WorldWideScience

Sample records for providing high spatial

  1. Spatial correlation of high density EMG signals provides features robust to electrode number and shift in pattern recognition for myocontrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stango, Antonietta; Negro, Francesco; Farina, Dario

    2015-03-01

    Research on pattern recognition for myoelectric control has usually focused on a small number of electromyography (EMG) channels because of better clinical acceptability and low computational load with respect to multi-channel EMG. However, recently, high density (HD) EMG technology has substantially improved, also in practical usability, and can thus be applied in myocontrol. HD EMG provides several closely spaced recordings in multiple locations over the skin surface. This study considered the use of HD EMG for controlling upper limb prostheses, based on pattern recognition. In general, robustness and reliability of classical pattern recognition systems are influenced by electrode shift in dons and doff, and by the presence of malfunctioning channels. The aim of this study is to propose a new approach to attenuate these issues. The HD EMG grid of electrodes is an ensemble of sensors that records data spatially correlated. The experimental variogram, which is a measure of the degree of spatial correlation, was used as feature for classification, contrary to previous approaches that are based on temporal or frequency features. The classification based on the variogram was tested on seven able-bodied subjects and one subject with amputation, for the classification of nine and seven classes, respectively. The performance of the proposed approach was comparable with the classic methods based on time-domain and autoregressive features (average classification accuracy over all methods ∼ 95% for nine classes). However, the new spatial features demonstrated lower sensitivity to electrode shift ( ± 1 cm) with respect to the classic features . When even just one channel was noisy, the classification accuracy dropped by ∼ 10% for all methods. However, the new method could be applied without any retraining to a subset of high-quality channels whereas the classic methods require retraining when some channels are omitted. In conclusion, the new spatial feature space

  2. Evaluation of Landsat-Based METRIC Modeling to Provide High-Spatial Resolution Evapotranspiration Estimates for Amazonian Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izaya Numata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While forest evapotranspiration (ET dynamics in the Amazon have been studied both as point estimates using flux towers, as well as spatially coarse surfaces using satellite data, higher resolution (e.g., 30 m resolution ET estimates are necessary to address finer spatial variability associated with forest biophysical characteristics and their changes by natural and human impacts. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential of the Landsat-based METRIC (Mapping Evapotranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration model to estimate high-resolution (30 m forest ET by comparing to flux tower ET (FT ET data collected over seasonally dry tropical forests in Rondônia, the southwestern region of the Amazon. Analyses were conducted at daily, monthly and seasonal scales for the dry seasons (June–September for Rondônia of 2000–2002. Overall daily ET comparison between FT ET and METRIC ET across the study site showed r2 = 0.67 with RMSE = 0.81 mm. For seasonal ET comparison, METRIC-derived ET estimates showed an agreement with FT ET measurements during the dry season of r2 >0.70 and %MAE <15%. We also discuss some challenges and potential applications of METRIC for Amazonian forests.

  3. Providing of Spatial Wetland Information for Supporting National Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris Poniman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The wetland has a strategic role in national development. The potential uses of the wetland are varied such as for agriculture, fisheries, industries, and forestry. The intensive use of the wetland for agricultural development in Sumatera, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, and Papua through transmigration projects has been run since in 1973. Unfortunately, not all the projects were well developed, causing the social, economic, and physical environmental problems. These problems resulted in the negative impact for the life of the transmigration people. For that reason, the community empowerment for the unlucky transmigration people by handling the physical and non physical aspects is very important. This paper will describe the importance of providing spatial data and information biophysical wetland as an initial step in empowering people who live in the wetland resource.

  4. Spatial Cues Provided by Sound Improve Postural Stabilization: Evidence of a Spatial Auditory Map?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandemer, Lennie; Parseihian, Gaetan; Kronland-Martinet, Richard; Bourdin, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    It has long been suggested that sound plays a role in the postural control process. Few studies however have explored sound and posture interactions. The present paper focuses on the specific impact of audition on posture, seeking to determine the attributes of sound that may be useful for postural purposes. We investigated the postural sway of young, healthy blindfolded subjects in two experiments involving different static auditory environments. In the first experiment, we compared effect on sway in a simple environment built from three static sound sources in two different rooms: a normal vs. an anechoic room. In the second experiment, the same auditory environment was enriched in various ways, including the ambisonics synthesis of a immersive environment, and subjects stood on two different surfaces: a foam vs. a normal surface. The results of both experiments suggest that the spatial cues provided by sound can be used to improve postural stability. The richer the auditory environment, the better this stabilization. We interpret these results by invoking the “spatial hearing map” theory: listeners build their own mental representation of their surrounding environment, which provides them with spatial landmarks that help them to better stabilize. PMID:28694770

  5. Spatial Cues Provided by Sound Improve Postural Stabilization: Evidence of a Spatial Auditory Map?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandemer, Lennie; Parseihian, Gaetan; Kronland-Martinet, Richard; Bourdin, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    It has long been suggested that sound plays a role in the postural control process. Few studies however have explored sound and posture interactions. The present paper focuses on the specific impact of audition on posture, seeking to determine the attributes of sound that may be useful for postural purposes. We investigated the postural sway of young, healthy blindfolded subjects in two experiments involving different static auditory environments. In the first experiment, we compared effect on sway in a simple environment built from three static sound sources in two different rooms: a normal vs. an anechoic room. In the second experiment, the same auditory environment was enriched in various ways, including the ambisonics synthesis of a immersive environment, and subjects stood on two different surfaces: a foam vs. a normal surface. The results of both experiments suggest that the spatial cues provided by sound can be used to improve postural stability. The richer the auditory environment, the better this stabilization. We interpret these results by invoking the "spatial hearing map" theory: listeners build their own mental representation of their surrounding environment, which provides them with spatial landmarks that help them to better stabilize.

  6. Spatial Cues Provided by Sound Improve Postural Stabilization: Evidence of a Spatial Auditory Map?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennie Gandemer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It has long been suggested that sound plays a role in the postural control process. Few studies however have explored sound and posture interactions. The present paper focuses on the specific impact of audition on posture, seeking to determine the attributes of sound that may be useful for postural purposes. We investigated the postural sway of young, healthy blindfolded subjects in two experiments involving different static auditory environments. In the first experiment, we compared effect on sway in a simple environment built from three static sound sources in two different rooms: a normal vs. an anechoic room. In the second experiment, the same auditory environment was enriched in various ways, including the ambisonics synthesis of a immersive environment, and subjects stood on two different surfaces: a foam vs. a normal surface. The results of both experiments suggest that the spatial cues provided by sound can be used to improve postural stability. The richer the auditory environment, the better this stabilization. We interpret these results by invoking the “spatial hearing map” theory: listeners build their own mental representation of their surrounding environment, which provides them with spatial landmarks that help them to better stabilize.

  7. Homebuyers and the representation of spatial markets by information providers

    OpenAIRE

    Dunning, R.J.; Grayson, A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to renew a research agenda considering the impact that information providers’ processes are having on the housing market; in particular to develop a research agenda around the role of the Internet in shaping households’ perceptions of the spatial nature of housing markets. Design/methodology/approach – This paper reviews the existing literature. It uses preliminary extensive survey findings about the role of the Internet in housing search to hypothesise ...

  8. Providing a non-deterministic representation of spatial variability of precipitation in the Everest region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eeckman, Judith; Chevallier, Pierre; Boone, Aaron; Neppel, Luc; De Rouw, Anneke; Delclaux, Francois; Koirala, Devesh

    2017-09-01

    This paper provides a new representation of the effect of altitude on precipitation that represents spatial and temporal variability in precipitation in the Everest region. Exclusive observation data are used to infer a piecewise linear function for the relation between altitude and precipitation and significant seasonal variations are highlighted. An original ensemble approach is applied to provide non-deterministic water budgets for middle and high-mountain catchments. Physical processes at the soil-atmosphere interface are represented through the Interactions Soil-Biosphere-Atmosphere (ISBA) surface scheme. Uncertainties associated with the model parametrization are limited by the integration of in situ measurements of soils and vegetation properties. Uncertainties associated with the representation of the orographic effect are shown to account for up to 16 % of annual total precipitation. Annual evapotranspiration is shown to represent 26 % ± 1 % of annual total precipitation for the mid-altitude catchment and 34% ± 3 % for the high-altitude catchment. Snowfall contribution is shown to be neglectable for the mid-altitude catchment, and it represents up to 44 % ± 8 % of total precipitation for the high-altitude catchment. These simulations on the local scale enhance current knowledge of the spatial variability in hydroclimatic processes in high- and mid-altitude mountain environments.

  9. Providing a non-deterministic representation of spatial variability of precipitation in the Everest region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Eeckman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a new representation of the effect of altitude on precipitation that represents spatial and temporal variability in precipitation in the Everest region. Exclusive observation data are used to infer a piecewise linear function for the relation between altitude and precipitation and significant seasonal variations are highlighted. An original ensemble approach is applied to provide non-deterministic water budgets for middle and high-mountain catchments. Physical processes at the soil–atmosphere interface are represented through the Interactions Soil–Biosphere–Atmosphere (ISBA surface scheme. Uncertainties associated with the model parametrization are limited by the integration of in situ measurements of soils and vegetation properties. Uncertainties associated with the representation of the orographic effect are shown to account for up to 16 % of annual total precipitation. Annual evapotranspiration is shown to represent 26 % ± 1 % of annual total precipitation for the mid-altitude catchment and 34% ± 3 % for the high-altitude catchment. Snowfall contribution is shown to be neglectable for the mid-altitude catchment, and it represents up to 44 % ± 8 % of total precipitation for the high-altitude catchment. These simulations on the local scale enhance current knowledge of the spatial variability in hydroclimatic processes in high- and mid-altitude mountain environments.

  10. Classification of High Spatial Resolution, Hyperspectral ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the availability of the final report,Classification of High Spatial Resolution, Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Imagery of the Little Miami River Watershed in Southwest Ohio, USA . This report and associated land use/land cover (LULC) coverage is the result of a collaborative effort among an interdisciplinary team of scientists with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA's) Office of Research and Development in Cincinnati, Ohio. A primary goal of this project is to enhance the use of geography and spatial analytic tools in risk assessment, and to improve the scientific basis for risk management decisions affecting drinking water and water quality. The land use/land cover classification is derived from 82 flight lines of Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) hyperspectral imagery acquired from July 24 through August 9, 2002 via fixed-wing aircraft.

  11. Spatial ability and spatial memory in high school students with different levels of mathematical fluency.

    OpenAIRE

    Tikhomirova, T.N.; Malykh, S.B.; Bogomaz, S.A.; Sudneva, O.V.; Kovas, Yulia

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated spatial ability and visuo-spatial memory in groups of high school students with different levels of mathematical fluency. We used the Mental Rotation Task and Corsi Block-Tapping Task to measure spatial ability and visuo-spatial memory, respectively. A statistically significant difference was found between the groups with different levels of math fluency in terms of effectiveness of spatial ability and level of visuo-spatial memory. Statistically significant sex differe...

  12. A fast high-spatial-resolution Raman distributed temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Hartog, A. H.; Marsh, R. J.; Hilton, I. M.; Hadley, M. R.; Ross, P. A.

    2014-05-01

    Conventional high-spatial-resolution Raman distributed temperature sensing (DTS) systems are based on photoncounting techniques, which result in slow measurements over short sensing fibers. We describe an alternative approach that uses a high-power, short-pulse-width laser and provides fast measurements over fibers longer than 1 km. We demonstrate measurements with 1-s update times over fiber lengths greater than 1 km with better than 0.4-m spatial resolution. We introduce a figure of merit for DTS and we show a substantial improvement (x 100) over earlier results.

  13. Farmers' willingness to provide ecosystem services and effects of their spatial distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broch, Stine Wamberg; Strange, Niels; Jacobsen, Jette Bredahl

    2013-01-01

    The supply of ecosystem goods and services is spatially heterogeneous and the provision of such goods and services is also influenced by landowners' willingness to provide. This is particularly the case in countries such as Denmark where many properties are privately owned. However, little...... attention has previously been given to the relationship between farmers' willingness to provide a good or service and the spatial heterogeneity associated with their demand. In this study farmers' willingness to participate in afforestation contracts are investigated using a choice experiment of various...... to enter an afforestation project. The share of groundwater and forest cover does not significantly influence preferences. We conclude that spatial variations should be considered when designing conservation policies....

  14. A lightweight augmented virtuality system for providing a faithful and spatially manipulable visual hand representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusch, Andreas; Martin, Olivier; Coquillart, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces the technical foundations of a system designed to embed a lightweight, faithful and spatially manipulable representation of the user's hand into an otherwise virtual world - Augmented Virtuality (AV). A highly intuitive control during pointing-like near space interaction can be provided to the user, as well as a very flexible means to experimenters, in a variety of non-medical and medical contexts. Our approach essentially relies on stereoscopic video see-through Augmented Reality (AR) technology and a generic, extendible framework for managing 3-D visual hand displacements. Research from human-computer interaction, perception and motor control has contributed to the elaboration of our proposal which combines a) acting in co-location, b) avoiding occlusion violations by assuring a correct scene depth ordering and c) providing a convincing visual feedback of the user's hand. We further present two cases in which this system has already successfully been used and then outline some other applications that we think are promising, for instance, in the fields of neuromotor rehabilitation and experimental neuroscience.

  15. High spatial resolution diffusion tensor imaging and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, J J

    2002-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic Resonance Imaging is at present the only imaging technique available to measure diffusion of water and metabolites in humans. It provides vital insights to brain connectivity and has proved to be an important tool in diagnosis and therapy planning in many neurological diseases such as brain tumour, ischaemia and multiple sclerosis. This project focuses on the development of a high resolution diffusion tensor imaging technique. In this thesis, the basic theory of diffusion tensor MR Imaging is presented. The technical challenges encountered during development of these techniques will be discussed, with proposed solutions. New sequences with high spatial resolution have been developed and the results are compared with the standard technique more commonly used. Overview The project aims at the development of diffusion tensor imaging techniques with a high spatial resolution. Chapter 2 will describe the basic physics of MRI, the phenomenon of diffusion and the measurement of diffusion by MRI...

  16. Does the edge effect impact on the measure of spatial accessibility to healthcare providers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Kihal, Wahida; Le Meur, Nolwenn; Souris, Marc; Deguen, Séverine

    2017-12-11

    Spatial accessibility indices are increasingly applied when investigating inequalities in health. Although most studies are making mentions of potential errors caused by the edge effect, many acknowledge having neglected to consider this concern by establishing spatial analyses within a finite region, settling for hypothesizing that accessibility to facilities will be under-reported. Our study seeks to assess the effect of edge on the accuracy of defining healthcare provider access by comparing healthcare provider accessibility accounting or not for the edge effect, in a real-world application. This study was carried out in the department of Nord, France. The statistical unit we use is the French census block known as 'IRIS' (Ilot Regroupé pour l'Information Statistique), defined by the National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies. The geographical accessibility indicator used is the "Index of Spatial Accessibility" (ISA), based on the E2SFCA algorithm. We calculated ISA for the pregnant women population by selecting three types of healthcare providers: general practitioners, gynecologists and midwives. We compared ISA variation when accounting or not edge effect in urban and rural zones. The GIS method was then employed to determine global and local autocorrelation. Lastly, we compared the relationship between socioeconomic distress index and ISA, when accounting or not for the edge effect, to fully evaluate its impact. The results revealed that on average ISA when offer and demand beyond the boundary were included is slightly below ISA when not accounting for the edge effect, and we found that the IRIS value was more likely to deteriorate than improve. Moreover, edge effect impact can vary widely by health provider type. There is greater variability within the rural IRIS group than within the urban IRIS group. We found a positive correlation between socioeconomic distress variables and composite ISA. Spatial analysis results (such as Moran's spatial

  17. High spatial resolution probes for neurobiology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, D. E.; Kenney, C. J.; Litke, A. M.; Mathieson, K.

    2009-06-01

    Position-sensitive biological neural networks, such as the brain and the retina, require position-sensitive detection methods to identify, map and study their behavior. Traditionally, planar microelectrodes have been employed to record the cell's electrical activity with device limitations arising from the electrode's 2-D nature. Described here is the development and characterization of an array of electrically conductive micro-needles aimed at addressing the limitations of planar electrodes. The capability of this array to penetrate neural tissue improves the electrode-cell electrical interface and allows more complicated 3-D networks of neurons, such as those found in brain slices, to be studied. State-of-the-art semiconductor fabrication techniques were used to etch and passivate conformally the metal coat and fill high aspect ratio holes in silicon. These are subsequently transformed into needles with conductive tips. This process has enabled the fabrication of arrays of unprecedented dimensions: 61 hexagonally close-packed electrodes, ˜200 μm tall with 60 μm spacing. Electroplating the tungsten tips with platinum ensure suitable impedance values (˜600 kΩ at 1 kHz) for the recording of neuronal signals. Without compromising spatial resolution of the neuronal recordings, this array adds a new and exciting dimension to the study of biological neural networks.

  18. Spatial Access to Primary Care Providers in Appalachia: Evaluating Current Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, Joseph; Marshall, Vince; Tan, Xi; Camacho, Fabian T; Anderson, Roger T; Balkrishnan, Rajesh

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this research was to examine spatial access to primary care physicians in Appalachia using both traditional access measures and the 2-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method. Spatial access to care was compared between urban and rural regions of Appalachia. The study region included Appalachia counties of Pennsylvania, Ohio, Kentucky, and North Carolina. Primary care physicians during 2008 and total census block group populations were geocoded into GIS software. Ratios of county physicians to population, driving time to nearest primary care physician, and various 2SFCA approaches were compared. Urban areas of the study region had shorter travel times to their closest primary care physician. Provider to population ratios produced results that varied widely from one county to another because of strict geographic boundaries. The 2SFCA method produced varied results depending on the distance decay weight and variable catchment size techniques chose. 2SFCA scores showed greater access to care in urban areas of Pennsylvania, Ohio, and North Carolina. The different parameters of the 2SFCA method-distance decay weights and variable catchment sizes-have a large impact on the resulting spatial access to primary care scores. The findings of this study suggest that using a relative 2SFCA approach, the spatial access ratio method, when detailed patient travel data are unavailable. The 2SFCA method shows promise for measuring access to care in Appalachia, but more research on patient travel preferences is needed to inform implementation. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. A Lightweight AV System for Providing a Faithful and Spatially Manipulable Visual Hand Representation

    OpenAIRE

    Pusch, Andreas; Martin, Olivier; Coquillart, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    Session: Developing new tools and technologies - Abstracts to be published in a regular issue of the journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking (indexed in MedLine and PsychInfo): http://online.liebertpub.com/loi/CYBER; International audience; This paper introduces the technical foundations of a system designed to embed a lightweight, faithful and spatially manipulable representation of the user's hand into an otherwise virtual world (aka Augmented Virtuality, AV). A highly intui...

  20. Generating High-Temporal and Spatial Resolution TIR Image Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Huerta, M.; Lagüela, S.; Alfieri, S. M.; Menenti, M.

    2017-09-01

    Remote sensing imagery to monitor global biophysical dynamics requires the availability of thermal infrared data at high temporal and spatial resolution because of the rapid development of crops during the growing season and the fragmentation of most agricultural landscapes. Conversely, no single sensor meets these combined requirements. Data fusion approaches offer an alternative to exploit observations from multiple sensors, providing data sets with better properties. A novel spatio-temporal data fusion model based on constrained algorithms denoted as multisensor multiresolution technique (MMT) was developed and applied to generate TIR synthetic image data at both temporal and spatial high resolution. Firstly, an adaptive radiance model is applied based on spectral unmixing analysis of . TIR radiance data at TOA (top of atmosphere) collected by MODIS daily 1-km and Landsat - TIRS 16-day sampled at 30-m resolution are used to generate synthetic daily radiance images at TOA at 30-m spatial resolution. The next step consists of unmixing the 30 m (now lower resolution) images using the information about their pixel land-cover composition from co-registered images at higher spatial resolution. In our case study, TIR synthesized data were unmixed to the Sentinel 2 MSI with 10 m resolution. The constrained unmixing preserves all the available radiometric information of the 30 m images and involves the optimization of the number of land-cover classes and the size of the moving window for spatial unmixing. Results are still being evaluated, with particular attention for the quality of the data streams required to apply our approach.

  1. GENERATING HIGH-TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL RESOLUTION TIR IMAGE DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Herrero-Huerta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing imagery to monitor global biophysical dynamics requires the availability of thermal infrared data at high temporal and spatial resolution because of the rapid development of crops during the growing season and the fragmentation of most agricultural landscapes. Conversely, no single sensor meets these combined requirements. Data fusion approaches offer an alternative to exploit observations from multiple sensors, providing data sets with better properties. A novel spatio-temporal data fusion model based on constrained algorithms denoted as multisensor multiresolution technique (MMT was developed and applied to generate TIR synthetic image data at both temporal and spatial high resolution. Firstly, an adaptive radiance model is applied based on spectral unmixing analysis of . TIR radiance data at TOA (top of atmosphere collected by MODIS daily 1-km and Landsat – TIRS 16-day sampled at 30-m resolution are used to generate synthetic daily radiance images at TOA at 30-m spatial resolution. The next step consists of unmixing the 30 m (now lower resolution images using the information about their pixel land-cover composition from co-registered images at higher spatial resolution. In our case study, TIR synthesized data were unmixed to the Sentinel 2 MSI with 10 m resolution. The constrained unmixing preserves all the available radiometric information of the 30 m images and involves the optimization of the number of land-cover classes and the size of the moving window for spatial unmixing. Results are still being evaluated, with particular attention for the quality of the data streams required to apply our approach.

  2. High Speed and High Spatial Density Parameter Measurement Using Fiber Optic Sensing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Allen R. Jr. (Inventor); Chan, Hon Man (Inventor); Richards, William Lance (Inventor); Piazza, Anthony (Inventor); Hamory, Philip J (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention is an improved fiber optic sensing system (FOSS) having the ability to provide both high spatial resolution and high frequency strain measurements. The inventive hybrid FOSS fiber combines sensors from high acquisition speed and low spatial resolution Wavelength-Division Multiplexing (WDM) systems and from low acquisition speed and high spatial resolution Optical Frequency Domain Reflection (OFDR) systems. Two unique light sources utilizing different wavelengths are coupled with the hybrid FOSS fiber to generate reflected data from both the WDM sensors and OFDR sensors operating on a single fiber optic cable without incurring interference from one another. The two data sets are then de-multiplexed for analysis, optionally with conventionally-available WDM and OFDR system analyzers.

  3. The honeycomb maze provides a novel test to study hippocampal-dependent spatial navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Ruth A; Bauza, Marius; Krupic, Julija; Burton, Stephen; Delekate, Andrea; Chan, Dennis; O'Keefe, John

    2018-02-01

    Here we describe the honeycomb maze, a behavioural paradigm for the study of spatial navigation in rats. The maze consists of 37 platforms that can be raised or lowered independently. Place navigation requires an animal to go to a goal platform from any of several start platforms via a series of sequential choices. For each, the animal is confined to a raised platform and allowed to choose between two of the six adjacent platforms, the correct one being the platform with the smallest angle to the goal-heading direction. Rats learn rapidly and their choices are influenced by three factors: the angle between the two choice platforms, the distance from the goal, and the angle between the correct platform and the direction of the goal. Rats with hippocampal damage are impaired in learning and their performance is affected by all three factors. The honeycomb maze represents a marked improvement over current spatial navigation tests, such as the Morris water maze, because it controls the choices of the animal at each point in the maze, provides the ability to assess knowledge of the goal direction from any location, enables the identification of factors influencing task performance and provides the possibility for concomitant single-cell recording.

  4. DPR-tree: a distributed parallel spatial index structure for high performance spatial databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Zhu, Qing; Liu, Qiang

    2008-12-01

    Parallelism of spatial index could significantly improve the performance of spatial queries, special for massive spatial databases, so the research of parallel spatial index takes a important role in high performance spatial databases. Existing parallel spatial index methods have two main shortcoming: one is accessing hotspot and bottleneck of index items located in main server, the other is high costs and complicated operations for maintaining index consistency. Aim at these, a distributed parallel spatial index structure called DPR-tree is proposed. It splits whole index region into partition sub-regions by using Hilbert space-filling curve grid and organizes index sub-regions according to locality of spatial objects, then maps index sub-regions to partition sub-regions and assigns these index sub-regions to different computer nodes by a appointed map function, Each computer node manages a multi-level distributed sub-Rtree which is built from a index sub-region. Our experimental results indicate that the proposed parallel spatial index can achieve speedup well and offer significant potential for reducing query response time.

  5. Spatial filters for high average power lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandson, Alvin C

    2012-11-27

    A spatial filter includes a first filter element and a second filter element overlapping with the first filter element. The first filter element includes a first pair of cylindrical lenses separated by a first distance. Each of the first pair of cylindrical lenses has a first focal length. The first filter element also includes a first slit filter positioned between the first pair of cylindrical lenses. The second filter element includes a second pair of cylindrical lenses separated by a second distance. Each of the second pair of cylindrical lenses has a second focal length. The second filter element also includes a second slit filter positioned between the second pair of cylindrical lenses.

  6. Spatial filters for high power lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandson, Alvin Charles; Bayramian, Andrew James

    2014-12-02

    A spatial filter includes a first filter element and a second filter element overlapping with the first filter element. The first filter element includes a first pair of cylindrical lenses separated by a first distance. Each of the first pair of cylindrical lenses has a first focal length. The first filter element also includes a first longitudinal slit filter positioned between the first pair of cylindrical lenses. The second filter element includes a second pair of cylindrical lenses separated by a second distance. Each of the second pair of cylindrical lenses has a second focal length. The second filter element also includes a second longitudinal slit filter positioned between the second pair of cylindrical lenses.

  7. High spatial resolution diffusion tensor imaging and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiun-Jie

    2002-07-01

    Introduction Magnetic Resonance Imaging is at present the only imaging technique available to measure diffusion of water and metabolites in humans. It provides vital insights to brain connectivity and has proved to be an important tool in diagnosis and therapy planning in many neurological diseases such as brain tumour, ischaemia and multiple sclerosis. This project focuses on the development of a high resolution diffusion tensor imaging technique. In this thesis, the basic theory of diffusion tensor MR Imaging is presented. The technical challenges encountered during development of these techniques will be discussed, with proposed solutions. New sequences with high spatial resolution have been developed and the results are compared with the standard technique more commonly used. Overview The project aims at the development of diffusion tensor imaging techniques with a high spatial resolution. Chapter 2 will describe the basic physics of MRI, the phenomenon of diffusion and the measurement of diffusion by MRI. The basic parameters used all through the projects will be presented. In Chapter 3, a reproducibility study on DTI with the single shot EPI sequence will be conducted. The single shot DT-EPI was carried out on a stroke patient. In Chapter 4, current techniques on high spatial resolution DTI will be explored. Sequences of Interleaved EPI of two segments and EPI with Half Fourier acquisition will be developed. The sources of artefacts which contaminate most DT images will be discussed with solution proposed. Chapter 5 proposed a new selective averaging algorithm for the data acquired by the sequences of interleaved EPI. It does not require cardiac gating during data acquisition period and thus increase the speed of data collection. A new ghost free segmented EPI sequence will be presented in Chapter 6: Half-FOV EPI. The technique will be tested on a phantom in vitro as well as in two normal male volunteers in vivo. A comparison study on diffusion tensor imaging

  8. High-Temporal-Resolution High-Spatial-Resolution Spaceborne SAR Based on Continuously Varying PRF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Zhirong; Wang, Pengbo; Li, Chunsheng; Chen, Jie; Liu, Wei; Fang, Yue

    2017-07-25

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is a well-established and powerful imaging technique for acquiring high-spatial-resolution images of the Earth's surface. With the development of beam steering techniques, sliding spotlight and staring spotlight modes have been employed to support high-spatial-resolution applications. In addition to this strengthened high-spatial-resolution and wide-swath capability, high-temporal-resolution (short repeat-observation interval) represents a key capability for numerous applications. However, conventional SAR systems are limited in that the same patch can only be illuminated for several seconds within a single pass. This paper considers a novel high-squint-angle system intended to acquire high-spatial-resolution spaceborne SAR images with repeat-observation intervals varying from tens of seconds to several minutes within a single pass. However, an exponentially increased range cell migration would arise and lead to a conflict between the receive window and 'blind ranges'. An efficient data acquisition technique for high-temporal-resolution, high-spatial-resolution and high-squint-angle spaceborne SAR, in which the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) is continuously varied according to the changing slant range, is presented in this paper. This technique allows echo data to remain in the receive window instead of conflicting with the transmitted pulse or nadir echo. Considering the precision of hardware, a compromise and practical strategy is also proposed. Furthermore, a detailed performance analysis of range ambiguities is provided with respect to parameters of TerraSAR-X. For strong point-like targets, the range ambiguity of this technique would be better than that of uniform PRF technique. For this innovative technique, a resampling strategy and modified imaging algorithm have been developed to handle the non-uniformly sampled echo data. Simulations are performed to validate the efficiency of the proposed technique and the associated

  9. Accelerated High Spatial Resolution Diffusion-Weighted Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Benoit; Afacan, Onur; Taquet, Maxime; Prabhu, Sanjay P; Gholipour, Ali; Warfield, Simon K

    2015-01-01

    Acquisition of a series of anisotropically oversampled acquisitions (so-called anisotropic "snapshots") and reconstruction in the image space has recently been proposed to increase the spatial resolution in diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), providing a theoretical 8x acceleration at equal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared to conventional dense k-space sampling. However, in most works, each DW image is reconstructed separately and the fact that the DW images constitute different views of the same anatomy is ignored. In addition, current approaches are limited by their inability to reconstruct a high resolution (HR) acquisition from snapshots with different subsets of diffusion gradients: an isotropic HR gradient image cannot be reconstructed if one .of its anisotropic snapshots is missing, for example due to intra-scan motion, even if other snapshots for this gradient were successfully acquired. In this work, we propose a novel multi-snapshot DWI reconstruction technique that simultaneously achieves HR reconstruction and local tissue model estimation while enabling reconstruction from snapshots containing different subsets of diffusion gradients, providing increased robustness to patient motion and potential for acceleration. Our approach is formalized as a joint probabilistic model with missing observations, from which interactions between missing snapshots, HR reconstruction and a generic tissue model naturally emerge. We evaluate our approach with synthetic simulations, simulated multi-snapshot scenario and in vivo multi-snapshot imaging. We show that (1) our combined approach ultimately provides both better HR reconstruction and better tissue model estimation and (2) the error in the case of missing snapshots can be quantified. Our novel multi-snapshot technique will enable improved high spatial characterization of the brain connectivity and microstructure in vivo.

  10. SHAPES - Spatial, high-accuracy, position-encoding sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerheim, Noble M.; Blue, Randel C.

    1992-01-01

    Future space systems will require control sensors capable of real-time measurements of position coordinates of many structural locations. Applications for such a sensor include figure and vibration control, rendezvous and docking, and structure assembly verification. The paper discusses an experimental study of SHAPES (spatial, high-accuracy, position-encoding sensor), a 3D position sensor that provides range and two angular positions of laser-illuminated retroreflector targets that mark the locations to be measured. Simultaneous range measurements to multiple targets by a time-of-flight corelation of short laser pulses are made with a CCD-equipped streak tube. Angular positions are measured with a CCD camera. Position measurements of 24 targets with sub-millimeter range accuracy at a 10 Hz update rate have been demonstrated.

  11. Trace metal imaging with high spatial resolution: applications in biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhenyu; Caruso, Joseph A; Lai, Barry; Matusch, Andreas; Becker, J Sabine

    2011-01-01

    New generations of analytical techniques for imaging of metals are pushing hitherto boundaries of spatial resolution and quantitative analysis in biology. Because of this, the application of these imaging techniques described herein to the study of the organization and dynamics of metal cations and metal-containing biomolecules in biological cell and tissue is becoming an important issue in biomedical research. In the current review, three common metal imaging techniques in biomedical research are introduced, including synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). These are exemplified by a demonstration of the dopamine-Fe complexes, by assessment of boron distribution in a boron neutron capture therapy cell model, by mapping Cu and Zn in human brain cancer and a rat brain tumor model, and by the analysis of metal topography within neuromelanin. These studies have provided solid evidence that demonstrates that the sensitivity, spatial resolution, specificity, and quantification ability of metal imaging techniques is suitable and highly desirable for biomedical research. Moreover, these novel studies on the nanometre scale (e.g., of individual single cells or cell organelles) will lead to a better understanding of metal processes in cells and tissues.

  12. System and Method for Providing Model-Based Alerting of Spatial Disorientation to a Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Kevin J (Inventor); Mathan, Santosh (Inventor); Johnson, Steve (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A system and method monitor aircraft state parameters, for example, aircraft movement and flight parameters, applies those inputs to a spatial disorientation model, and makes a prediction of when pilot may become spatially disoriented. Once the system predicts a potentially disoriented pilot, the sensitivity for alerting the pilot to conditions exceeding a threshold can be increased and allow for an earlier alert to mitigate the possibility of an incorrect control input.

  13. A Method of Spatial Mapping and Reclassification for High-Spatial-Resolution Remote Sensing Image Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guizhou Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new classification method for high-spatial-resolution remote sensing images based on a strategic mechanism of spatial mapping and reclassification. The proposed method includes four steps. First, the multispectral image is classified by a traditional pixel-based classification method (support vector machine. Second, the panchromatic image is subdivided by watershed segmentation. Third, the pixel-based multispectral image classification result is mapped to the panchromatic segmentation result based on a spatial mapping mechanism and the area dominant principle. During the mapping process, an area proportion threshold is set, and the regional property is defined as unclassified if the maximum area proportion does not surpass the threshold. Finally, unclassified regions are reclassified based on spectral information using the minimum distance to mean algorithm. Experimental results show that the classification method for high-spatial-resolution remote sensing images based on the spatial mapping mechanism and reclassification strategy can make use of both panchromatic and multispectral information, integrate the pixel- and object-based classification methods, and improve classification accuracy.

  14. A Method of Spatial Mapping and Reclassification for High-Spatial-Resolution Remote Sensing Image Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guizhou; Liu, Jianbo; He, Guojin

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new classification method for high-spatial-resolution remote sensing images based on a strategic mechanism of spatial mapping and reclassification. The proposed method includes four steps. First, the multispectral image is classified by a traditional pixel-based classification method (support vector machine). Second, the panchromatic image is subdivided by watershed segmentation. Third, the pixel-based multispectral image classification result is mapped to the panchromatic segmentation result based on a spatial mapping mechanism and the area dominant principle. During the mapping process, an area proportion threshold is set, and the regional property is defined as unclassified if the maximum area proportion does not surpass the threshold. Finally, unclassified regions are reclassified based on spectral information using the minimum distance to mean algorithm. Experimental results show that the classification method for high-spatial-resolution remote sensing images based on the spatial mapping mechanism and reclassification strategy can make use of both panchromatic and multispectral information, integrate the pixel- and object-based classification methods, and improve classification accuracy. PMID:24453808

  15. Spatial Mode Control of High-Order Harmonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercer, I.; Mevel, E.; Zerne, R.; LHuillier, A.; Antoine, P.; Wahlstroem, C. [Department of Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden)]|[Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, DSM/DRECAM/SPAM, Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1996-08-01

    We demonstrate that the spatial mode of high-order harmonics can be continuously controlled. The control is achieved by spatially modulating the degree of elliptical polarization of the fundamental field using birefringent optics. A highly sensitive relationship between the efficiency of harmonic generation and the degree of laser elliptical polarization leads to atoms emitting harmonics only in regions of linear polarization. The harmonics are emitted as annular beams whose angles of divergence can be continuously varied. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  16. The Application of Spatial Pattern Analysis in High School Level ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geography is a vital subject of the school curriculum which is creative, practical and intellectually stimulating. It tries to identify features on the field, their spatial pattern as well as give explanations to process which have generated the observed distributional patterns their location and provide scientific explanation for the ...

  17. Accelerating experimental high-order spatial statistics calculations using GPUs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Huang, Tao; Lu, De-Tang; Niu, Cong

    2014-09-01

    High-order spatial statistics have been widely used to describe the spatial phenomena in the field of geology science. Spatial statistics are subject to extremely heavy computational burden for large geostatistical models. To improve the computational efficiency, a parallel approach based on GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) is proposed for the calculation of high-order spatial statistics. The parallel scheme is achieved by utilizing a two-stage method to calculate the replicate of a moment for a given template simultaneously termed as the node-stage parallelism, and transform the spatial moments to cumulants for all lags of a template simultaneously termed as the template-stage parallelism. Also, a series of optimization strategies are proposed to take full advantage of the computational capabilities of GPUs, including the appropriate task allocation to the CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) threads, proper organization of the GPU physical memory, and optimal improvement of the existed parallel routines. Tests are carried out on two training images to compare the performance of the GPU-based method with that of the serial implementation. Error analysis results indicate that the proposed parallel method can generate accurate cumulant maps, and the performance comparisons on various examples show that all the speedups for third-order, fourth-order and fifth-order cumulants calculation are over 17 times.

  18. Providing Internet Access to High-Resolution Mars Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2008-01-01

    The OnMars server is a computer program that provides Internet access to high-resolution Mars images, maps, and elevation data, all suitable for use in geographical information system (GIS) software for generating images, maps, and computational models of Mars. The OnMars server is an implementation of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) server. Unlike other Mars Internet map servers that provide Martian data using an Earth coordinate system, the OnMars WMS server supports encoding of data in Mars-specific coordinate systems. The OnMars server offers access to most of the available high-resolution Martian image and elevation data, including an 8-meter-per-pixel uncontrolled mosaic of most of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Observer Camera Narrow Angle (MOCNA) image collection, which is not available elsewhere. This server can generate image and map files in the tagged image file format (TIFF), Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), 8- or 16-bit Portable Network Graphics (PNG), or Keyhole Markup Language (KML) format. Image control is provided by use of the OGC Style Layer Descriptor (SLD) protocol. The OnMars server also implements tiled WMS protocol and super-overlay KML for high-performance client application programs.

  19. Providing Internet Access to High-Resolution Lunar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2008-01-01

    The OnMoon server is a computer program that provides Internet access to high-resolution Lunar images, maps, and elevation data, all suitable for use in geographical information system (GIS) software for generating images, maps, and computational models of the Moon. The OnMoon server implements the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) server protocol and supports Moon-specific extensions. Unlike other Internet map servers that provide Lunar data using an Earth coordinate system, the OnMoon server supports encoding of data in Moon-specific coordinate systems. The OnMoon server offers access to most of the available high-resolution Lunar image and elevation data. This server can generate image and map files in the tagged image file format (TIFF) or the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), 8- or 16-bit Portable Network Graphics (PNG), or Keyhole Markup Language (KML) format. Image control is provided by use of the OGC Style Layer Descriptor (SLD) protocol. Full-precision spectral arithmetic processing is also available, by use of a custom SLD extension. This server can dynamically add shaded relief based on the Lunar elevation to any image layer. This server also implements tiled WMS protocol and super-overlay KML for high-performance client application programs.

  20. Generating high-temporal and spatial resolution tir image data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrero Huerta, M.; Lagüela, S.; Alfieri, S.M.; Menenti, M.; Lichti, D.; Weng, Q

    2017-01-01

    Remote sensing imagery to monitor global biophysical dynamics requires the availability of thermal infrared data at high temporal and spatial resolution because of the rapid development of crops during the growing season and the fragmentation of most agricultural landscapes. Conversely, no single

  1. Pigeons use high spatial frequencies when memorizing pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Matthew S; Brooks, Daniel I; Cook, Robert G

    2015-07-01

    The ability of animals to visually memorize and categorize a large number of pictures is well established. Determining the kinds of information animals use to accomplish these goals has been more difficult. This experiment examined the contribution of spatial frequency information to picture memorization by pigeons. A series of grayscale pictures were notch-filtered to eliminate different portions of the spatial frequency spectrum of memorized pictures. The results indicated that the higher spatial frequencies in the pictures were most important to accurate recognition, suggesting that the detection of fine detail at the high range of pigeon visual acuity was a critical component to their memorized representations. Subsequent tests with band-pass and hybrid conflict stimuli confirmed this conclusion. It is suggested that cognitive and task demands may determine how spatial frequency is used by pigeons, with higher frequencies more important to item memorization, while lower spatial frequencies may contribute to categorization in other types of discrimination tasks. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Method for providing a low density high strength polyurethane foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whinnery, Jr., Leroy L.; Goods, Steven H.; Skala, Dawn M.; Henderson, Craig C.; Keifer, Patrick N.

    2013-06-18

    Disclosed is a method for making a polyurethane closed-cell foam material exhibiting a bulk density below 4 lbs/ft.sup.3 and high strength. The present embodiment uses the reaction product of a modified MDI and a sucrose/glycerine based polyether polyol resin wherein a small measured quantity of the polyol resin is "pre-reacted" with a larger quantity of the isocyanate in a defined ratio such that when the necessary remaining quantity of the polyol resin is added to the "pre-reacted" resin together with a tertiary amine catalyst and water as a blowing agent, the polymerization proceeds slowly enough to provide a stable foam body.

  3. The high-speed train and its spatial effects

    OpenAIRE

    Javier Gutiérrez Puebla

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyses the high-speed train from a spatial point of view. The basic characteristics of this transportation mode,the evolution of high-speed networks in several countries and the building of a trans-European high-speed railway network are studied.The paper analyses also the process of space-time convergence and its consequences on competitivity and cohesion;the tunel effect;the impact of the high speed-train on transportation demand;and the impacts on the city.

  4. Prioritizing spatial accuracy in high-resolution fMRI data using multivariate feature weight mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes eStelzer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Although ultra-high-field fMRI at field strengths of 7T or above provides substantial gains in BOLD contrast-to-noise ratio, when very high-resolution fMRI is required such gains are inevitably reduced. The improvement in sensitivity provided by multivariate analysis techniques, as compared with univariate methods, then becomes especially welcome. Information mapping approaches are commonly used, such as the searchlight technique, which take into account the spatially distributed patterns of activation in order to predict stimulus conditions. However, the popular searchlight decoding technique, in particular, has been found to be prone to spatial inaccuracies. For instance, the spatial extent of informative areas is generally exaggerated, and their spatial configuration is distorted. We propose the combination of a nonparametric and permutation-based statistical framework with linear classifiers. We term this new combined method Feature Weight Mapping (FWM. The main goal of the proposed method is to map the specific contribution of each voxel to the classification decision while including a correction for the multiple comparisons problem. Next, we compare this new method to the searchlight approach using a simulation and ultra-high-field 7T experimental data. We found that the searchlight method led to spatial inaccuracies that are especially noticeable in high-resolution fMRI data. In contrast, FWM was more spatially precise, revealing both informative anatomical structures as well as the direction by which voxels contribute to the classification. By maximizing the spatial accuracy of ultra-high-field fMRI results, global multivariate methods provide a substantial improvement for characterizing structure-function relationships.

  5. The Anterior Thalamus Provides A Subcortical Circuit Supporting Memory And Spatial Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane M O‘Mara

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The anterior thalamic nuclei, a central component of Papez’ circuit, are generally assumed to be key constituents of the neural circuits responsible for certain categories of learning and memory. Supporting evidence for this contention is that damage to either of two brain regions, the medial temporal lobe and the medial diencephalon, is most consistently associated with anterograde amnesia. Within these respective regions, the hippocampal formation and the anterior thalamic nuclei (anteromedial, anteroventral, anterodorsal are the particular structures of interest. The extensive direct and indirect hippocampal-anterior thalamic interconnections and the presence of theta-modulated cells in both sites further support the hypothesis that these structures constitute a neuronal network crucial for memory and cognition. The major tool in understanding how the brain processes information is the analysis of neuronal output at each hierarchical level along the pathway of signal propagation coupled with neuroanatomical studies. Here, we discuss the electrophysiological properties of cells in the anterior thalamic nuclei with an emphasis on their role in spatial navigation. In addition, we describe neuroanatomical and functional relationships between the anterior thalamic nuclei and hippocampal formation.

  6. Humpback whale-generated ambient noise levels provide insight into singers' spatial densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seger, Kerri D; Thode, Aaron M; Urbán-R, Jorge; Martínez-Loustalot, Pamela; Jiménez-López, M Esther; López-Arzate, Diana

    2016-09-01

    Baleen whale vocal activity can be the dominant underwater ambient noise source for certain locations and seasons. Previous wind-driven ambient-noise formulations have been adjusted to model ambient noise levels generated by random distributions of singing humpback whales in ocean waveguides and have been combined to a single model. This theoretical model predicts that changes in ambient noise levels with respect to fractional changes in singer population (defined as the noise "sensitivity") are relatively unaffected by the source level distributions and song spectra of individual humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae). However, the noise "sensitivity" does depend on frequency and on how the singers' spatial density changes with population size. The theoretical model was tested by comparing visual line transect surveys with bottom-mounted passive acoustic data collected during the 2013 and 2014 humpback whale breeding seasons off Los Cabos, Mexico. A generalized linear model (GLM) estimated the noise "sensitivity" across multiple frequency bands. Comparing the GLM estimates with the theoretical predictions suggests that humpback whales tend to maintain relatively constant spacing between one another while singing, but that individual singers either slightly increase their source levels or song duration, or cluster more tightly as the singing population increases.

  7. Spatial Ensemble Postprocessing of Precipitation Forecasts Using High Resolution Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Moritz N.; Schicker, Irene; Kann, Alexander; Wang, Yong

    2017-04-01

    Ensemble prediction systems are designed to account for errors or uncertainties in the initial and boundary conditions, imperfect parameterizations, etc. However, due to sampling errors and underestimation of the model errors, these ensemble forecasts tend to be underdispersive, and to lack both reliability and sharpness. To overcome such limitations, statistical postprocessing methods are commonly applied to these forecasts. In this study, a full-distributional spatial post-processing method is applied to short-range precipitation forecasts over Austria using Standardized Anomaly Model Output Statistics (SAMOS). Following Stauffer et al. (2016), observation and forecast fields are transformed into standardized anomalies by subtracting a site-specific climatological mean and dividing by the climatological standard deviation. Due to the need of fitting only a single regression model for the whole domain, the SAMOS framework provides a computationally inexpensive method to create operationally calibrated probabilistic forecasts for any arbitrary location or for all grid points in the domain simultaneously. Taking advantage of the INCA system (Integrated Nowcasting through Comprehensive Analysis), high resolution analyses are used for the computation of the observed climatology and for model training. The INCA system operationally combines station measurements and remote sensing data into real-time objective analysis fields at 1 km-horizontal resolution and 1 h-temporal resolution. The precipitation forecast used in this study is obtained from a limited area model ensemble prediction system also operated by ZAMG. The so called ALADIN-LAEF provides, by applying a multi-physics approach, a 17-member forecast at a horizontal resolution of 10.9 km and a temporal resolution of 1 hour. The performed SAMOS approach statistically combines the in-house developed high resolution analysis and ensemble prediction system. The station-based validation of 6 hour precipitation sums

  8. Towards Building a High Performance Spatial Query System for Large Scale Medical Imaging Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aji, Ablimit; Wang, Fusheng; Saltz, Joel H

    2012-11-06

    Support of high performance queries on large volumes of scientific spatial data is becoming increasingly important in many applications. This growth is driven by not only geospatial problems in numerous fields, but also emerging scientific applications that are increasingly data- and compute-intensive. For example, digital pathology imaging has become an emerging field during the past decade, where examination of high resolution images of human tissue specimens enables more effective diagnosis, prediction and treatment of diseases. Systematic analysis of large-scale pathology images generates tremendous amounts of spatially derived quantifications of micro-anatomic objects, such as nuclei, blood vessels, and tissue regions. Analytical pathology imaging provides high potential to support image based computer aided diagnosis. One major requirement for this is effective querying of such enormous amount of data with fast response, which is faced with two major challenges: the "big data" challenge and the high computation complexity. In this paper, we present our work towards building a high performance spatial query system for querying massive spatial data on MapReduce. Our framework takes an on demand index building approach for processing spatial queries and a partition-merge approach for building parallel spatial query pipelines, which fits nicely with the computing model of MapReduce. We demonstrate our framework on supporting multi-way spatial joins for algorithm evaluation and nearest neighbor queries for microanatomic objects. To reduce query response time, we propose cost based query optimization to mitigate the effect of data skew. Our experiments show that the framework can efficiently support complex analytical spatial queries on MapReduce.

  9. High speed switching between arbitrary spatial light profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwell, N; Brickus, D; Clark, T W; Franke-Arnold, S

    2014-06-02

    Complex images, inscribed into the spatial profile of a laser beam or even a single photon, offer a highly efficient method of data encoding. Here we present a prototype system which can quickly modulate between arbitrary images. We display an array of holograms, each defined by its phase and intensity profile, on a spatial light modulator. The input beam is then steered by an acousto-optic modulator to one of these holograms, where it is converted into the desired light mode. We demonstrate switching between characters within three separate alphabets at a switching rate of up to10 kHz. This rate is limited by our detection system, and we anticipate that the system is capable of far higher rates. Furthermore our system is not limited in efficiency by channel number, making it ideal for quantum communication applications.

  10. High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smither, Robert K [Hinsdale, IL

    2011-05-17

    A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

  11. Can 28-Month-Old Children Learn Spatial Prepositions Robustly from Pictures? Yes, When Narrative Input Is Provided.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlfing, Katharina J; Nachtigäller, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    The learning of spatial prepositions is assumed to be based on experience in space. In a slow mapping study, we investigated whether 31 German 28-month-old children could robustly learn the German spatial prepositions hinter [behind] and neben [next to] from pictures, and whether a narrative input can compensate for a lack of immediate experience in space. One group of children received pictures with a narrative input as a training to understand spatial prepositions. In two further groups, we controlled (a) for the narrative input by providing unconnected speech during the training and (b) for the learning material by training the children on toys rather than pictures. We assessed children's understanding of spatial prepositions at three different time points: pretest, immediate test, and delayed posttest. Results showed improved word retention in children from the narrative but not the control group receiving unconnected speech. Neither of the trained groups succeeded in generalization to novel referents. Finally, all groups were instructed to deal with untrained material in the test to investigate the robustness of learning across tasks. None of the groups succeeded in this task transfer.

  12. Geographic Accessibility - Providing government servies in an spatially equitable manner: Perspectives for Fire Station location

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Green, Cheri A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Green1_2012.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 6780 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Green1_2012.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Geographic Accessibility... - Rural 8 878 7 820 28533 Cato Ridge E - Special 45 140 6698 Craigieburn A - High 1 411 160 6698 Craigieburn B - Moderate 177 20 6698 Craigieburn C - Low 28 262 2 460 6698 Craigieburn D - Rural 25 875 10 660 6698 Craigieburn E - Special 2 203 180...

  13. Aggregation-cokriging for highly multivariate spatial data

    KAUST Repository

    Furrer, R.

    2011-08-26

    Best linear unbiased prediction of spatially correlated multivariate random processes, often called cokriging in geostatistics, requires the solution of a large linear system based on the covariance and cross-covariance matrix of the observations. For many problems of practical interest, it is impossible to solve the linear system with direct methods. We propose an efficient linear unbiased predictor based on a linear aggregation of the covariables. The primary variable together with this single meta-covariable is used to perform cokriging. We discuss the optimality of the approach under different covariance structures, and use it to create reanalysis type high-resolution historical temperature fields. © 2011 Biometrika Trust.

  14. Microscale spatial analysis provides evidence for adhesive monopolization of dietary nutrients by specific intestinal bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Nagara

    Full Text Available Each species of intestinal bacteria requires a nutritional source to maintain its population in the intestine. Dietary factors are considered to be major nutrients; however, evidence directly explaining the in situ utilization of dietary factors is limited. Microscale bacterial distribution would provide clues to understand bacterial lifestyle and nutrient utilization. However, the detailed bacterial localization around dietary factors in the intestine remains uninvestigated. Therefore, we explored microscale habitats in the murine intestine by using histology and fluorescent in situ hybridization, focusing on dietary factors. This approach successfully revealed several types of bacterial colonization. In particular, bifidobacterial colonization and adhesion on granular starch was frequently and commonly observed in the jejunum and distal colon. To identify the bacterial composition of areas around starch granules and areas without starch, laser microdissection and next-generation sequencing-based 16S rRNA microbial profiling was performed. It was found that Bifidobacteriaceae were significantly enriched by 4.7 fold in peri-starch areas compared to ex-starch areas. This family solely consisted of Bifidobacterium pseudolongum. In contrast, there was no significant enrichment among the other major families. This murine intestinal B. pseudolongum had starch-degrading activity, confirmed by isolation from the mouse feces and in vitro analysis. Collectively, our results demonstrate the significance of starch granules as a major habitat and potential nutritional niche for murine intestinal B. pseudolongum. Moreover, our results suggest that colonizing bifidobacteria effectively utilize starch from the closest location and maintain the location. This may be a bacterial strategy to monopolize solid dietary nutrients. We believe that our analytical approach could possibly be applied to other nutritional factors, and can be a powerful tool to investigate

  15. Photoacoustic lymphatic imaging with high spatial-temporal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Catherine; Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-11-01

    Despite its critical function in coordinating the egress of inflammatory and immune cells out of tissues and maintaining fluid balance, the causative role of lymphatic network dysfunction in pathological settings is still understudied. Engineered-animal models and better noninvasive high spatial-temporal resolution imaging techniques in both preclinical and clinical studies will help to improve our understanding of different lymphatic-related pathologic disorders. Our aim was to take advantage of our newly optimized noninvasive wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic (PA) microcopy system to coordinately image the lymphatic vasculature and its flow dynamics, while maintaining high resolution and detection sensitivity. Here, by combining the optical-resolution PA microscopy with a fast-scanning water-immersible microelectromechanical system scanning mirror, we have imaged the lymph dynamics over a large field-of-view, with high spatial resolution and advanced detection sensitivity. Depending on the application, lymphatic vessels (LV) were spectrally or temporally differentiated from blood vessels. Validation experiments were performed on phantoms and in vivo to identify the LV. Lymphatic flow dynamics in nonpathological and pathological conditions were also visualized. These results indicate that our newly developed PA microscopy is a promising tool for lymphatic-related biological research.

  16. Reparable, high-density microelectronic module provides effective heat sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, K. J.; Maytone, F. F.

    1967-01-01

    Reparable modular system is used for packaging microelectronic flat packs and miniature discrete components. This three-dimensional compartmented structure incorporates etched phosphor bronze sheets and frames with etched wire conductors. It provides an effective heat sink for electric power dissipation in the absence of convective cooling means.

  17. High School Child Development Courses Provide a Valuable Apprenticeship

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCombie, Sally M.

    2009-01-01

    The current media are laden with reports of the many significant problems facing today's youth. In fact, parenting has become a national topic of discussion. Parenting instruction, a responsibility that had previously rested in the home, has become part of educational curricula. Courses in child development are offered for high school students in…

  18. A high-performance spatial database based approach for pathology imaging algorithm evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fusheng Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Algorithm evaluation provides a means to characterize variability across image analysis algorithms, validate algorithms by comparison with human annotations, combine results from multiple algorithms for performance improvement, and facilitate algorithm sensitivity studies. The sizes of images and image analysis results in pathology image analysis pose significant challenges in algorithm evaluation. We present an efficient parallel spatial database approach to model, normalize, manage, and query large volumes of analytical image result data. This provides an efficient platform for algorithm evaluation. Our experiments with a set of brain tumor images demonstrate the application, scalability, and effectiveness of the platform. Context: The paper describes an approach and platform for evaluation of pathology image analysis algorithms. The platform facilitates algorithm evaluation through a high-performance database built on the Pathology Analytic Imaging Standards (PAIS data model. Aims: (1 Develop a framework to support algorithm evaluation by modeling and managing analytical results and human annotations from pathology images; (2 Create a robust data normalization tool for converting, validating, and fixing spatial data from algorithm or human annotations; (3 Develop a set of queries to support data sampling and result comparisons; (4 Achieve high performance computation capacity via a parallel data management infrastructure, parallel data loading and spatial indexing optimizations in this infrastructure. Materials and Methods: We have considered two scenarios for algorithm evaluation: (1 algorithm comparison where multiple result sets from different methods are compared and consolidated; and (2 algorithm validation where algorithm results are compared with human annotations. We have developed a spatial normalization toolkit to validate and normalize spatial boundaries produced by image analysis algorithms or human annotations. The

  19. A high-performance spatial database based approach for pathology imaging algorithm evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fusheng; Kong, Jun; Gao, Jingjing; Cooper, Lee A D; Kurc, Tahsin; Zhou, Zhengwen; Adler, David; Vergara-Niedermayr, Cristobal; Katigbak, Bryan; Brat, Daniel J; Saltz, Joel H

    2013-01-01

    Algorithm evaluation provides a means to characterize variability across image analysis algorithms, validate algorithms by comparison with human annotations, combine results from multiple algorithms for performance improvement, and facilitate algorithm sensitivity studies. The sizes of images and image analysis results in pathology image analysis pose significant challenges in algorithm evaluation. We present an efficient parallel spatial database approach to model, normalize, manage, and query large volumes of analytical image result data. This provides an efficient platform for algorithm evaluation. Our experiments with a set of brain tumor images demonstrate the application, scalability, and effectiveness of the platform. The paper describes an approach and platform for evaluation of pathology image analysis algorithms. The platform facilitates algorithm evaluation through a high-performance database built on the Pathology Analytic Imaging Standards (PAIS) data model. (1) Develop a framework to support algorithm evaluation by modeling and managing analytical results and human annotations from pathology images; (2) Create a robust data normalization tool for converting, validating, and fixing spatial data from algorithm or human annotations; (3) Develop a set of queries to support data sampling and result comparisons; (4) Achieve high performance computation capacity via a parallel data management infrastructure, parallel data loading and spatial indexing optimizations in this infrastructure. WE HAVE CONSIDERED TWO SCENARIOS FOR ALGORITHM EVALUATION: (1) algorithm comparison where multiple result sets from different methods are compared and consolidated; and (2) algorithm validation where algorithm results are compared with human annotations. We have developed a spatial normalization toolkit to validate and normalize spatial boundaries produced by image analysis algorithms or human annotations. The validated data were formatted based on the PAIS data model and

  20. Systems Engineering Provides Successful High Temperature Steam Electrolysis Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles V. Park; Emmanuel Ohene Opare, Jr.

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes two Systems Engineering Studies completed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to support development of the High Temperature Stream Electrolysis (HTSE) process. HTSE produces hydrogen from water using nuclear power and was selected by the Department of Energy (DOE) for integration with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The first study was a reliability, availability and maintainability (RAM) analysis to identify critical areas for technology development based on available information regarding expected component performance. An HTSE process baseline flowsheet at commercial scale was used as a basis. The NGNP project also established a process and capability to perform future RAM analyses. The analysis identified which components had the greatest impact on HTSE process availability and indicated that the HTSE process could achieve over 90% availability. The second study developed a series of life-cycle cost estimates for the various scale-ups required to demonstrate the HTSE process. Both studies were useful in identifying near- and long-term efforts necessary for successful HTSE process deployment. The size of demonstrations to support scale-up was refined, which is essential to estimate near- and long-term cost and schedule. The life-cycle funding profile, with high-level allocations, was identified as the program transitions from experiment scale R&D to engineering scale demonstration.

  1. Electrolysis Propulsion Provides High-Performance, Inexpensive, Clean Spacecraft Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroot, Wim A.

    1999-01-01

    An electrolysis propulsion system consumes electrical energy to decompose water into hydrogen and oxygen. These gases are stored in separate tanks and used when needed in gaseous bipropellant thrusters for spacecraft propulsion. The propellant and combustion products are clean and nontoxic. As a result, costs associated with testing, handling, and launching can be an order of magnitude lower than for conventional propulsion systems, making electrolysis a cost-effective alternative to state-of-the-art systems. The electrical conversion efficiency is high (>85 percent), and maximum thrust-to-power ratios of 0.2 newtons per kilowatt (N/kW), a 370-sec specific impulse, can be obtained. A further advantage of the water rocket is its dual-mode potential. For relatively high thrust applications, the system can be used as a bipropellant engine. For low thrust levels and/or small impulse bit requirements, cold gas oxygen can be used alone. An added innovation is that the same hardware, with modest modifications, can be converted into an energy-storage and power-generation fuel cell, reducing the spacecraft power and propulsion system weight by an order of magnitude.

  2. High spatial resolution soft-x-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer-Ilse, W.; Medecki, H.; Brown, J.T. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    A new soft x-ray microscope (XM-1) with high spatial resolution has been constructed by the Center for X-ray Optics. It uses bending magnet radiation from beamline 6.1 at the Advanced Light Source, and is used in a variety of projects and applications in the life and physical sciences. Most of these projects are ongoing. The instrument uses zone plate lenses and achieves a resolution of 43 nm, measured over 10% to 90% intensity with a knife edge test sample. X-ray microscopy permits the imaging of relatively thick samples, up to 10 {mu}m thick, in water. XM-1 has an easy to use interface, that utilizes visible light microscopy to precisely position and focus the specimen. The authors describe applications of this device in the biological sciences, as well as in studying industrial applications including structured polymer samples.

  3. A high time and spatial resolution MRPC designed for muon tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, L.; Wang, Y.; Huang, X.; Wang, X.; Zhu, W.; Li, Y.; Cheng, J.

    2014-12-01

    A prototype of cosmic muon scattering tomography system has been set up in Tsinghua University in Beijing. Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) is used in the system to get the muon tracks. Compared with other detectors, MRPC can not only provide the track but also the Time of Flight (ToF) between two detectors which can estimate the energy of particles. To get a more accurate track and higher efficiency of the tomography system, a new type of high time and two-dimensional spatial resolution MRPC has been developed. A series of experiments have been done to measure the efficiency, time resolution and spatial resolution. The results show that the efficiency can reach 95% and its time resolution is around 65 ps. The cluster size is around 4 and the spatial resolution can reach 200 μ m.

  4. Estimation of the high-spatial-resolution variability in extreme wind speeds for forestry applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venäläinen, Ari; Laapas, Mikko; Pirinen, Pentti; Horttanainen, Matti; Hyvönen, Reijo; Lehtonen, Ilari; Junila, Päivi; Hou, Meiting; Peltola, Heli M.

    2017-07-01

    The bioeconomy has an increasing role to play in climate change mitigation and the sustainable development of national economies. In Finland, a forested country, over 50 % of the current bioeconomy relies on the sustainable management and utilization of forest resources. Wind storms are a major risk that forests are exposed to and high-spatial-resolution analysis of the most vulnerable locations can produce risk assessment of forest management planning. In this paper, we examine the feasibility of the wind multiplier approach for downscaling of maximum wind speed, using 20 m spatial resolution CORINE land-use dataset and high-resolution digital elevation data. A coarse spatial resolution estimate of the 10-year return level of maximum wind speed was obtained from the ERA-Interim reanalyzed data. Using a geospatial re-mapping technique the data were downscaled to 26 meteorological station locations to represent very diverse environments. Applying a comparison, we find that the downscaled 10-year return levels represent 66 % of the observed variation among the stations examined. In addition, the spatial variation in wind-multiplier-downscaled 10-year return level wind was compared with the WAsP model-simulated wind. The heterogeneous test area was situated in northern Finland, and it was found that the major features of the spatial variation were similar, but in some locations, there were relatively large differences. The results indicate that the wind multiplier method offers a pragmatic and computationally feasible tool for identifying at a high spatial resolution those locations with the highest forest wind damage risks. It can also be used to provide the necessary wind climate information for wind damage risk model calculations, thus making it possible to estimate the probability of predicted threshold wind speeds for wind damage and consequently the probability (and amount) of wind damage for certain forest stand configurations.

  5. Estimation of the high-spatial-resolution variability in extreme wind speeds for forestry applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Venäläinen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The bioeconomy has an increasing role to play in climate change mitigation and the sustainable development of national economies. In Finland, a forested country, over 50 % of the current bioeconomy relies on the sustainable management and utilization of forest resources. Wind storms are a major risk that forests are exposed to and high-spatial-resolution analysis of the most vulnerable locations can produce risk assessment of forest management planning. In this paper, we examine the feasibility of the wind multiplier approach for downscaling of maximum wind speed, using 20 m spatial resolution CORINE land-use dataset and high-resolution digital elevation data. A coarse spatial resolution estimate of the 10-year return level of maximum wind speed was obtained from the ERA-Interim reanalyzed data. Using a geospatial re-mapping technique the data were downscaled to 26 meteorological station locations to represent very diverse environments. Applying a comparison, we find that the downscaled 10-year return levels represent 66 % of the observed variation among the stations examined. In addition, the spatial variation in wind-multiplier-downscaled 10-year return level wind was compared with the WAsP model-simulated wind. The heterogeneous test area was situated in northern Finland, and it was found that the major features of the spatial variation were similar, but in some locations, there were relatively large differences. The results indicate that the wind multiplier method offers a pragmatic and computationally feasible tool for identifying at a high spatial resolution those locations with the highest forest wind damage risks. It can also be used to provide the necessary wind climate information for wind damage risk model calculations, thus making it possible to estimate the probability of predicted threshold wind speeds for wind damage and consequently the probability (and amount of wind damage for certain forest stand configurations.

  6. On the creation of high spatial resolution imaging spectroscopy data from multi-temporal low spatial resolution imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wei; van Aardt, Jan; Messinger, David

    2017-05-01

    The Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) mission aims to provide global imaging spectroscopy data to the benefit of especially ecosystem studies. The onboard spectrometer will collect radiance spectra from the visible to short wave infrared (VSWIR) regions (400-2500 nm). The mission calls for fine spectral resolution (10 nm band width) and as such will enable scientists to perform material characterization, species classification, and even sub-pixel mapping. However, the global coverage requirement results in a relatively low spatial resolution (GSD 30m), which restricts applications to objects of similar scales. We therefore have focused on the assessment of sub-pixel vegetation structure from spectroscopy data in past studies. In this study, we investigate the development or reconstruction of higher spatial resolution imaging spectroscopy data via fusion of multi-temporal data sets to address the drawbacks implicit in low spatial resolution imagery. The projected temporal resolution of the HyspIRI VSWIR instrument is 15 days, which implies that we have access to as many as six data sets for an area over the course of a growth season. Previous studies have shown that select vegetation structural parameters, e.g., leaf area index (LAI) and gross ecosystem production (GEP), are relatively constant in summer and winter for temperate forests; we therefore consider the data sets collected in summer to be from a similar, stable forest structure. The first step, prior to fusion, involves registration of the multi-temporal data. A data fusion algorithm then can be applied to the pre-processed data sets. The approach hinges on an algorithm that has been widely applied to fuse RGB images. Ideally, if we have four images of a scene which all meet the following requirements - i) they are captured with the same camera configurations; ii) the pixel size of each image is x; and iii) at least r2 images are aligned on a grid of x/r - then a high-resolution image, with a pixel

  7. New Potentiometric Wireless Chloride Sensors Provide High Resolution Information on Chemical Transport Processes in Streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Smettem

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying the travel times, pathways, and dispersion of solutes moving through stream environments is critical for understanding the biogeochemical cycling processes that control ecosystem functioning. Validation of stream solute transport and exchange process models requires data obtained from in-stream measurement of chemical concentration changes through time. This can be expensive and time consuming, leading to a need for cheap distributed sensor arrays that respond instantly and record chemical transport at points of interest on timescales of seconds. To meet this need we apply new, low-cost (in the order of a euro per sensor potentiometric chloride sensors used in a distributed array to obtain data with high spatial and temporal resolution. The application here is to monitoring in-stream hydrodynamic transport and dispersive mixing of an injected chemical, in this case NaCl. We present data obtained from the distributed sensor array under baseflow conditions for stream reaches in Luxembourg and Western Australia. The reaches were selected to provide a range of increasingly complex in-channel flow patterns. Mid-channel sensor results are comparable to data obtained from more expensive electrical conductivity meters, but simultaneous acquisition of tracer data at several positions across the channel allows far greater spatial resolution of hydrodynamic mixing processes and identification of chemical ‘dead zones’ in the study reaches.

