WorldWideScience

Sample records for providing haptic feedback

  1. A Surgical Robot Teleoperation Framework for Providing Haptic Feedback Incorporating Virtual Environment-Based Guidance

    OpenAIRE

    Munawar, Adnan; Fischer, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    In robot-assisted teleoperated laparoscopic surgeries, the patient side manipulators are controlled via the master manipulators, operated by the surgeon. The current generation of robots approved for laparoscopic surgery lack haptic feedback. In theory, haptic feedback could enhance the surgical procedures by providing a palpable sense of the environment as a function of surgeon’s hands movements. This research presents an overall control framework for haptic feedback on existing robot platfo...

  2. A Surgical Robot Teleoperation Framework for Providing Haptic Feedback Incorporating Virtual Envrioment-Based Guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Munawar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In robot-assisted tele-operated laparoscopic surgeries, the patient side manipulators are controlled via the master manipulators that are controlled by the surgeon. The current generation of robots approved for laparoscopic surgery lack haptic feedback. In theory, haptic feedback would enhance the surgical procedures by enabling better coordination between the hand movements that are improved by the tactile sense of the operating environment. This research presents an overall control framework for a haptic feedback on existing robot platforms, and demonstrated on the daVinci Research Kit (dVRK system. The paper discusses the implementation of a flexible framework that incorporates a stiffness control with gravity compensation for the surgeons manipulator and a sensing and collision detection algorithm for calculating the interaction between the patients manipulators and the surgical area.

  3. UltraHaptics: Multi-Point Mid-Air Haptic Feedback for Touch Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Tom; Seah, Sue Ann; Long, Benjamin J O; Drinkwater, Bruce W; Subramanian, Sriram

    2013-01-01

    We introduce UltraHaptics, a system designed to provide multi-point haptic feedback above an interactive surface. UltraHaptics employs focused ultrasound to project discrete points of haptic feedback through the display and directly on to users’ unadorned hands. We investigate the desirable properties of an acoustically transparent display and demonstrate that the system is capable of creating multiple localised points of feedback in mid-air. Through psychophysical experiments we show that fe...

  4. Haptic feedback for virtual assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecke, Greg R.; Zafer, Naci

    1998-12-01

    Assembly operations require high speed and precision with low cost. The manufacturing industry has recently turned attenuation to the possibility of investigating assembly procedures using graphical display of CAD parts. For these tasks, some sort of feedback to the person is invaluable in providing a real sense of interaction with virtual parts. This research develops the use of a commercial assembly robot as the haptic display in such tasks. For demonstration, a peg-hole insertion task is studied. Kane's Method is employed to derive the dynamics of the peg and the contact motions between the peg and the hole. A handle modeled as a cylindrical peg is attached to the end effector of a PUMA 560 robotic arm. The arm is handle modeled as a cylindrical peg is attached to the end effector of a PUMA 560 robotic arm. The arm is equipped with a six axis force/torque transducer. The use grabs the handle and the user-applied forces are recorded. A 300 MHz Pentium computer is used to simulate the dynamics of the virtual peg and its interactions as it is inserted in the virtual hole. The computed torque control is then employed to exert the full dynamics of the task to the user hand. Visual feedback is also incorporated to help the user in the process of inserting the peg into the hole. Experimental results are presented to show several contact configurations for this virtually simulated task.

  5. Pseudo-Haptic Feedback in Teleoperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupert, Carsten; Matich, Sebastian; Scherping, Nick; Kupnik, Mario; Werthschutzky, Roland; Hatzfeld, Christian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we develop possible realizations of pseudo-haptic feedback in teleoperation systems based on existing works for pseudo-haptic feedback in virtual reality and the intended applications. We derive four potential factors affecting the performance of haptic feedback (calculation operator, maximum displacement, offset force, and scaling factor), which are analyzed in three compliance identification experiments. First, we analyze the principle usability of pseudo-haptic feedback by comparing information transfer measures for teleoperation and direct interaction. Pseudo-haptic interaction yields well above-chance performance, while direct interaction performs almost perfectly. In order to optimize pseudo-haptic feedback, in the second study we perform a full-factorial experimental design with 36 subjects performing 6,480 trials with 36 different treatments. Information transfer ranges from 0.68 bit to 1.72 bit in a task with a theoretical maximum of 2.6 bit, with a predominant effect of the calculation operator and a minor effect of the maximum displacement. In a third study, short- and long-term learning effects are analyzed. Learning effects regarding the performance of pseudo-haptic feedback cannot be observed for single-day experiments. Tests over 10 days show a maximum increase in information transfer of 0.8 bit. The results show the feasibility of pseudo-haptic feedback for teleoperation and can be used as design basis for task-specific systems.

  6. Haptic Feedback Compared with Visual Feedback for BCI

    OpenAIRE

    Kauhanen, L.; Palomäki, T; Jylänki, P.; Aloise, F; Nuttin, Marnix; Millán, José del R.

    2006-01-01

    Feedback plays an important role when learning to use a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI). Here we compare visual and haptic feedback in a short experiment. By imagining left and right hand movements, six subjects tried to control a BCI with the help of either visual or haptic feedback every 1s. Alpha band EEG signals from C3 and C4 were classified. The classifier was updated after each prediction using correct class information. Thus feedback could be given throughout the experiment. Subjects g...

  7. Teleoperation in cluttered environments using wearable haptic feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Bimbo, Joao; Pacchierotti, Claudio; Aggravi, Marco; Tsagarakis, Nikos; Prattichizzo, Domenico

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Robotic teleoperation in cluttered environments is attracting increasing attention for its potential in hazardous scenarios, disaster response, and telemaintenance. Although haptic feedback has been proven effective in such applications, commercially-available grounded haptic interfaces still show significant limitations in terms of workspace, safety, transparency , and encumbrance. For this reason, we present a novel robotic teleoperation system with wearable haptic f...

  8. Optimal haptic feedback control of artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daniel; Besier, Thor; Anderson, Iain; McKay, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    As our population ages, and trends in obesity continue to grow, joint degenerative diseases like osteoarthritis (OA) are becoming increasingly prevalent. With no cure currently in sight, the only effective treatments for OA are orthopaedic surgery and prolonged rehabilitation, neither of which is guaranteed to succeed. Gait retraining has tremendous potential to alter the contact forces in the joints due to walking, reducing the risk of one developing hip and knee OA. Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEAs) are being explored as a potential way of applying intuitive haptic feedback to alter a patient's walking gait. The main challenge with the use of DEAs in this application is producing large enough forces and strains to induce sensation when coupled to a patient's skin. A novel controller has been proposed to solve this issue. The controller uses simultaneous capacitive self-sensing and actuation which will optimally apply a haptic sensation to the patient's skin independent of variability in DEAs and patient geometries.

  9. Haptic Feedback for the GPU-based Surgical Simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Mosegaard, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    The GPU has proven to be a powerful processor to compute spring-mass based surgical simulations. It has not previously been shown however, how to effectively implement haptic interaction with a simulation running entirely on the GPU. This paper describes a method to calculate haptic feedback...... with limited performance cost. It allows easy balancing of the GPU workload between calculations of simulation, visualisation, and the haptic feedback....

  10. Pantomime-grasping: Advance knowledge of haptic feedback availability supports an absolute visuo-haptic calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin eDavarpanah Jazi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available An emerging issue in movement neurosciences is whether haptic feedback influences the nature of the information supporting a simulated grasping response (i.e., pantomime-grasping. In particular, recent work by our group contrasted pantomime-grasping responses performed with (i.e., PH+ trials and without (i.e., PH- trials terminal haptic feedback in separate blocks of trials. Results showed that PH- trials were mediated via relative visual information. In contrast, PH+ trials showed evidence of an absolute visuo-haptic calibration – a finding attributed to an error signal derived from a comparison between expected and actual haptic feedback (i.e., an internal forward model. The present study examined whether advanced knowledge of haptic feedback availability influences the aforementioned calibration process. To that end, PH- and PH+ trials were completed in separate blocks (i.e., the feedback schedule used in our group’s previous study and a block wherein PH- and PH+ trials were randomly interleaved on a trial-by-trial basis (i.e., random feedback schedule. In other words, the random feedback schedule precluded participants from predicting whether haptic feedback would be available at the movement goal location. We computed just-noticeable-difference (JND values to determine whether responses adhered to, or violated, the relative psychophysical principles of Weber’s law. Results for the blocked feedback schedule replicated our group’s previous work, whereas in the random feedback schedule PH- and PH+ trials were supported via relative visual information. Accordingly, we propose that a priori knowledge of haptic feedback is necessary to support an absolute visuo-haptic calibration. Moreover, our results demonstrate that the presence and expectancy of haptic feedback is an important consideration in contrasting the behavioral and neural properties of natural and stimulated (i.e., pantomime-grasping grasping.

  11. Efficient visual recalibration from either visual or haptic feedback: the importance of being wrong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Wendy J; Kerrigan, Iona S; Graf, Erich W

    2010-11-03

    The human visual system adapts to the changing statistics of its environment. For example, the light-from-above prior, an assumption that aids the interpretation of ambiguous shading information, can be modified by haptic (touch) feedback. Here we investigate the mechanisms that drive this adaptive learning. In particular, we ask whether visual information can be as effective as haptics in driving visual recalibration and whether increased information (feedback from multiple modalities) induces faster learning. During several hours' training, feedback encouraged observers to modify their existing light-from-above assumption. Feedback was one of the following: (1) haptic only, (2) haptic and stereoscopic (providing binocular shape information), or (3) stereoscopic only. Haptic-only feedback resulted in substantial learning; the perceived shape of shaded objects was modified in accordance with observers' new light priors. However, the addition of continuous visual feedback (condition 2) substantially reduced learning. When visual-only feedback was provided intermittently (condition 3), mimicking the time course of the haptic feedback of conditions 1 and 2, substantial learning returned. The intermittent nature of conflict information, or feedback, appears critical for learning. It causes an initial, erroneous percept to be corrected. Contrary to previous proposals, we found no particular advantage for cross-modal feedback. Instead, we suggest that an "oops" factor drives efficient learning; recalibration is prioritized when a mismatch exists between sequential representations of an object property. This "oops" factor appears important both across and within sensory modalities, suggesting a general principle for perceptual learning and recalibration.

  12. Haptic Feedback in Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES)

    CERN Document Server

    Do, Thanh Nho

    2016-01-01

    Flexible tendon sheath mechanism is commonly used in NOTES systems because it offers high flexibility, light weight, and easy transmission. Due to the size constraints and sterilization problems, traditional sensors like force/torque sensor are extremely difficult to place at the tool tips of surgical arms. In addition, nonlinear dynamic friction and backlash cause challenges to provide haptic feedback to the surgeons when the robotic arms are inside the patient's body. Hence, it is extremely difficult to provide the force information to haptic devices and subsequently to the surgeons. To deal with these problems, in this paper we propose a new approach of friction model in the tendon-sheath mechanism to provide the force at distal end of endoscopic system. In comparison with current approaches in the literature, the proposed model is able to provide force information at zero velocity and it is smooth. In addition, the model is independent configuration and able to capture friction force with any complex shea...

  13. Investigating Students' Ideas About Buoyancy and the Influence of Haptic Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minogue, James; Borland, David

    2016-04-01

    While haptics (simulated touch) represents a potential breakthrough technology for science teaching and learning, there is relatively little research into its differential impact in the context of teaching and learning. This paper describes the testing of a haptically enhanced simulation (HES) for learning about buoyancy. Despite a lifetime of everyday experiences, a scientifically sound explanation of buoyancy remains difficult to construct for many. It requires the integration of domain-specific knowledge regarding density, fluid, force, gravity, mass, weight, and buoyancy. Prior studies suggest that novices often focus on only one dimension of the sinking and floating phenomenon. Our HES was designed to promote the integration of the subconcepts of density and buoyant forces and stresses the relationship between the object itself and the surrounding fluid. The study employed a randomized pretest-posttest control group research design and a suite of measures including an open-ended prompt and objective content questions to provide insights into the influence of haptic feedback on undergraduate students' thinking about buoyancy. A convenience sample (n = 40) was drawn from a university's population of undergraduate elementary education majors. Two groups were formed from haptic feedback (n = 22) and no haptic feedback (n = 18). Through content analysis, discernible differences were seen in the posttest explanations sinking and floating across treatment groups. Learners that experienced the haptic feedback made more frequent use of "haptically grounded" terms (e.g., mass, gravity, buoyant force, pushing), leading us to begin to build a local theory of language-mediated haptic cognition.

  14. Faster simulated laparoscopic cholecystectomy with haptic feedback technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiasemidou M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Marina Yiasemidou, Daniel Glassman, Peter Vasas, Sarit Badiani, Bijendra Patel Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Department of Upper GI Surgery, Barts and The Royal London Hospital, London, UK Background: Virtual reality simulators have been gradually introduced into surgical training. One of the enhanced features of the latest virtual simulators is haptic feedback. The usefulness of haptic feedback technology has been a matter of controversy in recent years. Previous studies have assessed the importance of haptic feedback in executing parts of a procedure or basic tasks, such as tissue grasping. The aim of this study was to assess the role of haptic feedback within a structured educational environment, based on the performance of junior surgical trainees after undergoing substantial simulation training. Methods: Novices, whose performance was assessed after several repetitions of a task, were recruited for this study. The performance of senior house officers at the last stage of a validated laparoscopic cholecystectomy curriculum was assessed. Nine senior house officers completed a validated laparoscopic cholecystectomy curriculum on a haptic simulator and nine on a nonhaptic simulator. Performance in terms of mean total time, mean total number of movements, and mean total path length at the last level of the validated curriculum (full procedure of laparoscopic cholecystectomy was compared between the two groups. Results: Haptic feedback significantly reduced the time required to complete the full procedure of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (mean total time for nonhaptic machine 608.83 seconds, mean total time for haptic machine 553.27 seconds; P = 0.019 while maintaining safety standards similar to those of the nonhaptic machine (mean total number of movements: nonhaptic machine 583.74, haptic machine 603.93, P = 0.145, mean total path length: for nonhaptic machine 1207.37 cm, for haptic machine 1262.36 cm, P = 0

  15. Haptic and Visual feedback in 3D Audio Mixing Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelineck, Steven; Overholt, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation and informal evaluation of a user interface that explores haptic feedback for 3D audio mixing. The implementation compares different approaches using either the LEAP Motion for mid-air hand gesture control, or the Novint Falcon for active haptic feed- back...... in order to augment the perception of the 3D space. We compare different interaction paradigms implemented using these interfaces, aiming to increase speed and accuracy and reduce the need for constant visual feedback. While the LEAP Motion relies upon visual perception and proprioception, users can forego...

  16. Effects of kinesthetic haptic feedback on standing stability of young healthy subjects and stroke patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Afzal, Muhammad Raheel; Byun, Ha-Young; Oh, Min-Kyun; Yoon, Jungwon

    2015-01-01

    .... Kinesthetic haptic feedback in terms of body sway can be delivered via a commercially available haptic device and can enhance the balance stability of both young healthy subjects and stroke patients...

  17. Ergonomics of laparoscopic graspers and the importance of haptic feedback: the surgeons' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleblas, Chantal C J; Vleugels, Michel P H; Nieboer, Theodoor E

    2016-01-01

    Haptic feedback is drastically reduced in laparoscopic surgery compared to open surgery. Introducing enhanced haptic feedback in laparoscopic instruments might well improve surgical safety and efficiency. In the design process of a laparoscopic grasper with enhanced haptic feedback, handle design should be addressed to strive for optimal usability and comfort. Additionally, the surgeons' perspective on the potential benefits of haptic feedback should be assessed to ascertain the clinical interest of enhanced haptic feedback. A questionnaire was designed to determine surgeons' use and preferences for laparoscopic instruments and expectations about enhanced haptic feedback. Surgeons were also asked whether they experience physical complaints related to laparoscopic instruments. The questionnaire was distributed to a group of laparoscopic surgeons based in Europe. From the 279 contacted subjects, 98 completed the questionnaire (response rate 35 %). Of all respondents, 77 % reported physical complaints directly attributable to the use of laparoscopic instruments. No evident similarity in the main preference for graspers was found, either with or without haptic feedback. According to respondents, the added value of haptic feedback could be of particular use in feeling differences in tissue consistencies, feeling the applied pressure, locating a tumor or enlarged lymph node, feeling arterial pulse, and limiting strain in the surgeon's hand. This study stresses that the high prevalence of physical complaints directly related to laparoscopic instruments among laparoscopic surgeons is still relevant. Furthermore, the potential benefits of enhanced haptic feedback in laparoscopic surgery are recognized by laparoscopic specialists. Therefore, haptic feedback is considered an unmet need in laparoscopy.

  18. Force control tasks with pure haptic feedback promote short-term focused attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dangxiao; Zhang, Yuru; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Yang, Gaofeng; Yang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Focused attention has great impact on our quality of life. Our learning, social skills and even happiness are closely intertwined with our capacity for focused attention. Attention promotion is replete with examples of training-induced increases in attention capability, most of which rely on visual and auditory stimulation. Pure haptic stimulation to increase attention capability is rarely found. We show that accurate force control tasks with pure haptic feedback enhance short-term focused attention. Participants were trained by a force control task in which information from visual and auditory channels was blocked, and only haptic feedback was provided. The trainees were asked to exert a target force within a pre-defined force tolerance for a specific duration. The tolerance was adaptively modified to different levels of difficulty to elicit full participant engagement. Three attention tests showed significant changes in different aspects of focused attention in participants who had been trained as compared with those who had not, thereby illustrating the role of haptic-based sensory-motor tasks in the promotion of short-term focused attention. The findings highlight the potential value of haptic stimuli in brain plasticity and serve as a new tool to extend existing computer games for cognitive enhancement.

  19. Haptic Feedback for Enhancing Realism of Walking Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchet, Luca; Burelli, Paolo; Serafin, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    system. While during the use of the interactive system subjects physically walked, during the use of the non-interactive system the locomotion was simulated while subjects were sitting on a chair. In both the configurations subjects were exposed to auditory and audio-visual stimuli presented...... appreciated the added feedback. However, some subjects found the added feedback disturbing and annoying. This might be due on one hand to the limits of the haptic simulation and on the other hand to the different individual desire to be involved in the simulations. Our findings can be applied to the context...

  20. Development of a Robotic Colonoscopic Manipulation System, Using Haptic Feedback Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jaehong; Choi, Jae Hyuk; Seo, Jong Tae; Kim, Tae Il; Yi, Byung Ju

    2017-01-01

    Colonoscopy is one of the most effective diagnostic and therapeutic tools for colorectal diseases. We aim to propose a master-slave robotic colonoscopy that is controllable in remote site using conventional colonoscopy. The master and slave robot were developed to use conventional flexible colonoscopy. The robotic colonoscopic procedure was performed using a colonoscope training model by one expert endoscopist and two unexperienced engineers. To provide the haptic sensation, the insertion force and the rotating torque were measured and sent to the master robot. A slave robot was developed to hold the colonoscopy and its knob, and perform insertion, rotation, and two tilting motions of colonoscope. A master robot was designed to teach motions of the slave robot. These measured force and torque were scaled down by one tenth to provide the operator with some reflection force and torque at the haptic device. The haptic sensation and feedback system was successful and helpful to feel the constrained force or torque in colon. The insertion time using robotic system decreased with repeated procedures. This work proposed a robotic approach for colonoscopy using haptic feedback algorithm, and this robotic device would effectively perform colonoscopy with reduced burden and comparable safety for patients in remote site.

  1. Prevalence of haptic feedback in robot-mediated surgery: a systematic review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirabdollahian, Farshid; Livatino, Salvatore; Vahedi, Behrad; Gudipati, Radhika; Sheen, Patrick; Gawrie-Mohan, Shan; Vasdev, Nikhil

    2017-12-01

    With the successful uptake and inclusion of robotic systems in minimally invasive surgery and with the increasing application of robotic surgery (RS) in numerous surgical specialities worldwide, there is now a need to develop and enhance the technology further. One such improvement is the implementation and amalgamation of haptic feedback technology into RS which will permit the operating surgeon on the console to receive haptic information on the type of tissue being operated on. The main advantage of using this is to allow the operating surgeon to feel and control the amount of force applied to different tissues during surgery thus minimising the risk of tissue damage due to both the direct and indirect effects of excessive tissue force or tension being applied during RS. We performed a two-rater systematic review to identify the latest developments and potential avenues of improving technology in the application and implementation of haptic feedback technology to the operating surgeon on the console during RS. This review provides a summary of technological enhancements in RS, considering different stages of work, from proof of concept to cadaver tissue testing, surgery in animals, and finally real implementation in surgical practice. We identify that at the time of this review, while there is a unanimous agreement regarding need for haptic and tactile feedback, there are no solutions or products available that address this need. There is a scope and need for new developments in haptic augmentation for robot-mediated surgery with the aim of improving patient care and robotic surgical technology further.

  2. Virtual Reality Cerebral Aneurysm Clipping Simulation With Real-time Haptic Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaraj, Ali; Luciano, Cristian J.; Bailey, Daniel P.; Elsenousi, Abdussalam; Roitberg, Ben Z.; Bernardo, Antonio; Banerjee, P. Pat; Charbel, Fady T.

    2014-01-01

    Background With the decrease in the number of cerebral aneurysms treated surgically and the increase of complexity of those treated surgically, there is a need for simulation-based tools to teach future neurosurgeons the operative techniques of aneurysm clipping. Objective To develop and evaluate the usefulness of a new haptic-based virtual reality (VR) simulator in the training of neurosurgical residents. Methods A real-time sensory haptic feedback virtual reality aneurysm clipping simulator was developed using the Immersive Touch platform. A prototype middle cerebral artery aneurysm simulation was created from a computed tomography angiogram. Aneurysm and vessel volume deformation and haptic feedback are provided in a 3-D immersive VR environment. Intraoperative aneurysm rupture was also simulated. Seventeen neurosurgery residents from three residency programs tested the simulator and provided feedback on its usefulness and resemblance to real aneurysm clipping surgery. Results Residents felt that the simulation would be useful in preparing for real-life surgery. About two thirds of the residents felt that the 3-D immersive anatomical details provided a very close resemblance to real operative anatomy and accurate guidance for deciding surgical approaches. They believed the simulation is useful for preoperative surgical rehearsal and neurosurgical training. One third of the residents felt that the technology in its current form provided very realistic haptic feedback for aneurysm surgery. Conclusion Neurosurgical residents felt that the novel immersive VR simulator is helpful in their training especially since they do not get a chance to perform aneurysm clippings until very late in their residency programs. PMID:25599200

  3. Augmented kinematic feedback from haptic virtual reality for dental skill acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suebnukarn, Siriwan; Haddawy, Peter; Rhienmora, Phattanapon; Jittimanee, Pannapa; Viratket, Piyanuch

    2010-12-01

    We have developed a haptic virtual reality system for dental skill training. In this study we examined several kinds of kinematic information about the movement provided by the system supplement knowledge of results (KR) in dental skill acquisition. The kinematic variables examined involved force utilization (F) and mirror view (M). This created three experimental conditions that received augmented kinematic feedback (F, M, FM) and one control condition that did not (KR-only). Thirty-two dental students were randomly assigned to four groups. Their task was to perform access opening on the upper first molar with the haptic virtual reality system. An acquisition session consisted of two days of ten trials of practice in which augmented kinematic feedback was provided for the appropriate experimental conditions after each trial. One week after, a retention test consisting of two trials without augmented feedback was completed. The results showed that the augmented kinematic feedback groups had larger mean performance scores than the KR-only group in Day 1 of the acquisition and retention sessions (ANOVA, p0.05). The trends in acquisition and retention sessions suggest that the augmented kinematic feedback can enhance the performance earlier in the skill acquisition and retention sessions.

  4. Towards a Teleoperated Needle Driver Robot with Haptic Feedback for RFA of Breast Tumors under Continuous MRI1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokes, Rebecca; Lister, Kevin; Gullapalli, Rao; Zhang, Bao; MacMillan, Alan; Richard, Howard; Desai, Jaydev P.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this paper is to explore the feasibility of developing a MRI-compatible needle driver system for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of breast tumors under continuous MRI imaging while being teleoperated by a haptic feedback device from outside the scanning room. The developed needle driver prototype was designed and tested for both tumor targeting capability as well as RFA. Methods The single degree-of-freedom (DOF) prototype was interfaced with a PHANToM haptic device controlled from outside the scanning room. Experiments were performed to demonstrate MRI-compatibility and position control accuracy with hydraulic actuation, along with an experiment to determine the PHANToM’s ability to guide the RFA tool to a tumor nodule within a phantom breast tissue model while continuously imaging within the MRI and receiving force feedback from the RFA tool. Results Hydraulic actuation is shown to be a feasible actuation technique for operation in an MRI environment. The design is MRI-compatible in all aspects except for force sensing in the directions perpendicular to the direction of motion. Experiments confirm that the user is able to detect healthy vs. cancerous tissue in a phantom model when provided with both visual (imaging) feedback and haptic feedback. Conclusion The teleoperated 1-DOF needle driver system presented in this paper demonstrates the feasibility of implementing a MRI-compatible robot for RFA of breast tumors with haptic feedback capability. PMID:19303805

  5. Towards a teleoperated needle driver robot with haptic feedback for RFA of breast tumors under continuous MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokes, Rebecca; Lister, Kevin; Gullapalli, Rao; Zhang, Bao; MacMillan, Alan; Richard, Howard; Desai, Jaydev P

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the feasibility of developing a MRI-compatible needle driver system for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of breast tumors under continuous MRI imaging while being teleoperated by a haptic feedback device from outside the scanning room. The developed needle driver prototype was designed and tested for both tumor targeting capability as well as RFA. The single degree-of-freedom (DOF) prototype was interfaced with a PHANToM haptic device controlled from outside the scanning room. Experiments were performed to demonstrate MRI-compatibility and position control accuracy with hydraulic actuation, along with an experiment to determine the PHANToM's ability to guide the RFA tool to a tumor nodule within a phantom breast tissue model while continuously imaging within the MRI and receiving force feedback from the RFA tool. Hydraulic actuation is shown to be a feasible actuation technique for operation in an MRI environment. The design is MRI-compatible in all aspects except for force sensing in the directions perpendicular to the direction of motion. Experiments confirm that the user is able to detect healthy vs. cancerous tissue in a phantom model when provided with both visual (imaging) feedback and haptic feedback. The teleoperated 1-DOF needle driver system presented in this paper demonstrates the feasibility of implementing a MRI-compatible robot for RFA of breast tumors with haptic feedback capability.

  6. Haptic Feedback in Motor Hand Virtual Therapy Increases Precision and Generates Less Mental Workload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Ramírez-Fernández

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work we show that haptic feedback in upper limb motor therapy improves performance and generates a lower mental workload. To demonstrate this, two groups of participants (healthy adults and elders with hand motor problems used a low-cost haptic device (Novint Falcon and a non-robotic device (Leap Motion Controller. Participants conducted the same rehabilitation task by using a non-immersive virtual environment. Results show significant differences for all participants regarding precision on the use of the haptic feedback device. Additionally, participants in the older adult group demonstrated a lower mental workload while using the haptic device (Novint Falcon. Finally, qualitative results show that participants preferred to conduct their therapy exercises by using the haptic device, as they found it more useful, easier to use and easier to learn

  7. Haptic feedback enhances grip force control of sEMG-controlled prosthetic hands in targeted reinnervation amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Keehoon; Colgate, J Edward

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that haptic feedback would enhance grip force control of surface electromyography (sEMG)-controlled prosthetic hands for targeted reinnervation (TR) amputees. A new miniature haptic device, a tactor, that can deliver touch, pressure, shear, and temperature sensation, allows modality-matching haptic feedback. TR surgery that creates sensory regions on the patient's skin that refer to the surface of the missing limb allows somatotopic-matching haptic feedback. This paper evaluates the hypothesis via an sEMG-controlled virtual prosthetic arm operated by TR amputees under diverse haptic feedback conditions. The results indicate that the grip force control is significantly enhanced via the haptic feedback. However, the simultaneous display of two haptic channels (pressure and shear) does not enhance, but instead degrades, grip force control.

  8. Exploring the role of haptic feedback in enabling implicit HCI-based bookmarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Matthew K X J; McGrenere, Joanna; Croft, Elizabeth A; MacLean, Karon E

    2014-03-01

    We examine how haptic feedback could enable an implicit human-computer interaction, in the context of an audio stream listening use case where a device monitors a user's electrodermal activity for orienting responses to external interruptions. When such a response is detected, our previously developed system automatically places a bookmark in the audio stream for later resumption of listening. Here, we investigate two uses of haptic feedback to support this implicit interaction and mitigate effects of noisy (false-positive) bookmarking: (a) low-attention notification when a bookmark is placed, and (b) focused-attention display of bookmarks during resumptive navigation. Results show that haptic notification of bookmark placement, when paired with visual display of bookmark location, significant improves navigation time. Solely visual or haptic display of bookmarks elicited equivalent navigation time; however, only the inclusion of haptic display significantly increased accuracy. Participants preferred haptic notification over no notification at interruption time, and combined haptic and visual display of bookmarks to support navigation to their interrupted location at resumption time. Our contributions include an approach to handling noisy data in implicit HCI, an implementation of haptic notifications that signal implicit system behavior, and discussion of user mental models that may be active in this context.

  9. Closing the sensorimotor loop: haptic feedback facilitates decoding of motor imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Rodriguez, M.; Peters, J.; Hill, J.; Schölkopf, B.; Gharabaghi, A.; Grosse-Wentrup, M.

    2011-06-01

    The combination of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) with robot-assisted physical therapy constitutes a promising approach to neurorehabilitation of patients with severe hemiparetic syndromes caused by cerebrovascular brain damage (e.g. stroke) and other neurological conditions. In such a scenario, a key aspect is how to reestablish the disrupted sensorimotor feedback loop. However, to date it is an open question how artificially closing the sensorimotor feedback loop influences the decoding performance of a BCI. In this paper, we answer this issue by studying six healthy subjects and two stroke patients. We present empirical evidence that haptic feedback, provided by a seven degrees of freedom robotic arm, facilitates online decoding of arm movement intention. The results support the feasibility of future rehabilitative treatments based on the combination of robot-assisted physical therapy with BCIs.

  10. On the design of a miniature haptic ring for cutaneous force feedback using shape memory alloy actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Donghyun; Lee, Jaemin; Kim, Keehoon

    2017-10-01

    This paper proposes a miniature haptic ring that can display touch/pressure and shearing force to the user’s fingerpad. For practical use and wider application of the device, it is developed with the aim of achieving high wearability and mobility/portability as well as cutaneous force feedback functionality. A main body of the device is designed as a ring-shaped lightweight structure with a simple driving mechanism, and thin shape memory alloy (SMA) wires having high energy density are applied as actuating elements. Also, based on a band-type wireless control unit including a wireless data communication module, the whole device could be realized as a wearable mobile haptic device system. These features enable the device to take diverse advantages on functional performances and to provide users with significant usability. In this work, the proposed miniature haptic ring is systematically designed, and its working performances are experimentally evaluated with a fabricated functional prototype. The experimental results obviously demonstrate that the proposed device exhibits higher force-to-weight ratio than conventional finger-wearable haptic devices for cutaneous force feedback. Also, it is investigated that operational performances of the device are strongly influenced by electro-thermomechanical behaviors of the SMA actuator. In addition to the experiments for performance evaluation, we conduct a preliminary user test to assess practical feasibility and usability based on user’s qualitative feedback.

