker, Sina; MacLeod, Colin D; Learmonth, Jennifer; Kopps, Anna M; Walsham, Pamela; Allen, Simon J

    2014-06-07

    Culturally transmitted tool use has important ecological and evolutionary consequences and has been proposed as a significant driver of human evolution. Such evidence is still scarce in other animals. In cetaceans, tool use has been inferred using indirect evidence in one population of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.), where particular dolphins ('spongers') use marine sponges during foraging. To date, evidence of whether this foraging tactic actually provides access to novel food items is lacking. We used fatty acid (FA) signature analysis to identify dietary differences between spongers and non-spongers, analysing data from 11 spongers and 27 non-spongers from two different study sites. Both univariate and multivariate analyses revealed significant differences in FA profiles between spongers and non-spongers between and within study sites. Moreover, FA profiles differed significantly between spongers and non-spongers foraging within the same deep channel habitat, whereas the profiles of non-spongers from deep channel and shallow habitats at this site could not be distinguished. Our results indicate that sponge use by bottlenose dolphins is linked to significant differences in diet. It appears that cultural transmission of tool use in dolphins, as in humans, allows the exploitation of an otherwise unused niche.

  14. A minority research and education information service: Design, develop, pilot test, and implement on-line access for historically black colleges and universities and government agencies. Annual status report, September 28, 1992--September 27, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodman, J.A.

    1993-08-01

    The goal of the MOLIS project was to develop, design, and pilot test on-line access to current information on minority colleges and universities as well as federal minority opportunities. Federal Information Exchange, Inc. (FIE), a diversified information services company recognized by researchers and educators as a leader in the field of information delivery services, was awarded a 5 year small business research grant to develop and implement MOLIS. Since going on-line on April 29, 1991, MOLIS has provided current information on 138 Black and Hispanic colleges and universities -- including faculty and student profiles, financial data, research centers and equipment information, precollege and education programs, emerging capabilities, enrollment data, administrative personnel data, and current events -- as well as minority opportunities from participating federal agencies. Six federal agencies are currently participating in MOLIS, including: Agency for International Development; Department of Commerce; Department of Energy; Department of Housing and Urban Development; National Aeronautics and Space Administration; and National Science Foundation.

  15. [Online gaming. Potential risk and prevention programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malischnig, Doris

    2014-12-01

    Online gaming is more and more common and increasingly accessible. Due to a lack of social control the participation could be a potential risk for certain customers. The given article focuses on prevention measures that are provided by the Austrian online gaming operator, the Austrian Lotteries, provider of the online gaming platform win2day, in the light of the specifics of Internet gaming in order to avoid problems with gaming.

  16. The IRIS Education and Outreach Program: Providing access to data and equipment for educational and public use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, J.; Toigo, M.; Bravo, T. K.; Hubenthal, M.; McQuillan, P. J.; Welti, R.

    2009-12-01

    The IRIS Education and Outreach Program has been an integral part of IRIS for the past 10 years and during that time has worked to advance awareness and understanding of seismology and earth science while inspiring careers in geophysics. The focus on seismology and the use of seismic data has allowed the IRIS E&O program to develop and disseminate a unique suite of products and services for a wide range of audiences. One result of that effort has been increased access to the IRIS Data Management System by non-specialist audiences and simplified use of location and waveform data. The Seismic Monitor was one of the first Web-based tools for observing near-real-time seismicity. It continues to be the most popular IRIS web page, and thus it presents aspects of seismology to a very wide audience. For individuals interested in more detailed ground motion information, waveforms can be easily viewed using the Rapid Earthquake Viewer, developed by the University of South Carolina in collaboration with IRIS E&O. The Seismographs in Schools program gives schools the opportunity to apply for a low-cost educational seismograph and to receive training for its use in the classroom. To provide better service to the community, a new Seismographs in Schools website was developed in the past year with enhanced functions to help teachers improve their teaching of seismology. The site encourages schools to make use of seismic data and communicate with other educational seismology users throughout the world. Users can view near-real-time displays of other participating schools, upload and download data, and use the “find a teacher” tool to contact nearby schools that also may be operating seismographs. In order to promote and maintain program participation and communication, the site features a discussion forum to encourage and support the growing global community of educational seismograph users. Any data that is submitted to the Seismographs in Schools Website is also accessible

  17. The Economic and Social Benefits and the Barriers of Providing People with Disabilities Accessible Clean Water and Sanitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Wolbring

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Resolution A/HRC/RES/16/2 adopted by the UN Human Rights Council on 8 April 2011 declared access to safe drinking water and sanitation a human right. However many people around the globe including people with disabilities do not have access to safe drinking water, hygiene or sanitation facilities. Inaccessibility of clean water sources, hygiene and sanitation facilities negatively impacts among others health, education, the ability to work, and the ability to partake in social activities. This paper looks at the benefits of, and access barriers to, clean water and sanitation for people with disabilities.

  18. Access, delivery and perceived efficacy of physiotherapy and use of complementary and alternative therapies by people with progressive multiple sclerosis in the United Kingdom: An online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Evan; Coulter, Elaine; Mattison, Paul; McFadyen, Angus; Miller, Linda; Paul, Lorna

    2017-02-01

    All people with progressive MS in the United Kingdom should have access to physiotherapy through the National Health Service (NHS). However levels of access and delivery are unknown. Furthermore there is no research on perceived efficacy of physiotherapy or the use of complementary and alternative medicine in people with progressive MS in the United Kingdom. An online survey was carried out via the UK MS Register. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of progressive MS, a member of UK MS Register and 18 years or older. The survey asked participants regarding access and delivery of physiotherapy; perceived efficacy of physiotherapy and interventions received; barriers to accessing physiotherapy and use of complementary and alternative medicine. The following additional data were supplied from the UK MS Register: demographics, EQ5D, MSIS-29 physical and psychological sub-scales and geographical data. Total number of respondents was 1,298 from an identified 2,538 potential registrants: 87% could access physiotherapy services, 77% received physiotherapy from the NHS and 32% were currently receiving physiotherapy. The most common interventions received were home exercise programme (86%), exercises with a physiotherapist (74%) and advice/education (67%). 40% had recently used complementary and alternative medicine. Perceived efficacy of physiotherapy was high with 70% reporting it to be either 'beneficial' or 'very beneficial'. Main barriers to accessing physiotherapy were mobility, fatigue, continence, transport issues, requiring someone to go with them and pain. Access to physiotherapy was high with most people reporting it as beneficial. However 13% reported not having access indicating a gap in accessibility. Considering some of the barriers reported may allow physiotherapy services to address this gap in accessibility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Educator Uses of Data-Enhanced Investigations for Climate Change Education (DICCE), An Online System for Accessing a Vast Portal of NASA Earth System Data Known As the Goddard Interactive Online Visualization and Analysis Infrastructure (GIOVANNI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalles, D. R.; Acker, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Data-enhanced Investigations for Climate Change Education (DICCE) has made it easier and more technologically feasible for secondary and post-secondary instructors and students to study climate change and related Earth system phenomena using data products from the Goddard Interactive Online Visualization and Analysis Infrastructure (GIOVANNI), a powerful portal of Earth observation data that provides access to numerous data products on Earth system phenomena representing the land biosphere, physical land, ocean biosphere, physical ocean, physical atmosphere, atmospheric gases, and energy and radiation system. These data products are derived from remote-sensing instruments on satellites, ground stations, and data assimilation models. Instructors and students can query the GIOVANNI data archive, then save the results as map images, time series plots, vertical profiles of the atmosphere, and data tables. Any part of the world can be selected for analysis. The project has also produced a tool for instructors to author and adapt standards-based lesson plans, student data investigation activities, and presentations around visualizations they make available to their students via DICCE-G. Supports are provided to students and teachers about how to interpret trends in data products of their choice at the regional level and a schema has been developed to help them understand how those data products fit into current scientific thinking about the certainties and uncertainties of climate change. The presentation will (1) describe the features of DICCE, (2) examples of curricula developed to make use of DICCE in classrooms, (3) how these curricula align to Next Generation Science Standards, and (4) how they align to science education research literature about how to make school science more engaging. Recently-analyzed teacher and student outcomes from DICCE use will also be reported.

  20. A Comparison of Mobile and Fixed Device Access on User Engagement Associated With Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Online Nutrition Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusk, John J; Bensley, Robert J

    2016-11-15

    Online health education has expanded its reach due to cost-effective implementation and demonstrated effectiveness. However, a limitation exists with the evaluation of online health education implementations and how the impact of the system is attenuated by the extent to which a user engages with it. Moreover, the current online health education research does not consider how this engagement has been affected by the transition from fixed to mobile user access over the last decade. This paper focuses on comparing the impact mobile versus fixed devices have on user engagement key performance indicators (KPI) associated with the wichealth website (.org), an Internet-based parent-child feeding intervention offered to clients associated with the US Department of Agriculture's Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). Data were collected from 612,201 nutrition education lessons completed by 305,735 unique WIC participants in 21 states over a 1-year period. Data consisted of system-collected measures, profile items, and items from an exit survey administered at the conclusion of each lesson. User engagement was defined based on 3 KPIs associated with usage of the wichealth website: number of link views, link view time, and progression in stage of readiness to change. Independent samples t tests were used to compare KPIs between fixed only and mobile only device users and paired samples t tests were used to compare KPIs within users who completed at least one lesson each on both a fixed and mobile device. A logistic regression was performed to estimate the odds of KPI performance thresholds in the independent samples study group given access device type while controlling for confounding of user characteristics associated with these KPIs. Analysis of 8 user characteristics (lessons completed, race, ethnicity, language, state of residence, pregnancy status, beginning stage of change, and preferred nutrition education method) were

  1. At the threshold of american personalism: providing the personal access to God’s Word in Elizabethan Bible translations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasyl O. Patsan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at defining the ways to the exposure of theistic basis of personhood which were paved by the personalist philosophy founded in the USA in the late nineteenth – early twentieth centuries. Having become an initiator of historical-philosophical reconstructing the genesis of American personalism in Ukraine, the author actualizes the problem of perceiving the Scripture text by the personalistic trend sprung from the Protestant soil in North America. The article substantiates the approach to reflecting this process based upon the meta-ontology of personality expounded by patristic trinitology at the turn of Antiquity and the Middle Ages and disclosed for rational consciousness of the modern era by the personalistic mode of thinking appealed to Orthodox theology. Prepared by the previous results of the author’s elaboration of the actualized problematics (represented in his publications in Ukrainian and foreign periodical scientific editions the article focuses on the theological foundations of the personalist philosophy of the USA connecting its unsteadiness with the departure of Protestantism from Christian dogmata affirming personal principle of being, Absolute Personality of God and godlikeness of the human person uncovered by the Revelation. Correlating horizons of personalistic perception of God Breathed Book with reconstructions of the Bible topology of personhood which were performed in the Scripture translations providing the personal access to God’s Word, the author analyzes the transmission of Biblical concepts of personal being in English Scripture versions appeared during the reign of Elizabeth I (the Geneva Bible, the Bishops’ Bible, initially accepted by the Protestant denominations of North America and formed the Biblical background of personalistic thinking in the New World. The study reveals the premises of reducing the spiritual source of personality to personalized ratio in the doctrine of the classical

  2. The 3 A's of the access process to long-term care for elderly: providers experiences in a multiple case study in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Lisette; Luijkx, Katrien; Meijboom, Bert; Schols, Jos

    2015-01-01

    The access process is an important step in the care provision to independently living elderly. Still, little attention has been given to the process of access to long-term care for older clients. Access can be described by three dimensions: availability, affordability and acceptability (three A's). In this paper we address the following question: How do care providers take the three dimensions of access into account for the access process to their care and related service provision to independently living elderly? To answer this question we performed a qualitative study. We used data gathered in a multiple case study in the Netherlands. This study provides insight in the way long-term care organizations organize their access process. Not all dimensions were equally present or acknowledged by the case organizations. The dimension acceptability seems an important dimension in the access process, as shown by the efforts done in building a relationship with their clients, mainly through a strong personal relationship between client and care advisor. In that respect it is remarkable that the case organizations do not structurally evaluate their access process. Availability is compromised by practical issues and organizational choices. Affordability hardly seems an issue. Further research can reveal the underlying factors that influence the three A dimensions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cost-Effectiveness of Access Expansion to Treatment of Hepatitis C Virus Infection Through Primary Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattay, Thilo; Dumont, Ian P; Heinzow, Hauke S; Hutton, David W

    2017-12-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major burden on individuals and health care systems. The Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (Project ECHO) enables primary care providers to deliver best-practice care for complex conditions to underserved populations. The US Congress passed the ECHO Act in late 2016, requiring the Department of Health and Human Services to investigate the model. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis to assess diagnosis and treatment of HCV infection in a primary care patient panel with and without the implementation of Project ECHO. We used Markov models to simulate disease progression, quality of life, and life expectancy among individuals with HCV infection and for the general population. Data from the University of New Mexico's ECHO operation for HCV show an increase in treatment rates. Corresponding increases in survival, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), costs, and resulting budget impact between ECHO and non-ECHO patients with HCV were then compared. Project ECHO increased costs and QALYs. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of ECHO was $10,351 per QALY compared with the status quo; >99.9% of iterations fell below the willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000 per QALY. We were unable to confirm whether the increase in rates of treatment associated with Project ECHO were due to increased or more targeted screening, higher adherence, or access to treatment. Our sensitivity analyses show that the results are largely independent of the cause. Budget impact analysis shows payers would have to invest an additional $339.54 million over a 5-year period to increase treatment by 4446 patients, per 1 million covered lives. Using a simulated primary care patient panel, we showed that Project ECHO is a cost-effective way to find and treat patients with HCV infection at scale using existing primary care providers. This approach could substantially reduce the burden of chronic HCV infection in the United States, but high

  4. Melinda - A custom search engine that provides access to locally-developed content using the HL7 Infobutton standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yik-Ki J; Staes, Catherine J

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare organizations use care pathways to standardize care, but once developed, adoption rates often remain low. One challenge for usage concerns clinicians' difficulty in accessing guidance when it is most needed. Although the HL7 'Infobutton Standard' allows clinicians easier access to external references, access to locally-developed resources often requires clinicians to deviate from their normal electronic health record (EHR) workflow to use another application. To address this gap between internal and external resources, we reviewed the literature and existing practices at the University of Utah Health Care. We identify the requirements to meet the needs of a healthcare enterprise and clinicians, describe the design and development of a prototype to aggregate both internal and external resources from within or outside the EHR, and evaluated strengths and limitations of the prototype. The system is functional but not implemented in a live EHR environment. We suggest next steps and enhancements.

  5. S.O.S.: Save Online Services!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura Jeanette

    2004-01-01

    Media specialists across the nation have developed innovate plans to ensure access to Online resources and safeguard them in the midst of the budget crisis, such as evaluating Online service providers involving stakeholders of elementary, middle, and high schools. This plan is aimed to produce valuable services, stronger communication, and an…

  6. Resources and Capabilities of the Department of Veterans Affairs to Provide Timely and Accessible Care to Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Peter S; Ringel, Jeanne S; Ahluwalia, Sangeeta; Price, Rebecca Anhang; Buttorff, Christine; Concannon, Thomas W; Lovejoy, Susan L; Martsolf, Grant R; Rudin, Robert S; Schultz, Dana; Sloss, Elizabeth M; Watkins, Katherine E; Waxman, Daniel; Bauman, Melissa; Briscombe, Brian; Broyles, James R; Burns, Rachel M; Chen, Emily K; DeSantis, Amy Soo Jin; Ecola, Liisa; Fischer, Shira H; Friedberg, Mark W; Gidengil, Courtney A; Ginsburg, Paul B; Gulden, Timothy; Gutierrez, Carlos Ignacio; Hirshman, Samuel; Huang, Christina Y; Kandrack, Ryan; Kress, Amii; Leuschner, Kristin J; MacCarthy, Sarah; Maksabedian, Ervant J; Mann, Sean; Matthews, Luke Joseph; May, Linnea Warren; Mishra, Nishtha; Miyashiro, Lisa; Muchow, Ashley N; Nelson, Jason; Naranjo, Diana; O'Hanlon, Claire E; Pillemer, Francesca; Predmore, Zachary; Ross, Rachel; Ruder, Teague; Rutter, Carolyn M; Uscher-Pines, Lori; Vaiana, Mary E; Vesely, Joseph V; Hosek, Susan D; Farmer, Carrie M

    2016-05-09

    The Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014 addressed the need for access to timely, high-quality health care for veterans. Section 201 of the legislation called for an independent assessment of various aspects of veterans' health care. The RAND Corporation was tasked with an assessment of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) current and projected health care capabilities and resources. An examination of data from a variety of sources, along with a survey of VA medical facility leaders, revealed the breadth and depth of VA resources and capabilities: fiscal resources, workforce and human resources, physical infrastructure, interorganizational relationships, and information resources. The assessment identified barriers to the effective use of these resources and capabilities. Analysis of data on access to VA care and the quality of that care showed that almost all veterans live within 40 miles of a VA health facility, but fewer have access to VA specialty care. Veterans usually receive care within 14 days of their desired appointment date, but wait times vary considerably across VA facilities. VA has long played a national leadership role in measuring the quality of health care. The assessment showed that VA health care quality was as good or better on most measures compared with other health systems, but quality performance lagged at some VA facilities. VA will require more resources and capabilities to meet a projected increase in veterans' demand for VA care over the next five years. Options for increasing capacity include accelerated hiring, full nurse practice authority, and expanded use of telehealth.

  7. New National Cryo-EM Facility Provides Access to Cutting-Edge Technology for Cancer Research Community | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer researchers nationwide now have access to the latest technology in the field of cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM)—the study of protein structures at atomic resolution—at the Frederick National Lab for Cancer Research. The emerging technol

  8. Developing an accessible video player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Rodríguez Soler

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Online Channels in financial institutions allows customers with disabilities to access services in a convenient way for them.However, one of the current challenges of this sector is to improve web accessibility and to incorporate technological resources to provide access to multimedia and video content, which has become a new form of internet communication.The present work shows in detail the strategy followed when designing and developing the new video player used by Bankinter for these purposes.

  9. Evaluation of the role of access providers. Discussion of Dutch Pirate Bay case law and introducing principles on directness, effectiveness, costs, relevance, and time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodder, A.R.; van der Meulen, N.S.

    2013-01-01

    Internet service providers (ISPs) play a pivotal role in contemporary society because they provide access to the Internet. The primary task of ISPs – to blindly transfer information across the network – has recently come under pressure, as has their status as neutral third parties. Both the public

  10. Access and utilisation of primary health care services comparing urban and rural areas of Riyadh Providence, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaqeeh, Ghadah; Cook, Erica J; Randhawa, Gurch; Ali, Nasreen

    2017-02-02

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) has seen an increase in chronic diseases. International evidence suggests that early intervention is the best approach to reduce the burden of chronic disease. However, the limited research available suggests that health care access remains unequal, with rural populations having the poorest access to and utilisation of primary health care centres and, consequently, the poorest health outcomes. This study aimed to examine the factors influencing the access to and utilisation of primary health care centres in urban and rural areas of Riyadh province of the KSA. A questionnaire survey was carried out to identify the barriers and enablers to accessing PHCS in rural (n = 5) and urban (n = 5) areas of Riyadh province, selected on the classification of the population density of the governorates. An adapted version of the NHS National Survey Programme was administered that included 50 questions over 11 sections that assessed a wide range of factors related to respondent's access and experience of the PHCS. A total of 935 responses were obtained with 52.9% (n = 495) from urban areas and the remaining 47.1% (n = 440) from rural areas of Riyadh province. This study highlights that there are high levels of satisfaction among patients among all PHCS. In relation to differences between urban and rural respondents, the findings indicated that there were significant variations in relation to: education level, monthly income, medical investigations, receiving blood tests on time, extra opening hours, distance, cleanliness and health prevention. Core barriers for rural patients related to the distance to reach PHCS, cleanliness of the PHCS, receiving health prevention and promotion services, which should serve to improve health outcomes. This study highlighted important differences in access to and utilisation of PHCS between urban and rural populations in Riyadh province in the KSA. These findings have implications for policy and

  11. A Qualitative Analysis of How Online Access to Mental Health Notes Is Changing Clinician Perceptions of Power and the Therapeutic Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denneson, Lauren M; Cromer, Risa; Williams, Holly B; Pisciotta, Maura; Dobscha, Steven K

    2017-06-14

    As part of the national OpenNotes initiative, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) provides veterans online access to their clinical progress notes, raising concern in mental health settings. The aim of this study was to examine the perspectives and experiences of mental health clinicians with OpenNotes to better understand how OpenNotes may be affecting mental health care. We conducted individual semi-structured interviews with 28 VHA mental health clinicians and nurses. Transcripts were analyzed using a thematic analysis approach, which allows for both inductive and deductive themes to be explored using an iterative, constant comparative coding process. OpenNotes is changing VHA mental health care in ways that mental health clinicians perceive as both challenging and beneficial. At the heart of these changes is a shifting power distribution within the patient-clinician relationship. Some clinicians view OpenNotes as an opportunity to better partner with patients, whereas others feel that it has the potential to undo the therapeutic relationship. Many clinicians are uncomfortable with OpenNotes, but acknowledge that this discomfort could both improve and diminish care and documentation practices. Specifically, we found that (1) OpenNotes is empowering patients, (2) OpenNotes is affecting how clinicians build and maintain the therapeutic relationship, and (3) mental health clinicians are adjusting their practices to protect patients and themselves from adverse consequences of OpenNotes. Our findings suggest that future research should monitor whether OpenNotes notes facilitates stronger patient-clinician relationships, enhancing patient-centered mental health care, or diminishes the quality of mental health care through disruptions in the therapeutic relationship and reduced documentation.