  8. Breast density estimation from high spectral and spatial resolution MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Weiss, William A.; Medved, Milica; Abe, Hiroyuki; Newstead, Gillian M.; Karczmar, Gregory S.; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. A three-dimensional breast density estimation method is presented for high spectral and spatial resolution (HiSS) MR imaging. Twenty-two patients were recruited (under an Institutional Review Board--approved Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant protocol) for high-risk breast cancer screening. Each patient received standard-of-care clinical digital x-ray mammograms and MR scans, as well as HiSS scans. The algorithm for breast density estimation includes breast mask generating, breast skin removal, and breast percentage density calculation. The inter- and intra-user variabilities of the HiSS-based density estimation were determined using correlation analysis and limits of agreement. Correlation analysis was also performed between the HiSS-based density estimation and radiologists’ breast imaging-reporting and data system (BI-RADS) density ratings. A correlation coefficient of 0.91 (pdensity estimations. An interclass correlation coefficient of 0.99 (pdensity estimations. A moderate correlation coefficient of 0.55 (p=0.0076) was observed between HiSS-based breast density estimations and radiologists’ BI-RADS. In summary, an objective density estimation method using HiSS spectral data from breast MRI was developed. The high reproducibility with low inter- and low intra-user variabilities shown in this preliminary study suggest that such a HiSS-based density metric may be potentially beneficial in programs requiring breast density such as in breast cancer risk assessment and monitoring effects of therapy. PMID:28042590

  9. Aberration production using a high-resolution liquid-crystal spatial light modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jason D; Goda, Matthew E; Duncan, Bradley D

    2007-05-01

    Phase-only liquid-crystal spatial light modulators provide a powerful means of wavefront control. With high resolution and diffractive (modulo 2pi) operation, they can accurately represent large-dynamic-range phase maps. As a result, they provide an excellent means of producing electrically controllable, dynamic, and repeatable aberrations. However, proper calibration is critical to achieving accurate phase maps. Several calibration methods from previous literature were considered. With simplicity and accuracy in mind, we selected one method for each type of necessary calibration. We augmented one of the selected methods with a new step that improves its accuracy. After calibrating our spatial light modulator with our preferred methods, we evaluated its ability to produce aberrations in the laboratory. We studied Zernike polynomial aberrations using interferometry and Fourier-transform-plane images, and atmospheric aberrations using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. These measurements show the closest agreement with theoretical expectations that we have seen to date.

  10. Estimating Urban Gross Primary Productivity at High Spatial Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D. L.; Roberts, D. A.; McFadden, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    Gross primary productivity (GPP) is an important metric of ecosystem function and describes the rate of carbon uptake as the sum of net photosynthesis by all plants at the ecosystem scale. To quantify regional and global carbon budgets, GPP is commonly mapped at large scales using remote sensing techniques. While urban areas often have high proportions of vegetated cover, they are largely excluded from global estimates of GPP due to the challenges of small-scale heterogeneity in cover types. Here, we created a map of mid-summer GPP for the Minneapolis-Saint Paul, Minnesota metropolitan region based on in-situ carbon flux measurements and remotely sensed data. Using 2-meter multispectral imagery from the WorldView-2 satellite, we were able to distinguish vegetated from non-vegetated surfaces, reducing the level of within-pixel land cover mixing that normally would be present in coarser resolution imagery. Additional data sources for classification included canopy height from airborne lidar and land use/land cover polygons from MetroGIS. Our overall classification accuracy was 98.17% (kappa = 0.9725). We found that trees and turf grasses within our study area had similar total extents, with trees covering 28% and grass covering 24% of the total study area of 894 km2. We estimated GPP with a light use efficiency approach, using eddy covariance and sap flow measurements of GPP that were independently obtained for tree and turf grass cover types in the study area. Our preliminary results showed significant differences in GPP between the tree and turf grass cover types, as well as high spatial variability of GPP within the cover types across the study area.

  11. Ultra-High Capacity Silicon Photonic Interconnects through Spatial Multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Christine P.

    -fabrication. Through ModePROP simulations, optimizing device performance dynamically post-fabrication is analyzed, through either electro-optical or thermo-optical means. By biasing the arm introducing the slight spectral offset, we can quantifiably improve device performance. Scaling bandwidth is experimentally demonstrated through the device at 3 modes, 2 wavelengths, and 40 Gb/s data rate for 240 Gb/s aggregate bandwidth, with the potential to reduce power penalty per the device optimization process we described. A main motivation for this on-chip spatial multiplexing is the need to reduce costs. As the laser source serves as the greatest power consumer in an optical system, mode-division multiplexing and other forms of spatial multiplexing can be implemented to push its potentially prohibitive cost metrics down. In order to demonstrate an intelligent platform capable of dynamically multicasting data and reallocating power as needed by the system, we must first initialize the switch fabric to control with an electronic interface. A dithering mechanism, whereby exact cross, bar, and sub-percentage states are enforced through the device, is described here. Such a method could be employed for actuating the device table of bias values to states automatically. We then employ a dynamic power reallocation algorithm through a data acquisition unit, showing real-time channel recovery for channels experiencing power loss by diverting power from paths that could tolerate it. The data that is being multicast through the system is experimentally shown to be error-free at 40 Gb/s data rate, when transmitting from one to three clients and going from automatic bar/cross states to equalized power distribution. For the last portion of this topic, the switch fabric was inserted into a high-performance computing system. In order to run benchmarks at 10 Gb/s data ontop of the switch fabric, a newer model of the control plane was implemented to toggle states according to the command issued by the server

  12. Scene content is predominantly conveyed by high spatial frequencies in scene-selective visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Daniel; Golomb, Julie D; Walther, Dirk B

    2017-01-01

    In complex real-world scenes, image content is conveyed by a large collection of intertwined visual features. The visual system disentangles these features in order to extract information about image content. Here, we investigate the role of one integral component: the content of spatial frequencies in an image. Specifically, we measure the amount of image content carried by low versus high spatial frequencies for the representation of real-world scenes in scene-selective regions of human visual cortex. To this end, we attempted to decode scene categories from the brain activity patterns of participants viewing scene images that contained the full spatial frequency spectrum, only low spatial frequencies, or only high spatial frequencies, all carefully controlled for contrast and luminance. Contrary to the findings from numerous behavioral studies and computational models that have highlighted how low spatial frequencies preferentially encode image content, decoding of scene categories from the scene-selective brain regions, including the parahippocampal place area (PPA), was significantly more accurate for high than low spatial frequency images. In fact, decoding accuracy was just as high for high spatial frequency images as for images containing the full spatial frequency spectrum in scene-selective areas PPA, RSC, OPA and object selective area LOC. We also found an interesting dissociation between the posterior and anterior subdivisions of PPA: categories were decodable from both high and low spatial frequency scenes in posterior PPA but only from high spatial frequency scenes in anterior PPA; and spatial frequency was explicitly decodable from posterior but not anterior PPA. Our results are consistent with recent findings that line drawings, which consist almost entirely of high spatial frequencies, elicit a neural representation of scene categories that is equivalent to that of full-spectrum color photographs. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the

  13. Scene content is predominantly conveyed by high spatial frequencies in scene-selective visual cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Berman

    Full Text Available In complex real-world scenes, image content is conveyed by a large collection of intertwined visual features. The visual system disentangles these features in order to extract information about image content. Here, we investigate the role of one integral component: the content of spatial frequencies in an image. Specifically, we measure the amount of image content carried by low versus high spatial frequencies for the representation of real-world scenes in scene-selective regions of human visual cortex. To this end, we attempted to decode scene categories from the brain activity patterns of participants viewing scene images that contained the full spatial frequency spectrum, only low spatial frequencies, or only high spatial frequencies, all carefully controlled for contrast and luminance. Contrary to the findings from numerous behavioral studies and computational models that have highlighted how low spatial frequencies preferentially encode image content, decoding of scene categories from the scene-selective brain regions, including the parahippocampal place area (PPA, was significantly more accurate for high than low spatial frequency images. In fact, decoding accuracy was just as high for high spatial frequency images as for images containing the full spatial frequency spectrum in scene-selective areas PPA, RSC, OPA and object selective area LOC. We also found an interesting dissociation between the posterior and anterior subdivisions of PPA: categories were decodable from both high and low spatial frequency scenes in posterior PPA but only from high spatial frequency scenes in anterior PPA; and spatial frequency was explicitly decodable from posterior but not anterior PPA. Our results are consistent with recent findings that line drawings, which consist almost entirely of high spatial frequencies, elicit a neural representation of scene categories that is equivalent to that of full-spectrum color photographs. Collectively, these findings

  14. Spatial Abilities of High-School Students in the Perception of Geologic Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kali, Yael; Orion, Nir

    1996-01-01

    Characterizes specific spatial abilities required in geology studies through the examination of the performance of high school students in solving structural geology problems on the geologic spatial ability test (GeoSAT). Concludes that visual penetration ability and the ability to perceive the spatial configuration of the structure are…

  15. Global anthropogenic heat flux database with high spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Y.; Varquez, A. C. G.; Kanda, M.

    2017-02-01

    This study developed a top-down method for estimating global anthropogenic heat emission (AHE), with a high spatial resolution of 30 arc-seconds and temporal resolution of 1 h. Annual average AHE was derived from human metabolic heating and primary energy consumption, which was further divided into three components based on consumer sector. The first and second components were heat loss and heat emissions from industrial sectors equally distributed throughout the country and populated areas, respectively. The third component comprised the sum of emissions from commercial, residential, and transportation sectors (CRT). Bulk AHE from the CRT was proportionally distributed using a global population dataset, with a radiance-calibrated nighttime lights adjustment. An empirical function to estimate monthly fluctuations of AHE based on gridded monthly temperatures was derived from various Japanese and American city measurements. Finally, an AHE database with a global coverage was constructed for the year 2013. Comparisons between our proposed AHE and other existing datasets revealed that the problem of overestimation of AHE intensity in previous top-down models was mitigated by the separation of energy consumption sectors; furthermore, the problem of AHE underestimation at central urban areas was solved by the nighttime lights adjustment. A strong agreement in the monthly profiles of AHE between our database and other bottom-up datasets further proved the validity of the current methodology. Investigations of AHE for the 29 largest urban agglomerations globally highlighted that the share of heat emissions from CRT sectors to the total AHE at the city level was 40-95%; whereas that of metabolic heating varied with the city's level of development by a range of 2-60%. A negative correlation between gross domestic product (GDP) and the share of metabolic heating to a city's total AHE was found. Globally, peak AHE values were found to occur between December and February, while

  16. Hadoop-GIS: A High Performance Spatial Data Warehousing System over MapReduce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aji, Ablimit; Wang, Fusheng; Vo, Hoang; Lee, Rubao; Liu, Qiaoling; Zhang, Xiaodong; Saltz, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Support of high performance queries on large volumes of spatial data becomes increasingly important in many application domains, including geospatial problems in numerous fields, location based services, and emerging scientific applications that are increasingly data- and compute-intensive. The emergence of massive scale spatial data is due to the proliferation of cost effective and ubiquitous positioning technologies, development of high resolution imaging technologies, and contribution from a large number of community users. There are two major challenges for managing and querying massive spatial data to support spatial queries: the explosion of spatial data, and the high computational complexity of spatial queries. In this paper, we present Hadoop-GIS – a scalable and high performance spatial data warehousing system for running large scale spatial queries on Hadoop. Hadoop-GIS supports multiple types of spatial queries on MapReduce through spatial partitioning, customizable spatial query engine RESQUE, implicit parallel spatial query execution on MapReduce, and effective methods for amending query results through handling boundary objects. Hadoop-GIS utilizes global partition indexing and customizable on demand local spatial indexing to achieve efficient query processing. Hadoop-GIS is integrated into Hive to support declarative spatial queries with an integrated architecture. Our experiments have demonstrated the high efficiency of Hadoop-GIS on query response and high scalability to run on commodity clusters. Our comparative experiments have showed that performance of Hadoop-GIS is on par with parallel SDBMS and outperforms SDBMS for compute-intensive queries. Hadoop-GIS is available as a set of library for processing spatial queries, and as an integrated software package in Hive. PMID:24187650

  17. Hadoop-GIS: A High Performance Spatial Data Warehousing System over MapReduce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aji, Ablimit; Wang, Fusheng; Vo, Hoang; Lee, Rubao; Liu, Qiaoling; Zhang, Xiaodong; Saltz, Joel

    2013-08-01

    Support of high performance queries on large volumes of spatial data becomes increasingly important in many application domains, including geospatial problems in numerous fields, location based services, and emerging scientific applications that are increasingly data- and compute-intensive. The emergence of massive scale spatial data is due to the proliferation of cost effective and ubiquitous positioning technologies, development of high resolution imaging technologies, and contribution from a large number of community users. There are two major challenges for managing and querying massive spatial data to support spatial queries: the explosion of spatial data, and the high computational complexity of spatial queries. In this paper, we present Hadoop-GIS - a scalable and high performance spatial data warehousing system for running large scale spatial queries on Hadoop. Hadoop-GIS supports multiple types of spatial queries on MapReduce through spatial partitioning, customizable spatial query engine RESQUE, implicit parallel spatial query execution on MapReduce, and effective methods for amending query results through handling boundary objects. Hadoop-GIS utilizes global partition indexing and customizable on demand local spatial indexing to achieve efficient query processing. Hadoop-GIS is integrated into Hive to support declarative spatial queries with an integrated architecture. Our experiments have demonstrated the high efficiency of Hadoop-GIS on query response and high scalability to run on commodity clusters. Our comparative experiments have showed that performance of Hadoop-GIS is on par with parallel SDBMS and outperforms SDBMS for compute-intensive queries. Hadoop-GIS is available as a set of library for processing spatial queries, and as an integrated software package in Hive.

  18. Low-Cost Ultra-High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Mapping of Intertidal Rock Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, M.; Johnson-Roberson, M.; Murphy, R.

    2012-07-01

    Intertidal ecosystems have primarily been studied using field-based sampling; remote sensing offers the ability to collect data over large areas in a snapshot of time which could compliment field-based sampling methods by extrapolating them into the wider spatial and temporal context. Conventional remote sensing tools (such as satellite and aircraft imaging) provide data at relatively course, sub-meter resolutions or with limited temporal resolutions and relatively high costs for small-scale environmental science and ecology studies. In this paper, we describe a low-cost, kite-based imaging system and photogrammetric pipeline that was developed for constructing highresolution, 3D, photo-realistic terrain models of intertidal rocky shores. The processing pipeline uses automatic image feature detection and matching, structure-from-motion and photo-textured terrain surface reconstruction algorithms that require minimal human input and only a small number of ground control points and allow the use of cheap, consumer-grade digital cameras. The resulting maps combine colour and topographic information at sub-centimeter resolutions over an area of approximately 100m, thus enabling spatial properties of the intertidal environment to be determined across a hierarchy of spatial scales. Results of the system are presented for an intertidal rock platform at Cape Banks, Sydney, Australia. Potential uses of this technique include mapping of plant (micro- and macro-algae) and animal (e.g. gastropods) assemblages at multiple spatial and temporal scales.

  19. Objective Delineation of River Bed Surface Patches from High-Resolution Spatial Grain Size Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, P. A.; Bellugi, D.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2010-12-01

    Gravel-bed rivers commonly display distinct sorting patterns on their beds. Visually, this heterogeneity often appears to form an organization of distinct textural patches or facies. The local bed surface grain size, and therefore bed surface patchiness, exerts considerable influence on local bed mobility, bedload transport rates, hydrodynamic roughness, and benthic microhabitats. Despite the ecological and morphodynamic importance of bed surface patchiness, we lack accurate and objective methods to delineate bed patches. However, recent advances in photographic measurement of bed surface grain size distributions are capable of providing data at a spatial resolution high enough to allow us an opportunity to answer the question: what is a patch? Here, we explore a variety of techniques that can be applied to high-resolution spatial grain size data to automatically generate maps of grain size patches. We apply a state-of-the-art image processing and machine learning procedure to a photographic survey of the bed surface of a near-field scale flume to extract grain size data and to generate a spatial grid of bed surface grain size distributions. The flume bed was composed of gravel 2-45 mm in diameter and it featured clearly identifiable sorting features. Using this dataset, we investigate several possible methods of patch delineation. The grid of grain size distributions can be represented by a graph of nodes (grain size distributions) connected by edges whose weight is a function of the similarity between two nodes. Spectral graph theory is then used to optimally cut the edges in order to produce a spatial structure of patches that minimizes the association between patches and maximizes the association of nodes within a patch. In a different approach, agglomerative clustering of spatially adjacent grain size distributions is used to produce a hierarchical dendrogram that can be thresholded to partition the bed into patches. We also explore using the k-means algorithm

  20. High-spatial-resolution thermal remote sensing of active volcanic features using Landsat and hyperspectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Luke P.; Harris, Andrew J. L.; Rothery, David A.; Oppenheimer, Clive

    After the initial observation in 1987 that high spatial resolution data could be used to acquire thermal information for active volcanoes, satellite technology and its applications have leapt forward in possibilities and complexity. Since 1972, the Landsat series of satellites has provided the longest continuous high spatial resolution (Landsat 4 and 5 (launched in 1982 and 1984, respectively) featuring the Thematic Mapper system have made it possible to detect, map, and model high temperature features such as lava bodies and fires. Landsat 7 was launched in April, 1999, carrying an enhanced instrument package that includes a higher spatial resolution thermal band and a 15-m panchromatic band that will greatly aid detailed mapping of volcanic features. Current planning for the future Landsat 8 instrument includes a fundamental shift towards a lighter, more energy efficient instrument having a greater number of spectral bands. Hyperspectral sensors, such as that of Earth Orbiter-1, that have been planned for launch as part of the New Millennium Program, are being considered as Landsat 8 prototypes. Initial studies of lava flows and lava lakes using field spectrometers afford a glimpse of the capabilities offered by the next generation of satellites to model lava flow temperatures. Hyperspectral measurements of lava flows allow for the solution of numerous thermal components, which can then be used for much more detailed modeling than can be supported by broad band radiometry.

  1. Laser Beam Filtration for High Spatial Resolution MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavalin, Andre; Yang, Junhai; Caprioli, Richard

    2013-07-01

    We describe an easy and inexpensive way to provide a highly defined Gaussian shaped laser spot on target of 5 μm diameter for imaging mass spectrometry using a commercial MALDI TOF instrument that is designed to produce a 20 μm diameter laser beam on target at its lowest setting. A 25 μm pinhole filter on a swivel arm was installed in the laser beam optics outside the vacuum ion source chamber so it is easily flipped into or out of the beam as desired by the operator. The resulting ion images at 5 μm spatial resolution are sharp since the satellite secondary laser beam maxima have been removed by the filter. Ion images are shown to demonstrate the performance and are compared with the method of oversampling to achieve higher spatial resolution when only a larger laser beam spot on target is available.

  2. From point to spatial information - integrating highly resolved sensor observations into crop models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallor, Evelyn; Kersebaum, Kurt-Christian; Lorenz, Karsten; Gebbers, Robin

    2017-04-01

    High spatial variability of soil properties restricts the benefits of process-oriented modelling for management recommendations on field scale due to rare information about the soil inventory and its distribution. On the other hand, sensor measurements as geo-electrical mapping provide with a certain spatial pattern, but interpretation of the results is diverse and influenced by local conditions. In the present study, the model HERMES was applied to 60 soil sampling points of a well-documented field in North-Rhine Westphalia characterised by a wide range of soil texture. Validation of HERMES resulted in satisfactory root mean square errors (RMSE) for yield, water and nitrogen in soil. Values of conducted measurements (n = 5,000) of electrical conductivity (ECa) at the same field ranged from 20 to 90 mS/m and were assigned to the soil sampling points. Subsequent regression analyses resulted in a high correlation of clay and sand contents with measured ECa values and justified the calculation of soil texture at mapping points of ECa. Hence, an improved resolution of the key value soil texture was produced to initialize model simulation and to finally generate spatial patterns of simulated state variables (e.g. water and nitrogen content in soil).

  3. Spatial and temporal instabilities in high voltage power devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milady, Saeed

    2010-01-29

    Dynamic avalanche can occur during the turn-off process of high voltage bipolar devices, e.g. IGBTs and p{sup +}n{sup -}n{sup +} power diodes, that may result in spatial instabilities of the homogeneous current density distribution across the device and the formation of current filaments. Filaments may cause the destruction of the device, mainly because of the high local temperatures. The first part of this work is dedicated to the current filament behavior. The positive feedback mechanisms caused by the transient current flow through the gate capacitance of an IGBT operating under short circuit conditions may result in oscillations and temporal instabilities of the IGBT current. The oscillations may cause electromagnetic interference (EMI). Furthermore, the positive feedback mechanism may accelerate the over-heating of the device and result in a thermal run-away. This is the subject of the second part of this work. In the first part of this work using the device simulation results of power diodes the underlying physical mechanisms of the filament dynamic is investigated. Simulation results of diode structures with evenly distributed doping inhomogeneities show that, the filament motion gets smoother as the distance between the inhomogeneities decreases. Hopping to faraway inhomogeneities turns into the hopping to neighboring ones and finally a smooth motion. In homogeneous structures the slow inhibitory effect of the electron-hole plasma extraction and the fast activation, due to hole current flowing along the filament, result in a smooth filament motion. An analytical model for the filament velocity under isothermal conditions is presented that can reproduce the simulation data satisfactorily. The influence of the boundary conditions on the filament behavior is discussed. The positive beveled edge termination prohibits a long stay of the filament at the edge reducing the risk of filament pinning. Self-heating effects may turn the initially electrically triggered

  4. Implementation of a Gaussian Beam Laser and Aspheric Optics for High Spatial Resolution MALDI Imaging MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavalin, Andre; Yang, Junhai; Haase, Andreas; Holle, Armin; Caprioli, Richard

    2014-06-01

    We have investigated the use of a Gaussian beam laser for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry to provide a precisely defined laser spot of 5 μm diameter on target using a commercial MALDI TOF instrument originally designed to produce a 20 μm diameter laser beam spot at its smallest setting. A Gaussian beam laser was installed in the instrument in combination with an aspheric focusing lens. This ion source produced sharp ion images at 5 μm spatial resolution with signals of high intensity as shown for images from thin tissue sections of mouse brain.

  5. Hierarchical spatial point process analysis for a plant community with high biodiversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illian, Janine B.; Møller, Jesper; Waagepetersen, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    A complex multivariate spatial point pattern of a plant community with high biodiversity is modelled using a hierarchical multivariate point process model. In the model, interactions between plants with different post-fire regeneration strategies are of key interest. We consider initially a maximum...... likelihood approach to inference where problems arise due to unknown interaction radii for the plants. We next demonstrate that a Bayesian approach provides a flexible framework for incorporating prior information concerning the interaction radii. From an ecological perspective, we are able both to confirm...

  6. Spatial point process analysis for a plant community with high biodiversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illian, Janine; Møller, Jesper; Waagepetersen, Rasmus Plenge

    A complex multivariate spatial point pattern for a plant community with high biodiversity is modelled using a hierarchical multivariate point process model. In the model, interactions between plants with different post-fire regeneration strategies are of key interest. We consider initially...... a maximum likelihood approach to inference where problems arise due to unknown interaction radii for the plants. We next demonstrate that a Bayesian approach provides a flexible framework for incorporating prior information concerning the interaction radii. From an ecological perspective, we are able both...

  7. High stakes and high emotions: providing safe care in Canadian emergency departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali S

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Samina Ali,1,2 Denise Thomson,3 Timothy A D Graham,4 Sean E Rickard,3 Antonia S Stang5 1Women and Children’s Health Research Institute, 2Department of Pediatrics, 3Cochrane Child Health Field, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, 4Department of Emergency Medicine, 5Section of Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada Background: The high-paced, unpredictable environment of the emergency department (ED contributes to errors in patient safety. The ED setting becomes even more challenging when dealing with critically ill patients, particularly with children, where variations in size, weight, and form present practical difficulties in many aspects of care. In this commentary, we will explore the impact of the health care providers’ emotional reactions while caring for critically ill patients, and how this can be interpreted and addressed as a patient safety issue. Discussion: ED health care providers encounter high-stakes, high-stress clinical scenarios, such as pediatric cardiac arrest or resuscitation. This health care providers’ stress, and at times, distress, and its potential contribution to medical error, is underrepresented in the current medical literature. Most patient safety research is limited to error reporting systems, especially medication-related ones, an approach that ignores the effects of health care provider stress as a source of error, and limits our ability to learn from the event. Ways to mitigate this stress and avoid this type of patient safety concern might include simulation training for rare, high-acuity events, use of pre-determined clinical order sets, and post-event debriefing. Conclusion: While there are physiologic and anatomic differences that contribute to patient safety, we believe that they are insufficient to explain the need to address critical life-threatening event-related patient safety issues for both adults and, especially, children

  8. Trace metal imaging with high spatial resolution: Applications in biomedicine

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Z.; Caruso, J A; B. Lai; Matusch, A.; Becker, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    New generations of analytical techniques for imaging of metals are pushing hitherto boundaries of spatial resolution and quantitative analysis in biology. Because of this, the application of these imaging techniques described herein to the study of the organization and dynamics of metal cations and metal-containing biomolecules in biological cell and tissue is becoming an important issue in biomedical research. In the current review, three common metal imaging techniques in biomedical researc...

  9. Can high resolution 3D topographic surveys provide reliable grain size estimates in gravel bed rivers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, E.; Smith, M. W.; Klaar, M. J.; Brown, L. E.

    2017-09-01

    High resolution topographic surveys such as those provided by Structure-from-Motion (SfM) contain a wealth of information that is not always exploited in the generation of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). In particular, several authors have related sub-metre scale topographic variability (or 'surface roughness') to sediment grain size by deriving empirical relationships between the two. In fluvial applications, such relationships permit rapid analysis of the spatial distribution of grain size over entire river reaches, providing improved data to drive three-dimensional hydraulic models, allowing rapid geomorphic monitoring of sub-reach river restoration projects, and enabling more robust characterisation of riverbed habitats. However, comparison of previously published roughness-grain-size relationships shows substantial variability between field sites. Using a combination of over 300 laboratory and field-based SfM surveys, we demonstrate the influence of inherent survey error, irregularity of natural gravels, particle shape, grain packing structure, sorting, and form roughness on roughness-grain-size relationships. Roughness analysis from SfM datasets can accurately predict the diameter of smooth hemispheres, though natural, irregular gravels result in a higher roughness value for a given diameter and different grain shapes yield different relationships. A suite of empirical relationships is presented as a decision tree which improves predictions of grain size. By accounting for differences in patch facies, large improvements in D50 prediction are possible. SfM is capable of providing accurate grain size estimates, although further refinement is needed for poorly sorted gravel patches, for which c-axis percentiles are better predicted than b-axis percentiles.

  10. Io’s volcanoes at high spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution from ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kleer, Katherine R.; de Pater, Imke

    2017-10-01

    Io’s dynamic volcanic eruptions provide a laboratory for studying large-scale volcanism on a body vastly different from Earth, and for unraveling the connections between tidal heating and the geological activity it powers. Ground-based near-infrared observatories allow for high-cadence, long-time-baseline observing programs using diverse instrumentation, and yield new information into the nature and variability of this activity. I will summarize results from four years of ground-based observations of Io’s volcanism, including: (1) A multi-year cadence observing campaign using adaptive optics on 8-10 meter telescopes, which places constraints on tidal heating models through sampling the spatial distribution of Io’s volcanic heat flow, and provides estimates of the occurrence rate of Io’s most energetic eruptions; (2) High-spectral-resolution (R~25,000) studies of Io’s volcanic SO gas emission at 1.7 microns, which resolves this rovibronic line into its different branches, and thus contains detailed information on the temperature and thermal state of the gas; and (3) The highest-spatial-resolution map ever produced of the entire Loki Patera, a 20,000 km2 volcanic feature on Io, derived from adaptive-optics observations of an occultation of Io by Europa. The map achieves a spatial resolution of ~10 km and indicates compositional differences across the patera. These datasets both reveal specific characteristics of Io’s individual eruptions, and provide clues into the sub-surface systems connecting Io’s tidally-heated interior to its surface expressions of volcanism.

  11. High-resolution full-field spatial coherence gated optical tomography using monochromatic light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Vishal; Nandy, Sreyankar; Singh Mehta, Dalip

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrate dispersion free, high-resolution full-field spatial coherence gated optical tomography using spatially incoherent monochromatic light source. Spatial coherence properties of light source were synthesized by means of combining a static diffuser and vibrating multi mode fiber bundle. Due to low spatial coherence of light source, the axial resolution of the system was achieved similar to that of conventional optical coherence tomography which utilizes low temporal coherence. Experimental results of fringe visibility versus optical path difference are presented for varying numerical apertures objective lenses. High resolution optically sectioned images of multilayer onion skin, and red blood cells are presented.

  12. A ROBUST PARALLEL FRAMEWORK FOR MASSIVE SPATIAL DATA PROCESSING ON HIGH PERFORMANCE CLUSTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Guan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Massive spatial data requires considerable computing power for real-time processing. With the help of the development of multicore technology and computer component cost reduction in recent years, high performance clusters become the only economically viable solution for this requirement. Massive spatial data processing demands heavy I/O operations however, and should be characterized as a data-intensive application. Data-intensive application parallelization strategies are imcompatible with currently available procssing frameworks, which are basically designed for traditional compute-intensive applications. In this paper we introduce a Split-and-Merge paradigm for spatial data processing and also propose a robust parallel framework in a cluster environment to support this paradigm. The Split-and-Merge paradigm efficiently exploits data parallelism for massive data processing. The proposed framework is based on the open-source TORQUE project and hosted on a multicore-enabled Linux cluster. One common LiDAR point cloud algorithm, Delaunay triangulation, was implemented on the proposed framework to evaluate its efficiency and scalability. Experimental results demonstrate that the system provides efficient performance speedup.

  13. Social impacts of high speed rail projects: addressing spatial equity effects.

    OpenAIRE

    Monzón de Cáceres, Andrés; Ortega Pérez, Emilio; López Suárez, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Equity issues are increasingly included among social impacts of transportation investments. Equity implications take into account the distribution of effects among different societal groups (social equity) or regions (spatial equity). The analysis of the spatial distribution of effects is crucial, as certain transportation investments may contribute to increase imbalances between regions, i.e. negative spatial equity impacts. The planning process of a new high speed rail (HSR) corridor ...

  14. Spatial economy: high-tech glossary or new regional economics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Machado Ruiz

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available "The Spatial Economy Cities, Regions and International Trade", by Masahisa Fujita, Paul Krugman and Anthony J. Venables, has been seen as the best synthesis of the so-called new economic geography. The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to review the book; and second, to place it in the current debate on regional economics. The first part of the paper is a brief introduction that situates the book in the history of regional economics. In the second part, a description and analysis of the basic models, their variations and applications are presented. The debate on regional economics concerning the theory proposed in the book is in the third part. Two aspects are stressed: the criticisms on the core-periphery model and how it incorporates regional diversity The fourth topic is a critical assessment of the achievements and originality of the new economic geography analysis.

  15. Spatial economy: high-tech glossary or new regional economics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Machado Ruiz

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The Spatial Economy – Cities, Regions and International Trade, by Masahisa Fujita, Paul Krugman and Anthony J. Venables, has been seen as the best synthesis of the so-called new economic geography. The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to review the book; and second, to place it in the current debate on regional economics. The first part of the paper is a brief introduction that situates the book in the history of regional economics. In the second part, a description and analysis of the basic models, their variations and applications are presented. The debate on regional economics concerning the theory proposed in the book is in the third part. Two aspects are stressed: the criticisms on the core-periphery model and how it incorporates regional diversity The fourth topic is a critical assessment of the achievements and originality of the new economic geography analysis...

  16. Advanced Extraction of Spatial Information from High Resolution Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pour, T.; Burian, J.; Miřijovský, J.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper authors processed five satellite image of five different Middle-European cities taken by five different sensors. The aim of the paper was to find methods and approaches leading to evaluation and spatial data extraction from areas of interest. For this reason, data were firstly pre-processed using image fusion, mosaicking and segmentation processes. Results going into the next step were two polygon layers; first one representing single objects and the second one representing city blocks. In the second step, polygon layers were classified and exported into Esri shapefile format. Classification was partly hierarchical expert based and partly based on the tool SEaTH used for separability distinction and thresholding. Final results along with visual previews were attached to the original thesis. Results are evaluated visually and statistically in the last part of the paper. In the discussion author described difficulties of working with data of large size, taken by different sensors and different also thematically.

  17. High and low schizotypal female subjects do not differ in spatial memory abilities in a virtual reality task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Montes, José Manuel; Noguera, Carmen; Alvarez, Dolores; Ruiz, Marina; Cimadevilla Redondo, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Schizotypy is a psychological construct related to schizophrenia. The exact relationship between both entities is not clear. In recent years, schizophrenia has been associated with hippocampal abnormalities and spatial memory problems. The aim of this study was to determine possible links between high schizotypy (HS) and low schizotypy (LS) and spatial abilities, using virtual reality tasks. We hypothesised that the HS group would exhibit a lower performance in spatial memory tasks than the LS group. Two groups of female students were formed according to their score on the ESQUIZO-Q-A questionnaire. HS and LS subjects were tested on two different tasks: the Boxes Room task, a spatial memory task sensitive to hippocampal alterations and a spatial recognition task. Data showed that both groups mastered both tasks. Groups differed in personality features but not in spatial performance. These results provide valuable information about the schizotypy-schizophrenia connections. Schizotypal subjects are not impaired on spatial cognition and, accordingly, the schizotypy-schizophrenia relationship is not straightforward.

  18. An optical setup for electric field measurements in MRI with high spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Simon; Bitzer, Andreas; Bock, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Electric field measurements in the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging environment are important to assess potentially dangerous radio-frequency (RF) heating in the vicinity of metallic structures such as coils, implants or catheters. So far, E-field measurements have been performed with dipole antennas that lag of limited spatial resolution and which are difficult to use in the magnet bore as they interfere with the RF transmit field of the MRI system. In this work an electro-optic sensor is presented that utilizes the Pockels effect to measure the E-field in a clinical MR system with high spatial resolution. This sensor consists of dielectric materials only and thus, it only minimally influences the measured E-field distribution. A 10 m long flexible optical fiber connects the small sensor head to a remote processing unit where the optical signal is transformed into an electrical output signal. Spatially resolved qualitative E-field measurements were performed in a 1.5 T clinical MR system in the vicinity of metallic samples and an active tracking catheter with a resolution of up to 1 mm. The near-field pattern of a resonant U-shaped metallic sample was clearly identified and compared with numerical simulations. A more complex field behavior was found for the tracking catheter where strong E-field enhancements were observed at the distal tip and at its proximal part outside the phantom solution. Due to its sub-mm spatial resolution the optical sensor approach provides detailed insight into the complex and difficult to access field distributions close to implants and metallic structures and has turned out to be promising tool for MRI field and safety inspections.

  19. Using High Spatial Resolution Satellite Imagery to Map Forest Burn Severity Across Spatial Scales in a Pine Barrens Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Ran; Wu, Jin; Schwager, Kathy L.; Zhao, Feng; Dennison, Philip E.; Cook, Bruce D.; Brewster, Kristen; Green, Timothy M.; Serbin, Shawn P.

    2017-01-01

    As a primary disturbance agent, fire significantly influences local processes and services of forest ecosystems. Although a variety of remote sensing based approaches have been developed and applied to Landsat mission imagery to infer burn severity at 30 m spatial resolution, forest burn severity have still been seldom assessed at fine spatial scales (less than or equal to 5 m) from very-high-resolution (VHR) data. We assessed a 432 ha forest fire that occurred in April 2012 on Long Island, New York, within the Pine Barrens region, a unique but imperiled fire-dependent ecosystem in the northeastern United States. The mapping of forest burn severity was explored here at fine spatial scales, for the first time using remotely sensed spectral indices and a set of Multiple Endmember Spectral Mixture Analysis (MESMA) fraction images from bi-temporal - pre- and post-fire event - WorldView-2 (WV-2) imagery at 2 m spatial resolution. We first evaluated our approach using 1 m by 1 m validation points at the sub-crown scale per severity class (i.e. unburned, low, moderate, and high severity) from the post-fire 0.10 m color aerial ortho-photos; then, we validated the burn severity mapping of geo-referenced dominant tree crowns (crown scale) and 15 m by 15 m fixed-area plots (inter-crown scale) with the post-fire 0.10 m aerial ortho-photos and measured crown information of twenty forest inventory plots. Our approach can accurately assess forest burn severity at the sub-crown (overall accuracy is 84% with a Kappa value of 0.77), crown (overall accuracy is 82% with a Kappa value of 0.76), and inter-crown scales (89% of the variation in estimated burn severity ratings (i.e. Geo-Composite Burn Index (CBI)). This work highlights that forest burn severity mapping from VHR data can capture heterogeneous fire patterns at fine spatial scales over the large spatial extents. This is important since most ecological processes associated with fire effects vary at the less than 30 m scale and

  20. Climate Change Driven Implications on Spatial Distribution of High Andean Peatlands in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Marco; Gibbons, Richard E.

    2013-04-01

    High Andean peatlands are among the most unique habitats in the tropical Andes and certainly among the least studied. High Andean peatlands occur patchily in montane grassland and scrub below snow line and above tree line. These high-elevation peatlands are sustained by glacial runoff and seasonal precipitation. We used remote sensing data to estimate that peatland habitat is approximately 2.5 % of our study region in the Puna, an ecoregion located in the high Andes above 4000 m a.s.l. Individual sizes of our estimated peatland polygons ranged from 0.72 ha to 1079 ha with a mean size of 4.9 ha. Climate change driven implications on spatial distribution of high Andean peatlands were assessed in two ways. First, we estimated the effect of predicted regional temperature increase by using the standard lapse rate of 2° C per 300 m for assessing peatland habitat patches that would remain above a critical thermocline. Nearly 80% of peatland habitat patches were predicted to occur below the thermocline if the prediction of 4° C temperature increase is realized. The second assessment relied on the quantified assumption that permanent snow or glacier cover, topographic characteristics (e.g. slope) and precipitation of a basin are essential variables in the occurrence of high Andean peatlands. All 17 basins were predicted to have a decrease in peatland habitat due to snow line uplift, decrease in precipitation and consequent insufficient wetland inflows. Total habitat loss was predicted for two basins in the semi-arid part of the study area with a snow line uplift to 5600 m and a projected decrease in precipitation of 1 mm per year over the next 40 years. A combined result of both assessments provides important information on climate change driven implications on the hydrology of high Andean peatlands and potential consequences for their spatial distribution within the Central Andes.

  1. Modified ideal observer model (MIOM) for high-contrast and high-spatial resolution CT imaging tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Bastida, Juan P; Gomez-Cardona, Daniel; Garrett, John; Szczykutowicz, Timothy; Chen, Guang-Hong; Li, Ke

    2017-09-01

    , the value of ρ was 0.05 (P = 0.904) for the ideal observer, 0.05 (P = 0.904) for the non-prewhitening observer, -0.18 (P = 0.634) for the non-prewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise, and 0.30 (P = 0.427) for the prewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise. Using the validated MIOM, the optimal reconstruction kernel for the Hi-Res mode to perform high spatial resolution and high contrast discrimination imaging tasks was determined to be the HD Ultra kernel at the center of the scan field of view (SFOV), or the Lung kernel at the peripheral region of the SFOV. This result was consistent with visual observations of nasal CT images of an in vivo canine subject. Compared with other observer models, the proposed modified ideal observer model provides significantly improved correlation with human observers for high contrast and high spatial resolution CT imaging tasks. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  2. Spatial 3D infrastructure: display-independent software framework, high-speed rendering electronics, and several new displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Won-Suk; Napoli, Joshua; Cossairt, Oliver S.; Dorval, Rick K.; Hall, Deirdre M.; Purtell, Thomas J., II; Schooler, James F.; Banker, Yigal; Favalora, Gregg E.

    2005-03-01

    We present a software and hardware foundation to enable the rapid adoption of 3-D displays. Different 3-D displays - such as multiplanar, multiview, and electroholographic displays - naturally require different rendering methods. The adoption of these displays in the marketplace will be accelerated by a common software framework. The authors designed the SpatialGL API, a new rendering framework that unifies these display methods under one interface. SpatialGL enables complementary visualization assets to coexist through a uniform infrastructure. Also, SpatialGL supports legacy interfaces such as the OpenGL API. The authors" first implementation of SpatialGL uses multiview and multislice rendering algorithms to exploit the performance of modern graphics processing units (GPUs) to enable real-time visualization of 3-D graphics from medical imaging, oil & gas exploration, and homeland security. At the time of writing, SpatialGL runs on COTS workstations (both Windows and Linux) and on Actuality"s high-performance embedded computational engine that couples an NVIDIA GeForce 6800 Ultra GPU, an AMD Athlon 64 processor, and a proprietary, high-speed, programmable volumetric frame buffer that interfaces to a 1024 x 768 x 3 digital projector. Progress is illustrated using an off-the-shelf multiview display, Actuality"s multiplanar Perspecta Spatial 3D System, and an experimental multiview display. The experimental display is a quasi-holographic view-sequential system that generates aerial imagery measuring 30 mm x 25 mm x 25 mm, providing 198 horizontal views.

  3. Strain measurements of a fiber loop rosette using high spatial resolution Rayleigh scatter distributed sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Dawn K.; Sang, Alex K.; Kreger, Steven T.; Froggatt, Mark E.

    2010-09-01

    Strain is measured with high spatial resolution on fiber loops bonded to a metal test sample to form a fiber rosette. Strain measurements are made using an Optical Backscatter Reflectometer to detect changes in the phase of the Rayleigh Scatter of the fiber with 160 μm spatial resolution along the length of the fiber. Using this experimental set-up, applied strain levels as well as the axis along which the loads are applied are measured. Thermal gradients are also detected. The high spatial resolution and strain sensitivity of this technique enable highly functional fiber rosettes formed of small diameter loops of standard low-bend-loss optical fiber.

  4. ADVANCED EXTRACTION OF SPATIAL INFORMATION FROM HIGH RESOLUTION SATELLITE DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pour

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper authors processed five satellite image of five different Middle-European cities taken by five different sensors. The aim of the paper was to find methods and approaches leading to evaluation and spatial data extraction from areas of interest. For this reason, data were firstly pre-processed using image fusion, mosaicking and segmentation processes. Results going into the next step were two polygon layers; first one representing single objects and the second one representing city blocks. In the second step, polygon layers were classified and exported into Esri shapefile format. Classification was partly hierarchical expert based and partly based on the tool SEaTH used for separability distinction and thresholding. Final results along with visual previews were attached to the original thesis. Results are evaluated visually and statistically in the last part of the paper. In the discussion author described difficulties of working with data of large size, taken by different sensors and different also thematically.

  5. High spatial resolution aerosol retrieval with MAIAC: Application to mountain regions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emili, E; Lyapustin, A; Wang, Y; Popp, C; Korkin, S; Zebisch, M; Wunderle, S; Petitta, M

    2011-01-01

    .... Satellites provide an effective tool to map aerosols on an operational basis, but most of the aerosol products intended for continental/global applications have a coarse spatial resolution (10–18 km...

  6. An Internet-Based GIS Platform Providing Data for Visualization and Spatial Analysis of Urbanization in Major Asian and African Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Gong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Rapid urbanization in developing countries has been observed to be relatively high in the last two decades, especially in the Asian and African regions. Although many researchers have made efforts to improve the understanding of the urbanization trends of various cities in Asia and Africa, the absence of platforms where local stakeholders can visualize and obtain processed urbanization data for their specific needs or analysis, still remains a gap. In this paper, we present an Internet-based GIS platform called MEGA-WEB. The Platform was developed in view of the urban planning and management challenges in developing countries of Asia and Africa due to the limited availability of data resources, effective tools, and proficiency in data analysis. MEGA-WEB provides online access, visualization, spatial analysis, and data sharing services following a mashup framework of the MEGA-WEB Geo Web Services (GWS, with the third-party map services using HTML5/JavaScript techniques. Through the integration of GIS, remote sensing, geo-modelling, and Internet GIS, several indicators for analyzing urbanization are provided in MEGA-WEB to give diverse perspectives on the urbanization of not only the physical land surface condition, but also the relationships of population, energy use, and the environment. The design, architecture, system functions, and uses of MEGA-WEB are discussed in the paper. The MEGA-WEB project is aimed at contributing to sustainable urban development in developing countries of Asia and Africa.

  7. Device for high spatial resolution chemical analysis of a sample and method of high spatial resolution chemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-10-06

    A system and method for analyzing a chemical composition of a specimen are described. The system can include at least one pin; a sampling device configured to contact a liquid with a specimen on the at least one pin to form a testing solution; and a stepper mechanism configured to move the at least one pin and the sampling device relative to one another. The system can also include an analytical instrument for determining a chemical composition of the specimen from the testing solution. In particular, the systems and methods described herein enable chemical analysis of specimens, such as tissue, to be evaluated in a manner that the spatial-resolution is limited by the size of the pins used to obtain tissue samples, not the size of the sampling device used to solubilize the samples coupled to the pins.

  8. Acceleration of high angular and spatial resolution diffusion imaging using compressed sensing with multichannel spiral data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Merry; Jacob, Mathews; Guidon, Arnaud; Magnotta, Vincent; Zhong, Jianhui

    2015-01-01

    To accelerate the acquisition of simultaneously high spatial and angular resolution diffusion imaging. Accelerated imaging is achieved by recovering the diffusion signal at all voxels simultaneously from under-sampled k-q space data using a compressed sensing algorithm. The diffusion signal at each voxel is modeled as a sparse complex Gaussian mixture model. The joint recovery scheme enables incoherent under-sampling of the 5-D k-q space, obtained by randomly skipping interleaves of a multishot variable density spiral trajectory. This sampling and reconstruction strategy is observed to provide considerably improved reconstructions than classical k-q under-sampling and reconstruction schemes. The complex model enables to account for the noise statistics without compromising the computational efficiency and theoretical convergence guarantees. The reconstruction framework also incorporates compensation of motion induced phase errors that result from the multishot acquisition. Reconstructions of the diffusion signal from under-sampled data using the proposed method yields accurate results with errors less that 5% for different accelerations and b-values. The proposed method is also shown to perform better than standard k-q acceleration schemes. The proposed scheme can significantly accelerate the acquisition of high spatial and angular resolution diffusion imaging by accurately reconstructing crossing fiber architectures from under-sampled data. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. High Spatial Resolution Soil Moisture with Passive Active Sensors Using a Change Detection Approach: Studies Using SMAPVEX12 Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, B.; Lakshmi, V.; Bindlish, R.; Jackson, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    Soil moisture is an important variable in many areas of geosciences. The passive microwave sensors have been providing soil moisture of various spatial resolutions and are available for all-weather conditions. However, restricted by the antenna diameter of microwave radiometer, the spatial resolution of passive microwave soil moisture product is at tens of kilometers and needs to be improved for many applications. The SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) is set to be launched in late 2014 and will be the first mission to provide L-band radar/radiometer soil moisture retrievals at three resolutions. The SMAPVEX12 is a pre-launch field validation experiment for evaluating and testing the soil moisture retrievals acquired from SMAP satellite. Airborne data using PALS (Passive/Active L-band Sensor) at two along-track resolutions (650 m and 1590 m) and UAVSAR (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar) at 5 m spatial resolution as well as in-situ measurements were collected during the campaign. The study will implement a Single Channel Algorithm (SCA) to retrieve soil moisture from high/low altitude PALS L-band radiometer observations, as well as produce downscaled soil moisture change by combining low spatial resolution soil moisture retrievals and high spatial resolution PALS L-band radar observations through a change-detection algorithm, which models the relationship between change in radar backscatter and the change in soil moisture.

  10. Provider Knowledge of Trivalent Inactivated and High-Dose Influenza Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Tewell, Chad; Wright, Patty W.; Talbot, H. Keipp

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess provider knowledge about trivalent inactivated and high dose influenza vaccines. Hence, a 20 item survey was distributed to providers within the Internal Medicine department at an urban academic medical center.

  11. Spatial data mining of pipeline data provides new wave of O and M capital cost optimization opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, D. [QM4 Engineering Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This paper discussed the cost optimization benefits of spatial data mining in upstream oil and gas pipeline operations. The data mining method was used to enhance the characterization and management of internal corrosion risk and to optimize pipeline corrosion inhibition, as well as to identify pipeline network hydraulic bottlenecks. The data mining method formed part of a quality-based pipeline integrity management program. Results of the data mining study highlighted trends in well operational data and historical pipeline failure events. Use of the methodology resulted in significant savings. It was demonstrated that the key to a successful pipeline management model is a complete inventory characterization and determination of failure susceptibility profiles through the application of rigorous data standards. 4 tabs., 8 figs.

  12. Thinking Spatially: GIS in the High School Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibrandi, Marsha

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the Geographic Information System (GIS) which can display information from a database in a geo-referenced map, the speed with which it can correlate many layers of information, the varied angles it can provide, and other images that it can rotate and transform. States benefits for the classroom including interdisciplinary applications…

  13. High spatial resolution quantitative MR images: an experimental study of dedicated surface coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gensanne, D [Laboratoire de Chimie Bioinorganique Medicale, Imagerie therapeutique et diagnostique, JE 2400-CNRS FR 2599, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118, route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France); Josse, G [Centre Europeen de Recherche et d' Evaluation sur la Peau et les Epitheliums de Revetement, Institut de Recherche Pierre Fabre, 2, rue Viguerie, BP 3071 31025 Toulouse Cedex 3 (France); Lagarde, J M [Centre Europeen de Recherche et d' Evaluation sur la Peau et les Epitheliums de Revetement, Institut de Recherche Pierre Fabre, 2, rue Viguerie, BP 3071 31025 Toulouse Cedex 3 (France); Vincensini, D [Laboratoire de Chimie Bioinorganique Medicale, Imagerie therapeutique et diagnostique, JE 2400-CNRS FR 2599, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118, route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2006-06-07

    Measuring spin-spin relaxation times (T{sub 2}) by quantitative MR imaging represents a potentially efficient tool to evaluate the physicochemical properties of various media. However, noise in MR images is responsible for uncertainties in the determination of T{sub 2} relaxation times, which limits the accuracy of parametric tissue analysis. The required signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depends on the T{sub 2} relaxation behaviour specific to each tissue. Thus, we have previously shown that keeping the uncertainty in T{sub 2} measurements within a limit of 10% implies that SNR values be greater than 100 and 300 for mono- and biexponential T{sub 2} relaxation behaviours, respectively. Noise reduction can be obtained either by increasing the voxel size (i.e., at the expense of spatial resolution) or by using high sensitivity dedicated surface coils (which allows us to increase SNR without deteriorating spatial resolution in an excessive manner). However, surface coil sensitivity is heterogeneous, i.e., it- and hence SNR-decreases with increasing depth, and the more so as the coil radius is smaller. The use of surface coils is therefore limited to the analysis of superficial structure such as the hypodermic tissue analysed here. The aim of this work was to determine the maximum limits of spatial resolution and depth compatible with reliable in vivo T{sub 2} quantitative MR images using dedicated surface coils available on various clinical MR scanners. The average thickness of adipose tissue is around 15 mm, and the results obtained have shown that obtaining reliable biexponential relaxation analysis requires a minimum achievable voxel size of 13 mm{sup 3} for a conventional volume birdcage coil and only of 1.7 mm{sup 3} for the smallest available surface coil (23 mm in diameter). Further improvement in spatial resolution allowing us to detect low details in MR images without deteriorating parametric T{sub 2} images can be obtained by image filtering. By using the non

  14. The contribution of high frequencies to human brain activity underlying horizontal localization of natural spatial sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alku Paavo

    2007-09-01

    -hemispheric cortical processes are insensitive to the presence of high-frequency spectral information. The previously described changes in localization-related brain activity, reflected in the enlarged N1m dynamic range elicited by natural spatial stimuli, can most likely be attributed to the processing of individualized spatial cues present already at relatively low frequencies. The left-hemispheric effect could be an indication of left-hemispheric processing of high-frequency sound information unrelated to sound localization. Taken together, these results provide converging evidence for a hemispheric asymmetry in sound localization.

  15. Cellular and Subcellular Level Localization of Maize Lipids and Metabolites Using High-Spatial Resolution MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueñas, Maria Emilia; Feenstra, Adam D; Korte, Andrew R; Hinners, Paige; Lee, Young Jin

    2018-01-01

    Recent technological advances have pushed the achievable spatial resolution for mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) to cellular and subcellular levels. Direct visualization of maize tissues by this tool has provided key insights into the localization of metabolites and lipids. This chapter outlines methodology for sample preparation, data acquisition, and data analysis of maize tissue sections using high-spatial resolution matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-MSI, as well as the incorporation of a multi-resolution optical system, which allows for simple inter-conversion between different resolution setups (5, 10, and 50 μm imaging).

  16. Role of high-order aberrations in senescent changes in spatial vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliot, S; Choi, S S; Doble, N; Hardy, J L; Evans, J W; Werner, J S

    2009-01-06

    The contributions of optical and neural factors to age-related losses in spatial vision are not fully understood. We used closed-loop adaptive optics to test the visual benefit of correcting monochromatic high-order aberrations (HOAs) on spatial vision for observers ranging in age from 18-81 years. Contrast sensitivity was measured monocularly using a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) procedure for sinusoidal gratings over 6 mm and 3 mm pupil diameters. Visual acuity was measured using a spatial 4AFC procedure. Over a 6 mm pupil, young observers showed a large benefit of AO at high spatial frequencies, whereas older observers exhibited the greatest benefit at middle spatial frequencies, plus a significantly larger increase in visual acuity. When age-related miosis is controlled, young and old observers exhibited a similar benefit of AO for spatial vision. An increase in HOAs cannot account for the complete senescent decline in spatial vision. These results may indicate a larger role of additional optical factors when the impact of HOAs is removed, but also lend support for the importance of neural factors in age-related changes in spatial vision.

  17. Role of high-order aberrations in senescent changes in spatial vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Sarah L.; Choi, Stacey S.; Doble, Nathan; Hardy, Joseph L.; Evans, Julia W.; Werner, John S.

    2009-01-01

    The contributions of optical and neural factors to age-related losses in spatial vision are not fully understood. We used closed-loop adaptive optics to test the visual benefit of correcting monochromatic high-order aberrations (HOAs) on spatial vision for observers ranging in age from 18 to 81 years. Contrast sensitivity was measured monocularly using a two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) procedure for sinusoidal gratings over 6 mm and 3 mm pupil diameters. Visual acuity was measured using a spatial 4AFC procedure. Over a 6 mm pupil, young observers showed a large benefit of AO at high spatial frequencies, whereas older observers exhibited the greatest benefit at middle spatial frequencies, plus a significantly larger increase in visual acuity. When age-related miosis is controlled, young and old observers exhibited a similar benefit of AO for spatial vision. An increase in HOAs cannot account for the complete senescent decline in spatial vision. These results may indicate a larger role of additional optical factors when the impact of HOAs is removed, but also lend support for the importance of neural factors in age-related changes in spatial vision. PMID:19271934

  18. Spatially detailed retrievals of spring phenology from single-season high-resolution image time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrieling, Anton; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Wang, Tiejun; Meroni, Michele; Ens, Bruno J.; Oosterbeek, Kees; O'Connor, Brian; Darvishzadeh, Roshanak; Heurich, Marco; Shepherd, Anita; Paganini, Marc

    2017-07-01

    Vegetation indices derived from satellite image time series have been extensively used to estimate the timing of phenological events like season onset. Medium spatial resolution (≥250 m) satellite sensors with daily revisit capability are typically employed for this purpose. In recent years, phenology is being retrieved at higher resolution (≤30 m) in response to increasing availability of high-resolution satellite data. To overcome the reduced acquisition frequency of such data, previous attempts involved fusion between high- and medium-resolution data, or combinations of multi-year acquisitions in a single phenological reconstruction. The objectives of this study are to demonstrate that phenological parameters can now be retrieved from single-season high-resolution time series, and to compare these retrievals against those derived from multi-year high-resolution and single-season medium-resolution satellite data. The study focuses on the island of Schiermonnikoog, the Netherlands, which comprises a highly-dynamic saltmarsh, dune vegetation, and agricultural land. Combining NDVI series derived from atmospherically-corrected images from RapidEye (5 m-resolution) and the SPOT5 Take5 experiment (10m-resolution) acquired between March and August 2015, phenological parameters were estimated using a function fitting approach. We then compared results with phenology retrieved from four years of 30 m Landsat 8 OLI data, and single-year 100 m Proba-V and 250 m MODIS temporal composites of the same period. Retrieved phenological parameters from combined RapidEye/SPOT5 displayed spatially consistent results and a large spatial variability, providing complementary information to existing vegetation community maps. Retrievals that combined four years of Landsat observations into a single synthetic year were affected by the inclusion of years with warmer spring temperatures, whereas adjustment of the average phenology to 2015 observations was only feasible for a few pixels

  19. How do migratory species add ecosystem service value to wilderness? Calculating the spatial subsidies provided by protected areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Hoffman, Laura; Semmens, Darius J.; Diffendorfer, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Species that migrate through protected and wilderness areas and utilize their resources, deliver ecosystem services to people in faraway locations. The mismatch between the areas that most support a species and those areas where the species provides most benefits to society can lead to underestimation of the true value of protected areas such as wilderness. We present a method to communicate the “off-site” value of wilderness and protected areas in providing habitat to migratory species that, in turn, provide benefits to people in distant locations. Using northern pintail ducks (Anas acuta) as an example, the article provides a method to estimate the amount of subsidy – the value of the ecosystem services provided by a migratory species in one area versus the cost to support the species and its habitat elsewhere.

  20. Research on controlling middle spatial frequency error of high gradient precise aspheric by pitch tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Hou, Xi; Wan, Yongjian; Shi, Chunyan; Zhong, Xianyun

    2016-09-01

    Extreme optical fabrication projects known as EUV and X-ray optic systems, which are representative of today's advanced optical manufacturing technology level, have special requirements for the optical surface quality. In synchroton radiation (SR) beamlines, mirrors of high shape accuracy is always used in grazing incidence. In nanolithograph systems, middle spatial frequency errors always lead to small-angle scattering or flare that reduces the contrast of the image. The slope error is defined for a given horizontal length, the increase or decrease in form error at the end point relative to the starting point is measured. The quality of reflective optical elements can be described by their deviation from ideal shape at different spatial frequencies. Usually one distinguishes between the figure error, the low spatial error part ranging from aperture length to 1mm frequencies, and the mid-high spatial error part from 1mm to 1 μm and from1 μm to some 10 nm spatial frequencies, respectively. Firstly, this paper will disscuss the relationship between slope error and middle spatial frequency error, which both describe the optical surface error along with the form profile. Then, experimental researches will be conducted on a high gradient precise aspheric with pitch tool, which aim to restraining the middle spatial frequency error.

  1. The intelligence of observation: improving high school students' spatial ability by means of intervention unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patkin, Dorit; Dayan, Ester

    2013-03-01

    This case study of one class versus a control group focused on the impact of an intervention unit, which is not part of the regular curriculum, on the improvement of spatial ability of high school students (forty-six 12th-graders, aged 17-18, both boys and girls) in general as well as from a gender perspective. The study explored three sub-abilities: mental rotation (MR), spatial visualization (VS) and spatial orientation (SO). Findings indicated that the spatial orientation of the experimental group students had considerably improved. The findings also illustrated a significant gender-based advantage in favour of the boys in some of the spatial abilities even before the implementation of the intervention unit. The hypothesis relating to the reduction of the gender differences was not corroborated.

  2. Nonlinear Elastodynamic Behaviour Analysis of High-Speed Spatial Parallel Coordinate Measuring Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiulong Chen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the elastodynamic behaviour of 4- universal joints- prismatic pairs- spherical joints / universal joints- prismatic pairs- universal joints 4-UPS-UPU high-speed spatial PCMMs(parallel coordinate measuring machines, the nonlinear time-varying dynamics model, which comprehensively considers geometric nonlinearity and the rigid-flexible coupling effect, is derived by using Lagrange equations and finite element methods. Based on the Newmark method, the kinematics output response of 4-UPS-UPU PCMMs is illustrated through numerical simulation. The results of the simulation show that the flexibility of the links is demonstrated to have a significant impact on the system dynamics response. This research can provide the important theoretical base of the optimization design and vibration control for 4-UPS-UPU PCMMs.

  3. Predicting spatial variations of tree species richness in tropical forests from high-resolution remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricker, Geoffrey A; Wolf, Jeffrey A; Saatchi, Sassan S; Gillespie, Thomas W

    2015-10-01

    There is an increasing interest in identifying theories, empirical data sets, and remote-sensing metrics that can quantify tropical forest alpha diversity at a landscape scale. Quantifying patterns of tree species richness in the field is time consuming, especially in regions with over 100 tree species/ha. We examine species richness in a 50-ha plot in Barro Colorado Island in Panama and test if biophysical measurements of canopy reflectance from high-resolution satellite imagery and detailed vertical forest structure and topography from light detection and ranging (lidar) are associated with species richness across four tree size classes (>1, 1-10, >10, and >20 cm dbh) and three spatial scales (1, 0.25, and 0.04 ha). We use the 2010 tree inventory, including 204,757 individuals belonging to 301 species of freestanding woody plants or 166 ± 1.5 species/ha (mean ± SE), to compare with remote-sensing data. All remote-sensing metrics became less correlated with species richness as spatial resolution decreased from 1.0 ha to 0.04 ha and tree size increased from 1 cm to 20 cm dbh. When all stems with dbh > 1 cm in 1-ha plots were compared to remote-sensing metrics, standard deviation in canopy reflectance explained 13% of the variance in species richness. The standard deviations of canopy height and the topographic wetness index (TWI) derived from lidar were the best metrics to explain the spatial variance in species richness (15% and 24%, respectively). Using multiple regression models, we made predictions of species richness across Barro Colorado Island (BCI) at the 1-ha spatial scale for different tree size classes. We predicted variation in tree species richness among all plants (adjusted r² = 0.35) and trees with dbh > 10 cm (adjusted r² = 0.25). However, the best model results were for understory trees and shrubs (dbh 1-10 cm) (adjusted r² = 0.52) that comprise the majority of species richness in tropical forests. Our results indicate that high

  4. High Spatial Resolution Airborne Multispectral Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data for Analysis of Urban Landscape Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have used airborne multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data collected at a high spatial resolution (i.e., 10m) over several cities in the United States to study thermal energy characteristics of the urban landscape. These TIR data provide a unique opportunity to quantify thermal responses from discrete surfaces typical of the urban landscape and to identify both the spatial arrangement and patterns of thermal processes across the city. The information obtained from these data is critical to understanding how urban surfaces drive or force development of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect, which exists as a dome of elevated air temperatures that presides over cities in contrast to surrounding non-urbanized areas. The UHI is most pronounced in the summertime where urban surfaces, such as rooftops and pavement, store solar radiation throughout the day, and release this stored energy slowly after sunset creating air temperatures over the city that are in excess of 2-4'C warmer in contrast with non-urban or rural air temperatures. The UHI can also exist as a daytime phenomenon with surface temperatures in downtown areas of cities exceeding 38'C. The implications of the UHI are significant, particularly as an additive source of thermal energy input that exacerbates the overall production of ground level ozone over cities. We have used the Airborne Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS), flown onboard a Lear 23 jet aircraft from the NASA Stennis Space Center, to acquire high spatial resolution multispectral TIR data (i.e., 6 bandwidths between 8.2-12.2 (um) over Huntsville, Alabama, Atlanta, Georgia, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Sacramento, California. These TIR data have been used to produce maps and other products, showing the spatial distribution of heating and cooling patterns over these cities to better understand how the morphology of the urban landscape affects development of the UHI. In turn, these data have been used

  5. Monitoring habitat preserves in southern California using high spatial resolution multispectral imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, Lloyd L; Stow, Douglas A

    2009-05-01

    Habitat preserve systems have been established adjacent to the densely populated regions of southern California to support indigenous plant and animal species that are listed as rare, threatened, or endangered. Monitoring the condition of habitat across these broad preserves is necessary to ensure their long-term viability and may be effectively accomplished using remote sensing techniques with high spatial resolution visible and near-infrared (VNIR) multispectral imagery. The utility of 1 m spatial resolution VNIR imagery for detailed change detection and monitoring of Mediterranean-type ecosystems is assessed here. Image acquisition and preprocessing procedures were conducted to ensure that image-detected changes represented real changes and not artifacts. Change classification products with six spectral-based transition classes were generated using multiband image differencing (MID) for three change periods: 1998-1999, 1998-2001, and 1998-2005. Land cover changes relevant to habitat quality monitoring such as human-induced disturbance, fire, vegetation growth/recovery, and drought related vegetation stress were readily detected using the multitemporal VNIR imagery. Suggestions for operational habitat monitoring using image products and mobile geographic information system technologies are provided.

  6. An Architecture Offering Mobile Pollution Sensing with High Spatial Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Alvear

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile sensing is becoming the best option to monitor our environment due to its ease of use, high flexibility, and low price. In this paper, we present a mobile sensing architecture able to monitor different pollutants using low-end sensors. Although the proposed solution can be deployed everywhere, it becomes especially meaningful in crowded cities where pollution values are often high, being of great concern to both population and authorities. Our architecture is composed of three different modules: a mobile sensor for monitoring environment pollutants, an Android-based device for transferring the gathered data to a central server, and a central processing server for analyzing the pollution distribution. Moreover, we analyze different issues related to the monitoring process: (i filtering captured data to reduce the variability of consecutive measurements; (ii converting the sensor output to actual pollution levels; (iii reducing the temporal variations produced by mobile sensing process; and (iv applying interpolation techniques for creating detailed pollution maps. In addition, we study the best strategy to use mobile sensors by first determining the influence of sensor orientation on the captured values and then analyzing the influence of time and space sampling in the interpolation process.

  7. Kite Aerial Photography for Low-Cost, Ultra-high Spatial Resolution Multi-Spectral Mapping of Intertidal Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Mitch; Johnson-Roberson, Matthew; Murphy, Richard J.; Bongiorno, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Intertidal ecosystems have primarily been studied using field-based sampling; remote sensing offers the ability to collect data over large areas in a snapshot of time that could complement field-based sampling methods by extrapolating them into the wider spatial and temporal context. Conventional remote sensing tools (such as satellite and aircraft imaging) provide data at limited spatial and temporal resolutions and relatively high costs for small-scale environmental science and ecologically-focussed studies. In this paper, we describe a low-cost, kite-based imaging system and photogrammetric/mapping procedure that was developed for constructing high-resolution, three-dimensional, multi-spectral terrain models of intertidal rocky shores. The processing procedure uses automatic image feature detection and matching, structure-from-motion and photo-textured terrain surface reconstruction algorithms that require minimal human input and only a small number of ground control points and allow the use of cheap, consumer-grade digital cameras. The resulting maps combine imagery at visible and near-infrared wavelengths and topographic information at sub-centimeter resolutions over an intertidal shoreline 200 m long, thus enabling spatial properties of the intertidal environment to be determined across a hierarchy of spatial scales. Results of the system are presented for an intertidal rocky shore at Jervis Bay, New South Wales, Australia. Potential uses of this technique include mapping of plant (micro- and macro-algae) and animal (e.g. gastropods) assemblages at multiple spatial and temporal scales. PMID:24069206

  8. Kite aerial photography for low-cost, ultra-high spatial resolution multi-spectral mapping of intertidal landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Mitch; Johnson-Roberson, Matthew; Murphy, Richard J; Bongiorno, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Intertidal ecosystems have primarily been studied using field-based sampling; remote sensing offers the ability to collect data over large areas in a snapshot of time that could complement field-based sampling methods by extrapolating them into the wider spatial and temporal context. Conventional remote sensing tools (such as satellite and aircraft imaging) provide data at limited spatial and temporal resolutions and relatively high costs for small-scale environmental science and ecologically-focussed studies. In this paper, we describe a low-cost, kite-based imaging system and photogrammetric/mapping procedure that was developed for constructing high-resolution, three-dimensional, multi-spectral terrain models of intertidal rocky shores. The processing procedure uses automatic image feature detection and matching, structure-from-motion and photo-textured terrain surface reconstruction algorithms that require minimal human input and only a small number of ground control points and allow the use of cheap, consumer-grade digital cameras. The resulting maps combine imagery at visible and near-infrared wavelengths and topographic information at sub-centimeter resolutions over an intertidal shoreline 200 m long, thus enabling spatial properties of the intertidal environment to be determined across a hierarchy of spatial scales. Results of the system are presented for an intertidal rocky shore at Jervis Bay, New South Wales, Australia. Potential uses of this technique include mapping of plant (micro- and macro-algae) and animal (e.g. gastropods) assemblages at multiple spatial and temporal scales.