  11. Development of a teleoperated micromanipulation system with visual and haptic feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Antoine; Cassier, Claude; Haddab, Yassine; Rougeot, Patrick; Chaillet, Nicolas

    2001-10-01

    Concerning the teleoperation between different scale worlds, it is important to take into account the scaling effect problem in terms of manipulator precision, human sensation, environment accessibility, dexterity, etc. To consider these different problems, this paper presents the development of a new macro-micro teleoperated micromanipulator, with two kinds of micromanipulation systems: a piezoelectric microgripper and an atomic force microscope (AFM) operating under an optical microscope. The natural force feedback sensation exerted on the piezoelectric microgripper is given through a teleoperated two-fingered planar hand mechanism. This system provides the human operator with natural force feedback sensation and augmented visual feedback while telemanipulating objects in the micro world. Firstly, the bilateral control system with active force feedback based on hybrid master-slave technologies is modeled. The results include the use of force feedback and power assist in order to demonstrate the feasibility and practicability of the micro-teleoperated system. Then, in order to improve the visual feedback issued form the optical microscope of the station, a virtual micro 3D environment is proposed. By combining 2D microscope images and augmented reality-based programming techniques, we reconstructed exactly the operational microworld. Finally, some experiments have been carried out in order to verify the validity of the proposed bilateral control scheme and to calibrate the developed virtual model incorporating visual and haptic feedback.

  12. Ray-casting based evaluation framework for haptic force feedback during percutaneous transhepatic catheter drainage punctures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastmeyer, Andre; Hecht, Tobias; Fortmeier, Dirk; Handels, Heinz

    2014-05-01

    Development of new needle insertion force feedback algorithms requires comparison with a gold standard method. A new evaluation framework was formulated and tested on needle punctures for percutaneous transhepatic catheter drainage (PTCD). Needle insertion is an established procedure for minimally invasive interventions in the liver. Up-to-date, needle insertions are precisely planned using 2D axial CT slices from 3D data sets. To provide a 3D virtual reality and haptic training and planning environment, the full segmentation of patient data is often a mandatory step. To lessen the time required for manual segmentation, we propose direct haptic volume-rendering based on CT gray values and partially segmented patient data. The core contribution is a new force output evaluation method driven by a ray-casting technique that defines paths from the skin to target structures, i.e., the right hepatic duct near the juncture with the common hepatic duct. A ray-casting method computes insertion trajectories from the skin to the duct considering no-go structures and plausibility criteria. A rating system scores each trajectory. Finally, the best insertion trajectories are selected that reach the target. Along the selected paths, force output comparison between a reference system and the new haptic force output algorithm is carried out, quantified and visualized. The evaluation framework is presented along with an exemplary study of the liver using the atlas data set from a reference patient. In a comparison of our reference method to a newer algorithm, force outputs are found to be similar in 99% of the paths. The proposed evaluation framework allows reliable detection of problematic PTCD trajectories and provides valuable hints to improve force feedback algorithm development.

  13. Interacting with the biomolecular solvent accessible surface via a haptic feedback device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayward Steven

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From the 1950s computer based renderings of molecules have been produced to aid researchers in their understanding of biomolecular structure and function. A major consideration for any molecular graphics software is the ability to visualise the three dimensional structure of the molecule. Traditionally, this was accomplished via stereoscopic pairs of images and later realised with three dimensional display technologies. Using a haptic feedback device in combination with molecular graphics has the potential to enhance three dimensional visualisation. Although haptic feedback devices have been used to feel the interaction forces during molecular docking they have not been used explicitly as an aid to visualisation. Results A haptic rendering application for biomolecular visualisation has been developed that allows the user to gain three-dimensional awareness of the shape of a biomolecule. By using a water molecule as the probe, modelled as an oxygen atom having hard-sphere interactions with the biomolecule, the process of exploration has the further benefit of being able to determine regions on the molecular surface that are accessible to the solvent. This gives insight into how awkward it is for a water molecule to gain access to or escape from channels and cavities, indicating possible entropic bottlenecks. In the case of liver alcohol dehydrogenase bound to the inhibitor SAD, it was found that there is a channel just wide enough for a single water molecule to pass through. Placing the probe coincident with crystallographic water molecules suggests that they are sometimes located within small pockets that provide a sterically stable environment irrespective of hydrogen bonding considerations. Conclusion By using the software, named HaptiMol ISAS (available from http://www.haptimol.co.uk, one can explore the accessible surface of biomolecules using a three-dimensional input device to gain insights into the shape and water

  14. Haptic force-feedback devices for the office computer: performance and musculoskeletal loading issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennerlein, J T; Yang, M C

    2001-01-01

    Pointing devices, essential input tools for the graphical user interface (GUI) of desktop computers, require precise motor control and dexterity to use. Haptic force-feedback devices provide the human operator with tactile cues, adding the sense of touch to existing visual and auditory interfaces. However, the performance enhancements, comfort, and possible musculoskeletal loading of using a force-feedback device in an office environment are unknown. Hypothesizing that the time to perform a task and the self-reported pain and discomfort of the task improve with the addition of force feedback, 26 people ranging in age from 22 to 44 years performed a point-and-click task 540 times with and without an attractive force field surrounding the desired target. The point-and-click movements were approximately 25% faster with the addition of force feedback (paired t-tests, p < 0.001). Perceived user discomfort and pain, as measured through a questionnaire, were also smaller with the addition of force feedback (p < 0.001). However, this difference decreased as additional distracting force fields were added to the task environment, simulating a more realistic work situation. These results suggest that for a given task, use of a force-feedback device improves performance, and potentially reduces musculoskeletal loading during mouse use. Actual or potential applications of this research include human-computer interface design, specifically that of the pointing device extensively used for the graphical user interface.

  15. Haptic feedback enhances rhythmic motor control by reducing variability, not improving convergence rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankarali, M Mert; Tutkun Sen, H; De, Avik; Okamura, Allison M; Cowan, Noah J

    2014-03-01

    Stability and performance during rhythmic motor behaviors such as locomotion are critical for survival across taxa: falling down would bode well for neither cheetah nor gazelle. Little is known about how haptic feedback, particularly during discrete events such as the heel-strike event during walking, enhances rhythmic behavior. To determine the effect of haptic cues on rhythmic motor performance, we investigated a virtual paddle juggling behavior, analogous to bouncing a table tennis ball on a paddle. Here, we show that a force impulse to the hand at the moment of ball-paddle collision categorically improves performance over visual feedback alone, not by regulating the rate of convergence to steady state (e.g., via higher gain feedback or modifying the steady-state hand motion), but rather by reducing cycle-to-cycle variability. This suggests that the timing and state cues afforded by haptic feedback decrease the nervous system's uncertainty of the state of the ball to enable more accurate control but that the feedback gain itself is unaltered. This decrease in variability leads to a substantial increase in the mean first passage time, a measure of the long-term metastability of a stochastic dynamical system. Rhythmic tasks such as locomotion and juggling involve intermittent contact with the environment (i.e., hybrid transitions), and the timing of such transitions is generally easy to sense via haptic feedback. This timing information may improve metastability, equating to less frequent falls or other failures depending on the task.

  16. Eye Tracking of Occluded Self-Moved Targets: Role of Haptic Feedback and Hand-Target Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danion, Frederic; Mathew, James; Flanagan, J Randall

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies on smooth pursuit eye movements have shown that humans can continue to track the position of their hand, or a target controlled by the hand, after it is occluded, thereby demonstrating that arm motor commands contribute to the prediction of target motion driving pursuit eye movements. Here, we investigated this predictive mechanism by manipulating both the complexity of the hand-target mapping and the provision of haptic feedback. Two hand-target mappings were used, either a rigid (simple) one in which hand and target motion matched perfectly or a nonrigid (complex) one in which the target behaved as a mass attached to the hand by means of a spring. Target animation was obtained by asking participants to oscillate a lightweight robotic device that provided (or not) haptic feedback consistent with the target dynamics. Results showed that as long as 7 s after target occlusion, smooth pursuit continued to be the main contributor to total eye displacement (∼60%). However, the accuracy of eye-tracking varied substantially across experimental conditions. In general, eye-tracking was less accurate under the nonrigid mapping, as reflected by higher positional and velocity errors. Interestingly, haptic feedback helped to reduce the detrimental effects of target occlusion when participants used the nonrigid mapping, but not when they used the rigid one. Overall, we conclude that the ability to maintain smooth pursuit in the absence of visual information can extend to complex hand-target mappings, but the provision of haptic feedback is critical for the maintenance of accurate eye-tracking performance.

  17. Using haptic feedback to increase seat belt use of service vehicle drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    This study pilot-tested a new application of a technology-based intervention to increase seat belt use. The technology was based on a : contingency in which unbelted drivers experienced sustained haptic feedback to the gas pedal when they exceeded 25...

  18. Augmented kinematic feedback from haptic virtual reality for dental skill acquisition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Suebnukarn, Siriwan; Haddawy, Peter; Rhienmora, Phattanapon; Jittimanee, Pannapa; Viratket, Piyanuch

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a haptic virtual reality system for dental skill training. In this study we examined several kinds of kinematic information about the movement provided by the system supplement knowledge of results (KR...

  19. Effects of 3D virtual haptics force feedback on brand personality perception: the mediating role of physical presence in advergames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Seung-A Annie

    2010-06-01

    This study gauged the effects of force feedback in the Novint Falcon haptics system on the sensory and cognitive dimensions of a virtual test-driving experience. First, in order to explore the effects of tactile stimuli with force feedback on users' sensory experience, feelings of physical presence (the extent to which virtual physical objects are experienced as actual physical objects) were measured after participants used the haptics interface. Second, to evaluate the effects of force feedback on the cognitive dimension of consumers' virtual experience, this study investigated brand personality perception. The experiment utilized the Novint Falcon haptics controller to induce immersive virtual test-driving through tactile stimuli. The author designed a two-group (haptics stimuli with force feedback versus no force feedback) comparison experiment (N = 238) by manipulating the level of force feedback. Users in the force feedback condition were exposed to tactile stimuli involving various force feedback effects (e.g., terrain effects, acceleration, and lateral forces) while test-driving a rally car. In contrast, users in the control condition test-drove the rally car using the Novint Falcon but were not given any force feedback. Results of ANOVAs indicated that (a) users exposed to force feedback felt stronger physical presence than those in the no force feedback condition, and (b) users exposed to haptics stimuli with force feedback perceived the brand personality of the car to be more rugged than those in the control condition. Managerial implications of the study for product trial in the business world are discussed.

  20. Real-time vision, tactile cues, and visual form agnosia in pantomimed grasping: removing haptic feedback induces a switch from natural to pantomime-like grasps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Leslie Whitwell

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Investigators study the kinematics of grasping movements (prehension under a variety of conditions to probe visuomotor function in normal and brain-damaged individuals. When patient DF, who suffers from visual form agnosia, performs natural grasps, her in-flight hand aperture is scaled to the widths of targets ('grip scaling' that she cannot discriminate amongst. In contrast, when DF's pantomime grasps are based on a memory of a previewed object, her grip scaling is very poor. Her failure on this task has been interpreted as additional support for the dissociation between the use of object vision for action and object vision for perception. Curiously, however, when DF directs her pantomimed grasps towards a displaced imagined copy of a visible object where her fingers make contact with the surface of the table, her grip scaling does not appear to be particularly poor. In the first of two experiments, we revisit this previous work and show that her grip scaling in this real-time pantomime grasping task does not differ from controls, suggesting that terminal tactile feedback from a proxy of the target can maintain DF's grip scaling. In a second experiment with healthy participants, we tested a recent variant of a grasping task in which no tactile feedback is available (i.e. no haptic feedback by comparing the kinematics of target-directed grasps with and without haptic feedback to those of real-time pantomime grasps without haptic feedback. Compared to natural grasps, removing haptic feedback increased RT, slowed the velocity of the reach, reduced grip aperture, sharpened the slopes relating grip aperture to target width, and reduced the final grip aperture. All of these effects were also observed in the pantomime grasping task. Taken together, these results provide compelling support for the view that removing haptic feedback induces a switch from real-time visual control to one that depends more on visual perception and cognitive supervision.

  1. Haptically facilitated bimanual training combined with augmented visual feedback in moderate to severe hemiplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boos, Amy; Qiu, Qinyin; Fluet, Gerard G.; Adamovich, Sergei V.

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the design and feasibility testing of a hand rehabilitation system that provides haptic assistance for hand opening in moderate to severe hemiplegia while subjects attempt to perform bilateral hand movements. A cable-actuated exoskeleton robot assists the subjects in performing impaired finger movements but is controlled by movement of the unimpaired hand. In an attempt to combine the neurophysiological stimuli of bilateral movement and action observation during training, visual feedback of the impaired hand is replaced by feedback of the unimpaired hand, either by using a sagittaly oriented mirror or a virtual reality setup with a pair of virtual hands presented on a flat screen controlled with movement of the unimpaired hand, providing a visual image of their paretic hand moving normally. Joint angles for both hands are measured using data gloves. The system is programmed to maintain a symmetrical relationship between the two hands as they respond to commands to open and close simultaneously. Three persons with moderate to severe hemiplegia secondary to stroke trained with the system for eight, 30 to 60 minute sessions without adverse events. Each demonstrated positive motor adaptations to training. The system was well tolerated by persons with moderate to severe upper extremity hemiplegia. Further testing of its effects on motor ability with a broader range of clinical presentations is indicated. PMID:22254998

  2. Modeling and Control of Collaborative Robot System using Haptic Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivekananda Shanmuganatha

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available When two robot systems can share understanding using any agreed knowledge, within the constraints of the system’s communication protocol, the approach may lead to a common improvement. This has persuaded numerous new research inquiries in human-robot collaboration. We have built up a framework prepared to do independent following and performing table-best protest object manipulation with humans and we have actualized two different activity models to trigger robot activities. The idea here is to explore collaborative systems and to build up a plan for them to work in a collaborative environment which has many benefits to a single more complex system. In the paper, two robots that cooperate among themselves are constructed. The participation linking the two robotic arms, the torque required and parameters are analyzed. Thus the purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a modular robot system which can serve as a base on aspects of robotics in collaborative robots using haptics.

  3. Finite Element Methods for real-time Haptic Feedback of Soft-Tissue Models in Virtual Reality Simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Andreas O.; Twombly, I. Alexander; Barth, Timothy J.; Smith, Jeffrey D.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have applied the linear elastic finite element method to compute haptic force feedback and domain deformations of soft tissue models for use in virtual reality simulators. Our results show that, for virtual object models of high-resolution 3D data (>10,000 nodes), haptic real time computations (>500 Hz) are not currently possible using traditional methods. Current research efforts are focused in the following areas: 1) efficient implementation of fully adaptive multi-resolution methods and 2) multi-resolution methods with specialized basis functions to capture the singularity at the haptic interface (point loading). To achieve real time computations, we propose parallel processing of a Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient method applied to a reduced system of equations resulting from surface domain decomposition. This can effectively be achieved using reconfigurable computing systems such as field programmable gate arrays (FPGA), thereby providing a flexible solution that allows for new FPGA implementations as improved algorithms become available. The resulting soft tissue simulation system would meet NASA Virtual Glovebox requirements and, at the same time, provide a generalized simulation engine for any immersive environment application, such as biomedical/surgical procedures or interactive scientific applications.

  4. A Haptic Feedback Scheme to Accurately Position a Virtual Wrist Prosthesis Using a Three-Node Tactor Array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Erwin

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel haptic feedback scheme, used for accurately positioning a 1DOF virtual wrist prosthesis through sensory substitution, is presented. The scheme employs a three-node tactor array and discretely and selectively modulates the stimulation frequency of each tactor to relay 11 discrete haptic stimuli to the user. Able-bodied participants were able to move the virtual wrist prosthesis via a surface electromyography based controller. The participants evaluated the feedback scheme without visual or audio feedback and relied solely on the haptic feedback alone to correctly position the hand. The scheme was evaluated through both normal (perpendicular and shear (lateral stimulations applied on the forearm. Normal stimulations were applied through a prototype device previously developed by the authors while shear stimulations were generated using an ubiquitous coin motor vibrotactor. Trials with no feedback served as a baseline to compare results within the study and to the literature. The results indicated that using normal and shear stimulations resulted in accurately positioning the virtual wrist, but were not significantly different. Using haptic feedback was substantially better than no feedback. The results found in this study are significant since the feedback scheme allows for using relatively few tactors to relay rich haptic information to the user and can be learned easily despite a relatively short amount of training. Additionally, the results are important for the haptic community since they contradict the common conception in the literature that normal stimulation is inferior to shear. From an ergonomic perspective normal stimulation has the potential to benefit upper limb amputees since it can operate at lower frequencies than shear-based vibrotactors while also generating less noise. Through further tuning of the novel haptic feedback scheme and normal stimulation device, a compact and comfortable sensory substitution

  5. Lack of transfer of skills after virtual reality simulator training with haptic feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Våpenstad, Cecilie; Hofstad, Erlend Fagertun; Bø, Lars Eirik; Kuhry, Esther; Johnsen, Gjermund; Mårvik, Ronald; Langø, Thomas; Hernes, Toril Nagelhus

    2017-12-01

    Virtual reality (VR) simulators enrich surgical training and offer training possibilities outside of the operating room (OR). In this study, we created a criterion-based training program on a VR simulator with haptic feedback and tested it by comparing the performances of a simulator group against a control group. Medical students with no experience in laparoscopy were randomly assigned to a simulator group or a control group. In the simulator group, the candidates trained until they reached predefined criteria on the LapSim ® VR simulator (Surgical Science AB, Göteborg, Sweden) with haptic feedback (Xitact TM IHP, Mentice AB, Göteborg, Sweden). All candidates performed a cholecystectomy on a porcine organ model in a box trainer (the clinical setting). The performances were video rated by two surgeons blinded to subject training status. In total, 30 students performed the cholecystectomy and had their videos rated (N = 16 simulator group, N = 14 control group). The control group achieved better video rating scores than the simulator group (p training program did not transfer skills to the clinical setting. Poor mechanical performance of the simulated haptic feedback is believed to have resulted in a negative training effect.

  6. Haptic feedback improves surgeons' user experience and fracture reduction in facial trauma simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girod, Sabine; Schvartzman, Sara C; Gaudilliere, Dyani; Salisbury, Kenneth; Silva, Rebeka

    2016-01-01

    Computer-assisted surgical (CAS) planning tools are available for craniofacial surgery, but are usually based on computer-aided design (CAD) tools that lack the ability to detect the collision of virtual objects (i.e., fractured bone segments). We developed a CAS system featuring a sense of touch (haptic) that enables surgeons to physically interact with individual, patient-specific anatomy and immerse in a three-dimensional virtual environment. In this study, we evaluated initial user experience with our novel system compared to an existing CAD system. Ten surgery resident trainees received a brief verbal introduction to both the haptic and CAD systems. Users simulated mandibular fracture reduction in three clinical cases within a 15 min time limit for each system and completed a questionnaire to assess their subjective experience. We compared standard landmarks and linear and angular measurements between the simulated results and the actual surgical outcome and found that haptic simulation results were not significantly different from actual postoperative outcomes. In contrast, CAD results significantly differed from both the haptic simulation and actual postoperative results. In addition to enabling a more accurate fracture repair, the haptic system provided a better user experience than the CAD system in terms of intuitiveness and self-reported quality of repair.

  7. Haptic feedback control in medical robots through fractional viscoelastic tissue model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yo; Moreira, Pedro; Liu, Chao; Poignet, Philippe; Zemiti, Nabil; Fujie, Masakatsu G

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the design of an adaptive control system for robot-assisted surgery with haptic feedback. Through a haptic device, the surgeon teleoperates the medical instrument in free space, fixed on a remote robot or in contact. In free space, the surgeon feels the motion of the robot. In the present paper, we evaluated the performance of the controller on viscoelastic tissue, modeled by a fractional derivative equation. In addition, we propose a novel controller using an integer formalization process that is suitable for these tissue properties. The simulation results suggested that performance, in terms of force control and telepresence, became poorer when the conventional controller, which was designed for elastic target object, was applied to the viscoelastic tissues. In contrast, the results suggested that our proposed controller maintained its performance on the viscoelastic tissues.

  8. The value of haptic feedback in conventional and robot-assisted minimal invasive surgery and virtual reality training: a current review

    OpenAIRE

    van der Meijden, O.A.J.; Schijven, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    Background Virtual reality (VR) as surgical training tool has become a state-of-the-art technique in training and teaching skills for minimally invasive surgery (MIS). Although intuitively appealing, the true benefits of haptic (VR training) platforms are unknown. Many questions about haptic feedback in the different areas of surgical skills (training) need to be answered before adding costly haptic feedback in VR simulation for MIS training. This study was designed to review the current stat...

  9. Haptics for Product Design and Manufacturing Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Pingjun

    2016-01-01

    Product design and manufacturing simulation is a promising research and application area for haptics. By benefiting from its natural human-computer interaction and realistic force/torque feedback, haptics can change the traditional design and manufacturing approaches which are mainly based on physical mock-ups or CAD (Computer Aided Design) modes. This paper provides a detailed and comprehensive survey of haptics for product design and manufacturing simulation in the past 10 years, mainly from 2004-2014, including haptics for product design and shape modelling, haptics for machining simulation, and haptics for virtual assembly and maintenance simulation. The new haptic devices and rendering algorithms involved in this area are introduced, the major research efforts and the typical systems are discussed, and the new ideas and research progresses are investigated. Then, conclusions and future trends are summarized.

  10. Virtual reality in neurosurgical education: part-task ventriculostomy simulation with dynamic visual and haptic feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemole, G Michael; Banerjee, P Pat; Luciano, Cristian; Neckrysh, Sergey; Charbel, Fady T

    2007-07-01

    Mastery of the neurosurgical skill set involves many hours of supervised intraoperative training. Convergence of political, economic, and social forces has limited neurosurgical resident operative exposure. There is need to develop realistic neurosurgical simulations that reproduce the operative experience, unrestricted by time and patient safety constraints. Computer-based, virtual reality platforms offer just such a possibility. The combination of virtual reality with dynamic, three-dimensional stereoscopic visualization, and haptic feedback technologies makes realistic procedural simulation possible. Most neurosurgical procedures can be conceptualized and segmented into critical task components, which can be simulated independently or in conjunction with other modules to recreate the experience of a complex neurosurgical procedure. We use the ImmersiveTouch (ImmersiveTouch, Inc., Chicago, IL) virtual reality platform, developed at the University of Illinois at Chicago, to simulate the task of ventriculostomy catheter placement as a proof-of-concept. Computed tomographic data are used to create a virtual anatomic volume. Haptic feedback offers simulated resistance and relaxation with passage of a virtual three-dimensional ventriculostomy catheter through the brain parenchyma into the ventricle. A dynamic three-dimensional graphical interface renders changing visual perspective as the user's head moves. The simulation platform was found to have realistic visual, tactile, and handling characteristics, as assessed by neurosurgical faculty, residents, and medical students. We have developed a realistic, haptics-based virtual reality simulator for neurosurgical education. Our first module recreates a critical component of the ventriculostomy placement task. This approach to task simulation can be assembled in a modular manner to reproduce entire neurosurgical procedures.

  11. Real-time surgery simulation of intracranial aneurysm clipping with patient-specific geometries and haptic feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenz, Wolfgang; Dirnberger, Johannes

    2015-03-01

    Providing suitable training for aspiring neurosurgeons is becoming more and more problematic. The increasing popularity of the endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms leads to a lack of simple surgical situations for clipping operations, leaving mainly the complex cases, which present even experienced surgeons with a challenge. To alleviate this situation, we have developed a training simulator with haptic interaction allowing trainees to practice virtual clipping surgeries on real patient-specific vessel geometries. By using specialized finite element (FEM) algorithms (fast finite element method, matrix condensation) combined with GPU acceleration, we can achieve the necessary frame rate for smooth real-time interaction with the detailed models needed for a realistic simulation of the vessel wall deformation caused by the clamping with surgical clips. Vessel wall geometries for typical training scenarios were obtained from 3D-reconstructed medical image data, while for the instruments (clipping forceps, various types of clips, suction tubes) we use models provided by manufacturer Aesculap AG. Collisions between vessel and instruments have to be continuously detected and transformed into corresponding boundary conditions and feedback forces, calculated using a contact plane method. After a training, the achieved result can be assessed based on various criteria, including a simulation of the residual blood flow into the aneurysm. Rigid models of the surgical access and surrounding brain tissue, plus coupling a real forceps to the haptic input device further increase the realism of the simulation.

  12. Evaluation of an Electromagnetic System with Haptic Feedback for Control of Untethered, Soft Grippers Affected by Disturbances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ongaro, Federico; Pacchierotti, Claudio; Yoon, ChangKyu; Prattichizzo, Domenico; Gracias, David H.; Misra, Sarthak

    2016-01-01

    Current wireless, small-scale robots have restricted manipulation capabilities, and limited intuitive tools to control their motion. This paper presents a novel teleoperation system with haptic feedback for the control of untethered soft grippers. The system is able to move and open/close the

  13. Internet based gripper teleoperation with random time delay by using haptic feedback and SEMG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaonong; Song, Aiguo; Zhang, Huatao; Ji, Peng

    2016-10-01

    Random time delay may cause instability in the internet based teleoperation system. Transparency and intuitiveness are also very important for operator to control the system to accurately perform the desired action, especially for the gripper teleoperation system. This paper presents a new grip force control method of gripper teleoperation system with haptic feedback. The system employs the SEMG signal as the control parameter in order to enhance the intuitive control experience for operator. In order to eliminate the impacts on the system stability caused by random time delay, a non-time based teleoperation method is applied to the control process. Besides, neural network and designed fuzzy logic controller is also utilized to improve this control method. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by experiment results.

  14. Conflicting audio-haptic feedback in physically based simulation of walking sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchet, Luca; Serafin, Stefania; Dimitrov, Smilen

    2010-01-01

    We describe an audio-haptic experiment conducted using a system which simulates in real-time the auditory and haptic sensation of walking on different surfaces. The system is based on physical models, that drive both the haptic and audio synthesizers, and a pair of shoes enhanced with sensors...

  15. High Fidelity Haptic Rendering

    CERN Document Server

    Otaduy, Miguel A

    2006-01-01

    The human haptic system, among all senses, provides unique and bidirectional communication between humans and their physical environment. Yet, to date, most human-computer interactive systems have focused primarily on the graphical rendering of visual information and, to a lesser extent, on the display of auditory information. Extending the frontier of visual computing, haptic interfaces, or force feedback devices, have the potential to increase the quality of human-computer interaction by accommodating the sense of touch. They provide an attractive augmentation to visual display and enhance t

  16. Providing Feedback: Practical Skills and Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkany, David; Deitte, Lori

    2017-06-01

    Feedback is an essential component of education. It is designed to influence, reinforce, and change behaviors, concepts, and attitudes in learners. Although providing constructive feedback can be challenging, it is a learnable skill. The negative consequences of destructive feedback or lack of feedback all together are far-reaching. This article summarizes the components of constructive feedback and provides readers with tangible skills to enhance their ability to give effective feedback to learners and peers. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Roughness based perceptual analysis towards digital skin imaging system with haptic feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K

    2016-08-01

    To examine psoriasis or atopic eczema, analyzing skin roughness by palpation is essential to precisely diagnose skin diseases. However, optical sensor based skin imaging systems do not allow dermatologists to touch skin images. To solve the problem, a new haptic rendering technology that can accurately display skin roughness must be developed. In addition, the rendering algorithm must be able to filter spatial noises created during 2D to 3D image conversion without losing the original roughness on the skin image. In this study, a perceptual way to design a noise filter that will remove spatial noises and in the meantime recover maximized roughness is introduced by understanding human sensitivity on surface roughness. A visuohaptic rendering system that can provide a user with seeing and touching digital skin surface roughness has been developed including a geometric roughness estimation method from a meshed surface. In following, a psychophysical experiment was designed and conducted with 12 human subjects to measure human perception with the developed visual and haptic interfaces to examine surface roughness. From the psychophysical experiment, it was found that touch is more sensitive at lower surface roughness, and vice versa. Human perception with both senses, vision and touch, becomes less sensitive to surface distortions as roughness increases. When interact with both channels, visual and haptic interfaces, the performance to detect abnormalities on roughness is greatly improved by sensory integration with the developed visuohaptic rendering system. The result can be used as a guideline to design a noise filter that can perceptually remove spatial noises while recover maximized roughness values from a digital skin image obtained by optical sensors. In addition, the result also confirms that the developed visuohaptic rendering system can help dermatologists or skin care professionals examine skin conditions by using vision and touch at the same time. © 2015

  18. Low cost heads-up virtual reality (HUVR) with optical tracking and haptic feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Todd; DeFanti, Thomas A.; Dawe, Greg; Prudhomme, Andrew; Schulze, Jurgen P.; Cutchin, Steve

    2011-03-01

    Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, have created a new, relatively low-cost augmented reality system that enables users to touch the virtual environment they are immersed in. The Heads-Up Virtual Reality device (HUVR) couples a consumer 3D HD flat screen TV with a half-silvered mirror to project any graphic image onto the user's hands and into the space surrounding them. With his or her head position optically tracked to generate the correct perspective view, the user maneuvers a force-feedback (haptic) device to interact with the 3D image, literally 'touching' the object's angles and contours as if it was a tangible physical object. HUVR can be used for training and education in structural and mechanical engineering, archaeology and medicine as well as other tasks that require hand-eye coordination. One of the most unique characteristics of HUVR is that a user can place their hands inside of the virtual environment without occluding the 3D image. Built using open-source software and consumer level hardware, HUVR offers users a tactile experience in an immersive environment that is functional, affordable and scalable.

  19. Low cost heads-up virtual reality (HUVR) with optical tracking and haptic feedback

    KAUST Repository

    Margolis, Todd

    2011-01-23

    Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, have created a new, relatively low-cost augmented reality system that enables users to touch the virtual environment they are immersed in. The Heads-Up Virtual Reality device (HUVR) couples a consumer 3D HD flat screen TV with a half-silvered mirror to project any graphic image onto the user\\'s hands and into the space surrounding them. With his or her head position optically tracked to generate the correct perspective view, the user maneuvers a force-feedback (haptic) device to interact with the 3D image, literally \\'touching\\' the object\\'s angles and contours as if it was a tangible physical object. HUVR can be used for training and education in structural and mechanical engineering, archaeology and medicine as well as other tasks that require hand-eye coordination. One of the most unique characteristics of HUVR is that a user can place their hands inside of the virtual environment without occluding the 3D image. Built using open-source software and consumer level hardware, HUVR offers users a tactile experience in an immersive environment that is functional, affordable and scalable.

  20. Real-time vision, tactile cues, and visual form agnosia: removing haptic feedback from a ?natural? grasping task induces pantomime-like grasps

    OpenAIRE

    Whitwell, Robert L.; Ganel, Tzvi; Byrne, Caitlin M.; Goodale, Melvyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Investigators study the kinematics of grasping movements (prehension) under a variety of conditions to probe visuomotor function in normal and brain-damaged individuals. ?Natural? prehensile acts are directed at the goal object and are executed using real-time vision. Typically, they also entail the use of tactile, proprioceptive, and kinesthetic sources of haptic feedback about the object (?haptics-based object information?) once contact with the object has been made. Natural and simulated (...

  1. Real-time vision, tactile cues, and visual form agnosia: removing haptic feedback from a “natural” grasping task induces pantomime-like grasps

    OpenAIRE

    Whitwell, Robert L.; Ganel, Tzvi; Byrne, Caitlin M.; Goodale, Melvyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Investigators study the kinematics of grasping movements (prehension) under a variety of conditions to probe visuomotor function in normal and brain-damaged individuals. “Natural” prehensile acts are directed at the goal object and are executed using real-time vision. Typically, they also entail the use of tactile, proprioceptive, and kinesthetic sources of haptic feedback about the object (“haptics-based object information”) once contact with the object has been made. Natural and simulated (...