  12. An online virtual-patient program to teach pharmacists and pharmacy students how to provide diabetes-specific medication therapy management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Jessica N; Kieser, Mara A; Bruskiewitz, Ruth H; Pitterle, Michael E; Thorpe, Joshua M

    2012-09-10

    To develop, implement, and assess the effectiveness of an online medication therapy management (MTM) program to train pharmacists and pharmacy students in providing MTM services for patients with diabetes and to increase their intent to perform these services. An online program was created using an Internet-based learning platform to simulate 4 MTM meetings between a pharmacist and a virtual patient diagnosed with diabetes. Eighty students and 42 pharmacists completed the program. After completing the program, scores on post-intervention assessments showed significant improvement in 2 areas: control over performing MTM, and knowledge of how to perform MTM. Students had a significantly less-positive attitude about MTM and a decline in their perception of the social expectation that MTM is part of the practice of pharmacy, while pharmacists' attitudes did not change significantly in these areas. This online program using a virtual patient improved both participants' belief that they have control over performing MTM, and their knowledge of how to perform MTM for diabetic patients, which may increase the likelihood that pharmacists and pharmacy students will perform MTM in the future.

  13. Public Funding and Budgetary Challenges To Providing Universal Access To Primary Education in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omwami, Edith Mukudi; Keller, Edmond J.

    2010-02-01

    Budgetary capacity that would allow for the public funding of the provision of universal access to primary education is lacking in many sub-Saharan economies. National revenues significantly lag behind the overall economic productivity measure of GDP. Analysis of data derived from UNESCO and UNDP for 2004 shows that governments in the region spend far less in US dollars per unit cost on primary education than do developed countries. Increasing the unit cost of education in order to enable a government to guarantee universal primary education would take away resources from other tiers of the education system in many countries in the region. The alternative is to universalise access, despite existing budget allocation constraints, and thereby further compound the problems of poor infrastructure and limited human resource capacity that continue to compromise education quality in sub-Saharan Africa.

  14. Access Denied! Contrasting Data Access in the United States and Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grogan Samuel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability of an Internet user to access data collected about himself as a result of his online activity is a key privacy safeguard. Online, data access has been overshadowed by other protections such as notice and choice. This paper describes attitudes about data access. 873 US and Irish Internet users participated in a survey designed to examine views on data access to information held by online companies and data brokers. We observed low levels of awareness of access mechanisms along with a high desire for access in both participant groups. We tested three proposed access systems in keeping with industry programs and regulatory proposals. User response was positive. We conclude that access remains an important privacy protection that is inadequately manifested in practice. Our study provides insight for lawmakers and policymakers, as well as computer scientists who implement these systems.

  15. Increasing access to sexual health care for rural and regional young people: Similarities and differences in the views of young people and service providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Karen; Harvey, Caroline; Matich, Paula; Page, Priscilla; Jukka, Clare; Hollins, Jane; Larkins, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to describe the views of sexual health service providers on access issues for young people and consider them together with the views of young people themselves. A cross-sectional mixed-methods study design involving semi-structured interviews with health service providers and an electronic survey with young people. Four towns in rural and regional Queensland, Australia. A total of 32 service providers: 9 sexual health nurses, 8 general practitioners, 6 school-based youth health nurses, 5 sexual health educators, 2 Australian Aboriginal health workers and 2 youth workers. There were 391 young people who participated in the Young People's Survey. Themes generated from interviews with service providers and quantitative data from young people addressing access to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services for rural and regional young people. Service providers frequently identified structural barriers, confidentiality and lack of awareness of SRH services as barriers for young people seeking SRH care. Young people also reported that structural factors such as transport, cost and service operating hours were important; however, they placed greater value on personal attributes of service providers, particularly welcoming and non-judgemental attitudes. Health service policy and training focused on attitudinal qualities of individual service providers may improve access to SRH services for young people. Selective staff recruitment and professional development are important to increase sensitivity to youth issues. Promotion of non-judgemental and confidential care may also improve access for youth. © 2015 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  16. Los catalogos en linea de aceso publico en las bibliotecas argentinas concolecciones juridicas Online public access catalogs in argentine libraries with law collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Gregui

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se analizan las interfaces de usuario de los catálogos en línea de acceso público (OPACs en entorno web de las bibliotecas argentinas con colecciones jurídicas, a fin de elaborar un diagnóstico de situación sobre la descripción bibliográfica, el análisis temático, los mensajes de ayuda al usuario y la visualización de los datos bibliográficos. Se adopta una metodología cuali-cuantitativa, se utiliza como instrumento de recolección de datos la lista de funcionalidades del sistema que proporciona Hildreth (1982, se actualiza en función de los nuevos desarrollos y se obtiene un formulario que permite, mediante 38 preguntas cerradas, observar la frecuencia de aparición de las funcionalidades básicas propias de cuatro áreas: Área I - control de operaciones; Área II, subdividida en control de formulación de la búsqueda y punto de acceso; Área III - control de salida y Área IV - asistencia al usuario: información e instrucción. Se trabaja con la información correspondiente a 43 unidades. Los resultados demuestran que la mayoría de los OPACs relevados brindan prestaciones mínimas, por lo que se encuentran en una fase inicial de implementación y no responden, por lo tanto, a las necesidades de los usuarios.User interfaces of web based online public access catalogs (OPACs of Argentine libraries with law collections are studied to provide a diagnosis of the situation of bibliographic description, subject analisis, help messages and bibliographic display. A cuali-cuantitative methodology is adopted and a checklist of systems functions created by Hildreth (1982, updated according to recent advances, has been used as data collection tool. The resulting 38 closed questions checklist has allowed to observe the frequency of appearance of the basic functions of four areas: Area I – operational control; Area II, subdivided in search formulation control and access points; Area III – output control and IV – user assistance

  17. African Journals Online: Estonia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH. AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING AJOL · RESOURCES. African Journals Online: Estonia. Home > African Journals Online: Estonia. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me

  18. African Journals Online: Ireland

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH. AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING AJOL · RESOURCES. African Journals Online: Ireland. Home > African Journals Online: Ireland. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me

  19. A minority research and education information service: Design, develop, pilot test, and implement on-line access for historically black colleges and universities and government agencies. Annual status report, April 1, 1991--March 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodman, J.A.

    1992-06-01

    This Annual Status Report describes the design, development and implementation of the Minority On-Line Information Service (MOLIS) project by Federal Information Exchange, Inc. for the period of April 1, 1991 to March 31, 1992. Summary information detailing developments prior to this reporting period will also be included to establish a comprehensive perspective of the project. The goal of the MOLIS project, was to develop, design, pilot test on-line access to current information on minority colleges and universities and federal minority opportunities. Federal Information Exchange, Inc. (FIE), a diversified information services company recognized by researchers and educators as a leader in the field of information delivery services, was awarded a 5 year small business research grant to develop and implement MOLIS. Since April 29, 1991, the inauguration of its on-line service, MOLIS has provided current information on 138 Black and Hispanic colleges and universities -- including faculty and student profiles, financial data, research centers and equipment information, pre-college and education programs, emerging capabilities, enrollment data, administrative personnel data, and current events -- as well as minority opportunities from 8 participating federal agencies.

  20. A Point to Share: Streamlining Access Services Workflow through Online Collaboration, Communication, and Storage with Microsoft SharePoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffin, Jennifer; Chirombo, Fanuel; Nangle, Dennis; de Jong, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This article explains how the document management team (circulation and interlibrary loan) at the University of Maryland University College implemented Microsoft's SharePoint product to create a central hub for online collaboration, communication, and storage. Enhancing the team's efficiency, organization, and cooperation was the primary goal.…

  1. Barriers to accessing ATLS provider course for junior doctors at a major university hospital in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odendaal, J J; Kong, V Y; Liu, T; Sartorius, B; Oosthuizen, G V; Clarke, D L

    2017-11-01

    Advanced trauma life support (ATLS) is the international standard of care and forms the basis of trauma training in South Africa. Previous local studies demonstrated a low completion rate among junior doctors (JD). This study was designed to determine the reasons and identify possible barriers of JDs to accessing the ATLS course at a major university hospital. This was a prospective study utilising a structured survey that included all JDs who were undertaking their internship training. A total of 105 JDs completed the survey. Sixty-two percent were female (65/105) and the mean age was 25 years. Forty-eight percent (50/105) of all JDs were post graduate year 1 (PGY 1) and the remaining 52% were post graduate year 2 (PGY 2) JDs. Sixty-two percent (65/105) of all respondents had completed their mandatory rotation in surgery. The reasons for non-attendance of ATLS were: unable to secure a place on course (52%), unable to afford course fee (18%), permission for attendance not granted (14%), unable to obtain study leave (10%) and lack of interest (5%). Subgroup analysis comparing the reasons for PGY1s vs PGY2s demonstrated that not being able to secure a place on course was more common among PGY2s [19% vs 33%, p ATLS training is difficulty in accessing the course due to oversubscription, financial reasons, followed by difficulty in obtaining professional development leave due to staff shortage. There is an urgent need to improve access to the ATLS training course for JDs in our environment.

  2. Online Ozonolysis Combined with Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Provides a New Platform for Lipid Isomer Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poad, Berwyck L. J. [Central; Zheng, Xueyun [Biological; Mitchell, Todd W. [School; Smith, Richard D. [Biological; Baker, Erin S. [Biological; Blanksby, Stephen J. [Central

    2017-12-21

    One of the most significant challenges in contemporary lipidomics lies in the separation and identification of lipid isomers that differ only in site(s) of unsaturation or geometric configuration of the carbon-carbon double bonds. While analytical separation techniques including ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and liquid chromatography (LC) can separate isomeric lipids under appropriate conditions, conventional tandem mass spectrometry cannot provide unequivocal identification. To address this challenge, we have implemented ozone-induced dissociation (OzID) in-line with LC, IMS and high resolution mass spectrometry. Modification of an IMS- capable quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer was undertaken to allow the introduction of ozone into the high-pressure trapping ion funnel region preceding the IMS cell. This enabled the novel LC-OzID-IMS-MS configuration where ozonolysis of ionized lipids occurred rapidly (10 ms) without prior mass-selection. LC-elution time alignment combined with accurate mass and arrival time extraction of ozonolysis products facilitated correlation of precursor and product ions without mass-selection (and associated reductions in duty cycle). Unsaturated lipids across 11 classes were examined using this workflow in both positive and negative ion modalities and in all cases the positions of carbon-carbon double bonds were unequivocally assigned based on predictable OzID transitions. Under these conditions geometric isomers exhibited different IMS arrival time distributions and distinct OzID product ion ratios providing a means for discrimination of cis/trans double bonds in complex lipids. The combination of OzID with multidimensional separations shows significant promise for facile profiling of unsaturation patterns within complex lipidomes.

  3. Time to market and patient access to new oncology products in Italy: a multistep pathway from European context to regional health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, P; Mennini, F S; Siviero, P D; Rasi, G

    2010-10-01

    The main purpose of this study was to identify each sequential phase followed by an oncology product, from European assessment until to patient access in each Italian region (IR). A panel of oncology products approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in the period 2006-2008 was considered. The explored sequential phases included the times to market for: the EMA; pharmaceutical companies; the Italian Medicines Agency (Agenzia Italiana del Farmaco, AIFA); and IRs as final providers of health care. The IR's time to market was also analyzed by a Cox regression model. The overall mean time required before patients access was 2.3 years. EMA accounted for the greater proportion of time (31.8%), followed by AIFA (28.2%). However, the duration for both pharmaceutical companies and IRs was associated with the highest variability. An oncology product authorized with a risk-sharing agreement showed an early access in the IRs. On the contrary, the introduction in IRs having a compulsory formulary was delayed. Both a high forecast of economic impact and a high oncology product price can also delay the patient access. The process before patient access to an oncology product is time and cost consuming. This study identifies the main predictors that affect the missing overlap between market and patient access in Italy.

  4. 20 CFR 652.207 - How does a State meet the requirement for universal access to services provided under the Act?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does a State meet the requirement for universal access to services provided under the Act? 652.207 Section 652.207 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT... Act, on a Statewide basis through: (i) Self-service; (ii) Facilitated self-help service; and (iii...

  5. Unifying Water Data Sources: How the CUAHSI Water Data Center is Enabling and Improving Access to a Growing Catalog of over 100 Data Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, J.; Berry, K.; Couch, A.; Arrigo, J.; Hooper, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Scientific data about water are collected and distributed by numerous sources which can differ tremendously in scale. As competition for water resources increases, increasing access to and understanding of information about water will be critical. The mission of the new CUAHSI Water Data Center (WDC) is to provide those researchers who collect data a medium to publish their datasets and give those wanting to discover data the proper tools to efficiently find the data that they seek. These tools include standards-based data publication, data discovery tools based upon faceted and telescoping search, and a data analysis tool HydroDesktop that downloads and unifies data in standardized formats. The CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System (HIS) is a community developed and open source system for sharing water data. As a federated, web service oriented system it enables data publication for a diverse user population including scientific investigators (Research Coordination Networks, Critical Zone Observatories), government agencies (USGS, NASA, EPA), and citizen scientists (watershed associations). HydroDesktop is an end user application for data consumption in this system that the WDC supports. This application can be used for finding, downloading, and analyzing data from the HIS. It provides a GIS interface that allows users to incorporate spatial data that are not accessible via HIS, simple analysis tools to facilitate graphing and visualization, tools to export data to common file types, and provides an extensible architecture that developers can build upon. HydroDesktop, however, is just one example of a data access client for HIS. The web service oriented architecture enables data access by an unlimited number of clients provided they can consume the web services used in HIS. One such example developed at the WDC is the 'Faceted Search Client', which capitalizes upon exploratory search concepts to improve accuracy and precision during search. We highlight such

  6. Online safety

    CERN Document Server

    Healey, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Australians are increasingly connecting online through computers, mobile phones and other electronic devices to access the internet and social media. In the process, young people in particular are becoming more at risk of being exposed to fraud, identity theft, unauthorised access to personal information, stalking, harassment and exposure to illicit or offensive materials. This book presents a range of cybersafety tips to arm readers with an informed awareness of the risks online and offer advice on how to stay protected. A chapter in the book is specifically dedicated to understanding and dea

  7. Online resources for senior citizens

    CERN Document Server

    Sharpe, Charles C

    2006-01-01

    This book facilitates and expands Internet access and usage by seniors, assists them in finding the information they want and need, and contributes to their knowledge of the aging process and the challenges it presents by providing a list of online resources of particular interest to them.

  8. Strategies to Increase Online Student Success for Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Kristen; Cohen, Alex H.; Veit, Daniel P.; Alphin, Henry C., Jr.; Broadus, Chanel; Allen, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Online learning provides extensive opportunities for individuals with disabilities to enroll in degree and certificate programs. However, accessibility must be central to online course development since this can have a profound effect on student engagement, academic performance, and completion rates. This article provides a unique perspective on…

  9. Open Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  10. Increasing Access to Preschool: Recommendations for Reducing Barriers to Providing Full-day, Full-year Programs. Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kate

    2008-01-01

    More than ever before, Californians recognize that preschool provides young children with a strong start in school and life. Research confirms that effective preschool not only prepares children for kindergarten, but benefits them in the long-term. Despite the benefits, only 48% of 3- and 4-year-old children attend preschool in California. While…

  11. Evaluation of online accessed systems: example of qualitative research of Fast Addresses of GeaBios System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Klemen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient online information service user interface enables independent use of these online. Designers of the GeaBios Internet information system intended to evaluate the user-friendliness of their service »Fast adresses« (»Hitri naslovi«. In December 2003, as a research project for a graduation thesis, an evaluation of »Fast adresses« was conducted. The study consisted of 10 study participants performing assigned tasks and a survey of the same individuals. During the study research questions were developed as well as list of tasks to be assigned to the participants for the observations. Each observation was performed using a qualitative research paradigm. This paradigm was enhanced with an adaptation of Shneiderman’s (1998 questionnaire. Identified difficulties participants had in using »Fast adresses« fell into four types: (1 formulation of queries, (2 display of results, (3 the influence of the operating system, Windows, and, (4 the color and design of the display background and elements of the Web page. Results indicate that the difficulties encountered were not limited to the inappropriate design of the user interface, but also are attributable to user error.

  12. The Association of Patient Factors, Digital Access, and Online Behavior on Sustained Patient Portal Use: A Prospective Cohort of Enrolled Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Susan S; Forsberg, Christopher W; Schwartz, Erin C; Nazi, Kim M; Hibbard, Judith H; Houston, Thomas K; Gerrity, Martha

    2017-10-17

    As electronic health records and computerized workflows expand, there are unprecedented opportunities to digitally connect with patients using secure portals. To realize the value of patient portals, initial reach across populations will need to be demonstrated, as well as sustained usage over time. The study aim was to identify patient factors associated with short-term and long-term portal usage after patients registered to access all portal functions. We prospectively followed a cohort of patients at a large Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care facility who recently completed identity proofing to use the VA patient portal. Information collected at baseline encompassed patient factors potentially associated with portal usage, including: demographics, Internet access and use, health literacy, patient activation, and self-reported health conditions. The primary outcome was the frequency of portal log-ins during 6-month and 18-month time intervals after study enrollment. A total of 270 study participants were followed prospectively. Almost all participants (260/268, 97.0%) reported going online, typically at home (248/268, 92.5%). At 6 months, 84.1% (227/270) of participants had visited the portal, with some variation in usage across demographic and health-related subgroups. There were no significant differences in portal log-ins by age, gender, education, marital status, race/ethnicity, distance to a VA facility, or patient activation measure. Significantly higher portal usage was seen among participants using high-speed broadband at home, greater self-reported ability using the Internet, and routinely going online. By 18 months, 91% participants had logged in to the portal, and no significant associations were found between usage and demographics, health status, or patient activation. When examining portal activity between 6 and 18 months, patients who were infrequent or high portal users remained in those categories, respectively. Short-term and long

  13. Online social support networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Neil; Atreja, Ashish

    2015-04-01

    Peer support groups have a long history and have been shown to improve health outcomes. With the increasing familiarity with online social networks like Facebook and ubiquitous access to the Internet, online social support networks are becoming popular. While studies have shown the benefit of these networks in providing emotional support or meeting informational needs, robust data on improving outcomes such as a decrease in health services utilization or reduction in adverse outcomes is lacking. These networks also pose unique challenges in the areas of patient privacy, funding models, quality of content, and research agendas. Addressing these concerns while creating patient-centred, patient-powered online support networks will help leverage these platforms to complement traditional healthcare delivery models in the current environment of value-based care.

  14. Online Training in Specific Meditation Practices Improves Gratitude, Well-Being, Self-Compassion, and Confidence in Providing Compassionate Care Among Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Nisha; Kemper, Kathi J

    2016-04-06

    Mind-body practices that intentionally generate positive emotion could improve health professionals' well-being and compassion. However, the feasibility and impact of clinician training in these practices is unknown. Data were analyzed from 3 online modules offered to health professionals: (a) Gratitude, (b) Positive Word, and (c) Loving-kindness/Compassion meditation. Pairedttests were used to assess pre- to posttraining changes in gratitude (Gratitude Questionnaire), well-being (World Health Organization Well-Being Index), self-compassion (Neff's Self-Compassion Scale), and confidence in providing compassionate care (Confidence in Providing Calm, Compassionate Care Scale). The 177 enrollees included diverse practitioners (nurses, physicians, social workers, and others). Training was associated with statistically significant improvements in gratitude (38.3 ± 4.6 to 39.5 ± 3.3), well-being (16.4 ± 4.0 to 17.9 ± 4.2), self-compassion (39.5 ± 8.1 to 43.1 ± 7.6), and confidence in providing compassionate care (73.3 ± 16.4 to 80.9 ± 13.8;Pgratitude, well-being, self-compassion, and confidence in providing compassionate care. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Los catálogos en línea de acceso público del Mercosur disponibles en entorno web Web accessible online public access catalogs in the Mercosur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Barber

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Se analizan las interfaces de usuario de los catálogos en línea de acceso público (OPACs en entorno web de las bibliotecas universitarias, especializadas, públicas y nacionales de los países parte del Mercosur (Argentina, Brasil, Paraguay, Uruguay, para elaborar un diagnóstico de situación sobre: descripción bibliográfica, análisis temático, mensajes de ayuda al usuario, visualización de datos bibliográficos. Se adopta una metodología cuali-cuantitativa, se utiliza como instrumento de recolección de datos la lista de funcionalidades del sistema que proporciona Hildreth (1982, se actualiza, se obtiene un formulario que permite, mediante 38 preguntas cerradas, observar la frecuencia de aparición de las funcionalidades básicas propias de cuatro áreas: Área I - control de operaciones; Área II - control de formulación de la búsqueda y puntos de acceso; Área III - control de salida y Área IV - asistencia al usuario: información e instrucción. Se trabaja con la información correspondiente a 297 unidades. Se delimitan estratos por tipo de software, tipo de biblioteca y país. Se aplican a los resultados las pruebas de Chi-cuadrado, Odds ratio y regresión logística multinomial. El análisis corrobora la existencia de diferencias significativas en cada uno de los estratos y verifica que la mayoría de los OPACs relevados brindan prestaciones mínimas.User interfaces of web based online public access catalogs (OPACs of academic, special, public and national libraries in countries belonging to Mercosur (Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay are studied to provide a diagnosis of the situation of bibliographic description, subject analisis, help messages and bibliographic display. A cuali-cuantitative methodology is adopted and a checklist of systems functions created by Hildreth (1982 is updated and used as data collection tool. The resulting 38 closed questions checklist has allowed to observe the frequency of appearance of the

  16. Process measures or patient reported experience measures (PREMs) for comparing performance across providers? A study of measures related to access and continuity in Swedish primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenngård, Anna H; Anell, Anders

    2017-09-15

    Aim To study (a) the covariation between patient reported experience measures (PREMs) and registered process measures of access and continuity when ranking providers in a primary care setting, and (b) whether registered process measures or PREMs provided more or less information about potential linkages between levels of access and continuity and explaining variables. Access and continuity are important objectives in primary care. They can be measured through registered process measures or PREMs. These measures do not necessarily converge in terms of outcomes. Patient views are affected by factors not necessarily reflecting quality of services. Results from surveys are often uncertain due to low response rates, particularly in vulnerable groups. The quality of process measures, on the other hand, may be influenced by registration practices and are often more easy to manipulate. With increased transparency and use of quality measures for management and governance purposes, knowledge about the pros and cons of using different measures to assess the performance across providers are important. Four regression models were developed with registered process measures and PREMs of access and continuity as dependent variables. Independent variables were characteristics of providers as well as geographical location and degree of competition facing providers. Data were taken from two large Swedish county councils. Findings Although ranking of providers is sensitive to the measure used, the results suggest that providers performing well with respect to one measure also tended to perform well with respect to the other. As process measures are easier and quicker to collect they may be looked upon as the preferred option. PREMs were better than process measures when exploring factors that contributed to variation in performance across providers in our study; however, if the purpose of comparison is continuous learning and development of services, a combination of PREMs and

  17. Impact of Patient-Centered Care Innovations on Access to Providers, Ambulatory Care Utilization, and Patient Clinical Indicators in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Lisa; Sohn, Min-Woong; Jordan, Neil; Tarlov, Elizabeth; Gampetro, Pamela; LaVela, Sherri L

    2016-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration piloted patient-centered care (PCC) innovations beginning in 2010 to improve patient and provider experience and environment in ambulatory care. We use secondary data to look at longitudinal trends, evaluate system redesign, and identify areas for further quality improvement. This was a retrospective, observational study using existing secondary data from multiple US Department of Veteran Affairs sources to evaluate changes in veteran and facility outcomes associated with PCC innovations at 2 innovation and matched comparison sites between FY 2008-2010 (pre-PCC innovations) and FY 2011-2012 (post-PCC innovations). Outcomes included access to primary care providers (PCPs); primary, specialty, and emergency care use; and clinical indicators for chronic disease. Longitudinal trends revealed a different story at each site. One site demonstrated better PCP access, decrease in emergency and primary care use, increase in specialty care use, and improvement in diabetic glucose control. The other site demonstrated a decrease in PCP access and primary care use, no change in specialty care use, and an increase in diastolic blood pressure in relation to the comparison site. Secondary data analysis can reveal longitudinal trends associated with system changes, thereby informing program evaluation and identifying opportunities for quality improvement.