  9. High-speed limnology: using advanced sensors to investigate spatial variability in biogeochemistry and hydrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, John T; Loken, Luke C; Casson, Nora J; Smith, Colin; Stone, Amanda G; Winslow, Luke A

    2015-01-06

    Advanced sensor technology is widely used in aquatic monitoring and research. Most applications focus on temporal variability, whereas spatial variability has been challenging to document. We assess the capability of water chemistry sensors embedded in a high-speed water intake system to document spatial variability. This new sensor platform continuously samples surface water at a range of speeds (0 to >45 km h(-1)) resulting in high-density, mesoscale spatial data. These novel observations reveal previously unknown variability in physical, chemical, and biological factors in streams, rivers, and lakes. By combining multiple sensors into one platform, we were able to detect terrestrial-aquatic hydrologic connections in a small dystrophic lake, to infer the role of main-channel vs backwater nutrient processing in a large river and to detect sharp chemical changes across aquatic ecosystem boundaries in a stream/lake complex. Spatial sensor data were verified in our examples by comparing with standard lab-based measurements of selected variables. Spatial fDOM data showed strong correlation with wet chemistry measurements of DOC, and optical NO3 concentrations were highly correlated with lab-based measurements. High-frequency spatial data similar to our examples could be used to further understand aquatic biogeochemical fluxes, ecological patterns, and ecosystem processes, and will both inform and benefit from fixed-site data.

  10. High-speed limnology: Using advanced sensors to investigate spatial variability in biogeochemistry and hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, John T.; Loken, Luke C.; Casson, Nora J.; Smith, Collin; Stone, Amanda G.; Winslow, Luke A.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced sensor technology is widely used in aquatic monitoring and research. Most applications focus on temporal variability, whereas spatial variability has been challenging to document. We assess the capability of water chemistry sensors embedded in a high-speed water intake system to document spatial variability. This new sensor platform continuously samples surface water at a range of speeds (0 to >45 km h–1) resulting in high-density, mesoscale spatial data. These novel observations reveal previously unknown variability in physical, chemical, and biological factors in streams, rivers, and lakes. By combining multiple sensors into one platform, we were able to detect terrestrial–aquatic hydrologic connections in a small dystrophic lake, to infer the role of main-channel vs backwater nutrient processing in a large river and to detect sharp chemical changes across aquatic ecosystem boundaries in a stream/lake complex. Spatial sensor data were verified in our examples by comparing with standard lab-based measurements of selected variables. Spatial fDOM data showed strong correlation with wet chemistry measurements of DOC, and optical NO3 concentrations were highly correlated with lab-based measurements. High-frequency spatial data similar to our examples could be used to further understand aquatic biogeochemical fluxes, ecological patterns, and ecosystem processes, and will both inform and benefit from fixed-site data.

  11. MODIS AOD retrieval at high spatial resolution with MAIAC on the Alpine region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emili, E.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Korkin, S.; Popp, C. T.; Petitta, M.; Wunderle, S.; Zebisch, M.

    2011-12-01

    Satellite data allow to determine the spatial distribution and variability of aerosols at a large scale. The standard products are developed for global applications and have a coarse resolution, for example 10 km for MODIS standard product (MOD04) Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD). On the other hand, the concentration of aerosols in in mountain regions like the Alps, is very heterogeneous and characterized by scales of variability of several kilometers. Therefore, satellite high resolution products are needed to provide an accurate aerosol mapping in mountain areas. Several approaches to derive aerosol optical depth (AOD) from MODIS at high resolution have been proposed in the recent years. They provide new opportunities for regional scale analysis, but application of these algorithms remains confined to few studies. Recently, the Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm was developed for MODIS, which performs a simultaneous retrieval of surface bidirectional reflection and aerosol properties at a resolution of 1km. This algorithm has a global scope and works over both dark and bright surfaces; it has an internal cloud mask and snow detection, and provides an enhanced data coverage with respect to the MODIS standard product, which is very appealing for the Alpine region. In this study we analyze the quality and potential of MAIAC AOD in the European Alpine region using the 1 km resolution AOD maps for the years 2008-2009. Since unresolved clouds and snow pixel contamination increase the noise of the AOD retrieval, we developed a filter that preserves the spatial resolution of the product and enhances the accuracy of MAIAC AOD for air-quality and climatological applications. The filtering approach is divided in three steps: a coarse and fine mode fraction filter, a proximity-cloud filter and an AOD standard deviation filter. The MAIAC AOD was validated with AERONET measurements in the region and compared with MODIS product MOD04. Similar

  12. A high-power spatial filter for Thomson scattering stray light reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, J. P.; Litzner, K. D.; Mauel, M. E.; Maurer, D. A.; Navratil, G. A.; Pedersen, T. S.

    2011-03-01

    The Thomson scattering diagnostic on the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) is routinely used to measure electron temperature and density during plasma discharges. Avalanche photodiodes in a five-channel interference filter polychromator measure scattered light from a 6 ns, 800 mJ, 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser pulse. A low cost, high-power spatial filter was designed, tested, and added to the laser beamline in order to reduce stray laser light to levels which are acceptable for accurate Rayleigh calibration. A detailed analysis of the spatial filter design and performance is given. The spatial filter can be easily implemented in an existing Thomson scattering system without the need to disturb the vacuum chamber or significantly change the beamline. Although apertures in the spatial filter suffer substantial damage from the focused beam, with proper design they can last long enough to permit absolute calibration.

  13. High-order mode based dispersion compensating modules using spatial mode conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tur, M.; Menashe, D.; Japha, Y.; Danziger, Y.

    High-Order Mode Dispersion Compensating Modules (HOM-DCM) using spatial optical transformations for mode conversion are reviewed. It is shown that mode transformers using this technology can be designed to transform the LP01 mode of SMF fibers to the LP02 mode of specially designed dispersion compensating High-Order Mode Fiber (HOMF), with typical insertion loss of ~1 dB, and typical extinction ratio to other modes less than -20 dB.TheHOMFitself can provide high negative dispersion [typically in the range of 400-600 ps/(nm km)], and high negative dispersion slope, allowing efficient compensation of all types of transmission fiber. Combining two mode transformers with HOMF and possibly trim fiber for fine-tuning, results, for example, in a HOM-DCM that compensates 100 km LEAF R ® fiber, with Insertion loss mode transformers and fiber coupling within the HOMF. MPI values of < -36 dB have been shown to allow error free transmission of 10 Gb/s signals over up to 6000 km. Finally, a number of applications well suited to the properties of HOM-DCMs are reviewed.

  14. Global assessment of shipping emissions in 2015 on a high spatial and temporal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Lasse; Jalkanen, Jukka-Pekka; Kukkonen, Jaakko

    2017-10-01

    We present a comprehensive global shipping emission inventory and the global activities of ships for the year 2015. The emissions were evaluated using the Ship Traffic Emission Assessment Model (STEAM3), which uses Automatic Identification System data to describe the traffic activities of ships. We have improved the model regarding (i) the evaluation of the missing technical specifications of ships, and (ii) the treatment of shipping activities in case of sparse satellite AIS-data. We have developed a model for the collection and processing of available information on the technical specifications, using data assimilation techniques. We have also developed a path regeneration model that constructs, whenever necessary, the detailed geometry of the ship routes. The presented results for fuel consumption were qualitatively in agreement both with those in the 3rd Greenhouse Gas Study of the International Maritime Organisation and those reported by the International Energy Agency. We have also presented high-resolution global spatial distributions of the shipping emissions of NOx, CO2, SO2 and PM2.5. The emissions were also analysed in terms of selected sea areas, ship categories, the sizes of ships and flag states. The emission datasets provided by this study are available upon request; the datasets produced by the model can be utilized as input data for air quality modelling on a global scale, including the full temporal and spatial variation of shipping emissions for the first time. Dispersion modelling using this inventory as input can be used to assess the impacts of various emission abatement scenarios. The emission computation methods presented in this paper could also be used, e.g., to provide annual updates of the global ship emissions.

  15. The fusion of satellite and UAV data: simulation of high spatial resolution band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenerowicz, Agnieszka; Siok, Katarzyna; Woroszkiewicz, Malgorzata; Orych, Agata

    2017-10-01

    Remote sensing techniques used in the precision agriculture and farming that apply imagery data obtained with sensors mounted on UAV platforms became more popular in the last few years due to the availability of low- cost UAV platforms and low- cost sensors. Data obtained from low altitudes with low- cost sensors can be characterised by high spatial and radiometric resolution but quite low spectral resolution, therefore the application of imagery data obtained with such technology is quite limited and can be used only for the basic land cover classification. To enrich the spectral resolution of imagery data acquired with low- cost sensors from low altitudes, the authors proposed the fusion of RGB data obtained with UAV platform with multispectral satellite imagery. The fusion is based on the pansharpening process, that aims to integrate the spatial details of the high-resolution panchromatic image with the spectral information of lower resolution multispectral or hyperspectral imagery to obtain multispectral or hyperspectral images with high spatial resolution. The key of pansharpening is to properly estimate the missing spatial details of multispectral images while preserving their spectral properties. In the research, the authors presented the fusion of RGB images (with high spatial resolution) obtained with sensors mounted on low- cost UAV platforms and multispectral satellite imagery with satellite sensors, i.e. Landsat 8 OLI. To perform the fusion of UAV data with satellite imagery, the simulation of the panchromatic bands from RGB data based on the spectral channels linear combination, was conducted. Next, for simulated bands and multispectral satellite images, the Gram-Schmidt pansharpening method was applied. As a result of the fusion, the authors obtained several multispectral images with very high spatial resolution and then analysed the spatial and spectral accuracies of processed images.

  16. The Relationship between Utilization of Computer Games and Spatial Abilities among High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motamedi, Vahid; Yaghoubi, Razeyah Mohagheghyan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the relationship between computer game use and spatial abilities among high school students. The sample consisted of 300 high school male students selected through multi-stage cluster sampling. Data gathering tools consisted of a researcher made questionnaire (to collect information on computer game usage) and the…

  17. Combination of high spatial resolution and low minimum detection limit using thinned specimens in cutting-edge electron probe microanalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Yugo, E-mail: kubo-yugo@sei.co.jp; Hamada, Kotaro

    2015-10-15

    The effect of sample thickness on the spatial resolution and minimum detection limit (MDL) has been investigated for field-emission electron probe microanalysis with wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (FE-EPMA–WDX). Indium gallium phosphide samples thinned to thicknesses of about 100, 130, 210, 310, and 430 nm provided effective thin-sample FE-EPMA–WDX in the resolution range of 40–350 nm and MDL range of 13,000–600 ppm (mass). A comparison of the FE-EPMA results for thin and bulk samples demonstrated that thin-sample FE-EPMA can achieve both higher sensitivity and better spatial resolution than is possible using bulk samples. Most of the X-rays that determine the MDL are generated in a surface region of the sample with a depth of approximately 300 nm. The spatial resolution and MDL can be tuned by the sample thickness. Furthermore, analysis of small amounts of Cl in SiO{sub 2} indicated that thin-sample FE-EPMA can realize a spatial resolution and MDL of 41 nm and 446 ppm at I{sub prob}=50 nA, respectively, whereas bulk-sample FE-EPMA offers a resolution of only 348 nm and MDL of 426 ppm. - Highlights: • Mechanism for FE-EPMA combining high spatial resolution with a low detection limit. • Spatial resolution and minimum detection limit controllable by sample thickness. • Achievement of a combined resolution and detection limit of 41 nm and 446 ppm. • Spatial resolution and detection limit for FE-EPMA–WDX and FE-SEM–EDX.

  18. Neogene paleogeography provides context for understanding the origin and spatial distribution of cryptic diversity in a widespread Balkan freshwater amphipod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Grabowski

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background The Balkans are a major worldwide biodiversity and endemism hotspot. Among the freshwater biota, amphipods are known for their high cryptic diversity. However, little is known about the temporal and paleogeographic aspects of their evolutionary history. We used paleogeography as a framework for understanding the onset of diversification in Gammarus roeselii: (1 we hypothesised that, given the high number of isolated waterbodies in the Balkans, the species is characterised by high level of cryptic diversity, even on a local scale; (2 the long geological history of the region might promote pre-Pleistocene divergence between lineages; (3 given that G. roeselii thrives both in lakes and rivers, its evolutionary history could be linked to the Balkan Neogene paleolake system; (4 we inspected whether the Pleistocene decline of hydrological networks could have any impact on the diversification of G. roeselii. Material and Methods DNA was extracted from 177 individuals collected from 26 sites all over Balkans. All individuals were amplified for ca. 650 bp long fragment of the mtDNA cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI. After defining molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTU based on COI, 50 individuals were amplified for ca. 900 bp long fragment of the nuclear 28S rDNA. Molecular diversity, divergence, differentiation and historical demography based on COI sequences were estimated for each MOTU. The relative frequency, geographic distribution and molecular divergence between COI haplotypes were presented as a median-joining network. COI was used also to reconstruct time-calibrated phylogeny with Bayesian inference. Probabilities of ancestors’ occurrence in riverine or lacustrine habitats, as well their possible geographic locations, were estimated with the Bayesian method. A Neighbour Joining tree was constructed to illustrate the phylogenetic relationships between 28S rDNA haplotypes. Results We revealed that G. roeselii includes at least

  19. The Relationship Between Utilization of Computer Games and Spatial Abilities Among High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Motamedi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at investigating the relationship between computer game use and spatial abilities among high school students. The sample consisted of 300 high school male students selected through multi-stage cluster sampling. Data gathering tools consisted of a researcher made questionnaire (to collect information on computer game usage and the Newton and Bristol spatial ability questionnaire with reliability value of .85. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results showed that there was a meaningful relationship between the use of computer games and spatial ability (r = .59 and p = 00.00, there was a meaningful relationship between the use of computer games and the spatial perceived ability (r = .60 and p = .00, there was a meaningful relationship between the use of computer games and mental rotation ability (r = .48 and p = .00 and there was a meaningful relationship between computer game use and spatial visualization ability (r = .48 and p = .00. In general, the findings showed there was a positive and a significant relationship between the use of computer games and spatial abilities in students.

  20. High spatial resolution phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometer with a frequency-swept pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin; Pan, Zhengqing; Wang, Zhaoyong; Zheng, Hanrong; Ye, Qing; Qu, Ronghui; Cai, Haiwen

    2017-02-01

    A high spatial resolution phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometer (ϕ-OTDR) with an optical frequency-swept pulse (FSP) is proposed, and the experimental results are presented in the Letter. The FSP ϕ-OTDR uses optical pulses with linear frequency modulation with higher pulse energy for longer sensing fiber and uses matched filter in the receiver to compress the processed pulse width. Thus, the contradiction between spatial resolution and the working distance in ordinary ϕ-OTDR is relaxed. A spatial resolution of 30 cm, a sensing distance of 19.8 km, and a signal-to-noise ratio of 10 dB for vibration sensing were obtained experimentally. To our best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a sub-meter spatial resolution over such a long sensing range has been reported in ϕ-OTDR sensors.

  1. Explorative analysis of long time series of very high resolution spatial rainfall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Emma Dybro; Sørup, Hjalte Jomo Danielsen; Scheibel, Marc

    2017-01-01

    variables a weather generator should employ. Both principal component analysis and cluster analysis show patterns that are in accordance with our understanding of physical properties of rainfall. In particular it seems that the differences between hourly and daily extremes can be described by relatively...... and daily extreme rainfall with the purpose of identifying suitable characteristics that can be used in a spatial weather generator of similar resolution. The spatial and temporal properties of the extreme events are explored by means of principal component analysis, cluster analysis, and linear models...... simple scaling across the set of variables, i.e. the level of each variable varies signicantly, but not the overall structure of the spatial precipitation. The analysis show that there is a good potential for making a spatial weather generator for high spatio-temporal precipitation for precipitation...

  2. Providing Behavioral Feedback to Students in an Alternative High School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, Sara A.; Hefter, Sheera; Barker, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This column provides an example method for improving the consistency and quality of daily behavioral feedback provided to students in an alternative high school setting. Often, homeroom or advisory periods are prime points in the day for students to review their behavior from the previous day and set goals for a successful day to come. The method…

  3. Applications of high-resolution spatial discretization scheme and Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov method in two-phase flow problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Ling [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhao, Haihua [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Hongbin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The majority of the existing reactor system analysis codes were developed using low-order numerical schemes in both space and time. In many nuclear thermal–hydraulics applications, it is desirable to use higher-order numerical schemes to reduce numerical errors. High-resolution spatial discretization schemes provide high order spatial accuracy in smooth regions and capture sharp spatial discontinuity without nonphysical spatial oscillations. In this work, we adapted an existing high-resolution spatial discretization scheme on staggered grids in two-phase flow applications. Fully implicit time integration schemes were also implemented to reduce numerical errors from operator-splitting types of time integration schemes. The resulting nonlinear system has been successfully solved using the Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov (JFNK) method. The high-resolution spatial discretization and high-order fully implicit time integration numerical schemes were tested and numerically verified for several two-phase test problems, including a two-phase advection problem, a two-phase advection with phase appearance/disappearance problem, and the water faucet problem. Numerical results clearly demonstrated the advantages of using such high-resolution spatial and high-order temporal numerical schemes to significantly reduce numerical diffusion and therefore improve accuracy. Our study also demonstrated that the JFNK method is stable and robust in solving two-phase flow problems, even when phase appearance/disappearance exists.

  4. Land agroecological quality assessment in conditions of high spatial soil cover variability at the Pereslavskoye Opolye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morev, Dmitriy; Vasenev, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    The essential spatial variability is mutual feature for most natural and man-changed soils at the Central region of European territory of Russia. The original spatial heterogeneity of forest soils has been further complicated by a specific land-use history and human impacts. For demand-driven land-use planning and decision making the quantitative analysis and agroecological interpretation of representative soil cover spatial variability is an important and challenging task that receives increasing attention from private companies, governmental and environmental bodies. Pereslavskoye Opolye is traditionally actively used in agriculture due to dominated high-quality cultivated soddy-podzoluvisols which are relatively reached in organic matter (especially for conditions of the North part at the European territory of Russia). However, the soil cover patterns are often very complicated even within the field that significantly influences on crop yield variability and have to be considered in farming system development and land agroecological quality evaluation. The detailed investigations of soil regimes and mapping of the winter rye yield have been carried in conditions of two representative fields with slopes sharply contrasted both in aspects and degrees. Rye biological productivity and weed infestation have been measured in elementary plots of 0.25 m2 with the following analysis the quality of the yield. In the same plot soil temperature and moisture have been measured by portable devices. Soil sampling was provided from three upper layers by drilling. The results of ray yield detailed mapping shown high differences both in average values and within-field variability on different slopes. In case of low-gradient slope (field 1) there is variability of ray yield from 39.4 to 44.8 dt/ha. In case of expressed slope (field 2) the same species of winter rye grown with the same technology has essentially lower yield and within-field variability from 20 to 29.6 dt/ha. The

  5. High spatial resolution NO2 tropospheric slant columns retrieved from OMI spatial-zoom spectra using an earthshine reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Jasdeep S.; Leigh, Roland J.; Monks, Paul S.

    2014-08-01

    Future satellite instruments measuring urban NO2 will need to have high spatio-temporal resolution in order to improve air quality model forecasts. However, the likely cost and data telemetry requirements for such instruments will be high with current techniques. In this work we propose a new retrieval algorithm for deriving tropospheric NO2 slant column densities (SCDs) by DOAS fitting an earthshine reference spectrum measured over the Pacific to account for stratospheric NO2, which would eliminate the need for a solar reference and simplify instrument and retrieval design. The retrieval is tested by fitting earthshine radiance spectra measured by the Ozone Measuring Instrument (OMI) during its spatial-zoom mode (nadir pixel size: 13 x 12 km2) and super-zoom mode (nadir pixel size: 13 x 3 km2) using a Pacific reference spectrum. Transects taken over urban areas showed that the retrieval appears to retrieve tropospheric NO2 SCDs with good agreement with the operational L2 DOMINO product over regions with high NOx emissions. The retrieval also appeared to supress across-track striping without the need for a posteriori correction and showed sensitivity to absorption due to sand and liquid water over deserts and oceans. Comparisons with operational-scale retrievals also showed improved SCD precision, if random noise is expected to be the cause of retrieval uncertainty.

  6. Improved contrast for high frame rate imaging using coherent compounding combined with spatial matched filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Yang; Yen, Jesse T

    2017-07-01

    The concept of high frame rate ultrasound imaging (typically greater than 1000 frames per second) has inspired new fields of clinical applications for ultrasound imaging such as fast cardiovascular imaging, fast Doppler imaging and real-time 3D imaging. Coherent plane-wave compounding is a promising beamforming technique to achieve high frame rate imaging. By combining echoes from plane waves with different angles, dynamic transmit focusing is efficiently accomplished at all points in the image field. Meanwhile, the image frame rate can still be kept at a high level. Spatial matched filtering (SMF) with plane-wave insonification is a novel ultrafast beamforming method. An analytical study shows that SMF is equivalent to synthetic aperture methods that can provide dynamic transmit-receive focusing throughout the field of view. Experimental results show that plane-wave SMF has better performance than dynamic-receive focusing. In this paper, we propose integrating coherent plane-wave compounding with SMF to obtain greater image contrast. By using a combination of SMF beamformed images, image contrast is improved without degrading its high frame rate capabilities. The performance of compounded SMF (CSMF) is evaluated and compared with that of synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) beamforming and compounded dynamic-receive-focus (CDRF) beamforming. The image quality of different beamforming methods was quantified in terms of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Our results show that the new SMF based plane-wave compounding method provides better contrast than DAS based compounding method. Also CSMF can obtain a similar contrast level to dynamic transmit-receive focusing with only 21 transmit events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Nurses and Dietitians Differ in Food Safety Information Provided to Highly Susceptible Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffer, Janet; Kendall, Patricia; Medeiros, Lydia; Schroeder, Mary; Sofos, John

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine content, education channels, and motivational factors that influence what health professionals teach about safe food handling to populations who are highly susceptible for foodborne illnesses. To assess the differences in information provided by health professionals to highly susceptible populations. Design: Descriptive,…

  8. Ultra high spatial and temporal resolution breast imaging at 7T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Bank, B L; Voogt, I J; Italiaander, M; Stehouwer, B L; Boer, V O; Luijten, P R; Klomp, D W J

    2013-04-01

    There is a need to obtain higher specificity in the detection of breast lesions using MRI. To address this need, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced (DCE) MRI has been combined with other structural and functional MRI techniques. Unfortunately, owing to time constraints structural images at ultra-high spatial resolution can generally not be obtained during contrast uptake, whereas the relatively low spatial resolution of functional imaging (e.g. diffusion and perfusion) limits the detection of small lesions. To be able to increase spatial as well as temporal resolution simultaneously, the sensitivity of MR detection needs to increase as well as the ability to effectively accelerate the acquisition. The required gain in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be obtained at 7T, whereas acceleration can be obtained with high-density receiver coil arrays. In this case, morphological imaging can be merged with DCE-MRI, and other functional techniques can be obtained at higher spatial resolution, and with less distortion [e.g. Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI)]. To test the feasibility of this concept, we developed a unilateral breast coil for 7T. It comprises a volume optimized dual-channel transmit coil combined with a 30-channel receive array coil. The high density of small coil elements enabled efficient acceleration in any direction to acquire ultra high spatial resolution MRI of close to 0.6 mm isotropic detail within a temporal resolution of 69 s, high spatial resolution MRI of 1.5 mm isotropic within an ultra high temporal resolution of 6.7 s and low distortion DWI at 7T, all validated in phantoms, healthy volunteers and a patient with a lesion in the right breast classified as Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) IV. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Contralateral Bias of High Spatial Frequency Tuning and Cardinal Direction Selectivity in Mouse Visual Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Kirstie J; Figueroa Velez, Dario X; Zeitoun, Jack H; Kim, Hyungtae; Gandhi, Sunil P

    2017-10-18

    Binocular mechanisms for visual processing are thought to enhance spatial acuity by combining matched input from the two eyes. Studies in the primary visual cortex of carnivores and primates have confirmed that eye-specific neuronal response properties are largely matched. In recent years, the mouse has emerged as a prominent model for binocular visual processing, yet little is known about the spatial frequency tuning of binocular responses in mouse visual cortex. Using calcium imaging in awake mice of both sexes, we show that the spatial frequency preference of cortical responses to the contralateral eye is ∼35% higher than responses to the ipsilateral eye. Furthermore, we find that neurons in binocular visual cortex that respond only to the contralateral eye are tuned to higher spatial frequencies. Binocular neurons that are well matched in spatial frequency preference are also matched in orientation preference. In contrast, we observe that binocularly mismatched cells are more mismatched in orientation tuning. Furthermore, we find that contralateral responses are more direction-selective than ipsilateral responses and are strongly biased to the cardinal directions. The contralateral bias of high spatial frequency tuning was found in both awake and anesthetized recordings. The distinct properties of contralateral cortical responses may reflect the functional segregation of direction-selective, high spatial frequency-preferring neurons in earlier stages of the central visual pathway. Moreover, these results suggest that the development of binocularity and visual acuity may engage distinct circuits in the mouse visual system.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Seeing through two eyes is thought to improve visual acuity by enhancing sensitivity to fine edges. Using calcium imaging of cellular responses in awake mice, we find surprising asymmetries in the spatial processing of eye-specific visual input in binocular primary visual cortex. The contralateral visual pathway is

  10. Evaluating the Value of High Spatial Resolution in National Capacity Expansion Models using ReEDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, Venkat; Cole, Wesley

    2016-07-18

    This poster is based on the paper of the same name, presented at the IEEE Power & Energy Society General Meeting, July18, 2016. Power sector capacity expansion models (CEMs) have a broad range of spatial resolutions. This paper uses the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, a long-term national scale electric sector CEM, to evaluate the value of high spatial resolution for CEMs. ReEDS models the United States with 134 load balancing areas (BAs) and captures the variability in existing generation parameters, future technology costs, performance, and resource availability using very high spatial resolution data, especially for wind and solar modeled at 356 resource regions. In this paper we perform planning studies at three different spatial resolutions - native resolution (134 BAs), state-level, and NERC region level - and evaluate how results change under different levels of spatial aggregation in terms of renewable capacity deployment and location, associated transmission builds, and system costs. The results are used to ascertain the value of high geographically resolved models in terms of their impact on relative competitiveness among renewable energy resources.

  11. High Incidence of Breast Cancer in Light-Polluted Areas with Spatial Effects in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun Jeong; Park, Man Sik; Lee, Eunil; Choi, Jae Wook

    2016-01-01

    We have reported a high prevalence of breast cancer in light-polluted areas in Korea. However, it is necessary to analyze the spatial effects of light polluted areas on breast cancer because light pollution levels are correlated with region proximity to central urbanized areas in studied cities. In this study, we applied a spatial regression method (an intrinsic conditional autoregressive [iCAR] model) to analyze the relationship between the incidence of breast cancer and artificial light at night (ALAN) levels in 25 regions including central city, urbanized, and rural areas. By Poisson regression analysis, there was a significant correlation between ALAN, alcohol consumption rates, and the incidence of breast cancer. We also found significant spatial effects between ALAN and the incidence of breast cancer, with an increase in the deviance information criterion (DIC) from 374.3 to 348.6 and an increase in R2 from 0.574 to 0.667. Therefore, spatial analysis (an iCAR model) is more appropriate for assessing ALAN effects on breast cancer. To our knowledge, this study is the first to show spatial effects of light pollution on breast cancer, despite the limitations of an ecological study. We suggest that a decrease in ALAN could reduce breast cancer more than expected because of spatial effects.

  12. Optophysiological approach to resolve neuronal action potentials with high spatial and temporal resolution in cultured neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane ePages

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell to cell communication in the central nervous system is encoded into transient and local membrane potential changes (ΔVm. Deciphering the rules that govern synaptic transmission and plasticity entails to be able to perform Vm recordings throughout the entire neuronal arborization. Classical electrophysiology is, in most cases, not able to do so within small and fragile neuronal subcompartments. Thus, optical techniques based on the use of fluorescent voltage-sensitive dyes (VSDs have been developed. However, reporting spontaneous or small ΔVm from neuronal ramifications has been challenging, in part due to the limited sensitivity and phototoxicity of VSD-based optical measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of water soluble VSD, ANNINE-6plus, with laser scanning microscopy to optically record ΔVm in cultured neurons. We show that the sensitivity (> 10 % of fluorescence change for 100 mV depolarization and time response (submillisecond of the dye allows the robust detection of action potentials (APs even without averaging, allowing the measurement of spontaneous neuronal firing patterns. In addition, we show that back-propagating APs can be recorded, along distinct dendritic sites and within dendritic spines. Importantly, our approach does not induce any detectable phototoxic effect on cultured neurons. This optophysiological approach provides a simple, minimally invasive and versatile optical method to measure electrical activity in cultured neurons with high temporal (ms resolution and high spatial (µm resolution.

  13. Spatially uniform resistance switching of low current, high endurance titanium–niobium-oxide memristors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Suhas [Hewlett Packard Labs, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Davila, Noraica [Hewlett Packard Labs, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Wang, Ziwen [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Huang, Xiaopeng [Hewlett Packard Labs, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Strachan, John Paul [Hewlett Packard Labs, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Vine, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); David Kilcoyne, A. L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Nishi, Yoshio [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Stanley Williams, R. [Hewlett Packard Labs, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2016-11-24

    Here we analyzed micrometer-scale titanium-niobium-oxide prototype memristors, which exhibited low write-power (< 3 μW) and energy (< 200 fJ per bit per μm2), low read-power (~nW), and high endurance ( > millions of cycles). To understand their physico-chemical operating mechanisms, we performed in operando synchrotron X-ray transmission nanoscale spectromicroscopy using an ultra-sensitive time-multiplexed technique. We observed only spatially uniform material changes during cell operation, in sharp contrast to the frequently detected formation of a localized conduction channel in transition-metal-oxide memristors. We also associated the response of assigned spectral features distinctly to non-volatile storage (resistance change) and writing of information (application of voltage and Joule heating). Lastly, these results provide critical insights into high-performance memristors that will aid in device design, scaling and predictive circuit-modeling, all of which are essential for the widespread deployment of successful memristor applications.

  14. Decoding continuous limb movements from high-density epidural electrode arrays using custom spatial filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marathe, A. R.; Taylor, D. M.

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Our goal was to identify spatial filtering methods that would improve decoding of continuous arm movements from epidural field potentials as well as demonstrate the use of the epidural signals in a closed-loop brain-machine interface (BMI) system in monkeys. Approach. Eleven spatial filtering options were compared offline using field potentials collected from 64-channel high-density epidural arrays in monkeys. Arrays were placed over arm/hand motor cortex in which intracortical microelectrodes had previously been implanted and removed leaving focal cortical damage but no lasting motor deficits. Spatial filters tested included: no filtering, common average referencing (CAR), principle component analysis, and eight novel modifications of the common spatial pattern (CSP) algorithm. The spatial filtering method and decoder combination that performed the best offline was then used online where monkeys controlled cursor velocity using continuous wrist position decoded from epidural field potentials in real time. Main results. Optimized CSP methods improved continuous wrist position decoding accuracy by 69% over CAR and by 80% compared to no filtering. Kalman decoders performed better than linear regression decoders and benefitted from including more spatially-filtered signals but not from pre-smoothing the calculated power spectra. Conversely, linear regression decoders required fewer spatially-filtered signals and were improved by pre-smoothing the power values. The ‘position-to-velocity’ transformation used during online control enabled the animals to generate smooth closed-loop movement trajectories using the somewhat limited position information available in the epidural signals. The monkeys’ online performance significantly improved across days of closed-loop training. Significance. Most published BMI studies that use electrocorticographic signals to decode continuous limb movements either use no spatial filtering or CAR. This study suggests a

  15. Coupling temporal and spatial gradient information in high-density unstructured Lagrangian measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jaime G.; Rosi, Giuseppe A.; Rouhi, Amirreza; Rival, David E.

    2017-10-01

    Particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) produces high-quality temporal information that is often neglected when computing spatial gradients. A method is presented here to utilize this temporal information in order to improve the estimation of spatial gradients for spatially unstructured Lagrangian data sets. Starting with an initial guess, this method penalizes any gradient estimate where the substantial derivative of vorticity along a pathline is not equal to the local vortex stretching/tilting. Furthermore, given an initial guess, this method can proceed on an individual pathline without any further reference to neighbouring pathlines. The equivalence of the substantial derivative and vortex stretching/tilting is based on the vorticity transport equation, where viscous diffusion is neglected. By minimizing the residual of the vorticity-transport equation, the proposed method is first tested to reduce error and noise on a synthetic Taylor-Green vortex field dissipating in time. Furthermore, when the proposed method is applied to high-density experimental data collected with `Shake-the-Box' PTV, noise within the spatial gradients is significantly reduced. In the particular test case investigated here of an accelerating circular plate captured during a single run, the method acts to delineate the shear layer and vortex core, as well as resolve the Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, which were previously unidentifiable without the use of ensemble averaging. The proposed method shows promise for improving PTV measurements that require robust spatial gradients while retaining the unstructured Lagrangian perspective.

  16. A KERNEL METHOD BASED ON TOPIC MODEL FOR VERY HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION (VHSR REMOTE SENSING IMAGE CLASSIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A kernel-based method for very high spatial resolution remote sensing image classification is proposed in this article. The new kernel method is based on spectral-spatial information and structure information as well, which is acquired from topic model, Latent Dirichlet Allocation model. The final kernel function is defined as K = u1Kspec + u2Kspat + u3Kstru, in which Kspec, Kspat, Kstru are radial basis function (RBF and u1 + u2 + u3 = 1. In the experiment, comparison with three other kernel methods, including the spectral-based, the spectral- and spatial-based and the spectral- and structure-based method, is provided for a panchromatic QuickBird image of a suburban area with a size of 900 × 900 pixels and spatial resolution of 0.6 m. The result shows that the overall accuracy of the spectral- and structure-based kernel method is 80 %, which is higher than the spectral-based kernel method, as well as the spectral- and spatial-based which accuracy respectively is 67 % and 74 %. What's more, the accuracy of the proposed composite kernel method that jointly uses the spectral, spatial, and structure information is highest among the four methods which is increased to 83 %. On the other hand, the result of the experiment also verifies the validity of the expression of structure information about the remote sensing image.

  17. Spectral, spatial and temporal control of high-power diode lasers through nonlinear optical feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Voorst, P.D.

    2008-01-01

    A high-power diode laser offers multi-Watt output power from a small and efficient device, which makes them an interesting source for numerous applications. The spatial and spectral output however, are of reduced quality which limits the applicability. This limited quality is connected to the design

  18. Resolving mass flux at high spatial and temporal resolution using GRACE intersatellite measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowlands, D. D.; Luthcke, S. B.; Klosko, S. M.

    2005-01-01

    The GRACE mission is designed to monitor mass flux on the Earth's surface at one month and high spatial resolution through the estimation of monthly gravity fields. Although this approach has been largely successful, information at submonthly time scales can be lost or even aliased through...

  19. High spatial resolution three-dimensional mapping of vegetation spectral dynamics using computer vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan P. Dandois; Erle C. Ellis

    2013-01-01

    High spatial resolution three-dimensional (3D) measurements of vegetation by remote sensing are advancing ecological research and environmental management. However, substantial economic and logistical costs limit this application, especially for observing phenological dynamics in ecosystem structure and spectral traits. Here we demonstrate a new aerial remote sensing...

  20. Ultra high spatial and temporal resolution breast imaging at 7T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bank, B.L. van de; Voogt, I.J.; Italiaander, M.; Stehouwer, B.L.; Boer, V.O.; Luijten, P.R.; Klomp, D.W.J.

    2013-01-01

    There is a need to obtain higher specificity in the detection of breast lesions using MRI. To address this need, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced (DCE) MRI has been combined with other structural and functional MRI techniques. Unfortunately, owing to time constraints structural images at ultra-high spatial

  1. Estimation of crops biomass and evapotranspiration from high spatial and temporal resolutions remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claverie, Martin; Demarez, Valérie; Duchemin, Benoît.; Ceschia, Eric; Hagolle, Olivier; Ducrot, Danielle; Keravec, Pascal; Beziat, Pierre; Dedieu, Pierre

    2010-05-01

    Carbon and water cycles are closely related to agricultural activities. Agriculture has been indeed identified by IPCC 2007 report as one of the options to sequester carbon in soil. Concerning the water resources, their consumptions by irrigated crops are called into question in view of demographic pressure. In the prospect of an assessment of carbon production and water consumption, the use of crop models at a regional scale is a challenging issue. The recent availability of high spatial resolution (10 m) optical sensors associated to high temporal resolution (1 day) such as FORMOSAT-2 and, in the future, Venµs and SENTINEL-2 will offer new perspectives for agricultural monitoring. In this context, the objective of this work is to show how multi-temporal satellite observations acquired at high spatial resolution are useful for a regional monitoring of following crops biophysical variables: leaf area index (LAI), aboveground biomass (AGB) and evapotranspiration (ET). This study focuses on three summer crops dominant in South-West of France: maize, sunflower and soybean. A unique images data set (82 FORMOSAT-2 images over four consecutive years, 2006-2009) was acquired for this project. The experimental data set includes LAI and AGB measurements over eight agricultural fields. Two fields were intensively monitored where ET flux were measured with a 30 minutes time step using eddy correlation methods. The modelisation approach is based on FAO-56 method coupled with a vegetation functioning model based on Monteith theory: the SAFY model [5]. The model operates at a daily time step model to provide estimates of plant characteristics (LAI, AGB), soil conditions (soil water content) and water use (ET). As a key linking variable, LAI is deduced from FORMOSAT-2 reflectances images, and then introduced into the SAFY model to provide spatial and temporal estimates of these biophysical variables. Most of the SAFY parameters are crop related and have been fixed according to

  2. High-fidelity multiactor emergency preparedness training for patient care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lancer A; Maddux, P Tim; Schnellmann, Jennifer; Hayes, Lauren; Tolley, Jessica; Wahlquist, Amy E

    2012-01-01

    Providing comprehensive emergency preparedness training (EPT) for patient care providers is important to the future success of emergency preparedness operations in the United States. Disasters are rare, complex events involving many patients and environmental factors that are difficult to reproduce in a training environment. Few EPT programs possess both competency-driven goals and metrics to measure life-saving performance during a multiactor simulated disaster. The development of an EPT curriculum for patient care providers-provided first to medical students, then to a group of experienced disaster medical providers-that recreates a simulated clinical disaster using a combination of up to 15 live actors and six high-fidelity human simulators is described. Specifically, the authors detail the Center for Health Professional Training and Emergency Response's (CHPTER's) 1-day clinical EPT course including its organization, core competency development, medical student self-evaluation, and course assessment. Two 1-day courses hosted by CHPTER were conducted in a university simulation center. Students who completed the course improved their overall knowledge and comfort level with EPT skills. The authors believe this is the first published description of a curriculum method that combines high-fidelity, multiactor scenarios to measure the life-saving performance of patient care providers utilizing a clinical disaster scenario with > 10 patients at once. A larger scale study, or preferably a multicenter trial, is needed to further study the impact of this curriculum and its potential to protect provider and patient lives.

  3. High spatial resolution distributed optical fiber dynamic strain sensor with enhanced frequency and strain resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudi, Ali; Newson, Trevor P

    2017-01-15

    A distributed optical fiber dynamic strain sensor with high spatial and frequency resolution is demonstrated. The sensor, which uses the ϕ-OTDR interrogation technique, exhibited a higher sensitivity thanks to an improved optical arrangement and a new signal processing procedure. The proposed sensing system is capable of fully quantifying multiple dynamic perturbations along a 5 km long sensing fiber with a frequency and spatial resolution of 5 Hz and 50 cm, respectively. The strain resolution of the sensor was measured to be 40 nε.

  4. Provider knowledge of trivalent inactivated and high-dose influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewell, Chad; Wright, Patty W; Talbot, H Keipp

    2014-10-21

    The objective of this study was to assess provider knowledge about trivalent inactivated and high dose influenza vaccines. Hence, a 20-item survey was distributed to providers within the Internal Medicine department at an urban academic medical center. Two hundred and eighty-one (24.5%) providers responded. The correct response rate was 63.2%. The highest performing subspecialties were infectious diseases (80.5%), endocrinology (69.2%), and pulmonary (68%). Those who received an influenza vaccine during the most recent season scored significantly higher than those who did not (63.6% vs. 43.6%, p=.001). Areas where respondents did poorly included questions pertaining to contraindications to immunizations (27.4%), common adverse events after immunization (29.2%), target antigen (73.5%), number of strains in the trivalent inactivated vaccine (62.9%), and time to immunity (61.4%). High dose vaccine knowledge was poor, with 37% of providers unaware of its existence. Significant gaps in provider knowledge exist regarding both trivalent inactivated and high dose influenza vaccines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Providing wireless bandwidth for high-speed rail operations : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This project examined the possibility of providing wireless communication for train control systems on American high-speed trains. In this : study, the key issue is that the frequencies allocated for rail operations in the U.S. and the frequencies us...

  6. Providing high-quality HIV care in a deeply rural setting – the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Providing high-quality HIV care in a deeply rural setting – the Zithulele experience. C Young, B Gaunt. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.7196/sajhivmed.1035 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO ...

  7. A spatial-spectral approach for deriving high signal quality eigenvectors for remote sensing image transformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogge, Derek; Bachmann, Martin; Rivard, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    Spectral decorrelation (transformations) methods have long been used in remote sensing. Transformation of the image data onto eigenvectors that comprise physically meaningful spectral properties (signal) can be used to reduce the dimensionality of hyperspectral images as the number of spectrally......-line surveys, or temporal data sets as computational burden becomes significant. In this paper we present a spatial-spectral approach to deriving high signal quality eigenvectors for image transformations which possess an inherently ability to reduce the effects of noise. The approach applies a spatial...... and spectral subsampling to the data, which is accomplished by deriving a limited set of eigenvectors for spatially contiguous subsets. These subset eigenvectors are compiled together to form a new noise reduced data set, which is subsequently used to derive a set of global orthogonal eigenvectors. Data from...

  8. Spatial and temporal variations of the high-altitude cusp precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Němeček

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Structured dispersion patterns of the ion precipitation in low- and mid-altitude cusp regions have been reported by many authors. These patterns are interpreted either as temporal features in terms of the pulsed reconnection model or as spatial changes caused by a combination of the particle velocity with the convection of magnetic field lines. It is generally expected that the spatial dispersion is predominantly observed in lower altitudes where the spacecraft crosses a wide range of geomagnetic coordinates in a short time, whereas the high-altitude spacecraft observes temporal changes because it stays nearly on the same field line for a long time. We have analyzed one pass of the INTERBALL-1/MAGION-4 satellite pair through the high-altitude cusp and found that both temporal and spatial dispersion effects are important even in the magnetopause vicinity. The analysis of the present event shows a spatial nature of the observed dispersion in the LLBL and in the plasma mantle. We have identified two sources of a mantle precipitation operating simultaneously. Our investigations suggest that besides already reported latitudinal dispersion, the longitudinal dispersion can be observed during intervals of sufficiently high east-west interplanetary magnetic field component.

  9. High Resolution Spatial and Temporal Mapping of Traffic-Related Air Pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Batterman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Vehicle traffic is one of the most significant emission sources of air pollutants in urban areas. While the influence of mobile source emissions is felt throughout an urban area, concentrations from mobile emissions can be highest near major roadways. At present, information regarding the spatial and temporal patterns and the share of pollution attributable to traffic-related air pollutants is limited, in part due to concentrations that fall sharply with distance from roadways, as well as the few monitoring sites available in cities. This study uses a newly developed dispersion model (RLINE and a spatially and temporally resolved emissions inventory to predict hourly PM2.5 and NOx concentrations across Detroit (MI, USA at very high spatial resolution. Results for annual averages and high pollution days show contrasting patterns, the need for spatially resolved analyses, and the limitations of surrogate metrics like proximity or distance to roads. Data requirements, computational and modeling issues are discussed. High resolution pollutant data enable the identification of pollutant “hotspots”, “project-level” analyses of transportation options, development of exposure measures for epidemiology studies, delineation of vulnerable and susceptible populations, policy analyses examining risks and benefits of mitigation options, and the development of sustainability indicators integrating environmental, social, economic and health information.

  10. Visualization of brainstem perfusion using a high spatial resolution SPECT system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierckx, R; Dobbeleir, A; Vandevivere, J; Abts, H; DeDeyn, P P

    1992-05-01

    The authors explored the high spatial resolution of a three-head rotating SPECT system, equipped with lead super-fine fanbeam collimator. The brainstem was high-lighted in a three-dimensional reconstruction, showing perfusion small structures such as mesencephalon, pons, and medulla oblongata. The visualization of brainstem perfusion sets new landmarks in functional neuroimaging and, moreover, was obtained with a commercially available three-head SPECT system.

  11. Spatial working memory in children with high-functioning autism: intact configural processing but impaired capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuhong V; Capistrano, Christian G; Palm, Bryce E

    2014-02-01

    Visual attention and visual working memory exert severe capacity limitations on cognitive processing. Impairments in both functions may exacerbate the social and communication deficits seen in children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study characterizes spatial working memory and visual attention in school-age children with high-functioning autism. Children with ASD, and age, gender, and IQ-matched typically developing (TD) children performed 2 tasks: a spatial working memory task and an attentive tracking task. Compared with TD children, children with ASD showed a more pronounced deficit in the spatial working memory task than the attentive tracking task, even though the latter placed significant demands on sustained attention, location updating, and distractor inhibition. Because both groups of children were sensitive to configuration mismatches between the sample and test arrays, the spatial working memory deficit was not because of atypical organization of spatial working memory. These findings show that attention and working memory are dissociable, and that children with ASD show a specific deficit in buffering visual information across temporal discontinuity. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. High Cognitive Reserve is associated with a reduced age-related deficit in spatial conflict resolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga ePuccioni

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Several studies support the existence of a specific age-related difficulty in suppressing potentially distracting information. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether spatial conflict resolution is selectively affected by aging. The way aging affects individuals could be modulated by many factors determined by the socieconomic status: we investigated whether factors such as cognitive reserve (CR and years of education may play a compensatory role against age-related deficits in the spatial domain. A spatial Stroop task with no feature repetitions was administered to a sample of 17 non-demented older adults (69-79 years old and 18 younger controls (18-34 years old matched for gender and years of education. The two age groups were also administered with measures of intelligence and CR. The overall spatial Stroop effect did not differ according to age, neither for speed nor for accuracy. The two age groups equally showed sequential effects for congruent trials: reduced response times (RTs if another congruent trial preceded them, and accuracy at ceiling. For incongruent trials, older adults, but not younger controls, were influenced by congruency of trialn-1, since RTs increased with preceding congruent trials. Interestingly, such an age-related modulation negatively correlated with CR. These findings suggest that spatial conflict resolution in aging is predominantly affected by general slowing, rather than by a more specific deficit. However, a high level of CR seems to play a compensatory role for both factors.

  13. 3D printing of hydrogels in a temperature controlled environment with high spatial resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Benjamin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There is great hope in 3D printing techniques to create patient specific scaffolds for therapeutic applications. The majority of these approaches rely on materials that both give support to cells and effectively mimic a tissue specific microenvironment. Hydrogels provide an exceptional support for cells but their physicochemical properties are not suited for conventional additive layer manufacturing. Their low viscosity and resulting fluidic nature inhibit voluminous 3D deposition and lead to crude printing accuracy. To enhance mechanical features, hydrogels are often chemically modified and/or mixed with additives; however it is not clear whether these changes induce effects on cellular behavior or if in vivo applications are at risk. Certainly it increases the complexity of scaffold systems. To circumvent these obstacles, we aimed for a 3D printing technique which is capable of creating scaffolds out of unmodified, pure hydrogels. Here we present a new method to produce alginate scaffolds in a viscosity- independent manner with high spatial resolution. This is achieved by printing in a sub-zero environment which leads to fast freezing of the hydrogels, thus preserving the printed shape and circumventing any viscosity dependent flows. This enables the user to create scaffolds which are able to reflect soft or stiff cell niches.

  14. Increased left hemisphere impairment in high-functioning autism: a tract based spatial statistics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Thomas John; Stokes, Mark Andrew; McGillivray, Jane Anne; Mussap, Alexander Julien; Cox, Ivanna Anne; Maller, Jerome Joseph; Bittar, Richard Garth

    2014-11-30

    There is evidence emerging from Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) research that autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are associated with greater impairment in the left hemisphere. Although this has been quantified with volumetric region of interest analyses, it has yet to be tested with white matter integrity analysis. In the present study, tract based spatial statistics was used to contrast white matter integrity of 12 participants with high-functioning autism or Aspergers syndrome (HFA/AS) with 12 typically developing individuals. Fractional Anisotropy (FA) was examined, in addition to axial, radial and mean diffusivity (AD, RD and MD). In the left hemisphere, participants with HFA/AS demonstrated significantly reduced FA in predominantly thalamic and fronto-parietal pathways and increased RD. Symmetry analyses confirmed that in the HFA/AS group, WM disturbance was significantly greater in the left compared to right hemisphere. These findings contribute to a growing body of literature suggestive of reduced FA in ASD, and provide preliminary evidence for RD impairments in the left hemisphere. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A high spatial resolution retrieval of NO 2 column densities from OMI: method and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Cohen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a new retrieval of tropospheric NO2 vertical column density from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI based on high spatial and temporal resolution terrain and profile inputs. We compare our NO2 product, the Berkeley High-Resolution (BEHR product, with operational retrievals and find that the operational retrievals are biased high (30 % over remote areas and biased low (8 % over urban regions. Additionally, we find non-negligible impacts on the retrieved NO2 column for terrain pressure (±20 %, albedo (±40 %, and NO2 vertical profile (−75 %–+10 %. We validate the operational and BEHR products using boundary layer aircraft observations from the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS-CA field campaign which occurred in June 2008 in California. Results indicate that columns derived using our boundary layer extrapolation method show good agreement with satellite observations (R2 = 0.65–0.83; N = 68 and provide a more robust validation of satellite-observed NO2 column than those determined using full vertical spirals (R2 = 0.26; N = 5 as in previous work. Agreement between aircraft observations and the BEHR product (R2 = 0.83 is better than agreement with the operational products (R2 = 0.65–0.72. We also show that agreement between satellite and aircraft observations can be further improved (e.g. BEHR: R2 = 0.91 using cloud information from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS instrument instead of the OMI cloud product. These results indicate that much of the variance in the operational products can be attributed to coarse resolution terrain pressure, albedo, and profile parameters implemented in the retrievals.

  16. High-Resolution Spatial Distribution and Estimation of Access to Improved Sanitation in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Jia

    Full Text Available Access to sanitation facilities is imperative in reducing the risk of multiple adverse health outcomes. A distinct disparity in sanitation exists among different wealth levels in many low-income countries, which may hinder the progress across each of the Millennium Development Goals.The surveyed households in 397 clusters from 2008-2009 Kenya Demographic and Health Surveys were divided into five wealth quintiles based on their national asset scores. A series of spatial analysis methods including excess risk, local spatial autocorrelation, and spatial interpolation were applied to observe disparities in coverage of improved sanitation among different wealth categories. The total number of the population with improved sanitation was estimated by interpolating, time-adjusting, and multiplying the surveyed coverage rates by high-resolution population grids. A comparison was then made with the annual estimates from United Nations Population Division and World Health Organization /United Nations Children's Fund Joint Monitoring Program for Water Supply and Sanitation.The Empirical Bayesian Kriging interpolation produced minimal root mean squared error for all clusters and five quintiles while predicting the raw and spatial coverage rates of improved sanitation. The coverage in southern regions was generally higher than in the north and east, and the coverage in the south decreased from Nairobi in all directions, while Nyanza and North Eastern Province had relatively poor coverage. The general clustering trend of high and low sanitation improvement among surveyed clusters was confirmed after spatial smoothing.There exists an apparent disparity in sanitation among different wealth categories across Kenya and spatially smoothed coverage rates resulted in a closer estimation of the available statistics than raw coverage rates. Future intervention activities need to be tailored for both different wealth categories and nationally where there are areas of

  17. High-Resolution Spatial Distribution and Estimation of Access to Improved Sanitation in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Peng; Anderson, John D; Leitner, Michael; Rheingans, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Access to sanitation facilities is imperative in reducing the risk of multiple adverse health outcomes. A distinct disparity in sanitation exists among different wealth levels in many low-income countries, which may hinder the progress across each of the Millennium Development Goals. The surveyed households in 397 clusters from 2008-2009 Kenya Demographic and Health Surveys were divided into five wealth quintiles based on their national asset scores. A series of spatial analysis methods including excess risk, local spatial autocorrelation, and spatial interpolation were applied to observe disparities in coverage of improved sanitation among different wealth categories. The total number of the population with improved sanitation was estimated by interpolating, time-adjusting, and multiplying the surveyed coverage rates by high-resolution population grids. A comparison was then made with the annual estimates from United Nations Population Division and World Health Organization /United Nations Children's Fund Joint Monitoring Program for Water Supply and Sanitation. The Empirical Bayesian Kriging interpolation produced minimal root mean squared error for all clusters and five quintiles while predicting the raw and spatial coverage rates of improved sanitation. The coverage in southern regions was generally higher than in the north and east, and the coverage in the south decreased from Nairobi in all directions, while Nyanza and North Eastern Province had relatively poor coverage. The general clustering trend of high and low sanitation improvement among surveyed clusters was confirmed after spatial smoothing. There exists an apparent disparity in sanitation among different wealth categories across Kenya and spatially smoothed coverage rates resulted in a closer estimation of the available statistics than raw coverage rates. Future intervention activities need to be tailored for both different wealth categories and nationally where there are areas of greater needs when

  18. [Examination of upper abdominal region in high spatial resolution diffusion-weighted imaging using 3-Tesla MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Masaki; Matsushita, Hiroki; Oosugi, Masanori; Inoue, Kazuyasu; Yaegashi, Taku; Anma, Takeshi

    2009-03-20

    The advantage of the higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3-Tesla) has the possibility of contributing to the improvement of high spatial resolution without causing image deterioration. In this study, we compared SNR and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value with 3-Tesla as the condition in the diffusion-weighted image (DWI) parameter of the 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (1.5-Tesla) and we examined the high spatial resolution images in the imaging method [respiratory-triggering (RT) method and breath free (BF) method] and artifact (motion and zebra) in the upper abdominal region of DWI at 3-Tesla. We have optimized scan parameters based on phantom and in vivo study. As a result, 3-Tesla was able to obtain about 1.5 times SNR in comparison with the 1.5-Tesla, ADC value had few differences. Moreover, the RT method was effective in correcting the influence of respiratory movement in comparison with the BF method, and image improvement by the effective acquisition of SNR and reduction of the artifact were provided. Thus, DWI of upper abdominal region was a useful sequence for the high spatial resolution in 3-Tesla.

  19. High-spatial resolution numerical simulations of in-water radiative transfer processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alimonte, D.; Kajiyama, T.; Zibordi, G.

    2012-04-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of radiative processes allow for addressing optical radiometric problems strictly linked to complex geometries. Within such a context, MC simulations have been used to investigate uncertainties affecting in-water radiometric measurements performed with free-fall optical profilers commonly utilized for the vicarious calibration of space sensors or the validation of satellite ocean color primary products (e.g, the normalized water leaving radiance). Specifically, a MC code (henceforth called MOX) has been developed to simulate in-water and above-water radiometric fields with high spatial-resolution (up to 1 cm) over a 2-dimensional (2D) domain of tens of meters. This has been achieved by exploiting high performance computing (HPC) solutions (e.g., parallel programs and job-scheduling based on novel performance prediction and optimization schemes) to trace up to 10^12 photons. A dedicated study, focused on the simulation of in-water radiometric fields, has led to the generation of virtual optical profiles accounting for perturbations due to light focusing effect by sea-surface gravity and capillary waves at a spatial resolution comparable to that of actual measurements. Different from field experiments, which are often constrained by environmental factors like illumination conditions and sea-water optical properties, numerical simulations permits analyzing realistic cases whereas allowing for a free input parameter selection. MOX simulations have shown that uncertainties induced by focusing effects upon radiometric data products can be reduced by slowing the deployment speed of free-fall optical profilers, rather than increasing the sampling frequency (i.e., while keeping the same number of samples per depth unit). This result has confirmed the appropriateness of profiling techniques (i.e., multicasting) so far solely supported by a limited number of field measurements and has additionally suggested the possibility of investigating further

  20. A high-order spatial filter for a cubed-sphere spectral element model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Gyu; Cheong, Hyeong-Bin

    2017-04-01

    A high-order spatial filter is developed for the spectral-element-method dynamical core on the cubed-sphere grid which employs the Gauss-Lobatto Lagrange interpolating polynomials (GLLIP) as orthogonal basis functions. The filter equation is the high-order Helmholtz equation which corresponds to the implicit time-differencing of a diffusion equation employing the high-order Laplacian. The Laplacian operator is discretized within a cell which is a building block of the cubed sphere grid and consists of the Gauss-Lobatto grid. When discretizing a high-order Laplacian, due to the requirement of C0 continuity along the cell boundaries the grid-points in neighboring cells should be used for the target cell: The number of neighboring cells is nearly quadratically proportional to the filter order. Discrete Helmholtz equation yields a huge-sized and highly sparse matrix equation whose size is N*N with N the number of total grid points on the globe. The number of nonzero entries is also almost in quadratic proportion to the filter order. Filtering is accomplished by solving the huge-matrix equation. While requiring a significant computing time, the solution of global matrix provides the filtered field free of discontinuity along the cell boundaries. To achieve the computational efficiency and the accuracy at the same time, the solution of the matrix equation was obtained by only accounting for the finite number of adjacent cells. This is called as a local-domain filter. It was shown that to remove the numerical noise near the grid-scale, inclusion of 5*5 cells for the local-domain filter was found sufficient, giving the same accuracy as that obtained by global domain solution while reducing the computing time to a considerably lower level. The high-order filter was evaluated using the standard test cases including the baroclinic instability of the zonal flow. Results indicated that the filter performs better on the removal of grid-scale numerical noises than the explicit

  1. Evidence for Separate Contributions of High and Low Spatial Frequencies during Visual Word Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Winsler

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that different spatial frequency information processing streams interact during the recognition of visual stimuli. However, it is a matter of debate as to the contributions of high and low spatial frequency (HSF and LSF information for visual word recognition. This study examined the role of different spatial frequencies in visual word recognition using event-related potential (ERP masked priming. EEG was recorded from 32 scalp sites in 30 English-speaking adults in a go/no-go semantic categorization task. Stimuli were white characters on a neutral gray background. Targets were uppercase five letter words preceded by a forward-mask (####### and a 50 ms lowercase prime. Primes were either the same word (repeated or a different word (un-repeated than the subsequent target and either contained only high, only low, or full spatial frequency information. Additionally within each condition, half of the prime-target pairs were high lexical frequency, and half were low. In the full spatial frequency condition, typical ERP masked priming effects were found with an attenuated N250 (sub-lexical and N400 (lexical-semantic for repeated compared to un-repeated primes. For HSF primes there was a weaker N250 effect which interacted with lexical frequency, a significant reversal of the effect around 300 ms, and an N400-like effect for only high lexical frequency word pairs. LSF primes did not produce any of the classic ERP repetition priming effects, however they did elicit a distinct early effect around 200 ms in the opposite direction of typical repetition effects. HSF information accounted for many of the masked repetition priming ERP effects and therefore suggests that HSFs are more crucial for word recognition. However, LSFs did produce their own pattern of priming effects indicating that larger scale information may still play a role in word recognition.

  2. Diluting the dilution effect: a spatial Lyme model provides evidence for the importance of habitat fragmentation with regard to the risk of infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Estrada-Peña

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to construct a spatially-explicit model of Ixodes scapularis infection in the State of New York, USA, based on climate traits, high-resolution landscape features and patch-connectivity according to graph theory. The degree of risk for infection is calculated based on empirical data of host abundance, previous studies on host infectivity rates and tick preferences towards a given host. The outcome signifies what is called the “recruitment of infection”, i.e. an index representing the abundance of infected ticks in a particular patch of vegetation. The results show that the I. scapularis recruitment of infection (IR index is highly dependent upon a complex array of landscape fragmentation and the presence of key hosts. Neither faunal richness nor host density alone has any reasonable effect on the recruitment of infection. The experience of Lyme disease in the State of New York shows no clear relationship between the IR as calculated at the patch level and then summarized county by county and the rates of disease over the last eight years reported for these counties. However, areas characterized by low IR have consistently been associated with locations with low disease rates. Above all, the low levels of disease are related to minimal suitability due to the climate and negligible connection between patches. Social factors, mainly activities leading to an increased contact of humans with infective foci (which can be situated far from their homes, may lead to a high rates being reported from areas with high human densities rather than areas characterized by a high recruitment of infection. The spatial model developed here may be used to study the long-term changes in infective risk and tick recruitment as a result of humaninduced changes in the landscape.

  3. Ultra-long high-sensitivity Φ-OTDR for high spatial resolution intrusion detection of pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fei; Wu, Han; Jia, Xin-Hong; Rao, Yun-Jiang; Wang, Zi-Nan; Peng, Zheng-Pu

    2014-06-02

    An ultra-long phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometry (Φ-OTDR) that can achieve high-sensitivity intrusion detection over 131.5km fiber with high spatial resolution of 8m is presented, which is the longest Φ-OTDR reported to date, to the best of our knowledge. It is found that the combination of distributed Raman amplification with heterodyne detection can extend the sensing distance and enhances the sensitivity substantially, leading to the realization of ultra-long Φ-OTDR with high sensitivity and spatial resolution. Furthermore, the feasibility of applying such an ultra-long Φ-OTDR to pipeline security monitoring is demonstrated and the features of intrusion signal can be extracted with improved SNR by using the wavelet detrending/denoising method proposed.

  4. Frequency-comb-based BOTDA sensors for high-spatial-resolution/long-distance sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xin-Hong; Chang, Han-Qing; Lin, Kai; Xu, Cong; Wu, Jia-Gui

    2017-03-20

    Frequency-comb-based Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA) sensors were developed to achieve acquisition-time reduction and high-spatial-resolution/long-distance sensing simultaneously. We found that, for the standard frequency-comb-based BOTDA, the use of a double-sideband (DSB) pulse generates a series of pulse pairs that simultaneously propagate along the sensing fiber, leading to a nonlinear interaction between the two sidebands of each frequency comb pulse, and a significant splitting of the Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS). This problem prevents its application in high-spatial-resolution sensing due to the higher pulse power requirement. Thus, one of the sidebands of DSB pulse was proposed for greatly suppressing the BGS distortion. In combination with the phonon pre-excitation technique based on phase-shifted pulse, a sensor with a spatial-resolution approximately 60 cm along a fiber approximately 592 m in length was demonstrated. Furthermore, we explored the detailed performance of long-distance sensing by frequency- comb-based BOTDA. The use of a frequency comb for the probe wave can suppress the pulse distortion and non-local effect, which is helpful for extending the sensing distance. A spatial resolution of approximately 6 m along a sensing fiber approximately 74.2 km in length was successfully demonstrated.

  5. High resolution genome wide binding event finding and motif discovery reveals transcription factor spatial binding constraints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchun Guo

    Full Text Available An essential component of genome function is the syntax of genomic regulatory elements that determine how diverse transcription factors interact to orchestrate a program of regulatory control. A precise characterization of in vivo spacing constraints between key transcription factors would reveal key aspects of this genomic regulatory language. To discover novel transcription factor spatial binding constraints in vivo, we developed a new integrative computational method, genome wide event finding and motif discovery (GEM. GEM resolves ChIP data into explanatory motifs and binding events at high spatial resolution by linking binding event discovery and motif discovery with positional priors in the context of a generative probabilistic model of ChIP data and genome sequence. GEM analysis of 63 transcription factors in 214 ENCODE human ChIP-Seq experiments recovers more known factor motifs than other contemporary methods, and discovers six new motifs for factors with unknown binding specificity. GEM's adaptive learning of binding-event read distributions allows it to further improve upon previous methods for processing ChIP-Seq and ChIP-exo data to yield unsurpassed spatial resolution and discovery of closely spaced binding events of the same factor. In a systematic analysis of in vivo sequence-specific transcription factor binding using GEM, we have found hundreds of spatial binding constraints between factors. GEM found 37 examples of factor binding constraints in mouse ES cells, including strong distance-specific constraints between Klf4 and other key regulatory factors. In human ENCODE data, GEM found 390 examples of spatially constrained pair-wise binding, including such novel pairs as c-Fos:c-Jun/USF1, CTCF/Egr1, and HNF4A/FOXA1. The discovery of new factor-factor spatial constraints in ChIP data is significant because it proposes testable models for regulatory factor interactions that will help elucidate genome function and the

  6. Two-dimensional high spatial-resolution dosimeter using europium doped potassium chloride: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H. Harold; Driewer, Joseph P.; Han, Zhaohui; Low, Daniel A.; Yang, Deshan; Xiao, Zhiyan

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has shown that KCl:Eu2+ has great potential for use in megavoltage radiation therapy dosimetry because this material exhibits excellent storage performance and is reusable due to strong radiation hardness. This work reports the authors’ attempts to fabricate 2D KCl:Eu2+ storage phosphor films (SPFs) using both a physical vapor deposition (PVD) method and a tape casting method. X ray diffraction analysis showed that a 10 µm thick PVD sample was composed of highly crystalline KCl. No additional phases were observed, suggesting that the europium activator had completed been incorporated into the KCl matrix. Photostimulated luminescence and photoluminescence spectra suggested that F (Cl-) centers were the electron storage centers post×ray irradiation and that Eu2+ cations acted as luminescence centers in the photostimulation process. The 150-µm thick casted KCl:Eu2+ SPF showed sub-millimeter spatial resolution. Monte Carlo simulations further demonstrated that the admixture of 20% KCl:Eu2+ and 80% low Z polymer binder exhibited almost no energy dependence in a 6 MV beam. KCl:Eu2+ pellet samples showed a large dynamic range from 0.01 cGy to 60 Gy dose-to-water, and saturated at approximately 500 Gy as a result of KCl’s intrinsic high radiation hardness. Taken together, this work provides strong evidence that KCl:Eu2+ based SPF with associated readout apparatus could result in a novel electronic film system that has all the desirable features associated with classic radiographic film and, importantly, water equivalence and the capability of permanent identification of each detector. PMID:24651448

  7. High spatial resolution brain functional MRI using submillimeter balanced steady-state free precession acquisition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Pei-Hsin; Chung, Hsiao-Wen [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Ping-Huei [Imaging Research Center, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan and Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ming-Long, E-mail: minglong.wu@csie.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Medical Informatics, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan and Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Chuang, Tzu-Chao [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Shih, Yi-Yu [Siemens Limited Healthcare Sector, Taipei 11503, Taiwan (China); Huang, Teng-Yi [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: One of the technical advantages of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is its precise localization of changes from neuronal activities. While current practice of fMRI acquisition at voxel size around 3 × 3 × 3 mm{sup 3} achieves satisfactory results in studies of basic brain functions, higher spatial resolution is required in order to resolve finer cortical structures. This study investigated spatial resolution effects on brain fMRI experiments using balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging with 0.37 mm{sup 3} voxel volume at 3.0 T. Methods: In fMRI experiments, full and unilateral visual field 5 Hz flashing checkerboard stimulations were given to healthy subjects. The bSSFP imaging experiments were performed at three different frequency offsets to widen the coverage, with functional activations in the primary visual cortex analyzed using the general linear model. Variations of the spatial resolution were achieved by removing outerk-space data components. Results: Results show that a reduction in voxel volume from 3.44 × 3.44 × 2 mm{sup 3} to 0.43 × 0.43 × 2 mm{sup 3} has resulted in an increase of the functional activation signals from (7.7 ± 1.7)% to (20.9 ± 2.0)% at 3.0 T, despite of the threefold SNR decreases in the original images, leading to nearly invariant functional contrast-to-noise ratios (fCNR) even at high spatial resolution. Activation signals aligning nicely with gray matter sulci at high spatial resolution would, on the other hand, have possibly been mistaken as noise at low spatial resolution. Conclusions: It is concluded that the bSSFP sequence is a plausible technique for fMRI investigations at submillimeter voxel widths without compromising fCNR. The reduction of partial volume averaging with nonactivated brain tissues to retain fCNR is uniquely suitable for high spatial resolution applications such as the resolving of columnar organization in the brain.