  2. Virtual Cerebral Aneurysm Clipping with Real-Time Haptic Force Feedback in Neurosurgical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmeiner, Matthias; Dirnberger, Johannes; Fenz, Wolfgang; Gollwitzer, Maria; Wurm, Gabriele; Trenkler, Johannes; Gruber, Andreas

    2018-01-11

    Realistic, safe, and efficient modalities for simulation-based training are highly warranted to enhance the quality of surgical education, and they should be incorporated in resident training. The aim of this study was to develop a patient-specific virtual cerebral aneurysm-clipping simulator with haptic force feedback and real-time deformation of the aneurysm and vessels. A prototype simulator was developed from 2012 to 2016. Evaluation of virtual clipping by blood flow simulation was integrated in this software, and the prototype was evaluated by 18 neurosurgeons. In 4 patients with different medial cerebral artery aneurysms, virtual clipping was performed after real-life surgery, and surgical results were compared regarding clip application, surgical trajectory, and blood flow. After head positioning and craniotomy, bimanual virtual aneurysm clipping with an original forceps was performed. Blood flow simulation demonstrated residual aneurysm filling or branch stenosis. The simulator improved anatomic understanding for 89% of neurosurgeons. Simulation of head positioning and craniotomy was considered realistic by 89% and 94% of users, respectively. Most participants agreed that this simulator should be integrated into neurosurgical education (94%). Our illustrative cases demonstrated that virtual aneurysm surgery was possible using the same trajectory as in real-life cases. Both virtual clipping and blood flow simulation were realistic in broad-based but not calcified aneurysms. Virtual clipping of a calcified aneurysm could be performed using the same surgical trajectory, but not the same clip type. We have successfully developed a virtual aneurysm-clipping simulator. Next, we will prospectively evaluate this device for surgical procedure planning and education. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Optimizing Video Games for the Hearing Impaired : The Use of Haptic Feedback and Visual Cues in Games

    OpenAIRE

    Mäenpää, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to see how games can be optimized for the hearing impaired users without adding greatly to the development costs. The objective was to collect data on the target group’s gaming habits and explore ways haptic feedback and visual cues could be used in games. Based on the findings the aim was to create a sound-based puzzle game and optimize that to the hearing impaired gamers. The initial research data was collected from 28 people in an online survey. The resul...

  4. Providing QoS for Networked Peers in Distributed Haptic Virtual Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Marshall

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Haptic information originates from a different human sense (touch, therefore the quality of service (QoS required to support haptic traffic is significantly different from that used to support conventional real-time traffic such as voice or video. Each type of network impairment has different (and severe impacts on the user's haptic experience. There has been no specific provision of QoS parameters for haptic interaction. Previous research into distributed haptic virtual environments (DHVEs have concentrated on synchronization of positions (haptic device or virtual objects, and are based on client-server architectures. We present a new peer-to-peer DHVE architecture that further extends this to enable force interactions between two users whereby force data are sent to the remote peer in addition to positional information. The work presented involves both simulation and practical experimentation where multimodal data is transmitted over a QoS-enabled IP network. Both forms of experiment produce consistent results which show that the use of specific QoS classes for haptic traffic will reduce network delay and jitter, leading to improvements in users' haptic experiences with these types of applications.

  5. Real-time vision, tactile cues, and visual form agnosia: removing haptic feedback from a "natural" grasping task induces pantomime-like grasps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitwell, Robert L; Ganel, Tzvi; Byrne, Caitlin M; Goodale, Melvyn A

    2015-01-01

    Investigators study the kinematics of grasping movements (prehension) under a variety of conditions to probe visuomotor function in normal and brain-damaged individuals. "Natural" prehensile acts are directed at the goal object and are executed using real-time vision. Typically, they also entail the use of tactile, proprioceptive, and kinesthetic sources of haptic feedback about the object ("haptics-based object information") once contact with the object has been made. Natural and simulated (pantomimed) forms of prehension are thought to recruit different cortical structures: patient DF, who has visual form agnosia following bilateral damage to her temporal-occipital cortex, loses her ability to scale her grasp aperture to the size of targets ("grip scaling") when her prehensile movements are based on a memory of a target previewed 2 s before the cue to respond or when her grasps are directed towards a visible virtual target but she is denied haptics-based information about the target. In the first of two experiments, we show that when DF performs real-time pantomimed grasps towards a 7.5 cm displaced imagined copy of a visible object such that her fingers make contact with the surface of the table, her grip scaling is in fact quite normal. This finding suggests that real-time vision and terminal tactile feedback are sufficient to preserve DF's grip scaling slopes. In the second experiment, we examined an "unnatural" grasping task variant in which a tangible target (along with any proxy such as the surface of the table) is denied (i.e., no terminal tactile feedback). To do this, we used a mirror-apparatus to present virtual targets with and without a spatially coincident copy for the participants to grasp. We compared the grasp kinematics from trials with and without terminal tactile feedback to a real-time-pantomimed grasping task (one without tactile feedback) in which participants visualized a copy of the visible target as instructed in our laboratory in the

  6. Real-time vision, tactile cues, and visual form agnosia: removing haptic feedback from a “natural” grasping task induces pantomime-like grasps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitwell, Robert L.; Ganel, Tzvi; Byrne, Caitlin M.; Goodale, Melvyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Investigators study the kinematics of grasping movements (prehension) under a variety of conditions to probe visuomotor function in normal and brain-damaged individuals. “Natural” prehensile acts are directed at the goal object and are executed using real-time vision. Typically, they also entail the use of tactile, proprioceptive, and kinesthetic sources of haptic feedback about the object (“haptics-based object information”) once contact with the object has been made. Natural and simulated (pantomimed) forms of prehension are thought to recruit different cortical structures: patient DF, who has visual form agnosia following bilateral damage to her temporal-occipital cortex, loses her ability to scale her grasp aperture to the size of targets (“grip scaling”) when her prehensile movements are based on a memory of a target previewed 2 s before the cue to respond or when her grasps are directed towards a visible virtual target but she is denied haptics-based information about the target. In the first of two experiments, we show that when DF performs real-time pantomimed grasps towards a 7.5 cm displaced imagined copy of a visible object such that her fingers make contact with the surface of the table, her grip scaling is in fact quite normal. This finding suggests that real-time vision and terminal tactile feedback are sufficient to preserve DF’s grip scaling slopes. In the second experiment, we examined an “unnatural” grasping task variant in which a tangible target (along with any proxy such as the surface of the table) is denied (i.e., no terminal tactile feedback). To do this, we used a mirror-apparatus to present virtual targets with and without a spatially coincident copy for the participants to grasp. We compared the grasp kinematics from trials with and without terminal tactile feedback to a real-time-pantomimed grasping task (one without tactile feedback) in which participants visualized a copy of the visible target as instructed in our

  7. Self-Control of Haptic Assistance for Motor Learning: Influences of Frequency and Opinion of Utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Camille K; Tseung, Victrine; Carnahan, Heather

    2017-01-01

    Studies of self-controlled practice have shown benefits when learners controlled feedback schedule, use of assistive devices and task difficulty, with benefits attributed to information processing and motivational advantages of self-control. Although haptic assistance serves as feedback, aids task performance and modifies task difficulty, researchers have yet to explore whether self-control over haptic assistance could be beneficial for learning. We explored whether self-control of haptic assistance would be beneficial for learning a tracing task. Self-controlled participants selected practice blocks on which they would receive haptic assistance, while participants in a yoked group received haptic assistance on blocks determined by a matched self-controlled participant. We inferred learning from performance on retention tests without haptic assistance. From qualitative analysis of open-ended questions related to rationales for/experiences of the haptic assistance that was chosen/provided, themes emerged regarding participants' views of the utility of haptic assistance for performance and learning. Results showed that learning was directly impacted by the frequency of haptic assistance for self-controlled participants only and view of haptic assistance. Furthermore, self-controlled participants' views were significantly associated with their requested haptic assistance frequency. We discuss these findings as further support for the beneficial role of self-controlled practice for motor learning.

  8. Self-Control of Haptic Assistance for Motor Learning: Influences of Frequency and Opinion of Utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille K. Williams

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies of self-controlled practice have shown benefits when learners controlled feedback schedule, use of assistive devices and task difficulty, with benefits attributed to information processing and motivational advantages of self-control. Although haptic assistance serves as feedback, aids task performance and modifies task difficulty, researchers have yet to explore whether self-control over haptic assistance could be beneficial for learning. We explored whether self-control of haptic assistance would be beneficial for learning a tracing task. Self-controlled participants selected practice blocks on which they would receive haptic assistance, while participants in a yoked group received haptic assistance on blocks determined by a matched self-controlled participant. We inferred learning from performance on retention tests without haptic assistance. From qualitative analysis of open-ended questions related to rationales for/experiences of the haptic assistance that was chosen/provided, themes emerged regarding participants’ views of the utility of haptic assistance for performance and learning. Results showed that learning was directly impacted by the frequency of haptic assistance for self-controlled participants only and view of haptic assistance. Furthermore, self-controlled participants’ views were significantly associated with their requested haptic assistance frequency. We discuss these findings as further support for the beneficial role of self-controlled practice for motor learning.

  9. Human-computer interface including haptically controlled interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Thomas G.

    2005-10-11

    The present invention provides a method of human-computer interfacing that provides haptic feedback to control interface interactions such as scrolling or zooming within an application. Haptic feedback in the present method allows the user more intuitive control of the interface interactions, and allows the user's visual focus to remain on the application. The method comprises providing a control domain within which the user can control interactions. For example, a haptic boundary can be provided corresponding to scrollable or scalable portions of the application domain. The user can position a cursor near such a boundary, feeling its presence haptically (reducing the requirement for visual attention for control of scrolling of the display). The user can then apply force relative to the boundary, causing the interface to scroll the domain. The rate of scrolling can be related to the magnitude of applied force, providing the user with additional intuitive, non-visual control of scrolling.

  10. Occupational therapists' evaluation of haptic motor rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayyali, Ruba; Alamri, Atif; Eid, Mohamad; Iglesias, Rosa; Shirmohammadi, Shervin; El Saddik, Abdulmotaleb; Lemaire, Edward

    2007-01-01

    Haptic-based virtual rehabilitation systems have recently become a subject of interest. In addition to the benefits provided by virtual rehabilitation, the haptic-based systems offer force and tactile feedback which can be for upper and lower extremity rehabilitation. In this paper, we present a system that uses haptics, in conjunction with virtual environments, to provide a rich media environment for motor rehabilitation of stroke patients. The system also provides Occupational Therapists (OTs) with a Graphical User Interface (GUI) that enables them to configure the hardware and virtual exercises and to monitor patients' performance. We also present an analysis of the system by a group of OTs from the Ottawa General Hospital, Rehabilitation Center. The OT's feedback, both the positives and negatives, and the results of the assessment test are also presented.

  11. Evaluation of a virtual-reality-based simulator using passive haptic feedback for knee arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucentese, Sandro F; Rahm, Stefan; Wieser, Karl; Spillmann, Jonas; Harders, Matthias; Koch, Peter P

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this work is to determine face validity and construct validity of a new virtual-reality-based simulator for diagnostic and therapeutic knee arthroscopy. The study tests a novel arthroscopic simulator based on passive haptics. Sixty-eight participants were grouped into novices, intermediates, and experts. All participants completed two exercises. In order to establish face validity, all participants filled out a questionnaire concerning different aspects of simulator realism, training capacity, and different statements using a seven-point Likert scale (range 1-7). Construct validity was tested by comparing various simulator metric values between novices and experts. Face validity could be established: overall realism was rated with a mean value of 5.5 points. Global training capacity scored a mean value of 5.9. Participants considered the simulator as useful for procedural training of diagnostic and therapeutic arthroscopy. In the foreign body removal exercise, experts were overall significantly faster in the whole procedure (6 min 24 s vs. 8 min 24 s, p virtual-reality-based simulation using passive haptics has the potential to complement conventional training of knee arthroscopy skills. II.

  12. Precise Haptic Device Co-Location for Visuo-Haptic Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Ulrich; Pankratz, Frieder; Sandor, Christian; Klinker, Gudrun; Laga, Hamid

    2015-12-01

    Visuo-haptic augmented reality systems enable users to see and touch digital information that is embedded in the real world. PHANToM haptic devices are often employed to provide haptic feedback. Precise co-location of computer-generated graphics and the haptic stylus is necessary to provide a realistic user experience. Previous work has focused on calibration procedures that compensate the non-linear position error caused by inaccuracies in the joint angle sensors. In this article we present a more complete procedure that additionally compensates for errors in the gimbal sensors and improves position calibration. The proposed procedure further includes software-based temporal alignment of sensor data and a method for the estimation of a reference for position calibration, resulting in increased robustness against haptic device initialization and external tracker noise. We designed our procedure to require minimal user input to maximize usability. We conducted an extensive evaluation with two different PHANToMs, two different optical trackers, and a mechanical tracker. Compared to state-of-the-art calibration procedures, our approach significantly improves the co-location of the haptic stylus. This results in higher fidelity visual and haptic augmentations, which are crucial for fine-motor tasks in areas such as medical training simulators, assembly planning tools, or rapid prototyping applications.

  13. Remote Minimally Invasive Surgery – Haptic Feedback and Selective Automation in Medical Robotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Staub

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The automation of recurrent tasks and force feedback are complex problems in medical robotics. We present a novel approach that extends human-machine skill-transfer by a scaffolding framework. It assumes a consolidated working environment for both, the trainee and the trainer. The trainer provides hints and cues in a basic structure which is already understood by the learner. In this work, the scaffolding is constituted by abstract patterns, which facilitate the structuring and segmentation of information during “Learning by Demonstration” (LbD. With this concept, the concrete example of knot-tying for suturing is exemplified and evaluated. During the evaluation, most problems and failures arose due to intrinsic system imprecisions of the medical robot system. These inaccuracies were then improved by the visual guidance of the surgical instruments. While the benefits of force feedback in telesurgery has already been demonstrated and measured forces are also used during task learning, the transmission of signals between the operator console and the robot system over long-distances or across-network remote connections is still a challenge due to time-delay. Especially during incision processes with a scalpel into tissue, a delayed force feedback yields to an unpredictable force perception at the operator-side and can harm the tissue which the robot is interacting with. We propose a XFEM-based incision force prediction algorithm that simulates the incision contact-forces in real-time and compensates the delayed force sensor readings. A realistic 4-arm system for minimally invasive robotic heart surgery is used as a platform for the research.

  14. SU-D-BRF-06: A Brachytherapy Simulator with Realistic Haptic Force Feedback and Real-Time Ultrasounds Image Simulation for Training and Teaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaulieu, L [Centre Hospitalier Universityde Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Carette, A; Comtois, S; Lavigueur, M; Cardou, P; Laurendeau, D [Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Surgical procedures require dexterity, expertise and repetition to reach optimal patient outcomes. However, efficient training opportunities are usually limited. This work presents a simulator system with realistic haptic force-feedback and full, real-time ultrasounds image simulation. Methods: The simulator is composed of a custom-made Linear-DELTA force-feedback robotic platform. The needle tip is mounted on a force gauge at the end effector of the robot, which responds to needle insertion by providing reaction forces. 3D geometry of the tissue is using a tetrahedral finite element mesh (FEM) mimicking tissue properties. As the needle is inserted/retracted, tissue deformation is computed using a mass-tensor nonlinear visco-elastic FEM. The real-time deformation is fed to the L-DELTA to take into account the force imparted to the needle, providing feedback to the end-user when crossing tissue boundaries or needle bending. Real-time 2D US image is also generated synchronously showing anatomy, needle insertion and tissue deformation. The simulator is running on an Intel I7 6- core CPU at 3.26 MHz. 3D tissue rendering and ultrasound display are performed on a Windows 7 computer; the FEM computation and L-DELTA control are executed on a similar PC using the Neutrino real-time OS. Both machines communicate through an Ethernet link. Results: The system runs at 500 Hz for a 8333-tetrahedron tissue mesh and a 100-node angular spring needle model. This frame rate ensures a relatively smooth displacement of the needle when pushed or retracted (±20 N in all directions at speeds of up to 2 m/s). Unlike commercially-available haptic platforms, the oblong workspace of the L-DELTA robot complies with that required for brachytherapy needle displacements of 0.1m by 0.1m by 0.25m. Conclusion: We have demonstrated a real-life, realistic brachytherapy simulator developed for prostate implants (LDR/HDR). The platform could be adapted to other sites or training for other

  15. Haptic Cues for Balance: Use of a Cane Provides Immediate Body Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Sozzi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Haptic cues are important for balance. Knowledge of the temporal features of their effect may be crucial for the design of neural prostheses. Touching a stable surface with a fingertip reduces body sway in standing subjects eyes closed (EC, and removal of haptic cue reinstates a large sway pattern. Changes in sway occur rapidly on changing haptic conditions. Here, we describe the effects and time-course of stabilization produced by a haptic cue derived from a walking cane. We intended to confirm that cane use reduces body sway, to evaluate the effect of vision on stabilization by a cane, and to estimate the delay of the changes in body sway after addition and withdrawal of haptic input. Seventeen healthy young subjects stood in tandem position on a force platform, with eyes closed or open (EO. They gently lowered the cane onto and lifted it from a second force platform. Sixty trials per direction of haptic shift (Touch → NoTouch, T-NT; NoTouch → Touch, NT-T and visual condition (EC-EO were acquired. Traces of Center of foot Pressure (CoP and the force exerted by cane were filtered, rectified, and averaged. The position in space of a reflective marker positioned on the cane tip was also acquired by an optoelectronic device. Cross-correlation (CC analysis was performed between traces of cane tip and CoP displacement. Latencies of changes in CoP oscillation in the frontal plane EC following the T-NT and NT-T haptic shift were statistically estimated. The CoP oscillations were larger in EC than EO under both T and NT (p < 0.001 and larger during NT than T conditions (p < 0.001. Haptic-induced effect under EC (Romberg quotient NT/T ~ 1.2 was less effective than that of vision under NT condition (EC/EO ~ 1.5 (p < 0.001. With EO cane had little effect. Cane displacement lagged CoP displacement under both EC and EO. Latencies to changes in CoP oscillations were longer after addition (NT-T, about 1.6 s than withdrawal (T-NT, about 0.9 s of haptic

  16. Providing Effective Feedback to EFL Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Holi Ibrahim Holi; Al-Adawi, Hamed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Feedback on school practicum is of utmost importance for student teachers to help them to develop their pedagogical and teaching skills. This paper attempts to collect data from both student teachers and their mentors in an ELT teacher training programme in Oman to answer the questions which are raised by this study: 1) What kind of feedback do…

  17. Haptic interface of the KAIST-Ewha colonoscopy simulator II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hyun Soo; Kim, Woo Seok; Ahn, Woojin; Lee, Doo Yong; Yi, Sun Young

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents an improved haptic interface for the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology Ewha Colonoscopy Simulator II. The haptic interface enables the distal portion of the colonoscope to be freely bent while guaranteeing sufficient workspace and reflective forces for colonoscopy simulation. Its force-torque sensor measures the profiles of the user. Manipulation of the colonoscope tip is monitored by four deflection sensors and triggers computations to render accurate graphic images corresponding to the rotation of the angle knob. Tack sensors are attached to the valve-actuation buttons of the colonoscope to simulate air injection or suction as well as the corresponding deformation of the colon. A survey study for face validation was conducted, and the result shows that the developed haptic interface provides realistic haptic feedback for colonoscopy simulations.

  18. Haptics in periodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savita Abdulpur Mallikarjun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout history, education has evolved, and new teaching/learning methods have been developed. These methods have helped us come a long way in understanding the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases of the oral cavity. However, there is still no one good way to render a student/clinician the tactile sense for detecting calculus/caries or placing the incisions or detecting the smoothness of a restoration or any treatment procedures before entering the clinics. In the education field, to improve the tactile sensation, the sense of touch and force-feedback can offer great improvements to the existing learning methods, thus enhancing the quality of education procedures. The concept of Haptics, which is extensively in use and indispensable in other fields like aviation, telecommunication etc., is now making its way into dentistry. Against this background, the following write-up intends to provide a glimpse of the coming wave of Haptics - A virtual reality system in dental education and discusses the strengths and weak points of this system.

  19. Feedback in Clinical Education, Part I: Characteristics of Feedback Provided by Approved Clinical Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottingham, Sara; Henning, Jolene

    2014-01-01

    Context Providing students with feedback is an important component of athletic training clinical education; however, little information is known about the feedback that Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs; now known as preceptors) currently provide to athletic training students (ATSs). Objective To characterize the feedback provided by ACIs to ATSs during clinical education experiences. Design Qualitative study. Setting One National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I athletic training facility and 1 outpatient rehabilitation clinic that were clinical sites for 1 entry-level master's degree program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Patients or Other Participants A total of 4 ACIs with various experience levels and 4 second-year ATSs. Data Collection and Analysis Extensive field observations were audio recorded, transcribed, and integrated with field notes for analysis. The constant comparative approach of open, axial, and selective coding was used to inductively analyze data and develop codes and categories. Member checking, triangulation, and peer debriefing were used to promote trustworthiness of the study. Results The ACIs gave 88 feedback statements in 45 hours and 10 minutes of observation. Characteristics of feedback categories included purpose, timing, specificity, content, form, and privacy. Conclusions Feedback that ACIs provided included several components that made each feedback exchange unique. The ACIs in our study provided feedback that is supported by the literature, suggesting that ACIs are using current recommendations for providing feedback. Feedback needs to be investigated across multiple athletic training education programs to gain more understanding of certain areas of feedback, including frequency, privacy, and form. PMID:24143902

  20. Multimodal Sensing Interface for Haptic Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Diaz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the integration of a multimodal sensing system for exploring limits of vibrato tactile haptic feedback when interacting with 3D representation of real objects. In this study, the spatial locations of the objects are mapped to the work volume of the user using a Kinect sensor. The position of the user’s hand is obtained using the marker-based visual processing. The depth information is used to build a vibrotactile map on a haptic glove enhanced with vibration motors. The users can perceive the location and dimension of remote objects by moving their hand inside a scanning region. A marker detection camera provides the location and orientation of the user’s hand (glove to map the corresponding tactile message. A preliminary study was conducted to explore how different users can perceive such haptic experiences. Factors such as total number of objects detected, object separation resolution, and dimension-based and shape-based discrimination were evaluated. The preliminary results showed that the localization and counting of objects can be attained with a high degree of success. The users were able to classify groups of objects of different dimensions based on the perceived haptic feedback.

  1. Using Turnitin to Provide Feedback on L2 Writers' Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostka, Ilka; Maliborska, Veronika

    2016-01-01

    Second language (L2) writing instructors have varying tools at their disposal for providing feedback on students' writing, including ones that enable them to provide written and audio feedback in electronic form. One tool that has been underexplored is Turnitin, a widely used software program that matches electronic text to a wide range of…

  2. The importance of haptic feedback in laparoscopic suturing training and the additive value of virtual reality simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botden, Sanne M B I; Torab, Fawaz; Buzink, Sonja N; Jakimowicz, Jack J

    2008-05-01

    Previous studies on the difference between physical, augmented and virtual reality (VR) simulation state that haptic feedback is an important feature in laparoscopic suturing simulation. Objective assessment is important to improve skills during training. This study focuses on the additive value of VR simulation for laparoscopic suturing training. All participants of several European Association for Endoscopic Surgery (EAES)-approved laparoscopic skills courses (N = 45) filled out a questionnaire on their opinion on laparoscopic suturing training. Additionally, participants with little or no laparoscopic suturing experience were allotted to two groups: group A (N = 10), who started training on the box trainer and subsequently the VR simulator (SimSurgery), and group B (N = 10), who began on the VR simulator followed by the box. Finally, suturing and knot-tying skills were assessed by an expert observer, using a standard evaluation form (eight items on five-point-Likert scale). The same was done after the initial training on the box in group A, as a control. Significant differences were calculated with the independent-sample t-test and the paired t-test. The total score of group A was higher than both group B and control (means of 30.80, 27.60, 28.20, respectively), but not significantly. The only tendency to a significant difference between group A and B was found in 'taking proper bites' (mean 4.10 versus 3.60, p = 0.054). All the participants scored the features of the box trainer significantly higher than those of the VR simulator (p < 0.001), 46.7% was of the opinion that the box alone would be sufficient for laparoscopic suturing training. From this study we can conclude that VR simulation does not have a significant additional value in laparoscopic suturing training, over traditional box trainers. One should consider that the future development in VR simulation should focus on basic skills and component tasks of procedural training in laparoscopic surgery

  3. Improving Challenge/Skill Ratio in a Multimodal Interface by Simultaneously Adapting Game Difficulty and Haptic Assistance through Psychophysiological and Performance Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rodriguez-Guerrero

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to harmonize robotic devices with human beings, the robots should be able to perceive important psychosomatic impact triggered by emotional states such as frustration or boredom. This paper presents a new type of biocooperative control architecture, which acts toward improving the challenge/skill relation perceived by the user when interacting with a robotic multimodal interface in a cooperative scenario. In the first part of the paper, open-loop experiments revealed which physiological signals were optimal for inclusion in the feedback loop. These were heart rate, skin conductance level, and skin conductance response frequency. In the second part of the paper, the proposed controller, consisting of a biocooperative architecture with two degrees of freedom, simultaneously modulating game difficulty and haptic assistance through performance and psychophysiological feedback, is presented. With this setup, the perceived challenge can be modulated by means of the game difficulty and the perceived skill by means of the haptic assistance. A new metric (FlowIndex is proposed to numerically quantify and visualize the challenge/skill relation. The results are contrasted with comparable previously published work and show that the new method afforded a higher FlowIndex (i.e., a superior challenge/skill relation and an improved balance between augmented performance and user satisfaction (higher level of valence, i.e., a more enjoyable and satisfactory experience.

  4. Evaluation of Wearable Haptic Systems for the Fingers in Augmented Reality Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisto, Maurizio; Pacchierotti, Claudio; Chinello, Francesco; Salvietti, Gionata; De Luca, Alessandro; Prattichizzo, Domenico

    2017-01-01

    Although Augmented Reality (AR) has been around for almost five decades, only recently we have witnessed AR systems and applications entering in our everyday life. Representative examples of this technological revolution are the smartphone games "Pokémon GO" and "Ingress" or the Google Translate real-time sign interpretation app. Even if AR applications are already quite compelling and widespread, users are still not able to physically interact with the computer-generated reality. In this respect, wearable haptics can provide the compelling illusion of touching the superimposed virtual objects without constraining the motion or the workspace of the user. In this paper, we present the experimental evaluation of two wearable haptic interfaces for the fingers in three AR scenarios, enrolling 38 participants. In the first experiment, subjects were requested to write on a virtual board using a real chalk. The haptic devices provided the interaction forces between the chalk and the board. In the second experiment, subjects were asked to pick and place virtual and real objects. The haptic devices provided the interaction forces due to the weight of the virtual objects. In the third experiment, subjects were asked to balance a virtual sphere on a real cardboard. The haptic devices provided the interaction forces due to the weight of the virtual sphere rolling on the cardboard. Providing haptic feedback through the considered wearable device significantly improved the performance of all the considered tasks. Moreover, subjects significantly preferred conditions providing wearable haptic feedback.

  5. Haptic stabilization of posture: changes in arm proprioception and cutaneous feedback for different arm orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, E.; Bortolami, S. B.; DiZio, P.; Lackner, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    Postural sway during quiet stance is attenuated by actively maintained contact of the index finger with a stationary surface, even if the level of applied force (test this analysis, subjects touched a laterally versus anteriorly placed surface while in each of two stances: the heel-to-toe tandem Romberg stance that reduces medial-lateral stability and the heel-to-heel, toes-outward, knees-bent, "duck stance" that reduces fore-aft stability. Postural sway was always least with finger contact in the unstable plane: for the tandem stance, lateral fingertip contact was significantly more effective than frontal contact, and, for the duck stance, frontal contact was more effective than lateral fingertip contact. Force changes at the fingertip led changes in center of pressure of the feet by approximately 250 ms for both fingertip contact locations for both test stances. These results support the geometric analysis, which showed that 1) arm joint angles change by the largest amount when fingertip contact is maintained in the plane of greatest sway, and 2) the somatosensory cues at the fingertip provide both direction and amplitude information about sway when the finger is contacting a surface in the unstable plane.

  6. Video Game Device Haptic Interface for Robotic Arc Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corrie I. Nichol; Milos Manic

    2009-05-01

    Recent advances in technology for video games have made a broad array of haptic feedback devices available at low cost. This paper presents a bi-manual haptic system to enable an operator to weld remotely using the a commercially available haptic feedback video game device for the user interface. The system showed good performance in initial tests, demonstrating the utility of low cost input devices for remote haptic operations.

  7. User Acceptance of a Haptic Interface for Learning Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Soonja; Choi-Lundberg, Derek; Fluck, Andrew; Sale, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Visualizing the structure and relationships in three dimensions (3D) of organs is a challenge for students of anatomy. To provide an alternative way of learning anatomy engaging multiple senses, we are developing a force-feedback (haptic) interface for manipulation of 3D virtual organs, using design research methodology, with iterations of system…

  8. Haptic stylus and empirical studies on braille, button, and texture display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyung, Ki-Uk; Lee, Jun-Young; Park, Junseok

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a haptic stylus interface with a built-in compact tactile display module and an impact module as well as empirical studies on Braille, button, and texture display. We describe preliminary evaluations verifying the tactile display's performance indicating that it can satisfactorily represent Braille numbers for both the normal and the blind. In order to prove haptic feedback capability of the stylus, an experiment providing impact feedback mimicking the click of a button has been conducted. Since the developed device is small enough to be attached to a force feedback device, its applicability to combined force and tactile feedback display in a pen-held haptic device is also investigated. The handle of pen-held haptic interface was replaced by the pen-like interface to add tactile feedback capability to the device. Since the system provides combination of force, tactile and impact feedback, three haptic representation methods for texture display have been compared on surface with 3 texture groups which differ in direction, groove width, and shape. In addition, we evaluate its capacity to support touch screen operations by providing tactile sensations when a user rubs against an image displayed on a monitor.

  9. Haptic Stylus and Empirical Studies on Braille, Button, and Texture Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Uk Kyung

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a haptic stylus interface with a built-in compact tactile display module and an impact module as well as empirical studies on Braille, button, and texture display. We describe preliminary evaluations verifying the tactile display's performance indicating that it can satisfactorily represent Braille numbers for both the normal and the blind. In order to prove haptic feedback capability of the stylus, an experiment providing impact feedback mimicking the click of a button has been conducted. Since the developed device is small enough to be attached to a force feedback device, its applicability to combined force and tactile feedback display in a pen-held haptic device is also investigated. The handle of pen-held haptic interface was replaced by the pen-like interface to add tactile feedback capability to the device. Since the system provides combination of force, tactile and impact feedback, three haptic representation methods for texture display have been compared on surface with 3 texture groups which differ in direction, groove width, and shape. In addition, we evaluate its capacity to support touch screen operations by providing tactile sensations when a user rubs against an image displayed on a monitor.