  18. Vascular access placement in patients with chronic kidney disease Stages 4 and 5 attending an inner city nephrology clinic: a cohort study and survey of providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Narender; Kwon, Caroline; Zachariah, Teena P; Broker, Michael; Folkert, Vaughn W; Bauer, Carolyn; Melamed, Michal L

    2017-01-17

    The majority of incident hemodialysis (HD) patients initiate dialysis via catheters. We sought to identify factors associated with initiating hemodialysis with a functioning arterio-venous (AV) access. We conducted a retrospective chart review of all adult patients, age >18 years seeing a nephrologist with a diagnosis of CKD stage 4 or 5 during the study period between 06/01/2011 and 08/31/2013 to evaluate the placement of an AV access, initiation of dialysis and we conducted a survey of providers about the process. The 221 patients (56% female) in the study had median age of 66 years (interquartile range (IQR), 57-75) and were followed for a median of 1.26 years (IQR 0.6-1.68). At study entry, 81%had CKD stage 4 and 19% had CKD stage 5. By the end of study, 48 patients had initiated dialysis. Thirty-four of the patients started dialysis with a catheter (1 failed and 10 maturing AVFs), 9 with an AVF and 5 with an AVG. During the study period, 61 total AV accesses were placed (54 AVF and 7 AVG). A higher urinary protein/ creatinine ratio and a lower eGFR were associated with AV access placement and dialysis initiation. A greater number of nephrology visits were associated with AV access creation but not dialysis initiation. Hospitalizations and hospitalizations with an episode of acute kidney injury (AKI) were strongly associated with dialysis initiation (odds ratio (OR) 13.0 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.3 to 73.3, p-value = 0.004) and OR 6.6 (95% CI 1.9 to 22.8, p-value = 0.003)). More frequent nephrology clinic visits for patients with a recent hospitalization may improve rates of placement of an AV access. A hospitalization with AKI is strongly associated with the need for dialysis initiation. Nephrologists may not be referring the correct patients to get an AV access surgery.

  19. Comparing Online and Face-to-Face Student Counselling: What Therapeutic Goals Are Identifed and What Are the Implications for Educational Providers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Terry; Ersahin, Zehra; Sefi, Aaron; Hebron, Judith

    2017-01-01

    Online counselling is increasingly being used as an alternative to face-to-face student counselling. Using an exploratory mixed methods design, this project investigated the practice by examining the types of therapeutic goals that 11- to 25-year-olds identify online in routine practice. These goals were then compared to goals identified in…

  20. Combining the Formative with the Summative: The Development of a Two-Stage Online Test to Encourage Engagement and Provide Personal Feedback in Large Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this action research project was to improve student learning by encouraging more "time on task" and to improve self-assessment and feedback through the introduction of weekly online tests in a Year 2 lecture module in biological sciences. Initially voluntary online tests were offered to students and those who participated…

  1. Florentine Renaissance Resources. Online Tratte of Office Holders 1282-1532, Ed. by D. Herlihy, R. Burr Litchfield, A. Molho, R. Barducci, 2000. Online Catasto of 1427, Ed. by D. Herlihy, C. Klapisch-Zuber, Vers. 1.2., Brown University, Providence, R.I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bicchierai

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Florentine Renaissance Resources. - Online Tratte of Office Holders 1282-1532, Edited by David Herlihy, R. Burr Litchfield, Anthony Molho and Roberto Barducci , 2000 - Online Catasto of 1427, Edited by David Herlihy, Christiane Klapisch-Zuber, Version 1.2., Brown University, Providence, R.I. , 1996

  2. Accessibility of services for early infant diagnosis of Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Accessibility of services for early infant diagnosis of Human ... Tanzania Journal of Health Research ... If you would like more information about how to print, save, and work with PDFs, Highwire Press provides a ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  3. [Detection of plasma and urine furosemide based on online enrichment and restricted- access media coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Rong; Xie, Hua; Yin, Qiang; Li, Wen-Bin; Jia, Zheng-Ping; Zhang, Juan-Hong

    2014-10-01

    To establish a method based on restricted access media-high performance liquid chromatography for direct online sample injection and detection of plasma and urine furosemide in rats. The column of restricted access media was used as the pre-treatment column and a C18 column as the analytical column. The mobile phase of the pre- treatment column was water-methanol (95:5, V/V) with a volume percentage of formic acid of 0.1%. The mobile phase of the analytical column was methanol-water (65:35, V/V) for plasma and methanol-water (55:45, V/V) for urine samples, all containing a volume percentage of formic acid of 0.1% with a flow rate of 1 ml/min. The detection wavelength was 274 nm and the column temperature was maintained at 25 degrees celsius. The calibration curve showed an excellent linear relationship in rat plasma furosemide concentration range of 0.1-3.2 µg/ml (r=0.9995) and in urine concentration range of 0.5-32 µg/ml (r=0.9991). The average recoveries of furosemide at 3 spiked levels ranged from 101.82% to 113.36% for plasma and from 98.75% to 112.27% for urine samples. The detection showed good intra- and inter-day assay precisions and accuracies with the relative standard deviations all below 5%. The pharmacokinetic parameters AUC(0→24) was 6.265 g/(ml·h) with a t(1/2) of 2.447 h and a C(Max) of 1.414 g/ml. The mean cumulative excretory rate of furosemide in the urine of rats over 24 h was 32.50%-39.08%. Detection of furosemide in plasma and urine samples using restricted access media-high performance liquid chromatography is simple and efficient and allows direct online injection of the samples.

  4. African Journals Online: Vanuatu

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online: Vanuatu. Home > African Journals Online: Vanuatu. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Browse By Category · Browse Alphabetically · Browse By Country · List All Titles · Free to read Titles This Journal is Open Access ...

  5. African Journals Online: Armenia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online: Armenia. Home > African Journals Online: Armenia. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Browse By Category · Browse Alphabetically · Browse By Country · List All Titles · Free to read Titles This Journal is Open Access ...

  6. African Journals Online: Kazakhstan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online: Kazakhstan. Home > African Journals Online: Kazakhstan. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Browse By Category · Browse Alphabetically · Browse By Country · List All Titles · Free to read Titles This Journal is Open Access ...

  7. African Journals Online: Tuvalu

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online: Tuvalu. Home > African Journals Online: Tuvalu. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Browse By Category · Browse Alphabetically · Browse By Country · List All Titles · Free to read Titles This Journal is Open Access. Afghanistan ...

  8. Tools for assessing the quality and accessibility of online health information: initial testing among breast cancer websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitten, Pamela; Nazione, Samantha; Lauckner, Carolyn

    2013-12-01

    Health websites are used frequently, but there are many concerns about their value as information sources. Additionally, there are numerous personal barriers that prevent individuals from wholly benefitting from them. In order to assess the quality of health websites and their accessibility to users, we created tools based on previous research that examine design aspects, information validity, motivational health content and literacy content. To test these tools, we examined 155 breast cancer websites and created scores for each assessment tool to describe the percent of constructs on the average website. Results demonstrated that websites performed best on the design tool followed by the information validity, motivational health content and literacy assessment tools. The average website contained the majority of the design and information validity constructs, but only about a third of the motivational health or literacy constructs. Multiple items from the motivational health content and literacy assessment tools were not found on any of the websites, and many were only represented on a handful of sites. Overall, the assessment tools were useful in evaluating the quality of websites, and could serve as valuable resources for health website developers in the future.

  9. Combining the formative with the summative: the development of a twostage online test to encourage engagement and provide personal feedback in large classes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Susanne Voelkel

    2013-01-01

      The aim of this action research project was to improve student learning by encouraging more "time on task" and to improve self-assessment and feedback through the introduction of weekly online tests...

  10. Combining the formative with the summative: the development of a two-stage online test to encourage engagement and provide personal feedback in large classes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Voelkel, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this action research project was to improve student learning by encouraging more "time on task" and to improve self-assessment and feedback through the introduction of weekly online tests...

  11. AGRIS: providing access to agricultural research data exploiting open data on the web [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/599

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Celli

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available AGRIS is the International System for Agricultural Science and Technology. It is supported by a large community of data providers, partners and users. AGRIS is a database that aggregates bibliographic data, and through this core data, related content across online information systems is retrieved by taking advantage of Semantic Web capabilities. AGRIS is a global public good and its vision is to be a responsive service to its user needs by facilitating contributions and feedback regarding the AGRIS core knowledgebase, AGRIS’s future and its continuous development. Periodic AGRIS e-consultations, partner meetings and user feedback are assimilated to the development of the AGRIS application and content coverage. This paper outlines the current AGRIS technical set-up, its network of partners, data providers and users as well as how AGRIS’s responsiveness to clients’ needs inspires the continuous technical development of the application. The paper concludes by providing a use case of how the AGRIS stakeholder input and the subsequent AGRIS e-consultation results influence the development of the AGRIS application, knowledgebase and service delivery.

  12. LigoDV-web: Providing easy, secure and universal access to a large distributed scientific data store for the LIGO scientific collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areeda, J. S.; Smith, J. R.; Lundgren, A. P.; Maros, E.; Macleod, D. M.; Zweizig, J.

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational-wave observatories around the world, including the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), record a large volume of gravitational-wave output data and auxiliary data about the instruments and their environments. These data are stored at the observatory sites and distributed to computing clusters for data analysis. LigoDV-web is a web-based data viewer that provides access to data recorded at the LIGO Hanford, LIGO Livingston and GEO600 observatories, and the 40 m prototype interferometer at Caltech. The challenge addressed by this project is to provide meaningful visualizations of small data sets to anyone in the collaboration in a fast, secure and reliable manner with minimal software, hardware and training required of the end users. LigoDV-web is implemented as a Java Enterprise Application, with Shibboleth Single Sign On for authentication and authorization, and a proprietary network protocol used for data access on the back end. Collaboration members with proper credentials can request data be displayed in any of several general formats from any Internet appliance that supports a modern browser with Javascript and minimal HTML5 support, including personal computers, smartphones, and tablets. Since its inception in 2012, 634 unique users have visited the LigoDV-web website in a total of 33 , 861 sessions and generated a total of 139 , 875 plots. This infrastructure has been helpful in many analyses within the collaboration including follow-up of the data surrounding the first gravitational-wave events observed by LIGO in 2015.

  13. Cruising the information highway: online services and electronic mail for physicians and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faughnan, J G; Doukas, D J; Ebell, M H; Fox, G N

    1994-10-01

    Commercial online service providers, bulletin board services, and the Internet make up the rapidly expanding "information highway." Physicians and their families can use these services for professional and personal communication, for recreation and commerce, and to obtain reference information and computer software. Commercial providers include America Online, CompuServe, GEnie, and MCIMail. Internet access can be obtained indirectly through America Online or directly through specialized access providers. Today's online services are destined to evolve into a National Information Infrastructure that will change the way we work and play.

  14. Next generation sequencing provides rapid access to the genome of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat stripe rust.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Cantu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The wheat stripe rust fungus (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, PST is responsible for significant yield losses in wheat production worldwide. In spite of its economic importance, the PST genomic sequence is not currently available. Fortunately Next Generation Sequencing (NGS has radically improved sequencing speed and efficiency with a great reduction in costs compared to traditional sequencing technologies. We used Illumina sequencing to rapidly access the genomic sequence of the highly virulent PST race 130 (PST-130. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We obtained nearly 80 million high quality paired-end reads (>50x coverage that were assembled into 29,178 contigs (64.8 Mb, which provide an estimated coverage of at least 88% of the PST genes and are available through GenBank. Extensive micro-synteny with the Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (PGTG genome and high sequence similarity with annotated PGTG genes support the quality of the PST-130 contigs. We characterized the transposable elements present in the PST-130 contigs and using an ab initio gene prediction program we identified and tentatively annotated 22,815 putative coding sequences. We provide examples on the use of comparative approaches to improve gene annotation for both PST and PGTG and to identify candidate effectors. Finally, the assembled contigs provided an inventory of PST repetitive elements, which were annotated and deposited in Repbase. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The assembly of the PST-130 genome and the predicted proteins provide useful resources to rapidly identify and clone PST genes and their regulatory regions. Although the automatic gene prediction has limitations, we show that a comparative genomics approach using multiple rust species can greatly improve the quality of gene annotation in these species. The PST-130 sequence will also be useful for comparative studies within PST as more races are sequenced. This study illustrates the power of NGS for

  15. Access to emergency hospital care provided by the public sector in sub-Saharan Africa in 2015: a geocoded inventory and spatial analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouma, Paul O; Maina, Joseph; Thuranira, Pamela N; Macharia, Peter M; Alegana, Victor A; English, Mike; Okiro, Emelda A; Snow, Robert W

    2018-01-25

    %) women of child bearing age are located more than 2-h travel time from the nearest hospital. Marked differences were observed within and between countries, ranging from less than 25% of the population within 2-h travel time of a public hospital in South Sudan to more than 90% in Nigeria, Kenya, Cape Verde, Swaziland, South Africa, Burundi, Comoros, São Tomé and Príncipe, and Zanzibar. Only 16 countries reached the international benchmark of more than 80% of their populations living within a 2-h travel time of the nearest hospital. Physical access to emergency hospital care provided by the public sector in Africa remains poor and varies substantially within and between countries. Innovative targeting of emergency care services is necessary to reduce these inequities. This study provides the first spatial census of public hospital services in Africa. Wellcome Trust and the UK Department for International Development. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY 4.0 license. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Counseling on Access to Lethal Means (CALM): An Evaluation of a Suicide Prevention Means Restriction Training Program for Mental Health Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sale, Elizabeth; Hendricks, Michelle; Weil, Virginia; Miller, Collin; Perkins, Scott; McCudden, Suzanne

    2017-11-28

    This paper evaluates the effectiveness of the Counseling on Access to Lethal Means (CALM) suicide prevention program. CALM trains mental health providers how to counsel suicidal individuals and those who support them on mean restriction during times of crisis. Pre/post/3-month follow-up assessments measured knowledge of lethal means, confidence and comfort in discussing means restriction (self-efficacy), and future intentions to counsel clients on means restriction. Change in the number of clients receiving lethal means counseling was also assessed. All constructs increased significantly at posttest. Confidence and counseling intentions were sustained at follow-up and significantly more clients received means counseling in the 3 months following the CALM training. Knowledge and comfort levels decreased at follow-up but not to pre-training levels. CALM is effective at increasing mental health professionals' comfort, knowledge, and frequency of talking about means restriction with clients. an effective means restriction training program. A template to assess clients for suicidality and lethal means access and booster sessions are recommended to further sustain effects.

  17. Legislation should support optimal breastfeeding practices and access to low-cost, high-quality complementary foods: Indonesia provides a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soekarjo, Damayanti; Zehner, Elizabeth

    2011-10-01

    It is important to support women to exclusively breastfeed for 6 months and continue breastfeeding for 24 months and beyond. It is also necessary to provide the poor with access to affordable ways to improve the quality of complementary foods. Currently, many countries do not have the legal and policy environment necessary to support exclusive and continued breastfeeding. Legislative and policy changes are also necessary for introducing complementary food supplements, allowing them to be marketed to those who need them, and ensuring that marketing remains appropriate and in full compliance with the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes. This paper aims to illustrate the above with examples from Indonesia and to identify legislative requirements for supporting breastfeeding and enabling appropriate access to high-quality complementary food supplements for children 6-24 months of age. Requirements include improved information, training, monitoring and enforcement systems for the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes; implementation and monitoring of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative; establishment of a registration category for complementary food supplements to enhance availability of high-quality, low-cost fortified products to help improve young child feeding; clear identification and marketing of these products as complementary food supplements for 6-24-month-olds so as to promote proper use and not interfere with breastfeeding. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Online Archives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian D. Richards

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Online archives are of increasing importance in Archaeological Informatics, but like any new genre they prompt a number of questions. What is their relationship to publication? What should go in them? How should they be delivered and indexed? Can they be preserved? Whilst their delivery requires technology, we must also consider how that technology should best be employed in the service of our discipline. This article attempts to address some of these questions but it need not be read from start to finish. The links from this summary provide one fairly linear route through the text but each section is self-contained and can also be accessed directly from the Contents page. The problems posed by effective publication of archaeological fieldwork have exercised the profession for many decades. The issues raised go to the core of discussion of whether preservation by record is a valid concept, and indeed whether archaeological data exist. There are different schools of thought about the relationship between publication and archiving, but hopefully we can accept that data are recorded observations but still agree that they have a re-use value for re-examination and re-interpretation. Since the 1960s archaeology has experienced a publication crisis point. The scenario is familiar. Excavation is destruction; it is an unrepeatable experiment and the archaeologist has a professional obligation to make a full and accessible record of his/her observations. Yet full publication is increasingly expensive and difficult, and excavation monographs are read by few people, and bought by even fewer. In England the development of post-PPG16 fieldwork has exacerbated the problem by creating a mountain of unpublished grey literature and making the work of synthesis even harder; a similar situation exists in other countries. Meanwhile museum archives are also reaching breaking point; most are running out of storage space, few can provide facilities for access, and

  19. Usability and Acceptance of the Librarian Infobutton Tailoring Environment: An Open Access Online Knowledge Capture, Management, and Configuration Tool for OpenInfobutton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xia; Cimino, James J; Del Fiol, Guilherme

    2015-11-30

    The Librarian Infobutton Tailoring Environment (LITE) is a Web-based knowledge capture, management, and configuration tool with which users can build profiles used by OpenInfobutton, an open source infobutton manager, to provide electronic health record users with context-relevant links to online knowledge resources. We conducted a multipart evaluation study to explore users' attitudes and acceptance of LITE and to guide future development. The evaluation consisted of an initial online survey to all LITE users, followed by an observational study of a subset of users in which evaluators' sessions were recorded while they conducted assigned tasks. The observational study was followed by administration of a modified System Usability Scale (SUS) survey. Fourteen users responded to the survey and indicated good acceptance of LITE with feedback that was mostly positive. Six users participated in the observational study, demonstrating average task completion time of less than 6 minutes and an average SUS score of 72, which is considered good compared with other SUS scores. LITE can be used to fulfill its designated tasks quickly and successfully. Evaluators proposed suggestions for improvements in LITE functionality and user interface.

  20. Podcasting for Online Learners with Vision Loss: A Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whetstone, Kimarie W.