  8. GIEMS-D3: A new long-term, dynamical, high-spatial resolution inundation extent dataset at global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aires, Filipe; Miolane, Léo; Prigent, Catherine; Pham Duc, Binh; Papa, Fabrice; Fluet-Chouinard, Etienne; Lehner, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    The Global Inundation Extent from Multi-Satellites (GIEMS) provides multi-year monthly variations of the global surface water extent at 25kmx25km resolution. It is derived from multiple satellite observations. Its spatial resolution is usually compatible with climate model outputs and with global land surface model grids but is clearly not adequate for local applications that require the characterization of small individual water bodies. There is today a strong demand for high-resolution inundation extent datasets, for a large variety of applications such as water management, regional hydrological modeling, or for the analysis of mosquitos-related diseases. A new procedure is introduced to downscale the GIEMS low spatial resolution inundations to a 3 arc second (90 m) dataset. The methodology is based on topography and hydrography information from the HydroSHEDS database. A new floodability index is adopted and an innovative smoothing procedure is developed to ensure the smooth transition, in the high-resolution maps, between the low-resolution boxes from GIEMS. Topography information is relevant for natural hydrology environments controlled by elevation, but is more limited in human-modified basins. However, the proposed downscaling approach is compatible with forthcoming fusion with other more pertinent satellite information in these difficult regions. The resulting GIEMS-D3 database is the only high spatial resolution inundation database available globally at the monthly time scale over the 1993-2007 period. GIEMS-D3 is assessed by analyzing its spatial and temporal variability, and evaluated by comparisons to other independent satellite observations from visible (Google Earth and Landsat), infrared (MODIS) and active microwave (SAR).

  9. Lithium fluoride crystal as a novel high dynamic neutron imaging detector with microns scale spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faenov, Anatoly; Pikuz, Tatiana [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaja Street 13/19, Moscow (Russian Federation); Matsubayashi, Masahito; Yasuda, Ryo; Iikura, Hiroshi; Nojima, Takehiro; Sakai, Takuro [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Fukuda, Yuji; Kando, Masaki [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Shiozawa, Masahiro [Nippon SOKEN, Inc., Iwaya 14, Shimohasumi, Nishio, Aichi 445-0012 (Japan); Kato, Yoshiaki [The Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Recently, a new field of application of optically stimulated luminescence of color centers (CCs) in lithium fluoride (LiF) crystals was proposed - using them for high-performance neutron imaging - and promising results were obtained (Matsubayashi et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 622, 637 (2010) and Matsubayashi et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 651, 90 (2011)). Here we present the overview of main findings, which clearly demonstrated that the LiF crystal performs efficiently as neutron imaging detector in areas, where a high spatial resolution with a high image gradation resolution is needed. It was shown that the obtained neutron images are almost free from granular noises, have spatial resolution of {proportional_to} 6 {mu}m, and have practically linear response with the dynamic range of at least 10{sup 3}. It was also found that the LiF crystal detector offers a fairly good sensitivity. Moreover, detailed evaluation using a standard sensitivity indicator for neutron radiography showed that two holes with less than 2% transmittance differences could be distinguished. Additionally, we recently demonstrated that the high resolution neutron imaging with LiF crystals could be useful for quantitative characterizations of neutron sources and electric devices, comprising of low-Z elements, for example, such as fuel cells. All of this gives new opportunity for microns scale spatial resolution imaging by neutrons (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Constant Flux of Spatial Niche Partitioning through High-Resolution Sampling of Magnetotactic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kuang; Gilder, Stuart A; Orsi, William D; Zhao, Xiangyu; Petersen, Nikolai

    2017-10-15

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) swim along magnetic field lines in water. They are found in aquatic habitats throughout the world, yet knowledge of their spatial and temporal distribution remains limited. To help remedy this, we took MTB-bearing sediment from a natural pond, mixed the thoroughly homogenized sediment into two replicate aquaria, and then counted three dominant MTB morphotypes (coccus, spirillum, and rod-shaped MTB cells) at a high spatiotemporal sampling resolution: 36 discrete points in replicate aquaria were sampled every ∼30 days over 198 days. Population centers of the MTB coccus and MTB spirillum morphotypes moved in continual flux, yet they consistently inhabited separate locations, displaying significant anticorrelation. Rod-shaped MTB were initially concentrated toward the northern end of the aquaria, but at the end of the experiment, they were most densely populated toward the south. The finding that the total number of MTB cells increased over time during the experiment argues that population reorganization arose from relative changes in cell division and death and not from migration. The maximum net growth rates were 10, 3, and 1 doublings day -1 and average net growth rates were 0.24, 0.11, and 0.02 doublings day -1 for MTB cocci, MTB spirilla, and rod-shaped MTB, respectively; minimum growth rates for all three morphotypes were -0.03 doublings day -1 Our results suggest that MTB cocci and MTB spirilla occupy distinctly different niches: their horizontal positioning in sediment is anticorrelated and under constant flux. IMPORTANCE Little is known about the horizontal distribution of magnetotactic bacteria in sediment or how the distribution changes over time. We therefore measured three dominant magnetotactic bacterium morphotypes at 36 places in two replicate aquaria each month for 7 months. We found that the spatial positioning of population centers changed over time and that the two most abundant morphotypes (MTB cocci and MTB spirilla

  11. Exploiting spatial degrees of freedom for high data rate ultrasound communication with implantable devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Max L.; Arbabian, Amin

    2017-09-01

    We propose and demonstrate an ultrasonic communication link using spatial degrees of freedom to increase data rates for deeply implantable medical devices. Low attenuation and millimeter wavelengths make ultrasound an ideal communication medium for miniaturized low-power implants. While a small spectral bandwidth has drastically limited achievable data rates in conventional ultrasonic implants, a large spatial bandwidth can be exploited by using multiple transducers in a multiple-input/multiple-output system to provide spatial multiplexing gain without additional power, larger bandwidth, or complicated packaging. We experimentally verify the communication link in mineral oil with a transmitter and a receiver 5 cm apart, each housing two custom-designed mm-sized piezoelectric transducers operating at the same frequency. Two streams of data modulated with quadrature phase-shift keying at 125 kbps are simultaneously transmitted and received on both channels, effectively doubling the data rate to 250 kbps with a measured bit error rate below 10-4. We also evaluate the performance and robustness of the channel separation network by testing the communication link after introducing position offsets. These results demonstrate the potential of spatial multiplexing to enable more complex implant applications requiring higher data rates.

  12. High spatial resolution mapping of folds and fractures using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruden, A. R.; Vollgger, S.

    2016-12-01

    The emerging capability of UAV photogrammetry combines a simple and cost-effective method to acquire digital aerial images with advanced computer vision algorithms that compute spatial datasets from a sequence of overlapping digital photographs from various viewpoints. Depending on flight altitude and camera setup, sub-centimeter spatial resolution orthophotographs and textured dense point clouds can be achieved. Orientation data can be collected for detailed structural analysis by digitally mapping such high-resolution spatial datasets in a fraction of time and with higher fidelity compared to traditional mapping techniques. Here we describe a photogrammetric workflow applied to a structural study of folds and fractures within alternating layers of sandstone and mudstone at a coastal outcrop in SE Australia. We surveyed this location using a downward looking digital camera mounted on commercially available multi-rotor UAV that autonomously followed waypoints at a set altitude and speed to ensure sufficient image overlap, minimum motion blur and an appropriate resolution. The use of surveyed ground control points allowed us to produce a geo-referenced 3D point cloud and an orthophotograph from hundreds of digital images at a spatial resolution < 10 mm per pixel, and cm-scale location accuracy. Orientation data of brittle and ductile structures were semi-automatically extracted from these high-resolution datasets using open-source software. This resulted in an extensive and statistically relevant orientation dataset that was used to 1) interpret the progressive development of folds and faults in the region, and 2) to generate a 3D structural model that underlines the complex internal structure of the outcrop and quantifies spatial variations in fold geometries. Overall, our work highlights how UAV photogrammetry can contribute to new insights in structural analysis.

  13. Health-risk behaviors among high school athletes and preventive services provided during sports physicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Karen E; McRee, Annie-Laurie

    2015-01-01

    Preparticipation examinations (PPEs), or sports physicals, present opportunities for health care providers to identify and discuss common adolescent health-risk behaviors. We sought to examine the prevalence of health-risk behaviors among high school athletes and the proportion of providers who address these behaviors during PPEs. For this descriptive study we used data from two statewide surveys: a survey of adolescents (n = 46,492) and a survey of nurse practitioners and physicians (n = 561). The most prevalent risk behaviors reported by student athletes were low levels of physical activity (70%), bullying perpetration (41%), and alcohol use (41%). Most providers (≥75%) addressed many common risk behaviors during PPEs but fewer addressed bullying, violence, and prescription drug use. Topics discussed differed by provider type and patient population. Many providers addressed critical threats to adolescent health during PPEs, but findings suggest potential disconnects between topics addressed during PPEs and behaviors of athletes. Copyright © 2015 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Skin Cancer Training Provided to Maritime High School Students on Their Knowledge and Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sümen, Adem; Öncel, Selma

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted with the purpose of evaluating the effect of skin cancer training provided to maritime high school students on their knowledge and behaviour. The study had a quasi-experimental design with pre-test and post-test intervention and control groups. Two maritime high schools located in the city of Antalya were included within the scope of the study between March and June 2013, covering a total of 567 students. While the knowledge mean scores of students regarding skin cancer and sun protection did not vary in the pre-test (6.2 ± 1.9) and post-test (6.8 ± 1.9) control group, the knowledge mean scores of students in the experimental group increased from 6.0 ± 2.3 to 10.6 ± 1.2 after the provided training. Some 25.4% of students in the experimental group had low knowledge level and 62.2% had medium knowledge level in the pre-test; whereas no students had low knowledge level and 94.3% had high knowledge level in the post-test. It was determined that tenth grade students, those who had previous knowledge on the subject, who considered themselves to be protecting from the sun better, had higher knowledge levels and their knowledge levels increased as the risk level increased. It was found that the provided training was effective and increased positively the knowledge, attitude and behaviour levels of students in the experimental group in terms of skin cancer and sun protection. Along with the provided training which started to form a lifestyle, appropriate attitudes and behaviours concerning skin cancer and sun protection could be brought to students who will work in outdoor spaces and are members of the maritime profession within the risk group.

  15. A comparative analysis of two highly spatially resolved European atmospheric emission inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, J.; Guevara, M.; Baldasano, J. M.; Tchepel, O.; Schaap, M.; Miranda, A. I.; Borrego, C.

    2013-08-01

    A reliable emissions inventory is highly important for air quality modelling applications, especially at regional or local scales, which require high resolutions. Consequently, higher resolution emission inventories have been developed that are suitable for regional air quality modelling. This research performs an inter-comparative analysis of different spatial disaggregation methodologies of atmospheric emission inventories. This study is based on two different European emission inventories with different spatial resolutions: 1) the EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme) inventory and 2) an emission inventory developed by the TNO (Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research). These two emission inventories were converted into three distinct gridded emission datasets as follows: (i) the EMEP emission inventory was disaggregated by area (EMEParea) and (ii) following a more complex methodology (HERMES-DIS - High-Elective Resolution Modelling Emissions System - DISaggregation module) to understand and evaluate the influence of different disaggregation methods; and (iii) the TNO gridded emissions, which are based on different emission data sources and different disaggregation methods. A predefined common grid with a spatial resolution of 12 × 12 km2 was used to compare the three datasets spatially. The inter-comparative analysis was performed by source sector (SNAP - Selected Nomenclature for Air Pollution) with emission totals for selected pollutants. It included the computation of difference maps (to focus on the spatial variability of emission differences) and a linear regression analysis to calculate the coefficients of determination and to quantitatively measure differences. From the spatial analysis, greater differences were found for residential/commercial combustion (SNAP02), solvent use (SNAP06) and road transport (SNAP07). These findings were related to the different spatial disaggregation that was conducted by the TNO and HERMES

  16. Difet: Distributed Feature Extraction Tool for High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eken, S.; Aydın, E.; Sayar, A.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we propose distributed feature extraction tool from high spatial resolution remote sensing images. Tool is based on Apache Hadoop framework and Hadoop Image Processing Interface. Two corner detection (Harris and Shi-Tomasi) algorithms and five feature descriptors (SIFT, SURF, FAST, BRIEF, and ORB) are considered. Robustness of the tool in the task of feature extraction from LandSat-8 imageries are evaluated in terms of horizontal scalability.

  17. DIFET: DISTRIBUTED FEATURE EXTRACTION TOOL FOR HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION REMOTE SENSING IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Eken

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose distributed feature extraction tool from high spatial resolution remote sensing images. Tool is based on Apache Hadoop framework and Hadoop Image Processing Interface. Two corner detection (Harris and Shi-Tomasi algorithms and five feature descriptors (SIFT, SURF, FAST, BRIEF, and ORB are considered. Robustness of the tool in the task of feature extraction from LandSat-8 imageries are evaluated in terms of horizontal scalability.

  18. Spatial filter with volume gratings for high-peak-power multistage laser amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yi-zhou; Yang, Yi-sheng; Zheng, Guang-wei; Shen, Ben-jian; Pan, Heng-yue; Liu, Li

    2010-08-01

    The regular spatial filters comprised of lens and pinhole are essential component in high power laser systems, such as lasers for inertial confinement fusion, nonlinear optical technology and directed-energy weapon. On the other hand the pinhole is treated as a bottleneck of high power laser due to harmful plasma created by the focusing beam. In this paper we present a spatial filter based on angular selectivity of Bragg diffraction grating to avoid the harmful focusing effect in the traditional pinhole filter. A spatial filter consisted of volume phase gratings in two-pass amplifier cavity were reported. Two-dimensional filter was proposed by using single Pi-phase-shifted Bragg grating, numerical simulation results shown that its angular spectrum bandwidth can be less than 160urad. The angular selectivity of photo-thermorefractive glass and RUGATE film filters, construction stability, thermal stability and the effects of misalignments of gratings on the diffraction efficiencies under high-pulse-energy laser operating condition are discussed.

  19. Assessing spatial heterogeneity of MDR-TB in a high burden country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Helen E.; Plesca, Valeriu; Ciobanu, Anisoara; Crudu, Valeriu; Galusca, Irina; Soltan, Viorel; Serbulenco, Aliona; Zignol, Matteo; Dadu, Andrei; Dara, Masoud; Cohen, Ted

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a major concern in countries of the former Soviet Union. The reported risk of resistance among TB cases in the Republic of Moldova is among the highest in the world. We aimed to produce high-resolution spatial maps of MDR-TB risk and burden in this setting. We analyzed national TB surveillance data collected between 2007 and 2010 in Moldova. High drug susceptibility testing coverage and detailed location data permitted identification of sub-regional areas of higher MDR-TB risk. We investigated whether the distribution of cases with MDR-TB risk factors could explain this observed spatial variation in MDR-TB. 3,447 MDR-TB cases were notified during this period; 24% of new and 62% of previously treated patients had MDR-TB. Nationally, the estimated annual MDR-TB incidence was 54 cases/100,000 persons and >1,000 cases/100,000 persons within penitentiaries. We identified substantial geographic variation in MDR-TB burden and hotspots of MDR-TB. Locations with a higher percentage of previously incarcerated TB cases were at greater risk of being MDR-TB hotspots. Spatial analyses revealed striking geographic heterogeneity of MDR-TB. Methods to identify locations of high MDR-TB risk and burden should allow for better resource allocation and more appropriate targeting of studies to understand local mechanisms driving resistance. PMID:23100496

  20. Recombinant differential anchorage probes that tower over the spatial dimension of intracellular signals for high content screening and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schembri, Laura; Zanese, Marion; Depierre-Plinet, Gaelle; Petit, Muriel; Elkaoukabi-Chaibi, Assia; Tauzin, Loic; Florean, Cristina; Lartigue, Lydia; Medina, Chantal; Rey, Christophe; Belloc, Francis; Reiffers, Josy; Ichas, François; De Giorgi, Francesca

    2009-12-01

    Recombinant fluorescent probes allow the detection of molecular events inside living cells. Many of them exploit the intracellular space to provide positional signals and, thus, require detection by single cell imaging. We describe here a novel strategy based on probes capable of encoding the spatial dimension of intracellular signals into "all-or-none" fluorescence intensity changes (differential anchorage probes, DAPs). The resulting signals can be acquired in single cells at high throughput by automated flow cytometry, (i) bypassing image acquisition and analysis, (ii) providing a direct quantitative readout, and (iii) allowing the exploration of large experimental series. We illustrate our purpose with DAPs for Bax and the effector caspases 3 and 7, which are keys players in apoptotic cell death, and show applications in basic research, high content multiplexed library screening, compound characterization, and drug profiling.

  1. Detecting high spatial variability of ice shelf basal mass balance, Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Berger

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ice shelves control the dynamic mass loss of ice sheets through buttressing and their integrity depends on the spatial variability of their basal mass balance (BMB, i.e. the difference between refreezing and melting. Here, we present an improved technique – based on satellite observations – to capture the small-scale variability in the BMB of ice shelves. As a case study, we apply the methodology to the Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf, Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica, and derive its yearly averaged BMB at 10 m horizontal gridding. We use mass conservation in a Lagrangian framework based on high-resolution surface velocities, atmospheric-model surface mass balance and hydrostatic ice-thickness fields (derived from TanDEM-X surface elevation. Spatial derivatives are implemented using the total-variation differentiation, which preserves abrupt changes in flow velocities and their spatial gradients. Such changes may reflect a dynamic response to localized basal melting and should be included in the mass budget. Our BMB field exhibits much spatial detail and ranges from −14.7 to 8.6 m a−1 ice equivalent. Highest melt rates are found close to the grounding line where the pressure melting point is high, and the ice shelf slope is steep. The BMB field agrees well with on-site measurements from phase-sensitive radar, although independent radar profiling indicates unresolved spatial variations in firn density. We show that an elliptical surface depression (10 m deep and with an extent of 0.7 km × 1.3 km lowers by 0.5 to 1.4 m a−1, which we tentatively attribute to a transient adaptation to hydrostatic equilibrium. We find evidence for elevated melting beneath ice shelf channels (with melting being concentrated on the channel's flanks. However, farther downstream from the grounding line, the majority of ice shelf channels advect passively (i.e. no melting nor refreezing toward the ice shelf front. Although the absolute, satellite

  2. Detecting high spatial variability of ice shelf basal mass balance, Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Sophie; Drews, Reinhard; Helm, Veit; Sun, Sainan; Pattyn, Frank

    2017-11-01

    Ice shelves control the dynamic mass loss of ice sheets through buttressing and their integrity depends on the spatial variability of their basal mass balance (BMB), i.e. the difference between refreezing and melting. Here, we present an improved technique - based on satellite observations - to capture the small-scale variability in the BMB of ice shelves. As a case study, we apply the methodology to the Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf, Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica, and derive its yearly averaged BMB at 10 m horizontal gridding. We use mass conservation in a Lagrangian framework based on high-resolution surface velocities, atmospheric-model surface mass balance and hydrostatic ice-thickness fields (derived from TanDEM-X surface elevation). Spatial derivatives are implemented using the total-variation differentiation, which preserves abrupt changes in flow velocities and their spatial gradients. Such changes may reflect a dynamic response to localized basal melting and should be included in the mass budget. Our BMB field exhibits much spatial detail and ranges from -14.7 to 8.6 m a-1 ice equivalent. Highest melt rates are found close to the grounding line where the pressure melting point is high, and the ice shelf slope is steep. The BMB field agrees well with on-site measurements from phase-sensitive radar, although independent radar profiling indicates unresolved spatial variations in firn density. We show that an elliptical surface depression (10 m deep and with an extent of 0.7 km × 1.3 km) lowers by 0.5 to 1.4 m a-1, which we tentatively attribute to a transient adaptation to hydrostatic equilibrium. We find evidence for elevated melting beneath ice shelf channels (with melting being concentrated on the channel's flanks). However, farther downstream from the grounding line, the majority of ice shelf channels advect passively (i.e. no melting nor refreezing) toward the ice shelf front. Although the absolute, satellite-based BMB values remain uncertain, we have

  3. High Spatial Resolution 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology of Lunar Impact Melt Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Cameron Mark

    Impact cratering has played a key role in the evolution of the solid surfaces of Solar System bodies. While much of Earth’s impact record has been erased, its Moon preserves an extensive history of bombardment. Quantifying the timing of lunar impact events is crucial to understanding how impacts have shaped the evolution of early Earth, and provides the basis for estimating the ages of other cratered surfaces in the Solar System. Many lunar impact melt rocks are complex mixtures of glassy and crystalline “melt” materials and inherited clasts of pre-impact minerals and rocks. If analyzed in bulk, these samples can yield complicated incremental release 40Ar/39Ar spectra, making it challenging to uniquely interpret impact ages. Here, I have used a combination of high-spatial resolution 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and thermal-kinetic modeling to gain new insights into the impact histories recorded by such lunar samples. To compare my data to those of previous studies, I developed a software tool to account for differences in the decay, isotopic, and monitor age parameters used for different published 40Ar/39Ar datasets. Using an ultraviolet laser ablation microprobe (UVLAMP) system I selectively dated melt and clast components of impact melt rocks collected during the Apollo 16 and 17 missions. UVLAMP 40Ar/39Ar data for samples 77135, 60315, 61015, and 63355 show evidence of open-system behavior, and provide new insights into how to interpret some complexities of published incremental heating 40Ar/39Ar spectra. Samples 77115, 63525, 63549, and 65015 have relatively simple thermal histories, and UVLAMP 40Ar/39Ar data for the melt components of these rocks indicate the timing of impact events—spanning hundreds of millions of years—that influenced the Apollo 16 and 17 sites. My modeling and UVLAMP 40Ar/39Ar data for sample 73217 indicate that some impact melt rocks can quantitatively retain evidence for multiple melt-producing impact events, and imply that such

  4. Spatial Cognition in Adult and Aged Mice Exposed to High-Fat Diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Kesby

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with a decline in multiple aspects of cognitive function, with spatial cognition being particularly sensitive to age-related decline. Environmental stressors, such as high-fat diet (HFD exposure, that produce a diabetic phenotype and metabolic dysfunction may indirectly lead to exacerbated brain aging and promote the development of cognitive deficits. The present work investigated whether exposure to HFD exacerbates age-related cognitive deficits in adult versus aged mice. Adult (5 months old and aged (15 months old mice were exposed to control diet or HFD for three months prior to, and throughout, behavioral testing. Anxiety-like behavior in the light-dark box test, discrimination learning and memory in the novel object/place recognition tests, and spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze test were assessed. HFD resulted in significant gains in body weight and fat mass content with adult mice gaining significantly more weight and adipose tissue due to HFD than aged mice. Weight gain was attributed to food calories sourced from fat, but not total calorie intake. HFD increased fasting insulin levels in all mice, but adult mice showed a greater increase relative to aged mice. Behaviorally, HFD increased anxiety-like behavior in adult but not aged mice without significantly affecting spatial cognition. In contrast, aged mice fed either control or HFD diet displayed deficits in novel place discrimination and spatial learning. Our results suggest that adult mice are more susceptible to the physiological and anxiety-like effects of HFD consumption than aged mice, while aged mice displayed deficits in spatial cognition regardless of dietary influence. We conclude that although HFD induces systemic metabolic dysfunction in both adult and aged mice, overall cognitive function was not adversely affected under the current experimental conditions.

  5. High spatial resolution analysis of ferromanganese concretions by LA-ICP-MS†

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingri Johan

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available A procedure was developed for the determination of element distributions in cross-sections of ferromanganese concretions using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS. The effects of carrier flow rates, rf forward power, ablation energy, ablation spot size, repetition rate and number of shots per point on analyte intensity were studied. It is shown that different carrier gas flow rates are required in order to obtain maximum sensitivities for different groups of elements, thus complicating the optimisation of ICP parameters. On the contrary, LA parameters have very similar effects on almost all elements studied, thus providing a common optimum parameter set for the entire mass range. However, for selected LA parameters, the use of compromise conditions was necessary in order to compensate for relatively slow data acquisition by ICP-MS and maintain high spatial resolution without sacrificing the multielemental capabilities of the technique. Possible variations in ablation efficiency were corrected for mathematically using the sum of Fe and Mn intensities. Quantification by external calibration against matrix-matched standards was successfully used for more than 50 elements. These standards, in the form of pressed pellets (no binder, were prepared in-house using ferromanganese concentrates from a deep-sea nodule reference material as well as from shallow-marine concretions varying in size and having different proportions of three major phases: aluminosilicates, Fe- and Mn-oxyhydroxides. Element concentrations in each standard were determined by means of conventional solution nebulisation ICP-MS following acid digestion. Examples of selected inter-element correlations in distribution patterns along the cross-section of a concretion are given.

  6. A model program: neonatal nurse practitioners providing community health care for high-risk infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Elias Provencio; Pitts, Kathleen; Mejia, Nilson Enrique

    2008-01-01

    Perinatal drug exposure costs our communities millions of dollars each year in hospital fees and in services such as foster care, child protection, and drug treatment. Infants and their families in this group require substantial long-term health care and community resources. Neonatal health care providers should take an active role in developing and implementing home visitation programs to support early hospital discharge and continuity of care for these high-risk infants and their families. Neonatal nurse practitioners should prepare in the future to practice not only in secondary-- and tertiary--level neonatal centers, but also in follow-up clinics, long-term developmental centers, and the community This article describes a home intervention program delivered by neonatal nurse practitioners for high-risk infants and their mothers. The target population is infants exposed prenatally to drugs and/or alcohol.

  7. Perils of providing visual health information overviews for consumers with low health literacy or high stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Trudi

    2010-01-01

    This pilot study explores the impact of a health topics overview (HTO) on reading comprehension. The HTO is generated automatically based on the presence of Unified Medical Language System terms. In a controlled setting, we presented health texts and posed 15 questions for each. We compared performance with and without the HTO. The answers were available in the text, but not always in the HTO. Our study (n=48) showed that consumers with low health literacy or high stress performed poorly when the HTO was available without linking directly to the answer. They performed better with direct links in the HTO or when the HTO was not available at all. Consumers with high health literacy or low stress performed better regardless of the availability of the HTO. Our data suggests that vulnerable consumers relied solely on the HTO when it was available and were misled when it did not provide the answer. PMID:20190068

  8. Mapping the layer count of few-layer hexagonal boron nitride at high lateral spatial resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsin, Ali; Cross, Nicholas G.; Liu, Lei; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Duscher, Gerd; Gu, Gong

    2018-01-01

    Layer count control and uniformity of two dimensional (2D) layered materials are critical to the investigation of their properties and to their electronic device applications, but methods to map 2D material layer count at nanometer-level lateral spatial resolutions have been lacking. Here, we demonstrate a method based on two complementary techniques widely available in transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) to map the layer count of multilayer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) films. The mass-thickness contrast in high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) mode allows for thickness determination in atomically clean regions with high spatial resolution (sub-nanometer), but is limited by surface contamination. To complement, another technique based on the boron K ionization edge in the electron energy loss spectroscopy spectrum (EELS) of h-BN is developed to quantify the layer count so that surface contamination does not cause an overestimate, albeit at a lower spatial resolution (nanometers). The two techniques agree remarkably well in atomically clean regions with discrepancies within  ±1 layer. For the first time, the layer count uniformity on the scale of nanometers is quantified for a 2D material. The methodology is applicable to layer count mapping of other 2D layered materials, paving the way toward the synthesis of multilayer 2D materials with homogeneous layer count.

  9. HIGH-RESOLUTION SPATIAL MODELING OF DAILY WEATHER ELEMENTS FOR A CATCHMENT IN THE OREGON CASCADE MOUNTAINS, UNITED STATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-quality, daily meteorological data at high spatial resolution are essential for a variety of hydrologic and ecological modeling applications that support environmental risk assessments and decision making. This paper describes the development, application, and assessment of ...

  10. Spatial genetic analysis reveals high connectivity of tiger (Panthera tigris) populations in the Satpura-Maikal landscape of Central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sandeep; Dutta, Trishna; Maldonado, Jesús E; Wood, Thomas C; Panwar, Hemendra Singh; Seidensticker, John

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the spatial genetic structure of the tiger meta-population in the Satpura-Maikal landscape of central India using population- and individual-based genetic clustering methods on multilocus genotypic data from 273 individuals. The Satpura-Maikal landscape is classified as a global-priority Tiger Conservation Landscape (TCL) due to its potential for providing sufficient habitat that will allow the long-term persistence of tigers. We found that the tiger meta-population in the Satpura-Maikal landscape has high genetic variation and very low genetic subdivision. Individual-based Bayesian clustering algorithms reveal two highly admixed genetic populations. We attribute this to forest connectivity and high gene flow in this landscape. However, deforestation, road widening, and mining may sever this connectivity, impede gene exchange, and further exacerbate the genetic division of tigers in central India.

  11. Spatial genetic analysis reveals high connectivity of tiger (Panthera tigris) populations in the Satpura–Maikal landscape of Central India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sandeep; Dutta, Trishna; Maldonado, Jesús E; Wood, Thomas C; Panwar, Hemendra Singh; Seidensticker, John

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the spatial genetic structure of the tiger meta-population in the Satpura–Maikal landscape of central India using population- and individual-based genetic clustering methods on multilocus genotypic data from 273 individuals. The Satpura–Maikal landscape is classified as a global-priority Tiger Conservation Landscape (TCL) due to its potential for providing sufficient habitat that will allow the long-term persistence of tigers. We found that the tiger meta-population in the Satpura–Maikal landscape has high genetic variation and very low genetic subdivision. Individual-based Bayesian clustering algorithms reveal two highly admixed genetic populations. We attribute this to forest connectivity and high gene flow in this landscape. However, deforestation, road widening, and mining may sever this connectivity, impede gene exchange, and further exacerbate the genetic division of tigers in central India. PMID:23403813

  12. High-spatial-frequency periodic surface structures on steel substrate induced by subnanosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikage, Haruki; Nosaka, Nami; Matsuo, Shigeki

    2017-11-01

    By irradiation with 0.5 ns laser pulses at a wavelength λ = 1.064 µm, laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were fabricated on a steel substrate. In addition to low-spatial-frequency LIPSS (LSFL), a high-spatial-frequency LIPSS (HSFL) of period Λ ∼ 0.4λ with two-dimensional expansion was formed, although it is generally recognized that HSFL are formed only by ultrafast laser pulses. The wavevector of the observed HSFL was perpendicular to the electric field of the irradiated laser pulse (each ridge/groove of the HSFL was parallel to the electric field). We discuss the relationship between the formation of HSFL and the pulse duration.

  13. Temporal and spatial multiplexed infrared single-photon counter based on high-speed avalanche photodiode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiuliang; Ding, Chengjie; Pan, Haifeng; Huang, Kun; Laurat, Julien; Wu, Guang; Wu, E

    2017-03-15

    We report on a high-speed temporal and spatial multiplexed single-photon counter with photon-number-resolving capability up to four photons. The infrared detector combines a fiber loop to split, delay and recombine optical pulses and a 200 MHz dual-channel single-photon detector based on InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiode. To fully characterize the photon-number-resolving capability, we perform quantum detector tomography and then reconstruct its positive-operator-valued measure and the associated Wigner functions. The result shows that, despite of the afterpulsing noise and limited system detection efficiency, this temporal and spatial multiplexed single-photon counter can already find applications for large repetition rate quantum information schemes.

  14. High spatial resolution burn severity mapping of the New Jersey Pine Barrens with WorldView-3 near-infrared and shortwave infrared imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy A. Warner; Nicholas S. Skowronski; Michael R. Gallagher

    2017-01-01

    The WorldView-3 (WV-3) sensor, launched in 2014, is the first highspatial resolution scanner to acquire imagery in the shortwave infrared (SWIR). A spectral ratio of the SWIR combined with the nearinfrared (NIR) can potentially provide an effective differentiation of wildfire burn severity. Previous high spatial resolution sensors were limited to data fromthe visible...

  15. Acute stress differentially affects spatial configuration learning in high and low cortisol-responding healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Meyer

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stress and stress hormones modulate memory formation in various ways that are relevant to our understanding of stress-related psychopathology, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Particular relevance is attributed to efficient memory formation sustained by the hippocampus and parahippocampus. This process is thought to reduce the occurrence of intrusions and flashbacks following trauma, but may be negatively affected by acute stress. Moreover, recent evidence suggests that the efficiency of visuo-spatial processing and learning based on the hippocampal area is related to PTSD symptoms. Objective: The current study investigated the effect of acute stress on spatial configuration learning using a spatial contextual cueing task (SCCT known to heavily rely on structures in the parahippocampus. Method: Acute stress was induced by subjecting participants (N = 34 to the Maastricht Acute Stress Test (MAST. Following a counterbalanced within-subject approach, the effects of stress and the ensuing hormonal (i.e., cortisol activity on subsequent SCCT performance were compared to SCCT performance following a no-stress control condition. Results: Acute stress did not impact SCCT learning overall, but opposing effects emerged for high versus low cortisol responders to the MAST. Learning scores following stress were reduced in low cortisol responders, while high cortisol-responding participants showed improved learning. Conclusions: The effects of stress on spatial configuration learning were moderated by the magnitude of endogenous cortisol secretion. These findings suggest a possible mechanism by which cortisol responses serve an adaptive function during stress and trauma, and this may prove to be a promising route for future research in this area.

  16. Defining the essential anatomical coverage provided by military body armour against high energy projectiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeze, John; Lewis, E A; Fryer, R; Hepper, A E; Mahoney, Peter F; Clasper, Jon C

    2016-08-01

    Body armour is a type of equipment worn by military personnel that aims to prevent or reduce the damage caused by ballistic projectiles to structures within the thorax and abdomen. Such injuries remain the leading cause of potentially survivable deaths on the modern battlefield. Recent developments in computer modelling in conjunction with a programme to procure the next generation of UK military body armour has provided the impetus to re-evaluate the optimal anatomical coverage provided by military body armour against high energy projectiles. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken to identify those anatomical structures within the thorax and abdomen that if damaged were highly likely to result in death or significant long-term morbidity. These structures were superimposed upon two designs of ceramic plate used within representative body armour systems using a computerised representation of human anatomy. Those structures requiring essential medical coverage by a plate were demonstrated to be the heart, great vessels, liver and spleen. For the 50th centile male anthropometric model used in this study, the front and rear plates from the Enhanced Combat Body Armour system only provide limited coverage, but do fulfil their original requirement. The plates from the current Mark 4a OSPREY system cover all of the structures identified in this study as requiring coverage except for the abdominal sections of the aorta and inferior vena cava. Further work on sizing of plates is recommended due to its potential to optimise essential medical coverage. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Providing high-quality care in primary care settings: how to make trade-offs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Geneau, Robert; Del Grande, Claudio; Denis, Jean-Louis; Hudon, Eveline; Haggerty, Jeannie L; Bonin, Lucie; Duplain, Réjean; Goudreau, Johanne; Hogg, William

    2014-05-01

    To gain a deeper understanding of how primary care (PC) practices belonging to different models manage resources to provide high-quality care. Multiple-case study embedded in a cross-sectional study of a random sample of 37 practices. Three regions of Quebec. Health care professionals and staff of 5 PC practices. Five cases showing above-average results on quality-of-care indicators were purposefully selected to contrast on region, practice size, and PC model. Data were collected using an organizational questionnaire; the Team Climate Inventory, which was completed by health care professionals and staff; and 33 individual interviews. Detailed case histories were written and thematic analysis was performed. The core common feature of these practices was their ongoing effort to make trade-offs to deliver services that met their vision of high-quality care. These compromises involved the same 3 areas, but to varying degrees depending on clinic characteristics: developing a shared vision of high-quality care; aligning resource use with that vision; and balancing professional aspirations and population needs. The leadership of the physician lead was crucial. The external environment was perceived as a source of pressure and dilemmas rather than as a source of support in these matters. Irrespective of their models, PC practices' pursuit of high-quality care is based on a vision in which accessibility is a key component, balanced by appropriate management of available resources and of external environment expectations. Current PC reforms often create tensions rather than support PC practices in their pursuit of high-quality care. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  18. Epidemiology of tuberculosis in a high HIV prevalence population provided with enhanced diagnosis of symptomatic disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth L Corbett

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Directly observed treatment short course (DOTS, the global control strategy aimed at controlling tuberculosis (TB transmission through prompt diagnosis of symptomatic smear-positive disease, has failed to prevent rising tuberculosis incidence rates in Africa brought about by the HIV epidemic. However, rising incidence does not necessarily imply failure to control tuberculosis transmission, which is primarily driven by prevalent infectious disease. We investigated the epidemiology of prevalent and incident TB in a high HIV prevalence population provided with enhanced primary health care.Twenty-two businesses in Harare, Zimbabwe, were provided with free smear- and culture-based investigation of TB symptoms through occupational clinics. Anonymised HIV tests were requested from all employees. After 2 y of follow-up for incident TB, a culture-based survey for undiagnosed prevalent TB was conducted. A total of 6,440 of 7,478 eligible employees participated. HIV prevalence was 19%. For HIV-positive and -negative participants, the incidence of culture-positive tuberculosis was 25.3 and 1.3 per 1,000 person-years, respectively (adjusted incidence rate ratio = 18.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 10.3 to 34.5: population attributable fraction = 78%, and point prevalence after 2 y was 5.7 and 2.6 per 1,000 population (adjusted odds ratio = 1.7; 95% CI = 0.5 to 6.8: population attributable fraction = 14%. Most patients with prevalent culture-positive TB had subclinical disease when first detected.Strategies based on prompt investigation of TB symptoms, such as DOTS, may be an effective way of controlling prevalent TB in high HIV prevalence populations. This may translate into effective control of TB transmission despite high TB incidence rates and a period of subclinical infectiousness in some patients.

  19. A comprehensive biomass burning emission inventory with high spatial and temporal resolution in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Xing, Xiaofan; Lang, Jianlei; Chen, Dongsheng; Cheng, Shuiyuan; Wei, Lin; Wei, Xiao; Liu, Chao

    2017-02-01

    . As for the straw burning emission of various crops, corn straw burning has the largest contribution to all of the pollutants considered, except for CH4; rice straw burning has highest contribution to CH4 and the second largest contribution to other pollutants, except for SO2, OC, and Hg; wheat straw burning is the second largest contributor to SO2, OC, and Hg and the third largest contributor to other pollutants. Heilongjiang, Shandong, and Henan provinces located in the north-eastern and central-southern regions of China have higher emissions compared to other provinces in China. Gridded emissions, which were obtained through spatial allocation based on the gridded rural population and fire point data from emission inventories at county resolution, could better represent the actual situation. High biomass burning emissions are concentrated in the areas with more agricultural and rural activity. The months of April, May, June, and October account for 65 % of emissions from in-field crop residue burning, while, regarding EC, the emissions in January, February, October, November, and December are relatively higher than other months due to biomass domestic burning in heating season. There are regional differences in the monthly variations of emissions due to the diversity of main planted crops and climatic conditions. Furthermore, PM2.5 component results showed that OC, Cl-, EC, K+, NH4+, elemental K, and SO42- are the main PM2.5 species, accounting for 80 % of the total emissions. The species with relatively high contribution to NMVOC emission include ethylene, propylene, toluene, mp-xylene, and ethyl benzene, which are key species for the formation of secondary air pollution. The detailed biomass burning emission inventory developed by this study could provide useful information for air-quality modelling and could support the development of appropriate pollution-control strategies.

  20. European industrial water use: a new dataset with high spatial and sectorial detail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Jeroen; Reynaud, Arnaud; de Roo, Ad; Karssenberg, Derek

    2017-04-01

    One of the most important components of the water balance in terms of water scarcity modelling is an accurate quantification of water abstractions by water using sectors. Data availability for this topic is sadly strikingly limited, most notably for the industry sector. Due to the lack of data, many global and continental scale modelling studies rely on relatively outdated water use datasets with course resolution which generally treat the industry sector as a single unit. The lack of spatial and sectorial detail hurts the local relevance and applicability of these large-scale models to the point that results might be meaningless for regional policy support, especially because economic assessments of potential water allocation policies require the separation of economic activities with different water use behavior and water productivity (industrial production per unit of water). With this work, we aim to solve this knowledge gap for Europe by providing a pan-European dataset with regional relevance of water use and water productivity values at the highest sectorial and spatial detail possible. We gathered industrial water use data from national statistical offices and other organizational bodies, separating ten different industry subsections of the NACE classification (Nomenclature of Economic Activities). Where data was not adequately available from national databases, we used complementary figures from EUROSTAT (official database of the European Commission). Then we used national GVA (Gross Value Added) to calculate water productivity values per country for all industrial subsections. As a final step, we used a database with locations and production records of nearly 20,000 individual industrial activities to proportionally distribute the national water use values for each industry section to roughly 1200 regions in Europe. This resulted in a pan-European dataset of water use at regional level and water productivity at the national level for ten industry sections

  1. Spatial Patterns of High Aedes aegypti Oviposition Activity in Northwestern Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estallo, Elizabet Lilia; Más, Guillermo; Vergara-Cid, Carolina; Lanfri, Mario Alberto; Ludueña-Almeida, Francisco; Scavuzzo, Carlos Marcelo; Introini, María Virginia; Zaidenberg, Mario; Almirón, Walter Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Background In Argentina, dengue has affected mainly the Northern provinces, including Salta. The objective of this study was to analyze the spatial patterns of high Aedes aegypti oviposition activity in San Ramón de la Nueva Orán, northwestern Argentina. The location of clusters as hot spot areas should help control programs to identify priority areas and allocate their resources more effectively. Methodology Oviposition activity was detected in Orán City (Salta province) using ovitraps, weekly replaced (October 2005–2007). Spatial autocorrelation was measured with Moran’s Index and depicted through cluster maps to identify hot spots. Total egg numbers were spatially interpolated and a classified map with Ae. aegypti high oviposition activity areas was performed. Potential breeding and resting (PBR) sites were geo-referenced. A logistic regression analysis of interpolated egg numbers and PBR location was performed to generate a predictive mapping of mosquito oviposition activity. Principal Findings Both cluster maps and predictive map were consistent, identifying in central and southern areas of the city high Ae. aegypti oviposition activity. A logistic regression model was successfully developed to predict Ae. aegypti oviposition activity based on distance to PBR sites, with tire dumps having the strongest association with mosquito oviposition activity. A predictive map reflecting probability of oviposition activity was produced. The predictive map delimitated an area of maximum probability of Ae. aegypti oviposition activity in the south of Orán city where tire dumps predominate. The overall fit of the model was acceptable (ROC = 0.77), obtaining 99% of sensitivity and 75.29% of specificity. Conclusions Distance to tire dumps is inversely associated with high mosquito activity, allowing us to identify hot spots. These methodologies are useful for prevention, surveillance, and control of tropical vector borne diseases and might assist National Health

  2. A novel airport extraction model based on saliency region detection for high spatial resolution remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wen; Zhang, Libao; Zhu, Yongchun

    2017-06-01

    The airport is one of the most crucial traffic facilities in military and civil fields. Automatic airport extraction in high spatial resolution remote sensing images has many applications such as regional planning and military reconnaissance. Traditional airport extraction strategies usually base on prior knowledge and locate the airport target by template matching and classification, which will cause high computation complexity and large costs of computing resources for high spatial resolution remote sensing images. In this paper, we propose a novel automatic airport extraction model based on saliency region detection, airport runway extraction and adaptive threshold segmentation. In saliency region detection, we choose frequency-tuned (FT) model for computing airport saliency using low level features of color and luminance that is easy and fast to implement and can provide full-resolution saliency maps. In airport runway extraction, Hough transform is adopted to count the number of parallel line segments. In adaptive threshold segmentation, the Otsu threshold segmentation algorithm is proposed to obtain more accurate airport regions. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed model outperforms existing saliency analysis models and shows good performance in the extraction of the airport.

  3. Practical Considerations for High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, M; Boyden, K; Browning, N D; Campbell, G H; Colvin, J D; DeHope, B; Frank, A M; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F; Kim, J S; King, W E; LaGrange, T B; Pyke, B J; Reed, B W; Shuttlesworth, R M; Stuart, B C; Torralva, B R

    2006-05-01

    Although recent years have seen significant advances in the spatial resolution possible in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), the temporal resolution of most microscopes is limited to video rate at best. This lack of temporal resolution means that our understanding of dynamic processes in materials is extremely limited. High temporal resolution in the TEM can be achieved, however, by replacing the normal thermionic or field emission source with a photoemission source. In this case the temporal resolution is limited only by the ability to create a short pulse of photoexcited electrons in the source, and this can be as short as a few femtoseconds. The operation of the photo-emission source and the control of the subsequent pulse of electrons (containing as many as 5 x 10{sup 7} electrons) create significant challenges for a standard microscope column that is designed to operate with a single electron in the column at any one time. In this paper, the generation and control of electron pulses in the TEM to obtain a temporal resolution <10{sup -6} s will be described and the effect of the pulse duration and current density on the spatial resolution of the instrument will be examined. The potential of these levels of temporal and spatial resolution for the study of dynamic materials processes will also be discussed.

  4. Practical considerations for high spatial and temporal resolution dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Michael R. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)], E-mail: armstrong30@llnl.gov; Boyden, Ken [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Browning, Nigel D. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California-Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Colvin, Jeffrey D.; De Hope, William J.; Frank, Alan M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Gibson, David J.; Hartemann, Fred [N Division, Physics and Advanced Technologies Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-280, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Kim, Judy S. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California-Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); King, Wayne E.; La Grange, Thomas B.; Pyke, Ben J.; Reed, Bryan W.; Shuttlesworth, Richard M.; Stuart, Brent C.; Torralva, Ben R. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    Although recent years have seen significant advances in the spatial resolution possible in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), the temporal resolution of most microscopes is limited to video rate at best. This lack of temporal resolution means that our understanding of dynamic processes in materials is extremely limited. High temporal resolution in the TEM can be achieved, however, by replacing the normal thermionic or field emission source with a photoemission source. In this case the temporal resolution is limited only by the ability to create a short pulse of photoexcited electrons in the source, and this can be as short as a few femtoseconds. The operation of the photo-emission source and the control of the subsequent pulse of electrons (containing as many as 5x10{sup 7} electrons) create significant challenges for a standard microscope column that is designed to operate with a single electron in the column at any one time. In this paper, the generation and control of electron pulses in the TEM to obtain a temporal resolution <10{sup -6} s will be described and the effect of the pulse duration and current density on the spatial resolution of the instrument will be examined. The potential of these levels of temporal and spatial resolution for the study of dynamic materials processes will also be discussed.

  5. Sports Cardiology: Core Curriculum for Providing Cardiovascular Care to Competitive Athletes and Highly Active People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggish, Aaron L; Battle, Robert W; Beckerman, James G; Bove, Alfred A; Lampert, Rachel J; Levine, Benjamin D; Link, Mark S; Martinez, Matthew W; Molossi, Silvana M; Salerno, Jack; Wasfy, Meagan M; Weiner, Rory B; Emery, Michael S

    2017-10-10

    The last few decades have seen substantial growth in the populations of competitive athletes and highly active people (CAHAP). Although vigorous physical exercise is an effective way to reduce the risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease, CAHAP remain susceptible to inherited and acquired CV disease, and may be most at risk for adverse CV outcomes during intense physical activity. Traditionally, multidisciplinary teams comprising athletic trainers, physical therapists, primary care sports medicine physicians, and orthopedic surgeons have provided clinical care for CAHAP. However, there is increasing recognition that a care team including qualified CV specialists optimizes care delivery for CAHAP. In recognition of the increasing demand for CV specialists competent in the care of CAHAP, the American College of Cardiology has recently established a Sports and Exercise Council. An important primary objective of this council is to define the essential skills necessary to practice effective sports cardiology. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Autonomous agricultural remote sensing systems with high spatial and temporal resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Haitao

    In this research, two novel agricultural remote sensing (RS) systems, a Stand-alone Infield Crop Monitor RS System (SICMRS) and an autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) based RS system have been studied. A high-resolution digital color and multi-spectral camera was used as the image sensor for the SICMRS system. An artificially intelligent (AI) controller based on artificial neural network (ANN) and an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was developed. Morrow Plots corn field RS images in the 2004 and 2006 growing seasons were collected by the SICMRS system. The field site contained 8 subplots (9.14 m x 9.14 m) that were planted with corn and three different fertilizer treatments were used among those subplots. The raw RS images were geometrically corrected, resampled to 10cm resolution, removed soil background and calibrated to real reflectance. The RS images from two growing seasons were studied and 10 different vegetation indices were derived from each day's image. The result from the image processing demonstrated that the vegetation indices have temporal effects. To achieve high quality RS data, one has to utilize the right indices and capture the images at the right time in the growing season. Maximum variations among the image data set are within the V6-V10 stages, which indicated that these stages are the best period to identify the spatial variability caused by the nutrient stress in the corn field. The derived vegetation indices were also used to build yield prediction models via the linear regression method. At that point, all of the yield prediction models were evaluated by comparing the R2-value and the best index model from each day's image was picked based on the highest R 2-value. It was shown that the green normalized difference vegetation (GNDVI) based model is more sensitive to yield prediction than other indices-based models. During the VT-R4 stages, the GNDVI based models were able to explain more than 95% potential corn yield

  7. CESAME: Providing High Quality Professional Development in Science and Mathematics for K-12 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Paul

    2002-04-01

    It is appropriate that after almost half a century of Science and Mathematics education reform we take a look back and a peek forward to understand the present state of this wonderfully complex system. Each of the components of this system including teaching, professional development, assessment, content and the district K-12 curriculum all need to work together if we hope to provide quality science, mathematics and technology education for ALL students. How do the state and national standards drive the system? How do state policies on student testing and teacher licensure come into play? How do we improve the preparation, retention and job satisfaction of our K-12 teachers? What initiatives have made or are making a difference? What else needs to be done? What can the physics community do to support local efforts? This job is too big for any single organization or individual but we each can contribute to the effort. Our Center at Northeastern University, with support from the National Science Foundation, has a sharply defined focus: to get high quality, research-based instructional materials into the hands of K-12 classroom teachers and provide the support they need to use the materials effectively in their classrooms.

  8. Evaluating the Value of High Spatial Resolution in National Capacity Expansion Models using ReEDS: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, Venkat; Cole, Wesley

    2016-07-01

    Power sector capacity expansion models (CEMs) have a broad range of spatial resolutions. This paper uses the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, a long-term national scale electric sector CEM, to evaluate the value of high spatial resolution for CEMs. ReEDS models the United States with 134 load balancing areas (BAs) and captures the variability in existing generation parameters, future technology costs, performance, and resource availability using very high spatial resolution data, especially for wind and solar modeled at 356 resource regions. In this paper we perform planning studies at three different spatial resolutions--native resolution (134 BAs), state-level, and NERC region level--and evaluate how results change under different levels of spatial aggregation in terms of renewable capacity deployment and location, associated transmission builds, and system costs. The results are used to ascertain the value of high geographically resolved models in terms of their impact on relative competitiveness among renewable energy resources.

  9. Complete Control of Polarization and Phase of Light with High Efficiency and Sub-wavelength Spatial Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Arbabi, Amir; Bagheri, Mahmood; Faraon, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    Meta-surfaces are planar structures that locally change polarization, phase, and amplitude of light, thus enabling flat, lithographically patterned free-space optical components with functionalities controlled by design. Several types of meta-surfaces have been reported, but low efficiency and the inability to provide simultaneous phase and polarization control have limited their applications. Here we demonstrate a platform based on high-contrast dielectric elliptical nano-posts providing complete and efficient control of polarization and phase with sub-wavelength spatial resolution. The unprecedented freedom in manipulating light not only enables realization of conventional free-space transmissive optical elements such as phase-plates, wave-plates and beam-splitters, but also elements with novel functionalities such as general polarization switchable phase holograms and arbitrary vector beam generators which will change the design paradigms for free-space optical systems.

  10. 3D high spectral and spatial resolution imaging of ex vivo mouse brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foxley, Sean, E-mail: sean.foxley@ndcn.ox.ac.uk; Karczmar, Gregory S. [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Domowicz, Miriam [Department of Pediatrics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Schwartz, Nancy [Department of Pediatrics, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Widely used MRI methods show brain morphology both in vivo and ex vivo at very high resolution. Many of these methods (e.g., T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted imaging, phase-sensitive imaging, or susceptibility-weighted imaging) are sensitive to local magnetic susceptibility gradients produced by subtle variations in tissue composition. However, the spectral resolution of commonly used methods is limited to maintain reasonable run-time combined with very high spatial resolution. Here, the authors report on data acquisition at increased spectral resolution, with 3-dimensional high spectral and spatial resolution MRI, in order to analyze subtle variations in water proton resonance frequency and lineshape that reflect local anatomy. The resulting information compliments previous studies based on T{sub 2}{sup *} and resonance frequency. Methods: The proton free induction decay was sampled at high resolution and Fourier transformed to produce a high-resolution water spectrum for each image voxel in a 3D volume. Data were acquired using a multigradient echo pulse sequence (i.e., echo-planar spectroscopic imaging) with a spatial resolution of 50 × 50 × 70 μm{sup 3} and spectral resolution of 3.5 Hz. Data were analyzed in the spectral domain, and images were produced from the various Fourier components of the water resonance. This allowed precise measurement of local variations in water resonance frequency and lineshape, at the expense of significantly increased run time (16–24 h). Results: High contrast T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted images were produced from the peak of the water resonance (peak height image), revealing a high degree of anatomical detail, specifically in the hippocampus and cerebellum. In images produced from Fourier components of the water resonance at −7.0 Hz from the peak, the contrast between deep white matter tracts and the surrounding tissue is the reverse of the contrast in water peak height images. This indicates the presence of a shoulder in

  11. Ultra-high spatial resolution multi-energy CT using photon counting detector technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, S.; Gutjahr, R.; Ferrero, A.; Kappler, S.; Henning, A.; Halaweish, A.; Zhou, W.; Montoya, J.; McCollough, C.

    2017-03-01

    Two ultra-high-resolution (UHR) imaging modes, each with two energy thresholds, were implemented on a research, whole-body photon-counting-detector (PCD) CT scanner, referred to as sharp and UHR, respectively. The UHR mode has a pixel size of 0.25 mm at iso-center for both energy thresholds, with a collimation of 32 × 0.25 mm. The sharp mode has a 0.25 mm pixel for the low-energy threshold and 0.5 mm for the high-energy threshold, with a collimation of 48 × 0.25 mm. Kidney stones with mixed mineral composition and lung nodules with different shapes were scanned using both modes, and with the standard imaging mode, referred to as macro mode (0.5 mm pixel and 32 × 0.5 mm collimation). Evaluation and comparison of the three modes focused on the ability to accurately delineate anatomic structures using the high-spatial resolution capability and the ability to quantify stone composition using the multi-energy capability. The low-energy threshold images of the sharp and UHR modes showed better shape and texture information due to the achieved higher spatial resolution, although noise was also higher. No noticeable benefit was shown in multi-energy analysis using UHR compared to standard resolution (macro mode) when standard doses were used. This was due to excessive noise in the higher resolution images. However, UHR scans at higher dose showed improvement in multi-energy analysis over macro mode with regular dose. To fully take advantage of the higher spatial resolution in multi-energy analysis, either increased radiation dose, or application of noise reduction techniques, is needed.

  12. Modelling malaria risk in East Africa at high-spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omumbo, J A; Hay, S I; Snow, R W; Tatem, A J; Rogers, D J

    2005-06-01

    Malaria risk maps have re-emerged as an important tool for appropriately targeting the limited resources available for malaria control. In Sub-Saharan Africa empirically derived maps using standardized criteria are few and this paper considers the development of a model of malaria risk for East Africa. Statistical techniques were applied to high spatial resolution remotely sensed, human settlement and land-use data to predict the intensity of malaria transmission as defined according to the childhood parasite ratio (PR) in East Africa. Discriminant analysis was used to train environmental and human settlement predictor variables to distinguish between four classes of PR risk shown to relate to disease outcomes in the region. Independent empirical estimates of the PR were identified from Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda (n = 330). Surrogate markers of climate recorded on-board earth orbiting satellites, population settlement, elevation and water bodies all contributed significantly to the predictive models of malaria transmission intensity in the sub-region. The accuracy of the model was increased by stratifying East Africa into two ecological zones. In addition, the inclusion of urbanization as a predictor of malaria prevalence, whilst reducing formal accuracy statistics, nevertheless improved the consistency of the predictive map with expert opinion malaria maps. The overall accuracy achieved with ecological zone and urban stratification was 62% with surrogates of precipitation and temperature being among the most discriminating predictors of the PR. It is possible to achieve a high degree of predictive accuracy for Plasmodium falciparum parasite prevalence in East Africa using high-spatial resolution environmental data. However, discrepancies were evident from mapped outputs from the models which were largely due to poor coverage of malaria training data and the comparable spatial resolution of predictor data. These deficiencies will only be addressed by more random

  13. Cumulus cloud base height estimation from high spatial resolution Landsat data - A Hough transform approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berendes, Todd; Sengupta, Sailes K.; Welch, Ron M.; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Navar, Murgesh

    1992-01-01

    A semiautomated methodology is developed for estimating cumulus cloud base heights on the basis of high spatial resolution Landsat MSS data, using various image-processing techniques to match cloud edges with their corresponding shadow edges. The cloud base height is then estimated by computing the separation distance between the corresponding generalized Hough transform reference points. The differences between the cloud base heights computed by these means and a manual verification technique are of the order of 100 m or less; accuracies of 50-70 m may soon be possible via EOS instruments.

  14. THE IMPACT OF SPATIAL PROXIMITY TO CUSTOMERS, SUPPLIERS AND COMPETITORS ON INNOVATION ACTIVITY IN MEDIUM HIGH AND HIGH TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRY IN POLAND

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Piotr Dzikowski

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the impact of spatial proximity to customers, suppliers and competitors on innovation activity in medium high and high technology manufacturing industries in Poland...

  15. High temporal and spatial variability of atmospheric-methane oxidation in Alpine glacier-forefield soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiri, Eleonora; Nauer, Philipp A; Rainer, Edda-Marie; Zeyer, Josef; Schroth, Martin H

    2017-07-07

    Glacier-forefield soils can provide a substantial sink for atmospheric CH4, facilitated by aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB). However, MOB activity, abundance, and community structure may be affected by soil age, location in different forefield landforms, and temporal fluctuations in soil-physical parameters. We assessed spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric CH4 oxidation in an Alpine glacier forefield during the snow-free season 2013. We quantified CH4 flux in soils of increasing age and in different landforms (sandhill, terrace, floodplain) using soil-gas-profile and static flux-chamber methods. To determine MOB abundance and community structure, we employed pmoA-gene-based quantitative PCR and targeted-amplicon sequencing. Uptake of CH4 increased in magnitude and decreased in variability with increasing soil age. Sandhill soils exhibited CH4 uptake ranging from -0.03- -3.7 mg CH4 m-2 d-1 Floodplain and terrace soils exhibited smaller uptake and even intermittent CH4 emissions. Linear mixed-effect models indicated that soil age and landform were dominating factors shaping CH4 flux, followed by cumulative rainfall (weighted sum ≤ 4 d prior to sampling). Of 31 MOB operational taxonomic units retrieved, ∼30% were potentially novel, and ∼50% were affiliated with Upland Soil Clusters gamma and alpha. The MOB community structures in floodplain and terrace soils were nearly identical, but differed significantly from highly variable sandhill-soil communities. We conclude that soil age and landform modulate the soil CH4 sink strength in glacier forefields, and recent rainfall affects its short-term variability. This should be taken into account when including this environment in future CH4 inventories.Importance Oxidation of methane (CH4) in well-drained, "upland" soils is an important mechanism for the removal of this potent greenhouse gas from the atmosphere. It is largely mediated by aerobic, methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB). Whereas there is

  16. High Average Power Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers: Power Scaling With High Spectral and Spatial Coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-30

    power. The PPSLT chip was placed in a home-made mount whose temperature was controlled with a thermo- electric cooler (TEC) and monitored with a...main optical damage mechanisms need to be assessed when dealing with cw lasers, namely (1) optical surface damage arising from the high electric ...Yuen, H. P. Bae, M. A. Wistey, A. Moto , and J. S. Harris Jr., "Enhanced Luminescence in GaInNAsSb Quantum Wells Through Variation of the Arsenic and

  17. Brayton Power Conversion Unit Tested: Provides a Path to Future High-Power Electric Propulsion Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lee S.

    2003-01-01

    Closed-Brayton-cycle conversion technology has been identified as an excellent candidate for nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) power conversion systems. Advantages include high efficiency, long life, and high power density for power levels from about 10 kWe to 1 MWe, and beyond. An additional benefit for Brayton is the potential for the alternator to deliver very high voltage as required by the electric thrusters, minimizing the mass and power losses associated with the power management and distribution (PMAD). To accelerate Brayton technology development for NEP, the NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a low-power NEP power systems testbed that utilizes an existing 2- kWe Brayton power conversion unit (PCU) from previous solar dynamic technology efforts. The PCU includes a turboalternator, a recuperator, and a gas cooler connected by gas ducts. The rotating assembly is supported by gas foil bearings and consists of a turbine, a compressor, a thrust rotor, and an alternator on a single shaft. The alternator produces alternating-current power that is rectified to 120-V direct-current power by the PMAD unit. The NEP power systems testbed will be utilized to conduct future investigations of operational control methods, high-voltage PMAD, electric thruster interactions, and advanced heat rejection techniques. The PCU was tested in Glenn s Vacuum Facility 6. The Brayton PCU was modified from its original solar dynamic configuration by the removal of the heat receiver and retrofitting of the electrical resistance gas heater to simulate the thermal input of a steady-state nuclear source. Then, the Brayton PCU was installed in the 3-m test port of Vacuum Facility 6, as shown. A series of tests were performed between June and August of 2002 that resulted in a total PCU operational time of about 24 hr. An initial test sequence on June 17 determined that the reconfigured unit was fully operational. Ensuing tests provided the operational data needed to characterize PCU

  18. High spatial resolution infrared micro-spectroscopy reveals the mechanism of leaf lignin decomposition by aquatic fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice L Kerr

    Full Text Available Organic carbon is a critical component of aquatic systems, providing energy storage and transfer between organisms. Fungi are a major decomposer group in the aquatic carbon cycle, and are one of few groups thought to be capable of breaking down woody (lignified tissue. In this work we have used high spatial resolution (synchrotron light source infrared micro-spectroscopy to study the interaction between aquatic fungi and lignified leaf vein material (xylem from River Redgum trees (E. camaldulensis endemic to the lowland rivers of South-Eastern Australia. The work provides spatially explicit evidence that fungal colonisation of leaf litter involves the oxidative breakdown of lignin immediately adjacent to the fungal tissue and depletion of the lignin-bound cellulose. Cellulose depletion occurs over relatively short length scales (5-15 µm and highlights the likely importance of mechanical breakdown in accessing the carbohydrate content of this resource. Low bioavailability compounds (oxidized lignin and polyphenols of plant origin remain in colonised leaves, even after fungal activity diminishes, and suggests a possible pathway for the sequestration of carbon in wetlands. The work shows that fungi likely have a critical role in the partitioning of lignified material into a biodegradable fraction that can re-enter the aquatic carbon cycle, and a recalcitrant fraction that enters long-term storage in sediments or contribute to the formation of dissolved organic carbon in the water column.

  19. Determining the nature of active region heating using high spatially and spectrally resolved x-ray observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterrett, M. W.; Cirtain, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Rarely have active regions on the Sun been studied at wavelengths less than 10 nm while simultaneously maintaining both high spatial and high spectral measurements. Marshall's Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrometer (MaGIXS) will measure the soft X-ray solar spectrum within a wavelength range of 0.6 - 2.4 nm (0.5 - 2.0 keV) while maintaining a 5 arcsec spatial resolution. The wavelength range of 0.6 - 2.4 nm can provide insight into the heating roles of two of the likely coronal heating mechanisms: nanoflare and Alfven wave heating. The key difference in nanoflares and Alfven wave heating is the high temperature components of plasmas inside single magnetic strands. If the observed frequency of the heating event is low, it is determined to be a nanoflare. If the frequency of the heating event is high, it is Alfvenic in nature. To discriminate between these two distinct events requires that the components of the local high-temperature plasma be measured. MaGIXS is a proposed sounding rocket experiment. Currently in its prototype phase, MaGIXS is being aligned and characterized in hopes of a 2015 launch. To measure the attributes of high-temperature plasma, MaGIXS will employ the use of a matched pair of parabolic mirrors in conjunction with a planar varied-line-space silicon wafer grating. The two mirrors act as a collimator and re-focusing system, molding the beam to desired specifications and removing off-axis optical aberrations in the process. The grating has a HeNe alignment feature which allows the grating to be aligned at atmospheric pressure while focusing the HeNe laser beam near the center of MaGIXS wavelength range. This presentation will cover the alignment procedure of the mirrors, and the results of preliminary testing using both white light and X-ray sources.