  10. A novel approach to haptic tele-operation of aerial robot vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stramigioli, Stefano; Mahony, Robert; Corke, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel, simple and effective approach for tele-operation of aerial robotic vehicles with haptic feedback. Such feedback provides the remote pilot with an intuitive feel of the robot's state and perceived local environment that will ensure simple and safe operation in cluttered 3D

  11. A “virtually minimal” visuo-haptic training of attention in severe traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Although common during the early stages of recovery from severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), attention deficits have been scarcely investigated. Encouraging evidence suggests beneficial effects of attention training in more chronic and higher functioning patients. Interactive technology may provide new opportunities for rehabilitation in inpatients who are earlier in their recovery. Methods We designed a “virtually minimal” approach using robot-rendered haptics in a virtual environment to train severely injured inpatients in the early stages of recovery to sustain attention to a visuo-motor task. 21 inpatients with severe TBI completed repetitive reaching toward targets that were both seen and felt. Patients were tested over two consecutive days, experiencing 3 conditions (no haptic feedback, a break-through force, and haptic nudge) in 12 successive, 4-minute blocks. Results The interactive visuo-haptic environments were well-tolerated and engaging. Patients typically remained attentive to the task. However, patients exhibited attention loss both before (prolonged initiation) and during (pauses during motion) a movement. Compared to no haptic feedback, patients benefited from haptic nudge cues but not break-through forces. As training progressed, patients increased the number of targets acquired and spontaneously improved from one day to the next. Conclusions Interactive visuo-haptic environments could be beneficial for attention training for severe TBI patients in the early stages of recovery and warrants further and more prolonged clinical testing. PMID:23938101

  12. A "virtually minimal" visuo-haptic training of attention in severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorkin, Assaf Y; Ramaiya, Milan; Larson, Eric B; Zollman, Felise S; Hsu, Nancy; Pacini, Sonia; Shah, Amit; Patton, James L

    2013-08-09

    Although common during the early stages of recovery from severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), attention deficits have been scarcely investigated. Encouraging evidence suggests beneficial effects of attention training in more chronic and higher functioning patients. Interactive technology may provide new opportunities for rehabilitation in inpatients who are earlier in their recovery. We designed a "virtually minimal" approach using robot-rendered haptics in a virtual environment to train severely injured inpatients in the early stages of recovery to sustain attention to a visuo-motor task. 21 inpatients with severe TBI completed repetitive reaching toward targets that were both seen and felt. Patients were tested over two consecutive days, experiencing 3 conditions (no haptic feedback, a break-through force, and haptic nudge) in 12 successive, 4-minute blocks. The interactive visuo-haptic environments were well-tolerated and engaging. Patients typically remained attentive to the task. However, patients exhibited attention loss both before (prolonged initiation) and during (pauses during motion) a movement. Compared to no haptic feedback, patients benefited from haptic nudge cues but not break-through forces. As training progressed, patients increased the number of targets acquired and spontaneously improved from one day to the next. Interactive visuo-haptic environments could be beneficial for attention training for severe TBI patients in the early stages of recovery and warrants further and more prolonged clinical testing.

  13. Feedback providing improvement strategies and reflection on feedback use: Effects on students' writing motivation, process, and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijnhouwer, H.; Prins, F.J.; Stokking, K.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of feedback providing improvement strategies and a reflection assignment on students’ writing motivation, process, and performance. Students in the experimental feedback condition (n = 41) received feedback including improvement strategies, whereas students in the

  14. A Preliminary Study on the Use of Haptic Feedback to Assist Users with Impaired Arm Coordination During Mouse Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Tsagarakis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical movement impairments caused by central nervous system dysfunction or by muscle spasms generated from other neurological damage or dysfunction can often make it difficult or impossible for affected individuals to interact with computer generated environments using the conventional mouse interfaces. This work investigates the use of a 2 dimensional haptic device as an assistive robotic aid to minimize the effects of the pathological absence of motor control on the upper limb in impaired users while using a mouse interface. The haptic system used in this research is a two degree of freedom (DOF Pantograph planar device. To detect the intended user motion, the device is equipped with force sensing allowing the monitoring of the user applied loads. Impedance based techniques are used to develop a “clumsy” motion suppression control system. The erratic motion suppression techniques and the experimental system setup are evaluated in two dimensional tracking tasks using a human subject with failure of the gross coordination of the upper limb muscle movements resulting from a disorder called ‘Muscle Ataxia’. The results presented demonstrate the ability of the system to improve the tracking performance of the impaired user while interacting with a simple computer generated 2D space.

  15. Experimental evaluation of a miniature MR device for a wide range of human perceivable haptic sensations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tae-Heon; Koo, Jeong-Hoi

    2017-12-01

    Humans can experience a realistic and vivid haptic sensations by the sense of touch. In order to have a fully immersive haptic experience, both kinaesthetic and vibrotactile information must be presented to human users. Currently, little haptic research has been performed on small haptic actuators that can covey both vibrotactile feedback based on the frequency of vibrations up to the human-perceivable limit and multiple levels of kinaesthetic feedback rapidly. Therefore, this study intends to design a miniature haptic device based on MR fluid and experimentally evaluate its ability to convey vibrotactile feedback up to 300 Hz along with kinaesthetic feedback. After constructing a prototype device, a series of testing was performed to evaluate its performance of the prototype using an experimental setup, consisting of a precision dynamic mechanical analyzer and an accelerometer. The kinaesthetic testing results show that the prototype device can provide the force rate up to 89% at 5 V (360 mA), which can be discretized into multiple levels of ‘just noticeable difference’ force rate, indicating that the device can convey a wide range of kinaesthetic sensations. To evaluate the high frequency vibrotactile feedback performance of the device, its acceleration responses were measured and processed using the FFT analysis. The results indicate that the device can convey high frequency vibrotactile sensations up to 300 Hz with the sufficiently large intensity of accelerations that human can feel.

  16. A virtual universe utilizing haptic display

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)][New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1996-12-31

    This paper summarizes a virtual reality universe application in which a user can travel between four virtual worlds through the use of haptic buttons. Each of the worlds demonstrates different aspects of haptic rendering which together create a wide base for force feedback effects. Specifics of the rendering algorithms will be discussed along with possible uses and modifications for other real-life applications.

  17. Developing Visual Editors for High-Resolution Haptic Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuartielles, David; Göransson, Andreas; Olsson, Tony

    2012-01-01

    In this article we give an overview of our iterative work in developing visual editors for creating high resolution haptic patterns to be used in wearable, haptic feedback devices. During the past four years we have found the need to address the question of how to represent, construct and edit high...... resolution haptic patterns so that they translate naturally to the user’s haptic experience. To solve this question we have developed and tested several visual editors...

  18. Providing Rapid Feedback in Generated Modular Language Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kats, L.C.L.; De Jonge, M.; Nilsson-Nyman, E.; Visser, E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a pre-print of: Providing Rapid Feedback in Generated Modular Language Environments. Adding Error Recovery to Scannerless Generalized-LR Parsing. In: Gary T. Leavens, editor, Proceedings of the 24th ACM SIGPLAN Conference on Object-Oriented Programing, Systems, Languages, and

  19. A method for calculating active feedback system to provide vertical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 68; Issue 4. A method for calculating active feedback system to provide vertical position control of plasma in a tokamak. Nizami Gasilov. Research ... Nizami Gasilov1. Faculty of Engineering, Baskent University, Eskisehir Yolu 20. km, Baglica, 06530 Ankara, Turkey ...

  20. 5 CFR 9701.407 - Monitoring performance and providing feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... implementing directives and policies, supervisors must— (a) Monitor the performance of their employees and the organization; and (b) Provide timely periodic feedback to employees on their actual performance with respect to their performance expectations, including one or more interim performance reviews during each appraisal...

  1. Enhancing Healthcare Provider Feedback and Personal Health Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer; Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Salkeld, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    In this protocol for a pilot study we seek to establish the feasibility of using a web-based survey to simultaneously supply healthcare organisations and agencies with feedback on a key aspect of the care experience they provide and increase the generic health decision literacy of the individuals...

  2. Shared control of a medical robot with haptic guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Linfei; Chng, Chin Boon; Chui, Chee Kong; Yu, Peiwu; Li, Yao

    2017-01-01

    Tele-operation of robotic surgery reduces the radiation exposure during the interventional radiological operations. However, endoscope vision without force feedback on the surgical tool increases the difficulty for precise manipulation and the risk of tissue damage. The shared control of vision and force provides a novel approach of enhanced control with haptic guidance, which could lead to subtle dexterity and better maneuvrability during MIS surgery. The paper provides an innovative shared control method for robotic minimally invasive surgery system, in which vision and haptic feedback are incorporated to provide guidance cues to the clinician during surgery. The incremental potential field (IPF) method is utilized to generate a guidance path based on the anatomy of tissue and surgical tool interaction. Haptic guidance is provided at the master end to assist the clinician during tele-operative surgical robotic task. The approach has been validated with path following and virtual tumor targeting experiments. The experiment results demonstrate that comparing with vision only guidance, the shared control with vision and haptics improved the accuracy and efficiency of surgical robotic manipulation, where the tool-position error distance and execution time are reduced. The validation experiment demonstrates that the shared control approach could help the surgical robot system provide stable assistance and precise performance to execute the designated surgical task. The methodology could also be implemented with other surgical robot with different surgical tools and applications.

  3. Visual-haptic integration with pliers and tongs: signal "weights" take account of changes in haptic sensitivity caused by different tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Chie; Watt, Simon J

    2014-01-01

    When we hold an object while looking at it, estimates from visual and haptic cues to size are combined in a statistically optimal fashion, whereby the "weight" given to each signal reflects their relative reliabilities. This allows object properties to be estimated more precisely than would otherwise be possible. Tools such as pliers and tongs systematically perturb the mapping between object size and the hand opening. This could complicate visual-haptic integration because it may alter the reliability of the haptic signal, thereby disrupting the determination of appropriate signal weights. To investigate this we first measured the reliability of haptic size estimates made with virtual pliers-like tools (created using a stereoscopic display and force-feedback robots) with different "gains" between hand opening and object size. Haptic reliability in tool use was straightforwardly determined by a combination of sensitivity to changes in hand opening and the effects of tool geometry. The precise pattern of sensitivity to hand opening, which violated Weber's law, meant that haptic reliability changed with tool gain. We then examined whether the visuo-motor system accounts for these reliability changes. We measured the weight given to visual and haptic stimuli when both were available, again with different tool gains, by measuring the perceived size of stimuli in which visual and haptic sizes were varied independently. The weight given to each sensory cue changed with tool gain in a manner that closely resembled the predictions of optimal sensory integration. The results are consistent with the idea that different tool geometries are modeled by the brain, allowing it to calculate not only the distal properties of objects felt with tools, but also the certainty with which those properties are known. These findings highlight the flexibility of human sensory integration and tool-use, and potentially provide an approach for optimizing the design of visual-haptic devices.

  4. Visual-haptic integration with pliers and tongs: signal ‘weights’ take account of changes in haptic sensitivity caused by different tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chie eTakahashi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available When we hold an object while looking at it, estimates from visual and haptic cues to size are combined in a statistically optimal fashion, whereby the ‘weight’ given to each signal reflects their relative reliabilities. This allows object properties to be estimated more precisely than would otherwise be possible. Tools such as pliers and tongs systematically perturb the mapping between object size and the hand opening. This could complicate visual-haptic integration because it may alter the reliability of the haptic signal, thereby disrupting the determination of appropriate signal weights. To investigate this we first measured the reliability of haptic size estimates made with virtual pliers-like tools (created using a stereoscopic display and force-feedback robots with different ‘gains’ between hand opening and object size. Haptic reliability in tool use was straightforwardly determined by a combination of sensitivity to changes in hand opening and the effects of tool geometry. The precise pattern of sensitivity to hand opening, which violated Weber’s law, meant that haptic reliability changed with tool gain. We then examined whether the visuo-motor system accounts for these reliability changes. We measured the weight given to visual and haptic stimuli when both were available, again with different tool gains, by measuring the perceived size of stimuli in which visual and haptic sizes were varied independently. The weight given to each sensory cue changed with tool gain in a manner that closely resembled the predictions of optimal sensory integration. The results are consistent with the idea that different tool geometries are modelled by the brain, allowing it to calculate not only the distal properties of objects felt with tools, but also the certainty with which those properties are known. These findings highlight the flexibility of human sensory integration and tool-use, and potentially provide an approach for optimising the

  5. Feedback Providing Improvement Strategies and Reflection on Feedback Use: Effects on Students' Writing Motivation, Process, and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijnhouwer, Hendrien; Prins, Frans J.; Stokking, Karel M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of feedback providing improvement strategies and a reflection assignment on students' writing motivation, process, and performance. Students in the experimental feedback condition (n = 41) received feedback including improvement strategies, whereas students in the control feedback condition (n = 41) received…

  6. A feedback system in residency to evaluate CanMEDS roles and provide high-quality feedback : Exploring its application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renting, Nienke; Gans, Rijk O. B.; Borleffs, Jan C. C.; Van Der Wal, Martha A.; Jaarsma, A. Debbie C.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    Introduction: Residents benefit from regular, high quality feedback on all CanMEDS roles during their training. However, feedback mostly concerns Medical Expert, leaving the other roles behind. A feedback system was developed to guide supervisors in providing feedback on CanMEDS roles. We analyzed

  7. Haptic exploration of fingertip-sized geometric features using a multimodal tactile sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce Wong, Ruben D.; Hellman, Randall B.; Santos, Veronica J.

    2014-06-01

    Haptic perception remains a grand challenge for artificial hands. Dexterous manipulators could be enhanced by "haptic intelligence" that enables identification of objects and their features via touch alone. Haptic perception of local shape would be useful when vision is obstructed or when proprioceptive feedback is inadequate, as observed in this study. In this work, a robot hand outfitted with a deformable, bladder-type, multimodal tactile sensor was used to replay four human-inspired haptic "exploratory procedures" on fingertip-sized geometric features. The geometric features varied by type (bump, pit), curvature (planar, conical, spherical), and footprint dimension (1.25 - 20 mm). Tactile signals generated by active fingertip motions were used to extract key parameters for use as inputs to supervised learning models. A support vector classifier estimated order of curvature while support vector regression models estimated footprint dimension once curvature had been estimated. A distal-proximal stroke (along the long axis of the finger) enabled estimation of order of curvature with an accuracy of 97%. Best-performing, curvature-specific, support vector regression models yielded R2 values of at least 0.95. While a radial-ulnar stroke (along the short axis of the finger) was most helpful for estimating feature type and size for planar features, a rolling motion was most helpful for conical and spherical features. The ability to haptically perceive local shape could be used to advance robot autonomy and provide haptic feedback to human teleoperators of devices ranging from bomb defusal robots to neuroprostheses.

  8. The value of haptic feedback in conventional and robot-assisted minimal invasive surgery and virtual reality training: a current review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meijden, O. A. J.; Schijven, M. P.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Virtual reality (VR) as surgical training tool has become a state-of-the-art technique in training and teaching skills for minimally invasive surgery (MIS). Although intuitively appealing, the true benefits of haptic (VR training) platforms are unknown. Many questions about haptic

  9. Integration of Haptics in Agricultural Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan Megalingam, Rajesh; Sreekanth, M. M.; Sivanantham, Vinu; Sai Kumar, K.; Ghanta, Sriharsha; Surya Teja, P.; Reddy, Rajesh G.

    2017-08-01

    Robots can differentiate with open loop system and closed loop system robots. We face many problems when we do not have a feedback from robots. In this research paper, we are discussing all possibilities to achieve complete closed loop system for Multiple-DOF Robotic Arm, which is used in a coconut tree climbing and cutting robot by introducing a Haptic device. We are working on various sensors like tactile, vibration, force and proximity sensors for getting feedback. For monitoring the robotic arm achieved by graphical user interference software which simulates the working of the robotic arm, send the feedback of all the real time analog values which are produced by various sensors and provide real-time graphs for estimate the efficiency of the Robot.

  10. Prop-Based Haptic Interaction with Co-location and Immersion: an Automotive Application

    OpenAIRE

    Ortega, Michael; Coquillart, Sabine

    2006-01-01

    Most research on 3D user interfaces aims at providing only a single sensory modality. One challenge is to integrate several sensory modalities into a seamless system while preserving each modality's immersion and performance factors. This paper concerns manipulation tasks and proposes a visuo-haptic system integrating immersive visualization, tactile force and tactile feedback with co-location. An industrial application is presented.

  11. Evaluation of multimodal feedback effects on improving rowing competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korman Maria

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the selection and preliminary evaluation of different types of modal and information feedback in virtual environment to facilitate acquisition and transfer of a complex motor-cognitive skill of rowing. Specifically, we addressed the effectiveness of immediate information feedback provided visually as compared to sensory haptic feedback on the improvement in hands kinematics and changes in cognitive load during the course of learning the basic rowing technique. Several pilot experiments described in this report lead to the evaluation and optimization of the training protocol, to enhance facilitatory effects of adding visual and haptic feedback during training.

  12. Audio effects on haptics perception during drilling simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Valbuena

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Virtual reality has provided immersion and interactions through computer generated environments attempting to reproduce real life experiences through sensorial stimuli. Realism can be achieved through multimodal interactions which can enhance the user’s presence within the computer generated world. The most notorious advances in virtual reality can be seen in computer graphics visuals, where photorealism is the norm thriving to overcome the uncanny valley. Other advances have followed related to sound, haptics, and in a lesser manner smell and taste feedback. Currently, virtual reality systems (multimodal immersion and interactions through visual-haptic-sound are being massively used in entertainment (e.g., cinema, video games, art, and in non-entertainment scenarios (e.g., social inclusion, educational, training, therapy, and tourism. Moreover, the cost reduction of virtual reality technologies has resulted in the availability at a consumer-level of various haptic, headsets, and motion tracking devices. Current consumer-level devices offer low-fidelity experiences due to the properties of the sensors, displays, and other electro-mechanical devices, that may not be suitable for high-precision or realistic experiences requiring dexterity. However, research has been conducted on how toovercome or compensate the lack of high fidelity to provide an engaging user experience using storytelling, multimodal interactions and gaming elements. Our work focuses on analyzing the possible effects of auditory perception on haptic feedback within a drilling scenario. Drilling involves multimodal interactions and it is a task with multiple applications in medicine, crafting, and construction. We compare two drilling scenarios were two groups of participants had to drill through wood while listening to contextual and non-contextual audios. We gathered their perception using a survey after the task completion. From the results, we believe that sound does

  13. Haptic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Cindy; Mason, Earl

    2009-01-01

    The paper introduces haptic medicine--healthcare based on loving touch for healing and preventing disease. We describe the effects of loving touch (a square inch of our skin has over 1000 nerves) on the body, brain and mind. We describe two web-based health education and media projects. The first, HYPERLINK "http://www.21stcenturymed.org" www.21stcenturymed.org is a place for health practitioners to start learning about touch and resources. The second project, Humans Without Borders, is a multi-lingual self help education website for everyday people. Teaching materials for these projects are based on our previous work with a form of haptic medicine known as psychophysiophilosophy with patients at Stanford Hospital, Kaiser Permanente and Lucille Packard Children's Hospital. We describe psychophysiophilosophy, relate motherly love to recent discoveries in neurosciences and give hints on ways to increase motherly love in each of us. We present a plan for moving into the future by re-introducing haptic medicine into our daily lives through self-help and as an adjunct for current physician practice. There is an exercise in self-help for the reader and an appendix of recent clinical research with profound benefits on the use of human touch for over 40 conditions.

  14. Virtual Reality and Haptics for Product Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Restivo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Haptics can significantly enhance the user's sense of immersion and interactivity. An industrial application of virtual reality and haptics for product assembly is described in this paper, which provides a new and low-cost approach for product assembly design, assembly task planning and assembly operation training. A demonstration of the system with haptics device interaction was available at the session of exp.at'11.

  15. A polygonal method for haptic force generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, T. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering]|[Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Algorithms for computing forces and associated surface deformations (graphical and physical) are given, which, together with a force feedback device can be used to haptically display virtual objects. The Bendable Polygon algorithm, created at Sandia National Labs and the University of New Mexico, for visual rendering of computer generated surfaces is also presented. An implementation using the EIGEN virtual reality environment, and the PHANToM (Trademark) haptic interface, is reported together with suggestions for future research.

  16. A method for calculating active feedback system to provide vertical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    not difficult to see that ϕ (+∞)=+∞. Therefore, for the equation ϕ (γ)=0to have no positive root, the fulfillment of the following condition is necessary: ϕ (0) = (R−1w, a) − w0 ≥ 0. (12). We will call (12) as the necessary condition of vertical position control by active feedbacks. 5. Problem of selection of active feedback system.

  17. A survey on haptic technologies for mobile augmented reality

    OpenAIRE

    Bermejo, Carlos; Hui, Pan

    2017-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) and Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) applications have gained much research and industry attention these days. The mobile nature of MAR applications limits users' interaction capabilities such as inputs, and haptic feedbacks. This survey reviews current research issues in the area of human computer interaction for MAR and haptic devices. The survey first presents human sensing capabilities and their applicability in AR applications. We classify haptic devices into two gro...

  18. Teacher's Attitude into Different Approach to Providing Feedback to Students in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaqmaqchee, Zina Adil

    2015-01-01

    Feedback within higher education has an effective role in teaching staffs mode. The treatise on teachers' methods of feedback is represented to demonstrate how the novel feedback can help the academic staffs to provide an effective feedback for students in their assignments and written draft. The study investigates the academic staff's methods of…

  19. Haptic Addition to a Visual Menu Selection Interface Controlled by an In-Vehicle Rotary Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Grane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, several vehicles are equipped with a visual display combined with a haptic rotary device for handling in-vehicle information system tasks while driving. This experimental study investigates whether a haptic addition to a visual interface interferes with or supports secondary task performance and whether haptic information could be used without taking eyes off road. Four interfaces were compared during simulated driving: visual only, partly corresponding visual-haptic, fully corresponding visual-haptic, and haptic only. Secondary task performance and subjective mental workload were measured. Additionally, the participants were interviewed. It was found that some haptic support improved performance. However, when more haptic information was used, the results diverged in terms of task completion time and interface comprehension. Some participants did not sense all haptics provided, some did not comprehend the correspondence between the haptic and visual interfaces, and some did. Interestingly, the participants managed to complete the tasks when using haptic-only information.

  20. Exploring the value of peer feedback in online learning for the provider

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijke Kral; Gino Camp; Esther van Popta; Robert Jan Simons; Rob L. Martens

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews studies of peer feedback from the novel perspective of the providers of that feedback. The possible learning benefits of providing peer feedback in online learning have not been extensively studied. The goal of this study was therefore to explore the process of providing online

  1. An augmented reality haptic training simulator for spinal needle procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Colin; Hashtrudi-Zaad, Keyvan; Sellens, Rick; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Mousavi, Parvin

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents the prototype for an augmented reality haptic simulation system with potential for spinal needle insertion training. The proposed system is composed of a torso mannequin, a MicronTracker2 optical tracking system, a PHANToM haptic device, and a graphical user interface to provide visual feedback. The system allows users to perform simulated needle insertions on a physical mannequin overlaid with an augmented reality cutaway of patient anatomy. A tissue model based on a finite-element model provides force during the insertion. The system allows for training without the need for the presence of a trained clinician or access to live patients or cadavers. A pilot user study demonstrates the potential and functionality of the system.

  2. Open radical retropubic prostatectomy using high anterior release of the levator fascia and constant haptic feedback in bilateral neurovascular bundle preservation plus early postoperative phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibition: a contemporary series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubanks, J Mikel; Umbreit, Eric C; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Myers, Robert P

    2012-05-01

    Patients with newly diagnosed localized prostate cancer who choose surgery want cure and decent quality of life, namely, pad-free urinary control and, often, erectile function satisfactory for sexual intercourse. Determine in a prospective study the positive surgical margin rate and functional outcomes for a consecutive series of patients undergoing open radical retropubic prostatectomy (ORRP) with bilateral neurovascular bundle preservation (BNVBP) performed by one experienced surgeon. Of 197 consecutive patients undergoing BNVBP during 2008, 123 were evaluable, allowing both immediate postoperative phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibition (PDE5i) and a third-party questionnaire with validated urinary and erectile function domains provided preoperatively and at 3, 6, and 12 mo postoperatively. Two interventions were used: (1) ORRP with ×4.3 optical loupes and constant digital tactile monitoring during BNVBP preceded by high anterior release (HAR) of levator fascia and neurovascular bundles and (2) early postoperative PDE5i. Age; biopsy Gleason score; clinical stage; preoperative prostate-specific antigen level; pathologic grade; stage; margin status; University of California, Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index domain for urinary pad use and bother; and International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) were used. Surgical margins were positive in 1 of the 123 evaluable patients (1%). At 1 yr, 95% of patients were pad-free. Satisfactory erectile function was achieved by 109 patients (89%): 82 (67%) scored an IIEF-5 of 22-25, and 27 (22%) scored erection within the first year. Mean hospital stay was 1.3 d. Limitations were (1) observational, noncomparative, single-surgeon series and (2) in third-party methodology, failure to capture patient answers for all questionnaire intervals with resultant inability to address durability of functional results for all patients. ORRP using ×4.3 optical loupe magnification, constant haptic feedback in BNVBP with HAR, and immediate

  3. Multimodal Interaction in a Haptic Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Kole, S.; Zwiers, Jakob; Bicchi, A.; Bergamasco, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the introduction of haptics in a multimodal tutoring environment. In this environment a haptic device is used to control a virtual piece of sterile cotton and a virtual injection needle. Speech input and output is provided to interact with a virtual tutor, available as a

  4. Feel, imagine and learn! - Haptic augmented simulation and embodied instruction in physics learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, In Sook

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potentials and effects of an embodied instructional model in abstract concept learning. This embodied instructional process included haptic augmented educational simulation as an instructional tool to provide perceptual experiences as well as further instruction to activate those previous experiences with perceptual simulation. In order to verify the effectiveness of this instructional model, haptic augmented simulation with three different haptic levels (force and kinesthetic, kinesthetic, and non-haptic) and instructional materials (narrative and expository) were developed and their effectiveness tested. 220 fifth grade students were recruited to participate in the study from three elementary schools located in lower SES neighborhoods in Bronx, New York. The study was conducted for three consecutive weeks in regular class periods. The data was analyzed using ANCOVA, ANOVA, and MANOVA. The result indicates that haptic augmented simulations, both the force and kinesthetic and the kinesthetic simulations, was more effective than the non-haptic simulation in providing perceptual experiences and helping elementary students to create multimodal representations about machines' movements. However, in most cases, force feedback was needed to construct a fully loaded multimodal representation that could be activated when the instruction with less sensory modalities was being given. In addition, the force and kinesthetic simulation was effective in providing cognitive grounding to comprehend a new learning content based on the multimodal representation created with enhanced force feedback. Regarding the instruction type, it was found that the narrative and the expository instructions did not make any difference in activating previous perceptual experiences. These findings suggest that it is important to help students to make a solid cognitive ground with perceptual anchor. Also, sequential abstraction process would deepen

  5. Co-located haptic and 3D graphic interface for medical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkelman, Peter; Miyasaka, Muneaki; Bozlee, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    We describe a system which provides high-fidelity haptic feedback in the same physical location as a 3D graphical display, in order to enable realistic physical interaction with virtual anatomical tissue during modelled procedures such as needle driving, palpation, and other interventions performed using handheld instruments. The haptic feedback is produced by the interaction between an array of coils located behind a thin flat LCD screen, and permanent magnets embedded in the instrument held by the user. The coil and magnet configuration permits arbitrary forces and torques to be generated on the instrument in real time according to the dynamics of the simulated tissue by activating the coils in combination. A rigid-body motion tracker provides position and orientation feedback of the handheld instrument to the computer simulation, and the 3D display is produced using LCD shutter glasses and a head-tracking system for the user.

  6. Can Turnitin Be Used to Provide Instant Formative Feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, Vivien

    2011-01-01

    New students face the challenge of making a smooth transition between school and university, and with regards to academic practice, there are often gaps between student expectations and university requirements. This study supports the use of the plagiarism detection service Turnitin to give students instant feedback on essays to help improve…

  7. Active disturbance rejection control in steering by wire haptic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Angeles, A; Garcia-Antonio, J A

    2014-07-01

    This paper introduces a steering by wired haptic system based on disturbance rejection control techniques. High gain Generalized Proportional Integral (GPI) observers are considered for the estimation of tire and steering wheel dynamic disturbances. These disturbances are on line canceled to ensure tracking between the commanded steering wheel angle and the tire orientation angle. The estimated disturbances at the steering rack are feedback to the steering wheel to provide a haptic interface with the driver. The overall system behaves as a bilateral master-slave system. Very few sensors and minimum knowledge of the dynamic model are required. Experimental results are presented on a prototype platform that consists on: (1) half of the steering rack of a beetle VW vehicle, (2) a steering wheel. © 2013 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Emotion Telepresence: Emotion Augmentation through Affective Haptics and Visual Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsetserukou, D.; Neviarouskaya, A.

    2012-03-01

    The paper focuses on a novel concept of emotional telepresence. The iFeel_IM! system which is in the vanguard of this technology integrates 3D virtual world Second Life, intelligent component for automatic emotion recognition from text messages, and innovative affective haptic interfaces providing additional nonverbal communication channels through simulation of emotional feedback and social touch (physical co-presence). Users can not only exchange messages but also emotionally and physically feel the presence of the communication partner (e.g., family member, friend, or beloved person). The next prototype of the system will include the tablet computer. The user can realize haptic interaction with avatar, and thus influence its mood and emotion of the partner. The finger gesture language will be designed for communication with avatar. This will bring new level of immersion of on-line communication.

  9. Attention Paid to Feedback Provided by a Computer-Based Assessment for Learning on Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmers, Caroline; Veldkamp, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Three studies are presented on attention paid to feedback provided by a computer-based assessment for learning on information literacy. Results show that the attention paid to feedback varies greatly. In general the attention focuses on feedback of incorrectly answered questions. In each study approximately fifty percent of the respondents paid…

  10. Design of a 7-DOF haptic master using a magneto-rheological devices for robot surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seok-Rae; Choi, Seung-Bok; Hwang, Yong-Hoon; Cha, Seung-Woo

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a 7 degrees-of-freedom (7-DOF) haptic master which is applicable to the robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery (RMIS). By utilizing a controllable magneto-rheological (MR) fluid, the haptic master can provide force information to the surgeon during surgery. The proposed haptic master consists of three degrees motions of X, Y, Z and four degrees motions of the pitch, yaw, roll and grasping. All of them have force feedback capability. The proposed haptic master can generate the repulsive forces or torques by activating MR clutch and MR brake. Both MR clutch and MR brake are designed and manufactured with consideration of the size and output torque which is usable to the robotic surgery. A proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is then designed and implemented to achieve torque/force tracking trajectories. It is verified that the proposed haptic master can track well the desired torque and force occurred in the surgical place by controlling the input current applied to MR clutch and brake.

  11. Absence of modulatory action on haptic height perception with musical pitch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele eGeronazzo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although acoustic frequency is not a spatial property of physical objects, in common language, pitch, i.e., the psychological correlated of frequency, is often labeled spatially (i.e., high in pitch or low in pitch. Pitch-height is known to modulate (and interact with the response of participants when they are asked to judge spatial properties of non-auditory stimuli (e.g., visual in a variety of behavioral tasks. In the current study we investigated whether the modulatory action of pitch-height extended to the haptic estimation of height of a virtual step.We implemented a HW/SW setup which is able to render virtual 3D objects (stair-steps haptically through a PHANTOM device, and to provide real-time continuous auditory feedback depending on the user interaction with the object. The haptic exploration was associated with a sinusoidal tone whose pitch varied as a function of the interaction point’s height within (i a narrower and (ii a wider pitch range, or (iii a random pitch variation acting as a control audio condition. Explorations were also performed with no sound (haptic only. Participants were instructed to explore the virtual step freely, and to communicate height estimation by opening their thumb and index finger to mimic the step riser height, or verbally by reporting the height in centimeters of the step riser. We analyzed the role of musical expertise by dividing participants into non musicians and musicians. Results showed no effects of musical pitch on high-realistic haptic feedback. Overall there is no difference between the two groups in the proposed multimodal conditions. Additionally, we observed a different haptic response distribution between musicians and non musicians when estimations of the auditory conditions are matched with estimations in the no sound condition.