    2013-01-01

    The current uses of audio podcasts, the accessibility of audio podcasts, and the benefits of using audio podcasts in U.S. online college courses as a form of access to visual course content that would be otherwise unavailable to learners with vision loss had not been examined and described. To provide instructional designers with a firm basis for…

  1. Google Scholar Retrieves Twice as Many Relevant Citations as PubMed and Provides Greater Full-Text Access for Quick, Clinical Nephrology Searches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana K. Wakimoto

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To compare recall and precision of results retrieved by searches in PubMed and Google Scholar for clinical nephrology literature. Design – Survey questionnaire, comparative. Setting – Canada. Subjects – Practicing nephrologists with average age of 48 years and who have practiced nephrology for an average of 15 years. Methods – The researchers identified 100 systematic reviews in renal therapy published between 2001 and 2009. The primary studies cited in the systematic reviews served as the reference standard for relevant articles; 1,574 unique citations were identified and used to measure recall and precision. The researchers created a unique clinical question from each of the objective statements of systematic reviews and sent one question to a random sample of practicing nephrologists to determine the search strings they would use to search for clinical literature; the researchers collected 100 usable responses. Using the search string in both Google Scholar and PubMed, the researchers analyzed the first 40 retrieved results in each for recall of relevant literature and precision. The researchers also analyzed the availability of full-text articles in each database. A pilot study to test the methodology preceded the main study. Results – Google Scholar’s recall for the first 40 records was 21.9% and PubMed was 10.9%. Each database contained 78% of the relevant literature/reference standard set from the systematic reviews. However, 15% of the articles were in neither database. Precision results were similar (7.6% for Google Scholar and 5.6% for PubMed. Google Scholar had more full-text available at 15% of articles versus 5% for PubMed. Google Scholar and PubMed had similar numbers of relevant articles when all retrieved records were analyzed, but Google Scholar still provided more access to free full-text articles. Conclusion – Google Scholar provides better recall and provides more access to full-text than Pub

  2. Measuring the impact of Hurricane Katrina on access to a personal healthcare provider: the use of the National Survey of Children's Health for an external comparison group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehling-Ariza, Tasha; Park, Yoon Soo; Sury, Jonathan J; Abramson, David

    2012-04-01

    This paper examined the effect of Hurricane Katrina on children's access to personal healthcare providers and evaluated the use of propensity score methods to compare a nationally representative sample of children, as a proxy for an unexposed group, with a smaller exposed sample. 2007 data from the Gulf Coast Child and Family Health (G-CAFH) Study, a longitudinal cohort of households displaced or greatly impacted by Hurricane Katrina, were matched with 2007 National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH) data using propensity score techniques. Propensity scores were created using poverty level, household educational attainment, and race/ethnicity, with and without the addition of child age and gender. The outcome was defined as having a personal healthcare provider. Additional confounders (household structure, neighborhood safety, health and insurance status) were also examined. All covariates except gender differed significantly between the exposed (G-CAFH) and unexposed (NSCH) samples. Fewer G-CAFH children had a personal healthcare provider (65 %) compared to those from NSCH (90 %). Adjusting for all covariates, the propensity score analysis showed exposed children were 20 % less likely to have a personal healthcare provider compared to unexposed children in the US (OR = 0.80, 95 % CI 0.76, 0.84), whereas the logistic regression analysis estimated a stronger effect (OR = 0.28, 95 % CI 0.21, 0.39). Two years after Hurricane Katrina, children exposed to the storm had significantly lower odds of having a personal health care provider compared to unexposed children. Propensity score matching techniques may be useful for combining separate data samples when no clear unexposed group exists.

  3. From passive passenger to participating co-pilot - Pregnant women's expectations of being able to access their online journal from antenatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergevi, Charlotte; Lendahls, Lena; Crang-Svalenius, Elizabeth; Oscarsson, Marie G

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the study was to describe pregnant women's expectations of being able to access their electronic health records from antenatal care. Nine pregnant women passing 25 full gestational weeks were interviewed individually. Collected data were analysed with an inductive approach using content analysis. The study was performed in antenatal care units in southern Sweden. The following five categories emerged from the analysis: Being able to achieve increased participation, being able to have more control, being more knowledgeable about the pregnancy, identification of possible risks, and perceptions of one's own well-being can predict usage. The five categories led to one main category: 'Shift in power - from passive passenger to participating co-pilot'. The pregnant women expected that having access to electronic health records would give them more control, make them more knowledgeable and increase their participation. Access to electronic health records may empower pregnant women and contribute to a more person-centred approach. This could provide greater knowledge for the woman and her partner about her health, thus, allowing them to make evidence-based choices in relation to the newborn baby and the woman's health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization and application of restricted access carbon nanotubes in online extraction of anticonvulsant drugs from plasma samples followed by liquid chromatography analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Rodrigo Campos; Kakazu, Adriana Kaori; Santos, Mariane Gonçalves; Belinelli Silva, Fábio Antônio; Figueiredo, Eduardo Costa

    2017-06-01

    Anticonvulsant drugs are often used in the treatment of epilepsy. However, their therapeutic monitoring is often necessary in order to obtain an appropriate dose adjustment, due to the proximity between their therapeutic and toxic ranges. The aim of this study was to carry out the synthesis, characterization and use of restricted access carbon nanotubes (RACNTs) in an online method for the analyses of phenobarbital and carbamazepine and primidone from untreated human blood plasma by column switching liquid chromatography. Therefore, the synthesis of RACNTs was carried out through coating commercial Carbon nanotubes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) to subsequently use them as adsorbents in a column switching system operating in the backflush mode. This material was evaluated through the construction of the kinetic and isotherm curves. The experimental data for the interaction of primidone with RACNTs were adequately adjusted to the chemisorption and Sips models for the kinetic and adsorption studies, respectively. The analytical curves ranged from 2.0 to 40.0mgL(-1), with correlation coefficients higher than 0.99, for all the analytes. The LODs of 0.1, 0.1 and 0.01μgmL(-1) were defined for PHB, PRM and CBZ, respectively. The relative standard deviation values ranged from 1.0% to 8.4% for the intra assay precision and from 2.7% to 7.6% for inter assay precision. The relative error values ranged from -13.4% to 7.7% for the intra assay accuracy and from -8.6% to 2.5% for the inter assay accuracy. The method was adequately used in the therapeutic monitoring of anticonvulsant drugs in human plasma samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A Comparison between National and Transnational Students' Access of Online Learning Support Materials and Experience of Technical Difficulties on a Fully Online Distance Learning Master of Public Health Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, Isla; Harrison, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Online distance learning (ODL) is now recognised as a mainstream teaching method for undergraduate and postgraduate students around the world. However, differences in learner characteristics such as help-seeking behaviour between transnational students and home students may impact on student attainment. 64 students undertaking an online master of…

  6. Positive Perceptions of Access to Online Library Resources Correlates with Quality and Quantity of Scholarly Publications among Finnish Academics. A Review of: Vakkari, Pertti. “Perceived Influence of the Use of Electronic Information Resources on Scholarly Work and Publication Productivity.” Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology 59.4 (Feb. 15, 2008: 602-12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Marsalis

    2008-12-01

    mechanisms of the ease of access and breadth of resources available positively impacting their ability to keep abreast of new developments and inspiring new ideas. The study found mixed results between perceived improved access and number of publications. Although representation in national publications was not significantly impacted, there was a positive correlation with the number of international publications. There were interesting differences among disciplines and academic status, with a decreased impact among scholars in the humanities, and greater impact among lower-status or novice academics.Conclusion – There are positive perceptions of the accessibility of online information and of its impact on the quality of work, and a correlation between these perceptions and the number of international publications, thus validating the investment in providing access to digital information resources to Finnish academics.

  7. User Types in Online Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion IVAN

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Online applications are presented in the context of information society. Online applications characteristics are analyzed. Quality characteristics are presented in relation to online applications users. Types of users for AVIO application are presented. Use cases for AVIO application are identified. The limitations of AVIO application are defined. Types of users in online applications are identified. The threedimensional matrix of access to the online application resources is built. The user type-oriented database is structured. Access management of the fields related to the database tables is analyzed. The classification of online applications users is done.

  8. Online Resources

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Online Resources. Journal of Genetics. Online Resources. Volume 96. 2017 | Online resources. Volume 95. 2016 | Online resources. Volume 94. 2015 | Online resources. Volume 93. 2014 | Online resources. Volume 92. 2013 | Online resources. Volume 91. 2012 | Online resources ...

  9. Computational Science and Engineering Online (CSE-Online): a cyber-infrastructure for scientific computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Thanh N; Nayak, Manohar; Huynh, Hung H; Cook, Tom; Mahajan, Priya; Tran, LeThuy T; Bharath, Jannu; Jain, Shrish; Pham, Ha B; Boonyasiriwat, Chaiwoot; Nguyen, Nhat; Andersen, Evan; Kim, Yong; Choe, Suengkeol; Choi, Jihoon; Cheatham, Thomas E; Facelli, Julio C

    2006-01-01

    With the expansion of the Internet and World Wide Web (or the Web), research environments have changed dramatically. As a result, the need to be able to efficiently and securely access information and resources from remote computer systems is becoming even more critical. This paper describes the development of an extendable integrated Web-accessible simulation environment for computational science and engineering called Computational Science and Engineering Online (CSE-Online; http://cse-online.net). CSE-Online is based on a unique client-server software architecture that can distribute the workload between the client and server computers in such a way as to minimize the communication between the client and server, thus making the environment less-sensitive to network instability. Furthermore, the new software architecture allows the user to access data and resources on one or more remote servers as well as on the computing grid while having the full capability of the Web-services collaborative environment. It can be accessed anytime and anywhere from a Web browser connected to the network by either a wired or wireless connection. It has different modes of operations to support different working environments and styles. CSE-Online is evolving into middleware that can provide a framework for accessing and managing remote data and resources including the computing grid for any domain, not necessarily just within computational science and engineering.

  10. Using Information Visualization to Support Access to Archival Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Robert B.

    2005-01-01

    As more archival metadata and archival records become available online, providing effective interfaces to those materials is increasingly important to give users access. This article describes five approaches from the hypertext and visualization research communities which can be used to improve such access: (1) navigating hierarchical structures,…

  11. Determined to Learn: Accessing Education despite Life-Threatening Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    SchWeber, Claudine

    2008-01-01

    The "right to education" proclaimed by the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights requires access to learning as well as the support systems. Since access can be interrupted by various circumstances, the possibility of providing continuity despite external dangers by using online distance education, offers an intriguing and valuable…

  12. Chemists, Access, Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    2000-06-01

    New JCE Internet Feature at JCE Online Biographical Snapshots of Famous Chemists is a new JCE Internet feature on JCE Online. Edited by Barbara Burke, this feature provides biographical information on leading chemists, especially women and minority chemists, fostering the attitude that the practitioners of chemistry are as human as those who endeavor to learn about it. Currently, the column features biographical "snapshots" of 30 chemists. Each snapshot includes keywords and bibliography and several contain links to additional online information about the chemist. More biographical snapshots will appear in future installments. In addition, a database listing over 140 women and minority chemists is being compiled and will be made available online with the snapshots in the near future. The database includes the years of birth and death, gender and ethnicity, major and minor discipline, keywords to facilitate searching, and references to additional biographical information. We welcome your input into what we think is a very worthwhile resource. If you would like to provide additional biographical snapshots, see additional chemists added to the database, or know of additional references for those that are already in the database, please contact JCE Online or the feature editor. Your feedback is welcome and appreciated. You can find Biographical Snapshots of Famous Chemists starting from the JCE Online home page-- click the Features item under JCE Internet and then the Chemist Bios item. Access JCE Online without Name and Password We have recently been swamped by libraries requesting IP-number access to JCE Online. With the great benefit IP-number authentication gives to librarians (no user names and passwords to administer) and to their patrons (no need to remember and enter valid names and passwords) this is not surprising. If you would like access to JCE Online without the need to remember and enter a user name and password, you should tell your librarian about our

  13. The role of decentralized systems in providing universal electricity access in Sub-Saharan Africa – A model-based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dagnachew, Anteneh G.; Lucas, Paul L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/272607444; Hof, Andries F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/240412397; Gernaat, David E.H.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/372664636; de Boer, Harmen Sytze; van Vuuren, Detlef P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/11522016X

    2017-01-01

    Poverty and lack of access to electricity are highly correlated. In Sub-Saharan Africa, one of the poorest regions in the world, two in every three people have no access to electricity. This paper describes a purpose designed model to explore and project the development in the Sub-Saharan African

  14. Online-Befragung

    OpenAIRE

    Bandilla, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Der Beitrag behandelt grundlegende methodische Probleme bei Online-Befragungen, insbesondere das Coverage-Problem und Fragen der Stichprobenziehung. Lösungsmöglichkeiten werden im Einsatz von Access Panels auf der Basis von Zufallsstichproben gesehen.

  15. National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS): A USGS-Boem Partnership to Provide Free and Easy Access to Previously Proprietary Seismic Reflection Data on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triezenberg, P. J.; Hart, P. E.; Childs, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    The National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS) was established by the USGS in 2004 in an effort to rescue marine seismic reflection profile data acquired largely by the oil exploration industry throughout the US outer continental shelf (OCS). It features a Web interface for easy on-line geographic search and download. The commercial value of these data had decreased significantly because of drilling moratoria and newer acquisition technology, and large quantities were at risk of disposal. But, the data still had tremendous value for scientific research and education purposes, and an effort was undertaken to ensure that the data were preserved and publicly available. More recently, the USGS and Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) have developed a partnership to make similarly available a much larger quantity of 2D and 3D seismic data acquired by the U.S. government for assessment of resources in the OCS. Under Federal regulation, BOEM is required to publicly release all processed geophysical data, including seismic profiles, acquired under an exploration permit, purchased and retained by BOEM, no sooner than 25 years after issuance of the permit. Data acquired prior to 1989 are now eligible for release. Currently these data are distributed on CD or DVD, but data discovery can be tedious. Inclusion of these data within NAMSS vastly increases the amount of seismic data available for research purposes. A new NAMSS geographical interface provides easy and intuitive access to the data library. The interface utilizes OpenLayers, Mapnik, and the Django web framework. In addition, metadata capabilities have been greatly increased using a PostgresSQL/PostGIS database incorporating a community-developed ISO-compliant XML template. The NAMSS database currently contains 452 2D seismic surveys comprising 1,645,956 line km and nine 3D seismic surveys covering 9,385 square km. The 2D data holdings consist of stack, migrated and depth sections, most in SEG-Y format.

  16. Role of Human Health Care Providers and Medical Treatment Facilities in Military Working Dog Care and Accessibility Difficulties with Military Working Dog Blood Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles Iii, James T

    2016-01-01

    The use of military working dogs (MWDs) in support of military operations has increased dramatically over recent years, as they have proven to be our most reliable deterrent to improvised explosive devices. Healthcare delivery for MWDs in combat presents unique challenges and requires extensive collaboration between veterinarians and human health care providers (HCPs). A successful example is the incorporation of MWD emergency care for nonveterinary HCPs into the Joint Trauma System Clinical Practice Guidelines, which has proven to be a helpful product. Additional challenges that need further solutions include MWDs as patients in human medical treatment facilities (MTFs) and the procurement of appropriate canine blood components in an operational environment. It is often necessary for MWDs to be treated as patients in human MTFs, however, there is no Department of Defense guidance to support this activity. Access to MWD blood products is limited to collection of fresh whole blood in the operational setting. Similar to humans, specific blood component therapy, such as fresh frozen plasma, is often indicated for sick or injured MWDs. Currently there is no formal system in place to deliver any blood products for MWDs or to facilitate collection in theater.

  17. The World Intermediary Liability Map: Charting the Online Intermediary Liability Conundrum

    OpenAIRE

    Frosio, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Whether and when access providers and communications platforms like Google, Twitter and Facebook are liable for their users’ online activities is a key factor that effects innovation and free speech. There are emerging legal, policy and ethical issues facing online intermediaries. Unfortunately, with globalized online service providers operating across the world in an interdependent digital environment, inconsistencies across different regimes generate legal uncertainties that undermine both ...

  18. Improving Health Care Providers' Capacity for Self-Regulated Learning in Online Continuing Pharmacy Education: The Role of Internet Self-Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yen-Lin; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Mao, Pili Chih-Min; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Although Internet-based learning is widely used to improve health professionals' knowledge and skills, the self-regulated learning (SRL) activities of online continuing education in pharmacy are seldom discussed. The main purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between pharmacists' Internet self-efficacy (ISE) and their SRL in online continuing education. A total of 164 in-service pharmacists in Taiwan were surveyed with the Internet Self-Efficacy Survey, including basic ISE (B-ISE), advanced ISE (A-ISE) and professional ISE (P-ISE), as well as the Self-Regulated Learning Questionnaire consisting of preparatory SRL (P-SRL) and enactment SRL (E-SRL). Results of a 1-by-3 (educational levels: junior college versus bachelor versus master) analysis of variance and a 1-by-4 (institutions: community-based versus hospital versus clinic versus company) analysis of variance revealed that there were differences in ISE and SRL among different education levels and working institutions. The hierarchical regression analyses indicated that B-ISE and P-ISE were significant predictors of P-SRL, whereas P-ISE was a critical predictor of E-SRL. Moreover, the interaction of P-ISE × age was linked to E-SRL, implying that P-ISE has a stronger influence on E-SRL for older pharmacists than for younger pharmacists. However, the interactions between age and ISE (A-ISE, B-ISE, and P-ISE) were not related to P-SRL. This study highlighted the importance of ISE and age for increasing pharmacists' SRL in online continuing education.

  19. Empowering University Students Through Online Multiple Choice Questions

    OpenAIRE

    Bolat, Elvira; Dogan, H.; Biggins, David; Dupac, Mihai; Crowley, Emma J.

    2016-01-01

    The benefit of using online multiple choice questions (MCQs) to test knowledge acquisition, provide reassurance to learners that required knowledge has be understood and as a tool to detect knowledge deficits or misunderstanding have long been understood. Moving the MCQ online provides an opportunity to widen access, measure participation and interaction and to test the use of theories such as gamification in raising engagement by students. Aim of this paper is to describe how Bournemouth Uni...

  20. Computerized monitoring and online information system for energy and facility management service providers. Outsourcing of management and maintenance services; Informationssystem mit Online-Service fuer Dienstleistungsanbieter. Service und Wartung kostenguenstig gestalten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niclas, C. [Segno Industrie Automation GmbH, Bremen (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    The article addresses the emerging new business opportunities of service companies as contractors in the energy sector. Outsourcing and contracting models and in particular the computer architecture and the software and programming of available online systems are discussed. (orig./CB) [German] Regionale und kommunale Versorgungsunternehmen, Krankenhaeuser, Druckereien sowie produzierende Unternehmen koennen sich voll und ganz auf ihr Kerngeschaeft konzentrieren und einen Service- und Wartungsdienst kostenguenstig outsourcen. Serviceorientierte Dienstleister werden im gleichen Zuge durch Einsatz eines Service-Informationssystems in die Lage versetzt, Versorgungs- und Betreuungskonzepte optimal anzubieten. Langfristige Kundenbindungen sowie eine Verbesserung der Kundennaehe sind die Erfolge. Optimierung von Kunden-Anlagen und Einbindung in zukuenftige Investitionsmassnahmen seien an dieser Stelle nur als moegliche Zusatzgeschaefte zu erwaehnen. (orig.)

  1. Open Access Scholarly Publications as OER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Anderson

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the rationale, common practices, challenges, and some personal anecdotes from a journal editor on the production, use, and re-use of peer-reviewed scholarly articles as open educational resources (OER. The scholarly and professional discourse related to open educational resources has largely focused on open learning objects, courseware, and textbooks. However, especially in graduate education, articles published in scholarly journals are often a major component of the course content in formal education. In addition, open access journal articles are critical to expanding access to knowledge by scholars in the developing world and in fostering citizen science, by which everyone has access to the latest academic information and research results. In this article, I highlight some of the challenges, economic models, and evidence for quality of open access journal content and look at new affordances provided by the Net for enhanced functionality, access, and distribution.In the 17 years since I graduated with a doctorate degree, the climate and acceptance of open access publishing has almost reversed itself. I recall a conversation with my PhD supervisor in which he argued that publishing online was not a viable option as the product would not have permanency, scholarly recognition, or the prestige of a paper publication. His comments reflect the confusion between online resources and those described as open access, but as well illustrate the change in academic acceptance and use of open access products during the past decade. The evolution from paper to online production and consumption is a disruptive technology in which much lower cost and increased accessibility of online work opens the product to a completely new group of potential users. In the case of OER these consumers are primarily students, but certainly access to scholars from all parts of the globe and the availability to support citizen science (Silvertown, 2009

  2. Evaluation of the use of clinical decision support and online resources for pharmacogenomics education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrer Vitek, Carolyn R; Nicholson, Wayne T; Schultz, Cloann; Caraballo, Pedro J

    2015-01-01

    To assess impact and value of using clinical decision support (CDS) to drive providers toward online pharmacogenomics education. CDS was used to target prescribers of codeine/tramadol, send an educational email, display alert/inbox and provide links to an online resource. Providers were surveyed to assess impact. Of the methods used to target providers, educational email was more effective (7.2%). Survey response rate was 29.2% (n = 528/1817). Of respondents, 57.4% reported opening the email and 27.1% accessed the online resource. Of those accessing the resource, 89% found it useful and learned something new about pharmacogenomics. The impact of using CDS to target pharmacogenomics education was limited. However, providers accessing the online resource found it useful and educational.

  3. Managing SEMP on-line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, L.E.; Luppens, J.C. [Phillips Petroleum, Lafayette, LA (United States); Johnson, S.T. [M and H Enterprises, Inc., Lafayette, LA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The North America Production Division of Phillips Petroleum Company has teamed with M and H Enterprises to provide its operators, technicians, engineers and management on-line access and control of the change process and the extensive documentation involved in compliance with API RP 75 Safety and Environmental Management Program (SEMP). M and H Enterprises developed the WinPSM/SEMP{trademark} software and customized it to meet Phillips` SEMP policies and software standards. WinPSM/SEMP is a Windows based client server application, which features the use of a state of the art document management software technology. This system addresses all the elements of SEMP with the all important Management of Change module as a cornerstone component to the program. This paper presents the benefits of an on-line system over the traditional paper based system to control documentation resulting from SEMP compliance. It will demonstrate how this solution has resulted in a streamlined management of change process, safety training has become more current, and safety related procedures have become more accessible to the employees and better documented for compliance reporting purposes. The paper will point out the effectiveness of integrating all elements of SEMP into a single software product, taking advantage of familiar workplace environments to speed up the learning curve for field personnel. It will also address the flexibility of using such a system to include other on-line applications that have similar database accessibility requirements between the field and the supporting office.