  20. High spatial resolution myocardial perfusion imaging during high dose dobutamine/atropine stress magnetic resonance using k-t SENSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebker, R; Jahnke, C; Manka, R; Frick, M; Hucko, T; Kozerke, S; Schnackenburg, B; Fleck, E; Paetsch, I

    2012-07-26

    To prospectively evaluate the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of high spatial resolution myocardial perfusion imaging during high dose dobutamine/atropine stress magnetic resonance (DSMR) for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD). DSMR-wall motion was combined with perfusion imaging (DSMR-perfusion) in 78 patients prior to clinically indicated invasive coronary angiography. For DSMR-perfusion an in-plane spatial resolution of 1.5 × 1.5mm(2) was attained by using 8 × k-space and time sensitivity encoding (k-t SENSE). Image quality and extent of artifacts during perfusion imaging were evaluated. Wall motion and perfusion data were interpreted sequentially. Significant CAD (stenosis ≥ 70%) was present in 52 patients and involved 86 coronary territories. One patient did not reach target heart rate despite maximum infusion of dobutamine/atropine. Two studies (3%) were non-diagnostic due k-t SENSE related artifacts resulting from insufficient breathhold capability. Overall image quality was good. Dark-rim artifacts were limited to the endocardial border at a mean width of 1.8mm. The addition of DSMR-perfusion to DSMR-wall motion data improved sensitivity for the detection of CAD (92% vs. 81%, P=0.03) and accurate determination of disease extent (85% vs. 66% of territories, Pspatial resolution DSMR-perfusion imaging at maximum stress level was feasible, improved sensitivity over DSMR-wall motion for the detection of CAD and allowed an accurate determination of disease extent. Specificity of DSMR-perfusion with k-t SENSE improved compared to prior studies using lower spatial resolution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Estimating babassu palm density using automatic palm tree detection with very high spatial resolution satellite images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Alessio Moreira; Mitja, Danielle; Delaître, Eric; Demagistri, Laurent; de Souza Miranda, Izildinha; Libourel, Thérèse; Petit, Michel

    2017-05-15

    High spatial resolution images as well as image processing and object detection algorithms are recent technologies that aid the study of biodiversity and commercial plantations of forest species. This paper seeks to contribute knowledge regarding the use of these technologies by studying randomly dispersed native palm tree. Here, we analyze the automatic detection of large circular crown (LCC) palm tree using a high spatial resolution panchromatic GeoEye image (0.50 m) taken on the area of a community of small agricultural farms in the Brazilian Amazon. We also propose auxiliary methods to estimate the density of the LCC palm tree Attalea speciosa (babassu) based on the detection results. We used the "Compt-palm" algorithm based on the detection of palm tree shadows in open areas via mathematical morphology techniques and the spatial information was validated using field methods (i.e. structural census and georeferencing). The algorithm recognized individuals in life stages 5 and 6, and the extraction percentage, branching factor and quality percentage factors were used to evaluate its performance. A principal components analysis showed that the structure of the studied species differs from other species. Approximately 96% of the babassu individuals in stage 6 were detected. These individuals had significantly smaller stipes than the undetected ones. In turn, 60% of the stage 5 babassu individuals were detected, showing significantly a different total height and a different number of leaves from the undetected ones. Our calculations regarding resource availability indicate that 6870 ha contained 25,015 adult babassu palm tree, with an annual potential productivity of 27.4 t of almond oil. The detection of LCC palm tree and the implementation of auxiliary field methods to estimate babassu density is an important first step to monitor this industry resource that is extremely important to the Brazilian economy and thousands of families over a large scale. Copyright

  2. SU-E-T-244: High Spatial Resolution EBT2 Film Dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppinga, D; Schoenfeld, A; Poppe, B; Chofor, N

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure depth dose curves and dose effects near high-Z interfaces with radiochromic EBT-2 films reaching a spatial resolution superior to conventional methods with no quality losses. The setup is made of two 12cm stacks of RW3, fixing an EBT2 film in a vertical position. To measure a depth dose curve, the setup was irradiated with a 15MV photon beam (Siemens Primus). Since the film is positioned parallel to the beam propagation, the depth dose curve is measured with only one film per depth. Additionally, a dental gold alloy probe was inserted in the RW3 stack at 6cm depth and the dose enhancement in front of the probe was measured with the method described above. Hereby, the bottom edge of the film touches the probe's surface.The irradiated films were digitized with a resolution of 72dpi using an Epson 10000XL flatbed scanner with a transparency unit and alignment frames. With this setup, the spatial resolution is only limited by the scanning resolution. In order to verify the new measurement method, comparisons of the measured depth dose curves with the conventional method of placing the film orthogonal to the beam propagation showed deviations of lesser than 3%.The comparison of the dental gold measurements with Monte Carlo simulations shows a systematic lower measured dose which is still within 5% consistency. However attention has to be paid in the experimental setup and film preparation. The introduced method shows significant advantages to conventional orthogonal EBT2 film positioning. It shows a very high spatial resolution and the area of interest is only limited by the film size. The method will be used in further studies, to investigate dose profiles and dose effects near interfaces and in inhomogeneities. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  3. Intracranial plaque enhancement in patients with cerebrovascular events on high-spatial-resolution MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Ye; Zeiler, Steven R; Mirbagheri, Saeedeh; Leigh, Richard; Urrutia, Victor; Wityk, Robert; Wasserman, Bruce A

    2014-05-01

    To characterize intracranial plaque inflammation in vivo by using three-dimensional (3D) high-spatial-resolution contrast material-enhanced black-blood (BB) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and to investigate the relationship between intracranial plaque inflammation and cerebrovascular ischemic events. The study was approved by the institutional review board and was HIPAA compliant. Twenty-seven patients (19 men; mean age, 56.8 years ± 12.4 [standard deviation]) with cerebrovascular ischemic events (acute stroke, n = 20; subacute stroke, n = 2; chronic stroke, n = 3; transient ischemic attack, n = 2) underwent 3D time-of-flight MR angiography and contrast-enhanced BB 3-T MR imaging for intracranial atherosclerotic disease. Each identified plaque was classified as either culprit (the only or most stenotic lesion upstream from a stroke), probably culprit (not the most stenotic lesion upstream from a stroke), or nonculprit (not within the vascular territory of a stroke). Plaque contrast enhancement was categorized on BB MR images (grade 0, enhancement less than or equal to that of normal arterial walls seen elsewhere; grade 1, enhancement greater than grade 0 but less than that of the pituitary infundibulum; grade 2, enhancement greater than or equal to that of the pituitary infundibulum), and degree of contrast enhancement was calculated. Associations of the likelihood of being a culprit lesion with both plaque contrast enhancement and plaque thickness were estimated with ordinal logistic regression. Seventy-eight plaques were identified in 20 patients with acute stroke (21 [27%] culprit, 12 [15%] probably culprit, and 45 [58%] nonculprit plaques). In these patients, grade 2 contrast enhancement was associated with culprit plaques (odds ratio 34.6; 95% confidence interval: 4.5, 266.5 compared with grade 0) when adjusted for plaque thickness. Grade 0 was observed in only nonculprit plaques. Culprit plaques had a higher degree of contrast enhancement than did

  4. Compressed sensing cine imaging with high spatial or high temporal resolution for analysis of left ventricular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Juliane; Nensa, Felix; Schemuth, Haemi P; Maderwald, Stefan; Gratz, Marcel; Quick, Harald H; Schlosser, Thomas; Nassenstein, Kai

    2016-08-01

    To assess two compressed sensing cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences with high spatial or high temporal resolution in comparison to a reference steady-state free precession cine (SSFP) sequence for reliable quantification of left ventricular (LV) volumes. LV short axis stacks of two compressed sensing breath-hold cine sequences with high spatial resolution (SPARSE-SENSE HS: temporal resolution: 40 msec, in-plane resolution: 1.0 × 1.0 mm(2) ) and high temporal resolution (SPARSE-SENSE HT: temporal resolution: 11 msec, in-plane resolution: 1.7 × 1.7 mm(2) ) and of a reference cine SSFP sequence (standard SSFP: temporal resolution: 40 msec, in-plane resolution: 1.7 × 1.7 mm(2) ) were acquired in 16 healthy volunteers on a 1.5T MR system. LV parameters were analyzed semiautomatically twice by one reader and once by a second reader. The volumetric agreement between sequences was analyzed using paired t-test, Bland-Altman plots, and Passing-Bablock regression. Small differences were observed between standard SSFP and SPARSE-SENSE HS for stroke volume (SV; -7 ± 11 ml; P = 0.024), ejection fraction (EF; -2 ± 3%; P = 0.019), and myocardial mass (9 ± 9 g; P = 0.001), but not for end-diastolic volume (EDV; P = 0.079) and end-systolic volume (ESV; P = 0.266). No significant differences were observed between standard SSFP and SPARSE-SENSE HT regarding EDV (P = 0.956), SV (P = 0.088), and EF (P = 0.103), but for ESV (3 ± 5 ml; P = 0.039) and myocardial mass (8 ± 10 ml; P = 0.007). Bland-Altman analysis showed good agreement between the sequences (maximum bias ≤ -8%). Two compressed sensing cine sequences, one with high spatial resolution and one with high temporal resolution, showed good agreement with standard SSFP for LV volume assessment. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:366-374. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. An Object-Based Image Analysis Approach for Detecting Penguin Guano in very High Spatial Resolution Satellite Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandi Witharana

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The logistical challenges of Antarctic field work and the increasing availability of very high resolution commercial imagery have driven an interest in more efficient search and classification of remotely sensed imagery. This exploratory study employed geographic object-based analysis (GEOBIA methods to classify guano stains, indicative of chinstrap and Adélie penguin breeding areas, from very high spatial resolution (VHSR satellite imagery and closely examined the transferability of knowledge-based GEOBIA rules across different study sites focusing on the same semantic class. We systematically gauged the segmentation quality, classification accuracy, and the reproducibility of fuzzy rules. A master ruleset was developed based on one study site and it was re-tasked “without adaptation” and “with adaptation” on candidate image scenes comprising guano stains. Our results suggest that object-based methods incorporating the spectral, textural, spatial, and contextual characteristics of guano are capable of successfully detecting guano stains. Reapplication of the master ruleset on candidate scenes without modifications produced inferior classification results, while adapted rules produced comparable or superior results compared to the reference image. This work provides a road map to an operational “image-to-assessment pipeline” that will enable Antarctic wildlife researchers to seamlessly integrate VHSR imagery into on-demand penguin population census.

  6. SCENE CLASSFICATION BASED ON THE SEMANTIC-FEATURE FUSION FULLY SPARSE TOPIC MODEL FOR HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION REMOTE SENSING IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Zhu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Topic modeling has been an increasingly mature method to bridge the semantic gap between the low-level features and high-level semantic information. However, with more and more high spatial resolution (HSR images to deal with, conventional probabilistic topic model (PTM usually presents the images with a dense semantic representation. This consumes more time and requires more storage space. In addition, due to the complex spectral and spatial information, a combination of multiple complementary features is proved to be an effective strategy to improve the performance for HSR image scene classification. But it should be noticed that how the distinct features are fused to fully describe the challenging HSR images, which is a critical factor for scene classification. In this paper, a semantic-feature fusion fully sparse topic model (SFF-FSTM is proposed for HSR imagery scene classification. In SFF-FSTM, three heterogeneous features – the mean and standard deviation based spectral feature, wavelet based texture feature, and dense scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT based structural feature are effectively fused at the latent semantic level. The combination of multiple semantic-feature fusion strategy and sparse based FSTM is able to provide adequate feature representations, and can achieve comparable performance with limited training samples. Experimental results on the UC Merced dataset and Google dataset of SIRI-WHU demonstrate that the proposed method can improve the performance of scene classification compared with other scene classification methods for HSR imagery.

  7. Scene Classfication Based on the Semantic-Feature Fusion Fully Sparse Topic Model for High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qiqi; Zhong, Yanfei; Zhang, Liangpei

    2016-06-01

    Topic modeling has been an increasingly mature method to bridge the semantic gap between the low-level features and high-level semantic information. However, with more and more high spatial resolution (HSR) images to deal with, conventional probabilistic topic model (PTM) usually presents the images with a dense semantic representation. This consumes more time and requires more storage space. In addition, due to the complex spectral and spatial information, a combination of multiple complementary features is proved to be an effective strategy to improve the performance for HSR image scene classification. But it should be noticed that how the distinct features are fused to fully describe the challenging HSR images, which is a critical factor for scene classification. In this paper, a semantic-feature fusion fully sparse topic model (SFF-FSTM) is proposed for HSR imagery scene classification. In SFF-FSTM, three heterogeneous features - the mean and standard deviation based spectral feature, wavelet based texture feature, and dense scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) based structural feature are effectively fused at the latent semantic level. The combination of multiple semantic-feature fusion strategy and sparse based FSTM is able to provide adequate feature representations, and can achieve comparable performance with limited training samples. Experimental results on the UC Merced dataset and Google dataset of SIRI-WHU demonstrate that the proposed method can improve the performance of scene classification compared with other scene classification methods for HSR imagery.

  8. Ultrasound line-by-line scanning method of spatial-temporal active cavitation mapping for high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ting; Zhang, Siyuan; Fu, Quanyou; Xu, Zhian; Wan, Mingxi

    2014-01-01

    This paper presented an ultrasound line-by-line scanning method of spatial-temporal active cavitation mapping applicable in a liquid or liquid filled tissue cavities exposed by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Scattered signals from cavitation bubbles were obtained in a scan line immediately after one HIFU exposure, and then there was a waiting time of 2 s long enough to make the liquid back to the original state. As this pattern extended, an image was built up by sequentially measuring a series of such lines. The acquisition of the beamformed radiofrequency (RF) signals for a scan line was synchronized with HIFU exposure. The duration of HIFU exposure, as well as the delay of the interrogating pulse relative to the moment while HIFU was turned off, could vary from microseconds to seconds. The feasibility of this method was demonstrated in tap-water and a tap-water filled cavity in the tissue-mimicking gelatin-agar phantom as capable of observing temporal evolutions of cavitation bubble cloud with temporal resolution of several microseconds, lateral and axial resolution of 0.50 mm and 0.29 mm respectively. The dissolution process of cavitation bubble cloud and spatial distribution affected by cavitation previously generated were also investigated. Although the application is limited by the requirement for a gassy fluid (e.g. tap water, etc.) that allows replenishment of nuclei between HIFU exposures, the technique may be a useful tool in spatial-temporal cavitation mapping for HIFU with high precision and resolution, providing a reference for clinical therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Flood monitoring in a semi-arid environment using spatially high resolution radar and optical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Ralf; Schmidt, Jana; Diallo, Ousmane; Csaplovics, Elmar

    2009-05-01

    The geographic term "Niger Inland Delta" stands for a vast plain of approximately 40,000 km(2), which is situated in the western Sahel (Republic of Mali). The Inland Delta is affected by yearly inundation through the variable water levels of the Niger-Bani river system. Due to a good availability of (surface) water, the ecosystem at the Niger Inland Delta serves as resting place stop-over for many migrating birds and other wildlife species as well as economic base for farmers and pastoral people. To foster the sustainable usage of its natural resources and to protect this natural heritage, the entire Niger Inland Delta became RAMSAR site in 2004. This paper aims to test to which extent texture analysis can improve the quality of flood monitoring in a semi-arid environment using spatially high resolution ASAR imaging mode data. We found the Gray Level Dependence Method (GLDM) was most suitable proceeding for our data. Several statistical parameters were calculated via co-occurrence matrices and were used to classify the images in different gradation of soil moisture classes. In a second step we used additional information from spatially high resolution optical data (ASTER) to improve the separability of open water areas from moisture/vegetated areas.

  10. Matrix sublimation/recrystallization for imaging proteins by mass spectrometry at high spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junhai; Caprioli, Richard M

    2011-07-15

    We have employed matrix deposition by sublimation for protein image analysis on tissue sections using a hydration/recrystallization process that produces high-quality MALDI mass spectra and high-spatial-resolution ion images. We systematically investigated different washing protocols, the effect of tissue section thickness, the amount of sublimated matrix per unit area, and different recrystallization conditions. The results show that an organic solvent rinse followed by ethanol/water rinses substantially increased sensitivity for the detection of proteins. Both the thickness of the tissue section and the amount of sinapinic acid sublimated per unit area have optimal ranges for maximal protein signal intensity. Ion images of mouse and rat brain sections at 50, 20, and 10 μm spatial resolution are presented and are correlated with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained optical images. For targeted analysis, histology-directed imaging can be performed using this protocol where MS analysis and H&E staining are performed on the same section.

  11. Plant Growth under Natural Light Conditions Provides Highly Flexible Short-Term Acclimation Properties toward High Light Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Tobias; Paul, Suman; Melzer, Michael; Dörmann, Peter; Jahns, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Efficient acclimation to different growth light intensities is essential for plant fitness. So far, most studies on light acclimation have been conducted with plants grown under different constant light regimes, but more recent work indicated that acclimation to fluctuating light or field conditions may result in different physiological properties of plants. Thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana) was grown under three different constant light intensities (LL: 25 μmol photons m−2 s−1; NL: 100 μmol photons m−2 s−1; HL: 500 μmol photons m−2 s−1) and under natural fluctuating light (NatL) conditions. We performed a thorough characterization of the morphological, physiological, and biochemical properties focusing on photo-protective mechanisms. Our analyses corroborated the known properties of LL, NL, and HL plants. NatL plants, however, were found to combine characteristics of both LL and HL grown plants, leading to efficient and unique light utilization capacities. Strikingly, the high energy dissipation capacity of NatL plants correlated with increased dynamics of thylakoid membrane reorganization upon short-term acclimation to excess light. We conclude that the thylakoid membrane organization and particularly the light-dependent and reversible unstacking of grana membranes likely represent key factors that provide the basis for the high acclimation capacity of NatL grown plants to rapidly changing light intensities. PMID:28515734

  12. Block periodization of high-intensity aerobic intervals provides superior training effects in trained cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rønnestad, B R; Hansen, J; Ellefsen, S

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of two different methods of organizing endurance training in trained cyclists. One group of cyclists performed block periodization, wherein the first week constituted five sessions of high-intensity aerobic training (HIT), followed by 3 weeks of one weekly HIT session and focus on low-intensity training (LIT) (BP; n = 10, VO2max  = 62 ± 2 mL/kg/min). Another group of cyclists performed a more traditional organization, with 4 weeks of two weekly HIT sessions interspersed with LIT (TRAD; n = 9, VO2max  = 63 ± 2 mL/kg/min). Similar volumes of both HIT and LIT was performed in the two groups. While BP increased VO2max , peak power output (Wmax) and power output at 2 mmol/L [la(-)] by 4.6 ± 3.7%, 2.1 ± 2.8%, and 10 ± 12%, respectively (P training compared with TRAD training (ES = 1.34, ES = 0.85, and ES = 0.71, respectively). The present study suggests that block periodization of training provides superior adaptations to traditional organization during a 4-week endurance training period, despite similar training volume and intensity. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Highly Effective Light Beam Diffraction on Holographic PDLC Photonic Structure, Controllable by the Spatially Inhomogeneous Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semkin, A. O.; Sharangovich, S. N.

    In this work the highly effiective light beam diffraction on holographic photonic structure formed in polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLCs) is theoretically described. The ability to manage its diffraction characteristics by the spatially inhomogeneous electric field is also shown.

  14. Access to emergency hospital care provided by the public sector in sub-Saharan Africa in 2015: a geocoded inventory and spatial analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouma, Paul O; Maina, Joseph; Thuranira, Pamela N; Macharia, Peter M; Alegana, Victor A; English, Mike; Okiro, Emelda A; Snow, Robert W

    2018-01-25

    %) women of child bearing age are located more than 2-h travel time from the nearest hospital. Marked differences were observed within and between countries, ranging from less than 25% of the population within 2-h travel time of a public hospital in South Sudan to more than 90% in Nigeria, Kenya, Cape Verde, Swaziland, South Africa, Burundi, Comoros, São Tomé and Príncipe, and Zanzibar. Only 16 countries reached the international benchmark of more than 80% of their populations living within a 2-h travel time of the nearest hospital. Physical access to emergency hospital care provided by the public sector in Africa remains poor and varies substantially within and between countries. Innovative targeting of emergency care services is necessary to reduce these inequities. This study provides the first spatial census of public hospital services in Africa. Wellcome Trust and the UK Department for International Development. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY 4.0 license. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. OBJECT BASED IMAGE ANALYSIS COMBINING HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGERY AND LASER POINT CLOUDS FOR URBAN LAND COVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Zou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid developments of the sensor technology, high spatial resolution imagery and airborne Lidar point clouds can be captured nowadays, which make classification, extraction, evaluation and analysis of a broad range of object features available. High resolution imagery, Lidar dataset and parcel map can be widely used for classification as information carriers. Therefore, refinement of objects classification is made possible for the urban land cover. The paper presents an approach to object based image analysis (OBIA combing high spatial resolution imagery and airborne Lidar point clouds. The advanced workflow for urban land cover is designed with four components. Firstly, colour-infrared TrueOrtho photo and laser point clouds were pre-processed to derive the parcel map of water bodies and nDSM respectively. Secondly, image objects are created via multi-resolution image segmentation integrating scale parameter, the colour and shape properties with compactness criterion. Image can be subdivided into separate object regions. Thirdly, image objects classification is performed on the basis of segmentation and a rule set of knowledge decision tree. These objects imagery are classified into six classes such as water bodies, low vegetation/grass, tree, low building, high building and road. Finally, in order to assess the validity of the classification results for six classes, accuracy assessment is performed through comparing randomly distributed reference points of TrueOrtho imagery with the classification results, forming the confusion matrix and calculating overall accuracy and Kappa coefficient. The study area focuses on test site Vaihingen/Enz and a patch of test datasets comes from the benchmark of ISPRS WG III/4 test project. The classification results show higher overall accuracy for most types of urban land cover. Overall accuracy is 89.5% and Kappa coefficient equals to 0.865. The OBIA approach provides an effective and convenient way

  16. High-energy Gamma Rays from the Milky Way: Three-dimensional Spatial Models for the Cosmic-Ray and Radiation Field Densities in the Interstellar Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, T. A.; Moskalenko, I. V. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Jóhannesson, G., E-mail: tporter@stanford.edu [Science Institute, University of Iceland, IS-107 Reykjavik (Iceland)

    2017-09-01

    High-energy γ -rays of interstellar origin are produced by the interaction of cosmic-ray (CR) particles with the diffuse gas and radiation fields in the Galaxy. The main features of this emission are well understood and are reproduced by existing CR propagation models employing 2D galactocentric cylindrically symmetrical geometry. However, the high-quality data from instruments like the Fermi Large Area Telescope reveal significant deviations from the model predictions on few to tens of degrees scales, indicating the need to include the details of the Galactic spiral structure and thus requiring 3D spatial modeling. In this paper, the high-energy interstellar emissions from the Galaxy are calculated using the new release of the GALPROP code employing 3D spatial models for the CR source and interstellar radiation field (ISRF) densities. Three models for the spatial distribution of CR sources are used that are differentiated by their relative proportion of input luminosity attributed to the smooth disk or spiral arms. Two ISRF models are developed based on stellar and dust spatial density distributions taken from the literature that reproduce local near- to far-infrared observations. The interstellar emission models that include arms and bulges for the CR source and ISRF densities provide plausible physical interpretations for features found in the residual maps from high-energy γ -ray data analysis. The 3D models for CR and ISRF densities provide a more realistic basis that can be used for the interpretation of the nonthermal interstellar emissions from the Galaxy.

  17. Spatial, High-Accuracy, Positioning-Encoding Sensor (SHAPES) for large space system control applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclauchlan, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The Spatial, High-Accuracy, Position-Encoding Sensor is a controls sensor suitable for the determination of the static shape and vibrational motion of large space structures and similar systems and for the determination of position and velocity in rendezvous and docking. It uses a combination of electro-optical techniques to measure the three-dimensional coordinates distributed over the structure at reading rates high compared to the rates at which the coordinates are changing. The technical approach is that of measuring the distance to and the direction of points on the structure from a single sensor head. Many points can be measured simultaneously from a single head without significantly increasing the complexity of the system.

  18. Spatial Qualification Tests for Highly Selective Compact Micromachined Band Pass Planar Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghida Hajj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A highly selective planar band pass filter is proposed for satellite receivers to suppress intermodulation components. The 4-pole filter has a center frequency of 19.825 GHz with a bandwidth of 240 MHz. The measured quality factor is over 600 and the insertion losses are 4.1 dB. The micromachining technological process is used to fabricate this filter. A BCB (benzocyclobutene thin layer is used as an electrical and mechanical support for the filter. The compatibility of the BCB with the spatial constraints was tested. Various tests were accomplished for this purpose and the results of all these tests are presented in the paper. The tests showed a very small influence of the temperature variation and high temperature storage test and practically no influence of the radiation test on the circuit.

  19. Modelling of the education quality of a high schools in Sumenep Regency using spatial structural equation modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anekawati, Anik; Widjanarko Otok, Bambang; Purhadi; Sutikno

    2017-09-01

    In some cases, education research often involves the latent variables that have a causal relationship as well as a spatial effect. Therefore, it requires a statistical analysis technique called spatial structural equation modelling (spatial SEM). In this research, a spatial SEM was developed to model the quality of education in high schools in Sumenep Regency. This model was improved after the evaluation of an outer and inner model of the model scheme centroid, factor and path since some indicators were not valid. The path scheme model showed better results compared to the other schemes since all of its indicators were valid and its value of R-square increased. Furthermore, only the model of path scheme was tested for spatial effects. The result of the identification test of spatial effects on the inner model using a robust Lagrange multiplier test (using queen contiguity) showed that the education quality model leads to a spatial autoregressive model (SAR in SEM) with a significance level α of 5%, while the model of school infrastructure has no significant spatial effects. The improved model of SAR in SEM, the R2 value obtained was 47.33%, so that it is clear that data variation can be explained by the model of SAR in SEM for the quality of education in high schools.

  20. Predictors of early acceptance of free spectacles provided to junior high school students in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keay, Lisa; Zeng, Yangfa; Munoz, Beatriz; He, Mingguang; Friedman, David S

    2010-10-01

    To examine factors influencing adherence to spectacle wear and perceived value within a prospective 1-month trial of ready-made and custom spectacles in school-aged children with uncorrected refractive error in urban China. A total of 428 students aged 12 to 15 years with at least 1 diopter of uncorrected refractive error were given free spectacles and evaluated 1 month later at an unannounced visit. Demographic factors, vision, optical effects, and perceptions were modeled as predictors of observed use and perceived value using logistic regression adjusted for spectacle allocation. Of 415 students, 388 (93.5%) planned to use their spectacles, 227 (54.7%) valued their spectacles highly, 204 (49.2%) had their spectacles on hand, and 13 (3.0%) were lost to follow-up. Female students were 1.72 times (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-2.68), students from lower income households were 1.78 times (1.32-2.39), and those not concerned over appearance were 2.04 times (1.25-3.36) more likely to have spectacles on hand. Students with a pupil size of 4 mm or greater were 2.55 times (95% CI, 1.61-4.03) and students with spectacle vision worse than 20/20 were 2.06 times (1.20-3.49) more likely to have spectacles on hand. Self-report of high perceived value was 2.23 times (95% CI, 1.30-3.80) more likely with 20/20 spectacle vision, 1.63 times (1.06-2.52) more likely with base-in prismatic effects of 0.5 prism diopters or more, 3.52 times (2.03-6.13) more likely when students would not tolerate blur to avoid wearing spectacles, and 2.16 times (1.24-3.76) more likely with disbelief that spectacles would make vision worse. Spectacle type had no effect. Although most students planned to use their spectacles, only half were observed using them. Day-to-day use might increase if students were less concerned over appearance. Optical factors and beliefs surrounding spectacles are also predictive of acceptance. These findings provide further understanding of spectacle acceptance in

  1. A High-performance temporal-spatial discretization method for the parallel computing of river basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Fu, Xudong; Wang, Yuanjian; Wang, Guangqian

    2013-08-01

    The distributed basin model (DBM) has become one of the most effective tools in river basin studies. In order to overcome the efficiency bottleneck of DBM, an effective parallel-computing method, named temporal-spatial discretization method (TSDM), is proposed. In space, TSDM adopts the sub-basin partitioning manner to the river basin. Compared to the existing sub-basin-based parallel methods, more computable units can be supplied, organized and dispatched using TSDM. Through the characteristic of the temporal-spatial dual discretization, TSDM is capable of exploiting the river-basin parallelization degree to the maximum extent and obtaining higher computing performance. A mathematical formula assessing the maximum speedup ratio (MSR) of TSDM is provided as well. TSDM is independent of the implementation of any physical models and is preliminarily tested in the Lhasa River basin with 1-year rainfall-runoff process simulated. The MSR acquired in the existing traditional way is 7.98. Comparatively, the MSR using TSDM equals to 15.04 under the present limited computing resources, which appears to still have potential to keep increasing. The final results demonstrate the effectiveness and applicability of TSDM.

  2. Improving High-resolution Spatial Estimates of Precipitation in the Equatorial Americas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdin, A.; Rajagopalan, B.; Funk, C. C.

    2013-12-01

    Drought and flood management practices require accurate estimates of precipitation in space and time. However, data is sparse in regions with complicated terrain (such as the Equatorial Americas), often in valleys (where people farm), and of poor quality. Consequently, extreme precipitation events are poorly represented. Satellite-derived rainfall data is an attractive alternative in such regions and is being widely used, though it too suffers from problems such as underestimation of extreme events (due to its dependency on retrieval algorithms) and the indirect relationship between satellite radiation observations and precipitation intensities. Thus, it seems appropriate to blend satellite-derived rainfall data of extensive spatial coverage with rain gauge data in order to provide a more robust estimate of precipitation. To this end, in this research we offer three techniques to blend rain gauge data and the Climate Hazards group InfraRed Precipitation (CHIRP) satellite-derived precipitation estimate for Central America and Colombia. In the first two methods, the gauge data is assigned to the closest CHIRP grid point, where the error is defined as r = Yobs - Ysat. The spatial structure of r is then modeled using physiographic information (Easting, Northing, and Elevation) by two methods (i) a traditional Cokriging approach whose variogram is calculated in Euclidean space and (ii) a nonparametric method based on local polynomial functional estimation. The models are used to estimate r at all grid points, which is then added to the CHIRP, thus creating an improved satellite estimate. We demonstrate these methods by applying them to pentadal and monthly total precipitation fields during 2009. The models' predictive abilities and their ability to capture extremes are investigated. These blending methods significantly improve upon the satellite-derived estimates and are also competitive in their ability to capture extreme precipitation. The above methods assume

  3. Best period for high spatial resolution satellite images for the detection of marks of buried structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Kaimaris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Improvements in sensor technology in recent decades led to the creation of ground, air and space imaging systems, whose data can be used in archaeological studies. Greece is one of the lucky areas that are rich in archaeological heritage. The detection of prehistoric/historic undiscovered constructions on satellite images or aerial photos is a complex and complicated matter. These marks are not visible from the ground, they can, however, be traced on satellite or aerial images, because of the differences in tone and texture. These differences appear as crop, soil and shadow marks. Undoubtedly, the detection of buried structures requires a suitable spatial resolution image, taken under appropriate meteorological conditions and during the best period of the vegetation growing cycle. According to the pertinent literature, detecting covered memorials may be achieved either accidentally or, usually, after a systematic investigation based on historical narratives. The purpose of this study is to determine the factors that facilitate or hinder the detection of buried structures through high spatial resolution satellite imagery. In this study, pan sharpened images from the QuickBird-2 satellite were used, of a spatial resolution of 0.60-0.70 m. This study concerns the detection of marks of the ancient Via Egnatia, from the ancient Amphipolis to Philippi (Eastern Macedonia, Greece. We studied different types of vegetation in the region and their phenological cycle. Taking into account the vegetation phenological cycle of the study area as well as the meteorological data, four pan sharpened QuickBird-2 images of a spatial resolution of 0.60–0.70 m. were used, during four different seasons. By processing the four images, we can determine the one acquired during the most appropriate conditions for the detection of buried structures. The application of this methodology in the study area had positive results, and not only was the main purpose of this

  4. Large patch convolutional neural networks for the scene classification of high spatial resolution imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yanfei; Fei, Feng; Zhang, Liangpei

    2016-04-01

    The increase of the spatial resolution of remote-sensing sensors helps to capture the abundant details related to the semantics of surface objects. However, it is difficult for the popular object-oriented classification approaches to acquire higher level semantics from the high spatial resolution remote-sensing (HSR-RS) images, which is often referred to as the "semantic gap." Instead of designing sophisticated operators, convolutional neural networks (CNNs), a typical deep learning method, can automatically discover intrinsic feature descriptors from a large number of input images to bridge the semantic gap. Due to the small data volume of the available HSR-RS scene datasets, which is far away from that of the natural scene datasets, there have been few reports of CNN approaches for HSR-RS image scene classifications. We propose a practical CNN architecture for HSR-RS scene classification, named the large patch convolutional neural network (LPCNN). The large patch sampling is used to generate hundreds of possible scene patches for the feature learning, and a global average pooling layer is used to replace the fully connected network as the classifier, which can greatly reduce the total parameters. The experiments confirm that the proposed LPCNN can learn effective local features to form an effective representation for different land-use scenes, and can achieve a performance that is comparable to the state-of-the-art on public HSR-RS scene datasets.

  5. A microreactor array for spatially resolved measurement of catalytic activity for high-throughput catalysis science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondratyuk, Petro; Gumuslu, Gamze; Shukla, Shantanu; Miller, James B; Morreale, Bryan D; Gellman, Andrew J

    2013-04-01

    We describe a 100 channel microreactor array capable of spatially resolved measurement of catalytic activity across the surface of a flat substrate. When used in conjunction with a composition spread alloy film (CSAF, e.g. Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y}) across which component concentrations vary smoothly, such measurements permit high-throughput analysis of catalytic activity and selectivity as a function of catalyst composition. In the reported implementation, the system achieves spatial resolution of 1 mm{sup 2} over a 10×10 mm{sup 2} area. During operation, the reactant gases are delivered at constant flow rate to 100 points of differing composition on the CSAF surface by means of a 100-channel microfluidic device. After coming into contact with the CSAF catalyst surface, the product gas mixture from each of the 100 points is withdrawn separately through a set of 100 isolated channels for analysis using a mass spectrometer. We demonstrate the operation of the device on a Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y} CSAF catalyzing the H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} exchange reaction at 333 K. In essentially a single experiment, we measured the catalytic activity over a broad swathe of concentrations from the ternary composition space of the Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y} alloy.

  6. Application of spatially resolved high resolution crystal spectrometry to inertial confinement fusion plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K W; Bitter, M; Delgado-Aparacio, L; Pablant, N A; Beiersdorfer, P; Schneider, M; Widmann, K; Sanchez del Rio, M; Zhang, L

    2012-10-01

    High resolution (λ∕Δλ ∼ 10 000) 1D imaging x-ray spectroscopy using a spherically bent crystal and a 2D hybrid pixel array detector is used world wide for Doppler measurements of ion-temperature and plasma flow-velocity profiles in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas. Meter sized plasmas are diagnosed with cm spatial resolution and 10 ms time resolution. This concept can also be used as a diagnostic of small sources, such as inertial confinement fusion plasmas and targets on x-ray light source beam lines, with spatial resolution of micrometers, as demonstrated by laboratory experiments using a 250-μm (55)Fe source, and by ray-tracing calculations. Throughput calculations agree with measurements, and predict detector counts in the range 10(-8)-10(-6) times source x-rays, depending on crystal reflectivity and spectrometer geometry. Results of the lab demonstrations, application of the technique to the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and predictions of performance on NIF will be presented.

  7. Factors Influencing the Spatial Variation of Microplastics on High-Tidal Coastal Beaches in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In-Sung; Chae, Doo-Hyeon; Kim, Seung-Kyu; Choi, SooBong; Woo, Seung-Bum

    2015-10-01

    The presence and distribution characteristics of microplastics become a big issue due to the adverse effects on marine organisms caused by not only microplastics but any incorporated and/or adsorbed pollutants. Distribution of microplastics (50- to 5000-μm size) was determined for three sandy beaches on an isolated island in a high-tidal costal region to elucidate spatial distributions in relation to beach locations. The abundances of microplastics (n = 21) measured were 56-285,673 (46,334 ± 71,291) particles/m(2) corresponding to the highest level globally. Out of observed polymer types, expanded polystyrene was overwhelmingly dominant. Although lying toward the estuary of the largest river in the country, the north-side beach contained a 100-fold lower abundance than two south-side beaches that faced southerly wind and currents that were prevalent throughout the study season. In addition, distinct differences between the beaches on either side were also present in terms of size distribution and spatial homogeneity of microplastics on the same beach. Winds and currents are therefore considered to be the driving forces in the distribution of microplastics.

  8. Derivation of high spatial resolution albedo from UAV digital imagery: application over the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Jonathan C.; Hubbard, Alun; Box, Jason E.; Brough, Stephen; Cameron, Karen; Cook, Joseph M.; Cooper, Matthew; Doyle, Samuel H.; Edwards, Arwyn; Holt, Tom; Irvine-Fynn, Tristram; Jones, Christine; Pitcher, Lincoln H.; Rennermalm, Asa K.; Smith, Laurence C.; Stibal, Marek; Snooke, Neal

    2017-05-01

    Measurements of albedo are a prerequisite for modelling surface melt across the Earth's cryosphere, yet available satellite products are limited in spatial and/or temporal resolution. Here, we present a practical methodology to obtain centimetre resolution albedo products with accuracies of 5% using consumer-grade digital camera and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technologies. Our method comprises a workflow for processing, correcting and calibrating raw digital images using a white reference target, and upward and downward shortwave radiation measurements from broadband silicon pyranometers. We demonstrate the method with a set of UAV sorties over the western, K-sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet. The resulting albedo product, UAV10A1, covers 280 km2, at a resolution of 20 cm per pixel and has a root-mean-square difference of 3.7% compared to MOD10A1 and 4.9% compared to ground-based broadband pyranometer measurements. By continuously measuring downward solar irradiance, the technique overcomes previous limitations due to variable illumination conditions during and between surveys over glaciated terrain. The current miniaturization of multispectral sensors and incorporation of upward facing radiation sensors on UAV packages means that this technique will likely become increasingly attractive in field studies and used in a wide range of applications for high temporal and spatial resolution surface mapping of debris, dust, cryoconite and bioalbedo and for directly constraining surface energy balance models.

  9. Correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy with high spatial precision and improved sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schorb, Martin [Structural and Computational Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Briggs, John A.G., E-mail: john.briggs@embl.de [Structural and Computational Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-08-01

    Performing fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy on the same sample allows fluorescent signals to be used to identify and locate features of interest for subsequent imaging by electron microscopy. To carry out such correlative microscopy on vitrified samples appropriate for structural cryo-electron microscopy it is necessary to perform fluorescence microscopy at liquid-nitrogen temperatures. Here we describe an adaptation of a cryo-light microscopy stage to permit use of high-numerical aperture objectives. This allows high-sensitivity and high-resolution fluorescence microscopy of vitrified samples. We describe and apply a correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy workflow together with a fiducial bead-based image correlation procedure. This procedure allows us to locate fluorescent bacteriophages in cryo-electron microscopy images with an accuracy on the order of 50 nm, based on their fluorescent signal. It will allow the user to precisely and unambiguously identify and locate objects and events for subsequent high-resolution structural study, based on fluorescent signals. - Highlights: • Workflow for correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy. • Cryo-fluorescence microscopy setup incorporating a high numerical aperture objective. • Fluorescent signals located in cryo-electron micrographs with 50 nm spatial precision.

  10. Spatial heterogeneity as a genetic mixing mechanism in highly philopatric colonial seabirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofari, Robin; Trucchi, Emiliano; Whittington, Jason D; Vigetta, Stéphanie; Gachot-Neveu, Hélène; Stenseth, Nils Christian; Le Maho, Yvon; Le Bohec, Céline

    2015-01-01

    How genetic diversity is maintained in philopatric colonial systems remains unclear, and understanding the dynamic balance of philopatry and dispersal at all spatial scales is essential to the study of the evolution of coloniality. In the King penguin, Aptenodytes patagonicus, return rates of post-fledging chicks to their natal sub-colony are remarkably high. Empirical studies have shown that adults return year after year to their previous breeding territories within a radius of a few meters. Yet, little reliable data are available on intra- and inter-colonial dispersal in this species. Here, we present the first fine-scale study of the genetic structure in a king penguin colony in the Crozet Archipelago. Samples were collected from individual chicks and analysed at 8 microsatellite loci. Precise geolocation data of hatching sites and selective pressures associated with habitat features were recorded for all sampling locations. We found that despite strong natal and breeding site fidelity, king penguins retain a high degree of panmixia and genetic diversity. Yet, genetic structure appears markedly heterogeneous across the colony, with higher-than-expected inbreeding levels, and local inbreeding and relatedness hotspots that overlap predicted higher-quality nesting locations. This points towards heterogeneous population structure at the sub-colony level, in which fine-scale environmental features drive local philopatric behaviour, while lower-quality patches may act as genetic mixing mechanisms at the colony level. These findings show how a lack of global genetic structuring can emerge from small-scale heterogeneity in ecological parameters, as opposed to the classical model of homogeneous dispersal. Our results also emphasize the importance of sampling design for estimation of population parameters in colonial seabirds, as at high spatial resolution, basic genetic features are shown to be location-dependent. Finally, this study stresses the importance of

  11. Spatial heterogeneity as a genetic mixing mechanism in highly philopatric colonial seabirds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Cristofari

    Full Text Available How genetic diversity is maintained in philopatric colonial systems remains unclear, and understanding the dynamic balance of philopatry and dispersal at all spatial scales is essential to the study of the evolution of coloniality. In the King penguin, Aptenodytes patagonicus, return rates of post-fledging chicks to their natal sub-colony are remarkably high. Empirical studies have shown that adults return year after year to their previous breeding territories within a radius of a few meters. Yet, little reliable data are available on intra- and inter-colonial dispersal in this species. Here, we present the first fine-scale study of the genetic structure in a king penguin colony in the Crozet Archipelago. Samples were collected from individual chicks and analysed at 8 microsatellite loci. Precise geolocation data of hatching sites and selective pressures associated with habitat features were recorded for all sampling locations. We found that despite strong natal and breeding site fidelity, king penguins retain a high degree of panmixia and genetic diversity. Yet, genetic structure appears markedly heterogeneous across the colony, with higher-than-expected inbreeding levels, and local inbreeding and relatedness hotspots that overlap predicted higher-quality nesting locations. This points towards heterogeneous population structure at the sub-colony level, in which fine-scale environmental features drive local philopatric behaviour, while lower-quality patches may act as genetic mixing mechanisms at the colony level. These findings show how a lack of global genetic structuring can emerge from small-scale heterogeneity in ecological parameters, as opposed to the classical model of homogeneous dispersal. Our results also emphasize the importance of sampling design for estimation of population parameters in colonial seabirds, as at high spatial resolution, basic genetic features are shown to be location-dependent. Finally, this study stresses the

  12. Quantitative skin assessment using spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) in patients with or at high risk for pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yafi, Amr; Muakkassa, Fuad K; Pasupneti, Tejasvi; Fulton, Judy; Cuccia, David J; Mazhar, Amaan; Blasiole, Kimberly N; Mostow, Eliot N

    2017-11-01

    Pressure ulcers (PU) are a significant problem facing the health system in the United States. Here, we present preliminary case studies demonstrating feasibility of Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (SFDI) to assess skin status in high-risk populations and pre-existing wounds. SFDI is a wide-field non-contact optical imaging technology that uses structured light to obtain tissue optical properties and of tissue constituents. This study aims to determine the fit of SFDI for PU care and determine the next steps. Patients at risk for pressure ulcers were imaged using a near-infrared SFDI system. SFDI-derived images of tissue function (tissue hemoglobin, tissue oxygen saturation) and structure (tissue scattering) were then compared to each other as well as a blinded dermatologist's clinical impressions. Four case series were chosen to demonstrate the imaging capability of this technology. The first scenario demonstrates normal skin of three patients without skin breakdown with spatially uniform measures of tissue oxygen saturation, scattering, and blood volume. The second scenario demonstrates a stage II PU; the third case shows non-blanchable erythema of an unstageable PU; a fourth scenario is a clinically indistinguishable skin rash versus early stages of a PU. In all these cases, we observe spatial changes in tissue constituents (decrease in tissue oxygen saturation, increased blood pooling, decreased scattering). We have presented the first use of SFDI for pressure ulcer imaging and staging. This preliminary study demonstrates the feasibility of this optical technology to assess tissue oxygen saturation and blood volume status in a quantitative manner. With the proposed improvements in modeling and hardware, SFDI has potential to provide a means for pressure ulcer risk stratification, healing and staging. Lasers Surg. Med. 49:827-834, 2017 © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. High-resolution mapping and spatial variability of soil organic carbon storage of permafrost-affected soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewert, Matthias; Hugelius, Gustaf

    2017-04-01

    Permafrost-affected soils store large amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC). Mapping of this SOC provides a first order spatial input variable for research that relates carbon stored in permafrost regions to carbon cycle dynamics. High-resolution satellite imagery is becoming increasingly available even in circum-polar regions. The presented research highlights findings of high-resolution mapping efforts of SOC from five study areas in the northern circum-polar permafrost region. These study areas are located in Siberia (Kytalyk, Spasskaya Pad /Neleger, Lena delta), Northern Sweden (Abisko) and Northwestern Canada (Herschel Island). Our high spatial resolution analyses show how geomorphology has a strong influence on the distribution of SOC. This is organized at different spatial scales. Periglacial landforms and processes dictate local scale SOC distribution due to patterned ground. Such landforms are non-sorted circles and ice-wedge polygons of different age and scale. Palsas and peat plateaus are formed and can cover larger areas in Sub-Arctic environments. Study areas that have not been affected by Pleistocene glaciation feature ice-rich Yedoma sediments that dominate the local relief through thermokarst formation and create landscape scale macro environments that dictate the distribution of SOC. A general trend indicates higher SOC storage in Arctic tundra soils compared to forested Boreal or Sub-Arctic taiga soils. Yet, due to the shallower active layer depth in the Arctic, much of the SOC may be permanently frozen and thus not be available to ecosystem processes. Significantly more SOC is stored in soils compared to vegetation, indicating that vegetation growth and incorporation of the carbon into the plant phytomass alone will not be able to offset SOC released from permafrost. This contribution also addresses advances in thematic mapping methods and digital soil mapping of SOC in permafrost terrain. In particular machine-learning methods, such as support

  14. Relating spatial perspective taking to the perception of other’s affordances: Providing a foundation for predicting the future behavior of others.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah H Creem-Regehr

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding what another agent can see relates functionally to the understanding of what they can do. We propose that spatial perspective taking and perceiving other’s affordances, while two separate spatial processes, together share the common social function of predicting the behavior of others. Perceiving the action capabilities of others allows for a common understanding of how agents may act together. The ability to take another’s perspective focuses an understanding of action goals so that more precise understanding of intentions may result. This review presents an analysis of these complementary abilities, both in terms of the frames of reference and the proposed sensorimotor mechanisms involved. Together, we argue for the importance of reconsidering the role of basic spatial processes to explain more complex behaviors.

  15. Geo-Parcel Based Crop Identification by Integrating High Spatial-Temporal Resolution Imagery from Multi-Source Satellite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingpin Yang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Geo-parcel based crop identification plays an important role in precision agriculture. It meets the needs of refined farmland management. This study presents an improved identification procedure for geo-parcel based crop identification by combining fine-resolution images and multi-source medium-resolution images. GF-2 images with fine spatial resolution of 0.8 m provided agricultural farming plot boundaries, and GF-1 (16 m and Landsat 8 OLI data were used to transform the geo-parcel based enhanced vegetation index (EVI time-series. In this study, we propose a piecewise EVI time-series smoothing method to fit irregular time profiles, especially for crop rotation situations. Global EVI time-series were divided into several temporal segments, from which phenological metrics could be derived. This method was applied to Lixian, where crop rotation was the common practice of growing different types of crops, in the same plot, in sequenced seasons. After collection of phenological features and multi-temporal spectral information, Random Forest (RF was performed to classify crop types, and the overall accuracy was 93.27%. Moreover, an analysis of feature significance showed that phenological features were of greater importance for distinguishing agricultural land cover compared to temporal spectral information. The identification results indicated that the integration of high spatial-temporal resolution imagery is promising for geo-parcel based crop identification and that the newly proposed smoothing method is effective.

  16. High spatial dynamics-photoluminescence imaging reveals the metallurgy of the earliest lost-wax cast object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoury, M.; Mille, B.; Séverin-Fabiani, T.; Robbiola, L.; Réfrégiers, M.; Jarrige, J.-F.; Bertrand, L.

    2016-11-01

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy is a key method to monitor defects in semiconductors from nanophotonics to solar cell systems. Paradoxically, its great sensitivity to small variations of local environment becomes a handicap for heterogeneous systems, such as are encountered in environmental, medical, ancient materials sciences and engineering. Here we demonstrate that a novel full-field photoluminescence imaging approach allows accessing the spatial distribution of crystal defect fluctuations at the crystallite level across centimetre-wide fields of view. This capacity is illustrated in archaeology and material sciences. The coexistence of two hitherto indistinguishable non-stoichiometric cuprous oxide phases is revealed in a 6,000-year-old amulet from Mehrgarh (Baluchistan, Pakistan), identified as the oldest known artefact made by lost-wax casting and providing a better understanding of this fundamental invention. Low-concentration crystal defect fluctuations are readily mapped within ZnO nanowires. High spatial dynamics-photoluminescence imaging holds great promise for the characterization of bulk heterogeneous systems across multiple disciplines.

  17. High spatial dynamics-photoluminescence imaging reveals the metallurgy of the earliest lost-wax cast object.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoury, M; Mille, B; Séverin-Fabiani, T; Robbiola, L; Réfrégiers, M; Jarrige, J-F; Bertrand, L

    2016-11-15

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy is a key method to monitor defects in semiconductors from nanophotonics to solar cell systems. Paradoxically, its great sensitivity to small variations of local environment becomes a handicap for heterogeneous systems, such as are encountered in environmental, medical, ancient materials sciences and engineering. Here we demonstrate that a novel full-field photoluminescence imaging approach allows accessing the spatial distribution of crystal defect fluctuations at the crystallite level across centimetre-wide fields of view. This capacity is illustrated in archaeology and material sciences. The coexistence of two hitherto indistinguishable non-stoichiometric cuprous oxide phases is revealed in a 6,000-year-old amulet from Mehrgarh (Baluchistan, Pakistan), identified as the oldest known artefact made by lost-wax casting and providing a better understanding of this fundamental invention. Low-concentration crystal defect fluctuations are readily mapped within ZnO nanowires. High spatial dynamics-photoluminescence imaging holds great promise for the characterization of bulk heterogeneous systems across multiple disciplines.

  18. Very high resolution Earth observation features for monitoring plant and animal community structure across multiple spatial scales in protected areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairota, Paola; Cafarelli, Barbara; Labadessa, Rocco; Lovergine, Francesco; Tarantino, Cristina; Lucas, Richard M.; Nagendra, Harini; Didham, Raphael K.

    2015-05-01

    Monitoring the status and future trends in biodiversity can be prohibitively expensive using ground-based surveys. Consequently, significant effort is being invested in the use of satellite remote sensing to represent aspects of the proximate mechanisms (e.g., resource availability) that can be related to biodiversity surrogates (BS) such as species community descriptors. We explored the potential of very high resolution (VHR) satellite Earth observation (EO) features as proxies for habitat structural attributes that influence spatial variation in habitat quality and biodiversity change. In a semi-natural grassland mosaic of conservation concern in southern Italy, we employed a hierarchical nested sampling strategy to collect field and VHR-EO data across three spatial extent levels (landscape, patch and plot). Species incidence and abundance data were collected at the plot level for plant, insect and bird functional groups. Spectral and textural VHR-EO image features were derived from a Worldview-2 image. Three window sizes (grains) were tested for analysis and computation of textural features, guided by the perception limits of different organisms. The modelled relationships between VHR-EO features and BS responses differed across scales, suggesting that landscape, patch and plot levels are respectively most appropriate when dealing with birds, plants and insects. This research demonstrates the potential of VHR-EO for biodiversity mapping and habitat modelling, and highlights the importance of identifying the appropriate scale of analysis for specific taxonomic groups of interest. Further, textural features are important in the modelling of functional group-specific indices which represent BS in high conservation value habitat types, and provide a more direct link to species interaction networks and ecosystem functioning, than provided by traditional taxonomic diversity indices.

  19. Spatiotemporal neurodynamics underlying internally and externally driven temporal prediction: a high spatial resolution ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mento, Giovanni; Tarantino, Vincenza; Vallesi, Antonino; Bisiacchi, Patrizia Silvia

    2015-03-01

    Temporal prediction (TP) is a flexible and dynamic cognitive ability. Depending on the internal or external nature of information exploited to generate TP, distinct cognitive and brain mechanisms are engaged with the same final goal of reducing uncertainty about the future. In this study, we investigated the specific brain mechanisms involved in internally and externally driven TP. To this end, we employed an experimental paradigm purposely designed to elicit and compare externally and internally driven TP and a combined approach based on the application of a distributed source reconstruction modeling on a high spatial resolution electrophysiological data array. Specific spatiotemporal ERP signatures were identified, with significant modulation of contingent negative variation and frontal late sustained positivity in external and internal TP contexts, respectively. These different electrophysiological patterns were supported by the engagement of distinct neural networks, including a left sensorimotor and a prefrontal circuit for externally and internally driven TP, respectively.

  20. Miniaturization of high spectral spatial resolution hyperspectral imagers on unmanned aerial systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Samuel L.; Clemens, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Traditional airborne environmental monitoring has frequently deployed hyperspectral imaging as a leading tool for characterizing and analyzing a scene's critical spectrum-based signatures for applications in agriculture genomics and crop health, vegetation and mineral monitoring, and hazardous material detection. As the acceptance of hyperspectral evaluation grows in the airborne community, there has been a dramatic trend in moving the technology from use on midsize aircraft to Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS). The use of UAS accomplishes a number of goals including the reduction in cost to run multiple seasonal evaluations over smaller but highly valuable land-areas, the ability to use frequent data collections to make rapid decisions on land management, and the improvement of spatial resolution by flying at lower altitudes (GIS datasets.

  1. Approximate degeneracy of J =1 spatial correlators in high temperature QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrhofer, C.; Aoki, Y.; Cossu, G.; Fukaya, H.; Glozman, L. Ya.; Hashimoto, S.; Lang, C. B.; Prelovsek, S.

    2017-11-01

    We study spatial isovector meson correlators in Nf=2 QCD with dynamical domain-wall fermions on 3 23×8 lattices at temperatures T =220 - 380 MeV . We measure the correlators of spin-one (J =1 ) operators including vector, axial-vector, tensor and axial-tensor. Restoration of chiral U (1 )A and S U (2 )L×S U (2 )R symmetries of QCD implies degeneracies in vector-axial-vector (S U (2 )L×S U (2 )R) and tensor-axial-tensor (U (1 )A) pairs, which are indeed observed at temperatures above Tc. Moreover, we observe an approximate degeneracy of all J =1 correlators with increasing temperature. This approximate degeneracy suggests emergent S U (2 )CS and S U (4 ) symmetries at high temperatures, that mix left- and right-handed quarks.

  2. High-resolution mapping of the triangle of Koch: Spatial heterogeneity of fast pathway atrionodal connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Kelvin; Upadhyay, Gaurav; Lee, Elliot; Aziz, Zaid; Beaser, Andrew; Ozcan, Cevher; Broman, Michael; Nayak, Hemal; Tung, Roderick

    2017-11-24

    Dedicated mapping studies of the triangle of Koch to characterize retrograde fast pathway activation have not been previously performed using high-resolution, 3-dimensional, multielectrode mapping technology. To delineate the activation pattern and spatial distribution of the retrograde fast pathway within the triangle of Koch during typical atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) and right ventricular pacing in a consecutive series of patients using the Rhythmia mapping system (Boston Scientific, Natick, MA). A total of 18 patients with symptomatic typical AVNRT referred for ablation underwent ultrahigh-density mapping of atrial activation with minielectrode basket configuration during tachycardia. The earliest atrial activation was mapped using automated annotation, with manual overreading by 2 independent observers. The triangle of Koch was classified into 3 anatomic regions: anteroseptal (His), midseptal, and posteroseptal (coronary sinus roof). Thirteen patients underwent mapping of atrial activation during ventricular pacing. A median of 422 mapping points (interquartile range 258-896 points) was acquired within the triangle of Koch during tachycardia. The most common site of earliest atrial activation within the triangle of Koch was anterior in 67% of patients (n = 12). Midseptal early atrial activation was seen in 17% (n = 3), and posteroseptal activation was observed in 11% (n = 2). One patient exhibited broad simultaneous activation of the entire triangle of Koch. Slow pathway potentials were not identified. With high-resolution multielectrode mapping, atrial activation during typical AVNRT exhibited anatomic variability and spatially heterogeneous activation within the triangle of Koch. These findings highlight the limitations of an anatomically based classification of atrioventricular nodal retrograde pathways. Copyright © 2017 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Numerical modeling of permafrost dynamics in Alaska using a high spatial resolution dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Jafarov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Climate projections for the 21st century indicate that there could be a pronounced warming and permafrost degradation in the Arctic and sub-Arctic regions. Climate warming is likely to cause permafrost thawing with subsequent effects on surface albedo, hydrology, soil organic matter storage and greenhouse gas emissions.

    To assess possible changes in the permafrost thermal state and active layer thickness, we implemented the GIPL2-MPI transient numerical model for the entire Alaska permafrost domain. The model input parameters are spatial datasets of mean monthly air temperature and precipitation, prescribed thermal properties of the multilayered soil column, and water content that are specific for each soil class and geographical location. As a climate forcing, we used the composite of five IPCC Global Circulation Models that has been downscaled to 2 by 2 km spatial resolution by Scenarios Network for Alaska Planning (SNAP group.

    In this paper, we present the modeling results based on input of a five-model composite with A1B carbon emission scenario. The model has been calibrated according to the annual borehole temperature measurements for the State of Alaska. We also performed more detailed calibration for fifteen shallow borehole stations where high quality data are available on daily basis. To validate the model performance, we compared simulated active layer thicknesses with observed data from Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM stations. The calibrated model was used to address possible ground temperature changes for the 21st century. The model simulation results show widespread permafrost degradation in Alaska could begin between 2040–2099 within the vast area southward from the Brooks Range, except for the high altitude regions of the Alaska Range and Wrangell Mountains.

  4. Spatially and chemically resolved source apportionment analysis: Case study of high particulate matter event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeong-Uk; Bae, Changhan; Kim, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Eunhye; Kim, Soontae

    2017-08-01

    This article presents the results of a detailed source apportionment study of the high particulate matter (PM) event in the Seoul Metropolitan Area (SMA), South Korea, during late February 2014. Using the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions with its Particulate Source Apportionment Technology (CAMx-PSAT), we defined 10 source regions, including five in China, for spatially and chemically resolved analyses. During the event, the spatially averaged PM10 concentration at all PM10 monitors in the SMA was 129 μg/m3, while the PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations at the BulGwang Supersite were 143 μg/m3 and 123 μg/m3, respectively. CAMx-PSAT showed reasonably good PM model performance in both China and the SMA. For February 23-27, CAMx-PSAT estimated that Chinese contributions to the SMA PM10 and PM2.5 were 84.3 μg/m3 and 80.0 μg/m3, respectively, or 64% and 70% of the respective totals, while South Korea's respective domestic contributions were 36.5 μg/m3 and 23.3 μg/m3. We observed that the spatiotemporal pattern of PM constituent concentrations and contributions did not necessarily follow that of total PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations. For example, Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei produced high nitrate concentrations, but the two most-contributing regions to PM in the SMA were the Near Beijing area and South Korea. In addition, we noticed that the relative contributions from each region changed over time. We found that most ammonium mass that neutralized Chinese sulfate mass in the SMA came from South Korean sources, indicating that secondary inorganic aerosol in the SMA, especially ammonium sulfates, during this event resulted from different major precursors originating from different regions.

  5. Training Physicians to Provide High-Value, Cost-Conscious Care A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stammen, L.A.; Stalmeijer, R.E.; Paternotte, E.; Pool, A.O.; Driessen, E.W.; Scheele, F.; Stassen, L.P.S.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Increasing health care expenditures are taxing the sustainability of the health care system. Physicians should be prepared to deliver high-value, cost-conscious care. Objective To understand the circumstances in which the delivery of high-value, cost-conscious care is learned, with a goal

  6. Practicing provider-initiated HIV testing in high prevalence settings: consent concerns and missed preventive opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Shayo Elizabeth H; Blystad Astrid; Njeru Mercy K; Nyamongo Isaac K; Fylkesnes Knut

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Counselling is considered a prerequisite for the proper handling of testing and for ensuring effective HIV preventive efforts. HIV testing services have recently been scaled up substantially with a particular focus on provider-initiated models. Increasing HIV test rates have been attributed to the rapid scale-up of the provider-initiated testing model, but there is limited documentation of experiences with this new service model. The aim of this study was to determine the ...

  7. Generating daily high spatial land surface temperatures by combining ASTER and MODIS land surface temperature products for environmental process monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingquan; Li, Hua; Huang, Wenjiang; Niu, Zheng; Wang, Changyao

    2015-08-01

    There is a shortage of daily high spatial land surface temperature (LST) data for use in high spatial and temporal resolution environmental process monitoring. To address this shortage, this work used the Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM), Enhanced Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (ESTARFM), and the Spatial and Temporal Data Fusion Approach (STDFA) to estimate high spatial and temporal resolution LST by combining Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) LST and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LST products. The actual ASTER LST products were used to evaluate the precision of the combined LST images using the correlation analysis method. This method was tested and validated in study areas located in Gansu Province, China. The results show that all the models can generate daily synthetic LST image with a high correlation coefficient (r) of 0.92 between the synthetic image and the actual ASTER LST observations. The ESTARFM has the best performance, followed by the STDFA and the STARFM. Those models had better performance in desert areas than in cropland. The STDFA had better noise immunity than the other two models.

  8. ELABORATION OF HIGH-VOLTAGE PULSE INSTALLATIONS AND PROVIDING THEIR OPERATION PROTECTIVE MEASURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Hashimov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents design engineering methods for the high-voltage pulse installations of technological purpose for disinfection of drinking water, sewage, and edible liquids by high field micro- and nanosecond pulsing exposure. Designing potentialities are considered of the principal elements of the high-voltage part and the discharge circuit of the installations towards assuring the best efficient on-load utilization of the source energy and safe operation of the high-voltage equipment. The study shows that for disinfection of drinking water and sewage it is expedient to apply microsecond pulse actions causing the electrohydraulic effect in aqueous media with associated complex of physical processes (ultraviolet emission, generation of ozone and atomic oxygen, mechanical compression waves, etc. having detrimental effect on life activity of the microorganisms. In case of disinfecting edible liquids it is recommended to use the nanosecond pulses capable of straight permeating the biological cell nucleus, inactivating it. Meanwhile, the nutritive and biological values of the foodstuffs are saved and their organoleptic properties are improved. It is noted that in elaboration process of high-frequency pulse installations special consideration should be given to issues of the operating personnel safety discipline and securing conditions for the entire installation uninterrupted performance. With this objective in view the necessary requirements should be fulfilled on shielding the high- and low-voltage installation parts against high-frequency electromagnetic emissions registered by special differential sensors. Simultaneously, the abatement measures should be applied on the high-voltage equipment operational noise level. The authors offer a technique for noise abatement to admissible levels (lower than 80 dB A by means of coating the inside surface with shielded enclosure of densely-packed abutting sheets of porous electro-acoustic insulating

  9. The Fisher Kernel Coding Framework for High Spatial Resolution Scene Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei Zhao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available High spatial resolution (HSR image scene classification is aimed at bridging the semantic gap between low-level features and high-level semantic concepts, which is a challenging task due to the complex distribution of ground objects in HSR images. Scene classification based on the bag-of-visual-words (BOVW model is one of the most successful ways to acquire the high-level semantic concepts. However, the BOVW model assigns local low-level features to their closest visual words in the “visual vocabulary” (the codebook obtained by k-means clustering, which discards too many useful details of the low-level features in HSR images. In this paper, a feature coding method under the Fisher kernel (FK coding framework is introduced to extend the BOVW model by characterizing the low-level features with a gradient vector instead of the count statistics in the BOVW model, which results in a significant decrease in the codebook size and an acceleration of the codebook learning process. By considering the differences in the distributions of the ground objects in different regions of the images, local FK (LFK is proposed for the HSR image scene classification method. The experimental results show that the proposed scene classification methods under the FK coding framework can greatly reduce the computational cost, and can obtain a better scene classification accuracy than the methods based on the traditional BOVW model.

  10. Spatial and temporal variability of bacterial communities in high alpine water spring sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Alfonso; Engel, Michael; Ciccazzo, Sonia; Daprà, Luca; Penna, Daniele; Comiti, Francesco; Zerbe, Stefan; Brusetti, Lorenzo

    2016-05-01

    Water springs are complex, fragile and taxa-rich environments, especially in highly dynamic ecosystems such as glacier forefields experiencing glacier retreat. Bacterial communities are important actors in alpine water body metabolism, and have shown both high seasonal and spatial variations. Seven springs from a high alpine valley (Matsch Valley, South Tyrol, Italy) were examined via a multidisciplinary approach using both hydrochemical and microbiological techniques. Amplified ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) and electric conductivity (EC) measurements, as well as elemental composition and water stable isotopic analyses, were performed. Our target was to elucidate whether and how bacterial community structure is influenced by water chemistry, and to determine the origin and extent of variation in space and time. There existed variations in both space and time for all variables measured. Diversity values more markedly differed at the beginning of summer and then at the end; the extent of variation in space was prevalent over the time scale. Bacterial community structural variation responded to hydrochemical parameter changes; moreover, the stability of the hydrochemical parameters played an important role in shaping distinctive bacterial communities. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Access to high-volume surgeons and the opportunity cost of performing radical prostatectomy by low-volume providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzi, Afsaneh; Klein, Eric A; Daneshmand, Siamak; Gill, Inderbir; Quinn, David I; Sadeghi, Sarmad

    2017-07-01

    Evidence suggests that redirecting surgeries to high-volume providers may be associated with better outcomes and significant societal savings. Whether such referrals are feasible remains unanswered. Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data, SEER 18, and US Incidence data were used to determine the geographic distribution and radical prostatectomy volume for providers. Access was defined as availability of a high-volume provider within driving distance of 100 miles. The opportunity cost was defined as the value of benefits achievable by performing the surgery by a high-volume provider that was forgone by not making a referral. The savings per referral were derived from a published Markov model for radical prostatectomy. A total of 14% of providers performed>27% of the radical prostatectomies with>30 cases per year and were designated high-volume providers. Providers with below-median volume (≤16 prostatectomies per year) performed>32% of radical prostatectomies. At least 47% of these were within a 100-mile driving distance (median = 22 miles), and therefore had access to a high-volume provider (>30 prostatectomies per year). This translated into a discounted savings of more than $24 million per year, representing the opportunity cost of not making a referral. The average volume for high- and low-volume providers was 55 and 13, respectively, resulting in an annual experience gap of 43 and a cumulative gap of 125 surgeries over 3 years. In 2014, the number of surgeons performing radical prostatectomy decreased by 5% while the number of high- and low-volume providers decreased by 25% and 11% showing a faster decline in the number of high-volume providers compared with low-volume surgeons. About half of prostatectomies performed by surgeons with below-median annual volume were within a 100-mile driving distance (median of 22 miles) of a high-volume surgeon. Such a referral may result in minimal additional costs and substantially improved outcomes. Copyright

  12. Spatial representativeness of ground-based solar radiation measurements estimated from high-resolution Meteosat data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyta Hakuba, Maria; Folini, Doris; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Wild, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The validation of gridded surface solar radiation (SSR) data often relies on the comparison with ground-based in-situ measurements. This poses the question on how representative a point measurement is for a larger-scale surrounding. We use the high-resolution (0.03° ) SIS MVIRI data from the Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) to study the spatial sub-grid variability in all-sky surface solar radiation (SSR) over Europe, Africa, and parts of South America as covered by the Meteosat disk. This is done for the CERES EBAF 1° standard grid and two equal-angle grids of 0.25° and 3° resolution. Furthermore, we quantify the spatial representativeness of numerous surface sites from the BSRN and the GEBA for their site-centered larger surroundings varying in size from 0.25° to 3°, as well as with respect to the given standard grids. These analyses are done on a climatological annual and monthly mean basis over the period 2001-2005. The annual mean sub-grid variability (mean absolute deviation) in the 1° standard grid over European land is on average 1.6% (2.4 Wm¯²), with a maximum of up to 10% in Northern Spain (Hakuba et al. 2013). As expected, highest sub-grid variability is found in mountainous and coastal regions. The annual mean representation error of point values at 143 surface sites in Europe with respect to their 1° surrounding and the 1° standard grid is on average 2% (3 Wm¯² ). For larger surroundings of 3°, the representation error increases to 3% (4.8 Wm¯²), which is of similar order as the measurement accuracy of in-situ observations. Most of the sites can thus be considered as representative for their larger surroundings of up to 3°, which holds also true for the majority of BSRN sites located in Africa and South America. This representation error can be reduced if site-specific correction factors are applied or when multiple sites are available in the same grid cell, i.e., three more sites reduce the error by 50

  13. Spatial heterogeneity of denitrification genes in a highly homogenous urban stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Charles W; Dodds, Walter K; Wilson, Kymberly C; O'Brien, Jonathan M; Graham, David W

    2009-06-15

    Human modification of natural streams by urbanization has led to more homogeneous channel surfaces; however, the influence of channel simplification on in situ microbial distribution and function is poorly characterized. For example, denitrification, a microbial process that reduces soluble nitrogen (N) levels, requires peripheral anoxic zones that might be lost in artificial channels such as those with a concrete lining. To examine how microbial function might be influenced by channel simplification, we quantified denitrification rates and conditions in microbial mats within an urban concrete channel. We quantified spatial and diurnal patterns of nitrate uptake, diurnal dissolved oxygen (DO) levels, and nutrient conditions, along with the spatial distribution of DO, solids, chlorophyll a, and genes associated with denitrification (nirS and nirK), ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), cyanobacteria, and algal chloroplasts. Despite the channel being superficially homogeneous, nir genes were distributed in a patchy manner. Two types of gene patches were observed: one associated with nirK, which had diurnally variable DO levels and high nocturnal nitrate uptake rates, and the other associated with nirS, which had elevated AOB genes, thicker layers of mud, and an apparent 24 h nitrate uptake. All active nir patches had elevated microbial photosynthetic genes. Results implythat even artificial channels, with reduced macroscale heterogeneity, can sustain significant rates of denitrification, although the responsible communities vary with space and time. This patchiness has significant implications to extending local data to landscape level predictions and field sampling strategies but also suggests alternate channel designs to increase N retention rates.