  12. A predictive bone drilling force model for haptic rendering with experimental validation using fresh cadaveric bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yanping; Chen, Huajiang; Yu, Dedong; Zhang, Ying; Yuan, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Bone drilling simulators with virtual and haptic feedback provide a safe, cost-effective and repeatable alternative to traditional surgical training methods. To develop such a simulator, accurate haptic rendering based on a force model is required to feedback bone drilling forces based on user input. Current predictive bone drilling force models based on bovine bones with various drilling conditions and parameters are not representative of the bone drilling process in bone surgery. The objective of this study was to provide a bone drilling force model for haptic rendering based on calibration and validation experiments in fresh cadaveric bones with different bone densities. Using a commonly used drill bit geometry (2 mm diameter), feed rates (20-60 mm/min) and spindle speeds (4000-6000 rpm) in orthognathic surgeries, the bone drilling forces of specimens from two groups were measured and the calibration coefficients of the specific normal and frictional pressures were determined. The comparison of the predicted forces and the measured forces from validation experiments with a large range of feed rates and spindle speeds demonstrates that the proposed bone drilling forces can predict the trends and average forces well. The presented bone drilling force model can be used for haptic rendering in surgical simulators.

  13. Teaching and Learning Writing through Providing Teacher’s Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sihem Boubekeur

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Teaching English as a foreign language refers to instructing English to learners who are non native speakers. Mastering the language very well does not mean neither that the teacher can instruct writing in a good way; nor the student can compose coherently. Writing is a fundamental skill in both learning and teaching processes; in which EFL students need to master. Yet; the latter is considered as a complex and difficult task in that learners have to explore their thoughts and ideas via communicating on a paper; but clearly. Thus; since learners are required to write extended essays appropriately; they need to be aware of their mistakes via receiving teachers’ feedback which could be an effective strategy that enhances the students’ writing capacities.

  14. A real-time haptic interface for interventional radiology procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moix, Thomas; Ilic, Dejan; Fracheboud, Blaise; Zoethout, Jurjen; Bleuler, Hannes

    2005-01-01

    Interventional Radiology (IR) is a minimally-invasive surgery technique (MIS) where guidewires and catheters are steered in the vascular system under X-ray imaging. In order to perform these procedures, a radiologist has to be correctly trained to master hand-eye coordination, instrument manipulation and procedure protocols. This paper proposes a computer-assisted training environment dedicated to IR. The system is composed of a virtual reality (VR) simulation of the anatomy of the patient linked to a robotic interface providing haptic force feedback.The paper focuses on the requirements, design and prototyping of a specific part of the haptic interface dedicated to catheters. Translational tracking and force feedback on the catheter is provided by two cylinders forming a friction drive arrangement. The whole friction can be set in rotation with an additional motor providing torque feedback. A force and a torque sensor are integrated in the cylinders for direct measurement on the catheter enabling disturbance cancellation with a close-loop force control strategy.

  15. Haptic simulation framework for determining virtual dental occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen; Chen, Hui; Cen, Yuhai; Hong, Yang; Khambay, Balvinder; Heng, Pheng Ann

    2017-04-01

    The surgical treatment of many dentofacial deformities is often complex due to its three-dimensional nature. To determine the dental occlusion in the most stable position is essential for the success of the treatment. Computer-aided virtual planning on individualized patient-specific 3D model can help formulate the surgical plan and predict the surgical change. However, in current computer-aided planning systems, it is not possible to determine the dental occlusion of the digital models in the intuitive way during virtual surgical planning because of absence of haptic feedback. In this paper, a physically based haptic simulation framework is proposed, which can provide surgeons with the intuitive haptic feedback to determine the dental occlusion of the digital models in their most stable position. To provide the physically realistic force feedback when the dental models contact each other during the searching process, the contact model is proposed to describe the dynamic and collision properties of the dental models during the alignment. The simulated impulse/contact-based forces are integrated into the unified simulation framework. A validation study has been conducted on fifteen sets of virtual dental models chosen at random and covering a wide range of the dental relationships found clinically. The dental occlusions obtained by an expert were employed as a benchmark to compare the virtual occlusion results. The mean translational and angular deviations of the virtual occlusion results from the benchmark were small. The experimental results show the validity of our method. The simulated forces can provide valuable insights to determine the virtual dental occlusion. The findings of this work and the validation of proposed concept lead the way for full virtual surgical planning on patient-specific virtual models allowing fully customized treatment plans for the surgical correction of dentofacial deformities.

  16. Tactile Feedback for Above-Device Gesture Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Euan; Brewster, Stephen; Lantz, Vuokko

    2014-01-01

    Above-device gesture interfaces let people interact in the space above mobile devices using hand and finger movements. For example, users could gesture over a mobile phone or wearable without having to use the touchscreen. We look at how above-device interfaces can also give feedback in the space over the device. Recent haptic and wearable technologies give new ways to provide tactile feedback while gesturing, letting touchless gesture interfaces give touch feedback. In this paper we take a f...

  17. Haptic-assistive technologies for audition and vision sensory disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorgini, Francesca; Caliò, Renato; Carrozza, Maria Chiara; Oddo, Calogero Maria

    2017-10-10

    The aim of this review is to analyze haptic sensory substitution technologies for deaf, blind and deaf-blind individuals. The literature search has been performed in Scopus, PubMed and Google Scholar databases using selected keywords, analyzing studies from 1960s to present. Search on databases for scientific publications has been accompanied by web search for commercial devices. Results have been classified by sensory disability and functionality, and analyzed by assistive technology. Complementary analyses have also been carried out on websites of public international agencies, such as the World Health Organization (WHO), and of associations representing sensory disabled persons. The reviewed literature provides evidences that sensory substitution aids are able to mitigate in part the deficits in language learning, communication and navigation for deaf, blind and deaf-blind individuals, and that the tactile sense can be a means of communication to provide some kind of information to sensory disabled individuals. A lack of acceptance emerged from the discussion of capabilities and limitations of haptic assistive technologies. Future researches shall go towards miniaturized, custom-designed and low-cost haptic interfaces and integration with personal devices such as smartphones for a major diffusion of sensory aids among disabled. Implications for rehabilitation Systematic review of state of the art of haptic assistive technologies for vision and audition sensory disabilities. Sensory substitution systems for visual and hearing disabilities have a central role in the transmission of information for patients with sensory impairments, enabling users to interact with the not disabled community in daily activities. Visual and auditory inputs are converted in haptic feedback via different actuation technologies. The information is presented in the form of static or dynamic stimulation of the skin. Their effectiveness and ease of use make haptic sensory substitution

  18. A haptic device for wrist and elbow rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest in the devices for rehabilitation applications has been increasing. And the devices before have proved that they might assist in and quantify the rehabilitation for upper limb disability caused by stroke. This paper is to introduce rehabilitation application of a haptic device based on virtual reality technology, which is compact, portable, and modular. The focus here is a device with force feedback designed to provide five degrees of freedom, which are rotation, opposition, translation, pitch, and yaw. With five degrees of freedom above, the device can help individuals with arm weakness do their exercise and make patients achieve favorable rehabilitation efficacy during their upper limb rehabilitation.

  19. Haptics in Robot-Assisted Surgery: Challenges and Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enayati, Nima; De Momi, Elena; Ferrigno, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Robotic surgery is transforming the current surgical practice, not only by improving the conventional surgical methods but also by introducing innovative robot-enhanced approaches that broaden the capabilities of clinicians. Being mainly of man-machine collaborative type, surgical robots are seen as media that transfer pre- and intraoperative information to the operator and reproduce his/her motion, with appropriate filtering, scaling, or limitation, to physically interact with the patient. The field, however, is far from maturity and, more critically, is still a subject of controversy in medical communities. Limited or absent haptic feedback is reputed to be among reasons that impede further spread of surgical robots. In this paper, objectives and challenges of deploying haptic technologies in surgical robotics are discussed, and a systematic review is performed on works that have studied the effects of providing haptic information to the users in major branches of robotic surgery. It attempts to encompass both classical works and the state-of-the-art approaches, aiming at delivering a comprehensive and balanced survey both for researchers starting their work in this field and for the experts.

  20. Multimodality with Eye tracking and Haptics: A New Horizon for Serious Games?

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Shujie; Kirkby, Julie A.; Chang, Jian; Zhang, Jian J.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this review is to illustrate the emerging use of multimodal virtual reality that can benefit learning-based games. The review begins with an introduction to multimodal virtual reality in serious games and we provide a brief discussion of why cognitive processes involved in learning and training are enhanced under immersive virtual environments. We initially outline studies that have used eye tracking and haptic feedback independently in serious games, and then review some innovati...

  1. Haptic rendering for simulation of fine manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Dangxiao; Zhang, Yuru

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces the latest progress in six degrees of freedom (6-DoF) haptic rendering with the focus on a new approach for simulating force/torque feedback in performing tasks that require dexterous manipulation skills. One of the major challenges in 6-DoF haptic rendering is to resolve the conflict between high speed and high fidelity requirements, especially in simulating a tool interacting with both rigid and deformable objects in a narrow space and with fine features. The book presents a configuration-based optimization approach to tackle this challenge. Addressing a key issue in man

  2. Quality of Grasping and the Role of Haptics in a 3-D Immersive Virtual Reality Environment in Individuals With Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Mindy F; Magdalon, Eliane C; Michaelsen, Stella M; Quevedo, Antonio A F

    2015-11-01

    Reaching and grasping parameters with and without haptic feedback were characterized in people with chronic post-stroke behaviors. Twelve (67 ± 10 years) individuals with chronic stroke and arm/hand paresis (Fugl-Meyer Assessment-Arm: ≥ 46/66 pts) participated. Three dimensional (3-D) temporal and spatial kinematics of reaching and grasping movements to three objects (can: cylindrical grasp; screwdriver: power grasp; pen: precision grasp) in a physical environment (PE) with and without additional haptic feedback and a 3-D virtual environment (VE) with haptic feedback were recorded. Participants reached, grasped and transported physical and virtual objects using similar movement strategies in all conditions. Reaches made in VE were less smooth and slower compared to the PE. Arm and trunk kinematics were similar in both environments and glove conditions. For grasping, stroke subjects preserved aperture scaling to object size but used wider hand apertures with longer delays between times to maximal reaching velocity and maximal grasping aperture. Wearing the glove decreased reaching velocity. Our results in a small group of subjects suggest that providing haptic information in the VE did not affect the validity of reaching and grasping movement. Small disparities in movement parameters between environments may be due to differences in perception of object distance in VE. Reach-to-grasp kinematics to smaller objects may be improved by better 3-D rendering. Comparable kinematics between environments and conditions is encouraging for the incorporation of high quality VEs in rehabilitation programs aimed at improving upper limb recovery.

  3. Integrating Haptics with Augmented Reality in a Femoral Palpation and Needle Insertion Training Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, T R; John, N W; Gould, Derek A; Caldwell, D G

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a virtual environment for training femoral palpation and needle insertion, the opening steps of many interventional radiology procedures. A novel augmented reality simulation called PalpSim has been developed that allows the trainees to feel a virtual patient using their own hands. The palpation step requires both force and tactile feedback. For the palpation haptics effect, two off-the-shelf force feedback devices have been linked together to provide a hybrid device that gives five degrees of force feedback. This is combined with a custom built hydraulic interface to provide a pulse like tactile effect. The needle interface is based on a modified PHANTOM Omni end effector that allows a real interventional radiology needle to be mounted and used during simulation. While using the virtual environment, the haptics hardware is masked from view using chroma-key techniques. The trainee sees a computer generated patient and needle, and interacts using their own hands. This simulation provides a high level of face validity and is one of the first medical simulation devices to integrate haptics with augmented reality.

  4. Volunteer Expert Readers: Drawing on the University Community to Provide Professional Feedback for Engineering Student Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskovitz, Cary

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on a 3-year study utilizing a novel approach to providing students in an introductory engineering course with feedback on drafts of course writing projects. In the Volunteer Expert Reader (VER) approach, students are matched with university alumni or employees who have the background to give feedback from the perspective of the…

  5. Auris System: Providing Vibrotactile Feedback for Hearing Impaired Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Alves Araujo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Deafness, an issue that affects millions of people around the globe, is manifested in different intensities and related to many causes. This impairment negatively affects different aspects of the social life of the deaf people, and music-centered situations (concerts, religious events, etc. are obviously not inviting for them. The Auris System was conceived to provide the musical experimentation for people who have some type of hearing loss. This system is able to extract musical information from audio and create a representation for music pieces using different stimuli, a new media format to be interpreted by other senses than the hearing. In addition, the system defines a testing methodology based on a noninvasive brain activity recording using an electroencephalographic (EEG device. The results of the tests are being used to better understand the human musical cognition, in order to improve the accuracy of the Auris musical representation.

  6. Auris System: Providing Vibrotactile Feedback for Hearing Impaired Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves Araujo, Felipe; Lima Brasil, Fabricio; Candido Lima Santos, Allison; de Sousa Batista Junior, Luzenildo; Pereira Fonseca Dutra, Savio; Eduardo Coelho Freire Batista, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Deafness, an issue that affects millions of people around the globe, is manifested in different intensities and related to many causes. This impairment negatively affects different aspects of the social life of the deaf people, and music-centered situations (concerts, religious events, etc.) are obviously not inviting for them. The Auris System was conceived to provide the musical experimentation for people who have some type of hearing loss. This system is able to extract musical information from audio and create a representation for music pieces using different stimuli, a new media format to be interpreted by other senses than the hearing. In addition, the system defines a testing methodology based on a noninvasive brain activity recording using an electroencephalographic (EEG) device. The results of the tests are being used to better understand the human musical cognition, in order to improve the accuracy of the Auris musical representation.

  7. fMRI-Compatible Electromagnetic Haptic Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riener, R; Villgrattner, T; Kleiser, R; Nef, T; Kollias, S

    2005-01-01

    A new haptic interface device is suggested, which can be used for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. The basic component of this 1 DOF haptic device are two coils that produce a Lorentz force induced by the large static magnetic field of the MR scanner. A MR-compatible optical angular encoder and a optical force sensor enable the implementation of different control architectures for haptic interactions. The challenge was to provide a large torque, and not to affect image quality by the currents applied in the device. The haptic device was tested in a 3T MR scanner. With a current of up to 1A and a distance of 1m to the focal point of the MR-scanner it was possible to generate torques of up to 4 Nm. Within these boundaries image quality was not affected.

  8. A flexible postoperative debriefing process can effectively provide formative resident feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Mackenzie R; Watters, Jennifer M; Barton, Jeffrey S; Kamin, Carol; Brown, Sarah N; Deveney, Karen E; Kiraly, Laszlo N

    2015-05-01

    Providing residents with formative operative feedback is one of the ongoing challenges in modern surgical education. This is highlighted by the recent American Board of Surgery requirement for formal operative assessments. A flexible and adaptable procedure feedback process may allow attending surgeons to provide qualitative and quantitative feedback to residents while encouraging surgeons-in-training to critically reflect on their own performance. We designed and implemented a flexible feedback process in which residents initiated a postoperative feedback discussion and completed a Procedure Feedback Form (PFF) with their supervising attending surgeon. Comparisons were made between the quantitative and qualitative assessments of attending and resident surgeons. Free text statements describing strengths and weaknesses were analyzed using grounded theory with constant comparison. We identified 346 assessments of 48 surgery residents performing 38 different cases. There was good inter-rater reliability between resident and attending surgeons' quantitative assessment, Goodman and Kruskal gamma > 0.65. Key themes identified on qualitative analysis included flow, technique, synthesis/decision, outcomes, knowledge, and communication/attitudes. Subthematic analysis demonstrated that our novel debriefing procedure was easily adaptable to a wide variety of clinical settings and grew more individualized for senior learners. This procedure feedback process is easily adaptable to a wide variety of cases and supports resident self-reflection. The process grows in nuance and complexity with the learner and may serve as a guide for a flexible and widely applicable postoperative feedback process. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Haptic fMRI: accurately estimating neural responses in motor, pre-motor, and somatosensory cortex during complex motor tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Samir; Yu, Michelle; Kay, Kendrick; Khatib, Oussama

    2014-01-01

    Haptics combined with functional magnetic resonance imaging (Haptic fMRI) can non-invasively study how the human brain coordinates movement during complex manipulation tasks, yet avoiding associated fMRI artifacts remains a challenge. Here, we demonstrate confound-free neural activation measurements using Haptic fMRI for an unconstrained three degree-of-freedom motor task that involves planning, reaching, and visually guided trajectory tracking. Our haptic interface tracked subjects' hand motions, velocities, and accelerations (sample-rate, 350Hz), and provided continuous realtime visual feedback. During fMRI acquisition, we achieved uniform response latencies (reaching, 0.7-1.1s; tracking, 0.4-0.65s); minimized hand jitter (neural activation across cortex; unreliable motions and response latencies, which reduce statistical power; and task-correlated head motion, which causes spurious fMRI activation. Haptic fMRI can thus reliably elicit and localize heterogeneous neural activation for different tasks in motor (movement), pre-motor (planning), and somatosensory (limb displacement) cortex, demonstrating that it is feasible to use the technique to study how the brain achieves three dimensional motor control.

  10. Continuum of haptic space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappers, A.M.L.; Koenderink, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    The structure of haptic space has first received serious attention in 1937 by Blumenfeld. Haptic space, as used in this chapter and indeed also by Blumenfeld, involves the space around us which we can reach by touch from a fixed position. How this space is related to the space through which we

  11. Rendering Virtual Tumors in Real Tissue Mock-Ups Using Haptic Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seokhee Jeon; Seungmoon Choi; Harders, M

    2012-01-01

    Haptic augmented reality (AR) is an emerging research area, which targets the modulation of haptic properties of real objects by means of virtual feedback. In our research, we explore the feasibility of using this technology for medical training systems. As a possible demonstration example, we currently examine the use of augmentation in the context of breast tumor palpation. The key idea in our prototype system is to augment the real feedback of a silicone breast mock-up with simulated forces stemming from virtual tumors. In this paper, we introduce and evaluate the underlying algorithm to provide these force augmentations. This includes a method for the identification of the contact dynamics model via measurements on real sample objects. The performance of our augmentation is examined quantitatively as well as in a user study. Initial results show that the haptic feedback of indenting a real silicone tumor with a rod can be approximated reasonably well with our algorithm. The advantage of such an augmentation approach over physical training models is the ability to create a nearly infinite variety of palpable findings.

  12. Human-Centered Design and Evaluation of Haptic Cueing for Teleoperation of Multiple Mobile Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Hyoung Il; Franchi, Antonio; Chuang, Lewis L; Kim, Junsuk; Bulthoff, Heinrich H; Giordano, Paolo Robuffo

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of haptic cueing on a human operator's performance in the field of bilateral teleoperation of multiple mobile robots, particularly multiple unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Two aspects of human performance are deemed important in this area, namely, the maneuverability of mobile robots and the perceptual sensitivity of the remote environment. We introduce metrics that allow us to address these aspects in two psychophysical studies, which are reported here. Three fundamental haptic cue types were evaluated. The Force cue conveys information on the proximity of the commanded trajectory to obstacles in the remote environment. The Velocity cue represents the mismatch between the commanded and actual velocities of the UAVs and can implicitly provide a rich amount of information regarding the actual behavior of the UAVs. Finally, the Velocity+Force cue is a linear combination of the two. Our experimental results show that, while maneuverability is best supported by the Force cue feedback, perceptual sensitivity is best served by the Velocity cue feedback. In addition, we show that large gains in the haptic feedbacks do not always guarantee an enhancement in the teleoperator's performance.

  13. Integrating mid-air haptics into movie experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Ablart, Damien; Velasco, Carlos; Obrist, Marianna

    2017-01-01

    `Seeing is believing, but feeling is the truth''. This idiom from the seventeenth century English clergyman Thomas Fuller gains new momentum in light of an increased proliferation of haptic technologies that allow people to have various kinds of `touch' and `touchless' interactions. Here, we report on the process of creating and integrating touchless feedback (i.e. mid-air haptic stimuli) into short movie experiences (i.e. one-minute movie format). Based on a systematic evaluation of user's e...

  14. Computer-Supported Feedback Message Tailoring for Healthcare Providers in Malawi: Proof-of-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis-Lewis, Zach; Douglas, Gerald P; Hochheiser, Harry; Kam, Matthew; Gadabu, Oliver; Bwanali, Mwatha; Jacobson, Rebecca S

    2015-01-01

    Although performance feedback has the potential to help clinicians improve the quality and safety of care, healthcare organizations generally lack knowledge about how this guidance is best provided. In low-resource settings, tools for theory-informed feedback tailoring may enhance limited clinical supervision resources. Our objectives were to establish proof-of-concept for computer-supported feedback message tailoring in Malawi, Africa. We conducted this research in five stages: clinical performance measurement, modeling the influence of feedback on antiretroviral therapy (ART) performance, creating a rule-based message tailoring process, generating tailored messages for recipients, and finally analysis of performance and message tailoring data. We retrospectively generated tailored messages for 7,448 monthly performance reports from 11 ART clinics. We found that tailored feedback could be routinely generated for four guideline-based performance indicators, with 35% of reports having messages prioritized to optimize the effect of feedback. This research establishes proof-of-concept for a novel approach to improving the use of clinical performance feedback in low-resource settings and suggests possible directions for prospective evaluations comparing alternative designs of feedback messages. PMID:26958217

  15. Improved Haptic Linear Lines for Better Movement Accuracy in Upper Limb Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan De Boeck

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Force feedback has proven to be beneficial in the domain of robot-assisted rehabilitation. According to the patients' personal needs, the generated forces may either be used to assist, support, or oppose their movements. In our current research project, we focus onto the upper limb training for MS (multiple sclerosis and CVA (cerebrovascular accident patients, in which a basic building block to implement many rehabilitation exercises was found. This building block is a haptic linear path: a second-order continuous path, defined by a list of points in space. Earlier, different attempts have been investigated to realize haptic linear paths. In order to have a good training quality, it is important that the haptic simulation is continuous up to the second derivative while the patient is enforced to follow the path tightly, even when low or no guiding forces are provided. In this paper, we describe our best solution to these haptic linear paths, discuss the weaknesses found in practice, and propose and validate an improvement.

  16. Design of a new haptic device and experiments in minimally invasive surgical robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Pan, Bo; Fu, Yili; Wang, Shuguo; Ai, Yue

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we designed a 8 degrees of freedom (DOFs) haptic device for applications in minimally invasive surgical robot. The device can provide three translational, three rotational and a grasping motion and force feedback capability. It is composed of three parts, including an arm mechanism, a redundant wrist mechanism and a grasper mechanism. The kinematics and gravity compensation algorithms are also detailed in the paper. In addition, the haptic device and a slave surgical robot for minimally invasive surgery (MIS) developed by our lab are integrated as a master-slave surgical robotic system in this paper. In the master-slave robotic system, a new control system is designed to realize real-time mater-slave control based on EtherCAT bus technology. Experiments show that the haptic device can effectively compensate gravity at any position in its workspace and successfully realize master-slave operation by the control method, which prove the haptic device designed in this paper can be used as a master manipulator to control the surgical robot.

  17. A qualitative study on feedback provided by students in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Zenobia C Y; Stanley, David John; Meadus, Robert J; Chien, Wai Tong

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to help nurse educators/academics understand the perspectives and expectations of students providing their feedback to educators about teaching performance and subject quality. The aim of this study is to reveal students' voices regarding their feedback in nurse education in order to shed light on how the current student feedback practice may be modified. A qualitative study using focus group inquiry. Convenience sampling was adopted and participants recruited from one school of nursing in Hong Kong. A total of 66 nursing students from two pre-registration programs were recruited for seven focus group interviews: one group of Year 1 students (n=21), two groups of Year 3 students (n=27), and four groups of Final Year students (n=18). The interviews were guided by a semi-structured interview guideline and the interview narratives were processed through content analysis. The trustworthiness of this study was guaranteed through peer checking, research meetings, and an audit trail. The participants' privacy was protected throughout the study. Four core themes were discerned based on the narratives of the focus group interviews: (1) "timing of collecting feedback at more than one time point"; (2) "modify the questions being asked in collecting student feedback"; (3) "are electronic means of collecting feedback good enough?; and (4) "what will be next for student feedback?". This study is significant in the following three domains: 1) it contributed to student feedback because it examined the issue from a student's perspective; 2) it explored the timing and channels for collecting feedback from the students' point of view; and 3) it showed the preferred uses of student feedback. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. UPPER LIMB FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT USING HAPTIC INTERFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Bardorfer

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A new method for the assessment of the upper limb (UL functional state, using a haptic interface is presented. A haptic interface is used as a measuring device, capable of providing objective, repeatable and quantitative data of the UL motion. A patient is presented with a virtual environment, both graphically via a computer screen and haptically via the Phantom Premium 1.5 haptic interface. The setup allows the patient to explore and feel the virtual environment with three of his/her senses; sight, hearing, and most important, touch. Specially designed virtual environments are used to assess the patient’s UL movement capabilities. The tests range from tracking tasks – to assess the accuracy of movement – tracking tasks with added disturbances in a form of random forces – to assess the patient’s control abilities, a labyrinth test – to assess both speed and accuracy, to the last test for measuring the maximal force capacity of the UL.A new method for the assessment of the upper limb (UL functional state, using a haptic interface is presented. A haptic interface is used as a measuring device, capable of providing objective, repeatable and quantitative data of the UL motion. A patient is presented with a virtual environment, both graphically via a computer screen and haptically via the Phantom Premium 1.5 haptic interface. The setup allows the patient to explore and feel the virtual environment with three of his/her senses; sight, hearing, and most important, touch. Specially designed virtual environments are used to assess the patient’s UL movement capabilities. The tests range from tracking tasks–to assess the accuracy of movement-tracking tasks with added disturbances in a form of random forces-to assess the patient’s control abilities, a labyrinth test-to assess both speed and accuracy, to the last test for measuring the maximal force capacity of the UL.A comprehensive study, using the developed measurement setup within the

  19. Development of a wearable haptic game interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Foottit

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the ongoing development of a wearable haptic game interface, in this case for controlling a flight simulator. The device differs from many traditional haptic feedback implementations in that it combines vibrotactile feedback with gesture based input, thus becoming a two-way conduit between the user and the virtual environment. The device is intended to challenge what is considered an “interface” and sets out to purposefully blur the boundary between man and machine. This allows for a more immersive experience, and a user evaluation shows that the intuitive interface allows the user to become the aircraft that is controlled by the movements of the user's hand.

  20. Multimodality with Eye tracking and Haptics: A New Horizon for Serious Games?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujie Deng

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this review is to illustrate the emerging use of multimodal virtual reality that can benefit learning-based games. The review begins with an introduction to multimodal virtual reality in serious games and we provide a brief discussion of why cognitive processes involved in learning and training are enhanced under immersive virtual environments. We initially outline studies that have used eye tracking and haptic feedback independently in serious games, and then review some innovative applications that have already combined eye tracking and haptic devices in order to provide applicable multimodal frameworks for learning-based games. Finally, some general conclusions are identified and clarified in order to advance current understanding in multimodal serious game production as well as exploring possible areas for new applications.

  1. Six Degrees of Freedom Implicit Haptic Rendering

    OpenAIRE

    Moustakas, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Part 13: AI Applications - Mobile Applications; International audience; This paper introduces a six degrees of freedom haptic rendering scheme based on an implicit support plane mapping representation of the object geometries. The proposed scheme enables, under specific assumptions, the analytical reconstruction of the rigid 3D object’s surface, using the equations of the support planes and their respective distance map. As a direct consequence, the problem of calculating the force feedback c...

  2. Preliminary Experiment Combining Virtual Reality Haptic Shoes and Audio Synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahl, Rolf; Berrezag, Amir; Dimitrov, Smilen

    2010-01-01

    We describe a system that provides combined auditory and haptic sensations to simulate walking on different grounds. It uses a physical model that drives haptic transducers embedded in sandals and headphones. The model represents walking interactions with solid surfaces that can creak, or be cove...

  3. Robot-Assisted Proprioceptive Training with Added Vibro-Tactile Feedback Enhances Somatosensory and Motor Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuppone, Anna Vera; Squeri, Valentina; Semprini, Marianna; Masia, Lorenzo; Konczak, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the trainability of the proprioceptive sense and explored the relationship between proprioception and motor learning. With vision blocked, human learners had to perform goal-directed wrist movements relying solely on proprioceptive/haptic cues to reach several haptically specified targets. One group received additional somatosensory movement error feedback in form of vibro-tactile cues applied to the skin of the forearm. We used a haptic robotic device for the wrist and implemented a 3-day training regimen that required learners to make spatially precise goal-directed wrist reaching movements without vision. We assessed whether training improved the acuity of the wrist joint position sense. In addition, we checked if sensory learning generalized to the motor domain and improved spatial precision of wrist tracking movements that were not trained. The main findings of the study are: First, proprioceptive acuity of the wrist joint position sense improved after training for the group that received the combined proprioceptive/haptic and vibro-tactile feedback (VTF). Second, training had no impact on the spatial accuracy of the untrained tracking task. However, learners who had received VTF significantly reduced their reliance on haptic guidance feedback when performing the untrained motor task. That is, concurrent VTF was highly salient movement feedback and obviated the need for haptic feedback. Third, VTF can be also provided by the limb not involved in the task. Learners who received VTF to the contralateral limb equally benefitted. In conclusion, somatosensory training can significantly enhance proprioceptive acuity within days when learning is coupled with vibro-tactile sensory cues that provide feedback about movement errors. The observable sensory improvements in proprioception facilitates motor learning and such learning may generalize to the sensorimotor control of the untrained motor tasks. The implications of these findings for

  4. Robot-Assisted Proprioceptive Training with Added Vibro-Tactile Feedback Enhances Somatosensory and Motor Performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Vera Cuppone

    Full Text Available This study examined the trainability of the proprioceptive sense and explored the relationship between proprioception and motor learning. With vision blocked, human learners had to perform goal-directed wrist movements relying solely on proprioceptive/haptic cues to reach several haptically specified targets. One group received additional somatosensory movement error feedback in form of vibro-tactile cues applied to the skin of the forearm. We used a haptic robotic device for the wrist and implemented a 3-day training regimen that required learners to make spatially precise goal-directed wrist reaching movements without vision. We assessed whether training improved the acuity of the wrist joint position sense. In addition, we checked if sensory learning generalized to the motor domain and improved spatial precision of wrist tracking movements that were not trained. The main findings of the study are: First, proprioceptive acuity of the wrist joint position sense improved after training for the group that received the combined proprioceptive/haptic and vibro-tactile feedback (VTF. Second, training had no impact on the spatial accuracy of the untrained tracking task. However, learners who had received VTF significantly reduced their reliance on haptic guidance feedback when performing the untrained motor task. That is, concurrent VTF was highly salient movement feedback and obviated the need for haptic feedback. Third, VTF can be also provided by the limb not involved in the task. Learners who received VTF to the contralateral limb equally benefitted. In conclusion, somatosensory training can significantly enhance proprioceptive acuity within days when learning is coupled with vibro-tactile sensory cues that provide feedback about movement errors. The observable sensory improvements in proprioception facilitates motor learning and such learning may generalize to the sensorimotor control of the untrained motor tasks. The implications of these

  5. Simulation and training of lumbar punctures using haptic volume rendering and a 6DOF haptic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Färber, Matthias; Heller, Julika; Handels, Heinz

    2007-03-01

    The lumbar puncture is performed by inserting a needle into the spinal chord of the patient to inject medicaments or to extract liquor. The training of this procedure is usually done on the patient guided by experienced supervisors. A virtual reality lumbar puncture simulator has been developed in order to minimize the training costs and the patient's risk. We use a haptic device with six degrees of freedom (6DOF) to feedback forces that resist needle insertion and rotation. An improved haptic volume rendering approach is used to calculate the forces. This approach makes use of label data of relevant structures like skin, bone, muscles or fat and original CT data that contributes information about image structures that can not be segmented. A real-time 3D visualization with optional stereo view shows the punctured region. 2D visualizations of orthogonal slices enable a detailed impression of the anatomical context. The input data consisting of CT and label data and surface models of relevant structures is defined in an XML file together with haptic rendering and visualization parameters. In a first evaluation the visible human male data has been used to generate a virtual training body. Several users with different medical experience tested the lumbar puncture trainer. The simulator gives a good haptic and visual impression of the needle insertion and the haptic volume rendering technique enables the feeling of unsegmented structures. Especially, the restriction of transversal needle movement together with rotation constraints enabled by the 6DOF device facilitate a realistic puncture simulation.