  4. HIV behavioral research online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiasson, Mary Ann; Parsons, Jeffrey T; Tesoriero, James M; Carballo-Dieguez, Alex; Hirshfield, Sabina; Remien, Robert H

    2006-01-01

    Internet access has caused a global revolution in the way people of all ages and genders interact. Many have turned to the Internet to seek love, companionship, and sex, prompting researchers to move behavioral studies online. The sexual behavior of men who have sex with men (MSM) has been more closely studied than that of any other group online given the abundance of gay-oriented websites and concerns about increasing transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Not only does the Internet provide a new medium for the conduct of behavioral research and for participant recruitment into an array of research studies, it has the as yet unrealized potential to reach huge numbers of MSM with innovative harm reduction and prevention messages tailored to individualized needs, interests, and risk behavior. Internet-based research on sexual behavior has many advantages in rapidity of recruitment of diverse samples which include individuals unreachable through conventional methods (i.e., non-gay identified and geographically and socially isolated MSM, etc.). Internet-based research also presents some new methodologic challenges in study design, participant recruitment, survey implementation, and interpretation of results. In addition, there are ethical issues unique to online research including difficulties in verifying informed consent, obstacles to surveying minors, and the ability to assure anonymity. This paper presents a review of Internet-based research on sexual behavior in MSM, a general discussion of the methodologic and ethical challenges of Internet-based research, and recommendations for future interdisciplinary research.

  5. African Journals Online: Cabo Verde

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online: Cabo Verde. Home > African Journals Online: Cabo Verde. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Browse By Category · Browse Alphabetically · Browse By Country · List All Titles · Free to read Titles This Journal is Open Access ...

  6. African Journals Online: New Zealand

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online: New Zealand. Home > African Journals Online: New Zealand. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Browse By Category · Browse Alphabetically · Browse By Country · List All Titles · Free to read Titles This Journal is Open Access ...

  7. Critical Discussions on the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) in India and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehan, Sangeeta; Sanzgiri, Janesh; Li, Chenxi; Wang, Rongsheng; Joshi, Rakesh Mohan

    2017-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have been a relatively recent entrant in the field of online learning, yet with their "massiveness" and "openness" were posited to have the potential to transform learning and development in developing countries by providing willing learners with ready access to knowledge and Higher Education…

  8. CLSI On-Line Public Catalog Keyboard Terminal Manual: Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Chico.

    This training manual developed by the Public Access Subcommittee of the Reference Department of Meriam Library (California State University, Chico) provides instructions for using the library's online public catalog by means of a keyboard terminal. An introduction describes the Boolean searching capability of the online catalog and gives examples…

  9. Using a Design-Based Research Study to Identify Principles for Training Instructors to Teach Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shattuck, Julie; Anderson, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Within the overall framework of design-based research, this paper reports on a study that focused on evaluating an online training course for online instructors. This intervention was designed as a possible solution to the problem facing some higher education institutions of how to provide quality, accessible training for mostly part-time…

  10. Risky Internet Behaviors: A Case Study of Online and Offline Stalking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdell, Elizabeth Burgess; Bradley, Patricia K.

    2010-01-01

    Today's youth are more technologically savvy than any other generation possessing the ability to go online anytime. This increase in use of and access to technology has also provided adolescents with increasing opportunities to experience online relationships, which can place them in a vulnerable position and risk for harassment, bullying,…

  11. Introducing Online Training in an Early Childhood Professional Development System: Lessons Learned in One State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone-MacDonald, Angi; Douglass, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Online educational opportunities provide improved access to high quality professional development for the early education and care workforce. Online and technology mediated learning can create sustainable education and development opportunities for states when face-to-face training is financially prohibitive. This study examined one state's…

  12. Mediating Tourist Experiences. Access to Places via Shared Videos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tussyadiah, Iis; Fesenmaier, D.R.

    2009-01-01

    The emergence of new media using multimedia features has generated a new set of mediators for tourists' experiences. This study examines two hypotheses regarding the roles that online travel videos play as mediators of tourist experiences. The results confirm that online shared videos can provide...... mental pleasure to viewers by stimulating fantasies and daydreams, as well as bringing back past travel memories. In addition, the videos act as a narrative transportation, providing access to foreign landscapes and socioscapes....

  13. Problem-based learning online: perceptions of health science students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valaitis, Ruta K; Sword, Wendy A; Jones, Bob; Hodges, Andrea

    2005-08-01

    This qualitative study explored health sciences students' perceptions of their experiences in online problem based learning (PBL) and focused on their views about learning and group process in the online environment. Participants were novices to online learning and highly experienced in PBL, therefore, they could reflect on past face-to-face PBL experiences. Three groups of learners were involved, including undergraduate nursing and midwifery students and graduate students in a neonatal nurse practitioner program. Findings are presented using the six steps of the PBL process (Rideout & Carpio, 2001). Results indicated that it is feasible to conduct PBL online. Students felt that it increased their flexibility for learning, enhanced their ability to deeply process content, and provided access to valuable learning resources. Students experienced a period of adaptation to the online environment, perceived a heavy workload, and had difficulties making group decisions online. In addition to using asynchronous communication, chats (synchronous communication) were valued to support group decision-making online. Students appreciated validation of their online contributions from their peers and wanted clear expectations of what constituted successful tutorial participation from their tutors. Although online PBL can work effectively, tutors and students need to develop online literacy skills to smooth their transition to an online PBL environment.

  14. Impact Of Online Advertising On Consumer Attitudes And Interests Buy Online Survey On Students Of Internet Users In Makassar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Aqsa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The rapid development of technology today makes Internet users continues to increase. This is supported by the ease of internet users access the internet either through a PC laptop mobile phones tablets and other media. The increase in Internet users this makes the internet into a proper promotion using online advertising. With a wide reach and touch the various layers of the Internet media communities may be appropriate advice for company promotion. However an increasing number of Internet users especially in the city of Makassar is not accompanied by an increase in the number of online purchases. Based on that it is necessary to examine how the effect of online advertising on consumer buying behavior and online as well as how to control the behavior and subjective norms influence the attitudes and interests of consumers buy online. This study aims to analyze and test the effect of online advertising on consumer attitudes and purchase interest online a survey conducted on students of Internet users in the city of Makassar. The study was conducted on students of public and private universities in the city of Makassar. The method used was a quantitative analysis using the technique of purposive sampling method with a sample of 340 people. Testing this hypothesis using structural equation modeling SEM. The results showed that online advertising has an influence on consumer buying behavior and online. Dimensions interactivity of online advertising provides the highest influence on the attitudes and interests of consumers purchasing online.

  15. Novel Humanitarian Aid Program: The Glivec International Patient Assistance Program-Lessons Learned From Providing Access to Breakthrough Targeted Oncology Treatment in Low- and Middle-Income Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Pat; Boultbee, Paula; Epstein, David

    2015-10-01

    Imatinib was the first targeted therapy approved for the treatment of cancer. With its approval, it was immediately clear to Novartis that this breakthrough therapy would require an innovative approach to worldwide access, with special consideration of low- and middle-income countries. Lack of government reimbursement, universal health care, or health insurance coverage, few trained specialty physicians or diagnostic services, and poor health care infrastructure were, and continue to be, contributing barriers to access to treatment in low- and middle-income countries. The Glivec International Patient Assistance Program (GIPAP) is an international drug donation program established by Novartis Pharma AG and implemented in partnership with The Max Foundation, a nonprofit, nongovernmental organization. GIPAP was established in 2001, essentially in parallel with the first approval of imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia. Since 2001, GIPAP has made imatinib accessible to all medically and financially eligible patients within 80 countries on an ongoing basis as long as their physicians prescribe it and no other means of access exists. To date, more than 49,000 patients have benefited from GIPAP, and 2.3 million monthly doses of imatinib have been approved through the program. GIPAP represents an innovative drug donation model that has set the standard for access programs for other targeted or innovative therapies. The purpose of this article is to describe the structure of GIPAP, as well as important lessons that have contributed to the success of the program. This article may assist other companies with the development of successful and far-reaching patient assistance programs in the future.

  16. Health care use amongst online buyers of medications and vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Karishma; Chewning, Betty; Mott, David

    2015-01-01

    With increased use of the internet, more people access medications and health supplements online. However little is known about factors associated with using online buying. Given the variable quality of online pharmacies, an important question is whether online consumers also have health care providers with whom they discuss internet information and decisions. To help address these gaps this study used the Andersen Model to explore (1) the characteristics of internet buyers of medicines and/vitamins, (2) the association between health care use and buying medicines and/vitamins online drawing on the Andersen health care utilization framework, and (3) factors predicting discussion of internet information with health providers. The National Cancer Institute's Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) 2007 was analyzed to study online medication buying among a national sample of internet users (N = 5074). The Andersen Model of health care utilization guided the study's variable selection and analyses. Buying online and talking about online information are the two main outcome variables. Separate multivariate logistic regression analyses identified factors associated with online buying and factors predicting discussions with providers about online information. In 2007, 14.5% (n = 871) of internet users bought a medication or vitamin online. About 85% of online buyers had a regular provider, but only 39% talked to the provider about online information even though most (93.7%) visited the provider ≥1 times/year. Multivariate analyses found internet health product consumers were more likely to be over 50 years old, have insurance and discuss the internet with their provider than non-internet health product consumers. Moreover, discussion of internet information was more likely if consumers had a regular provider and perceived their communication to be at least fair or good in general. There is a clear association of online buying with age, frequency of visits and

  17. Access to healthcare, HIV/STI testing, and preferred pre-exposure prophylaxis providers among men who have sex with men and men who engage in street-based sex work in the US.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Underhill

    Full Text Available Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP is a promising strategy for HIV prevention among men who have sex with men (MSM and men who engage in sex work. But access will require routine HIV testing and contacts with healthcare providers. This study investigated men's healthcare and HIV testing experiences to inform PrEP implementation.We conducted 8 focus groups (n = 38 in 2012 and 56 in-depth qualitative interviews in 2013-14 with male sex workers (MSWs (n = 31 and other MSM (n = 25 in Providence, RI. MSWs primarily met clients in street-based sex work venues. Facilitators asked participants about access to healthcare and HIV/STI testing, healthcare needs, and preferred PrEP providers.MSWs primarily accessed care in emergency rooms (ERs, substance use clinics, correctional institutions, and walk-in clinics. Rates of HIV testing were high, but MSWs reported low access to other STI testing, low insurance coverage, and unmet healthcare needs including primary care, substance use treatment, and mental health services. MSM not engaging in sex work were more likely to report access to primary and specialist care. Rates of HIV testing among these MSM were slightly lower, but they reported more STI testing, more insurance coverage, and fewer unmet needs. Preferred PrEP providers for both groups included primary care physicians, infectious disease specialists, and psychiatrists. MSWs were also willing to access PrEP in substance use treatment and ER settings.PrEP outreach efforts for MSWs and other MSM should engage diverse providers in many settings, including mental health and substance use treatment, ERs, needle exchanges, correctional institutions, and HIV testing centers. Access to PrEP will require financial assistance, but can build on existing healthcare contacts for both populations.

  18. The role of non-dental health professionals in providing access to dental care for low-income and minority patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Leonard A

    2009-07-01

    The disadvantaged suffer disproportionately from dental problems. These persons are more likely to have untreated oral health problems and associated pain, and also are more likely to forego dental treatment even when in pain. There has been increased emphasis on the potential role of physicians in alleviating oral health disparities, especially among children. In addition, many adults lacking access to traditional dental services seek care and consultation from hospital emergency departments, physicians, and pharmacists. The delivery of oral health care services by non-dental health professionals may assume increasing importance as the population continues to age and becomes more diverse. This is because, in general, the elderly and ethnic and racial minorities face significant economic barriers to accessing private dental services.

  19. e-Learning Programs Come in All Shapes and Sizes: From Alaska to Arkansas, Districts Are Experimenting with Online Learning to Solve Access Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Shawn; Jones, Thea; Pickle, Shirley Kirk

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a sample of online learning programs serving very different populations: a small district spread over a vast area, a large inner school district, and a statewide program serving numerous districts. It describes how these districts successfully implemented e-learning programs in their schools and discusses the positive impact…

  20. Massive Open Online Courses for Africa by Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedict Oyo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Africa is known for inadequate access to all sorts of human needs including health, education, food, shelter, transport, security, and energy. Before the emergence of massive open online courses (MOOCs, open access to higher education (HE was exclusive of Africa. However, as a generally affordable method of post-secondary education delivery, MOOCs place the developing countries at the centre of universal access to HE. This paper provides the strategy for MOOC implementation in the context of limited resources in Africa. The strategy is clustered under five baseline requirements: national accredited MOOC curriculum, electronic content development, development of an online and offline eLearning platform, establishment and funding of MOOC coordination units at public HEIs, and establishment of MOOC access hubs at strategic locations. Emerging from this paper is the insight that a new era of universal access to HE in Africa is achievable through MOOCs only if initial requirements are met by the respective governments.

  1. Guiding Principles for Implementing School-Based Management Programs: An Online Toolkit Providing General Principles That Can Be Applied to the Implementation of School-Based Management Reforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrinos, Harry Anthony; Fasih, Tazeen; Barrera, Felipe; Garcia-Moreno, Vicente A.; Bentaouet-Kattan, Raja; Baksh, Shaista; Wickramasekera, Inosha

    2007-01-01

    School-based management (SBM) has become a very popular movement over the past decade. The World Bank Education Team's SBM work program emerged out of a need to define the concept more clearly, review the evidence, support impact assessments in various countries, and provide some initial feedback to teams preparing education projects. During the…

  2. Online Exhibits & Concept Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douma, M.

    2009-12-01

    Presenting the complexity of geosciences to the public via the Internet poses a number of challenges. For example, utilizing various - and sometimes redundant - Web 2.0 tools can quickly devour limited time. Do you tweet? Do you write press releases? Do you create an exhibit or concept map? The presentation will provide participants with a context for utilizing Web 2.0 tools by briefly highlighting methods of online scientific communication across several dimensions. It will address issues of: * breadth and depth (e.g. from narrow topics to well-rounded views), * presentation methods (e.g. from text to multimedia, from momentary to enduring), * sources and audiences (e.g. for experts or for the public, content developed by producers to that developed by users), * content display (e.g. from linear to non-linear, from instructive to entertaining), * barriers to entry (e.g. from an incumbent advantage to neophyte accessible, from amateur to professional), * cost and reach (e.g. from cheap to expensive), and * impact (e.g. the amount learned, from anonymity to brand awareness). Against this backdrop, the presentation will provide an overview of two methods of online information dissemination, exhibits and concept maps, using the WebExhibits online museum (www.webexhibits.org) and SpicyNodes information visualization tool (www.spicynodes.org) as examples, with tips on how geoscientists can use either to communicate their science. Richly interactive online exhibits can serve to engage a large audience, appeal to visitors with multiple learning styles, prompt exploration and discovery, and present a topic’s breadth and depth. WebExhibits, which was among the first online museums, delivers interactive information, virtual experiments, and hands-on activities to the public. While large, multidisciplinary exhibits on topics like “Color Vision and Art” or “Calendars Through the Ages” require teams of scholars, user interface experts, professional writers and editors

  3. Integrated social facility location planning for decision support: Accessibility studies provide support to facility location and integration of social service provision

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Green, Cheri A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available in facility provision ?Identification of suitable location(s) for selected new facilities and assisting in the development of a integrated facility provision location plans ?Evaluation of the impact of planned project or budget requests on facility backlog... the people?s access to transport ? Road network ? the road network is used to simulate the way in which people traverse across spaces. Different types of roads also have different speeds at which traffic or a person can move on it or impedances. Using...

  4. Improvements in access to malaria treatment in Tanzania after switch to artemisinin combination therapy and the introduction of accredited drug dispensing outlets - a provider perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dillip Angel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To improve access to treatment in the private retail sector a new class of outlets known as accredited drug dispensing outlets (ADDO was created in Tanzania. Tanzania changed its first-line treatment for malaria from sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP to artemether-lumefantrine (ALu in 2007. Subsidized ALu was made available in both health facilities and ADDOs. The effect of these interventions on access to malaria treatment was studied in rural Tanzania. Methods The study was carried out in the villages of Kilombero and Ulanga Demographic Surveillance System (DSS and in Ifakara town. Data collection consisted of: 1 yearly censuses of shops selling drugs; 2 collection of monthly data on availability of anti-malarials in public health facilities; and 3 retail audits to measure anti-malarial sales volumes in all public, mission and private outlets. The data were complemented with DSS population data. Results Between 2004 and 2008 access to malaria treatment greatly improved and the number of anti-malarial treatment doses dispensed increased by 78%. Particular improvements were observed in the availability (from 0.24 shops per 1,000 people in 2004 to 0.39 in 2008 and accessibility (from 71% of households within 5 km of a shop in 2004 to 87% in 2008 of drug shops. Despite no improvements in affordability this resulted in an increase of the market share from 49% of anti-malarial sales 2005 to 59% in 2008. The change of treatment policy from SP to ALu led to severe stock-outs of SP in health facilities in the months leading up to the introduction of ALu (only 40% months in stock, but these were compensated by the wide availability of SP in shops. After the introduction of ALu stock levels of the drug were relatively high in public health facilities (over 80% months in stock, but the drug could only be found in 30% of drug shops and in no general shops. This resulted in a low overall utilization of the drug (19% of all anti

  5. Los catálogos en línea de acceso público (OPACs: un estado de la cuestión = Public Access Online Catalogs (OPACs: A State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Nicolás Rucks

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Revisión bibliográfica sobre los catálogos en línea de acceso público, más conocidos por su sigla en inglés, OPAC (Online Public Access Catalogs. Se plantean las principales dificultades que tienen sus usuarios. Se hace un diagnóstico de la situación basado en la literatura especializada, concluyendo que se está todavía lejos de lo deseable. La revisión cubre bibliografía, principalmente de los Estados Unidos de América, desde 1994 hasta 1998 = Review on the Online Public Access Catalogs, (OPAC. It explains the main difficulties the patron has to use the OPAC A diagnosis of the situation is made based on the specialized literature, concluding that we are still far from what is desirable. The review covers bibliography from 1994 to 1998, mainly from the USA.

  6. Optical Access Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-01-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks Guest Editors Jun Zheng, University of Ottawa Nirwan Ansari, New Jersey Institute of Technology Submission Deadline: 1 June 2005 h2>Backgroundh2> With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access

  7. Touchable Online Braille Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wooseob Jeong

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A prototype of a touchable online Braille generator has been developed for the visually impaired or blind using force feedback technology, which has been used in video games for years. Without expensive devices, this prototype allows blind people to access information on the Web by touching output Braille displays with a force feedback mouse. The data collected from user studies conducted with blind participants has provided valuable information about the optimal conditions for the use of the prototype. The end product of this research will enable visually impaired people to enjoy information on the Web more freely.

  8. Enhancing Motivation in Online Courses with Mobile Communication Tool Support: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiprasurt, Chantorn; Esichaikul, Vatcharaporn

    2013-01-01

    Mobile technologies have helped establish new channels of communication among learners and instructors, potentially providing greater access to course information, and promoting easier access to course activities and learner motivation in online learning environments. The paper compares motivation between groups of learners being taught through an…

  9. Open access

    CERN Document Server

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder consent, and many authors, musicians, filmmakers, and other creators who depend on royalties are understandably unwilling to give their consent. But for 350 years, scholars have written peer-reviewed journal articles for impact, not for money, and are free to consent to open access without losing revenue. In this concise introduction, Peter Suber tells us what open access is and isn't, how it benefits authors and readers of research, how we pay for it, how it avoids copyright problems, how it has moved from the periphery to the mainstream, and what its future may hold. Distilling a decade of Suber's influential writing and thinking about open access, this is the indispe...

  10. Creating online tutorials a practical guide for librarians

    CERN Document Server

    Gascho Rempel, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    Today’s students rely heavily on using electronic resources; they expect to be able to access library resources from any location and at any time of the day. More and more schools, from K-12 through graduate level universities, are offering online education, and libraries must be prepared to guide learners in how to use library resources when and where they are needed. Online tutorials are the library’s answer to providing this immediate instruction, and today’s learners are expecting to have these guides available. Many librarians don’t have the technical expertise needed to create online tutorials.

  11. Online professional networks for physicians: risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, Jon L; Luks, Howard J; Sechrest, Randale

    2012-05-01

    The rapidly developing array of online physician-only communities represents a potential extraordinary advance in the availability of educational and informational resources to physicians. These online communities provide physicians with a new range of controls over the information they process, but use of this social media technology carries some risk. The purpose of this review was to help physicians manage the risks of online professional networking and discuss the potential benefits that may come with such networks. This article explores the risks and benefits of physicians engaging in online professional networking with peers and provides suggestions on risk management. Through an Internet search and literature review, we scrutinized available case law, federal regulatory code, and guidelines of conduct from professional organizations and consultants. We reviewed the OrthoMind.com site as a case example because it is currently the only online social network exclusively for orthopaedic surgeons. Existing case law suggests potential liability for orthopaedic surgeons who engage with patients on openly accessible social network platforms. Current society guidelines in both the United States and Britain provide sensible rules that may mitigate such risks. However, the overall lack of a strong body of legal opinions, government regulations as well as practical experience for most surgeons limit the suitability of such platforms. Closed platforms that are restricted to validated orthopaedic surgeons may limit these downside risks and hence allow surgeons to collaborate with one another both as clinicians and practice owners. Educating surgeons about the pros and cons of participating in these networking platforms is helping them more astutely manage risks and optimize benefits. This evolving online environment of professional interaction is one of few precedents, but the application of risk management strategies that physicians use in daily practice carries over

  12. Pretest online discussion groups to augment teaching and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Jonathan; Hasbargen, Barbara; Miziniak, Halina

    2010-01-01

    Tests and final examination scores of three semesters of control students in a nursing foundation course were compared with tests and final examination scores of three semesters of participating students. Participating students were offered access to an asynchronous pretest online discussion activity with a faculty e-moderator. While the simplified Bloom's revised taxonomy assisted in creating appropriate preparatory test and final examination questions for pretest online discussion, Salmon's five-stage online method provided direction to the e-moderator on how to encourage students to achieve Bloom's higher-order thinking skills during the pretest online discussions. Statistical analysis showed the pretest online discussion activity had a generally positive impact on tests and final examination scores, when controlling for a number of possible confounding variables, including instructor, cumulative grade point average, age, and credit hours.