  14. Factors associated with high heterogeneity of malaria at fine spatial scale in the Western Kenyan highlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidjoe, Amrish Y; Stevenson, Jennifer; Knight, Philip; Stone, William; Stresman, Gillian; Osoti, Victor; Makori, Euniah; Owaga, Chrispin; Odongo, Wycliffe; China, Pauline; Shagari, Shehu; Kariuki, Simon; Drakeley, Chris; Cox, Jonathan; Bousema, Teun

    2016-06-04

    The East African highlands are fringe regions between stable and unstable malaria transmission. What factors contribute to the heterogeneity of malaria exposure on different spatial scales within larger foci has not been extensively studied. In a comprehensive, community-based cross-sectional survey an attempt was made to identify factors that drive the macro- and micro epidemiology of malaria in a fringe region using parasitological and serological outcomes. A large cross-sectional survey including 17,503 individuals was conducted across all age groups in a 100 km(2) area in the Western Kenyan highlands of Rachuonyo South district. Households were geo-located and prevalence of malaria parasites and malaria-specific antibodies were determined by PCR and ELISA. Household and individual risk-factors were recorded. Geographical characteristics of the study area were digitally derived using high-resolution satellite images. Malaria antibody prevalence strongly related to altitude (1350-1600 m, p malaria infections were apparently asymptomatic. Malaria parasite prevalence was associated with age, bed net use, house construction features, altitude and topographical wetness index. Antibody prevalence was associated with all these factors and distance to the nearest water body. Altitude was a major driver of malaria transmission in this study area, even across narrow altitude bands. The large proportion of asymptomatic parasite carriers at all altitudes and the age-dependent acquisition of malaria antibodies indicate stable malaria transmission; the strong correlation between current parasite carriage and serological markers of malaria exposure indicate temporal stability of spatially heterogeneous transmission.

  15. High-resolution phylogeny providing insights towards the epidemiology, zoonotic aspects and taxonomy of sapoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barry, A.F.; Durães-Carvalho, R.; Oliveira-Filho, Edmilson F.; Alfieri, A.; Poel, Van der W.H.M.

    2017-01-01

    The evolution, epidemiology and zoonotic aspects of Sapoviruses (SaV) are still not well explored. In this study, we applied high-resolution phylogeny to investigate the epidemiological and zoonotic origins as well as taxonomic classification of animal and human SaV. Bayesian framework analyses

  16. New Policies Allow High School Child Development Programs to Provide CDA Licensure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlais, Amanda G.

    2012-01-01

    Recent changes made by the Council for Professional Recognition to the Child Development Associate (CDA) credentialing program create an opportunity to redesign high school child development programs. On April 1, 2011, the Council for Professional Recognition lifted the age restriction in the CDA credentialing requirements, now allowing students…

  17. Genome sequencing of the high oil crop sesame provides insight into oil biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linhai; Yu, Sheng; Tong, Chaobo; Zhao, Yingzhong; Liu, Yan; Song, Chi; Zhang, Yanxin; Zhang, Xudong; Wang, Ying; Hua, Wei; Li, Donghua; Li, Dan; Li, Fang; Yu, Jingyin; Xu, Chunyan; Han, Xuelian; Huang, Shunmou; Tai, Shuaishuai; Wang, Junyi; Xu, Xun; Li, Yingrui; Liu, Shengyi; Varshney, Rajeev K; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xiurong

    2014-02-27

    Sesame, Sesamum indicum L., is considered the queen of oilseeds for its high oil content and quality, and is grown widely in tropical and subtropical areas as an important source of oil and protein. However, the molecular biology of sesame is largely unexplored. Here, we report a high-quality genome sequence of sesame assembled de novo with a contig N50 of 52.2 kb and a scaffold N50 of 2.1 Mb, containing an estimated 27,148 genes. The results reveal novel, independent whole genome duplication and the absence of the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain in resistance genes. Candidate genes and oil biosynthetic pathways contributing to high oil content were discovered by comparative genomic and transcriptomic analyses. These revealed the expansion of type 1 lipid transfer genes by tandem duplication, the contraction of lipid degradation genes, and the differential expression of essential genes in the triacylglycerol biosynthesis pathway, particularly in the early stage of seed development. Resequencing data in 29 sesame accessions from 12 countries suggested that the high genetic diversity of lipid-related genes might be associated with the wide variation in oil content. Additionally, the results shed light on the pivotal stage of seed development, oil accumulation and potential key genes for sesamin production, an important pharmacological constituent of sesame. As an important species from the order Lamiales and a high oil crop, the sesame genome will facilitate future research on the evolution of eudicots, as well as the study of lipid biosynthesis and potential genetic improvement of sesame.

  18. Spatially-discretized high-temperature approximations and theirO(N) implementation on a grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Predescu, Cristian

    2006-10-01

    We consider the problem of performing imaginary-time propagation of wavefunctions on a grid. We demonstrate that spatially-continuous high-temperature approximations can be discretized in such a way that their convergence order is preserved. Requirements of minimal computational work and reutilization of data then uniquely determine the optimal grid, quadrature technique, and propagation method. It is shown that the optimal propagation technique is O(N) with respect to the grid size. The grid technique is utilized to compare the Monte Carlo efficiency of the Trotter-Suzuki approximation against a recently introduced fourth-order high-temperature approximation, while circumventing the issue of statistical noise, which usually prevents such comparisons from being carried out. We document the appearance of a systematic bias in the Monte Carlo estimators that involve temperature differentiation of the density matrix, bias that is due to the dependence of the eigenvalues on the inverse temperature. This bias is negotiated more successfully by the short-time approximations having higher convergence order, leading to non-trivial computational savings.

  19. High Spatial Resolution Europa Coverage by the Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The NIMS instrument on the Galileo spacecraft, which is being used to map the mineral and ice properties over the surfaces of the Jovian moons, produces global spectral images at modest spatial resolution and high resolution spectral images for small selected regions on the satellites. This map illustrates the high resolution coverage of Europa obtained by NIMS through the April 1997 G7 orbit.The areas covered are displayed on a Voyager-derived map. A good sampling of the dark trailing-side material (180 to 360 degrees) has been obtained, with less coverage of Europa's leading side.The false-color composites use red, green and blue to represent the infrared brightnesses at 0.7, 1.51 and 1.82 microns respectively. Considerable variations are evident and are related to the composition and sizes of the surface grains.The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  20. Low LET proton microbeam to understand high-LET RBE by shaping spatial dose distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greubel, Christoph; Ilicic, Katarina; Rösch, Thomas; Reindl, Judith; Siebenwirth, Christian; Moser, Marcus; Girst, Stefanie; Walsh, Dietrich W. M.; Schmid, Thomas E.; Dollinger, Günther

    2017-08-01

    High LET radiation, like heavy ions, are known to have a higher biological effectiveness (RBE) compared to low LET radiation, like X- or γ -rays. Theories and models attribute these higher effectiveness mostly to their extremely inhomogeneous dose deposition, which is concentrated in only a few micron sized spots. At the ion microprobe SNAKE, low LET 20 MeV protons (LET in water of 2.6 keV/μm) can be applied to cells either randomly distributed or focused to submicron spots, approximating heavy ion dose deposition. Thus, the transition between low and high LET energy deposition is experimentally accessible and the effect of different spatial dose distributions can be analysed. Here, we report on the technical setup to cultivate and irradiate 104 cells with submicron spots of low LET protons to measure cell survival in unstained cells. In addition we have taken special care to characterise the beam spot of the 20 MeV proton microbeam with fluorescent nuclear track detectors.

  1. Unexpected materials in a Rembrandt painting characterized by high spatial resolution cluster-TOF-SIMS imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyova, Jana; Cersoy, Sophie; Richardin, Pascale; Laprévote, Olivier; Walter, Philippe; Brunelle, Alain

    2011-02-01

    The painting materials of the Portrait of Nicolaes van Bambeeck (Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium, Brussels, inv. 155) painted by Rembrandt van Rijn in 1641 has been studied using high resolution cluster-TOF-SIMS imaging. In the first step, a moderate spatial resolution (2 μm) was used to characterize the layer structure and the chemical composition of each layer on account of a high mass resolution. Then, in the second step, and despite a low mass resolution, the cluster primary ion beam was focused well below 1 μm in order to reveal smaller structures in the painting sample. The study confirmed the presence of starch in the second ground layer, which is quite surprising and, at least for Rembrandt paintings, has never been reported before. TOF-SIMS also indicated the presence of proteins, which, added to the size and shape of lake particles, suggests that it was manufactured from shearings (waste of textile manufacturing) of dyed wool, used as the source of the dyestuff. The analyses have also shown various lead carboxylates, being the products of the interaction between lead white and the oil of the binding medium. These findings considerably contribute to the understanding of Rembrandt's studio practice and thus demonstrate the importance and potential of cluster-TOF-SIMS imaging in the characterization on a submicrometer scale of artist painting materials.

  2. Estimating spatially distributed turbulent heat fluxes from high-resolution thermal imagery acquired with a UAV system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Claire; Thiem, Christina Elisabeth; Wizemann, Hans-Dieter; Bernhardt, Matthias; Schulz, Karsten

    2017-05-19

    In this study, high-resolution thermal imagery acquired with a small unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is used to map evapotranspiration (ET) at a grassland site in Luxembourg. The land surface temperature (LST) information from the thermal imagery is the key input to a one-source and two-source energy balance model. While the one-source model treats the surface as a single uniform layer, the two-source model partitions the surface temperature and fluxes into soil and vegetation components. It thus explicitly accounts for the different contributions of both components to surface temperature as well as turbulent flux exchange with the atmosphere. Contrary to the two-source model, the one-source model requires an empirical adjustment parameter in order to account for the effect of the two components. Turbulent heat flux estimates of both modelling approaches are compared to eddy covariance (EC) measurements using the high-resolution input imagery UAVs provide. In this comparison, the effect of different methods for energy balance closure of the EC data on the agreement between modelled and measured fluxes is also analysed. Additionally, the sensitivity of the one-source model to the derivation of the empirical adjustment parameter is tested. Due to the very dry and hot conditions during the experiment, pronounced thermal patterns developed over the grassland site. These patterns result in spatially variable turbulent heat fluxes. The model comparison indicates that both models are able to derive ET estimates that compare well with EC measurements under these conditions. However, the two-source model, with a more complex treatment of the energy and surface temperature partitioning between the soil and vegetation, outperformed the simpler one-source model in estimating sensible and latent heat fluxes. This is consistent with findings from prior studies. For the one-source model, a time-variant expression of the adjustment parameter (to account for the difference between

  3. Electrophysiological Evidence of Atypical Spatial Attention in Those with a High Level of Self-Reported Autistic Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Stephanie A.; Freeth, Megan; Milne, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Selective attention is atypical in individuals with autism spectrum conditions. Evidence suggests this is also the case for those with high levels of autistic traits. Here we investigated the neural basis of spatial attention in those with high and low levels of self-reported autistic traits via analysis of ERP deflections associated with covert…

  4. High-Speed AFM Images of Thermal Motion Provide Stiffness Map of Interfacial Membrane Protein Moieties

    OpenAIRE

    Preiner, Johannes; Horner, Andreas; Karner, Andreas; Ollinger, Nicole; Siligan, Christine; Pohl, Peter; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The flexibilities of extracellular loops determine ligand binding and activation of membrane receptors. Arising from fluctuations in inter- and intraproteinaceous interactions, flexibility manifests in thermal motion. Here we demonstrate that quantitative flexibility values can be extracted from directly imaging the thermal motion of membrane protein moieties using high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM). Stiffness maps of the main periplasmic loops of single reconstituted water channels ...

  5. Software project estimation the fundamentals for providing high quality information to decision makers

    CERN Document Server

    Abran, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Software projects are often late and over-budget and this leads to major problems for software customers. Clearly, there is a serious issue in estimating a realistic, software project budget. Furthermore, generic estimation models cannot be trusted to provide credible estimates for projects as complex as software projects. This book presents a number of examples using data collected over the years from various organizations building software. It also presents an overview of the non-for-profit organization, which collects data on software projects, the International Software Benchmarking Stan

  6. EMODNet Bathymetry - building and providing a high resolution digital bathymetry for European seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, D.

    2016-12-01

    Access to marine data is a key issue for the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive and the EU Marine Knowledge 2020 agenda and includes the European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODnet) initiative. The EMODnet Bathymetry project develops and publishes Digital Terrain Models (DTM) for the European seas. These are produced from survey and aggregated data sets that are indexed with metadata by adopting from SeaDataNet the Common Data Index (CDI) data discovery and access service and the Sextant data products catalogue service. SeaDataNet is a network of major oceanographic data centres around the European seas that manage, operate and further develop a pan-European infrastructure for marine and ocean data management. SeaDataNet is also setting and governing marine data standards, and exploring and establishing interoperability solutions to connect to other e-infrastructures on the basis of standards such as ISO and OGC. The SeaDataNet portal provides users a number of interrelated meta directories, an extensive range of controlled vocabularies, and the various SeaDataNet standards and tools. SeaDataNet at present gives overview and access to more than 1.8 million data sets for physical oceanography, chemistry, geology, geophysics, bathymetry and biology from more than 100 connected data centres from 34 countries riparian to European seas. The latest EMODnet Bathymetry DTM has a resolution of 1/8 arcminute * 1/8 arcminute and covers all European sea regions. Use is made of available and gathered surveys and already more than 13.000 surveys have been indexed by 27 European data providers from 15 countries. Also use is made of composite DTMs as generated and maintained by several data providers for their areas of interest. Already 44 composite DTMs are included in the Sextant data products catalogue. For areas without coverage use is made of the latest global DTM of GEBCO who is partner in the EMODnet Bathymetry project. In return GEBCO integrates the EMODnet

  7. Assessment of an Operational System for Crop Type Map Production Using High Temporal and Spatial Resolution Satellite Optical Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Inglada

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Crop area extent estimates and crop type maps provide crucial information for agricultural monitoring and management. Remote sensing imagery in general and, more specifically, high temporal and high spatial resolution data as the ones which will be available with upcoming systems, such as Sentinel-2, constitute a major asset for this kind of application. The goal of this paper is to assess to what extent state-of-the-art supervised classification methods can be applied to high resolution multi-temporal optical imagery to produce accurate crop type maps at the global scale. Five concurrent strategies for automatic crop type map production have been selected and benchmarked using SPOT4 (Take5 and Landsat 8 data over 12 test sites spread all over the globe (four in Europe, four in Africa, two in America and two in Asia. This variety of tests sites allows one to draw conclusions applicable to a wide variety of landscapes and crop systems. The results show that a random forest classifier operating on linearly temporally gap-filled images can achieve overall accuracies above 80% for most sites. Only two sites showed low performances: Madagascar due to the presence of fields smaller than the pixel size and Burkina Faso due to a mix of trees and crops in the fields. The approach is based on supervised machine learning techniques, which need in situ data collection for the training step, but the map production is fully automatic.

  8. Spatial Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sudipto

    2016-01-01

    With increasing accessibility to geographic information systems (GIS) software, statisticians and data analysts routinely encounter scientific data sets with geocoded locations. This has generated considerable interest in statistical modeling for location-referenced spatial data. In public health, spatial data routinely arise as aggregates over regions, such as counts or rates over counties, census tracts, or some other administrative delineation. Such data are often referred to as areal data. This review article provides a brief overview of statistical models that account for spatial dependence in areal data. It does so in the context of two applications: disease mapping and spatial survival analysis. Disease maps are used to highlight geographic areas with high and low prevalence, incidence, or mortality rates of a specific disease and the variability of such rates over a spatial domain. They can also be used to detect hot spots or spatial clusters that may arise owing to common environmental, demographic, or cultural effects shared by neighboring regions. Spatial survival analysis refers to the modeling and analysis for geographically referenced time-to-event data, where a subject is followed up to an event (e.g., death or onset of a disease) or is censored, whichever comes first. Spatial survival analysis is used to analyze clustered survival data when the clustering arises from geographical regions or strata. Illustrations are provided in these application domains.

  9. Neuraminidase activity provides a practical read-out for a high throughput influenza antiviral screening assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Meng

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of influenza strains that are resistant to commonly used antivirals has highlighted the need to develop new compounds that target viral gene products or host mechanisms that are essential for effective virus replication. Existing assays to identify potential antiviral compounds often use high throughput screening assays that target specific viral replication steps. To broaden the search for antivirals, cell-based replication assays can be performed, but these are often labor intensive and have limited throughput. Results We have adapted a traditional virus neutralization assay to develop a practical, cell-based, high throughput screening assay. This assay uses viral neuraminidase (NA as a read-out to quantify influenza replication, thereby offering an assay that is both rapid and sensitive. In addition to identification of inhibitors that target either viral or host factors, the assay allows simultaneous evaluation of drug toxicity. Antiviral activity was demonstrated for a number of known influenza inhibitors including amantadine that targets the M2 ion channel, zanamivir that targets NA, ribavirin that targets IMP dehydrogenase, and bis-indolyl maleimide that targets protein kinase A/C. Amantadine-resistant strains were identified by comparing IC50 with that of the wild-type virus. Conclusion Antivirals with specificity for a broad range of targets are easily identified in an accelerated viral inhibition assay that uses NA as a read-out of replication. This assay is suitable for high throughput screening to identify potential antivirals or can be used to identify drug-resistant influenza strains.

  10. High sensitivity troponin T provides useful prognostic information in non-acute chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, J; Jack, D; Mackle, G; Callaghan, T S; Wei, L; Lang, C C; Dow, E; Struthers, A D

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the prognostic value of high-sensitivity troponin T (hs-cTnT) in patients who present to General Practitioners (GPs) with non-acute chest pain. A total of 625 patients who were referred by their GPs to a regional Rapid Access Chest Pain Clinic in Tayside, Scotland were consented and recruited. Diamond-Forrester pretest probability of coronary artery disease (CAD) was used to select patients with intermediate and high-pretest probability. Hs-cTnT and B-type Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) were measured and final diagnosis recorded. Twelve-month follow-up for cardiac events and hospital admission data was collected. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value (NPV), for both prognosis and diagnosis, were produced using various pre-specified cut-off values for hs-cTnT and BNP. A total of 579 patients were included in the final analysis. Of these, 477 had intermediate/high-pretest probability of CAD. A total of 431 (90.4%) of patients had a hs-cTnT ≤14 ng/l. In this study, hs-cTnT of 14 ng/l was the best cut-off for ruling out if a patient would have an admission for cardiac chest pain in the following 12 months (specificity 90%, NPV 91.4%). It performed well as a predictor of a subsequent negative diagnosis of cardiac chest pain with a specificity of 92.4% and NPV of 83.5%. Hs-cTnT, at the same level currently used in clinical practice as a diagnostic cut-off for myocardial infarction and acute coronary syndromes, is also a clinically-meaningful indicator for further 12-month cardiac chest pain hospital admissions in patients with non-acute chest pain referred to chest pain clinics by GPs.

  11. Quantifying tree mortality in a mixed species woodland using multitemporal high spatial resolution satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrity, Steven R.; Allen, Craig D.; Brumby, Steven P.; Gangodagamage, Chandana; McDowell, Nate G.; Cai, D. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Widespread tree mortality events have recently been observed in several biomes. To effectively quantify the severity and extent of these events, tools that allow for rapid assessment at the landscape scale are required. Past studies using high spatial resolution satellite imagery have primarily focused on detecting green, red, and gray tree canopies during and shortly after tree damage or mortality has occurred. However, detecting trees in various stages of death is not always possible due to limited availability of archived satellite imagery. Here we assess the capability of high spatial resolution satellite imagery for tree mortality detection in a southwestern U.S. mixed species woodland using archived satellite images acquired prior to mortality and well after dead trees had dropped their leaves. We developed a multistep classification approach that uses: supervised masking of non-tree image elements; bi-temporal (pre- and post-mortality) differencing of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and red:green ratio (RGI); and unsupervised multivariate clustering of pixels into live and dead tree classes using a Gaussian mixture model. Classification accuracies were improved in a final step by tuning the rules of pixel classification using the posterior probabilities of class membership obtained from the Gaussian mixture model. Classifications were produced for two images acquired post-mortality with overall accuracies of 97.9% and 98.5%, respectively. Classified images were combined with land cover data to characterize the spatiotemporal characteristics of tree mortality across areas with differences in tree species composition. We found that 38% of tree crown area was lost during the drought period between 2002 and 2006. The majority of tree mortality during this period was concentrated in piñon-juniper (Pinus edulis-Juniperus monosperma) woodlands. An additional 20% of the tree canopy died or was removed between 2006 and 2011, primarily in areas

  12. Attitudes of high school students regarding intimate relationships and gender norms in New Providence, The Bahamas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolls, Donna

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the attitudes and actions on relationships with the opposite sex of 1,002 Grade 10 and Grade 12 students in New Providence. Girls were more likely than boys to use aggressive behaviours in teen relationships. Some of the behaviours noted in teen relationships informed expectations of marital relationships, such as restricted access to friends of the opposite sex. The students endorsed a number of sex-related stereotypes, such as a man being the head of the household. Both male and female students indicated that it was acceptable for men to control their wives. Participation in aggressive and controlling behaviours by teens points to the need to educate students about how to develop more respectful relationships.

  13. Very high MHC Class IIB diversity without spatial differentiation in the mediterranean population of greater Flamingos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillingham, Mark A F; Béchet, Arnaud; Courtiol, Alexandre; Rendón-Martos, Manuel; Amat, Juan A; Samraoui, Boudjéma; Onmuş, Ortaç; Sommer, Simone; Cézilly, Frank

    2017-02-20

    Selective pressure from pathogens is thought to shape the allelic diversity of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes in vertebrates. In particular, both local adaptation to pathogens and gene flow are thought to explain a large part of the intraspecific variation observed in MHC allelic diversity. To date, however, evidence that adaptation to locally prevalent pathogens maintains MHC variation is limited to species with limited dispersal and, hence, reduced gene flow. On the one hand high gene flow can disrupt local adaptation in species with high dispersal rates, on the other hand such species are much more likely to experience spatial variation in pathogen pressure, suggesting that there may be intense pathogen mediated selection pressure operating across breeding sites in panmictic species. Such pathogen mediated selection pressure operating across breeding sites should therefore be sufficient to maintain high MHC diversity in high dispersing species in the absence of local adaptation mechanisms. We used the Greater Flamingo, Phoenicopterus roseus, a long-lived colonial bird showing a homogeneous genetic structure of neutral markers at the scale of the Mediterranean region, to test the prediction that higher MHC allelic diversity with no population structure should occur in large panmictic populations of long-distance dispersing birds than in other resident species. We assessed the level of allelic diversity at the MHC Class IIB exon 2 from 116 individuals born in four different breeding colonies of Greater Flamingo in the Mediterranean region. We found one of the highest allelic diversity (109 alleles, 2 loci) of any non-passerine avian species investigated so far relative to the number of individuals and loci genotyped. There was no evidence of population structure between the four major Mediterranean breeding colonies. Our results suggest that local adaptation at MHC Class IIB in Greater Flamingos is constrained by high gene flow and high MHC diversity

  14. A Highly Flexible, Automated System Providing Reliable Sample Preparation in Element- and Structure-Specific Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorberg, Ellen; Fleischer, Heidi; Junginger, Steffen; Liu, Hui; Stoll, Norbert; Thurow, Kerstin

    2016-10-01

    Life science areas require specific sample pretreatment to increase the concentration of the analytes and/or to convert the analytes into an appropriate form for the detection and separation systems. Various workstations are commercially available, allowing for automated biological sample pretreatment. Nevertheless, due to the required temperature, pressure, and volume conditions in typical element and structure-specific measurements, automated platforms are not suitable for analytical processes. Thus, the purpose of the presented investigation was the design, realization, and evaluation of an automated system ensuring high-precision sample preparation for a variety of analytical measurements. The developed system has to enable system adaption and high performance flexibility. Furthermore, the system has to be capable of dealing with the wide range of required vessels simultaneously, allowing for less cost and time-consuming process steps. However, the system's functionality has been confirmed in various validation sequences. Using element-specific measurements, the automated system was up to 25% more precise compared to the manual procedure and as precise as the manual procedure using structure-specific measurements. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  15. Bio-Inspired Supramolecular Chemistry Provides Highly Concentrated Dispersions of Carbon Nanotubes in Polythiophene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ting Lin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report the first observation, through X-ray diffraction, of noncovalent uracil–uracil (U–U dimeric π-stacking interactions in carbon nanotube (CNT–based supramolecular assemblies. The directionally oriented morphology determined using atomic force microscopy revealed highly organized behavior through π-stacking of U moieties in a U-functionalized CNT derivative (CNT–U. We developed a dispersion system to investigate the bio-inspired interactions between an adenine (A-terminated poly(3-adeninehexyl thiophene (PAT and CNT–U. These hybrid CNT–U/PAT materials interacted through π-stacking and multiple hydrogen bonding between the U moieties of CNT–U and the A moieties of PAT. Most importantly, the U···A multiple hydrogen bonding interactions between CNT–U and PAT enhanced the dispersion of CNT–U in a high-polarity solvent (DMSO. The morphology of these hybrids, determined using transmission electron microscopy, featured grape-like PAT bundles wrapped around the CNT–U surface; this tight connection was responsible for the enhanced dispersion of CNT–U in DMSO.

  16. Prior high corticosterone exposure reduces activation of immature neurons in the ventral hippocampus in response to spatial and nonspatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Joanna L; Chan, Melissa Y T; Galea, Liisa A M

    2015-03-01

    Chronic stress or chronically high glucocorticoids attenuate adult hippocampal neurogenesis by reducing cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in male rodents. Neurons are still produced in the dentate gyrus during chronically high glucocorticoids, but it is not known whether these new neurons are appropriately activated in response to spatial memory. Thus, the goal of this study was to determine whether immature granule neurons generated during chronically high glucocorticoids (resulting in a depressive-like phenotype) are differentially activated by spatial memory retrieval. Male Sprague Dawley rats received either 40 mg/kg corticosterone (CORT) or vehicle for 18 days prior to behavioral testing. Rats were tested in the forced swim test (FST) and then tested in a spatial (hippocampus-dependent) or cued (hippocampus-independent) Morris Water Maze. Tissue was then processed for doublecortin (DCX) to identify immature neurons and zif268, an immediate early gene product. As expected, CORT increased depressive-like behavior (greater immobility in the FST) however, prior CORT modestly enhanced spatial learning and memory compared with oil. Prior CORT reduced the number of DCX-expressing cells and proportion of DCX-expressing cells colabeled for zif268, but only in the ventral hippocampus. Prior CORT shifted the proportion of cells in the ventral hippocampus away from postmitotic cells and toward immature, proliferative cells, likely due to the fact that postmitotic cells were produced and matured during CORT exposure but proliferative cells were produced after high CORT exposure ceased. Compared with cue training, spatial training slightly increased DCX-expressing cells and shifted cells toward the postmitotic stage in the ventral hippocampus. These data suggest that the effects of CORT and spatial training on immature neurons are more pronounced in the ventral hippocampus. Further, high CORT reduced activation of immature neurons, suggesting that exposure

  17. Fusion of Landsat-8/OLI and GOCI Data for Hourly Mapping of Suspended Particulate Matter at High Spatial Resolution: A Case Study in the Yangtze (Changjiang Estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanqun Pan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Suspended particulate matter (SPM concentrations ([SPM] in the Yangtze estuary, which has third-order bifurcations and four outlets, exhibit large spatial and temporal variations. Studying the characteristics of these variations in [SPM] is important for understanding sediment transport and pollutant diffusion in the estuary as well as for the construction of port and estuarine engineering structures. The 1-h revisit frequency of the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI sensor and the 30-m spatial resolution of the Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (L8/OLI provide a new opportunity to study the large spatial and temporal variations in the [SPM] in the Yangtze estuary. In this study, [SPM] images with a temporal resolution of 1 h and a spatial resolution of 30 m are generated through the product-level fusion of [SPM] data derived from L8/OLI and GOCI images using the Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM. The results show that the details and accuracy of the spatial and temporal variations are maintained well in the [SPM] images that are predicted based on the fused images. Compared to the [SPM] observations at fixed field stations, the mean relative error (MRE of the predicted SPM is 17.7%, which is lower than that of the GOCI-derived [SPM] (27.5%. In addition, thanks to the derived high-resolution [SPM] with high spatiotemporal dynamic changes, both natural phenomena (dynamic variation of the maximum turbid zone and human engineering changes leading to the dynamic variability of SPM in the channel are observed.

  18. High-level context effects on spatial displacement: The effects of body orientation and language on memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Vinson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Three decades of research suggests that cognitive simulation of motion is involved in the comprehension of object location, bodily configuration, and linguistic meaning. For example, the remembered location of an object associated with actual or implied motion is typically displaced in the direction of motion. In this paper, two experiments explore context effects in spatial displacement. They provide a novel approach to estimating the remembered location of an implied motion image by employing a cursor-positioning task. Both experiments examine how the remembered spatial location of a person is influenced by subtle differences in implied motion, specifically, by shifting the orientation of the person’s body to face upward or downward, and by pairing the image with motion language that differed on intentionality, fell versus jumped. The results of Experiment 1, a survey-based experiment, suggest that language and body orientation influenced vertical spatial displacement. Results of Experiment 2, a task that used Adobe Flash and Amazon Mechanical Turk, showed consistent effects of body orientation on vertical spatial displacement but no effect of language. Our findings replicate are in line with previous work on spatial displacement task that used a cursor-positioning task with implied motion stimuli. We discuss how different ways of simulating motion can influence spatial memory.

  19. Presentation : Spatial Analysis and GEOmatics

    OpenAIRE

    Didier Josselin; Thérèse Libourel

    2014-01-01

    SAGEO is the annual International Conference on Spatial Analysis and GEOmatics. It aims to:  present recent and high quality research in the field of Geomatics and Spatial Analysis, bring together researchers from various disciplines, provide an exchange platform on research and development in Geomatics, on a national and international level, for public or private bodies. SAGEO is a good opportunity for two complementary research networks to meet and to discuss their points of view on spatial...

  20. High Spatial Resolution MRI of Cystic Adventitial Disease of the Iliofemoral Vein Communicating with the Hip Joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaelides, Michael, E-mail: mihalismihailidis@gmail.com [Ygia Polyclinic Hospital, MRI/CT Department (Cyprus); Papas, Stylianos, E-mail: vascular@drpapas.com [Ygia Polyclinic Hospital, Vascular Surgery Department (Cyprus); Pantziara, Maria, E-mail: mgpantziara@gmail.com; Ioannidis, Kleanthis, E-mail: aktinodiagnostis@gmail.com [Ygia Polyclinic Hospital, MRI/CT Department (Cyprus)

    2013-05-14

    Venous cystic adventitial disease (CAD) is an extremely rare entity, and so far less than 20 cases have been described in the literature. Herein, we describe the imaging findings of CAD of iliofemoral vein in a 51-year-old woman who presented with leg swelling with special emphasis on high spatial resolution MRI, which demonstrated communication of the cyst with the hip joint. To our knowledge, this is the first description of high spatial resolution MRI findings in venous CAD supporting a new theory about the pathogenesis of venous CAD.

  1. High spatial resolution MRI of cystic adventitial disease of the iliofemoral vein communicating with the hip joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelides, Michael; Papas, Stylianos; Pantziara, Maria; Ioannidis, Kleanthis

    2014-02-01

    Venous cystic adventitial disease (CAD) is an extremely rare entity, and so far less than 20 cases have been described in the literature. Herein, we describe the imaging findings of CAD of iliofemoral vein in a 51-year-old woman who presented with leg swelling with special emphasis on high spatial resolution MRI, which demonstrated communication of the cyst with the hip joint. To our knowledge, this is the first description of high spatial resolution MRI findings in venous CAD supporting a new theory about the pathogenesis of venous CAD.

  2. High-density surface electromyography provides reliable estimates of motor unit behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Valdes, E; Laine, C M; Falla, D; Mayer, F; Farina, D

    2016-06-01

    To assess the intra- and inter-session reliability of estimates of motor unit behavior and muscle fiber properties derived from high-density surface electromyography (HDEMG). Ten healthy subjects performed submaximal isometric knee extensions during three recording sessions (separate days) at 10%, 30%, 50% and 70% of their maximum voluntary effort. The discharge timings of motor units of the vastus lateralis and medialis muscles were automatically identified from HDEMG by a decomposition algorithm. We characterized the number of detected motor units, their discharge rates, the coefficient of variation of their inter-spike intervals (CoVisi), the action potential conduction velocity and peak-to-peak amplitude. Reliability was assessed for each motor unit characteristics by intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Additionally, a pulse-to-noise ratio (PNR) was calculated, to verify the accuracy of the decomposition. Good to excellent reliability within and between sessions was found for all motor unit characteristics at all force levels (ICCs>0.8), with the exception of CoVisi that presented poor reliability (ICC95%). Motor unit features can be assessed non-invasively and reliably within and across sessions over a wide range of force levels. These results suggest that it is possible to characterize motor units in longitudinal intervention studies. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A review of atomic layer deposition providing high performance lithium sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bo; Li, Xifei; Bai, Zhimin; Song, Xiaosheng; Xiong, Dongbin; Zhao, Mengli; Li, Dejun; Lu, Shigang

    2017-01-01

    With the significant obstacles that have been conquered in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries, it is urgent to impel accelerating development of room-temperature Li-S batteries with high energy density and long-term stability. In view of the unique solid-liquid-solid conversion processes of Li-S batteries, however, designing effective strategies to address the insulativity and volume effect of cathode, shuttle of soluble polysulfides, and/or safety hazard of Li metal anode has been challenging. An atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a representative thin film technology with exceptional capabilities in developing atomic-precisely conformal films. It has been demonstrated to be a promise strategy of solving emerging issues in advanced electrical energy storage (EES) devices via the surface modification and/or the fabrication of complex nanostructured materials. In this review, the recent developments and significances on how ALD improves the performance of Li-S batteries were discussed in detail. Significant attention mainly focused on the various strategies with the use of ALD to refine the electrochemical interfaces and cell configurations. Furthermore, the novel opportunities and perspective associated with ALD for future research directions were summarized. This review may boost the development and application of advanced Li-S batteries using ALD.

  4. A Vesicle-to-Worm Transition Provides a New High-Temperature Oil Thickening Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Matthew J; Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O; Armes, Steven P

    2017-02-06

    Diblock copolymer vesicles are prepared via RAFT dispersion polymerization directly in mineral oil. Such vesicles undergo a vesicle-to-worm transition on heating to 150 °C, as judged by TEM and SAXS. Variable-temperature 1 H NMR spectroscopy indicates that this transition is the result of surface plasticization of the membrane-forming block by hot solvent, effectively increasing the volume fraction of the stabilizer block and so reducing the packing parameter for the copolymer chains. The rheological behavior of a 10 % w/w copolymer dispersion in mineral oil is strongly temperature-dependent: the storage modulus increases by five orders of magnitude on heating above the critical gelation temperature of 135 °C, as the non-interacting vesicles are converted into weakly interacting worms. SAXS studies indicate that, on average, three worms are formed per vesicle. Such vesicle-to-worm transitions offer an interesting new mechanism for the high-temperature thickening of oils. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. The IceCube MasterClass: providing high school students an authentic research experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo Gallart, Silvia; Bechtol, Ellen; Schultz, David; Madsen, Megan; Demerit, Jean; IceCube Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In May 2014, the first one-day long IceCube Masterclass for high school students was offered. The program was inspired by the masterclasses started in 2005 by the International Particle Physics Outreach Group and supported in the U.S. by QuarkNet. Participation in the IceCube masterclasses has grown each year, with a total of over 500 students in three U.S states and three European countries after three editions. In a masterclass, students join an IceCube research team to learn about astrophysics and replicate the results of a published paper, such as the discovery of astrophysical neutrinos or a measurement of the cosmic ray flux. We will discuss both the scientific and educational goals of the program as well as the organizational challenges. Data from the program evaluation will be used to support the need of educational activities based on actual research as a powerful approach for motivating more students to pursue STEM college programs, making science and scientists more approachable to teenagers, and helping students envision a career in science.

  6. Hierarchy of antiparallel vortex tubes in spatially periodic turbulence at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Susumu; Saito, Yuta; Kawahara, Genta

    2017-06-01

    To draw a precise picture of the hierarchy of coherent vortices in spatially periodic turbulence at high Reynolds numbers and to understand its generation mechanism, we conduct direct numerical simulations of turbulence in a periodic cube. By objectively identifying the axes of vortex tubes at various length scales in the inertial range, we quantitatively show that the sustained turbulence consists of a hierarchy of antiparallel pairs of vortex tubes. These vortex tubes are created by being stretched in strain fields around 2-8 times larger vortices, whereas they are weakened by strain around half-scale vortices. Temporal tracking of identified vortex tubes shows that they tend to form antiparallel pairs from the moment they are created. We examine three different external forces to show that the hierarchical structure of antiparallel vortex pairs is robust and its statistical features in inertial length scales are independent of the force. The turbulence that is sustained by steady forces is quasiperiodic in time and its significant temporal fluctuations are caused by successive creation of strong vortex tubes within the hierarchy.

  7. Structural health monitoring by using fiber-optic distributed strain sensors with high spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Hideaki; Wada, Daichi; Igawa, Hirotaka

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we review our researches on the topics of the structural health monitoring (SHM) with the fiber-optic distributed strain sensor. Highly-dense information on strains in a structure can be useful to identify some kind of existing damages or applied loads in implementation of SHM. The fiber-optic distributed sensors developed by the authors have been applied to the damage detection of a single-lap joint and load identification of a beam simply supported. We confirmed that the applicability of the distributed sensor to SHM could be improved as making the spatial resolution higher. In addition, we showed that the simulation technique considering both structural and optical effects seamlessly in strain measurement could be powerful tools to evaluate the performance of a sensing system and design it for SHM. Finally, the technique for simultaneous distributed strain and temperature measurement using the PANDA-fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is shown in this paper, because problems caused by the cross-sensitivity toward strain and temperature would be always inevitable in strain measurement for SHM.

  8. Mapping Banana Plants from High Spatial Resolution Orthophotos to Facilitate Plant Health Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Johansen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Banana Bunchy Top Virus (Genus: Babuvirus reduces plant growth and prevents banana production. Because of the very large number of properties with banana plants in South East Queensland, Australia, a mapping approach was developed to delineate individual and clusters of banana plants to help plant identification and enable prioritization of plant inspections for Banana Bunchy Top Virus. Due to current outbreaks in South East Queensland, there are concerns that the virus may spread to the major banana growing districts further north. The mapping approach developed was based on very high spatial resolution airborne orthophotos. Object-based image analysis was used to: (1 detect banana plants using edge and line detection approaches; (2 produce accurate and realistic outlines around classified banana plants; and (3 evaluate the mapping results. The mapping approach was developed based on 10 image tiles of 1 km × 1 km and was applied to orthophotos (3600 image tiles from September 2011 covering the entire Sunshine Coast Region in South East Queensland. Based on field inspections of the classified maps, a user’s mapping accuracy of 88% (n = 146 was achieved. The results will facilitate the detection of banana plants and increase the inspection rate of Banana Bunchy Top Virus in the future.

  9. High-speed spatial frequency domain imaging with temporally modulated light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegate, Matthew B.; Roblyer, Darren

    2017-07-01

    Spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) is a wide-field diffuse optical technique used to obtain optical properties and chromophore concentrations in highly scattering media, such as biological tissue. Here, we present a method for rapidly acquiring multispectral SFDI data by modulating each illumination wavelength at a different temporal frequency. In the remitted signal, each wavelength is temporally demodulated and processed using conventional SFDI techniques. We demonstrate a proof-of-concept system capable of acquiring wide-field maps (2048×1536 pixels, 8.5×6.4 cm) of optical properties at three wavelengths in under 2.5 s. Data acquired by this method show a good agreement with a commercial SFDI imaging system (with an average error of 13% in absorption and 8% in scattering). Additionally, we show that this strategy is insensitive to ambient lighting conditions, making it more practical for clinical translation. In the future, this technique could be expanded to tens or hundreds of wavelengths without increasing acquisition time.

  10. Femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: Elemental imaging of thin films with high spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamer, Christoph M.; Riepl, Kevin M.; Huber, Norbert; Pedarnig, Johannes D.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (fs-LIBS) for the spectrochemical imaging of thin films with high spatial resolution. Chemical images are obtained by recording LIBS spectra at each site of 2D raster-scans across the samples employing one fs-laser pulse per site. The diffraction images of the Echelle spectrometer are binned to reduce the read-out time of the intensified CCD detector and to increase the stability of the emission signals against peak drifts in the echellograms. For copper thin films on glass the intensities of Cu I emission lines and the size of ablation craters vary non-monotonously with the film thickness hCu = 5-500 nm. The emission efficiency, defined as the Cu I line intensity per ablated volume, strongly decreases for films thicker than the optical penetration depth. The Na I line intensity from glass increases exponentially with decreasing Cu film thickness. For yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) thin films on MgO various atomic and molecular emission lines of the laser-induced plasma are measured (film thickness hYBCO = 200-1000 nm). The obtained element (Y, Ba, Cu, Mg) and molecular (Y-O) fs-LIBS images match the structure of the micro-patterned YBCO films very well. The achieved lateral resolution δr = 6 μm is among the best values reported for spectrochemical LIBS imaging.

  11. Wine evolution and spatial distribution of oxygen during storage in high-density polyethylene tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Alamo-Sanza, María; Laurie, V Felipe; Nevares, Ignacio

    2015-04-01

    Porous plastic tanks are permeable to oxygen due to the nature of the polymers with which they are manufactured. In the wine industry, these types of tanks are used mainly for storing wine surpluses. Lately, their use in combination with oak pieces has also been proposed as an alternative to mimic traditional barrel ageing. In this study, the spatial distribution of dissolved oxygen in a wine-like model solution, and the oxygen transfer rate (OTR) of high-density polyethylene tanks (HDPE), was analysed by means of a non-invasive opto-luminescence detector. Also, the chemical and sensory evolution of red wine, treated with oak pieces, and stored in HDPE tanks was examined and compared against traditional oak barrel ageing. The average OTR calculated for these tanks was within the commonly accepted amounts reported for new barrels. With regards to wine evolution, a number of compositional and sensory differences were observed between the wines aged in oak barrels and those stored in HDPE tanks with oak barrel alternatives. The use of HDPE tanks in combination with oak wood alternatives is a viable alternative too for ageing wine. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Characterization of the spatial resolution of different high-frequency imaging systems using a novel anechoic-sphere phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filoux, Erwan; Mamou, Jonathan; Aristizábal, Orlando; Ketterling, Jeffrey A

    2011-05-01

    The spatial resolution of high-frequency ultrasound (HFU, >20 MHz) imaging systems is usually determined using wires perpendicular to the beam. Recently, two tissue-mimicking phantoms (TMPs) were developed to estimate three-dimensional (3-D) resolution. Each TMP consists of nine 1-cm-wide slabs of tissue-mimicking material containing randomly distributed anechoic spheres. All anechoic spheres in one slab have the same dimensions, and their diameter is increased from 0.1 mm in the first slab to 1.09 mm in the last. The scattering background for one set of slabs was fabricated using 3.5-μm glass beads; the second set used 6.4-μm glass beads. The ability of a HFU system to detect these spheres against a speckle background provides a realistic estimation of its 3-D spatial resolution. In the present study, these TMPs were used with HFU systems using single-element transducers, linear arrays, and annular arrays. The TMPs were immersed in water and each slab was scanned using two commercial imaging systems and a custom HFU system based on a 5-element annular array. The annular array had a nominal center frequency of 40 MHz, a focal length of 12 mm, and a total aperture of 6 mm. A synthetic-focusing algorithm was used to form images with an increased depth-of-field. The penetration depth was increased by using a linear-chirp signal spanning 15 to 65 MHz over 4 μs. Results obtained with the custom system were compared with those of the commercial systems (40-MHz probes) in terms of sphere detection, i.e., 3-D spatial resolution, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Resulting B-mode images indicated that only the linear-array transducer failed to clearly resolve the 0.2-mm spheres, which showed that the 3-D spatial resolution of the single-element and annular-array transducers was superior to that of the linear array. The single-element transducer could only detect these spheres over a narrow 1.5 mm depth-of-field, whereas the annular array was able to detect them to

  13. Evaluation of the use of high spatial resolution AOD retrievals from MODIS on air quality monitoring system in urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanho, A. D.; Natali, L.; Prinn, R.; Molina, L.; Artaxo, P.; Mattoo, S.; Remer, L.; Chin, M.

    2007-12-01

    The aerosol quality monitoring system in most mega-cities is based on a network of ground-based stations essentially measuring aerosol mass concentrations in one or two particle size ranges (usually PM10 and PM2.5). Satellite retrieval of aerosol optical depth (AOD) over urban areas has become an extremely important additional source of aerosol data as urbanization increases exponentially worldwide, and is critical in megacities without ground-based networks. Progress in this satellite domain will provide an alternative tool to complement the monitoring of urban air-pollution control efforts. Recent studies have compared quantitative AOD data from the MODIS sensor on the Terra and Aqua satellite (10 km x 10 km pixels) with data from ground-based particulate matter monitoring networks and have shown that the remote sensing product can be used quantitatively to estimate PM2.5 under certain conditions. Nevertheless, major improvements in the accuracy and spatial resolution of the satellite products are required for air quality applications in urban areas. We discuss the possibilities and limitations of the use of satellite AOD products with high spatial resolution over urban areas as air quality monitoring tools. The AOD product from satellites was compared specifically to the measured ground based PM2.5 mass concentrations of aerosols in different urban areas including Mexico City and Sao Paulo. We will present the results of a study evaluating the use of the remote sensing of aerosols as a complementary tool to the ground based monitoring of aerosols in the atmosphere in urban areas.

  14. ALMA high spatial resolution observations of the dense molecular region of NGC 6302

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santander-García, M.; Bujarrabal, V.; Alcolea, J.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Sánchez Contreras, C.; Quintana-Lacaci, G.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Neri, R.

    2017-01-01

    Context. The mechanism behind the shaping of bipolar planetary nebulae is still poorly understood. It is becoming increasingly clear that the main agents must operate at their innermost regions, where a significant equatorial density enhancement should be present and related to the collimation of light and jet launching from the central star preferentially towards the polar directions. Most of the material in this equatorial condensation must be lost during the asymptotic giant branch as stellar wind and later released from the surface of dust grains to the gas phase in molecular form. Accurately tracing the molecule-rich regions of these objects can give valuable insight into the ejection mechanisms themselves. Aims: We investigate the physical conditions, structure and velocity field of the dense molecular region of the planetary nebula NGC 6302 by means of ALMA band 7 interferometric maps. Methods: The high spatial resolution of the 12CO and 13CO J = 3-2 ALMA data allows for an analysis of the geometry of the ejecta in unprecedented detail. We built a spatio-kinematical model of the molecular region with the software SHAPE and performed detailed non-LTE calculations of excitation and radiative transfer with the shapemol plug-in. Results: We find that the molecular region consists of a massive ring out of which a system of fragments of lobe walls emerge and enclose the base of the lobes visible in the optical. The general properties of this region are in agreement with previous works, although the much greater spatial resolution of the data allows for a very detailed description. We confirm that the mass of the molecular region is 0.1 M⊙. Additionally, we report a previously undetected component at the nebular equator, an inner, younger ring inclined 60° with respect to the main ring, showing a characteristic radius of 7.5 × 1016 cm, a mass of 2.7 × 10-3M⊙, and a counterpart in optical images of the nebula. This inner ring has the same kinematical age as

  15. Prototyping and Testing a Wireless Sensor Network to Retrieve SWE at High Spatial Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, D.; Barros, A. P.

    2007-12-01

    A critical challenge in snow research from space is the ability to obtain measurements at the spatial and temporal resolution to characterize the statistical structure of the space-time variability of the physical properties of the snowpack within an area consistent with the pixel resolution in snow hydrology models or that expected from a future NASA mission dedicated to cold region processes. That is, observations of relevant snow dielectric properties are necessary at high spatial and temporal resolution during the accumulation and melt seasons. We present a new wireless sensor network prototype consisting of multiple antennas and buried low-power, multi- channel transmitters operating in L-band that communicate to a central pod equipped with a Vector Signal Analyzer (VSA) that receives, processes and manages the data. Only commercial off-the-shelf hard-ware parts were used to build the sensors. Because the sensors are very low cost and run autonomously, one envisions that self-organizing networks of large numbers of such sensors might be distributed over very large areas, therefore proving much needed data sets for scaling studies. The measurement strategy consists of placing the transmitters the land surface in the beginning of the snow season which are then run autonomously till the end of the spring and waken at pre-determined time-intervals to emit radio frequency signals and thus sample the snowpack. Along with the sensors, an important component of this work entails the development of an estimation algorithm to estimate snow dielectric properties, snow density, and volume fraction of snow (VF) from the time-of-travel, amplitude and phase modification of the multi-channel RF signals as they propagate through the snow-pack. Here, we present results from full system testing and evaluation of the sensors that were conducted at Duke University using ¢®¡Æsynthetic¢®¡¾ limited-area snowpacks (0.5 by 0.5 m2 and 1 by 2 m2) constructed of various

  16. High prevalence and spatial distribution of Strongyloides stercoralis in rural Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virak Khieu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The threadworm, Strongyloides stercoralis, endemic in tropical and temperate climates, is a neglected tropical disease. Its diagnosis requires specific methods, and accurate information on its geographic distribution and global burden are lacking. We predicted prevalence, using Bayesian geostatistical modeling, and determined risk factors in northern Cambodia. METHODS: From February to June 2010, we performed a cross-sectional study among 2,396 participants from 60 villages in Preah Vihear Province, northern Cambodia. Two stool specimens per participant were examined using Koga agar plate culture and the Baermann method for detecting S. stercoralis infection. Environmental data was linked to parasitological and questionnaire data by location. Bayesian mixed logistic models were used to explore the spatial correlation of S. stercoralis infection risk. Bayesian Kriging was employed to predict risk at non-surveyed locations. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Of the 2,396 participants, 44.7% were infected with S. stercoralis. Of 1,071 strongyloidiasis cases, 339 (31.6% were among schoolchildren and 425 (39.7% were found in individuals under 16 years. The incidence of S. stercoralis infection statistically increased with age. Infection among male participants was significantly higher than among females (OR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.4-2.0; P<0.001. Participants who defecated in latrines were infected significantly less than those who did not (OR: 0.6; 95% CI: 0.4-0.8; P=0.001. Strongyloidiasis cases would be reduced by 39% if all participants defecated in latrines. Incidence of S. stercoralis infections did not show a strong tendency toward spatial clustering in this province. The risk of infection significantly decreased with increasing rainfall and soil organic carbon content, and increased in areas with rice fields. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Prevalence of S. stercoralis in rural Cambodia is very high and school-aged children and adults over 45 years were the

  17. Reduction of voxel bleeding in highly accelerated parallel (1) H MRSI by direct control of the spatial response function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Thomas; Fillmer, Ariane; Tsao, Jeffrey; Pruessmann, Klaas Paul; Henning, Anke

    2015-02-01

    To substantially improve spatial localization in magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) accelerated by parallel imaging. This is important in order to make MRSI more reliable as a tool for clinical applications. The sensitivity encoding acceleration technique with spatial overdiscretization is applied for the reconstruction of parallel MRSI. In addition, the spatial response function is optimized by minimizing its deviation from a previously chosen target function. This modified minimum-norm sensitivity encoding-MRSI reconstruction approach is applied in this article for in vivo pulse-acquire MRSI of human brain at 7T with simulated acceleration factors of 2, 4, and 9 as well as actual 4-fold accelerated MRSI. The sidelobes of the spatial response function are significantly suppressed, which reduces far-reaching voxel bleeding. At the same time, the major enlargement of the effective voxel size, which would be introduced by conventional k-space apodization methods, is largely avoided. Regularization allows for a practical trade-off between noise minimization, effective voxel size, and unaliasing. Although not aiming at increasing the nominal spatial resolution, a better spatial specificity is achieved. Simultaneous suppression of short- and far-reaching voxel bleeding in MRSI is analyzed and reconstruction of highly accelerated parallel in vivo MRSI is demonstrated. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Spatial and temporal heterogeneity in high-grade serous ovarian cancer: a phylogenetic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland F Schwarz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The major clinical challenge in the treatment of high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC is the development of progressive resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy. The objective of this study was to determine whether intra-tumour genetic heterogeneity resulting from clonal evolution and the emergence of subclonal tumour populations in HGSOC was associated with the development of resistant disease.Evolutionary inference and phylogenetic quantification of heterogeneity was performed using the MEDICC algorithm on high-resolution whole genome copy number profiles and selected genome-wide sequencing of 135 spatially and temporally separated samples from 14 patients with HGSOC who received platinum-based chemotherapy. Samples were obtained from the clinical CTCR-OV03/04 studies, and patients were enrolled between 20 July 2007 and 22 October 2009. Median follow-up of the cohort was 31 mo (interquartile range 22-46 mo, censored after 26 October 2013. Outcome measures were overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS. There were marked differences in the degree of clonal expansion (CE between patients (median 0.74, interquartile range 0.66-1.15, and dichotimization by median CE showed worse survival in CE-high cases (PFS 12.7 versus 10.1 mo, p = 0.009; OS 42.6 versus 23.5 mo, p = 0.003. Bootstrap analysis with resampling showed that the 95% confidence intervals for the hazard ratios for PFS and OS in the CE-high group were greater than 1.0. These data support a relationship between heterogeneity and survival but do not precisely determine its effect size. Relapsed tissue was available for two patients in the CE-high group, and phylogenetic analysis showed that the prevalent clonal population at clinical recurrence arose from early divergence events. A subclonal population marked by a NF1 deletion showed a progressive increase in tumour allele fraction during chemotherapy.This study demonstrates that quantitative measures of intra

  19. Assessing uncertainty in high-resolution spatial climate data across the US Northeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Daniel A; Beier, Colin M

    2013-01-01

    Local and regional-scale knowledge of climate change is needed to model ecosystem responses, assess vulnerabilities and devise effective adaptation strategies. High-resolution gridded historical climate (GHC) products address this need, but come with multiple sources of uncertainty that are typically not well understood by data users. To better understand this uncertainty in a region with a complex climatology, we conducted a ground-truthing analysis of two 4 km GHC temperature products (PRISM and NRCC) for the US Northeast using 51 Cooperative Network (COOP) weather stations utilized by both GHC products. We estimated GHC prediction error for monthly temperature means and trends (1980-2009) across the US Northeast and evaluated any landscape effects (e.g., elevation, distance from coast) on those prediction errors. Results indicated that station-based prediction errors for the two GHC products were similar in magnitude, but on average, the NRCC product predicted cooler than observed temperature means and trends, while PRISM was cooler for means and warmer for trends. We found no evidence for systematic sources of uncertainty across the US Northeast, although errors were largest at high elevations. Errors in the coarse-scale (4 km) digital elevation models used by each product were correlated with temperature prediction errors, more so for NRCC than PRISM. In summary, uncertainty in spatial climate data has many sources and we recommend that data users develop an understanding of uncertainty at the appropriate scales for their purposes. To this end, we demonstrate a simple method for utilizing weather stations to assess local GHC uncertainty and inform decisions among alternative GHC products.

  20. Brightness of Solar Magnetic Elements As a Function of Magnetic Flux at High Spatial Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahil, F.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Solanki, S. K.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the relationship between the photospheric magnetic field of small-scale magnetic elements in the quiet-Sun (QS) at disk center and the brightness at 214, 300, 313, 388, 397, and 525.02 nm. To this end, we analyzed spectropolarimetric and imaging time series acquired simultaneously by the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment magnetograph and the SuFI filter imager on board the balloon-borne observatory {{S}}{{UNRISE}} during its first science flight in 2009, with high spatial and temporal resolution. We find a clear dependence of the contrast in the near ultraviolet and the visible on the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field, B LOS, which is best described by a logarithmic model. This function effectively represents the relationship between the Ca ii H-line emission and B LOS and works better than the power-law fit adopted by previous studies. This, along with the high contrast reached at these wavelengths, will help with determining the contribution of small-scale elements in the QS to the irradiance changes for wavelengths below 388 nm. At all wavelengths, including the continuum at 525.40 nm, the intensity contrast does not decrease with increasing B LOS. This result also strongly supports the fact that {{S}}{{UNRISE}} has resolved small strong magnetic field elements in the internetwork, resulting in constant contrasts for large magnetic fields in our continuum contrast at 525.40 nm versus the B LOS scatterplot, unlike the turnover obtained in previous observational studies. This turnover is due to the intermixing of the bright magnetic features with the dark intergranular lanes surrounding them.

  1. Distinct evolutionary trajectories of primary high-grade serous ovarian cancers revealed through spatial mutational profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashashati, Ali; Ha, Gavin; Tone, Alicia; Ding, Jiarui; Prentice, Leah M; Roth, Andrew; Rosner, Jamie; Shumansky, Karey; Kalloger, Steve; Senz, Janine; Yang, Winnie; McConechy, Melissa; Melnyk, Nataliya; Anglesio, Michael; Luk, Margaret T Y; Tse, Kane; Zeng, Thomas; Moore, Richard; Zhao, Yongjun; Marra, Marco A; Gilks, Blake; Yip, Stephen; Huntsman, David G; McAlpine, Jessica N; Shah, Sohrab P

    2013-09-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC) is characterized by poor outcome, often attributed to the emergence of treatment-resistant subclones. We sought to measure the degree of genomic diversity within primary, untreated HGSCs to examine the natural state of tumour evolution prior to therapy. We performed exome sequencing, copy number analysis, targeted amplicon deep sequencing and gene expression profiling on 31 spatially and temporally separated HGSC tumour specimens (six patients), including ovarian masses, distant metastases and fallopian tube lesions. We found widespread intratumoural variation in mutation, copy number and gene expression profiles, with key driver alterations in genes present in only a subset of samples (eg PIK3CA, CTNNB1, NF1). On average, only 51.5% of mutations were present in every sample of a given case (range 10.2-91.4%), with TP53 as the only somatic mutation consistently present in all samples. Complex segmental aneuploidies, such as whole-genome doubling, were present in a subset of samples from the same individual, with divergent copy number changes segregating independently of point mutation acquisition. Reconstruction of evolutionary histories showed one patient with mixed HGSC and endometrioid histology, with common aetiologic origin in the fallopian tube and subsequent selection of different driver mutations in the histologically distinct samples. In this patient, we observed mixed cell populations in the early fallopian tube lesion, indicating that diversity arises at early stages of tumourigenesis. Our results revealed that HGSCs exhibit highly individual evolutionary trajectories and diverse genomic tapestries prior to therapy, exposing an essential biological characteristic to inform future design of personalized therapeutic solutions and investigation of drug-resistance mechanisms. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  2. Quantitative FRET Analysis by Fast Acquisition Time Domain FLIM at High Spatial Resolution in Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Parra, Sergi; Audugé, Nicolas; Coppey-Moisan, Maïté; Tramier, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative analysis in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments in live cells for protein interaction studies is still a challenging issue. In a two-component system (FRET and no FRET donor species), fitting of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data gives the fraction of donor molecules involved in FRET (fD) and the intrinsic transfer efficiency. But when fast FLIM acquisitions are used to monitor dynamic changes in protein-protein interactions at high spatial and temporal resolutions in living cells, photon statistics and time resolution are limited. In this case, fitting procedures are not reliable, even for single lifetime donors. We introduce the new concept of a minimal fraction of donor molecules involved in FRET (mfD), coming from the mathematical minimization of fD. We find particular advantage in the use of mfD because it can be obtained without fitting procedures and it is derived directly from FLIM data. mfD constitutes an interesting quantitative parameter for live cell studies because it is related to the minimal relative concentration of interacting proteins. For multi-lifetime donors, the process of fitting complex fluorescence decays to find at least four reliable lifetimes is a near impossible task. Here, mfD extension for multi-lifetime donors is the only quantitative determinant. We applied this methodology for imaging the interaction between the bromodomains of TAFII250 and acetylated histones H4 in living cells at high resolution. We show the existence of discrete acetylated chromatin domains where the minimal fraction of bromodomain interacting with acetylated H4 oscillates from 0.26 to 0.36 and whose size is smaller than half of one micron cube. We demonstrate that mfD by itself is a useful tool to investigate quantitatively protein interactions in live cells, especially when using fast FRET-FLIM acquisition times. PMID:18539634

  3. High-power single spatial mode AlGaAs channeled-substrate-planar semiconductor diode lasers for spaceborne communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, J. C.; Carlin, D. B.; Ettenberg, M.

    1989-01-01

    A high power single spatial mode channeled substrate planar AlGaAs semiconductor diode laser was developed. The emission wavelength was optimized at 860 to 880 nm. The operating characteristics (power current, single spatial mode behavior, far field radiation patterns, and spectral behavior) and results of computer modeling studies on the performance of the laser are discussed. Reliability assessment at high output levels is included. Performance results on a new type of channeled substrate planar diode laser incorporating current blocking layers, grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, to more effectively focus the operational current to the lasing region was demonstrated. The optoelectronic behavior and fabrication procedures for this new diode laser are discussed. The highlights include single spatial mode devices with up to 160 mW output at 8600 A, and quantum efficiencies of 70 percent (1 W/amp) with demonstrated operating lifetimes of 10,000 h at 50 mW.

  4. AN ANALYSIS OF SPATIAL EQUITY CONCERNING INVESTMENTS IN HIGH-SPEED RAIL SYSTEMS: THE CASE STUDY OF ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca PAGLIARA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available It is recognised in the literature that spatial accessibility is a measure of spatial equity and can be represented by the ease of travelling from an origin to a given destination via a given mode or set of transport modes. Although urban areas can benefit from improvements in accessibility when a new high-speed rail line is built, equity issues may arise. This manuscript describes a methodology for evaluating equity impacts due to an extension of the High Speed Rail network in Italy. A joint Revealed/Stated Preference survey has been carried out, collecting socioeconomic and travel data. Specifically, nine hypothetical scenarios have been submitted to Italian users aiming at understanding the motivations for not choosing the High Speed Rail as an alternative. The main outcome is that the access/egress travel costs connected with the High Speed Rail have a strong impact on spatial equity. The main policy implications of this study are that investors in high-speed rail should not only take into account the economic benefits brought by them, but also the spatial imbalance that these systems can bring.

  5. High Performance Spatial Filter Array Based on Signal Mode Fiber Bundle Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Loveraging on Agiltron's experience in optical fiber components, Agiltron proposed a coherent single-mode fiber (SMF) spatial filter array (SFA) with a gradient...

  6. Remote high-definition rotating video enables fast spatial survey of marine underwater macrofauna and habitats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pelletier, Dominique; Leleu, Kévin; Mallet, Delphine; Mou-Tham, Gérard; Hervé, Gilles; Boureau, Matthieu; Guilpart, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Observing spatial and temporal variations of marine biodiversity from non-destructive techniques is central for understanding ecosystem resilience, and for monitoring and assessing conservation strategies, e.g...

  7. High-energy Gamma Rays from the Milky Way: Three-dimensional Spatial Models for the Cosmic-Ray and Radiation Field Densities in the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, T. A.; Jóhannesson, G.; Moskalenko, I. V.

    2017-09-01

    High-energy γ-rays of interstellar origin are produced by the interaction of cosmic-ray (CR) particles with the diffuse gas and radiation fields in the Galaxy. The main features of this emission are well understood and are reproduced by existing CR propagation models employing 2D galactocentric cylindrically symmetrical geometry. However, the high-quality data from instruments like the Fermi Large Area Telescope reveal significant deviations from the model predictions on few to tens of degrees scales, indicating the need to include the details of the Galactic spiral structure and thus requiring 3D spatial modeling. In this paper, the high-energy interstellar emissions from the Galaxy are calculated using the new release of the GALPROP code employing 3D spatial models for the CR source and interstellar radiation field (ISRF) densities. Three models for the spatial distribution of CR sources are used that are differentiated by their relative proportion of input luminosity attributed to the smooth disk or spiral arms. Two ISRF models are developed based on stellar and dust spatial density distributions taken from the literature that reproduce local near- to far-infrared observations. The interstellar emission models that include arms and bulges for the CR source and ISRF densities provide plausible physical interpretations for features found in the residual maps from high-energy γ-ray data analysis. The 3D models for CR and ISRF densities provide a more realistic basis that can be used for the interpretation of the nonthermal interstellar emissions from the Galaxy.