  6. Providing Behavioral Feedback to Students in an Alternative High School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, Sara A.; Hefter, Sheera; Barker, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This column provides an example method for improving the consistency and quality of daily behavioral feedback provided to students in an alternative high school setting. Often, homeroom or advisory periods are prime points in the day for students to review their behavior from the previous day and set goals for a successful day to come. The method…

  7. Dual Delayed Feedback Provides Sensitivity and Robustness to the NF-κB Signaling Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Jeffrey D.; Hasty, Jeff; Hoffmann, Alexander; Tsimring, Lev S.

    2013-01-01

    Many cellular stress-responsive signaling systems exhibit highly dynamic behavior with oscillatory features mediated by delayed negative feedback loops. What remains unclear is whether oscillatory behavior is the basis for a signaling code based on frequency modulation (FM) or whether the negative feedback control modules have evolved to fulfill other functional requirements. Here, we use experimentally calibrated computational models to interrogate the negative feedback loops that regulate the dynamic activity of the transcription factor NF-B. Linear stability analysis of the model shows that oscillatory frequency is a hard-wired feature of the primary negative feedback loop and not a function of the stimulus, thus arguing against an FM signaling code. Instead, our modeling studies suggest that the two feedback loops may be tuned to provide for rapid activation and inactivation capabilities for transient input signals of a wide range of durations; by minimizing late phase oscillations response durations may be fine-tuned in a graded rather than quantized manner. Further, in the presence of molecular noise the dual delayed negative feedback system minimizes stochastic excursions of the output to produce a robust NF-B response. PMID:23825938

  8. An investigation of a passively controlled haptic interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, J.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Book, W.J. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-03-01

    Haptic interfaces enhance cooperation between humans and robotic manipulators by providing force and tactile feedback to the human user during the execution of arbitrary tasks. The use of active actuators in haptic displays presents a certain amount of risk since they are capable of providing unacceptable levels of energy to the systems upon which they operate. An alternative to providing numerous safeguards is to remove the sources of risk altogether. This research investigates the feasibility of trajectory control using passive devices, that is, devices that cannot add energy to the system. Passive actuators are capable only of removing energy from the system or transferring energy within the system. It is proposed that the utility of passive devices is greatly enhanced by the use of redundant actuators. In a passive system, once motion is provided to the system, presumably by a human user, passive devices may be able to modify this motion to achieve a desired resultant trajectory. A mechanically passive, 2-Degree-of-Freedom (D.O.F.) manipulator has been designed and built. It is equipped with four passive actuators: two electromagnetic brakes and two electromagnetic clutches. This paper gives a review of the literature on passive and robotics and describes the experimental test bed used in this research. Several control algorithms are investigated, resulting in the formulation of a passive control law.

  9. Providing physicians with feedback on how they supervise students during patient contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmans, D H J M; Wolfhagen, H A P; Gerver, W J; De Grave, W; Scherpbier, A J J A

    2004-08-01

    In this descriptive study an instrument is presented that has been developed to provide physicians with feedback about their strengths and weaknesses in facilitating student learning during patient contacts. The instrument is strongly theory based, i.e. it is based on current general theories of context-bound learning environments, and forms of facilitation promoting transfer of knowledge to actual professional practice. In addition, it has been developed in cooperation with physicians supervising students during patient contacts. The authors have shown how physicians can be provided with individualized feedback on their performance in supervising students during patient contacts.

  10. Liver pathology simulation: algorithm for haptic rendering and force maps for palpation assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza-Lup, Felix G; Seitan, Adrian; Popovici, Dorin M; Bogdan, Crenguta M

    2013-01-01

    Pre-operatory gestures include tactile sampling of the mechanical properties of biological tissue for both histological and pathological considerations. Tactile properties used in conjunction with visual cues can provide useful feedback to the surgeon. Development of novel cost effective haptic-based simulators and their introduction in the minimally invasive surgery learning cycle can absorb the learning curve for your residents. Receiving pre-training in a core set of surgical skills can reduce skill acquisition time and risks. We present the integration of a real-time surface stiffness adjustment algorithm and a novel paradigm - force maps - in a visuo-haptic simulator module designed to train internal organs disease diagnostics through palpation.

  11. What Motivates Students to Provide Feedback to Teachers about Teaching and Learning? An Expectancy Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, Jay

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this empirical research study was to investigate what motivates students to provide formative anonymous feedback to teachers regarding their perceptions of the teaching and learning experience in order to improve student learning. Expectancy theory, specifically Vroom's Model, was used as the conceptual framework for the study.…

  12. The Effect of Performance Feedback Provided to Student-Teachers Working with Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, Pinar; Yilmaz, Hatice Cansu; Demiryurek, Pinar; Dogus, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of performance feedback (PF) provided to student teachers working with students with multiple disabilities and visual impairment (MDVI) on their teaching skills. The study group of the research was composed of 11 student teachers attending to the final year of the Teaching Students with Visual…

  13. Interactive education based on haptic technologies and educational testing of an innovative system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore S. Papatheodorou

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents on the one hand, the specifications and design of an educational haptic device and an educational platform and on the other hand, the educational trial of the applications that specially constructed in order to use this advanced virtual reality system. Α new haptic device designed especially for educational purposes and a prototype were implemented, under the framework of an IST European program called MUVII. This device is called Haptic-3D-Interface (H3DI. The novelty on this device is the tactile feedback that provides minute detailed information about the nature of virtual objects handled, in addition to force and torque feedback. The device was integrated into an innovative platform called Interactive Kiosk Demonstrator (IKD. IKD’s aim was to demonstrate new interactive paradigms forming a novel integration of the following modalities: 3D-vision, 3D-audio and haptic (force, torque, and tactile feedback. Besides, interactive educational software especially designed for IKD platform was developed. Then the educational trial of the IKD system, as well as the educational software, took place. All schools that participated in the trial were randomly selected. A total of 163 students participated in the educational trial, 64 of which were primary school students, 74 were lower-secondary school students, and 25 were upper secondary school students. For the educational trail all the international accepted practices concerning research in education were followed. The “exercises” for each group of students were chosen in accordance to their age. The educational results of this teaching approach, as well as the feedback derived from the users are presented in this work. Furthermore, some interesting results concerning important requirements for the specifications for haptic devices are also presented. Overall, we can state that the opportunity of having a natural “look and feel

  14. Teachers' Accounts of Their Perceptions and Practices of Providing Written Feedback to Nursing Students on Their Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Sajid; Gul, Raisa; Lakhani, Arusa; Rizvi, Nusrat Fatima

    2014-01-01

    Written feedback can facilitate students' learning in several ways. However, the teachers' practices of written feedback may be affected by various factors. This study aimed to explore the nurse teachers' accounts of their perceptions and practices of providing written feedback. A descriptive exploratory design was employed in the study. A…

  15. Multimodality with Eye tracking and Haptics: A New Horizon for Serious Games?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deng, Shujie; Kirkby, Julie A; Chang, Jian; Zhang, Jian Jun

    2014-01-01

    ... under immersive virtual environments. We initially outline studies that have used eye tracking and haptic feedback independently in serious games, and then review some innovative applications that have already combined eye tracking...

  16. Haptics: The science of touch in periodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Khanna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The simulation of clinical situations with the acquisition of fine motor skills is an essential component of the dental students′ learning experience. The traditional approach to dental skills training has drawbacks in terms of cost, availability, lack of real-world cases, with the restraints of time, clinical supervision, and the funding of raw materials such as real and plastic teeth. The introduction of dental haptics opens the door to a more realistic clinical experience which can be free from the previous constraints. The performance of the students should be reviewed invaluably by pinpointing exactly where mistakes may have been made and directed learning should be allowed. Also, haptics offers the possibility of unlimited training hours by which students can gain skills without demands on manpower and resources. This paper provides a comprehensive review of literature on haptics for training of periodontal procedures.

  17. Haptic interfaces using dielectric electroactive polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsecen, Muzaffer Y.; Sivak, Mark; Mavroidis, Constantinos

    2010-04-01

    Quality, amplitude and frequency of the interaction forces between a human and an actuator are essential traits for haptic applications. A variety of Electro-Active Polymer (EAP) based actuators can provide these characteristics simultaneously with quiet operation, low weight, high power density and fast response. This paper demonstrates a rolled Dielectric Elastomer Actuator (DEA) being used as a telepresence device in a heart beat measurement application. In the this testing, heart signals were acquired from a remote location using a wireless heart rate sensor, sent through a network and DEA was used to haptically reproduce the heart beats at the medical expert's location. A series of preliminary human subject tests were conducted that demonstrated that a) DE based haptic feeling can be used in heart beat measurement tests and b) through subjective testing the stiffness and actuator properties of the EAP can be tuned for a variety of applications.

  18. Effect of providing feedback and prescribing education on prescription writing: An intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajemigbitse, Adetutu A; Omole, Moses Kayode; Erhun, Wilson O

    2016-01-01

    Accurate medication prescribing important to avoid errors and ensure best possible outcomes. This is a report of assessment of the impact of providing feedback and educational intervention on prescribing error types and rates in routine practice. Doctors' prescriptions from selected wards in two tertiary hospitals in central Nigeria were prospectively reviewed for a 6-month period and assessed for errors; grouped into six categories. Intervention was by providing feedback and educational outreach on the specialty/departmental level at one hospital while the other acted as the control. Chi-squared statistics was used to compare prescribing characteristics pre- and post-intervention. At baseline, error rate was higher at the control site. At the intervention site, statistically significant reductions were obtained for errors involving omission of route of administration (P error rate post intervention (P = 0.984). Though House Officers and Registrars wrote most prescriptions, highest reduction in prescribing error rates post intervention was by the registrars (0.93% to 0.29%, P prescriptions that lacked essential details was common. Intervention resulted in modest changes. Routinely providing feedback and continuing prescriber education will likely sustain error reduction.

  19. Haptics-Based Apps for Middle School Students with Visual Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kristen; Darrah, Marjorie

    2015-01-01

    Twenty haptics-based computer applications (apps) have been created to utilize a low-cost, force feedback haptic device, the Novint Falcon, to provide students with tactile and kinesthetic sensations while learning about math and science. These low-cost apps, developed specifically for students with visual impairments (yet practical for all students), add to the accessible resources available for math and science. This article outlines the motivation, development, and testing of these PC-based applications that incorporate computer haptics, auditory cues, and high-contrast visuals. Included is a brief overview of two of the apps, one with science content and one with math content, in order to provide the reader with some insight into the student experience. The results of testing six of the apps in classroom settings show that the device and software are feasible for teachers to implement and significant learning gains can be achieved for students who use them. Student attitudes toward the apps were positive, implying that not only are the apps useful in the classroom, but engaging as well.

  20. Analyzing effects of providing performance feedback at ward rounds on guideline adherence - the importance of feedback usage analysis and statistical control charts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Eslami, Saeid; Schultz, Marcus J; de Jonge, Evert; de Keizer, Nicolette F

    2010-01-01

    Feedback to clinicians on their past performance is often aimed at increasing adherence to guidelines. We investigate how various analytical approaches influence the interpretation of adherence data. The analytical approaches vary in considering the actual or the intended use of the feedback, and whether outcomes are inspected over time. At base line, a computerized decision support system was employed at the ICU bedside to increase adherence to a mechanical ventilation strategy. We intervened by providing feedback about adherence to the guideline at the daily ward rounds. The outcome measure was the percentage of ventilation time (VT) in excess of the guideline's recommendation. Actual usage of the feedback was logged and data analysis was carried out using two approaches: classical statistics, and statistical process control (SPC) that inspect progress of an outcome over time. Prospective, before/after study. The classical analysis stated that the percentage of ventilation time in excess of the guideline's recommendation decreased significantly due to the feedback (5% reduction, p analysis of the outcome was applied, the effect was deemed not significant. When the actual delivery of feedback over time was also included it showed that the experiment does not allow for conclusive results. The concluded effect of providing feedback on adherence to a guideline depends on whether the actual usage pattern of the feedback and the inspection of the outcome over time are considered. Future evaluative studies should report on usage patterns and progression of outcomes over time.

  1. The Use of Haptic Display Technology in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, Woodrow

    2009-01-01

    The experience of "virtual reality" can consist of head-tracked and stereoscopic virtual worlds, spatialized sound, haptic feedback, and to a lesser extent olfactory cues. Although virtual reality systems have been proposed for numerous applications, the field of education is one particular application that seems well-suited for virtual…

  2. Haptic object individuation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plaisier, M.A.; Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2010-01-01

    Item individuation, i.e., how we decide which parts belong to one object and which to another, is an important aspect of haptic perception and may be important for design of interfaces in which different buttons have to be distinguished. We daily hold several objects in our hand. Somehow, we decide

  3. Mobile in vivo camera robots provide sole visual feedback for abdominal exploration and cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentschler, M E; Dumpert, J; Platt, S R; Ahmed, S I; Farritor, S M; Oleynikov, D

    2006-01-01

    The use of small incisions in laparoscopy reduces patient trauma, but also limits the surgeon's ability to view and touch the surgical environment directly. These limitations generally restrict the application of laparoscopy to procedures less complex than those performed during open surgery. Although current robot-assisted laparoscopy improves the surgeon's ability to manipulate and visualize the target organs, the instruments and cameras remain fundamentally constrained by the entry incisions. This limits tool tip orientation and optimal camera placement. The current work focuses on developing a new miniature mobile in vivo adjustable-focus camera robot to provide sole visual feedback to surgeons during laparoscopic surgery. A miniature mobile camera robot was inserted through a trocar into the insufflated abdominal cavity of an anesthetized pig. The mobile robot allowed the surgeon to explore the abdominal cavity remotely and view trocar and tool insertion and placement without entry incision constraints. The surgeon then performed a cholecystectomy using the robot camera alone for visual feedback. This successful trial has demonstrated that miniature in vivo mobile robots can provide surgeons with sufficient visual feedback to perform common procedures while reducing patient trauma.

  4. Training residential supervisors to provide feedback for maintaining staff teaching skills with people who have severe disabilities.

    OpenAIRE

    Parsons, M B; Reid, D H

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated procedures for training supervisors in a residential setting to provide feedback for maintaining direct-service staff members ' teaching skills with people who have severe disabilities. Using classroom-based instruction and on-the-job observation and feedback, 10 supervisors were initially trained to implement teaching programs themselves. The training improved supervisors' teaching skills but was insufficient to improve the quality of feedback they provided to direct-service sta...

  5. Using Press Ganey Provider Feedback to Improve Patient Satisfaction: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newgard, Craig D; Fu, Rongwei; Heilman, James; Tanski, Mary; John Ma, O; Lines, Alan; Keith French, L

    2017-09-01

    The objective was to conduct a pilot randomized controlled trial to assess the feasibility, logistics, and potential effect of monthly provider funnel plot feedback reports from Press Ganey data and semiannual face-to-face coaching sessions to improve patient satisfaction scores. This was a pilot randomized controlled trial of 25 emergency medicine faculty providers in one urban academic emergency department. We enrolled full-time clinical faculty with at least 12 months of baseline Press Ganey data, who anticipated working in the ED for at least 12 additional months. Providers were randomized into intervention or control groups in a 1:1 ratio. The intervention group had an initial 20-minute meeting to introduce the funnel plot feedback tool and standardized feedback based on their baseline Press Ganey scores and then received a monthly e-mail with their individualized funnel plot depicting cumulative Press Ganey scores (compared to their baseline score and the mean score of all providers) for 12 months. The primary outcome was the difference in Press Ganey "doctor-overall" scores between treatment groups at 12 months. We used a weighted analysis of covariance model to analyze the study groups, accounting for variation in the number of surveys by provider and baseline scores. Of 36 eligible faculty, we enrolled 25 providers, 13 of whom were randomized to the intervention group and 12 to the control group. During the study period, there were 815 Press Ganey surveys returned, ranging from four to 71 surveys per provider. For the standardized overall doctor score over 12 months (primary outcome), there was no difference between the intervention and control groups (difference = 1.3 points, 95% confidence interval = -2.4 to 5.9, p = 0.47). Similarly, there was no difference between groups when evaluating the four categories of doctor-specific patient satisfaction scores from the Press Ganey survey (all p > 0.05). In this pilot trial of monthly provider funnel plot

  6. Effects of vision and haptics on categorizing common objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Susan

    2011-02-01

    Most research on object recognition and categorization centers on vision. However, these phenomena are likely influenced by the commonly used modality of touch. The present study tested this notion by having participants explore three-dimensional objects using vision and haptics in naming and sorting tasks. Results showed greater difficulty naming (recognizing) and sorting (categorizing) objects haptically. For both conditions, error increased from the concrete attribute of size to the more abstract quality of predation, providing behavioral evidence for shared object representation in vision and haptics.

  7. HapTip: Displaying Haptic Shear Forces at the Fingertips for Multi-Finger Interaction in Virtual Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien eGirard

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The fingertips are one of the most important and sensitive parts of our body.They are the first stimulated areas of the hand when we interact with our environment.Providing haptic feedback to the fingertips in virtual reality could thus drastically improve perception and interaction with virtual environments.In this paper, we present a modular approach called HapTip to display such haptic sensations at the level of the fingertips.This approach relies on a wearable and compact haptic device able to simulate 2 Degree of Freedom (DoF shear forces on the fingertip with a displacement range of +/- 2 mm. Several modules can be added and used jointly in order to address multi-finger and/or bimanual scenarios in virtual environments.For that purpose, we introduce several haptic rendering techniques to cover different cases of 3D interaction such as touching a rough virtual surface, or feeling the inertia or weight of a virtual object.In order to illustrate the possibilities offered by HapTip, we provide four use cases focused on touching or grasping virtual objects.To validate the efficiency of our approach, we also conducted experiments to assess the tactile perception obtained with HapTip.Our results show that participants can successfully discriminate the directions of the 2 DoF stimulation of our haptic device.We found also that participants could well perceive different weights of virtual objects simulated using two HapTip devices. We believe that HapTip could be used in numerous applications in virtual reality for which 3D manipulation and tactile sensations are often crucial, such as in virtual prototyping or virtual training.

  8. Haptics using a smart material for eyes-free interaction in personal devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huihui; Lane, William Brian; Pappas, Devin; Duque, Bryam; Leong, John

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a prototype using a dry ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) in interactive personal devices such as bracelet, necklace, pocket key chain or mobile devices for haptic interaction when audio or visual feedback is not possible or practical. This prototype interface is an electro-mechanical system that realizes a shape-changing haptic display for information communication. A dry IPMC will change its dimensions due to the electrostatic effect when an electrical potential is provided to them. The IPMC can operate at a lower voltage (less than 2.5V) which is compatible with requirements for personal electrical devices or mobile devices. The prototype consists of the addressable arrays of the IPMCs with different dimensions which are deformable to different shapes with proper handling or customization. 3D printing technology will be used to form supporting parts. Microcontrollers (about 3cm square) from DigiKey will be imbedded into this personal device. An Android based mobile APP will be developed to talk with microcontrollers to control IPMCs. When personal devices receive information signals, the original shape of the prototype will change to another shape related to the specific sender or types of information sources. This interactive prototype can simultaneously realize multiple methods for conveying haptic information such as dimension, force, and texture due to the flexible array design. We conduct several studies of user experience to explore how users' respond to shape change information.

  9. Design and Evaluation of Shape-Changing Haptic Interfaces for Pedestrian Navigation Assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiers, Adam J; Dollar, Aaron M

    2017-01-01

    Shape-changing interfaces are a category of device capable of altering their form in order to facilitate communication of information. In this work, we present a shape-changing device that has been designed for navigation assistance. 'The Animotus' (previously, 'The Haptic Sandwich' ), resembles a cube with an articulated upper half that is able to rotate and extend (translate) relative to the bottom half, which is fixed in the user's grasp. This rotation and extension, generally felt via the user's fingers, is used to represent heading and proximity to navigational targets. The device is intended to provide an alternative to screen or audio based interfaces for visually impaired, hearing impaired, deafblind, and sighted pedestrians. The motivation and design of the haptic device is presented, followed by the results of a navigation experiment that aimed to determine the role of each device DOF, in terms of facilitating guidance. An additional device, 'The Haptic Taco', which modulated its volume in response to target proximity (negating directional feedback), was also compared. Results indicate that while the heading (rotational) DOF benefited motion efficiency, the proximity (translational) DOF benefited velocity. Combination of the two DOF improved overall performance. The volumetric Taco performed comparably to the Animotus' extension DOF.

  10. Physical student-robot interaction with the ETHZ haptic paddle

    OpenAIRE

    Gassert, Roger; Metzger, Jean-Claude; Leuenberger, Kaspar; Popp, Werner L.; Tucker, Michael R; Viganu, Bogdan; Zimmermann, Raphael; Lambercy, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Abstract—Haptic paddles — low-cost one-degree-of-freedom force feedback devices — have been used with great success at several universities throughout the United States to teach the basic concepts of dynamic systems and physical human-robot interaction (pHRI) to students. The ETHZ haptic paddle was developed for a new pHRI course offered in the undergraduate Mechatronics Focus track of the Mechanical Engineering curriculum at ETH Zurich, Switzerland. Twenty students engaged in this two-hou...

  11. Using a Log Analyser to Assist Research into Haptic Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jónsson, Fannar Freyr; Hvannberg, Ebba Þóra

    Usability evaluations collect subjective and objective measures. Examples of the latter are time to complete a task. The paper describes use cases of a log analyser for haptic feedback. The log analyser reads a log file and extracts information such as time of each practice and assessment session, analyses whether the user goes off curve and measures the force applied. A study case using the analyser is performed using a PHANToM haptic learning environment application that is used to teach young visually impaired students the subject of polynomials. The paper answers six questions to illustrate further use cases of the log analyser.

  12. Repeated training with augmentative vibrotactile feedback increases object manipulation performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara E Stepp

    Full Text Available Most users of prosthetic hands must rely on visual feedback alone, which requires visual attention and cognitive resources. Providing haptic feedback of variables relevant to manipulation, such as contact force, may thus improve the usability of prosthetic hands for tasks of daily living. Vibrotactile stimulation was explored as a feedback modality in ten unimpaired participants across eight sessions in a two-week period. Participants used their right index finger to perform a virtual object manipulation task with both visual and augmentative vibrotactile feedback related to force. Through repeated training, participants were able to learn to use the vibrotactile feedback to significantly improve object manipulation. Removal of vibrotactile feedback in session 8 significantly reduced task performance. These results suggest that vibrotactile feedback paired with training may enhance the manipulation ability of prosthetic hand users without the need for more invasive strategies.

  13. The Rightful Demise of the Sh*t Sandwich: Providing Effective Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Ian Andrew

    2015-11-01

    As a trainee cognitive therapist in the early 1990s, I was taught the Sh*t Sandwich by my supervisor. I continued to use this technique for many years without seeing the need to extend my repertoire of feedback strategies. This article describes a number of other feedback techniques, raising awareness of the processes underpinning feedback, and facilitating reflection on feedback methods. This review examines feedback and the methods of feedback used to improve clinical competence. Evidence informs us that the use of good feedback has a significant effect on learners' outcomes (Milne, 2009). However, despite recognition of its importance, many supervisors fail to give adequate feedback and utilize methods that are sub-optimal. One such problematic method is the notorious "Sh*t Sandwich" (SS), which attempts to hide criticism within a cushion of two positive statements. This paper looks at various models of giving negative and positive feedback, suggesting that our repertoire of feedback methods may require expanding. The review suggests that feedback is a complex process and methods that place an emphasis on the learner as an active participant in the learning process (i.e. interactive approaches) should be encouraged. The paper suggests that negative feedback should generally be avoided in favour of constructive support, accompanied by specific, descriptive, balanced feedback, with new learning being consolidated by role play. Generally, feedback should be given about the task rather than the person, but when it is personalized it should relate to effort rather than ability.

  14. [Preliminary study on force feedback of acupuncture in virtual reality based on the visible human].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhuo; Wang, Hai-sheng; Min, You-jiang; Yan, Zhen-guo; Hong, Z Tan; Zhuang, Tian-ge

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of virtual reality technology in the 3-D visible human body and acupuncture research. Based on the 3-D visible human fused with the localization information and hierarchy of acupoints, the paper analyzes the force against the needle and haptic rendering during the needle manipulation according to the physical properties of different tissues. A haptic model is constructed to demonstrate the force behaviors during acupuncture, and the force will be produced and passed to the manipulator by a force feedback device. It enriches the contents of 3-D visible human project, provides a dynamic simulation instrument for acupuncture teaching, and supplies a platform for acupuncture research.

  15. The effects of voluntary movements on auditory-haptic and haptic-haptic temporal order judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frissen, Ilja; Ziat, Mounia; Campion, Gianni; Hayward, Vincent; Guastavino, Catherine

    2012-10-01

    In two experiments we investigated the effects of voluntary movements on temporal haptic perception. Measures of sensitivity (JND) and temporal alignment (PSS) were obtained from temporal order judgments made on intermodal auditory-haptic (Experiment 1) or intramodal haptic (Experiment 2) stimulus pairs under three movement conditions. In the baseline, static condition, the arm of the participants remained stationary. In the passive condition, the arm was displaced by a servo-controlled motorized device. In the active condition, the participants moved voluntarily. The auditory stimulus was a short, 500Hz tone presented over headphones and the haptic stimulus was a brief suprathreshold force pulse applied to the tip of the index finger orthogonally to the finger movement. Active movement did not significantly affect discrimination sensitivity on the auditory-haptic stimulus pairs, whereas it significantly improved sensitivity in the case of the haptic stimulus pair, demonstrating a key role for motor command information in temporal sensitivity in the haptic system. Points of subjective simultaneity were by-and-large coincident with physical simultaneity, with one striking exception in the passive condition with the auditory-haptic stimulus pair. In the latter case, the haptic stimulus had to be presented 45ms before the auditory stimulus in order to obtain subjective simultaneity. A model is proposed to explain the discrimination performance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Haptic Distal Spatial Perception Mediated by Strings: Haptic "Looming"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabe, Patrick A.

    2011-01-01

    Five experiments tested a haptic analog of optical looming, demonstrating string-mediated haptic distal spatial perception. Horizontally collinear hooks supported a weighted string held taut by a blindfolded participant's finger midway between the hooks. At the finger, the angle between string segments increased as the finger approached…

  17. A method of providing engaging formative feedback to large cohort first-year physiology and anatomy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston-Green, Katrina; Wallace, Margaret

    2016-09-01

    A growing body of evidence demonstrates a critical role for effective, meaningful feedback to enhance student learning. Effective feedback can become part of the learning cycle that is not only a learning opportunity for the student but can also be used to inform the teacher and ongoing curriculum development. Feedback is considered particularly important during the first year of university and can even be viewed as a retention strategy that can help attenuate student performance anxieties and solidify perceptions of academic support. Unfortunately, the provision of individualized, timely feedback can be particularly challenging in first-year courses as they tend to be large and diverse cohort classes that pose challenges of time and logistics. Various forms of generic feedback can provide rapid and cost-effect feedback to large cohorts but may be of limited benefit to students other than signaling weaknesses in knowledge. The present study describes a method that was used to provide formative task-related feedback to a large cohort of first-year physiology and anatomy students. Based on student evaluations presented in this study, this method provided feedback in a manner that engaged students, uncovered underlying misconceptions, facilitated peer discussion, and provided opportunity for new instruction while allowing the lecturer to recognize common gaps in knowledge and inform ongoing curriculum development. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  18. The Effectiveness of Instructor Personalized and Formative Feedback Provided by Instructor in an Online Setting: Some Unresolved Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planar, Dolors; Moya, Soledad

    2016-01-01

    Formative feedback has great potential for teaching and learning in online undergraduate programmes. There is a large number of courses where the main source of feedback is provided by the instructor. This is particularly seen in subjects where assessments are designed based on specific activities which are the same for all students, and where the…

  19. The contributions of vision and haptics to reaching and grasping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayla Dawn Stone

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to provide a comprehensive outlook on the sensory (visual and haptic contributions to reaching and grasping. The focus is on studies in developing children, normal and neuropsychological populations, and in sensory-deprived individuals. Studies have suggested a right-hand/left-hemisphere specialization for visually-guided grasping and a left-hand/right-hemisphere specialization for haptically-guided object recognition. This poses the interesting possibility that when vision is not available and grasping relies heavily on the haptic system, there is an advantage to use the left hand. We review the evidence for this possibility and dissect the unique contributions of the visual and haptic systems to grasping. We ultimately discuss how the integration of these two sensory modalities shape hand preference.

  20. Visuohaptic augmented feedback for enhancing motor skills acquisition

    OpenAIRE

    Asadipour, Ali; Debattista, Kurt; Chalmers, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Serious games are accepted as an effective approach to deliver augmented feedback in motor (re-)learning processes. The multi-modal nature of the conventional computer games (eg. audiovisual representation) plus the ability to interact via haptic enabled inputs provides a more immersive experience. Thus, particular disciplines such as medical education in which frequent hands on rehearsals play a key role in learning core motor skills (eg. physical palpations) may benefit from this technique. ...

  1. Pervasive haptics science, design, and application

    CERN Document Server

    Saga, Satoshi; Konyo, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    This book examines the state of the art in diverse areas of haptics (touch)-related research, including the psychophysics and neurophysiology of haptics, development of haptics displays and sensors, and applications to a wide variety of fields such as industry, education, therapy, medicine, and welfare for the visually impaired. It also discusses the potential of future haptics interaction, such as haptics for emotional control and remote haptics communication. The book offers a valuable resource not only for haptics and human interface researchers, but also for developers and designers at manufacturing corporations and in the entertainment industries.

  2. Audio-haptic physically-based simulation of walking on different grounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchet, Luca; Nordahl, Rolf; Serafin, Stefania

    2010-01-01

    We describe a system which simulates in realtime the auditory and haptic sensations of walking on different surfaces. The system is based on a pair of sandals enhanced with pressure sensors and actuators. The pressure sensors detect the interaction force during walking, and control several...... physically based synthesis algorithms, which drive both the auditory and haptic feedback. The different hardware and software components of the system are described, together with possible uses and possibilities for improvements in future design iterations....

  3. An NLRA Transducer for Dual Use Bone Conduction Audio and Haptic Communication. Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-30

    audio and haptic transducer incorporates our existing NLRA haptics architecture for high fidelity vibrotactile feedback. The hybrid actuator combines a...CUSTOMERS The dual-mode bone conduction and vibrotactile transducer can assist in unburdening two sensory channels - vision and hearing - of a Warfighter...Its ideal use is as a component of a head-mounted communication system for CBRNE and Special Operations Forces exposed to many simultaneous sensory

  4. Haptic device for telerobotic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salisbury, Curt; Salisbury, Jr., J. Kenneth

    2014-12-30

    A haptic device for telerobotic surgery, including a base; a linkage system having first and second linkage members coupled to the base; a motor that provides a motor force; a transmission including first and second driving pulleys arranged such that their faces form an angle and their axes form a plane, first and second idler pulleys offset from the plane and arranged between the first and second driving pulleys such that their axes divide the angle between the first and second driving pulleys, and a cable that traverses the first and second driving pulleys and the set of idler pulleys and transfers the motor force to the linkage system; an end effector coupled to distal ends of the first and second linkage members and maneuverable relative to the base; and a controller that modulates the motor force to simulate a body part at a point portion of the end effector.