  13. Examining Reliability and Validity of an Online Score (ALiEM AIR) for Rating Free Open Access Medical Education Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Teresa Man-Yee; Grock, Andrew; Paddock, Michael; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan; Yarris, Lalena M; Lin, Michelle

    2016-12-01

    Since 2014, Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM) has used the Approved Instructional Resources (AIR) score to critically appraise online content. The primary goals of this study are to determine the interrater reliability (IRR) of the ALiEM AIR rating score and determine its correlation with expert educator gestalt. We also determine the minimum number of educator-raters needed to achieve acceptable reliability. Eight educators each rated 83 online educational posts with the ALiEM AIR scale. Items include accuracy, usage of evidence-based medicine, referencing, utility, and the Best Evidence in Emergency Medicine rating score. A generalizability study was conducted to determine IRR and rating variance contributions of facets such as rater, blogs, posts, and topic. A randomized selection of 40 blog posts previously rated through ALiEM AIR was then rated again by a blinded group of expert medical educators according to their gestalt. Their gestalt impression was subsequently correlated with the ALiEM AIR score. The IRR for the ALiEM AIR rating scale was 0.81 during the 6-month pilot period. Decision studies showed that at least 9 raters were required to achieve this reliability. Spearman correlations between mean AIR score and the mean expert gestalt ratings were 0.40 for recommendation for learners and 0.35 for their colleagues. The ALiEM AIR scale is a moderately to highly reliable, 5-question tool when used by medical educators for rating online resources. The score displays a fair correlation with expert educator gestalt in regard to the quality of the resources. The score displays a fair correlation with educator gestalt. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Positioning Extension Massive Open Online Courses (xMOOCs) within the Open Access and the Lifelong Learning Agendas in a Developing Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkuyubwatsi, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports on xMOOCs indicate that underprivileged learners in need of higher education have minimally been reached by these courses. While the "open access" agenda is needed to reach such learners, most MOOCs have been developed in societies that have shifted toward the "lifelong learning" agenda. In this paper, xMOOCs are…

  15. Science Education on the Internet: Conference for Developers of OnLine Curricula ''Learning Strategies for Science Education Websites''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gesteland,Raymond F.; Dart, Dorothy S.; Logan,Jennifer; Stark, Louisa

    2000-09-01

    Internet-based science education programs are coming of age. Educators now look seriously to the Internet as a source of accessible classroom materials, and they are finding many high-quality online science programs. Beyond providing solid curriculum, these programs have many advantages. They provide materials that are far more current than what textbooks offer and are more accessible to disadvantaged and rural population. Students can engage in inquiry-based learning online through interactive and virtual activities, accessing databases, tracking nature occurrences in real time, joining online science communities and conversing with scientists.

  16. Massive Open Online Librarianship: Emerging Practices in Response to MOOCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mune, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOCs, have recently emerged as a disruptive pedagogy gaining rapid momentum in higher education. In some states, proposed legislations would accredit MOOCs to provide college-credit courses in the name of cost saving, efficiency and access. While debates rage regarding the place of MOOCs in higher education, some…

  17. COSMOS (County of San Mateo Online System). A Searcher's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Mateo County Superintendent of Schools, Redwood City, CA. Educational Resources Center.

    Operating procedures are explained for COSMOS (County of San Mateo Online System), a computerized information retrieval system designed for the San Mateo Educational Resources Center (SMERC), which provides interactive access to both ERIC and a local file of fugitive documents. COSMOS hardware and modem compatibility requirements are reviewed,…

  18. Massive Open Online Courses: Disruptive Innovations or Disturbing Inventions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Langen, Frank; van den Bosch, Herman

    2013-01-01

    According to Christensen and Horn, Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are serving non-consumers. Although they are limited in the services they provide compared with traditional colleges, they offer free and accessible education to a broader audience, who cannot afford the traditional provision. However, this is a characteristic of online…

  19. Fishing Access Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department maintains developed fishing access areas. These sites provide public access to waters in Vermont for shore fishing...

  20. An iron-catalysed C-C bond-forming spirocyclization cascade providing sustainable access to new 3D heterocyclic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Kirsty; Ball, Anthony K.; Birkett, James; Brown, Lee; Chappell, Ben; Gill, Duncan M.; Lo, P. K. Tony; Patmore, Nathan J.; Rice, Craig. R.; Ryan, James; Raubo, Piotr; Sweeney, Joseph B.

    2017-04-01

    Heterocyclic architectures offer powerful creative possibilities to a range of chemistry end-users. This is particularly true of heterocycles containing a high proportion of sp3-carbon atoms, which confer precise spatial definition upon chemical probes, drug substances, chiral monomers and the like. Nonetheless, simple catalytic routes to new heterocyclic cores are infrequently reported, and methods making use of biomass-accessible starting materials are also rare. Here, we demonstrate a new method allowing rapid entry to spirocyclic bis-heterocycles, in which inexpensive iron(III) catalysts mediate a highly stereoselective C-C bond-forming cyclization cascade reaction using (2-halo)aryl ethers and amines constructed using feedstock chemicals readily available from plant sources. Fe(acac)3 mediates the deiodinative cyclization of (2-halo)aryloxy furfuranyl ethers, followed by capture of the intermediate metal species by Grignard reagents, to deliver spirocycles containing two asymmetric centres. The reactions offer potential entry to key structural motifs present in bioactive natural products.

  1. An iron-catalysed C-C bond-forming spirocyclization cascade providing sustainable access to new 3D heterocyclic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Kirsty; Ball, Anthony K; Birkett, James; Brown, Lee; Chappell, Ben; Gill, Duncan M; Lo, P K Tony; Patmore, Nathan J; Rice, Craig R; Ryan, James; Raubo, Piotr; Sweeney, Joseph B

    2017-04-01

    Heterocyclic architectures offer powerful creative possibilities to a range of chemistry end-users. This is particularly true of heterocycles containing a high proportion of sp 3 -carbon atoms, which confer precise spatial definition upon chemical probes, drug substances, chiral monomers and the like. Nonetheless, simple catalytic routes to new heterocyclic cores are infrequently reported, and methods making use of biomass-accessible starting materials are also rare. Here, we demonstrate a new method allowing rapid entry to spirocyclic bis-heterocycles, in which inexpensive iron(III) catalysts mediate a highly stereoselective C-C bond-forming cyclization cascade reaction using (2-halo)aryl ethers and amines constructed using feedstock chemicals readily available from plant sources. Fe(acac) 3 mediates the deiodinative cyclization of (2-halo)aryloxy furfuranyl ethers, followed by capture of the intermediate metal species by Grignard reagents, to deliver spirocycles containing two asymmetric centres. The reactions offer potential entry to key structural motifs present in bioactive natural products.

  2. Cognitive-behavioral therapy: How medical providers can increase patient and family openness and access to evidence-based multimodal therapy for pediatric migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Michelle M.; O’Brien, Hope; Powers, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    While evidence supports the recommendation for cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for pediatric migraine, few children actually receive this evidence-based intervention. In this article we briefly review the most recent empirical evidence supporting CBT. We then identify both provider/system-related barriers as well as patient-related barriers. Finally, we provide practical solutions to addressing these barriers in the service of facilitating children receiving optimal comprehensive management of their headaches. PMID:26198185

  3. The Emerging Diabetes Online Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Marisa E.; Sparling, Kerri M.; Hitchcock, Jeff; Oser, Tamara K.; Hood, Korey K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Background Diabetes self-management is complex and demanding, and isolation and burnout are common experiences. The Internet provides opportunities for people with diabetes to connect with one another to address these challenges. The aims of this paper are to introduce readers to the platforms on which Diabetes Online Community (DOC) participants interact, to discuss reasons for and risks associated with diabetes-related online activity, and to review research related to the potential impact of DOC participation on diabetes outcomes. Methods Research and online content related to diabetes online activity is reviewed, and DOC writing excerpts are used to illustrate key themes. Guidelines for meaningful participation in DOC activities for people with diabetes, families, health care providers, and industry are provided. Results Common themes around DOC participation include peer support, advocacy, self-expression, seeking and sharing diabetes information, improving approaches to diabetes data management, and humor. Potential risks include access to misinformation and threats to individuals’ privacy, though there are limited data on negative outcomes resulting from such activities. Likewise, few data are available regarding the impact of DOC involvement on glycemic outcomes, but initial research suggests a positive impact on emotional experiences, attitudes toward diabetes, and engagement in diabetes management behaviors. Conclusion The range of DOC participants, activities, and platforms is growing rapidly. The Internet provides opportunities to strengthen communication and support among individuals with diabetes, their families, health care providers, the health care industry, policy makers, and the general public. Research is needed to investigate the impact of DOC participation on self-management, quality of life, and glycemic control, and to design and evaluate strategies to maximize its positive impact. PMID:25901500

  4. Online Sellers’ Website Quality Influencing Online Buyers’ Purchase Intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea Lee, Tan; Ariff, Mohd Shoki Md; Zakuan, Norhayati; Sulaiman, Zuraidah; Zameri Mat Saman, Muhamad

    2016-05-01

    The increase adoption of Internet among young users in Malaysia provides high prospect for online seller. Young users aged between 18 and 25 years old are important to online sellers because they are actively involved in online purchasing and this group of online buyers is expected to dominate future online market. Therefore, examining online sellers’ website quality and online buyers’ purchase intention is crucial. Based on the Theory of planned behavior (TPB), a conceptual model of online sellers’ website quality and purchase intention of online buyers was developed. E-tailQ instrument was adapted in this study which composed of website design, reliability/fulfillment, security, privacy & trust, and customer service. Using online questionnaire and convenience sampling procedure, primary data were obtained from 240 online buyers aged between 18 to 25 years old. It was discovered that website design, website reliability/fulfillment, website security, privacy & trust, and website customer service positively and significantly influence intention of online buyers to continuously purchase via online channels. This study concludes that online sellers’ website quality is important in predicting online buyers’ purchase intention. Recommendation and implication of this study were discussed focusing on how online sellers should improve their website quality to stay competitive in online business.

  5. Systematic review and evaluation of web-accessible tools for management of diabetes and related cardiovascular risk factors by patients and healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Catherine H; Bahniwal, Robinder; Laupacis, Andreas; Leung, Eman; Orr, Michael S; Straus, Sharon E

    2012-01-01

    To identify and evaluate the effectiveness, clinical usefulness, sustainability, and usability of web-compatible diabetes-related tools. Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, world wide web. Studies were included if they described an electronic audiovisual tool used as a means to educate patients, care givers, or clinicians about diabetes management and assessed a psychological, behavioral, or clinical outcome. Study abstraction and evaluation for clinical usefulness, sustainability, and usability were performed by two independent reviewers. Of 12,616 citations and 1541 full-text articles reviewed, 57 studies met inclusion criteria. Forty studies used experimental designs (25 randomized controlled trials, one controlled clinical trial, 14 before-after studies), and 17 used observational designs. Methodological quality and ratings for clinical usefulness and sustainability were variable, and there was a high prevalence of usability errors. Tools showed moderate but inconsistent effects on a variety of psychological and clinical outcomes including HbA1c and weight. Meta-regression of adequately reported studies (12 studies, 2731 participants) demonstrated that, although the interventions studied resulted in positive outcomes, this was not moderated by clinical usefulness nor usability. This review is limited by the number of accessible tools, exclusion of tools for mobile devices, study quality, and the use of non-validated scales. Few tools were identified that met our criteria for effectiveness, usefulness, sustainability, and usability. Priority areas include identifying strategies to minimize website attrition and enabling patients and clinicians to make informed decisions about website choice by encouraging reporting of website quality indicators.

  6. Deep mRNA sequencing of the Tritonia diomedea brain transcriptome provides access to gene homologues for neuronal excitability, synaptic transmission and peptidergic signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Senatore

    Full Text Available The sea slug Tritonia diomedea (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Nudibranchia, has a simple and highly accessible nervous system, making it useful for studying neuronal and synaptic mechanisms underlying behavior. Although many important contributions have been made using Tritonia, until now, a lack of genetic information has impeded exploration at the molecular level.We performed Illumina sequencing of central nervous system mRNAs from Tritonia, generating 133.1 million 100 base pair, paired-end reads. De novo reconstruction of the RNA-Seq data yielded a total of 185,546 contigs, which partitioned into 123,154 non-redundant gene clusters (unigenes. BLAST comparison with RefSeq and Swiss-Prot protein databases, as well as mRNA data from other invertebrates (gastropod molluscs: Aplysia californica, Lymnaea stagnalis and Biomphalaria glabrata; cnidarian: Nematostella vectensis revealed that up to 76,292 unigenes in the Tritonia transcriptome have putative homologues in other databases, 18,246 of which are below a more stringent E-value cut-off of 1x10-6. In silico prediction of secreted proteins from the Tritonia transcriptome shotgun assembly (TSA produced a database of 579 unique sequences of secreted proteins, which also exhibited markedly higher expression levels compared to other genes in the TSA.Our efforts greatly expand the availability of gene sequences available for Tritonia diomedea. We were able to extract full length protein sequences for most queried genes, including those involved in electrical excitability, synaptic vesicle release and neurotransmission, thus confirming that the transcriptome will serve as a useful tool for probing the molecular correlates of behavior in this species. We also generated a neurosecretome database that will serve as a useful tool for probing peptidergic signalling systems in the Tritonia brain.

  7. Interactive access to forest inventory data for the South Central United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    William H. McWilliams

    1990-01-01

    On-line access to USDA, Forest Service successive forest inventory data for the South Central United States is provided by two computer systems. The Easy Access to Forest Inventory and Analysis Tables program (EZTAB) produces a set of tables for specific geographic areas. The Interactive Graphics and Retrieval System (INGRES) is a database management system that...

  8. Student perceptions of an online dental terminology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Ellen B

    2002-01-01

    Online learning is becoming a recognized method for delivering educational content throughout institutions of higher education. Few studies have been performed regarding online learning in dentistry or dental hygiene. The purpose of this qualitative research study was to describe and analyze the experiences of thirteen students enrolled in an online dental terminology course to determine their satisfaction level. The overall perceptions of online learning were positive, and although some frustrations were apparent, the majority of students stated that they learned a great deal, found the course valuable, and were now familiar with the terminology. Students commented on the convenience of taking the course at a time that fit their schedule and a place that they did not have to commute to attend. Technical issues and student isolation seemed to be the primary drawbacks to online learning. Some students missed the interaction that exists in a regular classroom. Students strongly suggested that, to be successful in online education, one had to be a self-directed learner. In addition, visual learners were more apt than audio learners to appreciate online learning. The results of this study suggest that online learning was a valuable method for teaching dental terminology and is particularly beneficial for students with no other alternative methods for gaining access to the courses due to geographical location. Where appropriate, online courses should be considered an option for providing distance education in dental hygiene programs.

  9. Online dictionaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Sven

    2012-01-01

    provide individualized solutions to the users’ punctual information needs. In this respect, it analyses the relation between the type and the individual and argues that lexicographers, although having individualization of needs satisfaction as their goal, still have to work with types of user, situation......, need, consultation, and data. The article then proceeds to the discussion of some advanced information science techniques that may contribute to the desired individualization. Upon this basis, it finally discusses the interaction between online dictionaries and external sources like the Internet...

  10. Life Online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markham, Annette

    the impact of cyberspace on self and society. Amidst the dizzying pace of technological innovation, Annette N. Markham embarks on a unique, ethnographic approach to understanding internet users by immersing herself in on-line reality. The result is an engrossing narrative as well as a theoretically engaging...... how people experience the internet, she must learn how to be embodied there—a process of acculturation and immersion which is not so different from other anthropological projects of cross-cultural understanding. Both new and not-so-new, cyberspace provides a context in which we can ask new sorts...

  11. Numident Online Verification Utility (NOVU)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — NOVU is a mainframe application that accesses the NUMIDENT to perform real-time SSN verifications. This program is called by other SSA online programs that serve as...

  12. State Online Query System (SOLQ)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Designed specifically for State Human Service agencies, SOLQ allows States real-time online access to SSA's SSN verification service and, if permitted, retrieval of...

  13. Access to scientific publications: the scientist's perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yegor Voronin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Scientific publishing is undergoing significant changes due to the growth of online publications, increases in the number of open access journals, and policies of funders and universities requiring authors to ensure that their publications become publicly accessible. Most studies of the impact of these changes have focused on the growth of articles available through open access or the number of open-access journals. Here, we investigated access to publications at a number of institutes and universities around the world, focusing on publications in HIV vaccine research--an area of biomedical research with special importance to the developing world. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We selected research papers in HIV vaccine research field, creating: 1 a first set of 50 most recently published papers with keywords "HIV vaccine" and 2 a second set of 200 articles randomly selected from those cited in the first set. Access to the majority (80% of the recently published articles required subscription, while cited literature was much more accessible (67% freely available online. Subscriptions at a number of institutions around the world were assessed for providing access to subscription-only articles from the two sets. The access levels varied widely, ranging among institutions from 20% to 90%. Through the WHO-supported HINARI program, institutes in low-income countries had access comparable to that of institutes in the North. Finally, we examined the response rates for reprint requests sent to corresponding authors, a method commonly used before internet access became widespread. Contacting corresponding authors with requests for electronic copies of articles by email resulted in a 55-60% success rate, although in some cases it took up to 1.5 months to get a response. CONCLUSIONS: While research articles are increasingly available on the internet in open access format, institutional subscriptions continue to play an important role. However

  14. Applying Universal Design for Learning in Online Courses:Pedagogical and Practical Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Ann Dell

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion of the universal design for learning (UDL model as a guiding set of principles for online curriculum development in higher education is discussed. Fundamentally, UDL provides the student with multiple means of accessing the course based on three overarching principles: presentation; action and expression; and engagement and interaction. Guidelines are also provided for incorporating UDL into an online curriculum for teaching both general and diverse populations including students with disabilities.

  15. An International Survey of Veterinary Students to Assess Their Use of Online Learning Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gledhill, Laura; Dale, Vicki H M; Powney, Sonya; Gaitskell-Phillips, Gemma H L; Short, Nick R M

    Today's veterinary students have access to a wide range of online resources that support self-directed learning. To develop a benchmark of current global student practice in e-learning, this study measured self-reported access to, and use of, these resources by students internationally. An online survey was designed and promoted via veterinary student mailing lists and international organizations, resulting in 1,070 responses. Analysis of survey data indicated that students now use online resources in a wide range of ways to support their learning. Students reported that access to online veterinary learning resources was now integral to their studies. Almost all students reported using open educational resources (OERs). Ownership of smartphones was widespread, and the majority of respondents agreed that the use of mobile devices, or m-learning, was essential. Social media were highlighted as important for collaborating with peers and sharing knowledge. Constraints to e-learning principally related to poor or absent Internet access and limited institutional provision of computer facilities. There was significant geographical variation, with students from less developed countries disadvantaged by limited access to technology and networks. In conclusion, the survey provides an international benchmark on the range and diversity in terms of access to, and use of, online learning resources by veterinary students globally. It also highlights the inequalities of access among students in different parts of the world.

  16. Healthcare provider perceptions of the role of interprofessional care in access to and outcomes of primary care in an underserved area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Shaowei; Teichman, Peter G; Latif, David; Boyd, Jennifer; Gupta, Rahul

    2018-03-01

    To meet the needs of an aging population who often have multiple chronic conditions, interprofessional care is increasingly adopted by patient-centred medical homes and Accountable Care Organisations to improve patient care coordination and decrease costs in the United States, especially in underserved areas with primary care workforce shortages. In this cross-sectional survey across multiple clinical settings in an underserved area, healthcare providers perceived overall outcomes associated with interprofessional care teams as positive. This included healthcare providers' beliefs that interprofessional care teams improved patient outcomes, increased clinic efficiency, and enhanced care coordination and patient follow-up. Teams with primary care physician available each day were perceived as better able to coordinate care and follow up with patients (p = .031), while teams that included clinical pharmacists were perceived as preventing medication-associated problems (p interprofessional care model as a useful strategy to improve various outcomes across different clinical settings in the context of a shortage of primary care physicians.

  17. Open Source Database and Website to Provide Free and Open Access to Inactive U.S. Patents in the Public Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuenyong Nilsiam

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Although theoretically the patent system is meant to bolster innovation, the current United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO is cumbersome and involves a significant time investment to locate inactive patents less than 20 years old. This article reports on the development of an open source database to find these public domain ideas. First, a search strategy is explained. Then the operation and use of free and open source software are detailed to meet the needs of open hardware innovators. Finally, a case study is presented to demonstrate the utility of the approach with 3-D printing. The results showed how the Free Inactive Patent Search enables users to search using plain language text to find public domain concepts and then provides a hyperlinked list of ideas that takes users to the USPTO database for the patent for more information. All of the source code to operate the search and the website are open source themselves and provided in the public domain for free. In the case study on 3-D printing the time to identify public domain patents was cut by a factor of more than 1500. This tool has the potential for accelerating the development of open hardware technologies to create high value for the public.

  18. African Journals Online: Brunei Darussalam

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online: Brunei Darussalam. Home > African Journals Online: Brunei Darussalam. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Browse By Category · Browse Alphabetically · Browse By Country · List All Titles · Free to read Titles This Journal is ...

  19. Online archives of Science

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    CERN Library has enabled till 26th June 2009 a trial access to the online archives of Science, starting in 1880. You are welcome to test this resource at http://www.sciencemag.org/archive/ Please contact mailto:Anne.Gentil-Beccot@cern.ch, for any feedback to share.

  20. The borderless online user

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Thomas; Schovsbo, Jens Hemmingsen

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally copyright has been exploited in separate geographical markets. This practice restricts the ability of users to access online services, music, movies and sports events on their electronic devices wherever they are in Europe and regardless of borders, viz. so called ‘portability...

  1. African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals OnLine (AJOL) is the world's largest and pre-eminent collection of peer-reviewed, African-published scholarly journals. Historically, scholarly information has flowed from North to South and from West to East. It has also been difficult for African researchers to access the work of other African academics.