  8. Tailoring High Order Time Discretizations for Use with Spatial Discretizations of Hyperbolic PDEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-19

    multi- ple steps and multiple stages have the potential to combine the properties of multistep and Runge–Kutta methods, and so provide an advantage over...Duration of Grant Sigal Gottlieb, Professor of Mathematics, UMass Dartmouth. Daniel Higgs , Graduate Student, UMass Dartmouth. Zachary Grant, Undergraduate...Grant, and D. Higgs , “Optimal Explicit Strong Stability Preserving Runge– Kutta Methods with High Linear Order and optimal Nonlinear Order.” Accepted

  9. Spatial and Temporal High Processing of Visual and Auditory Stimuli in Cervical Dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillemi, Gaetana; Calamuneri, Alessandro; Morgante, Francesca; Terranova, Carmen; Rizzo, Vincenzo; Girlanda, Paolo; Ghilardi, Maria Felice; Quartarone, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    Investigation of spatial and temporal cognitive processing in idiopathic cervical dystonia (CD) by means of specific tasks based on perception in time and space domains of visual and auditory stimuli. Previous psychophysiological studies have investigated temporal and spatial characteristics of neural processing of sensory stimuli (mainly somatosensorial and visual), whereas the definition of such processing at higher cognitive level has not been sufficiently addressed. The impairment of time and space processing is likely driven by basal ganglia dysfunction. However, other cortical and subcortical areas, including cerebellum, may also be involved. We tested 21 subjects with CD and 22 age-matched healthy controls with 4 recognition tasks exploring visuo-spatial, audio-spatial, visuo-temporal, and audio-temporal processing. Dystonic subjects were subdivided in three groups according to the head movement pattern type (lateral: Laterocollis, rotation: Torticollis) as well as the presence of tremor (Tremor). We found significant alteration of spatial processing in Laterocollis subgroup compared to controls, whereas impairment of temporal processing was observed in Torticollis subgroup compared to controls. Our results suggest that dystonia is associated with a dysfunction of temporal and spatial processing for visual and auditory stimuli that could underlie the well-known abnormalities in sequence learning. Moreover, we suggest that different movement pattern type might lead to different dysfunctions at cognitive level within dystonic population.

  10. The Intelligence of Observation: Improving High School Students' Spatial Ability by Means of Intervention Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patkin, Dorit; Dayan, Ester

    2013-01-01

    This case study of one class versus a control group focused on the impact of an intervention unit, which is not part of the regular curriculum, on the improvement of spatial ability of high school students (forty-six 12th-graders, aged 17-18, both boys and girls) in general as well as from a gender perspective. The study explored three…

  11. Using Pharmacological Manipulation and High-precision Radio Telemetry to Study the Spatial Cognition in Free-ranging Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Timothy C; Krochmal, Aaron R; Gerwig, William B; Rush, Sage; Simmons, Nathaniel T; Sullivan, Jeffery D; Wachter, Katrina

    2016-11-06

    An animal's ability to perceive and learn about its environment plays a key role in many behavioral processes, including navigation, migration, dispersal and foraging. However, the understanding of the role of cognition in the development of navigation strategies and the mechanisms underlying these strategies is limited by the methodological difficulties involved in monitoring, manipulating the cognition of, and tracking wild animals. This study describes a protocol for addressing the role of cognition in navigation that combines pharmacological manipulation of behavior with high-precision radio telemetry. The approach uses scopolamine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, to manipulate cognitive spatial abilities. Treated animals are then monitored with high frequency and high spatial resolution via remote triangulation. This protocol was applied within a population of Eastern painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) that has inhabited seasonally ephemeral water sources for ~100 years, moving between far-off sources using precise (± 3.5 m), complex (i.e., non-linear with high tortuosity that traverse multiple habitats), and predictable routes learned before 4 years of age. This study showed that the processes used by these turtles are consistent with spatial memory formation and recall. Together, these results are consistent with a role of spatial cognition in complex navigation and highlight the integration of ecological and pharmacological techniques in the study of cognition and navigation.

  12. Dynamics of spatial heterogeneity of stomatal closure in Tradescantia virginiana altered by growth at high relative air humidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rezaei Nejad, A.; Harbinson, J.; Meeteren, van U.

    2006-01-01

    The spatial heterogeneity of stomatal closure in response to rapid desiccation of excised well-watered Tradescantia virginiana leaves grown at moderate (55%) or high (90%) relative air humidity (RH) was studied using a chlorophyll fluorescence imaging system under non-photorespiratory conditions.

  13. High Performers in Complex Spatial Systems: A Self-Organizing Mapping Approach with Reference to The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kourtit, K.; Arribas-Bel, D.; Nijkamp, P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the performance of creative firms from the perspective of complex spatial systems. Based on an extensive high-dimensional database on both the attributes of individual creative firms in the Netherlands and a series of detailed regional facilitating and driving factors related,

  14. A high spatial resolution double-pulse Thomson scattering diagnostic; description, assessment of accuracy and examples of applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurskens, M. N. A.; Barth, C. J.; Cardozo, N. J. L.; van der Meiden, H. J.

    1999-01-01

    A high spatial resolution (3 mm full width half maximum, i.e. 2% of the minor radius) double-pulse multiposition Thomson scattering system was in operation at the Rijnhuizen tokamak project RTP from March 1996 until September 1998. It upgrades the previously installed single-pulse Thomson scattering

  15. Large-scale spatial variation in palm fruit abundance across a tropical moist forest estimated from high-resolution aerial photographs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Patrick A.; Bohlman, Stephanie A.; Garzon-Lopez, Carol X.; Olff, Han; Muller-Landau, Helene C.; Wright, S. Joseph; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    Fruit abundance is a critical factor in ecological studies of tropical forest animals and plants, but difficult to measure at large spatial scales. We tried to estimate spatial variation in fruit abundance on a relatively large spatial scale using low altitude, high-resolution aerial photography. We

  16. Analysis of the impact of spatial resolution on land/water classifications using high-resolution aerial imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwright, Nicholas M.; Jones, William R.; Garber, Adrienne L.; Keller, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Long-term monitoring efforts often use remote sensing to track trends in habitat or landscape conditions over time. To most appropriately compare observations over time, long-term monitoring efforts strive for consistency in methods. Thus, advances and changes in technology over time can present a challenge. For instance, modern camera technology has led to an increasing availability of very high-resolution imagery (i.e. submetre and metre) and a shift from analogue to digital photography. While numerous studies have shown that image resolution can impact the accuracy of classifications, most of these studies have focused on the impacts of comparing spatial resolution changes greater than 2 m. Thus, a knowledge gap exists on the impacts of minor changes in spatial resolution (i.e. submetre to about 1.5 m) in very high-resolution aerial imagery (i.e. 2 m resolution or less). This study compared the impact of spatial resolution on land/water classifications of an area dominated by coastal marsh vegetation in Louisiana, USA, using 1:12,000 scale colour-infrared analogue aerial photography (AAP) scanned at four different dot-per-inch resolutions simulating ground sample distances (GSDs) of 0.33, 0.54, 1, and 2 m. Analysis of the impact of spatial resolution on land/water classifications was conducted by exploring various spatial aspects of the classifications including density of waterbodies and frequency distributions in waterbody sizes. This study found that a small-magnitude change (1–1.5 m) in spatial resolution had little to no impact on the amount of water classified (i.e. percentage mapped was less than 1.5%), but had a significant impact on the mapping of very small waterbodies (i.e. waterbodies ≤ 250 m2). These findings should interest those using temporal image classifications derived from very high-resolution aerial photography as a component of long-term monitoring programs.

  17. High Spatial Resolution Studies of Epithermal Neutron Emission from the Lunar Poles: Constraints on Hydrogen Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, W. V.; Droege, G. F.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; McClanahan, T. P.; Sanin, A. B.; Litvak, M. L.; Schaffner, M.; Chin, G.; Evans, L. G.; Garvin, J. B.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The data from the collimated sensors of the LEND instrument are shown to be of exceptionally high quality. Counting uncertainties are about 0.3% relative and are shown to be the only significant source of random error, thus conclusions based on small differences in count rates are valid. By comparison with the topography of Shoemaker crater, the spatial resolution of the instrument is shown to be consistent with the design value of 5 km for the radius of the circle over which half the counts from the lunar surface would be determined. The observed epithermal-neutron suppression factor due to the hydrogen deposit in Shoemaker crater of 0.25 plus or minus 0.04 cps is consistent with the collimated field-of-view rate of 1.7 cps estimated by Mitrofanov et al. (2010a). The statistical significance of the neutron suppressed regions (NSRs) relative to the larger surrounding polar region is demonstrated, and it is shown that they are not closely related to the permanently shadowed regions. There is a significant increase in H content in the polar regions independent of the H content of the NSRs. The non-NSR H content increases directly with latitude, and the rate of increase is virtually identical at both poles. There is little or no increase with latitude outside the polar region. Various mechanisms to explain this steep increase in the non-NSR polar H with latitude are investigated, and it is suggested that thermal volatilization is responsible for the increase because it is minimized at the low surface temperatures close to the poles.

  18. High prevalence and spatial distribution of Strongyloides stercoralis in rural Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khieu, Virak; Schär, Fabian; Forrer, Armelle; Hattendorf, Jan; Marti, Hanspeter; Duong, Socheat; Vounatsou, Penelope; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2014-06-01

    The threadworm, Strongyloides stercoralis, endemic in tropical and temperate climates, is a neglected tropical disease. Its diagnosis requires specific methods, and accurate information on its geographic distribution and global burden are lacking. We predicted prevalence, using Bayesian geostatistical modeling, and determined risk factors in northern Cambodia. From February to June 2010, we performed a cross-sectional study among 2,396 participants from 60 villages in Preah Vihear Province, northern Cambodia. Two stool specimens per participant were examined using Koga agar plate culture and the Baermann method for detecting S. stercoralis infection. Environmental data was linked to parasitological and questionnaire data by location. Bayesian mixed logistic models were used to explore the spatial correlation of S. stercoralis infection risk. Bayesian Kriging was employed to predict risk at non-surveyed locations. Of the 2,396 participants, 44.7% were infected with S. stercoralis. Of 1,071 strongyloidiasis cases, 339 (31.6%) were among schoolchildren and 425 (39.7%) were found in individuals under 16 years. The incidence of S. stercoralis infection statistically increased with age. Infection among male participants was significantly higher than among females (OR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.4-2.0; PCambodia is very high and school-aged children and adults over 45 years were the most at risk for infection. Lack of access to adequate treatment for chronic uncomplicated strongyloidiasis is an urgent issue in Cambodia. We would expect to see similar prevalence rates elsewhere in Southeast Asia and other tropical resource poor countries.

  19. Uncoupling High Light Responses from Singlet Oxygen Retrograde Signaling and Spatial-Temporal Systemic Acquired Acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Melanie; Crisp, Peter A; d'Alessandro, Stefano; Ganguly, Diep; Gordon, Matthew; Havaux, Michel; Albrecht-Borth, Verónica; Pogson, Barry J

    2016-07-01

    Distinct ROS signaling pathways initiated by singlet oxygen ((1)O2) or superoxide and hydrogen peroxide have been attributed to either cell death or acclimation, respectively. Recent studies have revealed that more complex antagonistic and synergistic relationships exist within and between these pathways. As specific chloroplastic ROS signals are difficult to study, rapid systemic signaling experiments using localized high light (HL) stress or ROS treatments were used in this study to uncouple signals required for direct HL and ROS perception and distal systemic acquired acclimation (SAA). A qPCR approach was chosen to determine local perception and distal signal reception. Analysis of a thylakoidal ascorbate peroxidase mutant (tapx), the (1)O2-retrograde signaling double mutant (ex1/ex2), and an apoplastic signaling double mutant (rbohD/F) revealed that tAPX and EXECUTER 1 are required for both HL and systemic acclimation stress perception. Apoplastic membrane-localized RBOHs were required for systemic spread of the signal but not for local signal induction in directly stressed tissues. Endogenous ROS treatments revealed a very strong systemic response induced by a localized 1 h induction of (1)O2 using the conditional flu mutant. A qPCR time course of (1)O2 induced systemic marker genes in directly and indirectly connected leaves revealed a direct vascular connection component of both immediate and longer term SAA signaling responses. These results reveal the importance of an EXECUTER-dependent (1)O2 retrograde signal for both local and long distance RBOH-dependent acclimation signaling that is distinct from other HL signaling pathways, and that direct vascular connections have a role in spatial-temporal SAA induction. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  20. An Improved STARFM with Help of an Unmixing-Based Method to Generate High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Remote Sensing Data in Complex Heterogeneous Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengfeng Xie

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing technology plays an important role in monitoring rapid changes of the Earth's surface. However, sensors that can simultaneously provide satellite images with both high temporal and spatial resolution haven’t been designed yet. This paper proposes an improved spatial and temporal adaptive reflectance fusion model (STARFM with the help of an Unmixing-based method (USTARFM to generate the high spatial and temporal data needed for the study of heterogeneous areas. The results showed that the USTARFM had higher accuracy than STARFM methods in two aspects of analysis: individual bands and of heterogeneity analysis. Taking the predicted NIR band as an example, the correlation coefficients (r for the USTARFM, STARFM and unmixing methods were 0.96, 0.95, 0.90, respectively (p-value < 0.001; Root Mean Square Error (RMSE values were 0.0245, 0.0300, 0.0401, respectively; and ERGAS values were 0.5416, 0.6507, 0.8737, respectively. The USTARM showed consistently higher performance than STARM when the degree of heterogeneity ranged from 2 to 10, highlighting that the use of this method provides the capacity to solve the data fusion problems faced when using STARFM. Additionally, the USTARFM method could help researchers achieve better performance than STARFM at a smaller window size from its heterogeneous land surface quantitative representation.

  1. Spatial models for probabilistic prediction of wind power with application to annual-average and high temporal resolution data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenzi, Amanda; Pinson, Pierre; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    2017-01-01

    average wind power generation, and for a high temporal resolution (typically wind power averages over 15-min time steps). In both cases, we use a spatial hierarchical statistical model in which spatial correlation is captured by a latent Gaussian field. We explore how such models can be handled...... with stochastic partial differential approximations of Matérn Gaussian fields together with Integrated Nested Laplace Approximations. We demonstrate the proposed methods on wind farm data from Western Denmark, and compare the results to those obtained with standard geostatistical methods. The results show...

  2. High-Spatial and High-Mass Resolution Imaging of Surface Metabolites of Arabidopsis thaliana by Laser Desorption-Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using Colloidal Silver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Ji Hyun; Song, Zhihong; Liu, Zhenjiu; Nikolau, Basil J.; Yeung, Edward S.; and Lee, Young Jin

    2010-03-17

    High-spatial resolution and high-mass resolution techniques are developed and adopted for the mass spectrometric imaging of epicuticular lipids on the surface of Arabidopsis thaliana. Single cell level spatial resolution of {approx}12 {micro}m was achieved by reducing the laser beam size by using an optical fiber with 25 {micro}m core diameter in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer and improved matrix application using an oscillating capillary nebulizer. Fine chemical images of a whole flower were visualized in this high spatial resolution showing substructure of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anthers. The LTQ-Orbitrap with a MALDI ion source was adopted to achieve MS imaging in high mass resolution. Specifically, isobaric silver ion adducts of C29 alkane (m/z 515.3741) and C28 aldehyde (m/z 515.3377), indistinguishable in low-resolution LTQ, can now be clearly distinguished and their chemical images could be separately constructed. In the application to roots, the high spatial resolution allowed molecular MS imaging of secondary roots and the high mass resolution allowed direct identification of lipid metabolites on root surfaces.

  3. High-Spatial- and High-Temporal-Resolution Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Breast Imaging with Sweep Imaging with Fourier Transformation: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, John C.; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Snyder, Angela L.; Snyder, Carl J.; Hutter, Diane; Everson, Lenore I.; Eberly, Lynn E.; Nelson, Michael T.; Garwood, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the results of sweep imaging with Fourier transformation (SWIFT) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for diagnostic breast imaging. Materials and Methods Informed consent was obtained from all participants under one of two institutional review board–approved, HIPAA-compliant protocols. Twelve female patients (age range, 19–54 years; mean age, 41.2 years) and eight normal control subjects (age range, 22–56 years; mean age, 43.2 years) enrolled and completed the study from January 28, 2011, to March 5, 2013. Patients had previous lesions that were Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System 4 and 5 based on mammography and/or ultrasonographic imaging. Contrast-enhanced SWIFT imaging was completed by using a 4-T research MR imaging system. Noncontrast studies were completed in the normal control subjects. One of two sized single-breast SWIFT-compatible transceiver coils was used for nine patients and five controls. Three patients and five control subjects used a SWIFT-compatible dual breast coil. Temporal resolution was 5.9–7.5 seconds. Spatial resolution was 1.00 mm isotropic, with later examinations at 0.67 mm isotropic, and dual breast at 1.00 mm or 0.75 mm isotropic resolution. Results Two nonblinded breast radiologists reported SWIFT image findings of normal breast tissue, benign fibroadenomas (six of six lesions), and malignant lesions (10 of 12 lesions) concordant with other imaging modalities and pathologic reports. Two lesions in two patients were not visualized because of coil field of view. The images yielded by SWIFT showed the presence and extent of known breast lesions. Conclusion The SWIFT technique could become an important addition to breast imaging modalities because it provides high spatial resolution at all points during the dynamic contrast-enhanced examination. © RSNA, 2014 PMID:25247405

  4. Quantum spatial correlations in high-gain parametric down-conversion measured by means of a CCD camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jedrkiewicz, O.; Brambilla, E.; Bache, Morten

    2006-01-01

    We consider travelling-wave parametric down-conversion in the high-gain regime and present the experimental demonstration of the quantum character of the spatial fluctuations in the system. In addition to showing the presence of sub-shot noise fluctuations in the intensity difference, we...... demonstrate that the peak value of the normalized spatial correlations between signal and idler lies well above the line marking the boundary between the classical and the quantum domain. This effect is equivalent to the apparent violation of the Cauchy-Schwartz inequality, predicted by some of us years ago......, which represents a spatial analogue of photon antibunching in time. Finally, we analyse numerically the transition from the quantum to the classical regime when the gain is increased and we emphasize the role of the inaccuracy in the determination of the symmetry center of the signal/idler pattern...

  5. The variable stellar wind of Rigel probed at high spatial and spectral resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesneau, O.; Kaufer, A.; Stahl, O.; Colvinter, C.; Spang, A.; Dessart, L.; Prinja, R.; Chini, R.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Luminous BA-type supergiants are the brightest stars in the visible that can be observed in distant galaxies and are potentially accurate distance indicators. The impact of the variability of the stellar winds on the distance determination remains poorly understood. Aims: Our aim is to probe the inhomogeneous structures in the stellar wind using spectro-interferometric monitoring. Methods: We present a spatially resolved, high-spectral resolution (R = 12 000) K-band temporal monitoring of the bright supergiant β Orionis (Rigel, B8 Iab) using AMBER at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). Rigel was observed in the Brγ line and its nearby continuum once per month over 3 months in 2006-2007, and 5 months in 2009-2010. These unprecedented observations were complemented by contemporaneous optical high-resolution spectroscopy. We analyse the near-IR spectra and visibilities with the 1D non-LTE radiative-transfer code CMFGEN. The differential and closure phase signals are evidence of asymmetries that are interpreted as perturbations of the wind. Results: A systematic visibility decrease is observed across the Brγ line indicating that at a radius of about 1.25 R∗ the photospheric absorption is filled by emission from the wind. During the 2006-2007 period the Brγ and likely the continuum forming regions were larger than in the 2009-2010 epoch. Using CMFGEN we infer a mass-loss rate change of about 20% between the two epochs. We also find time variations in the differential visibilities and phases. The 2006-2007 period is characterised by noticeable variations in the differential visibilities in Doppler position and width and by weak variations in differential and closure phase. The 2009-2010 period is much quieter with virtually no detectable variations in the dispersed visibilities but a strong S-shaped signal is observed in differential phase coinciding with a strong ejection event discernible in the optical spectra. The differential phase signal

  6. High concentration of childhood deaths in the low-lying areas of Chakaria HDSS, Bangladesh: Findings from a spatial analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Manzoor Ahmed Hanifi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite significant reduction of childhood mortality in Bangladesh, large spatial variations persist. Identification of lower level spatial units with higher concentrations of deaths can be useful for strengthening services in these areas. This paper reports findings from a spatial analysis of deaths in Chakaria, a rural subdistrict, where a Health and Demographic Surveillance System has been in place since 1999. Chakaria is an INDEPTH member site. Methods: An analysis was done of 339 deaths among nearly 24,500 children under the age of five during 2005–2008. One ward, the lowest level of administrative units, was the unit of spatial analysis. Data from 24 wards were analyzed. The Discrete Poisson Probability Model was used to identify the clustering of deaths. Results: Deaths were concentrated within 12 wards located in the low-lying deltaic flood plains of the Chakaria HDSS area. The risk of death in the low-lying areas was statistically, significantly higher, 1.5 times, than the non-low-lying areas (p<0.02. Conclusion: Spatial analysis can be a useful tool for identifying high-risk mortality areas. An understanding of the risk factors prevalent in the low-lying areas can help design effective interventions to reduce mortality in these areas.

  7. High spatial correspondence at a columnar level between activation and resting state fMRI signals and local field potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhaoyue; Wu, Ruiqi; Yang, Pai-Feng; Wang, Feng; Wu, Tung-Lin; Mishra, Arabinda; Chen, Li Min; Gore, John C

    2017-05-16

    Although blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI has been widely used to map brain responses to external stimuli and to delineate functional circuits at rest, the extent to which BOLD signals correlate spatially with underlying neuronal activity, the spatial relationships between stimulus-evoked BOLD activations and local correlations of BOLD signals in a resting state, and whether these spatial relationships vary across functionally distinct cortical areas are not known. To address these critical questions, we directly compared the spatial extents of stimulated activations and the local profiles of intervoxel resting state correlations for both high-resolution BOLD at 9.4 T and local field potentials (LFPs), using 98-channel microelectrode arrays, in functionally distinct primary somatosensory areas 3b and 1 in nonhuman primates. Anatomic images of LFP and BOLD were coregistered within 0.10 mm accuracy. We found that the point spread functions (PSFs) of BOLD and LFP responses were comparable in the stimulus condition, and both estimates of activations were slightly more spatially constrained than local correlations at rest. The magnitudes of stimulus responses in area 3b were stronger than those in area 1 and extended in a medial to lateral direction. In addition, the reproducibility and stability of stimulus-evoked activation locations within and across both modalities were robust. Our work suggests that the intrinsic resolution of BOLD is not a limiting feature in practice and approaches the intrinsic precision achievable by multielectrode electrophysiology.

  8. Hydrological differentiation and spatial distribution of high altitude wetlands in a semi-arid Andean region derived from satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, M.; Scherer, D.; Richters, J.

    2011-05-01

    High Altitude Wetlands of the Andes (HAWA) belong to a unique type of wetland within the semi-arid high Andean region. Knowledge about HAWA has been derived mainly from studies at single sites within different parts of the Andes at only small time scales. On the one hand, HAWA depend on water provided by glacier streams, snow melt or precipitation. On the other hand, they are suspected to influence hydrology through water retention and vegetation growth altering stream flow velocity. We derived HAWA land cover from satellite data at regional scale and analysed changes in connection with precipitation over the last decade. Perennial and temporal HAWA subtypes can be distinguished by seasonal changes of photosynthetically active vegetation (PAV) indicating the perennial or temporal availability of water during the year. HAWA have been delineated within a region of 12 800 km2 situated in the Northwest of Lake Titicaca. The multi-temporal classification method used Normalized Differenced Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Normalized Differenced Infrared Index (NDII) data derived from two Landsat ETM+ scenes at the end of austral winter (September 2000) and at the end of austral summer (May 2001). The mapping result indicates an unexpected high abundance of HAWA covering about 800 km2 of the study region (6 %). Annual HAWA mapping was computed using NDVI 16-day composites of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Analyses on the relation between HAWA and precipitation was based on monthly precipitation data of the Tropical Rain Measurement Mission (TRMM 3B43) and MODIS Eight Day Maximum Snow Extent data (MOD10A2) from 2000 to 2010. We found HAWA subtype specific dependencies on precipitation conditions. A strong relation exists between perennial HAWA and snow fall (r2: 0.82) in dry austral winter months (June to August) and between temporal HAWA and precipitation (r2: 0.75) during austral summer (March to May). Annual changes in spatial extend of perennial HAWA

  9. A CZT high efficiency detector with 3D spatial resolution for Laue lens applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auricchio, N.; Basili, A.; Caroli, E.

    2010-01-01

    For X- and γ-ray astronomy in the coming decades, both ESA and NASA have indicated in their guidelines the importance of developing innovative instrumentation operating in the hard X- and soft γ-ray range where important scientific issues are still open, exploiting high sensitivity (50–100 times ...... unit, bonded onto a supporting ceramic layer. The readout electronics implements the new RENA-3 Asics and the data handling system uses custom designed FPGA based electronics to provide both the ASIC operation and the acquisition logic....

  10. Detection of Urban Land-cover Change in Altamira, the Brazilian Amazon With High Spatial Resolution Multi-sensor Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Y.; Lu, D.; Moran, E. F.; Dutra, L. V.; Calvi, M. F.

    2016-12-01

    Abstract:The hydroelectric dam construction in Belo Monte beginning in 2011 has resulted in rapid urban land cover change in Altamira, Para State, Brazil due to boomed population from less than 80 thousand persons before 2010 to more than 150 thousand persons in 2015. The rapid urbanization has produced many problems in urban planning and environmental conditions. It is an urgent work to monitor annual urban land cover change. However, the frequent cloud cover in the moist tropical region is a big problem constraining the acquisition of cloud-free optical sensor data. Thanks to the availability of different satellite images with high spatial resolution and high temporal resolutions, we collected RapidEye imagery in 2011 and 2012, Pleiades imagery in 2013 and 2014, and SPOT 6 imagery in 2015 with spatial resolutions from 0.5 m to 5 m for this research. This research proposed a comprehensive change detection approach using very high spatial resolution multi-sensor satellite images to examine annually urban land cover change in a moist tropical region of the Brazilian Amazon. A hybrid approach consisting of decision tree and cluster analysis based on spectral signatures, segmentation, vegetation indices, and textural images was proposed to classify the images into six land cover classes: impervious surface area, bare soils, water, pasture, primary forest, and non-forest vegetation. In order to improve the classification accuracy, the classified result was visually interpreted for each land cover class and the result was modified if classification errors were identified. The classified images were converted into vector format and object-based change detection approach was used to explore the annual land cover changes. The spatial patterns and annual land cover change rates were analyzed, and they were further related to household survey data to understand the relationships between and interactions of urbanization and population migration and economic conditions

  11. Spatial Relationships of Auroral Particle Acceleration Relative to High Latitude Plasma Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghielmetti, Arthur G.

    1997-01-01

    This final report describes the activities under NASA contract to Lockheed Missiles and Space Company. It covers the period from 10-1-94 to 12-31-97. The objective of this investigation is to identify and characterize the spatial relationships of auroral particle acceleration features relative to the characteristic transition features in the surrounding polar ionospheric plasmas. Due to the reduced funding level approved for this contract, the original scope of the proposed work was readjusted with the focus placed on examining spatial relationships with respect to particle structures.

  12. Providing High Quality Care in Low-Income Areas of Maryland: Definitions, Resources, and Challenges from Parents and Child Care Providers' Perspectives. Publication #2012-45

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forry, Nicole; Simkin, Shana; Wessel, Julia; Rodrigues, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Early life experiences are critical to a child's development. Research has shown that, for a variety of reasons, children born into low-income families are at a disadvantage when compared to their higher-income peers. Fortunately, research has also shown a positive association between high quality child care and the academic and social-emotional…

  13. Differences in Learning Geometry among High and Low Spatial Ability Pre-Service Mathematics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Hasan; Jakubowski, Elizabeth; Corey, Darryl

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate and characterize the geometric thinking and understanding of four pre-service middle and secondary mathematics teachers while considering their spatial ability levels. To investigate the differences, if any, that existed among these pre-service middle and secondary teachers with different spatial…

  14. High spatial validity is not sufficient to elicit voluntary shifts of attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauszek, Joseph R; Gibson, Bradley S

    2016-10-01

    Previous research suggests that the use of valid symbolic cues is sufficient to elicit voluntary shifts of attention. The present study interpreted this previous research within a broader theoretical context which contends that observers will voluntarily use symbolic cues to orient their attention in space when the temporal costs of using the cues are perceived to be less than the temporal costs of searching without the aid of the cues. In this view, previous research has not addressed the sufficiency of valid symbolic cues, because the temporal cost of using the cues is usually incurred before the target display appears. To address this concern, 70%-valid spatial word cues were presented simultaneously with a search display. In addition, other research suggests that opposing cue-dependent and cue-independent spatial biases may operate in these studies and alter standard measures of orienting. After identifying and controlling these opposing spatial biases, the results of two experiments showed that the word cues did not elicit voluntary shifts of attention when the search task was relatively easy but did when the search task was relatively difficult. Moreover, the findings also showed that voluntary use of the word cues changed over the course of the experiment when the task was difficult, presumably because the temporal cost of searching without the cue lessened as the task got easier with practice. Altogether, the present findings suggested that the factors underlying voluntary control are multifaceted and contextual, and that spatial validity alone is not sufficient to elicit voluntary shifts of attention.

  15. High-Spatial-Multiplicity Multicore Fibers for Future Dense Space-Division-Multiplexing Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matsuo, Shoichiro; Takenaga, Katsuhiro; Sasaki, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Multicore fibers and few-mode fibers have potential application in realizing dense-space-division multiplexing systems. However, there are some tradeoff requirements for designing the fibers. In this paper, the tradeoff requirements such as spatial channel count, crosstalk, differential mode dela...

  16. Fragmentation of urban forms and the environmental consequences: results from a high-spatial resolution model system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, U. W.; Wang, Z. S.

    2008-10-01

    Each city has its unique urban form. The importance of urban form on sustainable development has been recognized in recent years. Traditionally, air quality modelling in a city is in a mesoscale with grid resolution of kilometers, regardless of its urban form. This paper introduces a GIS-based air quality and noise model system developed to study the built environment of highly compact urban forms. Compared with traditional mesoscale air quality model system, the present model system has a higher spatial resolution down to individual buildings along both sides of the street. Applying the developed model system in the Macao Peninsula with highly compact urban forms, the average spatial resolution of input and output data is as high as 174 receptor points per km2. Based on this input/output dataset with a high spatial resolution, this study shows that even the highly compact urban forms can be fragmented into a very small geographic scale of less than 3 km2. This is due to the significant temporal variation of urban development. The variation of urban form in each fragment in turn affects air dispersion, traffic condition, and thus air quality and noise in a measurable scale.

  17. A co-training, mutual learning approach towards mapping snow cover from multi-temporal high-spatial resolution satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liujun; Xiao, Pengfeng; Feng, Xuezhi; Zhang, Xueliang; Huang, Yinyou; Li, Chengxi

    2016-12-01

    High-spatial and -temporal resolution snow cover maps for mountain areas are needed for hydrological applications and snow hazard monitoring. The Chinese GF-1 satellite is potential to provide such information with a spatial resolution of 8 m and a revisit of 4 days. The main challenge for the extraction of multi-temporal snow cover from high-spatial resolution images is that the observed spectral signature of snow and snow-free areas is non-stationary in both spatial and temporal domains. As a result, successful extraction requires adequate labelled samples for each image, which is difficult to be achieved. To solve this problem, a semi-supervised multi-temporal classification method for snow cover extraction (MSCE) is proposed. This method extends the co-training based algorithms from single image classification to multi-temporal ones. Multi-temporal images in MSCE are treated as different descriptions of the same land surface, and consequently, each pixel has multiple sets of features. Independent classifiers are trained on each feature set using a few labelled samples, and then, they are iteratively re-trained in a mutual learning way using a great number of unlabelled samples. The main principle behind MSCE is that the multi-temporal difference of land surface in spectral space can be the source of mutual learning inspired by the co-training paradigm, providing a new strategy to deal with multi-temporal image classification. The experimental findings of multi-temporal GF-1 images confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. The patient-provider relationship as experienced by a diverse sample of highly adherent HIV-infected people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brion, John

    2014-01-01

    Qualitative interviews with 23 HIV-infected people who self-reported high-level adherence to antiretroviral therapy were used to examine the process by which they came to accept their HIV infection and engage in high-level adherence behaviors. A major theme that emerged during data analysis was the importance of the patient-provider relationship. The quality of the relationship between patient and provider emerged as an important component of working through early struggles with diagnosis and the on-going struggles of living with a chronic illness. A variety of factors impacting the patient-provider relationship emerged as subthemes. What can be taken from this study is the importance of the patient-provider relationship in the effective self-management of HIV infection. Additionally, several specific behaviors can enhance the patient-provider relationship and help assure movement toward patient acceptance of the illness and engagement in high-level adherence behaviors. Copyright © 2014 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A feedback system in residency to evaluate CanMEDS roles and provide high-quality feedback : Exploring its application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renting, Nienke; Gans, Rijk O. B.; Borleffs, Jan C. C.; Van Der Wal, Martha A.; Jaarsma, A. Debbie C.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    Introduction: Residents benefit from regular, high quality feedback on all CanMEDS roles during their training. However, feedback mostly concerns Medical Expert, leaving the other roles behind. A feedback system was developed to guide supervisors in providing feedback on CanMEDS roles. We analyzed

  20. Monitoring of vegetation impact due to trampling on Cadillac Mountain summit using high spatial resolution remote sensing data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Kook; Daigle, John J

    2012-11-01

    Cadillac Mountain--the highest peak along the eastern seaboard of the United States--is a major tourist destination in Acadia National Park, Maine. Managing vegetation impact due to trampling on the Cadillac Mountain summit is extremely challenging because of the large number of visitors and the general open nature of landscape in this fragile subalpine environmental setting. Since 2000, more intensive management strategies--based on placing physical barriers and educational messages for visitors--have been employed to protect threatened vegetation, decrease vegetation impact, and enhance vegetation recovery in the vicinity of the summit loop trail. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the management strategies employed. For this purpose, vegetation cover changes between 2001 and 2007 were detected using multispectral high spatial resolution remote sensing data sets. A normalized difference vegetation index was employed to identify the rates of increase and decrease in the vegetation areas. Three buffering distances (30, 60, and 90 m) from the edges of the trail were used to define multiple spatial extents of the site, and the same spatial extents were employed at a nearby control site that had no visitors. No significant differences were detected between the mean rates of vegetation increase and decrease at the experimental site compared with a nearby control site in the case of a small spatial scale (≤30 m) comparison (in all cases P > 0.05). However, in the medium (≤60 m) and large (≤90 m) spatial scales, the rates of increased vegetation were significantly greater and rates of decreased vegetation significantly lower at the experimental site compared with the control site (in all cases P vegetation at the site level. Management implications are explored in terms of the spatial strategies used to decrease the impact of trampling on vegetation.

  1. A Precision-Positioning Method for a High-Acceleration Low-Load Mechanism Based on Optimal Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Inertial Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available High-speed and precision positioning are fundamental requirements for high-acceleration low-load mechanisms in integrated circuit (IC packaging equipment. In this paper, we derive the transient nonlinear dynamicresponse equations of high-acceleration mechanisms, which reveal that stiffness, frequency, damping, and driving frequency are the primary factors. Therefore, we propose a new structural optimization and velocity-planning method for the precision positioning of a high-acceleration mechanism based on optimal spatial and temporal distribution of inertial energy. For structural optimization, we first reviewed the commonly flexible multibody dynamic optimization using equivalent static loads method (ESLM, and then we selected the modified ESLM for optimal spatial distribution of inertial energy; hence, not only the stiffness but also the inertia and frequency of the real modal shapes are considered. For velocity planning, we developed a new velocity-planning method based on nonlinear dynamic-response optimization with varying motion conditions. Our method was verified on a high-acceleration die bonder. The amplitude of residual vibration could be decreased by more than 20% via structural optimization and the positioning time could be reduced by more than 40% via asymmetric variable velocity planning. This method provides an effective theoretical support for the precision positioning of high-acceleration low-load mechanisms.

  2. Airborne DOAS retrievals of methane, carbon dioxide, and water vapor concentrations at high spatial resolution: application to AVIRIS-NG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Andrew K.; Frankenberg, Christian; Thompson, David R.; Duren, Riley M.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Bue, Brian D.; Green, Robert O.; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Krings, Thomas; Borchardt, Jakob; Kort, Eric A.; Sweeney, Colm; Conley, Stephen; Roberts, Dar A.; Dennison, Philip E.

    2017-10-01

    At local scales, emissions of methane and carbon dioxide are highly uncertain. Localized sources of both trace gases can create strong local gradients in its columnar abundance, which can be discerned using absorption spectroscopy at high spatial resolution. In a previous study, more than 250 methane plumes were observed in the San Juan Basin near Four Corners during April 2015 using the next-generation Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG) and a linearized matched filter. For the first time, we apply the iterative maximum a posteriori differential optical absorption spectroscopy (IMAP-DOAS) method to AVIRIS-NG data and generate gas concentration maps for methane, carbon dioxide, and water vapor plumes. This demonstrates a comprehensive greenhouse gas monitoring capability that targets methane and carbon dioxide, the two dominant anthropogenic climate-forcing agents. Water vapor results indicate the ability of these retrievals to distinguish between methane and water vapor despite spectral interference in the shortwave infrared. We focus on selected cases from anthropogenic and natural sources, including emissions from mine ventilation shafts, a gas processing plant, tank, pipeline leak, and natural seep. In addition, carbon dioxide emissions were mapped from the flue-gas stacks of two coal-fired power plants and a water vapor plume was observed from the combined sources of cooling towers and cooling ponds. Observed plumes were consistent with known and suspected emission sources verified by the true color AVIRIS-NG scenes and higher-resolution Google Earth imagery. Real-time detection and geolocation of methane plumes by AVIRIS-NG provided unambiguous identification of individual emission source locations and communication to a ground team for rapid follow-up. This permitted verification of a number of methane emission sources using a thermal camera, including a tank and buried natural gas pipeline.

  3. Monitoring Oilfield Operations and GHG Emissions Sources Using Object-based Image Analysis of High Resolution Spatial Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englander, J. G.; Brodrick, P. G.; Brandt, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Fugitive emissions from oil and gas extraction have become a greater concern with the recent increases in development of shale hydrocarbon resources. There are significant gaps in the tools and research used to estimate fugitive emissions from oil and gas extraction. Two approaches exist for quantifying these emissions: atmospheric (or 'top down') studies, which measure methane fluxes remotely, or inventory-based ('bottom up') studies, which aggregate leakage rates on an equipment-specific basis. Bottom-up studies require counting or estimating how many devices might be leaking (called an 'activity count'), as well as how much each device might leak on average (an 'emissions factor'). In a real-world inventory, there is uncertainty in both activity counts and emissions factors. Even at the well level there are significant disagreements in data reporting. For example, some prior studies noted a ~5x difference in the number of reported well completions in the United States between EPA and private data sources. The purpose of this work is to address activity count uncertainty by using machine learning algorithms to classify oilfield surface facilities using high-resolution spatial imagery. This method can help estimate venting and fugitive emissions sources from regions where reporting of oilfield equipment is incomplete or non-existent. This work will utilize high resolution satellite imagery to count well pads in the Bakken oil field of North Dakota. This initial study examines an area of ~2,000 km2 with ~1000 well pads. We compare different machine learning classification techniques, and explore the impact of training set size, input variables, and image segmentation settings to develop efficient and robust techniques identifying well pads. We discuss the tradeoffs inherent to different classification algorithms, and determine the optimal algorithms for oilfield feature detection. In the future, the results of this work will be leveraged to be provide activity

  4. Airborne DOAS retrievals of methane, carbon dioxide, and water vapor concentrations at high spatial resolution: application to AVIRIS-NG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Thorpe

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available At local scales, emissions of methane and carbon dioxide are highly uncertain. Localized sources of both trace gases can create strong local gradients in its columnar abundance, which can be discerned using absorption spectroscopy at high spatial resolution. In a previous study, more than 250 methane plumes were observed in the San Juan Basin near Four Corners during April 2015 using the next-generation Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG and a linearized matched filter. For the first time, we apply the iterative maximum a posteriori differential optical absorption spectroscopy (IMAP-DOAS method to AVIRIS-NG data and generate gas concentration maps for methane, carbon dioxide, and water vapor plumes. This demonstrates a comprehensive greenhouse gas monitoring capability that targets methane and carbon dioxide, the two dominant anthropogenic climate-forcing agents. Water vapor results indicate the ability of these retrievals to distinguish between methane and water vapor despite spectral interference in the shortwave infrared. We focus on selected cases from anthropogenic and natural sources, including emissions from mine ventilation shafts, a gas processing plant, tank, pipeline leak, and natural seep. In addition, carbon dioxide emissions were mapped from the flue-gas stacks of two coal-fired power plants and a water vapor plume was observed from the combined sources of cooling towers and cooling ponds. Observed plumes were consistent with known and suspected emission sources verified by the true color AVIRIS-NG scenes and higher-resolution Google Earth imagery. Real-time detection and geolocation of methane plumes by AVIRIS-NG provided unambiguous identification of individual emission source locations and communication to a ground team for rapid follow-up. This permitted verification of a number of methane emission sources using a thermal camera, including a tank and buried natural gas pipeline.

  5. Estimation of Diurnal Cycle of Land Surface Temperature at High Temporal and Spatial Resolution from Clear-Sky MODIS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Bo Duan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal cycle of land surface temperature (LST is an important element of the climate system. Geostationary satellites can provide the diurnal cycle of LST with low spatial resolution and incomplete global coverage, which limits its applications in some studies. In this study, we propose a method to estimate the diurnal cycle of LST at high temporal and spatial resolution from clear-sky MODIS data. This method was evaluated using the MSG-SEVIRI-derived LSTs. The results indicate that this method fits the diurnal cycle of LST well, with root mean square error (RMSE values less than 1 K for most pixels. Because MODIS provides at most four observations per day at a given location, this method was further evaluated using only four MSG-SEVIRI-derived LSTs corresponding to the MODIS overpass times (10:30, 13:30, 22:30, and 01:30 local solar time. The results show that the RMSE values using only four MSG-SEVIRI-derived LSTs are approximately two times larger than those using all LSTs. The spatial distribution of the modeled LSTs at the MODIS pixel scale is presented from 07:00 to 05:00 local solar time of the next day with an increment of 2 hours. The diurnal cycle of the modeled LSTs describes the temporal evolution of the LSTs at the MODIS pixel scale.

  6. Predicting vehicular emissions in high spatial resolution using pervasively measured transportation data and microscopic emissions model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyhan, Marguerite; Sobolevsky, Stanislav; Kang, Chaogui; Robinson, Prudence; Corti, Andrea; Szell, Michael; Streets, David; Lu, Zifeng; Britter, Rex; Barrett, Steven R. H.; Ratti, Carlo

    2016-06-07

    Air pollution related to traffic emissions pose an especially significant problem in cities; this is due to its adverse impact on human health and well-being. Previous studies which have aimed to quantify emissions from the transportation sector have been limited by either simulated or coarsely resolved traffic volume data. Emissions inventories form the basis of urban pollution models, therefore in this study, Global Positioning System (GPS) trajectory data from a taxi fleet of over 15,000 vehicles were analyzed with the aim of predicting air pollution emissions for Singapore. This novel approach enabled the quantification of instantaneous drive cycle parameters in high spatio-temporal resolution, which provided the basis for a microscopic emissions model. Carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate matter (PM) emissions were thus estimated. Highly localized areas of elevated emissions levels were identified, with a spatio-temporal precision not possible with previously used methods for estimating emissions. Relatively higher emissions areas were mainly concentrated in a few districts that were the Singapore Downtown Core area, to the north of the central urban region and to the east of it. Daily emissions quantified for the total motor vehicle population of Singapore were found to be comparable to another emissions dataset Results demonstrated that high resolution spatio-temporal vehicle traces detected using GPS in large taxi fleets could be used to infer highly localized areas of elevated acceleration and air pollution emissions in cities, and may become a complement to traditional emission estimates, especially in emerging cities and countries where reliable fine-grained urban air quality data is not easily available. This is the first study of its kind to investigate measured microscopic vehicle movement in tandem with microscopic emissions modeling for a substantial study domain.

  7. Spatial downscaling algorithm of TRMM precipitation based on multiple high-resolution satellite data for Inner Mongolia, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Limin; Fan, Keke; Li, Wei; Liu, Tingxi

    2017-12-01

    Daily precipitation data from 42 stations in Inner Mongolia, China for the 10 years period from 1 January 2001 to 31 December 2010 was utilized along with downscaled data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) with a spatial resolution of 0.25° × 0.25° for the same period based on the statistical relationships between the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), meteorological variables, and digital elevation models (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_elevation_model) (DEM) using the leave-one-out (LOO) cross validation method and multivariate step regression. The results indicate that (1) TRMM data can indeed be used to estimate annual precipitation in Inner Mongolia and there is a linear relationship between annual TRMM and observed precipitation; (2) there is a significant relationship between TRMM-based precipitation and predicted precipitation, with a spatial resolution of 0.50° × 0.50°; (3) NDVI and temperature are important factors influencing the downscaling of TRMM precipitation data for DEM and the slope is not the most significant factor affecting the downscaled TRMM data; and (4) the downscaled TRMM data reflects spatial patterns in annual precipitation reasonably well, showing less precipitation falling in west Inner Mongolia and more in the south and southeast. The new approach proposed here provides a useful alternative for evaluating spatial patterns in precipitation and can thus be applied to generate a more accurate precipitation dataset to support both irrigation management and the conservation of this fragile grassland ecosystem.

  8. Spatial-Temporal Dynamics of High-Resolution Animal Networks: What Can We Learn from Domestic Animals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Chen

    Full Text Available Animal social network is the key to understand many ecological and epidemiological processes. We used real-time location system (RTLS to accurately track cattle position, analyze their proximity networks, and tested the hypothesis of temporal stationarity and spatial homogeneity in these networks during different daily time periods and in different areas of the pen. The network structure was analyzed using global network characteristics (network density, subgroup clustering (modularity, triadic property (transitivity, and dyadic interactions (correlation coefficient from a quadratic assignment procedure at hourly level. We demonstrated substantial spatial-temporal heterogeneity in these networks and potential link between indirect animal-environment contact and direct animal-animal contact. But such heterogeneity diminished if data were collected at lower spatial (aggregated at entire pen level or temporal (aggregated at daily level resolution. The network structure (described by the characteristics such as density, modularity, transitivity, etc. also changed substantially at different time and locations. There were certain time (feeding and location (hay that the proximity network structures were more consistent based on the dyadic interaction analysis. These results reveal new insights for animal network structure and spatial-temporal dynamics, provide more accurate descriptions of animal social networks, and allow more accurate modeling of multiple (both direct and indirect disease transmission pathways.

  9. Spatial-Temporal Dynamics of High-Resolution Animal Networks: What Can We Learn from Domestic Animals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shi; Ilany, Amiyaal; White, Brad J; Sanderson, Michael W; Lanzas, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Animal social network is the key to understand many ecological and epidemiological processes. We used real-time location system (RTLS) to accurately track cattle position, analyze their proximity networks, and tested the hypothesis of temporal stationarity and spatial homogeneity in these networks during different daily time periods and in different areas of the pen. The network structure was analyzed using global network characteristics (network density), subgroup clustering (modularity), triadic property (transitivity), and dyadic interactions (correlation coefficient from a quadratic assignment procedure) at hourly level. We demonstrated substantial spatial-temporal heterogeneity in these networks and potential link between indirect animal-environment contact and direct animal-animal contact. But such heterogeneity diminished if data were collected at lower spatial (aggregated at entire pen level) or temporal (aggregated at daily level) resolution. The network structure (described by the characteristics such as density, modularity, transitivity, etc.) also changed substantially at different time and locations. There were certain time (feeding) and location (hay) that the proximity network structures were more consistent based on the dyadic interaction analysis. These results reveal new insights for animal network structure and spatial-temporal dynamics, provide more accurate descriptions of animal social networks, and allow more accurate modeling of multiple (both direct and indirect) disease transmission pathways.

  10. High quality broadband spatial reflections of slow Rayleigh surface acoustic waves modulated by a graded grooved surface

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-01-21

    We report high quality broadband spatial reflections of Rayleigh surface acoustic waves (SAWs) through a graded grooved surface. High quality means that no wave is allowed to transmit and the incident wave is nearly all reflected to the input side. The graded grooved surface is structured by drilling one dimensional array of graded grooves with increased depths on a flat surface. We investigate SAW dispersion relations, wave field distribution at several typical SAW wavelengths, and time evolution of a Gaussian pulse through the graded grooved surface. Results show that the input broadband Rayleigh SAWs can be slowed, spatially enhanced and stopped, and finally reflected to the input side. The study suggests that engraving the flat surface can be used as an efficient and economical way to manipulate Rayleigh SAWs, which has potential application in novel SAW devices such as filters, reflectors, sensors, energy harvesters, and diodes.

  11. A spatially resolved estimate of High Mountain Asia glacier mass balances from 2000 to 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Fanny; Berthier, Etienne; Wagnon, Patrick; Kääb, Andreas; Treichler, Désirée

    2017-09-01

    High Mountain Asia hosts the largest glacier concentration outside the polar regions. These glaciers are important contributors to streamflow in one of the most populated areas of the world. Past studies have used methods that can provide only regionally averaged glacier mass balances to assess the glacier contribution to rivers and sea level rise. Here we compute the mass balance for about 92% of the glacierized area of High Mountain Asia using time series of digital elevation models derived from satellite stereo-imagery. We calculate a total mass change of -16.3 +/- 3.5 Gt yr-1 (-0.18 +/- 0.04 m w.e. yr-1) between 2000 and 2016, which is less negative than most previous estimates. Region-wide mass balances vary from -4.0 +/- 1.5 Gt yr-1 (-0.62 +/- 0.23 m w.e. yr-1) in Nyainqentanglha to +1.4 +/- 0.8 Gt yr-1 (+0.14 +/- 0.08 m w.e. yr-1) in Kunlun, with large intra-regional variability of individual glacier mass balances (standard deviation within a region ~0.20 m w.e. yr-1). Specifically, our results shed light on the Nyainqentanglha and Pamir glacier mass changes, for which contradictory estimates exist in the literature. They provide crucial information for the calibration of the models used for projecting glacier response to climatic change, as these models do not capture the pattern, magnitude and intra-regional variability of glacier changes at present.

  12. Factors associated with high heterogeneity of malaria at fine spatial scale in the Western Kenyan highlands.

    OpenAIRE

    Baidjoe, A.Y.; Stevenson, J.; Knight, P; Stone, W.J.R.; Stresman, G.; Osoti, V; Makori, E; OWAGA, C.; Odongo, W; China, P; Shagari, S; Kariuki, S; Drakeley, C; Cox, J; Bousema, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background The East African highlands are fringe regions between stable and unstable malaria transmission. What factors contribute to the heterogeneity of malaria exposure on different spatial scales within larger foci has not been extensively studied. In a comprehensive, community-based cross-sectional survey an attempt was made to identify factors that drive the macro- and micro epidemiology of malaria in a fringe region using parasitological and serological outcomes. Methods A large cross-...

  13. The Role of Low and High Spatial Frequencies in Exogenous Attention to Biologically Salient Stimuli

    OpenAIRE

    Carretié, Luis; Ríos, Marcos; Periáñez, José A.; Kessel, Dominique; Álvarez-Linera, Juan

    2012-01-01

    PLOS: Creative Commons Attribution License Exogenous attention can be understood as an adaptive tool that permits the detection and processing of biologically salient events even when the individual is engaged in a resource-consuming task. Indirect data suggest that the spatial frequency of stimulation may be a crucial element in this process. Behavioral and neural data (both functional and structural) were analyzed for 36 participants engaged in a digit categorization task in which dis...

  14. Modeling Above-Ground Biomass Across Multiple Circum-Arctic Tundra Sites Using High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räsänen, Aleksi; Juutinen, Sari; Aurela, Mika; Virtanen, Tarmo

    2017-04-01

    Biomass is one of the central bio-geophysical variables in Earth observation for tracking plant productivity, and flow of carbon, nutrients, and water. Most of the satellite based biomass mapping exercises in Arctic environments have been performed by using rather coarse spatial resolution data, e.g. Landsat and AVHRR which have spatial resolutions of 30 m and >1 km, respectively. While the coarse resolution images have high temporal resolution, they are incapable of capturing the fragmented nature of tundra environment and fine-scale changes in vegetation and carbon exchange patterns. Very high spatial resolution (VHSR, spatial resolution 0.5-2 m) satellite images have the potential to detect environmental variables with an ecologically sound spatial resolution. The usage of VHSR images has, nevertheless, been modest so far in biomass modeling in the Arctic. Our objectives were to use VHSR for predicting above ground biomass in tundra landscapes, evaluate whether a common predictive model can be applied across circum-Arctic tundra and peatland sites having different types of vegetation, and produce knowledge on distribution of plant functional types (PFT) in these sites. Such model development is dependent on ground-based surveys of vegetation with the same spatial resolution and extent with the VHSR images. In this study, we conducted ground-based surveys of vegetation composition and biomass in four different arctic tundra or peatland areas located in Russia, Canada, and Finland. First, we sorted species into PFTs and developed PFT-specific models to predict biomass on the basis of non-destructive measurements (cover, height). Second, we predicted overall biomass on landscape scale by combinations of single bands and vegetation indices of very high resolution satellite images (QuickBird or WorldView-2 images of the eight sites). We compared area-specific empirical regression models and common models that were applied across all sites. We found that NDVI was

  15. Maize and sunflower biomass estimation in southwest France using high spatial and temporal resolution remote sensing data

    OpenAIRE

    Claverie, M.; Demarez, V.; Duchemin, B.; Hagolle, O.; Hagolle, Olivier; Ducrot, D.; Marais Sicre, C.; Dejoux, J.-F.; Huc, M.; P. Keravec; Béziat, P.; R. Fieuzal; Ceschia, E.; Dedieu, G.

    2012-01-01

    The recent availability of high spatial and temporal resolution (HSTR) remote sensing data (Formosat-2, and future missions of Ven mu s and Sentinel-2) offers new opportunities for crop monitoring. In this context, we investigated the perspective offered by coupling a simple algorithm for yield estimate (SAFY) with the Formosat-2 data to estimate crop production over large areas. With a limited number of input parameters, the SAFY model enables the simulation of time series of green area inde...

  16. Understanding how the shape and spatial distribution of ULVZs provides insight into their cause and to the nature of global-scale mantle convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Allen; Li, Mingming; Garnero, Ed; Marin, Nicole

    2017-04-01

    Seismic observations of the lower mantle infer multiple scales of compositional heterogeneity. The largest-scale heterogeneity, observed in seismic tomography models, is in the form of large, nearly antipodal regions referred to as the Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs). In contrast, diffracted wave and core-reflection precursor seismic studies reveal small-scale Ultra Low Velocity Zones (ULVZs) at the base of the mantle that are almost two orders of magnitude smaller than the LLSVPs. We hypothesize that ULVZs provide insight into the nature of LLSVPs, and the LLSVPs, in turn, provide clues to the nature of global-scale mantle convection and compositional state. However, both LLSVPs and ULVZs are observations, and it remains unclear what is causing them. Here, we examine several related questions to aid in understanding their cause and the dynamical processes associated with them. Can we use seismic observations of ULVZ locations to differentiate whether they are caused by compositional heterogeneity or simply partial melting in otherwise normal mantle? Can we use the map-view shape of ULVZs to tell us about lowermost mantle flow directions and the temporal stability of these flow directions? Can the cross-sectional morphology of ULVZs tell us something about the viscosity difference between LLSVPs and background mantle? We performed geodynamical experiments to help answer these questions. We find that ULVZs caused by compositional heterogeneity preferentially form patch-like shapes along the margins of LLSVPs. Rounded patches indicate regions with long-lived stable mantle flow patterns, and linear patches indicate changing mantle flow patterns. Typically, these ULVZ patches have an asymmetrical cross-sectional shape; however, if LLSVPs have a larger grain-size than background mantle, their increased diffusion creep viscosity will act to make them more symmetrical. Alternatively, ULVZs caused simply by partial melting of normal mantle are preferentially

  17. Prospective comparison of high- and low-spatial-resolution dynamic MR imaging with sensitivity encoding (SENSE) for hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurusaki, Masakatsu; Semelka, Richard C; Uotani, Kensuke; Sugimoto, Koji; Fujii, Masahiko; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the efficacy of high-spatial-resolution dynamic MRI using sensitivity encoding (SENSE) in detection of hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Thirty-five patients were included in this prospectively planned study, and 25 patients with 31 HCCs were assigned into three groups and underwent the following sequences: group A (n=11): three-dimensional fast-gradient-echo (3D-FGE) high-spatial-resolution dynamic MRI (HR-MRI) with SENSE; group B (n=10): 3D-FGE low-spatial-resolution dynamic MRI (LR-MRI) with SENSE; and group C (n=14): 3D-FGE/LR-MRI without SENSE. For the quantitative analysis, the lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between the liver and HCCs was measured. For the qualitative analysis, overall image quality for each group was evaluated with a five-point scale analysis. The sensitivities for detection of HCCs were evaluated. The overall image quality in group A was significantly greater than both groups B and C (P0.05). In our pilot study on a small number of patients, image quality in HR-MRI with SENSE was superior to LR-MRI. A high detection rate was seen with HR-MRI with SENSE in the patients with hypervascular HCCs.

  18. Estimating gross primary productivity (GPP) of forests across southern England at high spatial and temporal resolution using the FLIGHT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankaew, Prasan; Milton, Edward; Dawson, Terry; Dash, Jadu

    2013-04-01

    Forests and woodlands play an important role in CO2 flux and in the storage of carbon, therefore it is important to be able to estimate gross primary productivity (GPP) and its change over time. The MODIS GPP product (MOD17) provides near-global GPP, but at relatively coarse spatial resolution (1km pixel size) and only every eight days. In order to study the dynamics of GPP over shorter time periods and over smaller areas it is necessary to make ground measurements or use a plant canopy model. The most reliable ground-based GPP data are those from the FLUXNET network, which comprises over 500 sites worldwide, each of which measures GPP using the eddy covariance method. Each FLUXNET measurement corresponds to GPP from an area around the sampling tower, the size and shape of which varies with weather conditions, notably wind speed and direction. The FLIGHT forest light simulation model (North, 1996) is a Monte Carlo based model to estimate the GPP from forest canopies, which does not take into account the spatial complexity of the site or the wind conditions at the time. Forests in southern England are small and embedded in a matrix of other land cover types (agriculture, urban etc.), so GPP estimated from FLIGHT needs to be adjusted to match that measured from a FLUXNET tower. The aim of this paper is to develop and test a method to adjust FLIGHT GPP so that it matches FLUXNET GPP. The advantage of this is that GPP can then be estimated over many other forests which do not possess FLUXNET sites. The study was based on data from two mixed broadleaf forests in southern England (Wytham Woods and Alice Holt forest), both of which have FLUXNET sites located within them. The FLUXNET meteorological data were prepared for use in the FLIGHT model by converting broadband irradiance to photosynthetically active radiance (PAR) and estimating diffuse PAR, using methods developed in previous work by the authors. The standard FLIGHT model tended to overestimate GPP in the winter

  19. Spatial navigation impairments among intellectually high-functioning adults with autism spectrum disorder: exploring relations with theory of mind, episodic memory, and episodic future thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Sophie E; Williams, David M; Raber, Jacob; Peel, Anna; Bowler, Dermot M

    2013-11-01

    Research suggests that spatial navigation relies on the same neural network as episodic memory, episodic future thinking, and theory of mind (ToM). Such findings have stimulated theories (e.g., the scene construction and self-projection hypotheses) concerning possible common underlying cognitive capacities. Consistent with such theories, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by concurrent impairments in episodic memory, episodic future thinking, and ToM. However, it is currently unclear whether spatial navigation is also impaired. Hence, ASD provides a test case for the scene construction and self-projection theories. The study of spatial navigation in ASD also provides a test of the extreme male brain theory of ASD, which predicts intact or superior navigation (purportedly a systemizing skill) performance among individuals with ASD. Thus, the aim of the current study was to establish whether spatial navigation in ASD is impaired, intact, or superior. Twenty-seven intellectually high-functioning adults with ASD and 28 sex-, age-, and IQ-matched neurotypical comparison adults completed the memory island virtual navigation task. Tests of episodic memory, episodic future thinking, and ToM were also completed. Participants with ASD showed significantly diminished performance on the memory island task, and performance was positively related to ToM and episodic memory, but not episodic future thinking. These results suggest that (contra the extreme male brain theory) individuals with ASD have impaired survey-based navigation skills--that is, difficulties generating cognitive maps of the environment--and adds weight to the idea that scene construction/self-projection are impaired in ASD. The theoretical and clinical implications of these results are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Open issues in hyperspectral imaging for diagnostics on paintings: when high-spectral and spatial resolution turns into data redundancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucci, Costanza; Casini, Andrea; Picollo, Marcello; Poggesi, Marco; Stefani, Lorenzo

    2011-06-01

    Hyper-Spectral Imaging (HSI) has emerged in the last decade as one of the most promising technologies for diagnostics and documentation of polychrome surfaces. Despite the fact that presently HSI is a well-established technique for non-invasive investigations on paintings, a number of technological issues remain open and are still topics for on-going studies. In particular, it is known that high spatial resolution is a crucial parameter for obtaining high quality images, whereas the possibility to identify pictorial materials strictly depends on the spectral resolution and on the extent of the spectral region investigated. At the same time, by increasing the sampling rates in both the spatial and spectral dimensions, the size of the data-set will be enlarged and the acquisition times will be lengthened. As a consequence, a good compromise between the acquisition of highquality data and their application should always be reached, taking into account the specific purposes of the HSI application. The above questions are discussed in the present work, which illustrates two applications of the latest version of a hyperspectral scanner designed at IFAC-CNR for the digitization of artworks. The prototype has recently been upgraded, with new visualization software as well as mechanical and optical improvements. This high performance system operates in the 400-1000nm spectral range, with a spectral resolution of about 2-3 nm and a spatial sampling of 0.1 mm over areas of about 1 m2. Three case-studies are presented, which highlight the importance of both high spatial and high spectral sampling rate in hyperspectral imaging. Two of the examples reported focus on the full exploitation of the spatial resolution: the first one is a study performed on a small painting, dated from the eighteenth century and belonging to the Uffizi Gallery in Florence; the second case-study refers to the valuable "Carrand diptych" (14th century) from the Bargello Museum in Florence. The last

  1. Physicians cite hurdles ranging from lack of coverage to poor communication in providing high-quality care to latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Bustamante, Arturo; Chen, Jie

    2011-10-01

    We surveyed physicians about their ability to provide high-quality care to patients from diverse ethnic backgrounds. Primarily, we wanted to explore the challenges faced by physicians treating Latino patients compared to physicians whose patients were primarily white and non-Latino. We found that physicians treating Latinos, particularly those who worked in primary care in comparison to specialists, were less likely than physicians treating primarily white patients to believe in their ability to provide high-quality care. They cited problems of inadequate time with patients, patients' ability to pay, patients' nonadherence to recommended treatment, difficulties communicating with patients, relative lack of specialist availability, and lack of timely transmission of reports among physicians. Insurance expansions and complementary reforms mandated by the Affordable Care Act of 2010 and other recent legislation should aid physicians in closing some of these gaps in quality.

  2. Species classification using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)-acquired high spatial resolution imagery in a heterogeneous grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bing; He, Yuhong

    2017-06-01

    Investigating spatio-temporal variations of species composition in grassland is an essential step in evaluating grassland health conditions, understanding the evolutionary processes of the local ecosystem, and developing grassland management strategies. Space-borne remote sensing images (e.g., MODIS, Landsat, and Quickbird) with spatial resolutions varying from less than 1 m to 500 m have been widely applied for vegetation species classification at spatial scales from community to regional levels. However, the spatial resolutions of these images are not fine enough to investigate grassland species composition, since grass species are generally small in size and highly mixed, and vegetation cover is greatly heterogeneous. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) as an emerging remote sensing platform offers a unique ability to acquire imagery at very high spatial resolution (centimetres). Compared to satellites or airplanes, UAVs can be deployed quickly and repeatedly, and are less limited by weather conditions, facilitating advantageous temporal studies. In this study, we utilize an octocopter, on which we mounted a modified digital camera (with near-infrared (NIR), green, and blue bands), to investigate species composition in a tall grassland in Ontario, Canada. Seven flight missions were conducted during the growing season (April to December) in 2015 to detect seasonal variations, and four of them were selected in this study to investigate the spatio-temporal variations of species composition. To quantitatively compare images acquired at different times, we establish a processing flow of UAV-acquired imagery, focusing on imagery quality evaluation and radiometric correction. The corrected imagery is then applied to an object-based species classification. Maps of species distribution are subsequently used for a spatio-temporal change analysis. Results indicate that UAV-acquired imagery is an incomparable data source for studying fine-scale grassland species composition

  3. High spatial-resolution CE-MRA of the carotid circulation with parallel imaging: comparison of image quality between 2 different acceleration factors at 3.0 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nael, Kambiz; Ruehm, Stefan G; Michaely, Henrik J; Pope, Whitney; Laub, Gerhard; Finn, J Paul; Villablanca, J Pablo

    2006-04-01

    We sought to evaluate and compare the image quality and vessel delineation of the carotid arteries with high spatial-resolution contrast-enhanced MRA (CE-MRA) at 3.0 T using integrated parallel acquisition (iPAT) with acceleration factors of 2 and 4. Using an 8-channel neurovascular array coil, we performed prospective high-spatial resolution CE-MRA at 3.0 T of the head and neck on 24 patients (11 men, 13 women, ages 37-89) with suspected arterio-occlusive disease who were assigned randomly to 2 groups. Twelve patients (group A) were examined with a 3D-GRE sequence using iPAT with acceleration factor of 2. For the next 12 patients (group B) a near-identical sequence with an acceleration factor of 4 was applied. Higher iPAT factors were used to increase the spatial-resolution while keeping scan time unchanged. Two volunteers were scanned by both protocols. Phantom measurements were performed to assess the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The presence of artifact, noise, image quality of the arterial segments, and the presence and degree of arterial stenosis were evaluated independently by 2 radiologists. Statistical analysis of data was performed by using Wilcoxon rank sum test and 2-sample Student t test (P acceleration factor of 4 was used (P acceleration factor (iPAT-4) results in superior depiction of small intracranial arterial segments. Imaging at higher magnetic field strength, in addition to the use of an optimized 8-channel array coil, provides sufficient SNR to support faster parallel acquisition protocols, leading to improved spatial-resolution. More extensive clinical studies are warranted to establish the range of applications and confirm the accuracy of the technique.

  4. Synergic Use of Sentinel-1 and Sentinel-2 Images for Operational Soil Moisture Mapping at High Spatial Resolution over Agricultural Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad El Hajj

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture mapping at a high spatial resolution is very important for several applications in hydrology, agriculture and risk assessment. With the arrival of the free Sentinel data at high spatial and temporal resolutions, the development of soil moisture products that can better meet the needs of users is now possible. In this context, the main objective of the present paper is to develop an operational approach for soil moisture mapping in agricultural areas at a high spatial resolution over bare soils, as well as soils with vegetation cover. The developed approach is based on the synergic use of radar and optical data. A neural network technique was used to develop an operational method for soil moisture estimates. Three inversion SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar configurations were tested: (1 VV polarization; (2 VH polarization; and (3 both VV and VH polarization, all in addition to the NDVI information extracted from optical images. Neural networks were developed and validated using synthetic and real databases. The results showed that the use of a priori information on the soil moisture condition increases the precision of the soil moisture estimates. The results showed that VV alone provides better accuracy on the soil moisture estimates than VH alone. In addition, the use of both VV and VH provides similar results, compared to VV alone. In conclusion, the soil moisture could be estimated in agricultural areas with an accuracy of approximately 5 vol % (volumetric unit expressed in percent. Better results were obtained for soil with a moderate surface roughness (for root mean surface height between 1 and 3 cm. The developed approach could be applied for agricultural plots with an NDVI lower than 0.75.