  5. Providing rapid feedback to residents on their teaching skills: an educational strategy for contemporary trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz-Sidlow, Rachel J; Baer, Tamar G; Gershel, Jeffrey C

    2016-03-20

    The objective of this study was to assess the attitudes of contemporary residents toward receiving rapid feedback on their teaching skills from their medical student learners. Participants consisted of 20 residents in their second post-graduate training year. These residents facilitated 44 teaching sessions with medical students within our Resident-as-Teacher program. Structured, written feedback from students was returned to the resident within 3 days following each session. Residents completed a short survey about the utility of the feedback, whether they would make a change to future teaching sessions based on the feedback, and what specifically they might change. The survey utilized a 4-point scale ("Not helpful/likely=1" to "Very helpful/likely=4"), and allowed for one free-text response. Free-text responses were hand-coded and underwent qualitative analysis to identify themes. There were 182 student feedback encounters resulting from 44 teaching sessions. The survey response rate was 73% (32/44). Ninety-four percent of residents rated the rapid feedback as "very helpful," and 91% would "very likely" make a change to subsequent sessions based on student feedback. Residents' proposed changes included modifications to session content and/or their personal teaching style. Residents found that rapid feedback received from medical student learners was highly valuable to them in their roles as teachers. A rapid feedback strategy may facilitate an optimal educational environment for contemporary trainees.

  6. Using Track Changes and Word Processor to Provide Corrective Feedback to Learners in Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbuSeileek, A. F.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of computer-mediated corrective feedback types in an English as a foreign language (EFL) intact class over time. The participants were 64 English majors who were assigned randomly into three treatment conditions that gave and received computer-mediated corrective feedback while writing (track changes, word…

  7. Effectiveness of a training program in supervisors' ability to provide feedback on residents' communication skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junod Perron, N.; Nendaz, M.; Louis-Simonet, M.; Sommer, J.; Gut, A.; Baroffio, A.; Dolmans, D.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Teaching communication skills (CS) to residents during clinical practice remains problematic. Direct observation followed by feedback is a powerful way to teach CS in clinical practice. However, little is known about the effect of training on feedback skills in this field. Controlled studies are

  8. Enhanced jump performance when providing augmented feedback compared to an external or internal focus of attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Martin; Lauber, Benedikt; Gottschalk, Marius; Taube, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Factors such as an external focus of attention (EF) and augmented feedback (AF) have been shown to improve performance. However, the efficacy of providing AF to enhance motor performance has never been compared with the effects of an EF or an internal focus of attention (IF). Therefore, the aim of the present study was to identify which of the three conditions (AF, EF or IF) leads to the highest performance in a countermovement jump (CMJ). Nineteen volunteers performed 12 series of 8 maximum CMJs. Changes in jump height between conditions and within the series were analysed. Jump heights differed between conditions (P jump heights at the end of the series in AF (+1.60%) and lower jump heights at the end of the series in EF (-1.79%) and IF (-1.68%) were observed. Muscle activity did not differ between conditions. The differences between conditions and within the series provide evidence that AF leads to higher performance and better progression within one series than EF and IF. Consequently, AF seems to outperform EF and IF when maximising jump height.

  9. Haptic identification of objects and their depictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatzky, R L; Loomis, J M; Lederman, S J; Wake, H; Fujita, N

    1993-08-01

    Haptic identification of real objects is superior to that of raised two-dimensional (2-D) depictions. Three explanations of real-object superiority were investigated: contribution of material information, contribution of 3-D shape and size, and greater potential for integration across the fingers. In Experiment 1, subjects, while wearing gloves that gently attenuated material information, haptically identified real objects that provided reduced cues to compliance, mass, and part motion. The gloves permitted exploration with free hand movement, a single outstretched finger, or five outstretched fingers. Performance decreased over these three conditions but was superior to identification of pictures of the same objects in all cases, indicating the contribution of 3-D structure and integration across the fingers. Picture performance was also better with five fingers than with one. In Experiment 2, the subjects wore open-fingered gloves, which provided them with material information. Consequently, the effect of type of exploration was substantially reduced but not eliminated. Material compensates somewhat for limited access to object structure but is not the primary basis for haptic object identification.

  10. Haptic controlled three-axis MEMS gripper system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayasai, Ashwin P; Sivakumar, Ganapathy; Mulsow, Matthew; Lacouture, Shelby; Holness, Alex; Dallas, Tim E

    2010-10-01

    In this work, we describe the development and testing of a three degree of freedom meso/micromanipulation system for handling micro-objects, including biological cells and microbeads. Three-axis control is obtained using stepper motors coupled to micromanipulators. The test specimen is placed on a linear X-stage, which is coupled to one stepper motor. The remaining two stepper motors are coupled to the Y and Z axes of a micromanipulator. The stepper motor-micromanipulator arrangement in the Y and Z axes has a minimum step resolution of ∼0.4 μm with a total travel of 12 mm and the stepper motor-X stage arrangement has a minimum resolution of ∼0.3 μm with a total travel of 10 mm. Mechanical backlash error is ∼0.8 μm for ∼750 μm of travel. A MEMS microgripper from Femtotools™ acts as an end-effector in the shaft end of the micromanipulator. The gripping ranges of the grippers used are 0-100 μm (for FT-G100) and 0-60 μm (for FT-G60). As the gripping action is performed, the force sense circuit of FT-G100 measures the handling force. This force feedback is integrated to a commercially available three degree of freedom haptic device (Novint Falcon) allowing the user to receive tactile feedback during the microscale handling. Both mesoscale and microscale controls are important, as mesoscale control is required for the travel motion of the test object whereas microscale control is required for the gripping action. The haptic device is used to control the position of the microgripper, control the actuation of the microgripper, and provide force feedback. A LABVIEW program was developed to interlink communication and control among hardware used in the system. Micro-objects such as SF-9 cells and polystyrene beads (∼45 μm) are handled and handling forces of ∼50 μN were experienced.

  11. Climate Feedback: Bringing the Scientific Community to Provide Direct Feedback on the Credibility of Climate Media Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, E. M.; Matlock, T.; Westerling, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    While most scientists recognize climate change as a major societal and environmental issue, social and political will to tackle the problem is still lacking. One of the biggest obstacles is inaccurate reporting or even outright misinformation in climate change coverage that result in the confusion of the general public on the issue.In today's era of instant access to information, what we read online usually falls outside our field of expertise and it is a real challenge to evaluate what is credible. The emerging technology of web annotation could be a game changer as it allows knowledgeable individuals to attach notes to any piece of text of a webpage and to share them with readers who will be able to see the annotations in-context -like comments on a pdf.Here we present the Climate Feedback initiative that is bringing together a community of climate scientists who collectively evaluate the scientific accuracy of influential climate change media coverage. Scientists annotate articles sentence by sentence and assess whether they are consistent with scientific knowledge allowing readers to see where and why the coverage is -or is not- based on science. Scientists also summarize the essence of their critical commentary in the form of a simple article-level overall credibility rating that quickly informs readers about the credibility of the entire piece.Web-annotation allows readers to 'hear' directly from the experts and to sense the consensus in a personal way as one can literaly see how many scientists agree with a given statement. It also allows a broad population of scientists to interact with the media, notably early career scientists.In this talk, we will present results on the impacts annotations have on readers -regarding their evaluation of the trustworthiness of the information they read- and on journalists -regarding their reception of scientists comments.Several dozen scientists have contributed to this effort to date and the system offers potential to

  12. Short-term plasticity of visuo-haptic object recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassuba, Tanja; Klinge, Corinna; Hölig, Cordula; Röder, Brigitte; Siebner, Hartwig R.

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have provided ample evidence for the involvement of the lateral occipital cortex (LO), fusiform gyrus (FG), and intraparietal sulcus (IPS) in visuo-haptic object integration. Here we applied 30 min of sham (non-effective) or real offline 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to perturb neural processing in left LO immediately before subjects performed a visuo-haptic delayed-match-to-sample task during fMRI. In this task, subjects had to match sample (S1) and target (S2) objects presented sequentially within or across vision and/or haptics in both directions (visual-haptic or haptic-visual) and decide whether or not S1 and S2 were the same objects. Real rTMS transiently decreased activity at the site of stimulation and remote regions such as the right LO and bilateral FG during haptic S1 processing. Without affecting behavior, the same stimulation gave rise to relative increases in activation during S2 processing in the right LO, left FG, bilateral IPS, and other regions previously associated with object recognition. Critically, the modality of S2 determined which regions were recruited after rTMS. Relative to sham rTMS, real rTMS induced increased activations during crossmodal congruent matching in the left FG for haptic S2 and the temporal pole for visual S2. In addition, we found stronger activations for incongruent than congruent matching in the right anterior parahippocampus and middle frontal gyrus for crossmodal matching of haptic S2 and in the left FG and bilateral IPS for unimodal matching of visual S2, only after real but not sham rTMS. The results imply that a focal perturbation of the left LO triggers modality-specific interactions between the stimulated left LO and other key regions of object processing possibly to maintain unimpaired object recognition. This suggests that visual and haptic processing engage partially distinct brain networks during visuo-haptic object matching. PMID

  13. Strategies to improve effectiveness of physical activity coaching systems: Development of personas for providing tailored feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterkamp, Reinoud; Dekker-Van Weering, Marit Gh; Evering, Richard Mh; Tabak, Monique; Timmerman, Josien G; Hermens, Hermie J; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Mr

    2016-06-27

    Mobile physical activity interventions can be improved by incorporating behavioural change theories. Relations between self-efficacy, stage of change, and physical activity are investigated, enabling development of feedback strategies that can be used to improve their effectiveness. A total of 325 healthy control participants and 82 patients wore an activity monitor. Participants completed a self-efficacy or stage of change questionnaire. Results show that higher self-efficacy is related to higher activity levels. Patients are less active than healthy controls and show a larger drop in physical activity over the day. Patients in the maintenance stage of change are more active than patients in lower stages of change, but show an equally large drop in level of physical activity. Findings suggest that coaching should at least be tailored to level of self-efficacy, stage of change, and physical activity pattern. Tailored coaching strategies are developed, which suggest that increasing self-efficacy of users is most important. Guidelines are provided. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Effectiveness of a training program in supervisors' ability to provide feedback on residents' communication skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod Perron, Noelle; Nendaz, Mathieu; Louis-Simonet, Martine; Sommer, Johanna; Gut, Anne; Baroffio, Anne; Dolmans, Diana; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2013-12-01

    Teaching communication skills (CS) to residents during clinical practice remains problematic. Direct observation followed by feedback is a powerful way to teach CS in clinical practice. However, little is known about the effect of training on feedback skills in this field. Controlled studies are scarce as well as studies that go beyond self-reported data. The aim of the study was to develop and assess the effectiveness of a training program for clinical supervisors on how to give feedback on residents' CS in clinical practice. The authors designed a pretest-posttest controlled study in which clinical supervisors working in two different medical services were invited to attend a sequenced and multifaceted program in teaching CS over a period of 6-9 months. Outcome measures were self-perceived and observed feedback skills collected during questionnaires and three videotaped objective structured teaching encounters. The videotaped feedbacks made by the supervisors were analysed using a 20-item feedback rating instrument. Forty-eight clinical supervisors participated (28 in the intervention, 20 in the control group). After training, a higher percentage of trained participants self-reported and demonstrated statistically significant improvement in making residents more active by exploring residents' needs, stimulating self-assessment, and using role playing to test strategies and checking understanding, with effect sizes ranging from 0.93 to 4.94. A training program on how to give feedback on residents' communication skills was successful in improving clinical supervisors' feedback skills and in helping them operate a shift from a teacher-centered to a more learner-centered approach.

  15. EMG-based visual-haptic biofeedback: a tool to improve motor control in children with primary dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casellato, Claudia; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Zorzi, Giovanna; Vernisse, Lea; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Nardocci, Nardo

    2013-05-01

    New insights suggest that dystonic motor impairments could also involve a deficit of sensory processing. In this framework, biofeedback, making covert physiological processes more overt, could be useful. The present work proposes an innovative integrated setup which provides the user with an electromyogram (EMG)-based visual-haptic biofeedback during upper limb movements (spiral tracking tasks), to test if augmented sensory feedbacks can induce motor control improvement in patients with primary dystonia. The ad hoc developed real-time control algorithm synchronizes the haptic loop with the EMG reading; the brachioradialis EMG values were used to modify visual and haptic features of the interface: the higher was the EMG level, the higher was the virtual table friction and the background color proportionally moved from green to red. From recordings on dystonic and healthy subjects, statistical results showed that biofeedback has a significant impact, correlated with the local impairment, on the dystonic muscular control. These tests pointed out the effectiveness of biofeedback paradigms in gaining a better specific-muscle voluntary motor control. The flexible tool developed here shows promising prospects of clinical applications and sensorimotor rehabilitation.

  16. Haptic communication to support biopsy procedures learning in virtual environments

    OpenAIRE

    Chellali, Amine; Dumas, Cédric; Milleville-Pennel, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    International audience; In interventional radiology, physicians require high haptic sensitivity and fine motor skills development because of the limited real-time visual feedback of the surgical site. The transfer of this type of surgical skill to novices is a challenging issue. This paper presents a study on the design of a biopsy procedure learning system. Our methodology, based on a task-centered design approach, aims to bring out new design rules for virtual learning environments. A new c...

  17. Robot-assisted training to improve proprioception does benefit from added vibro-tactile feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuppone, A; Squeri, V; Semprini, M; Konczak, J

    2015-01-01

    Proprioception is central for motor control and its role must also be taken into account when designing motor rehabilitation training protocols. This is particularly important when dealing with motor deficits due to proprioceptive impairment such as peripheral sensory neuropathy. In these cases substituting or augmenting diminished proprioceptive sensory information might be beneficial for improving motor function. However it still remains to be understood how proprioceptive senses can be improved by training, how this would translate into motor improvement and whether additional sensory modalities during motor training contribute to the sensorimotor training process. This preliminary study investigated how proprioceptive/haptic training can be augmented by providing additional sensory information in the form of vibro-tactile feedback. We tested the acuity of the wrist proprioceptive position sense before and after robotic training in two groups of healthy subjects, one trained only with haptic feedback and one with haptic and vibro-tactile feedback. We found that only the group receiving the multimodal feedback significantly improved proprioceptive acuity. This study demonstrates that non-proprioceptive position feedback derived from another somatosensory modality is easily interpretable for humans and can contribute to an increased precision of joint position. The clinical implications of this finding will be outlined.

  18. Using the PhysX engine for physics-based virtual surgery with force feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Anderson; Halic, Tansel; Lu, Zhonghua; Nedel, Luciana P; De, Suvranu

    2009-09-01

    The development of modern surgical simulators is highly challenging, as they must support complex simulation environments. The demand for higher realism in such simulators has driven researchers to adopt physics-based models, which are computationally very demanding. This poses a major problem, since real-time interactions must permit graphical updates of 30 Hz and a much higher rate of 1 kHz for force feedback (haptics). Recently several physics engines have been developed which offer multi-physics simulation capabilities, including rigid and deformable bodies, cloth and fluids. While such physics engines provide unique opportunities for the development of surgical simulators, their higher latencies, compared to what is necessary for real-time graphics and haptics, offer significant barriers to their use in interactive simulation environments. In this work, we propose solutions to this problem and demonstrate how a multimodal surgical simulation environment may be developed based on NVIDIA's PhysX physics library. Hence, models that are undergoing relatively low-frequency updates in PhysX can exist in an environment that demands much higher frequency updates for haptics. We use a collision handling layer to interface between the physical response provided by PhysX and the haptic rendering device to provide both real-time tissue response and force feedback. Our simulator integrates a bimanual haptic interface for force feedback and per-pixel shaders for graphics realism in real time. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, we present the simulation of the laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) procedure as a case study. To develop complex and realistic surgical trainers with realistic organ geometries and tissue properties demands stable physics-based deformation methods, which are not always compatible with the interaction level required for such trainers. We have shown that combining different modelling strategies for behaviour, collision and

  19. Grading by Category: A simple method for providing students with meaningful feedback on exams in large courses

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Cassandra; Weiss, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Many instructors choose to assess their students using open-ended written exam items that require students to show their understanding of physics by solving a problem and/or explaining a concept. Grading these items is fairly time consuming, and in large courses time constraints prohibit providing significant individualized feedback on students' exams. Instructors typically cross out areas of the response that are incorrect and write the total points awarded or subtracted. Sometimes, instructors will also write a word or two to indicate the error. This paper describes a grading method that provides greater individualized feedback, clearly communicates to students expected performance levels, takes no more time than traditional grading methods for open-ended responses, and seems to encourage more students to take advantage of the feedback provided.

  20. A haptically enhanced painting as a tool for neurorehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hoang H; Loureiro, Rui C V; Dussopt, Florian; Phillips, Nicholas; Zivanovic, Aleksander; Loomes, Martin J

    2013-06-01

    This paper examines a new form of interaction combining haptic and sonic exploration with static visual information from a real painting. Motivated by recent work in neurorehabilitation exploring group interactions with a robot, and by the educational and explorative value of artefacts, we investigate the feasibility of an interactive painting as a potential tool for the rehabilitation of brain injuries. The study consisted of a series of thirty-six single case studies with healthy individuals exploring a painting through haptic feedback with/without sonic interaction and assessed using a multidimensional measurement intended to evaluate the participants' subjective experience. The results showed that participants engaged with the interactive installation and executed more movements while exploring the painting in pairs. It appears that the haptic painting paradigm encourages development of analytical skills, imagination, promotes spatial skills realisation and enhances touch/hearing sensory channels. The results suggest that this approach might be of value to neurorehabilitation by exploring concepts of augmented artefact installations with technology (haptics + sound), promoting social integration and potential use in public spaces.

  1. Force modeling for incisions into various tissues with MRF haptic master

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pyunghwa; Kim, Soomin; Park, Young-Dai; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2016-03-01

    This study proposes a new model to predict the reaction force that occurs in incisions during robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery. The reaction force is fed back to the manipulator by a magneto-rheological fluid (MRF) haptic master, which is featured by a bi-directional clutch actuator. The reaction force feedback provides similar sensations to laparotomy that cannot be provided by a conventional master for surgery. This advantage shortens the training period for robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery and can improve the accuracy of operations. The reaction force modeling of incisions can be utilized in a surgical simulator that provides a virtual reaction force. In this work, in order to model the reaction force during incisions, the energy aspect of the incision process is adopted and analyzed. Each mode of the incision process is classified by the tendency of the energy change, and modeled for realistic real-time application. The reaction force model uses actual reaction force information with three types of actual tissues: hard tissue, medium tissue, and soft tissue. This modeled force is realized by the MRF haptic master through an algorithm based on the position and velocity of a scalpel using two different control methods: an open-loop algorithm and a closed-loop algorithm. The reaction forces obtained from the proposed model are compared with a desired force in time domain.

  2. Providing Graduated Corrective Feedback in an Intelligent Computer-Assisted Language Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Haiyang

    2017-01-01

    Corrective feedback (CF), a response to linguistic errors made by second language (L2) learners, has received extensive scholarly attention in second language acquisition. While much of the previous research in the field has focused on whether CF facilitates or impedes L2 development, few studies have examined the efficacy of gradually modifying…

  3. Strategies to improve effectiveness of physical activity coaching systems: Development of personas for providing tailored feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterkamp, Reinoud; van Weering, Marit; Evering, R.M.H.; Tabak, Monique; Timmerman, Josien; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé

    2017-01-01

    Mobile physical activity interventions can be improved by incorporating behavioural change theories. Relations between self-efficacy, stage of change, and physical activity are investigated, enabling development of feedback strategies that can be used to improve their effectiveness. A total of 325

  4. Providing Feedback on Computer-Based Algebra Homework in Middle-School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Emily R.

    2016-01-01

    Homework is transforming at a rapid rate with continuous advances in educational technology. Computer-based homework, in particular, is gaining popularity across a range of schools, with little empirical evidence on how to optimize student learning. The current aim was to test the effects of different types of feedback on computer-based homework.…

  5. Perception of CPR quality: Influence of CPR feedback, Just-in-Time CPR training and provider role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Adam; Overly, Frank; Kessler, David; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Lin, Yiqun; Doan, Quynh; Duff, Jonathan P; Tofil, Nancy M; Bhanji, Farhan; Adler, Mark; Charnovich, Alex; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Brown, Linda L

    2015-02-01

    Many healthcare providers rely on visual perception to guide cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), but little is known about the accuracy of provider perceptions of CPR quality. We aimed to describe the difference between perceived versus measured CPR quality, and to determine the impact of provider role, real-time visual CPR feedback and Just-in-Time (JIT) CPR training on provider perceptions. We conducted secondary analyses of data collected from a prospective, multicenter, randomized trial of 324 healthcare providers who participated in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario between July 2012 and April 2014. Participants were randomized to one of four permutations of: JIT CPR training and real-time visual CPR feedback. We calculated the difference between perceived and measured quality of CPR and reported the proportion of subjects accurately estimating the quality of CPR within each study arm. Participants overestimated achieving adequate chest compression depth (mean difference range: 16.1-60.6%) and rate (range: 0.2-51%), and underestimated chest compression fraction (0.2-2.9%) across all arms. Compared to no intervention, the use of real-time feedback and JIT CPR training (alone or in combination) improved perception of depth (pPerception of depth is more accurate in CPR providers versus team leaders (27.8% vs. 7.4%; p=0.043) when using real-time feedback. Healthcare providers' visual perception of CPR quality is poor. Perceptions of CPR depth are improved by using real-time visual feedback and with prior JIT CPR training. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Haptic search for spheres and cubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plaisier, M.A.; Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2008-01-01

    If you have multiple objects in your pocket, some are easy to find among the other ones, for instance, when they differ much in material properties or shape. Information on which haptic features stand out among others is valuable for research into the haptic system in general, but also for haptic

  7. Mobile Haptic Technology Development through Artistic Exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuartielles, David; Göransson, Andreas; Olsson, Tony

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates how artistic explorations can be useful for the development of mobile haptic technology. It presents an alternative framework of design for wearable haptics that contributes to the building of haptic communities outside specialized research contexts. The paper also present...

  8. Haptic Influence on Visual Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Grabowecky

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Information from different sensory modalities influences perception and attention in tasks such as visual search. We have previously reported identity-based crossmodal influences of audition on visual search (Iordanescu, Guzman-Martinez, Grabowecky, & Suzuki, 2008; Iordanescu, Grabowecky, Franconeri, Theeuwes, and Suzuki, 2010; Iordanescu, Grabowecky and Suzuki, 2011. Here, we extend those results and demonstrate a novel crossmodal interaction between haptic shape information and visual attention. Manually-explored, but unseen, shapes facilitated visual search for similarly-shaped objects. This effect manifests as a reduction in both overall search times and initial saccade latencies when the haptic shape (eg, a sphere is consistent with a visual target (eg, an orange compared to when it is inconsistent with a visual target (eg, a hockey puck]. This haptic-visual interaction occurred even though the manually held shapes were not predictive of the visual target's shape or location, suggesting that the interaction occurs automatically. Furthermore, when the haptic shape was consistent with a distracter in the visual search array (instead of with the target, initial saccades toward the target were disrupted. Together, these results demonstrate a robust shape-specific haptic influence on visual search.

  9. Using Audience Response Technology to provide formative feedback on pharmacology performance for non-medical prescribing students - a preliminary evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostyn Alison

    2012-11-01

    individualised handsets and personalised formative feedback highly. The significant correlation between ART response scores and student exam scores suggests that formative feedback can provide students with a useful reference point in terms of their level of exam-readiness.

  10. Can providing feedback on driving behavior and training on parental vigilant care affect male teen drivers and their parents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Haneen; Musicant, Oren; Shimshoni, Yaara; Toledo, Tomer; Grimberg, Einat; Omer, Haim; Lotan, Tsippy

    2014-08-01

    This study focuses on investigating the driving behavior of young novice male drivers during the first year of driving (three months of accompanied driving and the following nine months of solo driving). The study's objective is to examine the potential of various feedback forms on driving to affect young drivers' behavior and to mitigate the transition from accompanied to solo driving. The study examines also the utility of providing parents with guidance on how to exercise vigilant care regarding their teens' driving. Driving behavior was evaluated using data collected by In-Vehicle Data Recorders (IVDR), which document events of extreme g-forces measured in the vehicles. IVDR systems were installed in 242 cars of the families of young male drivers, however, only 217 families of young drivers aged 17-22 (M=17.5; SD=0.8) completed the one year period. The families were randomly allocated into 4 groups: (1) Family feedback: In which all the members of the family were exposed to feedback on their own driving and on that of the other family members; (2) Parental training: in which in addition to the family feedback, parents received personal guidance on ways to enhance vigilant care regarding their sons' driving; (3) Individual feedback: In which family members received feedback only on their own driving behavior (and were not exposed to the data on other family members); (4) CONTROL: Group that received no feedback at all. The feedback was provided to the different groups starting from the solo period, thus, the feedback was not provided during the supervised period. The data collected by the IVDRs was first analyzed using analysis of variance in order to compare the groups with respect to their monthly event rates. Events' rates are defined as the number of events in a trip divided by its duration. This was followed by the development and estimation of random effect negative binomial models that explain the monthly event rates of young drivers and their parents

  11. 1st International AsiaHaptics conference

    CERN Document Server

    Ando, Hideyuki; Kyung, Ki-Uk

    2015-01-01

    This book is aimed not only at haptics and human interface researchers, but also at developers and designers from manufacturing corporations and the entertainment industry who are working to change our lives. This publication comprises the proceedings of the first International AsiaHaptics conference, held in Tsukuba, Japan, in 2014. The book describes the state of the art of the diverse haptics- (touch-) related research, including scientific research into haptics perception and illusion, development of haptics devices, and applications for a wide variety of fields such as education, medicine, telecommunication, navigation, and entertainment.

  12. Engineering haptic devices a beginner's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Hatzfeld, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In this greatly reworked second edition of Engineering Haptic Devices the psychophysic content has been thoroughly revised and updated. Chapters on haptic interaction, system structures and design methodology were rewritten from scratch to include further basic principles and recent findings. New chapters on the evaluation of haptic systems and the design of three exemplary haptic systems from science and industry have been added. This book was written for students and engineers that are faced with the development of a task-specific haptic system. It is a reference book for the basics of hap

  13. Virtual haptic system for intuitive planning of bone fixation plate placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kup-Sze Choi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Placement of pre-contoured fixation plate is a common treatment for bone fracture. Fitting of fixation plates on fractured bone can be preoperatively planned and evaluated in 3D virtual environment using virtual reality technology. However, conventional systems usually employ 2D mouse and virtual trackball as the user interface, which makes the process inconvenient and inefficient. In the paper, a preoperative planning system equipped with 3D haptic user interface is proposed to allow users to manipulate the virtual fixation plate intuitively to determine the optimal position for placement on distal medial tibia. The system provides interactive feedback forces and visual guidance based on the geometric requirements. Creation of 3D models from medical imaging data, collision detection, dynamics simulation and haptic rendering are discussed. The system was evaluated by 22 subjects. Results show that the time to achieve optimal placement using the proposed system was shorter than that by using 2D mouse and virtual trackball, and the satisfaction rating was also higher. The system shows potential to facilitate the process of fitting fixation plates on fractured bones as well as interactive fixation plate design.

  14. Detection of Nuclear Sources by UAV Teleoperation Using a Visuo-Haptic Augmented Reality Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacopo Aleotti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A visuo-haptic augmented reality (VHAR interface is presented enabling an operator to teleoperate an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV equipped with a custom CdZnTe-based spectroscopic gamma-ray detector in outdoor environments. The task is to localize nuclear radiation sources, whose location is unknown to the user, without the close exposure of the operator. The developed detector also enables identification of the localized nuclear sources. The aim of the VHAR interface is to increase the situation awareness of the operator. The user teleoperates the UAV using a 3DOF haptic device that provides an attractive force feedback around the location of the most intense detected radiation source. Moreover, a fixed camera on the ground observes the environment where the UAV is flying. A 3D augmented reality scene is displayed on a computer screen accessible to the operator. Multiple types of graphical overlays are shown, including sensor data acquired by the nuclear radiation detector, a virtual cursor that tracks the UAV and geographical information, such as buildings. Experiments performed in a real environment are reported using an intense nuclear source.

  15. Detection of Nuclear Sources by UAV Teleoperation Using a Visuo-Haptic Augmented Reality Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micconi, Giorgio; Caselli, Stefano; Benassi, Giacomo; Zambelli, Nicola; Bettelli, Manuele

    2017-01-01

    A visuo-haptic augmented reality (VHAR) interface is presented enabling an operator to teleoperate an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) equipped with a custom CdZnTe-based spectroscopic gamma-ray detector in outdoor environments. The task is to localize nuclear radiation sources, whose location is unknown to the user, without the close exposure of the operator. The developed detector also enables identification of the localized nuclear sources. The aim of the VHAR interface is to increase the situation awareness of the operator. The user teleoperates the UAV using a 3DOF haptic device that provides an attractive force feedback around the location of the most intense detected radiation source. Moreover, a fixed camera on the ground observes the environment where the UAV is flying. A 3D augmented reality scene is displayed on a computer screen accessible to the operator. Multiple types of graphical overlays are shown, including sensor data acquired by the nuclear radiation detector, a virtual cursor that tracks the UAV and geographical information, such as buildings. Experiments performed in a real environment are reported using an intense nuclear source. PMID:28961198

  16. Detection of Nuclear Sources by UAV Teleoperation Using a Visuo-Haptic Augmented Reality Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleotti, Jacopo; Micconi, Giorgio; Caselli, Stefano; Benassi, Giacomo; Zambelli, Nicola; Bettelli, Manuele; Zappettini, Andrea

    2017-09-29

    A visuo-haptic augmented reality (VHAR) interface is presented enabling an operator to teleoperate an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) equipped with a custom CdZnTe-based spectroscopic gamma-ray detector in outdoor environments. The task is to localize nuclear radiation sources, whose location is unknown to the user, without the close exposure of the operator. The developed detector also enables identification of the localized nuclear sources. The aim of the VHAR interface is to increase the situation awareness of the operator. The user teleoperates the UAV using a 3DOF haptic device that provides an attractive force feedback around the location of the most intense detected radiation source. Moreover, a fixed camera on the ground observes the environment where the UAV is flying. A 3D augmented reality scene is displayed on a computer screen accessible to the operator. Multiple types of graphical overlays are shown, including sensor data acquired by the nuclear radiation detector, a virtual cursor that tracks the UAV and geographical information, such as buildings. Experiments performed in a real environment are reported using an intense nuclear source.

  17. Haptic rendering foundations, algorithms, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Ming C

    2008-01-01

    For a long time, human beings have dreamed of a virtual world where it is possible to interact with synthetic entities as if they were real. It has been shown that the ability to touch virtual objects increases the sense of presence in virtual environments. This book provides an authoritative overview of state-of-theart haptic rendering algorithms and their applications. The authors examine various approaches and techniques for designing touch-enabled interfaces for a number of applications, including medical training, model design, and maintainability analysis for virtual prototyping, scienti

  18. Multiresolution representation of data in a haptic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Mohammad W.; Barner, Kenneth E.