  2. Benefits of Synchronous Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Scott; Smith, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Most online courses are offered as "asynchronous" courses and have no real-time contact with students. The Synchronous online alternative provides normal scheduled class time and allows students to login to a virtual online classroom with the instructor. We provide an overview of two different platforms for hosting synchronous classes…

  3. Supporting Emergency Medical Care Teams with an Integrated Status Display Providing Real-Time Access to Medical Best Practices, Workflow Tracking, and Patient Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, PoLiang; Nam, Min-Young; Choi, Jeonghwan; Kirlik, Alex; Sha, Lui; Berlin, Richard B

    2017-10-17

    The work of a hospital's medical staff is safety critical and often occurs under severe time constraints. To provide timely and effective cognitive support to medical teams working in such contexts, guidelines in the form of best practice workflows for healthcare have been developed by medical organizations. However, the high cognitive load imposed in such stressful and rapidly changing environments poses significant challenges to the medical staff or team in adhering to these workflows. In collaboration with physicians and nurses from Carle Foundation Hospital, we first studied and modeled medical team's individual responsibilities and interactions in cardiac arrest resuscitation and decomposed their overall task into a set of distinct cognitive tasks that must be specifically supported to achieve successful human-centered system design. We then developed a medical Best Practice Guidance (BPG) system for reducing medical teams' cognitive load, thus fostering real-time adherence to best practices. We evaluated the resulting system with physicians and nurses using a professional patient simulator used for medical training and certification. The evaluation results point to a reduction of cognitive load and enhanced adherence to medical best practices.

  4. Using peer advocates to improve access to services among hard-to-reach populations with hepatitis C: a qualitative study of client and provider relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLellan, Jennifer; Surey, Julian; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Stagg, Helen R; Mannell, Jenevieve

    2017-11-28

    Peer support programmes use individuals with specific experiences to improve engagement and outcomes among new clients. However, the skills and techniques used to achieve this engagement have not been mapped. This potentially restricts the development and replication of successful peer advocate models of care. This study explored how a group of peer advocates with experience of homelessness, alcohol and drug misuse made and sustained relationships with their client group. For the purposes of this project, the client group were located among a hepatitis C-positive cohort of people who have a history of injecting drug use and homelessness. Five self-selecting advocates gave a narrative interview lasting 40-90 min. These interviews were double transcribed using both thematic analysis and narrative analysis in order to triangulate the data and provide a robust set of findings about the unique skills of peer advocates in creating and sustaining relationships with clients from hard-to-reach populations. Peer advocates build rapport with clients through disclosing personal details about their lives. While this runs counter to assumptions about the need to maintain distance in client-patient relationships, the therapeutic benefits appear to outweigh the potential costs of this engagement. We conclude the therapeutic benefits of self-disclosure between peer advocates and their clients offer a moral grounding for self-disclosure as a means of building relationships with key hard-to-reach populations.

  5. Access Based Cost Estimation for Beddown Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-23

    everyone in Air Mobility Command Planning and Programs Requirements Division that contributed to this effort: especially Major Brad Buckman and...investigate available on-line sources of data and other existing databases. The necessary protocols and network access authorizations must be...System (C2IPS), and Standard Base Supply System (SBSS), etc. Figure 2 outlines the basic architecture and interface protocols . The system provides

  6. Canadian Healthcare Practitioners’ Access to Evidence Based Information Is Inequitable. A Review of: Chatterley, T., Storie, D., Chambers, T., Buckingham, J., Shiri, A., & Dorgan, M. (2012. Health information support provided by professional associations in Canada. Health Information & Libraries Journal, 29(3, 233-241.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Melssen

    2013-06-01

    maintains usage statistics or surveys their members. Nor do they grant access to licensed databases or offer information services, such as having a librarian or other information professional available to answer reference questions or to perform mediated literature searches. The two provincial associations and the three licensing colleges interviewed do supply information pertinent to health professionals, for example insurance information and funding.Seven national associations were interviewed: two permit access to databases developed by that association and three grant access to licensed databases such as Medline. All seven national associations provide access to journals (four of the seven only provide access to their own association’s journal and five offer information services. Four maintain usage statistics and five survey their members.Of the seven associations not interviewed, none grant access to licensed databases and one permits access to databases developed by that association. Five provide access to their own association’s journal and one provides book loans. Only one offers information services. Cost and the priority to provide resources to staff over members are barriers when trying to provide association members’ services and resources.Conclusion – Health professionals’ access to health information varies depending on the professional’s area of specialization, location in Canada, and particular association memberships. There is no consistency as to what health information is available to all health professionals in Canada, specifically Alberta. The majority of the associations do not provide resources and services, nor do they survey members to assess their usage, desires, needs, or satisfaction with resources and services. Usage rates are low for the associations that do track resource and service usage.A resource list of freely available online health information should be generated to mitigate existing disparities without accruing additional

  7. Web-accessible γ-spectrum simulator with on-line Monte Carlo for voluminous and shielded γ-sources: First results of experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlizov, A. N.; Dreher, R.

    2009-10-01

    A modelling approach for a quick and accurate simulation of γ-spectra from volume and shielded sources is described. It is based on the combination of two web-accessible modelling tools, the Easy Monte Carlo (EMC) and the Gamma Spectrum Generator (GSG), which have been recently developed within the European Commission's Nucleonica portal. The high performance of the simulation was achieved by the use of a next-event estimator for the photon flux calculations and an extensive database of the pre-calculated detector responses for the flux-to-pulse height distribution conversion. The paper presents the first results of the experimental validation of this approach performed with a 10% High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector and shielded/unshielded reference γ-sources.

  8. Online consumer contracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luzak, J.

    2014-01-01

    The new Consumer Rights Directive introduced some changes to the level of consumers’ protection online. However, just like with its predecessor, the Distance Selling Directive, the main focus of the protection that consumers have been granted online is to provide them with transparent and salient

  9. Consumers' Online Brand Endorsements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernritter, S.F.; Verlegh, P.W.J.; Smit, E.G.; De Pelsmacker, P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose and Approach This Chapter has three central goals: First, it aims to introduce the concept of consumers’ online brand endorsements, which we define as consumers’ intentional, public, and positive online affiliations with brands (e.g., liking a brand page on Facebook). Second, it provides an

  10. AmphibiaChina: an online database of Chinese Amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Jing; Wang, Kai

    2016-01-18

    AmphibiaChina, an open-access, web-based database, is designed to provide comprehensive and up-to-date information on Chinese amphibians. It offers an integrated module with six major sections. Compared to other known databases including AmphibiaWeb and Amphibian Species of the World, AmphibiaChina has the following new functions: (1) online species identification based on DNA barcode sequences; (2) comparisons and discussions of different major taxonomic systems; and (3) phylogenetic progress on Chinese amphibians. This database offers a window for the world to access available information of Chinese amphibians. AmphibiaChina with its Chinese version can be accessed at http://www.amphibiachina.org.

  11. Accessibility Guidelines for Astronomy and Astrophysics Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkiewicz, Jacqueline; Murphy, Nicholas; Diaz-Merced, Wanda Liz; Aarnio, Alicia; Knierman, Karen; AAS Working Group for Accessibility and Disability

    2018-01-01

    Attendance at meetings and conferences is a critical component of an astronomer's professional life, providing opportunities for presenting one's work, staying current in the field, career networking, and scientific collaboration. Exclusion from these gatherings due to lack of accessibility and accommodation failure is a reality for disabled astronomers, and contributes substantially to low levels of representation in the senior-most levels of the field. We present a preview of the AAS Working Group for Accessibility and Disability's best practice recommendations for meetings accessibility. Applying the principles of universal access and barrier-free design, we model a paradigm of anticipating and removing accessibility barriers in advance, rather than putting the burden of requesting accommodation solely on disabled astronomers and students. We cite several professional and nonprofessional societies identified as meetings accessibility exemplars, and model our guidelines on their best practices. We establish standards for accessibility budgeting, venue choice, publication of policies online, designating point persons, and identifying barriers. We make recommendations for oral and poster presentations, event registration, receptions and banquets, excursions, and other typical conference activities. For meetings which are constrained by fixed budgets and venue choice, we identify a number of low cost/high reward accessibility steps which might still have a large beneficial impact. We likewise provide adapted recommendations for low budget meetings. THIS IS A POSTER LOCATED IN THE AAS BOOTH

  12. Quality open access publishing and registration to Directory of Open Access Journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Bi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available With the fast development of open access publishing worldwide, Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ as a community-curated online directory that indexes and provides access to high quality, open access, peer-reviewed journals, has been recognized for its high criteria in facilitating high quality open access scholarly publishing and used as the portal for accessing quality open access journals. While the numbers of journal application to be inclusion in DOAJ in Asia are kept increasing dramatically, many editors of these journals are not very clear about the idea or concept of the open access which have been embedded in the application form containing 58 questions falling into several different criteria categories. The very commonly seen misunderstanding of the required item, inaccurate or vague or incomplete and even missing information, poorly organized website, non-transparent process of publishing, especially no open access statement and copyright statement, or conflicts between the policy statements would cause much more communication between the reviewer and the editor and delay the completion of the review. This article gives an in depth introduction to DOAJ criteria and detailed introduction to the general process on how to register to DOAJ, suggestions based on application review also is given for journal editors to better prepare for this application. And it is the most important for editors to keep in mind that to be indexed by DOAJ is not just about filling a form, it is about truly change and adapt to best practices in open access publishing.

  13. On-Line Restricted Access Molecularly Imprinted Solid-Phase Extraction of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors Directly from Untreated Human Plasma Samples Followed by HPLC-UV Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Katrine Kyona Muniz Sirgom; Boralli, Vanessa Bergamin; Wisniewski, Célio; Figueiredo, Eduardo Costa

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we proposed a new restricted access molecularly imprinted polymer coated with bovine serum albumin (RAMIP-BSA) to be used in a multidimensional chromatographic system applied for the analysis of six selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) directly from untreated human plasma samples. Fluoxetine, methacrylic acid and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate were used as the template, functional monomer and cross-linker, respectively. The imprinted polymer was covered with a bovine serum albumin (BSA) layer via the interconnections between the amine groups of the BSA using glutaraldehyde as a cross-linker. The obtained RAMIP-BSA was able to extract the SSRIs directly from the human plasma, while ∼100% of the proteins were excluded from the sample. Selectivity coefficients were calculated for fluoxetine (template) in comparison with venlafaxine, duloxetine, citalopram, fluvoxamine, paroxetine and sertraline, and the values were >1 in all cases, attesting to the presence of binding sites in the imprinted polymer. The method presented analytical ranges from 20 to 500 µg/L and correlation coefficients >0.99 for all of the SSRIs (fluoxetine, venlafaxine, duloxetine, citalopram, fluvoxamine and sertraline). Precision and accuracy presented variation coefficients and relative errors 85%. The proposed method was able to analyze three samples per hour, and each column was used at least 50 times without any significant changes in its performance. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Accessibility in Teaching Assistant Training: A Critical Review of Programming from Ontario’s Teaching and Learning Centres

    OpenAIRE

    Marie Vander Kloet

    2015-01-01

    It is increasingly understood that university education must be accessible to persons with disabilities. The responsibility to make the university accessible is arguably shared by all of us and yet, the extent to which it has become fully accessible is certainly suspect. By undertaking qualitative, discursive analysis of websites, online texts and other materials provided by Ontario’s teaching and learning centres, this paper seeks to do two things. First, it provides a critical overview of t...

  15. Comparing Safari Tech Books Online and Books24x7 E-Book Collections: A Case Study from the University of British Columbia Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsky, Eugene; Schattman, Lisa; Greenwood, Aleteia

    2009-01-01

    Most academic libraries are seeking to provide electronic access to the very dynamic and changing field of technology related material. "Safari Tech Books Online" and "Books24x7" are the major e-book collections in this area. We compared the "Safari Tech Books Online" and "Books24x7" e-book packages as to…

  16. USING THE US EXPERIENCE OF ONLINE AND HYBRID EDUCATION IN UKRAINIAN UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ірина Задорожна

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the best practices of the US universities on providing hybrid and online education that can be implemented at Ukrainian universities which experience lack of finances and a decrease in student enrollment. Basic factors of online and hybrid courses popularity are analysed (flexibility; accessibility, especially for students with special needs; saving time; convenience; motivation as students often feel less stressed in a virtual classroom than in a face-to-face environment. The main challenges of online and hybrid learning (faculty training and professional development for online education (in terms of pedagogy, communication and technology, supporting student learning in the online environment, and creating an efficient and interactive online learning community are defined in the article. Hybrid courses are regarded as such that promote some equivalence between digital and live communication.

  17. Marshaling Resources: A Classic Grounded Theory Study of Online Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Yalof

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Classic grounded theory (CGT was used to identify a main concern of online students in higher education. One of the main impediments to studying online is a sense of isolation and lack of access to support systems as students navigate through complex requirements of their online programs. Hypothetical probability statements illustrate the imbalance between heightened needs of virtual learners and perceived inadequate support provided by educational institutions. The core variable, marshaling resources, explains how peer supports sustain motivation toward successful program completion. Understanding the critical contribution virtual interpersonal networks make towards maximizing resources by group problem solving is a significant aspect of this theory. Keywords: Online learning, e-learning, personal learning networks, peer networks

  18. Online English Language Learning: Theory-Based Course Design and Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Maureen Snow

    2017-01-01

    The demand for higher education is increasing worldwide. To meet this demand, and to provide increased access, flexible forms of delivery are needed. Although online courses are criticized for a lack of interaction, when intentionally designed, they can provide learners with opportunities for collaboration that supports the achievement of desired…

  19. Why some physicians envy dentists: the applications service provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBeau, S A

    2001-03-01

    To summarize, here's what I get from my ASP. My staff and I can access our schedules, patient information, etc, any time and from anywhere--not just from the office PC. All I need is a standard Internet browser and a connection to the Internet. Only authorized personnel have access to my data. My online practice management system is password protected and operates with Verisign SSL--the highest level of Internet security. All information is stored in my secure database, which my ASP backs up and replicates continuously. Dental. PackOnline even operates dual servers. In case one server has a problem, they just switch to the other server, so I never have to worry about "down-time." I can give patients access to their own information online-treatment plans, patient education material, balances, etc, in a highly private and confidential manner. I can share patient information, x-rays, and other materials online with colleagues, specialists, and labs, again in a highly confidential manner. I send out billing, recalls, claims, and more automatically because my ASP has real-time connections to service providers. No more time spent printing, folding, stamping cards, billing, or processing claims. This is a tremendous cost and time saver!

  20. Online Professional Development: A Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Meg S.; Phalen, Lena; Moran, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Many teachers are turning to online professional development to meet their learning needs, but the vast array of available opportunities may be overwhelming. This article provides a framework for making sense of common online teacher learning opportunities. It also suggests situations where online professional development may be most useful and…

  1. Online Fan Practices and CALL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauro, Shannon

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a narrative overview of research on online fan practices for language and literacy learning, use, and identity work. I begin with an introduction to online fan communities and common fan practices found in these online affinity spaces, the best known of which is fan fiction, fictional writing that reinterprets and remixes the…

  2. Supporting Indigenous Published Research: The African Journals Online (Ajol) Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    P. Smart

    2003-01-01

    The Programme for the Enhancement of Research Information (PERI) was launched by INASP to improve access to research results between developing and developed countries. This project includes 4components: (1) supply information online into academic and research libraries, (2) assist dissemination of national and regional scholarly publications, (3) provide training on best use of online resources, and(4) support local publishing through training in publishing skills. The first component of the...

  3. Negative Perceptions of Urban Tourism Community in Beijing: Based on Online Comments

    OpenAIRE

    Ping, Li; Kaiyong, Wang; Tian, Chen; Fuyuan, Wang

    2017-01-01

    The development of urban tourism community (UTC) will bring new vigor and vitality into the urban sustainable development. There are abundant tourists’ comments about personal experience in UTC in online travel communities, which provide good access to the knowledge of negative perceptions of urban tourism community. Based on online comments, this paper used content analysis method to research tourists’ negative perceptions about five typical tourism communities in Beijing, whereby the common...

  4. Internet Access by People with Intellectual Disabilities: Inequalities and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Fullwood

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This review gives an overview of the societal inequalities faced by people with intellectual disabilities, before focusing specifically on challenges people face accessing the Internet. Current access will be outlined along with the societal, support and attitudinal factors that can hinder access. Discussion of carer views of Internet use by people with intellectual disabilities will be covered incorporating consideration of the tension between protection, self-determination and lifestyle issues and gaining Internet access. We will address how impairment related factors may impede access and subsequently discuss how supports may be used to obfuscate impairments and facilitate access. We will move on from this to critically describe some of the potential benefits the Internet could provide to people with intellectual disabilities, including the potential for self-expression, advocacy and developing friendships. Finally, strategies to better include people with intellectual disabilities online will be given along with future research suggestions.

  5. Direct Care Workforce Training: Internet Accessibility and Acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochylski, Daniel P; Luz, Clare C; Shen, Xiaoxi

    2017-02-02

    Evidence exists that web-based learning for health care professionals can improve topic-specific knowledge, increase access to training, and lower training costs. However, limited information exists on the value of online education for improving hands-on skills as part of personal care aide (PCA) training. New PCA training programs are emerging that are fully online or hybrid models that blend online with in-person instruction. Such programs require access to a computer and high-speed internet, which could prove difficult for low-income PCAs who are less likely to own a computer. The current study evaluated a PCA training demonstration that examined issues of internet access, use, and acceptability for PCA training. Results show most trainees prefer a hybrid online/in-person model, but there are gaps in access and acceptability, particularly related to reading ability. These findings have implications for health care providers who deliver training programs aimed at developing a qualified PCA workforce capable of providing competent care to older adults. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, xx(x), xx-xx.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. You're a What? Online Seller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torpey, Elka

    2013-01-01

    As online shopping has grown, so too has the number of people who make money selling products online. Online sellers can sell just about anything. Starting an online business can be as simple as having something to sell and access to the Internet. But there are a lot of factors to consider if one is going to have a business that thrives. One is to…

  7. A peripherally inserted central catheter line, inserted the day before surgery, decreases the time from induction to incision for spinal deformity surgery and safely provides central venous access during surgery: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuedemann, Anne E; Schwend, Richard M; Thomas, Valorie K; Leamon, Julia M; Lightner, Tammy S

    2018-03-01

    Pediatric patients undergoing surgery for spinal deformity may benefit from central venous access to provide intraoperative monitoring and fluid resuscitation. For pediatric surgical patients requiring central access, we hypothesized that placing a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line preoperatively should decrease time from induction of anesthesia to incision and result in improved patient safety and decreased operating room charges. This was a retrospective, nonrandomized, and case comparison study. Clinical records of all children with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis or neuromuscular scoliosis treated surgically by the senior author between December 2007 and April 2012 were reviewed. Control group patients had a central venous catheter (CVC) placed by the anesthesiologist after induction of anesthesia. The trial group had a PICC placed under local anesthesia the day before surgery by an experienced vascular access team. The time from induction of anesthesia to the time for the surgical incision was determined for each study group. The CVC line placement charges were determined by the operating room time charges at $214/min. Charges saved were the mean time difference multiplied by the operating room time charge, less the charge for PICC line insertion ($1282). There were 29 neuromuscular patients, the mean age was 13 years (SD: 4 years). The mean time from induction to incision for the PICC group was 91 min [95% confidence interval (CI): 67-115 min] and for the CVC group 113 min (95% CI: 99-127 min, P=0.083). For this mean time difference of 22 min, the estimated cost savings would be $3426 per patient. There were 59 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, the mean age was 14 years (SD: 2 years). The mean time from induction to incision for the PICC group was 78 min (95% CI: 74-82 min) and for the CVC group 106 min (95% CI: 96-116  min, P≤0.001). For this mean time difference of 28 min, the estimated cost savings would

  8. Mining online community data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kasper; Liland, Kristian Hovde; Kvaal, Knut

    2017-01-01

    to provide an answer to what is it that makes such automatic idea detection possible? Our study is based on two datasets from dialogue between members of two distinct online communities. The first community is related to beer. The second is related to Lego. We generate machine learning classifiers based......Ideas are essential for innovation and for the continuous renewal of a firm’s product offerings. Previous research has argued that online communities contain such ideas. Therefore, online communities such as forums, Facebook groups, blogs etc. are potential gold mines for innovative ideas that can...... be used for boosting the innovation performance of the firm. However, the nature of online community data makes idea detection labor intensive. As an answer to this problem, research has shown that it might be possible to detect ideas from online communities, automatically. Research is however, yet...

  9. FEDIX on-line information service: Design, develop, test, and implement an on-line research and education information service. Annual status report, September 1992--August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodman, J.A.

    1993-08-01

    Federal Information Exchange, Inc. (FIE) is a diversified information services company that is recognized as the major electronic link between the higher education community and the Federal government in the field of research administration. FIE provides a range of information related services to the government, academic and private sectors, including database management, software development and technical support. FEDIX is the on-line information service designed, developed and implemented by FIE to accomplish the following objectives: (1). Broaden the participation of the education community in Federal research and education programs by providing free and unrestricted on-line access to information from all participating Federal agencies; and (2). Provide the education community with on-line access to a single keyword-searchable system for research and educational funding opportunities at the participating Federal agencies.

  10. How MOOCs Can Empower Learners: A Comparison of Provider Goals and User Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longstaff, Emily

    2017-01-01

    The collective aims of the three biggest providers of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are to promote anywhere, anytime learning; to increase access to world-class higher education; and to connect and empower learners. Through analysis of focus group discussions between MOOC participants at the Australian National University, this study shows…

  11. Online dating

    OpenAIRE

    Pilecká, Jarmila

    2014-01-01

    The usage of online dating sides has increased in last few decades. This kind of meeting potential new partner is specific in many ways. Especially in communication, ways of selection and initiation of the relationship online. The reduction of information is another phenomenon in this kind of interaction as a result of creating impression. This contains lying and deception in self-presentation on online dating sides as well. Analysis of data suggests, that men tell lies more than women. They ...