  5. High spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging of experimental cerebral venous thrombosis with a blood pool contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuentrup, E; Wiethoff, A J; Parsons, E C; Spangenberg, P; Stracke, C P

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of clot visualization in small sinus and cortical veins with contrast enhanced MRA in a cerebral venous thrombosis animal model using a blood pool contrast agent, Gadofosveset, and high spatial resolution imaging. For induction of cerebral venous thrombosis a recently developed combined interventional and microsurgical model was used. Cerebral sinus and cortical vein thrombosis was induced in six pigs. Two further pigs died during the procedure. Standard structural, time-of-flight- and phase contrast-angiograms were followed by fast time resolved high resolution 3D MRA (4D MRA) and subsequent high spatial resolution 3D MRA in the equilibrium phase with and without addition of parallel imaging. Visualization of the clots using the different sequences was subjectively compared and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was assessed. In the remaining six animals the procedure and MR-imaging protocol including administration of Gadofosveset was successfully completed. The 3D high resolution MRA in the equilibrium phase without the addition of parallel imaging was superior to all the other applied MR measurement techniques in terms of visualization of the clots. Only applying this sequence bridging vein thromboses were also seen as a small filling defect with a high CNR of >18. Only the non-accelerated high spatial resolution 3D MRA in the equilibrium in conjunction with the blood pool agent Gadofosveset allows for high-contrast visualization of very small clots in the cerebral sinus and cortical veins. STATEMENT CLINICAL IMPACT: Detection of cortical vein thrombosis is of high clinical impact. Conventional MRI sequences often fail to visualize the clot. We could demonstrate that, in contrast to conventional sequences, with high spatial resolution 3D MRA in the equilibrium in conjunction with the blood pool agent Gadofosveset very small clots in the cerebral sinus and cortical veins could be successfully visualized. We

  6. Developing a CCD camera with high spatial resolution for RIXS in the soft X-ray range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soman, M.R., E-mail: m.r.soman@open.ac.uk [e2v centre for electronic imaging, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Hall, D.J.; Tutt, J.H.; Murray, N.J.; Holland, A.D. [e2v centre for electronic imaging, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Schmitt, T.; Raabe, J.; Schmitt, B. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2013-12-11

    The Super Advanced X-ray Emission Spectrometer (SAXES) at the Swiss Light Source contains a high resolution Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera used for Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS). Using the current CCD-based camera system, the energy-dispersive spectrometer has an energy resolution (E/ΔE) of approximately 12,000 at 930 eV. A recent study predicted that through an upgrade to the grating and camera system, the energy resolution could be improved by a factor of 2. In order to achieve this goal in the spectral domain, the spatial resolution of the CCD must be improved to better than 5 µm from the current 24 µm spatial resolution (FWHM). The 400 eV–1600 eV energy X-rays detected by this spectrometer primarily interact within the field free region of the CCD, producing electron clouds which will diffuse isotropically until they reach the depleted region and buried channel. This diffusion of the charge leads to events which are split across several pixels. Through the analysis of the charge distribution across the pixels, various centroiding techniques can be used to pinpoint the spatial location of the X-ray interaction to the sub-pixel level, greatly improving the spatial resolution achieved. Using the PolLux soft X-ray microspectroscopy endstation at the Swiss Light Source, a beam of X-rays of energies from 200 eV to 1400 eV can be focused down to a spot size of approximately 20 nm. Scanning this spot across the 16 µm square pixels allows the sub-pixel response to be investigated. Previous work has demonstrated the potential improvement in spatial resolution achievable by centroiding events in a standard CCD. An Electron-Multiplying CCD (EM-CCD) has been used to improve the signal to effective readout noise ratio achieved resulting in a worst-case spatial resolution measurement of 4.5±0.2 μm and 3.9±0.1 μm at 530 eV and 680 eV respectively. A method is described that allows the contribution of the X-ray spot size to be deconvolved from these

  7. Developing a CCD camera with high spatial resolution for RIXS in the soft X-ray range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soman, M. R.; Hall, D. J.; Tutt, J. H.; Murray, N. J.; Holland, A. D.; Schmitt, T.; Raabe, J.; Schmitt, B.

    2013-12-01

    The Super Advanced X-ray Emission Spectrometer (SAXES) at the Swiss Light Source contains a high resolution Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera used for Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS). Using the current CCD-based camera system, the energy-dispersive spectrometer has an energy resolution (E/ΔE) of approximately 12,000 at 930 eV. A recent study predicted that through an upgrade to the grating and camera system, the energy resolution could be improved by a factor of 2. In order to achieve this goal in the spectral domain, the spatial resolution of the CCD must be improved to better than 5 μm from the current 24 μm spatial resolution (FWHM). The 400 eV-1600 eV energy X-rays detected by this spectrometer primarily interact within the field free region of the CCD, producing electron clouds which will diffuse isotropically until they reach the depleted region and buried channel. This diffusion of the charge leads to events which are split across several pixels. Through the analysis of the charge distribution across the pixels, various centroiding techniques can be used to pinpoint the spatial location of the X-ray interaction to the sub-pixel level, greatly improving the spatial resolution achieved. Using the PolLux soft X-ray microspectroscopy endstation at the Swiss Light Source, a beam of X-rays of energies from 200 eV to 1400 eV can be focused down to a spot size of approximately 20 nm. Scanning this spot across the 16 μm square pixels allows the sub-pixel response to be investigated. Previous work has demonstrated the potential improvement in spatial resolution achievable by centroiding events in a standard CCD. An Electron-Multiplying CCD (EM-CCD) has been used to improve the signal to effective readout noise ratio achieved resulting in a worst-case spatial resolution measurement of 4.5±0.2 μm and 3.9±0.1 μm at 530 eV and 680 eV respectively. A method is described that allows the contribution of the X-ray spot size to be deconvolved from these

  8. Enhanced Sensitivity for High Spatial Resolution Lipid Analysis by Negative Ion Mode MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Angel, Peggi M.; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Baldwin, H. Scott; Caprioli, Richard

    2012-01-01

    We have achieved enhanced lipid imaging to a ~10 μm spatial resolution using negative ion mode matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry, sublimation of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid as the MALDI matrix and a sample preparation protocol that uses aqueous washes. We report on the effect of treating tissue sections by washing with volatile buffers at different pHs prior to negative ion mode lipid imaging. The results show that washing with ammonium formate, pH 6....

  9. Spatial variability in cortex-muscle coherence investigated with magnetoencephalography and high-density surface electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botter, Alberto; Bourguignon, Mathieu; Jousmäki, Veikko; Hari, Riitta

    2015-01-01

    Cortex-muscle coherence (CMC) reflects coupling between magnetoencephalography (MEG) and surface electromyography (sEMG), being strongest during isometric contraction but absent, for unknown reasons, in some individuals. We used a novel nonmagnetic high-density sEMG (HD-sEMG) electrode grid (36 mm × 12 mm; 60 electrodes separated by 3 mm) to study effects of sEMG recording site, electrode derivation, and rectification on the strength of CMC. Monopolar sEMG from right thenar and 306-channel whole-scalp MEG were recorded from 14 subjects during 4-min isometric thumb abduction. CMC was computed for 60 monopolar, 55 bipolar, and 32 Laplacian HD-sEMG derivations, and two derivations were computed to mimic “macroscopic” monopolar and bipolar sEMG (electrode diameter 9 mm; interelectrode distance 21 mm). With unrectified sEMG, 12 subjects showed statistically significant CMC in 91–95% of the HD-sEMG channels, with maximum coherence at ∼25 Hz. CMC was about a fifth stronger for monopolar than bipolar and Laplacian derivations. Monopolar derivations resulted in most uniform CMC distributions across the thenar and in tightest cortical source clusters in the left rolandic hand area. CMC was 19–27% stronger for HD-sEMG than for “macroscopic” monopolar or bipolar derivations. EMG rectification reduced the CMC peak by a quarter, resulted in a more uniformly distributed CMC across the thenar, and provided more tightly clustered cortical sources than unrectifed sEMGs. Moreover, it revealed CMC at ∼12 Hz. We conclude that HD-sEMG, especially with monopolar derivation, can facilitate detection of CMC and that individual muscle anatomy cannot explain the high interindividual CMC variability. PMID:26354317

  10. Multiplicity and properties of Kepler planet candidates: High spatial imaging and RV studies*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aceituno J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Kepler space telescope is discovering thousands of new planet candidates. However, a follow up program is needed in order to reject false candidates and to fully characterize the bona-fide exoplanets. Our main aims are: 1./ Detect and analyze close companions inside the typical Kepler PSF to study if they are the responsible of the dim in the Kepler light curves, 2./ Study the change in the stellar and planetary parameters due to the presence of an unresolved object, 3./ Help to validate those Kepler Objects of Interest that do not present any object inside the Kepler PSF and 4./ Study the multiplicity rate in planet host candidates. Such a large sample of observed planet host candidates allows us to do statistics about the presence of close (visual or bounded companions to the harboring star. We present here Lucky Imaging observations for a total amount of 98 Kepler Objects of Interest. This technique is based on the acquisition of thousands of very short exposure time images. Then, a selection and combination of a small amount of the best quality frames provides a high resolution image with objects having a 0.1 arcsec PSF. We applied this technique to carry out observations in the Sloan i and Sloan z filters of our Kepler candidates. We find blended objects inside the Kepler PSF for a significant percentage of KOIs. On one hand, only 58.2% of the hosts do not present any object within 6 arcsec. On the other hand, we have found 19 companions closer than 3 arcsec in 17 KOIs. According to their magnitudes and i − z color, 8 of them could be physically bounded to the host star. We are also collecting high-spectral resolution spectroscopuy in order to derive the planet properties.

  11. The Effect of a Winglet on the Spatial Vortex of a Slender Body at High Angle of Attack,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-07

    OF A SLENDER BODY AT HIGH 0)ANGLE OF ATTACK !,D) toF by ~Wang Zixing, Wu Genxing Approved for public release;L"’J Distribution unlimited. q Ui...ATTACK By: Wang Zixing, Wu Genxing English pages: 12 Source: Konggi Donglixue Xuebao, Vol. 3, Nr. 1, 1985, pp. 49-53 Country of origin: China Translated by...U ~ ~ ’~ IL--c-k. au -ILI . W THE EFFECT OF A WINGLET ON THE SPATIAL VORTEX OF A SLENDER BODY AT HIGH ANGLE OF ATTACK Wang Zixing Wu Genxing

  12. Highly noise-tolerant hybrid algorithm for phase retrieval from a single-shot spatial carrier fringe pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhichao; Cheng, Haobo

    2018-01-01

    A highly noise-tolerant hybrid algorithm (NTHA) is proposed in this study for phase retrieval from a single-shot spatial carrier fringe pattern (SCFP), which effectively combines the merits of spatial carrier phase shift method and two dimensional continuous wavelet transform (2D-CWT). NTHA firstly extracts three phase-shifted fringe patterns from the SCFP with one pixel malposition; then calculates phase gradients by subtracting the reference phase from the other two target phases, which are retrieved respectively from three phase-shifted fringe patterns by 2D-CWT; finally, reconstructs the phase map by a least square gradient integration method. Its typical characters include but not limited to: (1) doesn't require the spatial carrier to be constant; (2) the subtraction mitigates edge errors of 2D-CWT; (3) highly noise-tolerant, because not only 2D-CWT is noise-insensitive, but also the noise in the fringe pattern doesn't directly take part in the phase reconstruction as in previous hybrid algorithm. Its feasibility and performances are validated extensively by simulations and contrastive experiments to temporal phase shift method, Fourier transform and 2D-CWT methods.

  13. Hydrological differentiation and spatial distribution of high altitude wetlands in a semi-arid Andean region derived from satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Otto

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available High Altitude Wetlands of the Andes (HAWA belong to a unique type of wetland within the semi-arid high Andean region. Knowledge about HAWA has been derived mainly from studies at single sites within different parts of the Andes at only small time scales. On the one hand, HAWA depend on water provided by glacier streams, snow melt or precipitation. On the other hand, they are suspected to influence hydrology through water retention and vegetation growth altering stream flow velocity. We derived HAWA land cover from satellite data at regional scale and analysed changes in connection with precipitation over the last decade. Perennial and temporal HAWA subtypes can be distinguished by seasonal changes of photosynthetically active vegetation (PAV indicating the perennial or temporal availability of water during the year. HAWA have been delineated within a region of 12 800 km2 situated in the Northwest of Lake Titicaca. The multi-temporal classification method used Normalized Differenced Vegetation Index (NDVI and Normalized Differenced Infrared Index (NDII data derived from two Landsat ETM+ scenes at the end of austral winter (September 2000 and at the end of austral summer (May 2001. The mapping result indicates an unexpected high abundance of HAWA covering about 800 km2 of the study region (6 %. Annual HAWA mapping was computed using NDVI 16-day composites of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS. Analyses on the relation between HAWA and precipitation was based on monthly precipitation data of the Tropical Rain Measurement Mission (TRMM 3B43 and MODIS Eight Day Maximum Snow Extent data (MOD10A2 from 2000 to 2010. We found HAWA subtype specific dependencies on precipitation conditions. A strong relation exists between perennial HAWA and snow fall (r2: 0.82 in dry austral winter months (June to August and between temporal HAWA and precipitation (r2: 0.75 during austral summer

  14. Every photon counts: improving low, mid, and high-spatial frequency errors on astronomical optics and materials with MRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Chris; Lormeau, Jean Pierre; Dumas, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Many astronomical sensing applications operate in low-light conditions; for these applications every photon counts. Controlling mid-spatial frequencies and surface roughness on astronomical optics are critical for mitigating scattering effects such as flare and energy loss. By improving these two frequency regimes higher contrast images can be collected with improved efficiency. Classically, Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) has offered an optical fabrication technique to correct low order errors as well has quilting/print-through errors left over in light-weighted optics from conventional polishing techniques. MRF is a deterministic, sub-aperture polishing process that has been used to improve figure on an ever expanding assortment of optical geometries, such as planos, spheres, on and off axis aspheres, primary mirrors and freeform optics. Precision optics are routinely manufactured by this technology with sizes ranging from 5-2,000mm in diameter. MRF can be used for form corrections; turning a sphere into an asphere or free form, but more commonly for figure corrections achieving figure errors as low as 1nm RMS while using careful metrology setups. Recent advancements in MRF technology have improved the polishing performance expected for astronomical optics in low, mid and high spatial frequency regimes. Deterministic figure correction with MRF is compatible with most materials, including some recent examples on Silicon Carbide and RSA905 Aluminum. MRF also has the ability to produce `perfectly-bad' compensating surfaces, which may be used to compensate for measured or modeled optical deformation from sources such as gravity or mounting. In addition, recent advances in MRF technology allow for corrections of mid-spatial wavelengths as small as 1mm simultaneously with form error correction. Efficient midspatial frequency corrections make use of optimized process conditions including raster polishing in combination with a small tool size. Furthermore, a novel MRF

  15. High spatial resolution hard X-ray microscope using X-ray refractive lens and phase contrast imaging experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Kohmura, Y; Takeuchi, A; Takano, H; Suzuki, Y; Ishikawa, T; Ohigashi, T; Yokosuka, H

    2001-01-01

    A high spatial resolution X-ray microscope was constructed using an X-ray refractive lens as an objective. The spatial resolution was tested using 18 keV X-ray. A 0.4 mu m line and 0.4 mu m space tantalum test pattern was successfully resolved. Using the similar setup with the addition of a phase plate, a Zernike type phase-contrast microscopy experiment was carried out for the phase retrieval of the samples. Two-dimensional phase-contrast images were successfully taken for the first time in the hard X-ray region. Images of a gold mesh sample were analyzed and the validity of this method was indicated. An improvement of the lens, however, is required for the precise phase retrieval of the samples.

  16. High-Order Dimension Synthesis of Planar/Spatial Mechanisms with One-DoF by CAD Variational Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a (computer aided design CAD variational geometry approach for the high-order dimension synthesis of one-DoF mechanisms based on the given velocity/acceleration of a moving platform along a prescribed trajectory. The objective of this approach is to determine the reasonable dimensions of the mechanisms when given the velocity or/and the acceleration of the moving platform along a prescribed trajectory. First, some concepts and mathematical foundations are explained for constructing the velocity/acceleration simulation mechanism of a general mechanism. Second, the inverse velocity/acceleration simulation mechanisms of the planar/spatial four-bar mechanisms with one-DoF are constructed by the CAD variational geometry. Third, when given the position and the velocity/acceleration of the coupler along a prescribed trajectory, all the reasonable dimensions of the planar/spatial four-bar mechanisms are solved from their simulation mechanisms.

  17. Two color multichannel heterodyne interferometer set up for high spatial resolution electron density profile measurements in TJ-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedreira, P.; Criado, A. R.; Acedo, P. [Department of Electronics Technology, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Leganes, Madrid 28911 (Spain); Esteban, L.; Sanchez, M.; Sanchez, J. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por ConfinamientoMagnetico-CIEMAT, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    A high spatial resolution two color [CO{sub 2}, {lambda}=10.6 {mu}m/Nd:YAG (Nd:YAG denotes neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet), and {lambda}=1.064 {mu}m] expanded-beam multichannel heterodyne interferometer has been installed on the TJ-II stellarator. Careful design of the optical system has allowed complete control on the evolution of both Gaussian beams along the interferometer, as well as the evaluation and optimization of the spatial resolution to be expected in the measurements. Five CO{sub 2} (measurement) channels and three Nd:YAG (vibration compensation) channels have been used to illuminate the plasma with a probe beam of 100 mm size. An optimum interpolation method has been applied to recover both interferometric phasefronts prior to mechanical vibration subtraction. The first results of the installed diagnostic are presented in this paper.

  18. Large Area and High Efficiency Photon Counting Imaging Detectors with High Time and Spatial Resolution for Night Time Sensing and Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, O.; Vallerga, J.; Tremsin, A.; McPhate, J.; Frisch, H.; Elam, J.; Mane, A.; Wagner, R.; Varner, G.

    2012-09-01

    The development of large area photon counting, imaging, timing detectors with high performance has significance for applications in astronomy (such as our sensor on the SAAO SALT 10m telescope), night time remote reconnaissance, airborne/space situational awareness, and high-speed adaptive optics. Sealed tube configurations for optical/IR sensing also have applications in detection of Cherenkov light (RICH), biological single-molecule fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and neutron imaging applications. In open faced configurations these devices are important for UV and particle detection in space astrophysics, mass spectroscopy and many time-of flight applications. Currently available devices are limited to sizes of about 5 cm and use either conventional microchannel plates, or dynode multipliers for amplification, coupled coarse pad array readouts. Extension of these schemes to devices as large as 20 cm with high spatial resolution presents significant problems and potentially considerable cost. A collaboration (Large Area Picosecond Photon Detector) of the U. Chicago, Argonne National Laboratory, U.C. Berkeley, U. Hawaii and a number of other institutions has developed novel technologies to realize 20 cm format detectors in open face or sealed tube configurations. One critical component of this development is novel microchannel plates employing borosilicate micro-capillary arrays. The microchannel plates are based on a novel concept where the substrate is constructed from a borosilicate micro-capillary array that is made to function as a microchannel plate by deposition of resistive and secondary emissive layers using atomic layer deposition. The process is relatively inexpensive compared with conventional microchannel plates and allows very large microchannel plates to be produced with pore sizes as small as 10 microns. These provide many performance characteristics typical of conventional microchannel plates, but have been made in sizes up to 20 cm, have

  19. High spatial resolution observations of NGC 7027 with a 10 micron array camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, J. F.; Lamb, G. M.; Peck, M. C.; Moseley, H.; Hoffmann, W. F.; Tresch-Fienberg, R.; Fazio, G. G.

    1984-01-01

    First observations of a planetary nebula with an infrared charge injection device (CID) array camera are reported. The 10 micron images of NGC 7027 have spatial resolution comparable to that of the highest resolution (less than 2 arcsec) radio aperture-synthesis maps of this source. A much closer correspondence between the mid-infrared and radio appearance of NGC 7027 was found than was known previously, confirming that warm dust is coextensive and well mixed with the gas in the ionized zone. Using maps at three wavelengths, the spatial dependence of the shape of the 8-13 micron spectrum within the nebula is examined. The dip at 9.60 microns is shallowest in regions of enhanced optical extinction (as determined from new images near 4000 and 9000 A obtained with an optical charge coupled device). The 9.60 micron emission is strongest in these same positions. It is shown that the results may be explained not by silicate absorption, but by a combination of emission from two distinct grain populations, one of which is also partly responsible for the variation in extinction across the nebula.

  20. Development of a compact and high spatial resolution gamma camera system using LaBr 3(Ce)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Imaizumi, Masao; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun

    2010-10-01

    In small animal imaging using a single photon emitting radionuclide, a high spatial resolution gamma camera is required. However, its spatial resolution is limited by the light output of conventional scintillators such as NaI(Tl). We developed and tested a small field-of-view (FOV) gamma camera using a new scintillator, LaBr3(Ce). The LaBr3(Ce) gamma camera consists of a 2 mm thick LaBr3(Ce) scintillator, a 2 in. 8×8 multi-anode position sensitive photomultiplier tube (Hamamatsu H8500), and a personal computer-based data acquisition system. The LaBr3(Ce) scintillator was directly coupled to the PSPMT and was contained in a hermetically shielded and light tight aluminum case. The signals from the PSPMT were gain corrected, weighted summed, and digitized by 100 MHz free running A-D converters in the data acquisition system. The detector part of the gamma camera was encased in a tungsten gamma shield, and a tungsten pinhole collimator was mounted in front of the detector surface. The intrinsic spatial resolution that was measured using a tungsten slit mask was 0.75 mm FWHM, and the energy resolution was 8.9% FWHM for 122 keV gamma photons. We obtained transmission and emission images that demonstrated the high spatial resolution of the gamma camera system. Approximately two years after the fabrication of the detector, the flood image showed significant distortion due to the change in LaBr3(Ce) of its hygroscopic characteristic. These results confirm that the developed LaBr3(Ce) gamma camera is promising for small animal imaging using a low energy single photon emitting radionuclide if the hygroscopic problem of LaBr3(Ce) will be solved.

  1. OSIS: remote sensing code for estimating aerosol optical properties in urban areas from very high spatial resolution images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Colin; Briottet, Xavier; Santer, Richard

    2011-10-01

    The achievement of new satellite or airborne remote sensing instruments enables the more precise study of cities with metric spatial resolutions. For studies such as the radiative characterization of urban features, knowledge of the atmosphere and particularly of aerosols is required to perform first an atmospheric compensation of the remote sensing images. However, to our knowledge, no efficient aerosol characterization technique adapted both to urban areas and to very high spatial resolution images has yet been developed. The goal of this paper is so to present a new code to characterize aerosol optical properties, OSIS, adapted to urban remote sensing images of metric spatial resolution acquired in the visible and near-IR spectral domains. First, a new aerosol characterization method based on the observation of shadow/sun transitions is presented, offering the advantage to avoid the assessment of target reflectances. Its principle and the modeling of the signal used to solve the retrieval equation are then detailed. Finally, a sensitivity study of OSIS from synthetic images simulated by the radiative transfer code AMARTIS v2 is also presented. This study has shown an intrinsic precision of this tool of Δτ(a)=0.1.τ(a) ± (0.02 + 0.4.τ(a)) for retrieval of aerosol optical thicknesses. This study shows that OSIS is a powerful tool for aerosol characterization that has a precision similar to satellite products for the aerosol optical thicknesses retrieval and that can be applied to every very high spatial resolution instrument, multispectral or hyperspectral, airborne or satellite.

  2. PROVIDING STRINGENT STAR FORMATION RATE LIMITS OF z ∼ 2 QSO HOST GALAXIES AT HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vayner, Andrey; Wright, Shelley A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H4 (Canada); Do, Tuan [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H4 (Canada); Larkin, James E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Armus, Lee [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gallagher, S. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2016-04-10

    We present integral field spectrograph (IFS) with laser guide star adaptive optics (LGS-AO) observations of z ∼ 2 quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) designed to resolve extended nebular line emission from the host galaxy. Our data was obtained with W. M. Keck and Gemini North Observatories, using OSIRIS and NIFS coupled with the LGS-AO systems, respectively. We have conducted a pilot survey of five QSOs, three observed with NIFS+AO and two observed with OSIRIS+AO at an average redshift of z = 2.2. We demonstrate that the combination of AO and IFSs provides the necessary spatial and spectral resolutions required to separate QSO emission from its host. We present our technique for generating a point-spread function (PSF) from the broad-line region of the QSO and performing PSF subtraction of the QSO emission to detect the host galaxy emission at a separation of ∼0.″2 (∼1.4 kpc). We detect Hα narrow-line emission for two sources, SDSS J1029+6510 (z{sub Hα} = 2.182) and SDSS J0925+0655 (z{sub Hα} = 2.197), that have evidence for both star formation and extended narrow-line emission. Assuming that the majority of narrow-line Hα emission is from star formation, we infer a star formation rate (SFR) for SDSS J1029+6510 of 78.4 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} originating from a compact region that is kinematically offset by 290–350 km s{sup −1}. For SDSS J0925+0655 we infer a SFR of 29 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} distributed over three clumps that are spatially offset by ∼7 kpc. The null detections on three of the QSOs are used to infer surface brightness limits and we find that at 1.4 kpc from the QSO the un-reddened star formation limit is ≲0.3 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} kpc{sup −2}. If we assume typical extinction values for z = 2 type-1 QSOs, the dereddened SFR for our null detections would be ≲0.6 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} kpc{sup −2}. These IFS observations indicate that while the central black hole is accreting mass at 10%–40% of the Eddington rate, if

  3. The costs and cost-efficiency of providing food through schools in areas of high food insecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelli, Aulo; Al-Shaiba, Najeeb; Espejo, Francisco

    2009-03-01

    The provision of food in and through schools has been used to support the education, health, and nutrition of school-aged children. The monitoring of financial inputs into school health and nutrition programs is critical for a number of reasons, including accountability, transparency, and equity. Furthermore, there is a gap in the evidence on the costs, cost-efficiency, and cost-effectiveness of providing food through schools, particularly in areas of high food insecurity. To estimate the programmatic costs and cost-efficiency associated with providing food through schools in food-insecure, developing-country contexts, by analyzing global project data from the World Food Programme (WFP). Project data, including expenditures and number of schoolchildren covered, were collected through project reports and validated through WFP Country Office records. Yearly project costs per schoolchild were standardized over a set number of feeding days and the amount of energy provided by the average ration. Output metrics, such as tonnage, calories, and micronutrient content, were used to assess the cost-efficiency of the different delivery mechanisms. The average yearly expenditure per child, standardized over a 200-day on-site feeding period and an average ration, excluding school-level costs, was US$21.59. The costs varied substantially according to choice of food modality, with fortified biscuits providing the least costly option of about US$11 per year and take-home rations providing the most expensive option at approximately US$52 per year. Comparisons across the different food modalities suggested that fortified biscuits provide the most cost-efficient option in terms of micronutrient delivery (particularly vitamin A and iodine), whereas on-site meals appear to be more efficient in terms of calories delivered. Transportation and logistics costs were the main drivers for the high costs. The choice of program objectives will to a large degree dictate the food modality

  4. The perceptions of teachers and principals toward providing additional compensation to teachers in high-need subject areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longing, Jeffrey Lucian

    The purpose of this study was to determine possible differences in the perceptions of teachers teaching in high-need areas (i.e., math, science, special education, etc.) and teachers not teaching in high-need areas, (i.e., business education, physical education, etc.) as defined by the states of Arkansas and Louisiana, regarding higher compensation for high-need teachers. In addition, possible perception differences among principals and teachers were determined. The independent variables consisted of gender, position held, years of certified experience, and certification areas. The dependent variable was the perceptions of the participants on providing higher compensation for high-need teachers in order to attract and retain them. The data for all variables were collected using the Teacher Compensation Survey. The sample for this study was limited to teachers, grades 9 through 12, and principals of public high schools in south Arkansas and north Louisiana. Forty-four school districts in south Arkansas (Arkansas Department of Education, 2008a) and north Louisiana (Louisiana Department of Education, 2008a) met the criteria for this study. Twenty-two superintendents gave permission for their districts to participate in the research. A sample of 849 teachers and 38 principals were identified in these districts. Surveys were returned from 350 teachers, creating a 41% response rate. When the 31 principals that returned surveys were added to the total population, the response rate increased to 43% with 381 of the 887 surveyed responding. However, 42 of the teachers and two of the principals skipped some of the questions on the survey and were not included in the study. The researcher used a One-Way ANOVA and independent t-tests to determine the presence of statistical differences at the .05 level. The data showed that most math and science teachers agreed that high-need teachers should be compensated at a higher rate than teachers not teaching in high-need areas. The data

  5. Abstinence and teenagers: prevention counseling practices of health care providers serving high-risk patients in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Cynthia C; Henderson, Jillian T; Schalet, Amy; Becker, Davida; Stratton, Laura; Raine, Tina R

    2010-06-01

    Abstinence-only education has had little demonstrable impact on teenagers' sexual behaviors, despite significant policy and funding efforts. Given the struggle over resources to improve teenagers' reproductive health outcomes, the views of clinicians serving teenagers at high risk for unintended pregnancy and STDs merit particular attention. In 2005, a qualitative study with 31 clinicians serving low-income, at-risk patients was conducted. A semistructured interview guide was used to ask clinicians about adolescent pregnancy, HIV and STD prevention counseling, and when they include abstinence. Thematic content analysis was used to examine the content of the counseling and the techniques used in different situations. Providers reported offering comprehensive counseling, presenting abstinence as a choice for teenagers, along with information about contraceptives and condoms. Several providers mentioned that with young, sexually inexperienced teenagers, they discuss delaying sexual activity and suggest other ways to be affectionate, while giving information on condoms. Providers explained how they assess whether teenagers feel ready to be sexually active and try to impart skills for healthy relationships. Some described abstinence as giving teenagers a way to opt out of unwanted sexual activity. Many support abstinence if that is the patient's desire, but routinely dispense condoms and contraceptives. Overall, providers did not give abstinence counseling as a rigid categorical concept in their preventive practices, but as a health tool to give agency to teenagers within a harm reduction framework. Their approach may be informative for adolescent policies and programs in the future.

  6. Harmful Algal Bloom Characterization at Ultra-High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Using Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Merwe, Deon; Price, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) degrade water quality and produce toxins. The spatial distribution of HAbs may change rapidly due to variations wind, water currents, and population dynamics. Risk assessments, based on traditional sampling methods, are hampered by the sparseness of water sample data points, and delays between sampling and the availability of results. There is a need for local risk assessment and risk management at the spatial and temporal resolution relevant to local human and animal interactions at specific sites and times. Small, unmanned aircraft systems can gather color-infrared reflectance data at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions, with full control over data collection timing, and short intervals between data gathering and result availability. Data can be interpreted qualitatively, or by generating a blue normalized difference vegetation index (BNDVI) that is correlated with cyanobacterial biomass densities at the water surface, as estimated using a buoyant packed cell volume (BPCV). Correlations between BNDVI and BPCV follow a logarithmic model, with r2-values under field conditions from 0.77 to 0.87. These methods provide valuable information that is complimentary to risk assessment data derived from traditional risk assessment methods, and could help to improve risk management at the local level. PMID:25826055

  7. Harmful Algal Bloom Characterization at Ultra-High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Using Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deon Van der Merwe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Harmful algal blooms (HABs degrade water quality and produce toxins. The spatial distribution of HAbs may change rapidly due to variations wind, water currents, and population dynamics. Risk assessments, based on traditional sampling methods, are hampered by the sparseness of water sample data points, and delays between sampling and the availability of results. There is a need for local risk assessment and risk management at the spatial and temporal resolution relevant to local human and animal interactions at specific sites and times. Small, unmanned aircraft systems can gather color-infrared reflectance data at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions, with full control over data collection timing, and short intervals between data gathering and result availability. Data can be interpreted qualitatively, or by generating a blue normalized difference vegetation index (BNDVI that is correlated with cyanobacterial biomass densities at the water surface, as estimated using a buoyant packed cell volume (BPCV. Correlations between BNDVI and BPCV follow a logarithmic model, with r2-values under field conditions from 0.77 to 0.87. These methods provide valuable information that is complimentary to risk assessment data derived from traditional risk assessment methods, and could help to improve risk management at the local level.

  8. Harmful algal bloom characterization at ultra-high spatial and temporal resolution using small unmanned aircraft systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Merwe, Deon; Price, Kevin P

    2015-03-27

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) degrade water quality and produce toxins. The spatial distribution of HAbs may change rapidly due to variations wind, water currents, and population dynamics. Risk assessments, based on traditional sampling methods, are hampered by the sparseness of water sample data points, and delays between sampling and the availability of results. There is a need for local risk assessment and risk management at the spatial and temporal resolution relevant to local human and animal interactions at specific sites and times. Small, unmanned aircraft systems can gather color-infrared reflectance data at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions, with full control over data collection timing, and short intervals between data gathering and result availability. Data can be interpreted qualitatively, or by generating a blue normalized difference vegetation index (BNDVI) that is correlated with cyanobacterial biomass densities at the water surface, as estimated using a buoyant packed cell volume (BPCV). Correlations between BNDVI and BPCV follow a logarithmic model, with r(2)-values under field conditions from 0.77 to 0.87. These methods provide valuable information that is complimentary to risk assessment data derived from traditional risk assessment methods, and could help to improve risk management at the local level.

  9. High-resolution mapping of the NO2 spatial distribution over Belgian urban areas based on airborne APEX remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Frederik; Merlaud, Alexis; Iordache, Marian-Daniel; Danckaert, Thomas; Yu, Huan; Fayt, Caroline; Meuleman, Koen; Deutsch, Felix; Fierens, Frans; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2017-05-01

    We present retrieval results of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) vertical column densities (VCDs), mapped at high spatial resolution over three Belgian cities, based on the DOAS analysis of Airborne Prism EXperiment (APEX) observations. APEX, developed by a Swiss-Belgian consortium on behalf of ESA (European Space Agency), is a pushbroom hyperspectral imager characterised by a high spatial resolution and high spectral performance. APEX data have been acquired under clear-sky conditions over the two largest and most heavily polluted Belgian cities, i.e. Antwerp and Brussels on 15 April and 30 June 2015. Additionally, a number of background sites have been covered for the reference spectra. The APEX instrument was mounted in a Dornier DO-228 aeroplane, operated by Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR). NO2 VCDs were retrieved from spatially aggregated radiance spectra allowing urban plumes to be resolved at the resolution of 60 × 80 m2. The main sources in the Antwerp area appear to be related to the (petro)chemical industry while traffic-related emissions dominate in Brussels. The NO2 levels observed in Antwerp range between 3 and 35 × 1015 molec cm-2, with a mean VCD of 17.4 ± 3.7 × 1015 molec cm-2. In the Brussels area, smaller levels are found, ranging between 1 and 20 × 1015 molec cm-2 and a mean VCD of 7.7 ± 2.1 × 1015 molec cm-2. The overall errors on the retrieved NO2 VCDs are on average 21 and 28 % for the Antwerp and Brussels data sets. Low VCD retrievals are mainly limited by noise (1σ slant error), while high retrievals are mainly limited by systematic errors. Compared to coincident car mobile-DOAS measurements taken in Antwerp and Brussels, both data sets are in good agreement with correlation coefficients around 0.85 and slopes close to unity. APEX retrievals tend to be, on average, 12 and 6 % higher for Antwerp and Brussels, respectively. Results demonstrate that the NO2 distribution in an urban environment, and its fine

  10. Physicians' assessments of their ability to provide high-quality care in a changing health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschovsky, J; Reed, M; Blumenthal, D; Landon, B

    2001-03-01

    With the growth of managed care, there are increasing concerns but inconclusive evidence regarding deterioration in the quality of medical care. To assess physicians' perceptions of their ability to provide high-quality care and explore what factors, including managed care, affect these perceptions. Bivariate and multivariate analyses of the Community Tracking Study Physician Survey, a cross-sectional, nationally representative telephone survey of 12,385 patient-care physicians conducted in 1996/1997. The response rate was 65%. Physicians who provide direct patient care for > or =20 h/wk, excluding federal employees and those in selected specialties. Level of agreement with 4 statements: 1 regarding overall ability to provide high-quality care and 3 regarding aspects of care delivery associated with quality. Between 21% and 31% of physicians disagreed with the quality statements. Specialists were generally 50% more likely than primary care physicians to express concerns about their ability to provide quality care. Generally, the number of managed care contracts, but not the percent of practice revenue from managed care, was negatively associated with perceived quality. Market-level managed care penetration independently affected physicians' perceptions. Practice setting affected perceptions of quality, with physicians in group settings less likely to express concerns than physicians in solo and 2-physician practices. Specific financial incentives and care management tools had limited positive or negative associations with perceived quality. Managed care involvement is only modestly associated with reduced perceptions of quality among physicians, with some specific tools enhancing perceived quality. Physicians may be able to moderate some negative effects of managed care by altering their practice arrangements.

  11. Full-field, high-spatial-resolution detection of local structural damage from low-resolution random strain field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongchao; Sun, Peng; Nagarajaiah, Satish; Bachilo, Sergei M.; Weisman, R. Bruce

    2017-07-01

    Structural damage is typically a local phenomenon that initiates and propagates within a limited area. As such high spatial resolution measurement and monitoring is often needed for accurate damage detection. This requires either significantly increased costs from denser sensor deployment in the case of global simultaneous/parallel measurements, or increased measurement time and labor in the case of global sequential measurements. This study explores the feasibility of an alternative approach to this problem: a computational solution in which a limited set of randomly positioned, low-resolution global strain measurements are used to reconstruct the full-field, high-spatial-resolution, two-dimensional (2D) strain field and rapidly detect local damage. The proposed approach exploits the implicit low-rank and sparse data structure of the 2D strain field: it is highly correlated without many edges and hence has a low-rank structure, unless damage-manifesting itself as sparse local irregularity-is present and alters such a low-rank structure slightly. Therefore, reconstruction of the full-field, high-spatial-resolution strain field from a limited set of randomly positioned low-resolution global measurements is modeled as a low-rank matrix completion framework and damage detection as a sparse decomposition formulation, enabled by emerging convex optimization techniques. Numerical simulations on a plate structure are conducted for validation. The results are discussed and a practical iterative global/local procedure is recommended. This new computational approach should enable the efficient detection of local damage using limited sets of strain measurements.

  12. High spatial resolution mapping of water quality and bathymetry with an autonomous underwater vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampalone, Vincenzo; Milici, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    The drone Ecomapper AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) is a rare example of highly technological instrument in the environmental coastal monitoring field. The YSI EcoMapper is a one-man deployable, Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) designed to collect bathymetry and water quality data. The submarine-like vehicle follows a programmed course and employs sensors mounted in the nose to record pertinent information. Once the vehicle has started its mission, it operates independently of the user and utilizes GPS waypoints navigation to complete its programmed course. Throughout the course, the vehicle constantly steers toward the line drawn in the mission planning software (VectorMap), essentially following a more accurate road of coordinates instead of transversing waypoint-to-waypoint. It has been equipped with a Doppler Velocity Log (DVL) to increase its underwater navigation accuracy. Potential EcoMapper applications include baseline environmental mapping in freshwater, estuarine or near-coastal environments, bathymetric mapping, dissolved oxygen studies, event monitoring (algal blooms, storm impacts, low dissolved oxygen), non-point source studies, point-source dispersion mapping, security, search & rescue, inspection, shallow water mapping, thermal dissipation mapping of cooling outfalls, trace-dye studies. The AUV is used in the coastal area of the Augusta Bay (Italy), located in the eastern part of Sicily. Due to the heavy contamination generated by the several chemical and petrochemical industries active in the zone, the harbour was declared a Contaminated Site of National Interest. The ecomapper allows for a simultaneous data collection of water quality and bathymetric data providing a complete environmental mapping system of the Harbour.

  13. Checking Asymmetry of Magnetic Helicity Using Magnetograms with High Spatial and Temporal Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lirong; Zhu, C.; Alexander, D.

    2010-05-01

    In order to check if the helicity imbalance is robust between the leading and following polarities, found by Tian & Alexander, we use an improved technique, differential affline velocity estimator (DAVE), on series of MDI 1m and 96m line-of-sight magnetograms with spatial resolution of 0.6 and 2 arcsecs. respectively, to measure photospheric flow motions of an emerging active region: NOAA 10365 (S08). A better parameter of helicity density (Gθ) than GA is employed to calculate helicity injection rate of leading and following polarities. Our results display that the helicity injection rate of using MDI/1m data is 2 times larger than that of using MDI/ 96m data. The helicity injection rate is little affected by the size of apodizing window selected and the noise level (20 Gauss). However, it is improved so much due to decreasing time difference (up to Δt=10 mines) of two images tracked. The helicity injection rate of two polarities of the active region developed as roughly same step with flux emergence,and maintain its imbalance with more amount in the negative (leading) polarity over tracking period of three days, which is a similar development tendency no matter using MDI/1m data or MDI/96m data. These results reflect that the time difference of two tracking images is the most important factor affecting amount of helicity injection rate, while there is little relation with spatial resolution of data, the size of apodizing window, and the noise level. Therefore, it should be reliable to study the development of helicity injection rate and imbalanced relationship of two polarities when using MDI/96m data, though the amount calculated is two times smaller. Further test for MDI/96m data of ARs 8214 and 0656 confirm that the helicity imbalance indeed exists between the leading and following polarities.

  14. Spatial and temporal patterns of sea ice variations in Vilkitsky strait, Russian High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ci, T.; Cheng, X.; Hui, F.

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean has been greatly affected by climate change. Future predications show an even more drastic reduction of the ice cap which will open new areas for the exploration of natural resources and maritime transportation.Shipping through the Arctic Ocean via the Northern Sea Route (NSR) could save about 40% of the sailing distance from Asia (Yokohama) to Europe (Rotterdam) compared to the traditional route via the Suez Canal. Vilkitsky strait is the narrowest and northest portion of the Northern Sea Route with heaviest traffic between the Taimyr Peninsular and the Severnaya Zemlya archipelago. The preliminary results of sea ice variations are presented by using moderate-resolution imaging spectro radiometer(MODIS) data with 250-m resolution in the Vilkitsky strait during 2009-2012. Temporally, the first rupture on sea ice in Vilkitsky strait usually comes up in April and sea ice completely break into pieces in early June. The strait would be ice-free between August and late September. The frequency of ice floes grows while temperature falls down in October. There are always one or two months suitable for transport. Spatially, Sea ice on Laptev sea side breaks earlier than that of Kara sea side while sea ice in central of strait breaks earlier than in shoreside. The phenomena are directly related with the direction of sea wind and ocean current. In summmary, study on Spatial and temporal patterns in this area is significant for the NSR. An additional research issue to be tackled is to seeking the trends of ice-free duration in the context of global warming. Envisat ASAR data will also be used in this study.

  15. High spatial resolution WorldView-2 imagery for mapping NDVI and its relationship to temporal urban landscape evapotranspiration factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Hamideh; Beecham, Simon; Anderson, Sharolyn; Nagler, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Evapotranspiration estimation has benefitted from recent advances in remote sensing and GIS techniques particularly in agricultural applications rather than urban environments. This paper explores the relationship between urban vegetation evapotranspiration (ET) and vegetation indices derived from newly-developed high spatial resolution WorldView-2 imagery. The study site was Veale Gardens in Adelaide, Australia. Image processing was applied on five images captured from February 2012 to February 2013 using ERDAS Imagine. From 64 possible two band combinations of WorldView-2, the most reliable one (with the maximum median differences) was selected. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values were derived for each category of landscape cover, namely trees, shrubs, turf grasses, impervious pavements, and water bodies. Urban landscape evapotranspiration rates for Veale Gardens were estimated through field monitoring using observational-based landscape coefficients. The relationships between remotely sensed NDVIs for the entire Veale Gardens and for individual NDVIs of different vegetation covers were compared with field measured urban landscape evapotranspiration rates. The water stress conditions experienced in January 2013 decreased the correlation between ET and NDVI with the highest relationship of ET-Landscape NDVI (Landscape Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) for shrubs (r2 = 0.66) and trees (r2 = 0.63). However, when the January data was excluded, there was a significant correlation between ET and NDVI. The highest correlation for ET-Landscape NDVI was found for the entire Veale Gardens regardless of vegetation type (r2 = 0.95, p > 0.05) and the lowest one was for turf (r2 = 0.88, p > 0.05). In support of the feasibility of ET estimation by WV2 over a longer period, an algorithm recently developed that estimates evapotranspiration rates based on the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) from MODIS was employed. The results revealed a significant positive

  16. Reconciling nature conservation and traditional farming practices: a spatially explicit framework to assess the extent of High Nature Value farmlands in the European countryside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomba, Angela; Alves, Paulo; Jongman, Rob H G; McCracken, David I

    2015-03-01

    Agriculture constitutes a dominant land cover worldwide, and rural landscapes under extensive farming practices acknowledged due to high biodiversity levels. The High Nature Value farmland (HNVf) concept has been highlighted in the EU environmental and rural policies due to their inherent potential to help characterize and direct financial support to European landscapes where high nature and/or conservation value is dependent on the continuation of specific low-intensity farming systems. Assessing the extent of HNV farmland by necessity relies on the availability of both ecological and farming systems' data, and difficulties associated with making such assessments have been widely described across Europe. A spatially explicit framework of data collection, building out from local administrative units, has recently been suggested as a means of addressing such difficulties. This manuscript tests the relevance of the proposed approach, describes the spatially explicit framework in a case study area in northern Portugal, and discusses the potential of the approach to help better inform the implementation of conservation and rural development policies. Synthesis and applications: The potential of a novel approach (combining land use/cover, farming and environmental data) to provide more accurate and efficient mapping and monitoring of HNV farmlands is tested at the local level in northern Portugal. The approach is considered to constitute a step forward toward a more precise targeting of landscapes for agri-environment schemes, as it allowed a more accurate discrimination of areas within the case study landscape that have a higher value for nature conservation.

  17. Medical School Anatomy and Pathology Workshops for High School Students Enhance Learning and Provide Inspiration for Careers in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenderson, Bruce A.; Veloski, J. Jon; Livesey, Michael; Wojdon-Smith, Tracey

    2016-01-01

    “Anatomy and Pathology Workshop” is a cadaver-based outreach program that models medical education to large groups of high school students. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of this program on students’ knowledge of anatomy and interest in biomedical science. A total of 144 high school students participated in the workshop in 2015. Preworkshop and postworkshop assessments were administered to assess students’ learning. A postworkshop survey was conducted to solicit students’ reflections and feedback. It was found that student performance in the postworkshop examination (mean 78%) had significantly improved when compared to the performance in the preexamination (mean 54%), indicating that this program enhances learning. Students were also inspired to consider opportunities in medicine and allied health professions—97% indicated that they had a better understanding of medical education; 95% agreed that they had better understanding of the human body; 84% thought anatomy was interesting and exciting; and 62% of the students indicated that they looked forward to studying medicine or another health profession. Students rated the instructors highly—95% agreed that the instructors were professional and served as role models. Medical/graduate student instructors were also highly regarded by the high school students—96% thought it was valuable to have student instructors and 94% thought that student instructors were caring and enthusiastic about teaching. In summary, this study demonstrates that outreach programs provided by medical schools help young adults during their formative years by modeling professionalism, providing role models, enhancing learning, and encouraging many to consider opportunities in the health professions. PMID:28725784

  18. Spatial-temporal structure of seismicity of the North Tien Shan and its changeunder effect of high energy electromagnetic pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Tarasova

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of high-energy electromagnetic pulses emitted by a magnetohydrodynamic generator used as a source for deep electrical sounding of the crust on spatial-temporal structure of seismicity of the North Tien Shan is explored. Five-six years periodicity of changes in spatial distribution of seismicity was revealed. The effect of electromagnetic pulses increases the stability of the spatial distribution of seismicity over time and simultaneously speeds up cycles of its transformations, which develop on stabilization background. Increasing of seismic energy release after electromagnetic impacts is observed basically in most active zones. Periodic variation of efficiency of earthquakes triggering on the distance to the MHD-generator was detected. It was shown that electromagnetic pulses give rise to an appreciable increase in the rate of local earthquakes, occurring around 2-6 days after the pulses. Total earthquakes energy released after start-ups was by 2.03·1015 J greater than the energy released before them. At the same time, the total energy transmitted by the MHD-generator was 1.1·109 J, i.e. six orders of magnitude smaller. Consequently, the electromagnetic pulses initiated the release of the energy that had been stored in the crust due to activity of natural tectonic processes in the form of comparatively small earthquakes, which leads to an additional release of tectonic stresses.

  19. Development of high-spatial and high-mass resolution mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) and its application to the study of small metabolites and endogenous molecules of plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Ji Hyun [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    High-spatial and high-mass resolution laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric (MS) imaging technology was developed for the attainment of MS images of higher quality containing more information on the relevant cellular and molecular biology in unprecedented depth. The distribution of plant metabolites is asymmetric throughout the cells and tissues, and therefore the increase in the spatial resolution was pursued to reveal the localization of plant metabolites at the cellular level by MS imaging. For achieving high-spatial resolution, the laser beam size was reduced by utilizing an optical fiber with small core diameter (25 μm) in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer. Matrix application was greatly improved using oscillating capillary nebulizer. As a result, single cell level spatial resolution of ~ 12 μm was achieved. MS imaging at this high spatial resolution was directly applied to a whole Arabidopsis flower and the substructures of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anther were successfully visualized. MS imaging of high spatial resolution was also demonstrated to the secondary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana and a high degree of localization of detected metabolites was successfully unveiled. This was the first MS imaging on the root for molecular species. MS imaging with high mass resolution was also achieved by utilizing the LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer for the direct identification of the surface metabolites on the Arabidopsis stem and root and differentiation of isobaric ions having the same nominal mass with no need of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS imaging at high-spatial and high-mass resolution was also applied to cer1 mutant of the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to demonstrate its usefulness in biological studies and reveal associated metabolite changes in terms of spatial distribution and/or abundances compared to those of wild-type. The spatial

  20. HiRadMat at CERN/SPS - A dedicated facility providing high intensity beam pulses to material samples

    CERN Multimedia

    Charitonidis, N; Efthymiopoulos, I

    2014-01-01

    HiRadMat (High Radiation to Materials), constructed in 2011, is a facility at CERN designed to provide high‐intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, high power beam targets, collimators…) can be tested. The facility uses a 440 GeV proton beam extracted from the CERN SPS with a pulse length of up to 7.2 us, and with a maximum pulse energy of 3.4 MJ (3xE13 proton/pulse). In addition to protons, ion beams with energy of 440 GeV/charge and total pulse energy of 21 kJ can be provided. The beam parameters can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. HiRadMat is not an irradiation facility where large doses on equipment can be accumulated. It is rather a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high‐intensity pulsed beams on materials or accelerator component assemblies in a controlled environment. The fa‐ cility is designed for a maximum of 1E16 protons per year, dist...

  1. Developing high-resolution spatial data of migration corridors for avian species of concern in regions of high potential wind development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katzner, Todd [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2014-06-15

    The future of the US economy, our national security, and our environmental quality all depend on decreasing our reliance on foreign oil and on fossil fuels. An essential component of decreasing this reliance is the development of alternative energy sources. Wind power is among the most important alternative energy sources currently available, and the mid-Atlantic region is a primary focus for wind power development. In addition to being important to the development of wind power, the mid-Atlantic region holds a special responsibility for the conservation of the eastern North America's golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos). This small population breeds in northeastern Canada, winters in the southern Appalachians, and nearly all of these birds pass through the mid-Atlantic region twice each year. Movement of these birds is not random and, particularly during spring and autumn, migrating golden eagles concentrate in a narrow 30-50 mile wide corridor in central Pennsylvania. Thus, because the fate of these rare birds may depend on responsible management of the habitat they use it is critical to use research to identify ways to mitigate prospective impacts on this and similar raptor species. The goal of this project was to develop high-resolution spatial risk maps showing migration corridors of and habitat use by eastern golden eagles in regions of high potential for wind development. To accomplish this, we first expanded existing models of raptor migration for the eastern USA to identify broad-scale migration patterns. We then used data from novel high-resolution tracking devices to discover routes of passage and detailed flight behavior of individual golden eagles throughout the eastern USA. Finally, we integrated these data and models to predict population-level migration patterns and individual eagle flight behavior on migration. We then used this information to build spatially explicit, probabilistic maps showing relative risk to birds from wind development. This

  2. Potential of High Spatial and Temporal Ocean Color Satellite Data to Study the Dynamics of Suspended Particles in a Micro-Tidal River Plume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouck Ody

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ocean color satellite sensors are powerful tools to study and monitor the dynamics of suspended particulate matter (SPM discharged by rivers in coastal waters. In this study, we test the capabilities of Landsat-8/Operational Land Imager (OLI, AQUA&TERRA/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and MSG-3/Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI sensors in terms of spectral, spatial and temporal resolutions to (i estimate the seawater reflectance signal and then SPM concentrations and (ii monitor the dynamics of SPM in the Rhône River plume characterized by moderately turbid surface waters in a micro-tidal sea. Consistent remote-sensing reflectance (Rrs values are retrieved in the red spectral bands of these four satellite sensors (median relative difference less than ~16% in turbid waters. By applying a regional algorithm developed from in situ data, these Rrs are used to estimate SPM concentrations in the Rhône river plume. The spatial resolution of OLI provides a detailed mapping of the SPM concentration from the downstream part of the river itself to the plume offshore limits with well defined small-scale turbidity features. Despite the low temporal resolution of OLI, this should allow to better understand the transport of terrestrial particles from rivers to the coastal ocean. These details are partly lost using MODIS coarser resolutions data but SPM concentration estimations are consistent, with an accuracy of about 1 to 3 g·m−3 in the river mouth and plume for spatial resolutions from 250 m to 1 km. The MODIS temporal resolution (2 images per day allows to capture the daily to monthly dynamics of the river plume. However, despite its micro-tidal environment, the Rhône River plume shows significant short-term (hourly variations, mainly controlled by wind and regional circulation, that MODIS temporal resolution failed to capture. On the contrary, the high temporal resolution of SEVIRI makes it a powerful tool to

  3. Linking innovative measurement technologies (ConMon and Dataflow© systems) for high-resolution temporal and spatial dissolved oxygen criteria assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, C A; Perry, E; Bayard, A; Wainger, L; Boynton, W R

    2015-10-01

    One consequence of nutrient-induced eutrophication in shallow estuarine waters is the occurrence of hypoxia and anoxia that has serious impacts on biota, habitats, and biogeochemical cycles of important elements. Because of the important role of dissolved oxygen (DO) on these ecosystem features, a variety of DO criteria have been established as indicators of system condition. However, DO dynamics are complex and vary on time scales ranging from diel to decadal and spatial scales from meters to multiple kilometers. Because of these complexities, determining DO criteria attainment or failure remains difficult. We propose a method for linking two common measurement technologies for shallow water DO criteria assessment using a Chesapeake Bay tributary as a test case. Dataflow© is a spatially intensive (30-60-m collection intervals) system used to map surface water conditions at the whole estuary scale, and ConMon is a high-frequency (15-min collection intervals) fixed station approach. The former technology is effective with spatial descriptions but poor regarding temporal resolution, while the latter provides excellent temporal but very limited spatial resolution. Our methodology for combining the strengths of these measurement technologies involved a sequence of steps. First, a statistical model of surface water DO dynamics, based on temporally intense ConMon data, was developed. The results of this model were used to calculate daily DO minimum concentrations. Second, this model was then inserted into Dataflow©-generated spatial maps of DO conditions and used to adjust measured DO concentrations to daily minimum concentrations. This information was used to assess DO criteria compliance at the full tributary scale. Model results indicated that it is vital to consider the short-term time scale DO criteria across both space and time concurrently. Large fluctuations in DO occurred within a 24-h time period, and DO dynamics varied across the length and width of the

  4. An Improved Method for Producing High Spatial-Resolution NDVI Time Series Datasets with Multi-Temporal MODIS NDVI Data and Landsat TM/ETM+ Images

    OpenAIRE

    Yuhan Rao; Xiaolin Zhu; Jin Chen; Jianmin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Due to technical limitations, it is impossible to have high resolution in both spatial and temporal dimensions for current NDVI datasets. Therefore, several methods are developed to produce high resolution (spatial and temporal) NDVI time-series datasets, which face some limitations including high computation loads and unreasonable assumptions. In this study, an unmixing-based method, NDVI Linear Mixing Growth Model (NDVI-LMGM), is proposed to achieve the goal of accurately and efficiently bl...

  5. The Relationship Between Spatial Configuration and Social Interaction in High-Rise Flats: A Case Study On The Jatinegara Barat in Jakarta.

    OpenAIRE

    Ridwana Rifan; Prayitno Budi; Utomo Hatmoko Adi

    2018-01-01

    The construction of high-rise flats to minimize urban slum areas in Indonesia still create space use behavior problems for its residents due to the changes of space configuration between high-rise landed housing. Conventional high-rise flats cannot well accommodate the needs of social interactions happened in landed housing because of its spatial limitation that leads to uncertainty of space use behavior settings. This study aims to understand the relationship between spatial configuration on...

  6. The Effects of the Planned High-Speed Rail System on Travel Times and Spatial Development in the European Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Ravazzoli

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the direct effects of introducing high-speed railway lines is a significant reduction in travel times between major cities. This is particularly relevant in mountain areas. It not only makes cities more easily reachable with more sustainable transport systems but can also encourage different travel behavior and reduce environmental pressures on sensitive areas. A comprehensive analysis of the spatiotemporal effects of the introduction of high-speed railways in the Alpine arc has not yet been developed. To help fill this gap, this study uses multidimensional scaling and the geographical information system to illustrate the time–space compression. This term indicates the erosion of spatial and temporal distances in the areas of the Alps directly affected by the new railway lines. Six trans-Alpine high-speed railway lines are analyzed, comparing current and projected travel times by train. A time-based map is created to show the time–space compression in every transversal direction, particularly on the French and the Austrian side of the Alps. Implications in terms of local accessibility are also analyzed, focusing on the Autonomous Province of Bolzano/Bozen-South Tyrol. Finally, the paper discusses the importance of time-based maps for the understanding of sociospatial dynamics and the possible implications for spatial development.

  7. Photosynthesis-dependent H2O2 transfer from chloroplasts to nuclei provides a high-light signalling mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposito-Rodriguez, Marino; Laissue, Pierre Philippe; Yvon-Durocher, Gabriel; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Mullineaux, Philip M

    2017-06-29

    Chloroplasts communicate information by signalling to nuclei during acclimation to fluctuating light. Several potential operating signals originating from chloroplasts have been proposed, but none have been shown to move to nuclei to modulate gene expression. One proposed signal is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by chloroplasts in a light-dependent manner. Using HyPer2, a genetically encoded fluorescent H2O2 sensor, we show that in photosynthetic Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells, exposure to high light increases H2O2 production in chloroplast stroma, cytosol and nuclei. Critically, over-expression of stromal ascorbate peroxidase (H2O2 scavenger) or treatment with DCMU (photosynthesis inhibitor) attenuates nuclear H2O2 accumulation and high light-responsive gene expression. Cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase over-expression has little effect on nuclear H2O2 accumulation and high light-responsive gene expression. This is because the H2O2 derives from a sub-population of chloroplasts closely associated with nuclei. Therefore, direct H2O2 transfer from chloroplasts to nuclei, avoiding the cytosol, enables photosynthetic control over gene expression.Multiple plastid-derived signals have been proposed but not shown to move to the nucleus to promote plant acclimation to fluctuating light. Here the authors use a fluorescent hydrogen peroxide sensor to provide evidence that H2O2 is transferred directly from chloroplasts to nuclei to control nuclear gene expression.

  8. Frequency of high-quality communication behaviors used by primary care providers of heterozygous infants after newborn screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Michael H; Christopher, Stephanie A

    2013-02-01

    To examine the quality of communication likely to be experienced by parents when being first informed about how newborn screening identified heterozygous "carrier" status for cystic fibrosis or sickle cell disease. Primary care providers (PCPs) of infants found to have carrier status were telephoned over a 48-month period, and asked to rehearse with a standardized patient how they would inform the infants' parent(s). 214 rehearsal transcripts were abstracted using explicit criteria methods to measure the frequency of five categories of high-quality communication behaviors. Overall, PCPs used large amounts of jargon and failed to use high quality communication behaviors. On average, PCPs used 18.6 total jargon words (8.7 unique words), but explained 2.4 jargon words. The most frequent assessment of understanding was the close-ended version, although it was only seen in 129 of 214 transcripts. The most common organizing behavior was importance emphasis (121/214). Precautionary empathy was rare; the most frequent behavior was "instruction about emotion" (33/214). The limited use of high-quality communication behaviors in rehearsals raises concern about parental understanding, decision-making, and psychosocial outcomes after newborn screening. Measurement of specific behaviors may help PCPs to improve communication, and thereby improve the patient experience. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The design of a high-efficiency neutron counter for waste drums to provide optimized sensitivity for plutonium assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menlove, H.O.; Beddingfield, D.H.; Pickrell, M.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-11-01

    An advanced passive neutron counter has been designed to improve the accuracy and sensitivity for the nondestructive assay of plutonium in scrap and waste containers. The High-Efficiency Neutron Counter (HENC) was developed under a Cooperative Research Development Agreement between the Los Alamos National Laboratory and Canberra Industries. The primary goal of the development was to produce a passive assay system for 200-L drums that has detectability limits and multiplicity counting features that are superior to previous systems. A detectability limit figure of merit (FOM) was defined that included the detector efficiency, the neutron die-away time, and the detector`s active volume and density that determine the cosmic-ray background. Monte Carlo neutron calculations were performed to determine the parameters to provide an optimum FOM. The system includes the {sup 252}Cf {open_quotes}add-a-source{close_quotes} feature to improve the accuracy as well as statistical filters to reduce the cosmic-ray spallation neutron background. The final decision gave an efficiency of 32% for plutonium with a detector {sup 3}He tube volume that is significantly smaller than for previous high-efficiency systems for 200-L drums. Because of the high efficiency of the HENC, we have incorporated neutron multiplicity counting for matrix corrections for those cases where the plutonium is localized in nonuniform hydrogenous materials. The paper describes the design and performance testing of the advanced system. 5 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Magnified image spatial spectrum (MISS) microscopy for high-speed QPI (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Hassaan; Min, Eun Jung; Kim, Sumin; Jung, Woonggyu; Best-Popescu, Catherine; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    Diffraction Phase Microscopy (DPM) is a common-path, single shot QPI technique that has found applications in studies of red blood cell morphology and dynamics, cell growth measurement, as well as in Fourier Transform Light Scattering. In DPM, the phase is retrieved by interfering two orders of diffraction from a grating placed at the image plane. The reference field has been, in the past, generated by low pass filtering the zero order via a pinhole placed in the Fourier plane. For achieving the desired spatial coherence, the pinhole is often only 5-10 µm in diameter, making the system difficult to align every time an imaging study is performed. In this work, we eliminated the pinhole from the DPM optical path and generated instead the reference field by magnifying strongly the zero order. We show that a gradient-index (GRIN) lens (effective focal length of 300 µm) can be used to magnify the Fourier transform of the zero order to the point where the DC component fills the camera sensor. We show that the resulting Magnified Object Spectrum Interference Microscopy (MOSIM) system can successfully reconstruct quantitative phase images, without the need for tedious alignment. Because it conserves the common path geometry, MOSIM is characterized by 1.1 nm spatiotemporal pathlength noise. Since it is single shot, we demonstrated 400 frames/s acquisition. We anticipate that this new method can potentially lead to a more robust and less vibration sensitive QPI instrument for carrying out biological studies at various spatiotemporal scales.

  11. Derivation of High Spatial Resolution Albedo from UAV Digital Imagery: Application over the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan C. Ryan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of albedo are a prerequisite for modeling surface melt across the Earth's cryosphere, yet available satellite products are limited in spatial and/or temporal resolution. Here, we present a practical methodology to obtain centimeter resolution albedo products with accuracies of ±5% using consumer-grade digital camera and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV technologies. Our method comprises a workflow for processing, correcting and calibrating raw digital images using a white reference target, and upward and downward shortwave radiation measurements from broadband silicon pyranometers. We demonstrate the method with a set of UAV sorties over the western, K-sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet. The resulting albedo product, UAV10A1, covers 280 km2, at a resolution of 20 cm per pixel and has a root-mean-square difference of 3.7% compared to MOD10A1 and 4.9% compared to ground-based broadband pyranometer measurements. By continuously measuring downward solar irradiance, the technique overcomes previous limitations due to variable illumination conditions during and between surveys over glaciated terrain. The current miniaturization of multispectral sensors and incorporation of upward facing radiation sensors on UAV packages means that this technique could become increasingly common in field studies and used for a wide range of applications. These include the mapping of debris, dust, cryoconite and bioalbedo, and directly constraining surface energy balance models.

  12. Spatial model of the gecko foot hair: functional significance of highly specialized non-uniform geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, Alexander E; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2015-02-06

    One of the important problems appearing in experimental realizations of artificial adhesives inspired by gecko foot hair is so-called clusterization. If an artificially produced structure is flexible enough to allow efficient contact with natural rough surfaces, after a few attachment-detachment cycles, the fibres of the structure tend to adhere one to another and form clusters. Normally, such clusters are much larger than original fibres and, because they are less flexible, form much worse adhesive contacts especially with the rough surfaces. Main problem here is that the forces responsible for the clusterization are the same intermolecular forces which attract fibres to fractal surface of the substrate. However, arrays of real gecko setae are much less susceptible to this problem. One of the possible reasons for this is that ends of the seta have more sophisticated non-uniformly distributed three-dimensional structure than that of existing artificial systems. In this paper, we simulated three-dimensional spatial geometry of non-uniformly distributed branches of nanofibres of the setal tip numerically, studied its attachment-detachment dynamics and discussed its advantages versus uniformly distributed geometry.

  13. SPATIAL PATTERNS OF WATER QUALITY AND PLANKTON FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION CONTINUOUS IN SITU SENSING ALONG A 537-KM NEARSHORE TRANSECT OF WESTERN LAKE SUPERIOR, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    A demonstration that the adaptation of electronic instrumentation and towed survey strategies are effective in providing rapid, spatially extensive, and cost effective data for assessment of the Great Lakes.

  14. High sensitive and high temporal and spatial resolved image of reactive species in atmospheric pressure surface discharge reactor by laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Feng, Chun-Lei; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Ding, Hongbin

    2017-05-01

    The current paucity of spatial and temporal characterization of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) concentration has been a major hurdle to the advancement and clinical translation of low temperature atmospheric plasmas. In this study, an advanced laser induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been developed to be an effective antibacterial surface discharge reactor for the diagnosis of RONS, where the highest spatial and temporal resolution of the LIF system has been achieved to ˜100 μm scale and ˜20 ns scale, respectively. Measurements on an oxidative OH radical have been carried out as typical RONS for the benchmark of the whole LIF system, where absolute number density calibration has been performed on the basis of the laser Rayleigh scattering method. Requirements for pixel resolved spatial distribution and outer plasma region detection become challenging tasks due to the low RONS concentration (˜ppb level) and strong interference, especially the discharge induced emission and pulsed laser induced stray light. In order to design the highly sensitive LIF system, a self-developed fluorescence telescope, the optimization of high precision synchronization among a tunable pulsed laser, a surface discharge generator, intensified Charge Coupled Device (iCCD) camera, and an oscilloscope have been performed. Moreover, an image BOXCAR approach has been developed to remarkably improve the sensitivity of the whole LIF system by optimizing spatial and temporal gating functions via both hardware and software, which has been integrated into our automatic control and data acquisition system on the LabVIEW platform. In addition, a reciprocation averaging measurement has been applied to verify the accuracy of the whole LIF detecting system, indicating the