  12. Gamers Online

    OpenAIRE

    Zulkarnaen, Alfi

    2015-01-01

    Komunitas gamers online merupakan suatu bentuk komunitas masa kini yang menyandarkan segala bentuk kegiatannya pada penggunaan teknologi berupa komputer dan jaringan internet untuk dapat menghubungkan diantara sesama pengguna, komunitas gamers online adalah suatu kelompok yang terdiri dari beragam individu dengan beragam latar belakang yang diikat oleh satu ide maupun tujuan, yakni games online. Perkembangan teknologi berupa komputer tidak hanya bertujuan sebagai alat bantu dalam kehidupan me...

  13. Online Advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Goldfarb, Avi; Tucker, Catherine Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This chapter explores what makes online advertising different from traditional advertising channels. We argue that online advertising differs from traditional advertising channels in two important ways: measurability and targetability. Measurability is higher because the digital nature of online advertising means that responses to ads can be tracked relatively easily. Targetability is higher because data can be automatically tracked at an individual level, and it is relatively easy to show di...

  14. Innovative uses of technology in online midwifery education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbour, Megan W; Nypaver, Cynthia F; Wika, Judith C

    2015-01-01

    Women's health care in the United States is at a critical juncture. There is increased demand for primary care providers, including women's health specialists such as certified nurse-midwives/certified midwives, women's health nurse practitioners, and obstetrician-gynecologists, yet shortages in numbers of these providers are expected. This deficit in the number of women's health care providers could have adverse consequences for women and their newborns when women have to travel long distances to access maternity health care. Online education using innovative technologies and evidence-based teaching and learning strategies have the potential to increase the number of health care providers in several disciplines, including midwifery. This article reviews 3 innovative uses of online platforms for midwifery education: virtual classrooms, unfolding case studies, and online return demonstrations of clinical skills. These examples of innovative teaching strategies can promote critical and creative thinking and enhance competence in skills. Their use in online education can help enhance the student experience. More students, including those who live in rural and underserved regions and who otherwise might be unable to attend a traditional onsite campus, are provided the opportunity to complete quality midwifery education through online programs, which in turn may help expand the women's health care provider workforce. This article is part of a special series of articles that address midwifery innovations in clinical practice, education, interprofessional collaboration, health policy, and global health. © 2015 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  15. Online Metacognitive Tasks for EFL Distance Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya GARCIA-SANCHEZ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Online courses have benefited from the adequate use of digital tools and resources that allow learners to be the center of their own learning process. More often online instructors not only aim at what students have to individually do but learners are also engaged in interacting with the educational community by means of a variety of ubiquitous learning (u-learning resources that can be accessed anywhere and at any time. This article proposes a debate on the importance of providing interactive scenarios among students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL in Higher Education when registered in online courses. Without communicative activities, the successful production of any foreign language is not complete since knowledge building and the understanding of the foreign language, either in written or spoken form, are the key points of an adequate performance of communicative competences. The findings of this study will provide information about useful u-learning tools and evaluation tasks for the adequate performance of communicative competences required in a foreign language online course.

  16. Development of an online, publicly accessible naive Bayesian decision support tool for mammographic mass lesions based on the American College of Radiology (ACR) BI-RADS lexicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benndorf, Matthias; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Herda, Christoph; Wu, Yirong; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop and validate a decision support tool for mammographic mass lesions based on a standardized descriptor terminology (BI-RADS lexicon) to reduce variability of practice. Materials and Methods We used separate training data (1276 lesions, 138 malignant) and validation data (1177 lesions, 175 malignant). We created naïve Bayes (NB) classifiers from the training data with 10-fold cross validation. Our “inclusive model” comprised BI-RADS categories, BI-RADS descriptors and age as predictive variables, our “descriptor model” comprised BI-RADS descriptors and age. The resulting NB classifiers were applied to the validation data. We evaluated and compared classifier performance with ROC-analysis. Results In the training data, the inclusive model yields an AUC of 0.959, the descriptor model yields an AUC of 0.910 (P<0.001). The inclusive model is superior to the clinical performance (BI-RADS categories alone, P<0.001), the descriptor model performs similarly. When applied to the validation data, the inclusive model yields an AUC of 0.935, the descriptor model yields an AUC of 0.876 (P<0.001). Again, the inclusive model is superior to the clinical performance (P<0.001), the descriptor model performs similarly. Conclusion We consider our classifier a step towards a more uniform interpretation of combinations of BI-RADS descriptors. We provide our classifier at www.ebm-radiology.com/nbmm/index.html. PMID:25576230

  17. Development of an online, publicly accessible naive Bayesian decision support tool for mammographic mass lesions based on the American College of Radiology (ACR) BI-RADS lexicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benndorf, Matthias; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Herda, Christoph [Kantonsspital Graubuenden, Chur (Switzerland); Wu, Yirong; Burnside, Elizabeth S. [University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-01

    To develop and validate a decision support tool for mammographic mass lesions based on a standardized descriptor terminology (BI-RADS lexicon) to reduce variability of practice. We used separate training data (1,276 lesions, 138 malignant) and validation data (1,177 lesions, 175 malignant). We created naive Bayes (NB) classifiers from the training data with tenfold cross-validation. Our ''inclusive model'' comprised BI-RADS categories, BI-RADS descriptors, and age as predictive variables; our ''descriptor model'' comprised BI-RADS descriptors and age. The resulting NB classifiers were applied to the validation data. We evaluated and compared classifier performance with ROC-analysis. In the training data, the inclusive model yields an AUC of 0.959; the descriptor model yields an AUC of 0.910 (P < 0.001). The inclusive model is superior to the clinical performance (BI-RADS categories alone, P < 0.001); the descriptor model performs similarly. When applied to the validation data, the inclusive model yields an AUC of 0.935; the descriptor model yields an AUC of 0.876 (P < 0.001). Again, the inclusive model is superior to the clinical performance (P < 0.001); the descriptor model performs similarly. We consider our classifier a step towards a more uniform interpretation of combinations of BI-RADS descriptors. We provide our classifier at www.ebm-radiology.com/nbmm/index.html. (orig.)

  18. NASA's Meteorologist Center: Online Resources to Promote Climate Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, R.; Tenenbaum, L. F.; Witte, J.

    2012-12-01

    In a recent survey by George Mason University, a significant number of meteorologists and weathercasters in America cited lack of access to appropriate visuals and graphics as a basic impediment to reporting the reality of anthropogenic climate change. To address this need, NASA's Global Climate Change Website, climate.nasa.gov, has developed an online Meteorologist Center, stocked with high quality graphics and animations, public education materials, and a list of credible online resources. The goal of the project is to provide weathercasters with a "one-stop shop" for broadcast-ready materials that can be used to report on global climate change and to educate audiences.;

  19. Teaching and Learning Communities through Online Annotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Pluijm, B.

    2016-12-01

    What do colleagues do with your assigned textbook? What they say or think about the material? Want students to be more engaged in their learning experience? If so, online materials that complement standard lecture format provide new opportunity through managed, online group annotation that leverages the ubiquity of internet access, while personalizing learning. The concept is illustrated with the new online textbook "Processes in Structural Geology and Tectonics", by Ben van der Pluijm and Stephen Marshak, which offers a platform for sharing of experiences, supplementary materials and approaches, including readings, mathematical applications, exercises, challenge questions, quizzes, alternative explanations, and more. The annotation framework used is Hypothes.is, which offers a free, open platform markup environment for annotation of websites and PDF postings. The annotations can be public, grouped or individualized, as desired, including export access and download of annotations. A teacher group, hosted by a moderator/owner, limits access to members of a user group of teachers, so that its members can use, copy or transcribe annotations for their own lesson material. Likewise, an instructor can host a student group that encourages sharing of observations, questions and answers among students and instructor. Also, the instructor can create one or more closed groups that offers study help and hints to students. Options galore, all of which aim to engage students and to promote greater responsibility for their learning experience. Beyond new capacity, the ability to analyze student annotation supports individual learners and their needs. For example, student notes can be analyzed for key phrases and concepts, and identify misunderstandings, omissions and problems. Also, example annotations can be shared to enhance notetaking skills and to help with studying. Lastly, online annotation allows active application to lecture posted slides, supporting real-time notetaking

  20. Online Customization of Retailers’ Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natorina Alona O.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to develop recommendations on correct online customization of retailers’ activities in the online space based on results of studying and analyzing trends in digital activity of consumers under real time conditions and taking into account the factors directly influencing buyers’ purchasing from corresponding online retailers. The trends of changes in digital forms of contacting consumers in different countries and regions of the world are studied, and their access to the digital content with details of gadget types and devices is analyzed. The level of digital activity of consumers in the online space is diagnosed in accordance with the consumer inclusion index using the GfK methodology. It is grounded that retailers are advisable to look for new tools of online customization with mandatory consideration of consumer preferences, which depend on the influence of various factors on their behavior. It is found out that a high level of online confidence in a retailer acts as a catalyst for purchasing on the Internet, and factors influencing it are identified. The prerequisites for successful online customization of retailers’ activities are considered, and categories of behavioral patterns of potential buyers to achieve the most effective digital promotion of retailers in the online space are proposed. The aspects of online customization that guarantee the necessary level of competitiveness of retailers for effective functioning in the online space are justified.

  1. Online Promotion of Romania’s Tourism Nationwide and Worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta-Andreea ANDREIANA

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Owing to electronic mailing, the Internet offers all users the possibility to have access to information, at any time, and to communicate rapidly. At present, the effects of the internet exceed by far our expectations. The electronic commerce represents the most efficient method by which sellers may increase the number of their customers. It is the most efficient means of presenting and exhibiting services and products. The Internet provides electronic means to improve marketing strategies within companies. The high number of people who access the internet (internet use in Romania is increasingly higher and its impact on us enable development of tourism through online promotion, as it is an inexpensive and accessible method. Another advantage is that websites may be viewed by all and any person, from anywhere in the world, providing there is internet access.

  2. Online Onderwijspioniers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaker, R.; Nat, van der L.; Kersten, A.H.

    2014-01-01

    Onderwijs voor tienduizenden studenten over de hele wereld, dat kan met een zogenaamde Massive Open Online Course, of MOOC. Wageningen University heeft er ondubbelzinnig voor gekozen, maar nu de uitvoering nog. Hoe pak je dat aan, zo’n online lesprogramma? ‘Het is zaak de aandacht van de student

  3. Live online communication facilitating collaborative learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    control access to the oral and written communication channels of the system, leaving the students with only the possibility to listen. It is a somewhat limiting view that leads to a superficial use of the system. Furthermore, this view brings with it a very narrow definition of the learning process which....... This has paved the way for web conference systems that provide users with easy access to live online communication. Teachers and students are no longer limited to physical class rooms, but can go global via virtual class rooms that can be created in the available web conference system. Fast connections......, new applications and devices are simply making blended learning eaiser than before and therefore support a strongere focus on the learning activities Most web conference systems provide presentation functions enabling users to show slides, share files and engage in oral and visual communication...

  4. PineappleDB: An online pineapple bioinformatics resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, Richard L; Crowe, Mark L; Ripi-Koia, Jonni; Fairbairn, David J; Botella, José R

    2005-01-01

    Background A world first pineapple EST sequencing program has been undertaken to investigate genes expressed during non-climacteric fruit ripening and the nematode-plant interaction during root infection. Very little is known of how non-climacteric fruit ripening is controlled or of the molecular basis of the nematode-plant interaction. PineappleDB was developed to provide the research community with access to a curated bioinformatics resource housing the fruit, root and nematode infected gall expressed sequences. Description PineappleDB is an online, curated database providing integrated access to annotated expressed sequence tag (EST) data for cDNA clones isolated from pineapple fruit, root, and nematode infected root gall vascular cylinder tissues. The database currently houses over 5600 EST sequences, 3383 contig consensus sequences, and associated bioinformatic data including splice variants, Arabidopsis homologues, both MIPS based and Gene Ontology functional classifications, and clone distributions. The online resource can be searched by text or by BLAST sequence homology. The data outputs provide comprehensive sequence, bioinformatic and functional classification information. Conclusion The online pineapple bioinformatic resource provides the research community with access to pineapple fruit and root/gall sequence and bioinformatic data in a user-friendly format. The search tools enable efficient data mining and present a wide spectrum of bioinformatic and functional classification information. PineappleDB will be of broad appeal to researchers investigating pineapple genetics, non-climacteric fruit ripening, root-knot nematode infection, crassulacean acid metabolism and alternative RNA splicing in plants. PMID:16202174

  5. PineappleDB: an online pineapple bioinformatics resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, Richard L; Crowe, Mark L; Ripi-Koia, Jonni; Fairbairn, David J; Botella, José R

    2005-10-05

    A world first pineapple EST sequencing program has been undertaken to investigate genes expressed during non-climacteric fruit ripening and the nematode-plant interaction during root infection. Very little is known of how non-climacteric fruit ripening is controlled or of the molecular basis of the nematode-plant interaction. PineappleDB was developed to provide the research community with access to a curated bioinformatics resource housing the fruit, root and nematode infected gall expressed sequences. PineappleDB is an online, curated database providing integrated access to annotated expressed sequence tag (EST) data for cDNA clones isolated from pineapple fruit, root, and nematode infected root gall vascular cylinder tissues. The database currently houses over 5600 EST sequences, 3383 contig consensus sequences, and associated bioinformatic data including splice variants, Arabidopsis homologues, both MIPS based and Gene Ontology functional classifications, and clone distributions. The online resource can be searched by text or by BLAST sequence homology. The data outputs provide comprehensive sequence, bioinformatic and functional classification information. The online pineapple bioinformatic resource provides the research community with access to pineapple fruit and root/gall sequence and bioinformatic data in a user-friendly format. The search tools enable efficient data mining and present a wide spectrum of bioinformatic and functional classification information. PineappleDB will be of broad appeal to researchers investigating pineapple genetics, non-climacteric fruit ripening, root-knot nematode infection, crassulacean acid metabolism and alternative RNA splicing in plants.

  6. Building an Online Data Management Plan Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Reilly

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Following the 2011 announcement by the National Science Foundation (NSF that it would begin requiring Data Management Plans with every funding application, the University of Houston Libraries explored ways to support our campus researchers in meeting this requirement. A small team of librarians built an online tool using a Drupal module. The tool includes informational content, an interactive questionnaire, and an extensive FAQ to meet diverse researcher needs. This easily accessible and locally maintained tool allows us to provide a high level of personalized service to our researchers.

  7. CMS OnlineWeb-Based Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Wan, Zongru; Chakaberia, Irakli; Lopez-Perez, Juan Antonio; Maeshima, Kaori; Maruyama, Sho; Soha, Aron; Sulmanas, Balys; Wan, Zongru

    2012-01-01

    For large international High Energy Physics experiments, modern web technologies make the online monitoring of detector status, data acquisition status, trigger rates, luminosity, etc., accessible for the collaborators anywhere and anytime. This helps the collaborating experts monitor the status of the experiment, identify the problems, and improve data-taking efficiency. We present the Web-Based Monitoring project of the CMS experiment at the LHC of CERN. The data sources are relational databases and various messaging systems. The project provides a vast amount of in-depth information including real time data, historical trend, and correlations, in a user friendly way.

  8. Access Denied! Contrasting Data Access in the United States and Ireland

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Samuel Grogan; Aleecia M. McDonald

    2016-01-01

    .... This paper describes attitudes about data access. 873 US and Irish Internet users participated in a survey designed to examine views on data access to information held by online companies and data brokers...

  9. Open access and the future of scholarly communication

    CERN Document Server

    Dickson, Katherine A

    It is impossible to imagine the future of academic libraries without an extensive consideration of open access the removal of price and permission barriers from scholarly research online. As textbook and journal subscription prices continue to rise, improvements in technology make online dissemination of scholarship less expensive, and faculty recognize the practical and philosophical appeal of making their work available to wider audiences. As a consequences, libraries have begun to consider a wide variety of open access flavors and business models. These new possibilities have significant impact on both library services and collection policies, and the call for new skills within library staffing. Volume 9 of the series Creating the 21st-Century Academic Library is the first of two addressing the topic of open access in academic libraries and focuses on policy and infrastructure for libraries that wish to provide leadership on their campus in the transition to more open forms of scholarship. Chapters in the ...

  10. Pedagogical Perspectives for the Online Education Skeptic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Pam Estes; Brewer, Edward C.

    2015-01-01

    While online programs continue to grow at an astounding rate in higher education, many faculty remain skeptical of the efficacy of online models. This article provides an overview of some significant benefits of online education while recognizing some common concerns. An examination of the current literature and the authors' own online experiences…

  11. Assessing the Accessibility of Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badge, Joanne L.; Dawson, Emma; Cann, Alan J.; Scott, Jon

    2008-01-01

    A wide range of tools is now available to enable teaching practitioners to create web-based educational materials from PowerPoint presentations, adding a variety of different digital media, such as audio and animation. The pilot study described in this paper compared three different systems for producing multimedia presentations from existing…

  12. Online dictionaries for assisting translators of LSP texts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro; Fuertes-Olivera, Pedro A.

    2012-01-01

    Bilingual specialized lexicography generally aims to facilitate communication within specialized domains. Bilingual terminology, in contrast, tends to focus on recording, structuring and analyzing terms by describing differences and similarities between the language communities involved. A study...... shows that online terminological dictionaries for translation are often insufficient and appear to be influenced by linguistic traditions and practices in the way they present and give access to data. Specialized translation dictionaries, however, provide help to solve user needs at various stages...

  13. Password Hardened Biometric: A Complete Solution of Online Security

    OpenAIRE

    Ajay Sharma; Deo Brat Ojha

    2013-01-01

    In present epoch, secure online access to enterprises resources is very important for any organization. To protect valuable data become one of the big challenge for today's business as enterprise customers or clients involved in business-to-customer (B2C) and business-to-business (B2B) e-commerce need to feel that their transactions are secured from system hackers. Biometric technology provides a solution to this problem in enterprise network security. In this article we enhance the security ...

  14. Out Online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raun, Tobias

    Trans people are increasingly stepping out of the shadow of pathologization and secretiveness to tell their life stories, share information and to connect with like-minded others, using YouTube as a platform. "Out Online: Trans Self-Representation and Community Building on YouTube" explores...... between trans identity and technology, "Out Online" explores the transformative and therapeutic potential of the video blog as a means by which trans vloggers can emerge and develop online, using the vlog as a site for creation, intervention, community building and resistance. As such, it will appeal...... to social scientists and scholars of cultural and media studies with interests in gender, sexuality and embodiment....

  15. Microbiology Learning and Education Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarner, Jeannette; Niño, Silvia M

    2016-05-01

    The ubiquity of devices that connect to the Internet has exploded, allowing for easy dissemination of information. Many teachers from kindergarten to universities use the information obtained online or post material they want their students to access. Online media readily places articles, books, videos, and games at our fingertips. The public in general also gathers health information from the Internet. The following review will explore what has been published regarding microbiology education and learning online and the use of electronic media by microbiologists for scientific purposes. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Preferences for Online and/or Face-to-Face Counseling among University Students in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kah P. Wong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, online counseling is considered to be a cost-effective and highly accessible method of providing basic counseling and mental health services. To examine the potential of online delivery as a way of increasing overall usage of services, this study looked at students’ attitudes toward and likelihood of using both online and/or face-to-face counseling. A survey was conducted with 409 students from six universities in Malaysia participating. Approximately 35% of participants reported that they would be likely to utilize online counseling services but would be unlikely to participate in face-to-face counseling. Based on these results, it is suggested that offering online counseling, in addition to face-to-face services, could be an effective way for many university counseling centers to increase the utilization of their services and thus better serve their communities.

  17. A Novel Image Steganography Technique for Secured Online Transaction Using DWT and Visual Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha Devi, M. D.; ShivaKumar, K. B.

    2017-08-01

    Online payment eco system is the main target especially for cyber frauds. Therefore end to end encryption is very much needed in order to maintain the integrity of secret information related to transactions carried online. With access to payment related sensitive information, which enables lot of money transactions every day, the payment infrastructure is a major target for hackers. The proposed system highlights, an ideal approach for secure online transaction for fund transfer with a unique combination of visual cryptography and Haar based discrete wavelet transform steganography technique. This combination of data hiding technique reduces the amount of information shared between consumer and online merchant needed for successful online transaction along with providing enhanced security to customer’s account details and thereby increasing customer’s confidence preventing “Identity theft” and “Phishing”. To evaluate the effectiveness of proposed algorithm Root mean square error, Peak signal to noise ratio have been used as evaluation parameters

  18. Applying Universal Design for Learning in Online Courses: Pedagogical and Practical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Cindy Ann; Dell, Thomas F.; Blackwell, Terry L.

    2015-01-01

    Inclusion of the universal design for learning (UDL) model as a guiding set of principles for online curriculum development in higher education is discussed. Fundamentally, UDL provides the student with multiple means of accessing the course based on three overarching principles: presentation; action and expression; and engagement and interaction.…

  19. Rethinking Online Education: The Impact of Synchronous Telecommunication Interactions on Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbard, Joshua A.

    2013-01-01

    Higher education leaders in the 21st century are faced with challenges of affordability, accessibility, and increased demand for postsecondary education. The recent growth of online educational programs in the United States provides institutions with potential solutions to these challenges; yet, persistence rates continue to lag behind traditional…

  20. Online Social Participation, Social Capital and Literacy of Adolescents with Hearing Loss: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Cara L.; Ching, Teresa Y. C.; Whitfield, Jessica; Duncan, Jill

    2016-01-01

    The internet and social media have fast become an everyday aspect of adolescents' lives. Online participation may increase social capital and be particularly beneficial for individuals who are deaf or hard-of-hearing (DHH), as it provides an alternative method to communicate, interact with others and access information. However, reduced levels of…