    1998-12-01

    A number of methods are available for the visualization of scientific data. Most of these methods use computer graphics for the visual representation of data. Such visual methods cannot be used by a blind person. Haptic interface technology makes it possible for a user to explore haptically rendered data. A haptic interface, therefore, can be used to effectively present data to a blind person. However large and complex datasets, if rendered without processing, are often confusing to the user. Additionally haptic devices are often point interaction. Thus the amount of information conveyed through the device is far less than that obtained through a visual device, making exploration difficult. Multiresolution methods provide a solution to problems that rise due to the low information capacity of these devices. Utilizing these methods the user can feel the data at low resolution and then add in details by increasing the resolution. These techniques are particular useful for the visually impaired because complex local detail of the data often prevent the user from obtaining an overall view of the haptic plot. Wavelet is a common technique used for the generation of multiresolution data. However, the wavelet decomposition uses linear filters result in edges that are smoothed. Since nonlinear filters are known to preserve edges, we have used affine median filter in a structure similar to that used for the evaluation of wavelet coefficient. The affine median filter is a hybrid filter because its characteristics can be varied from the nonlinear median filter to a linear filter. Thus a flexible multiresolution technique with controllable characteristic is proposed. The technique is used to haptically render a 2D evenly sampled data t different resolutions. The standard Wavelet multiresolution technique is also applied to the same data sets and compared to the hybrid multiresolution technique. The advantage with the hybrid method is that with the same multiresolution

  19. Prototype tactile feedback system for examination by skin touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, O; Lee, K; Oh, C; Kim, K; Kim, M

    2014-08-01

    Diagnosis of conditions such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, in the case of induration, involves palpating the infected area via hands and then selecting a ratings score. However, the score is determined based on the tester's experience and standards, making it subjective. To provide tactile feedback on the skin, we developed a prototype tactile feedback system to simulate skin wrinkles with PHANToM OMNI. To provide the user with tactile feedback on skin wrinkles, a visual and haptic Augmented Reality system was developed. First, a pair of stereo skin images obtained by a stereo camera generates a disparity map of skin wrinkles. Second, the generated disparity map is sent to an implemented tactile rendering algorithm that computes a reaction force according to the user's interaction with the skin image. We first obtained a stereo image of skin wrinkles from the in vivo stereo imaging system, which has a baseline of 50.8 μm, and obtained the disparity map with a graph cuts algorithm. The left image is displayed on the monitor to enable the user to recognize the location visually. The disparity map of the skin wrinkle image sends skin wrinkle information as a tactile response to the user through a haptic device. We successfully developed a tactile feedback system for virtual skin wrinkle simulation by means of a commercialized haptic device that provides the user with a single point of contact to feel the surface roughness of a virtual skin sample. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Force Control and Nonlinear Master-Slave Force Profile to Manage an Admittance Type Multi-Fingered Haptic User Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony L. Crawford

    2012-08-01

    Natural movements and force feedback are important elements in using teleoperated equipment if complex and speedy manipulation tasks are to be accomplished in remote and/or hazardous environments, such as hot cells, glove boxes, decommissioning, explosives disarmament, and space to name a few. In order to achieve this end the research presented in this paper has developed an admittance type exoskeleton like multi-fingered haptic hand user interface that secures the user’s palm and provides 3-dimensional force feedback to the user’s fingertips. Atypical to conventional haptic hand user interfaces that limit themselves to integrating the human hand’s characteristics just into the system’s mechanical design this system also perpetuates that inspiration into the designed user interface’s controller. This is achieved by manifesting the property differences of manipulation and grasping activities as they pertain to the human hand into a nonlinear master-slave force relationship. The results presented in this paper show that the admittance-type system has sufficient bandwidth that it appears nearly transparent to the user when the user is in free motion and when the system is subjected to a manipulation task, increased performance is achieved using the nonlinear force relationship compared to the traditional linear scaling techniques implemented in the vast majority of systems.

  1. Wearable Vibrotactile Haptic Device for Stiffness Discrimination during Virtual Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andualem Tadesse Maereg

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss the development of cost effective, wireless, and wearable vibrotactile haptic device for stiffness perception during an interaction with virtual objects. Our experimental setup consists of haptic device with five vibrotactile actuators, virtual reality environment tailored in Unity 3D integrating the Oculus Rift Head Mounted Display (HMD and the Leap Motion controller. The virtual environment is able to capture touch inputs from users. Interaction forces are then rendered at 500 Hz and fed back to the wearable setup stimulating fingertips with ERM vibrotactile actuators. Amplitude and frequency of vibrations are modulated proportionally to the interaction force to simulate the stiffness of a virtual object. A quantitative and qualitative study is done to compare the discrimination of stiffness on virtual linear spring in three sensory modalities: visual only feedback, tactile only feedback, and their combination. A common psychophysics method called the Two Alternative Forced Choice (2AFC approach is used for quantitative analysis using Just Noticeable Difference (JND and Weber Fractions (WF. According to the psychometric experiment result, average Weber fraction values of 0.39 for visual only feedback was improved to 0.25 by adding the tactile feedback.

  2. Factors Influencing Undergraduate Students' Acceptance of a Haptic Interface for Learning Gross Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Soonja; Choi-Lundberg, Derek L.; Fluck, Andrew Edward; Sale, Arthur

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to evaluate factors influencing undergraduate students' acceptance of a computer-aided learning resource using the Phantom Omni haptic stylus to enable rotation, touch and kinaesthetic feedback and display of names of three-dimensional (3D) human anatomical structures on a visual display. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  3. Haptic perception of mutiple objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plaisier, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis a series of investigations into haptic (touch) perception of multiple objects is presented. When we hold a collection of objects in our hand, we can extract different types of information about these objects. We can, for instance, identify which objects we are holding. The first

  4. Haptic and Audio Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 5th International Workshop on Haptic and Audio Interaction Design, HAID 2010 held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in September 2010. The 21 revised full papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected for inclusion in the book. The papers are or...

  5. Effects of Grip-Force, Contact, and Acceleration Feedback on a Teleoperated Pick-and-Place Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Rebecca P; Fitter, Naomi T; Fedalei, Elizabeth A; Kuchenbecker, Katherine J

    2017-01-01

    The multifaceted human sense of touch is fundamental to direct manipulation, but technical challenges prevent most teleoperation systems from providing even a single modality of haptic feedback, such as force feedback. This paper postulates that ungrounded grip-force, fingertip-contact-and-pressure, and high-frequency acceleration haptic feedback will improve human performance of a teleoperated pick-and-place task. Thirty subjects used a teleoperation system consisting of a haptic device worn on the subject's right hand, a remote PR2 humanoid robot, and a Vicon motion capture system to move an object to a target location. Each subject completed the pick-and-place task 10 times under each of the eight haptic conditions obtained by turning on and off grip-force feedback, contact feedback, and acceleration feedback. To understand how object stiffness affects the utility of the feedback, half of the subjects completed the task with a flexible plastic cup, and the others used a rigid plastic block. The results indicate that the addition of grip-force feedback with gain switching enables subjects to hold both the flexible and rigid objects more stably, and it also allowed subjects who manipulated the rigid block to hold the object more delicately and to better control the motion of the remote robot's hand. Contact feedback improved the ability of subjects who manipulated the flexible cup to move the robot's arm in space, but it deteriorated this ability for subjects who manipulated the rigid block. Contact feedback also caused subjects to hold the flexible cup less stably, but the rigid block more securely. Finally, adding acceleration feedback slightly improved the subject's performance when setting the object down, as originally hypothesized; interestingly, it also allowed subjects to feel vibrations produced by the robot's motion, causing them to be more careful when completing the task. This study supports the utility of grip-force and high-frequency acceleration

  6. The dominance of haptics over audition in controlling wrist velocity during striking movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yinan; Giordano, Bruno L; Avanzini, Federico; McAdams, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Skilled interactions with sounding objects, such as drumming, rely on resolving the uncertainty in the acoustical and tactual feedback signals generated by vibrating objects. Uncertainty may arise from mis-estimation of the objects' geometry-independent mechanical properties, such as surface stiffness. How multisensory information feeds back into the fine-tuning of sound-generating actions remains unexplored. Participants (percussionists, non-percussion musicians, or non-musicians) held a stylus and learned to control their wrist velocity while repeatedly striking a virtual sounding object whose surface stiffness was under computer control. Sensory feedback was manipulated by perturbing the surface stiffness specified by audition and haptics in a congruent or incongruent manner. The compensatory changes in striking velocity were measured as the motor effects of the sensory perturbations, and sensory dominance was quantified by the asymmetry of congruency effects across audition and haptics. A pronounced dominance of haptics over audition suggested a superior utility of somatosensation developed through long-term experience with object exploration. Large interindividual differences in the motor effects of haptic perturbation potentially arose from a differential reliance on the type of tactual prediction error for which participants tend to compensate: vibrotactile force versus object deformation. Musical experience did not have much of an effect beyond a slightly greater reliance on object deformation in mallet percussionists. The bias toward haptics in the presence of crossmodal perturbations was greater when participants appeared to rely on object deformation feedback, suggesting a weaker association between haptically sensed object deformation and the acoustical structure of concomitant sound during everyday experience of actions upon objects.

  7. Design and Calibration of a New 6 DOF Haptic Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanhuan Qin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available For many applications such as tele-operational robots and interactions with virtual environments, it is better to have performance with force feedback than without. Haptic devices are force reflecting interfaces. They can also track human hand positions simultaneously. A new 6 DOF (degree-of-freedom haptic device was designed and calibrated in this study. It mainly contains a double parallel linkage, a rhombus linkage, a rotating mechanical structure and a grasping interface. Benefited from the unique design, it is a hybrid structure device with a large workspace and high output capability. Therefore, it is capable of multi-finger interactions. Moreover, with an adjustable base, operators can change different postures without interrupting haptic tasks. To investigate the performance regarding position tracking accuracy and static output forces, we conducted experiments on a three-dimensional electric sliding platform and a digital force gauge, respectively. Displacement errors and force errors are calculated and analyzed. To identify the capability and potential of the device, four application examples were programmed.

  8. User-centered development and testing of a monitoring system that provides feedback regarding physical functioning to elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermeulen J

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Joan Vermeulen,1 Jacques CL Neyens,1 Marieke D Spreeuwenberg,1 Erik van Rossum,1,2 Walther Sipers,3 Herbert Habets,3 David J Hewson,4 Luc P de Witte1,2 1School for Public Health and Primary Care (CAPHRI, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands; 2Research Center for Technology in Care, Zuyd University of Applied Sciences, Heerlen, The Netherlands; 3Expertise Center for Elderly Care, Orbis Medical Center, Sittard, The Netherlands; 4Institute Charles Delaunay, Université de Technologie de Troyes, Troyes, France Purpose: To involve elderly people during the development of a mobile interface of a monitoring system that provides feedback to them regarding changes in physical functioning and to test the system in a pilot study. Methods and participants: The iterative user-centered development process consisted of the following phases: (1 selection of user representatives; (2 analysis of users and their context; (3 identification of user requirements; (4 development of the interface; and (5 evaluation of the interface in the lab. Subsequently, the monitoring and feedback system was tested in a pilot study by five patients who were recruited via a geriatric outpatient clinic. Participants used a bathroom scale to monitor weight and balance, and a mobile phone to monitor physical activity on a daily basis for six weeks. Personalized feedback was provided via the interface of the mobile phone. Usability was evaluated on a scale from 1 to 7 using a modified version of the Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire (PSSUQ; higher scores indicated better usability. Interviews were conducted to gain insight into the experiences of the participants with the system. Results: The developed interface uses colors, emoticons, and written and/or spoken text messages to provide daily feedback regarding (changes in weight, balance, and physical activity. The participants rated the usability of the monitoring and feedback system with a mean score of 5

  9. Training Sessional Academic Staff to Provide Quality Feedback on University Students' Assessment: Lessons from a Faculty of Law Learning and Teaching Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Kelly; Bell, Tamara; Dwyer, Angela

    2017-01-01

    The quality of feedback provided to university students has long been recognised as the most important predictor of student learning and satisfaction. However, providing quality feedback to students is challenging in the current context, in which universities increasingly rely on casualised and inexperienced academic staff to assess undergraduate…

  10. Utilizing Provider Feedback to Develop Opioid Risk Mitigation Tools for the Military Health System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-27

    complex environment of care, treating patients who are often mobile and whose prior prescription history may be difficult to access. Clinical Decision...Support (CDS) tools provide healthcare providers with knowledge and detailed information to enhance decision-making in the clinical workflow and

  11. Providing Written Feedback on Students' Mathematical Arguments: Proof Validations of Prospective Secondary Mathematics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiler, Sarah K.; Thompson, Denisse R.; Krajcevski, Milé

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics teachers play a unique role as experts who provide opportunities for students to engage in the practices of the mathematics community. Proof is a tool essential to the practice of mathematics, and therefore, if teachers are to provide adequate opportunities for students to engage with this tool, they must be able to validate student…

  12. Haptics using a smart material for eyes free interaction in mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huihui; Kaleas, Dimosthenis; Ruuspakka, Roger; Tartz, Robert

    2012-04-01

    We present a proof of concept (POC) for haptic interaction when audio or visual feedback is not practical. The POC includes addressable arrays of two-way Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) springs which can operate at a lower voltage and temperature compatible with mobile devices. They will form different shapes due to the thermal effect as current travels through the springs. The POC can simultaneously realize multiple methods for conveying haptic information such as dimension, force, texture and temperature due to the flexible array design. The haptic interface can go back to the original shape by itself after the current is off due to the advance of two way SMA. We are developing applications with different POC designs for tangible interactions.

  13. Design Considerations for Smoking Cessation Apps: Feedback From Nicotine Dependence Treatment Providers and Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Jennifer B; Hartzler, Andrea L; Catz, Sheryl L

    2016-02-12

    Hundreds of smoking cessation apps are commercially available, but most are not theory-based or designed to take advantage of mobile technology in ways that could make them more engaging and possibly more effective. Considering input from both clinical experts (who understand best practice nicotine dependence treatment requirements) to inform appropriate content and from smokers (the end users) to express their preferences is important in designing these programs in the future. To assess and compare the opinions of nicotine dependence treatment providers and smokers regarding the design of future smoking cessation apps. We surveyed providers (n=264) and smokers who own smartphones (n=40) to assess their opinions on the importance of 21 app design features. Features represented 5 domains: cost, reputation, privacy and security, content and user experience, and communication. Domains were chosen to reflect best practice treatment, leverage mobile technology to support smoking cessation, and elicit important user preferences. Data were collected between June and July 2015. Most providers agreed that mHealth apps hold promise for helping people quit smoking (203/264, 76.9%) and would recommend them to their clients/patients (201/264, 76.1%), especially if the app were empirically validated (236/264, 89.4%). Few providers believe effective cessation apps currently exist (112/264, 42.4%). Few smokers (5/40, 13%) had ever downloaded a smoking cessation app; of the ones who had not, most said they would consider doing so (29/35, 83%). Both respondent groups indicated the following features were very to extremely important to include in cessation apps: free or low cost, keeps information private, matches individual needs and interests, adapts as one's needs and interests change, helps to manage nicotine withdrawal symptoms and medication side effects, and allows users to track their progress. Providers and smokers also indicated gaming and social media connectivity were

  14. Optimal visual-haptic integration with articulated tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Chie; Watt, Simon J

    2017-05-01

    When we feel and see an object, the nervous system integrates visual and haptic information optimally, exploiting the redundancy in multiple signals to estimate properties more precisely than is possible from either signal alone. We examined whether optimal integration is similarly achieved when using articulated tools. Such tools (tongs, pliers, etc) are a defining characteristic of human hand function, but complicate the classical sensory 'correspondence problem' underlying multisensory integration. Optimal integration requires establishing the relationship between signals acquired by different sensors (hand and eye) and, therefore, in fundamentally unrelated units. The system must also determine when signals refer to the same property of the world-seeing and feeling the same thing-and only integrate those that do. This could be achieved by comparing the pattern of current visual and haptic input to known statistics of their normal relationship. Articulated tools disrupt this relationship, however, by altering the geometrical relationship between object properties and hand posture (the haptic signal). We examined whether different tool configurations are taken into account in visual-haptic integration. We indexed integration by measuring the precision of size estimates, and compared our results to optimal predictions from a maximum-likelihood integrator. Integration was near optimal, independent of tool configuration/hand posture, provided that visual and haptic signals referred to the same object in the world. Thus, sensory correspondence was determined correctly (trial-by-trial), taking tool configuration into account. This reveals highly flexible multisensory integration underlying tool use, consistent with the brain constructing internal models of tools' properties.

  15. Intelligent dental training simulator with objective skill assessment and feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhienmora, Phattanapon; Haddawy, Peter; Suebnukarn, Siriwan; Dailey, Matthew N

    2011-06-01

    We present a dental training simulator that provides a virtual reality (VR) environment with haptic feedback for dental students to practice dental surgical skills in the context of a crown preparation procedure. The simulator addresses challenges in traditional training such as the subjective nature of surgical skill assessment and the limited availability of expert supervision. We identified important features for characterizing the quality of a procedure based on interviews with experienced dentists. The features are patterns combining tool position, tool orientation, and applied force. The simulator monitors these features during the procedure, objectively assesses the quality of the performed procedure using hidden Markov models (HMMs), and provides objective feedback on the user's performance in each stage of the procedure. We recruited five dental students and five experienced dentists to evaluate the accuracy of our skill assessment method and the quality of the system's generated feedback. The experimental results show that HMMs with selected features can correctly classify all test sequences into novice and expert categories. The evaluation also indicates a high acceptance rate from experts for the system's generated feedback. In this work, we introduce our VR dental training simulator and describe a mechanism for providing objective skill assessment and feedback. The HMM is demonstrated as an effective tool for classifying a particular operator as novice-level or expert-level. The simulator can generate tutoring feedback with quality comparable to the feedback provided by human tutors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The results of a survey highlighting issues with feedback on medical training in the United Kingdom and how a Smartphone App could provide a solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Thomas G; Hood, Gill; Farrell, Tom

    2015-11-06

    Feedback drives learning in medical education. Healthcare Supervision Logbook (HSL) is a Smartphone App developed at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals for providing feedback on medical training, from both a trainee's and a supervisor's perspective. In order to establish a mandate for the role of HSL in clinical practice, a large survey was carried out. Two surveys (one for doctors undertaking specialty training and a second for consultants supervising their training) were designed. The survey for doctors-in-training was distributed to all specialty trainees in the South and West localities of the Health Education Yorkshire and the Humber UK region. The survey for supervisors was distributed to all consultants involved in educational and clinical supervision of specialty trainees at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals. The results confirm that specialty trainees provide feedback on their training infrequently-66 % do so only annually. 96 % of the specialty trainees owned a Smartphone and 45 % said that they would be willing to use a Smartphone App to provide daily feedback on the clinical and educational supervision they receive. Consultant supervisors do not receive regular feedback on the educational and clinical supervision they provide to trainees-56 % said they never received such feedback and 33 % said it was only on an annual basis. 86 % of consultants surveyed owned a Smartphone and 41 % said they would be willing to use a Smartphone App to provide feedback on the performance of trainees they were supervising. Feedback on medical training is recorded by specialty trainees infrequently and consultants providing educational and clinical supervision often do not receive any feedback on their performance in this area. HSL is a simple, quick and efficient way to collect and collate feedback on medical training to improve this situation. Good support and education needs to be provided when implementing this new technology.

  17. Validity of the Microsoft Kinect for providing lateral trunk lean feedback during gait retraining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ross A; Pua, Yong-Hao; Bryant, Adam L; Hunt, Michael A

    2013-09-01

    Gait retraining programs are prescribed to assist in the rehabilitation process of many clinical conditions. Using lateral trunk lean modification as the model, the aim of this study was to assess the concurrent validity of kinematic data recorded using a marker-based 3D motion analysis (3DMA) system and a low-cost alternative, the Microsoft Kinect™ (Kinect), during a gait retraining session. Twenty healthy adults were trained to modify their gait to obtain a lateral trunk lean angle of 10°. Real-time biofeedback of the lateral trunk lean angle was provided on a computer screen in front of the subject using data extracted from the Kinect skeletal tracking algorithm. Marker coordinate data were concurrently recorded using the 3DMA system, and the similarity and equivalency of the trunk lean angle data from each system were compared. The lateral trunk lean angle data obtained from the Kinect system without any form of calibration resulted in errors of a high (>2°) magnitude (mean error=3.2±2.2°). Performing global and individualized calibration significantly (PKinect can be used to create a real-time biofeedback system for gait retraining. Given that this system is low-cost, portable and does not require any sensors to be attached to the body, it could provide numerous advantages when compared to laboratory-based gait retraining systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Relationship between subjective test feedback provided by high-school athletes during computer-based assessment of baseline cognitive functioning and self-reported symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Philip; Neidzwski, Katherine; Moser, Rosemarie Scolaro; Karpf, Robin

    2010-06-01

    Subjective feedback about distractions or problems encountered during computerized assessment was provided by 538 out of a pool of 1659 high-school athletes who completed baseline testing using ImPACT (Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing). Three types of feedback were included: (a) environmental, (b) computer-based (mechanical), and (c) instruction-based (associated with difficulty understanding test instructions). One-way analyses of variance were conducted and revealed relationships between greater symptom reporting and any type of feedback, environmental feedback, and instruction-based feedback. Increased symptom reporting was noted for female students. Additional relationships were noted between providing computer-based feedback and faster reaction time; and between history of concussion and providing instruction-based feedback. Athletes endorsing more symptoms at baseline scored significantly worse on ImPACT, as reflected in decreased visual memory performance. Results suggest that feedback provided during computerized assessment may yield information about symptom reporting and test-taking style, which may also be of particular interpretive utility when athletes minimize their symptoms.

  19. Multi-arm multilateral haptics-based immersive tele-robotic system (HITS) for improvised explosive device disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, David; Lacheray, Hervé; Lai, Gilbert; Haddadi, Amir

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents the latest advancements of the Haptics-based Immersive Tele-robotic System (HITS) project, a next generation Improvised Explosive Device (IED) disposal (IEDD) robotic interface containing an immersive telepresence environment for a remotely-controlled three-articulated-robotic-arm system. While the haptic feedback enhances the operator's perception of the remote environment, a third teleoperated dexterous arm, equipped with multiple vision sensors and cameras, provides stereo vision with proper visual cues, and a 3D photo-realistic model of the potential IED. This decentralized system combines various capabilities including stable and scaled motion, singularity avoidance, cross-coupled hybrid control, active collision detection and avoidance, compliance control and constrained motion to provide a safe and intuitive control environment for the operators. Experimental results and validation of the current system are presented through various essential IEDD tasks. This project demonstrates that a two-armed anthropomorphic Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) robot interface can achieve complex neutralization techniques against realistic IEDs without the operator approaching at any time.

  20. Haptics in forensics: the possibilities and advantages in using the haptic device for reconstruction approaches in forensic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Ursula; Naether, Silvio; Braun, Marcel; Thali, Michael

    2008-09-18

    Non-invasive documentation methods such as surface scanning and radiological imaging are gaining in importance in the forensic field. These three-dimensional technologies provide digital 3D data, which are processed and handled in the computer. However, the sense of touch gets lost using the virtual approach. The haptic device enables the use of the sense of touch to handle and feel digital 3D data. The multifunctional application of a haptic device for forensic approaches is evaluated and illustrated in three different cases: the representation of bone fractures of the lower extremities, by traffic accidents, in a non-invasive manner; the comparison of bone injuries with the presumed injury-inflicting instrument; and in a gunshot case, the identification of the gun by the muzzle imprint, and the reconstruction of the holding position of the gun. The 3D models of the bones are generated from the Computed Tomography (CT) images. The 3D models of the exterior injuries, the injury-inflicting tools and the bone injuries, where a higher resolution is necessary, are created by the optical surface scan. The haptic device is used in combination with the software FreeForm Modelling Plus for touching the surface of the 3D models to feel the minute injuries and the surface of tools, to reposition displaced bone parts and to compare an injury-causing instrument with an injury. The repositioning of 3D models in a reconstruction is easier, faster and more precisely executed by means of using the sense of touch and with the user-friendly movement in the 3D space. For representation purposes, the fracture lines of bones are coloured. This work demonstrates that the haptic device is a suitable and efficient application in forensic science. The haptic device offers a new way in the handling of digital data in the virtual 3D space.

  1. Haptic perception of shapes and line drawings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijntjes, M.W.A.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis various aspect of haptic perception were studied. The first part of the thesis is mainly concerned with haptic perception of two-dimensional shapes and line drawings. We first studied the angular acuity of two-dimensional shapes an found that the manner of exploration as well as the

  2. Localized adenosine signaling provides fine-tuned negative feedback over a wide dynamic range of neocortical network activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Magnus J. E.

    2014-01-01

    Although the patterns of activity produced by neocortical networks are now better understood, how these states are activated, sustained, and terminated still remains unclear. Negative feedback by the endogenous neuromodulator adenosine may potentially play an important role, as it can be released by activity and there is dense A1 receptor expression in the neocortex. Using electrophysiology, biosensors, and modeling, we have investigated the properties of adenosine signaling during physiological and pathological network activity in rat neocortical slices. Both low- and high-rate network activities were reduced by A1 receptor activation and enhanced by block of A1 receptors, consistent with activity-dependent adenosine release. Since the A1 receptors were neither saturated nor completely unoccupied during either low- or high-rate activity, adenosine signaling provides a negative-feedback mechanism with a wide dynamic range. Modeling and biosensor experiments show that during high-rate activity increases in extracellular adenosine concentration are highly localized and are uncorrelated over short distances that are certainly adenosine release during low-rate activity, although it is present, is probably a consequence of small localized increases in adenosine concentration that are rapidly diminished by diffusion and active removal mechanisms. Saturation of such removal mechanisms when higher concentrations of adenosine are released results in the accumulation of inosine, explaining the strong purine signal during high-rate activity. PMID:25392170

  3. Haptic fMRI: combining functional neuroimaging with haptics for studying the brain's motor control representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Samir; Brantner, Gerald; Aholt, Chris; Kay, Kendrick; Khatib, Oussama

    2013-01-01

    A challenging problem in motor control neuroimaging studies is the inability to perform complex human motor tasks given the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanner's disruptive magnetic fields and confined workspace. In this paper, we propose a novel experimental platform that combines Functional MRI (fMRI) neuroimaging, haptic virtual simulation environments, and an fMRI-compatible haptic device for real-time haptic interaction across the scanner workspace (above torso ∼ .65×.40×.20m(3)). We implement this Haptic fMRI platform with a novel haptic device, the Haptic fMRI Interface (HFI), and demonstrate its suitability for motor neuroimaging studies. HFI has three degrees-of-freedom (DOF), uses electromagnetic motors to enable high-fidelity haptic rendering (>350Hz), integrates radio frequency (RF) shields to prevent electromagnetic interference with fMRI (temporal SNR >100), and is kinematically designed to minimize currents induced by the MRI scanner's magnetic field during motor displacement (Tesla fMRI scanner's baseline noise variation (∼.85±.1%). Finally, HFI is haptically transparent and does not interfere with human motor tasks (tested for .4m reaches). By allowing fMRI experiments involving complex three-dimensional manipulation with haptic interaction, Haptic fMRI enables-for the first time-non-invasive neuroscience experiments involving interactive motor tasks, object manipulation, tactile perception, and visuo-motor integration.

  4. Robust haptic large distance telemanipulation for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heck, D.J.F., E-mail: d.j.f.heck@tue.nl [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Heemskerk, C.J.M.; Koning, J.F. [Heemskerk Innovative Technologies, Sassenheim (Netherlands); Abbasi, A.; Nijmeijer, H. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • ITER remote handling maintenance can be controlled safely over a large distance. • Bilateral teleoperation experiments were performed in a local network. • Wave variables make the controller robust against constant communication delays. • Master and slave position synchronization guaranteed by proportional action. -- Abstract: During shutdowns, maintenance crews are expected to work in 24/6 shifts to perform critical remote handling maintenance tasks on the ITER system. In this article, we investigate the possibility to safely perform these haptic maintenance tasks remotely from control stations located anywhere around the world. To guarantee stability in time delayed bilateral teleoperation, the symmetric position tracking controller using wave variables is selected. This algorithm guarantees robustness against communication delays, can eliminate wave reflections and provide position synchronization of the master and slave devices. Experiments have been conducted under realistic local network bandwidth, latency and jitter constraints. They show sufficient transparency even for substantial communication delays.

  5. Haptic/graphic rehabilitation: integrating a robot into a virtual environment library and applying it to stroke therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Ian; Patton, James; Listenberger, Molly; Case, Emily

    2011-08-08

    Recent research that tests interactive devices for prolonged therapy practice has revealed new prospects for robotics combined with graphical and other forms of biofeedback. Previous human-robot interactive systems have required different software commands to be implemented for each robot leading to unnecessary developmental overhead time each time a new system becomes available. For example, when a haptic/graphic virtual reality environment has been coded for one specific robot to provide haptic feedback, that specific robot would not be able to be traded for another robot without recoding the program. However, recent efforts in the open source community have proposed a wrapper class approach that can elicit nearly identical responses regardless of the robot used. The result can lead researchers across the globe to perform similar experiments using shared code. Therefore modular "switching out"of one robot for another would not affect development time. In this paper, we outline the successful creation and implementation of a wrapper class for one robot into the open-source H3DAPI, which integrates the software commands most commonly used by all robots.

  6. Analyzing effects of providing performance feedback at ward rounds on guideline adherence - The importance of feedback usage analysis and statistical control charts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Eslami, Saeid; Schultz, Marcus J.; de Jonge, Evert; de Keizer, Nicolette F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Feedback to clinicians on their past performance is often aimed at increasing adherence to guidelines. We investigate how various analytical approaches influence the interpretation of adherence data. The analytical approaches vary in considering the actual or the intended use of the

  7. The effects of providing visual feedback and auditory stimulation using a robotic device on balance and gait abilities in persons with stroke: a pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jae Ho Park; ; Yijung Chung

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of providing visual feedback and auditory stimulation using a robotic device on balance and gait abilities in stroke patients. Design...

  8. Seeing a haptically explored face: visual facial-expression aftereffect from haptic adaptation to a face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumiya, Kazumichi

    2013-10-01

    Current views on face perception assume that the visual system receives only visual facial signals. However, I show that the visual perception of faces is systematically biased by adaptation to a haptically explored face. Recently, face aftereffects (FAEs; the altered perception of faces after adaptation to a face) have been demonstrated not only in visual perception but also in haptic perception; therefore, I combined the two FAEs to examine whether the visual system receives face-related signals from the haptic modality. I found that adaptation to a haptically explored facial expression on a face mask produced a visual FAE for facial expression. This cross-modal FAE was not due to explicitly imaging a face, response bias, or adaptation to local features. Furthermore, FAEs transferred from vision to haptics. These results indicate that visual face processing depends on substrates adapted by haptic faces, which suggests that face processing relies on shared representation underlying cross-modal interactions.

  9. Evaluation of Subjective and Objective Performance Metrics for Haptically Controlled Robotic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Dung Pham

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies in detail how different evaluation methods perform when it comes to describing the performance of haptically controlled mobile manipulators. Particularly, we investigate how well subjective metrics perform compared to objective metrics. To find the best metrics to describe the performance of a control scheme is challenging when human operators are involved; how the user perceives the performance of the controller does not necessarily correspond to the directly measurable metrics normally used in controller evaluation. It is therefore important to study whether there is any correspondence between how the user perceives the performance of a controller, and how it performs in terms of directly measurable metrics such as the time used to perform a task, number of errors, accuracy, and so on. To perform these tests we choose a system that consists of a mobile manipulator that is controlled by an operator through a haptic device. This is a good system for studying different performance metrics as the performance can be determined by subjective metrics based on feedback from the users, and also as objective and directly measurable metrics. The system consists of a robotic arm which provides for interaction and manipulation, which is mounted on a mobile base which extends the workspace of the arm. The operator thus needs to perform both interaction and locomotion using a single haptic device. While the position of the on-board camera is determined by the base motion, the principal control objective is the motion of the manipulator arm. This calls for intelligent control allocation between the base and the manipulator arm in order to obtain intuitive control of both the camera and the arm. We implement three different approaches to the control allocation problem, i.e., whether the vehicle or manipulator arm actuation is applied to generate the desired motion. The performance of the different control schemes is evaluated, and our

  10. Effectiveness of a Training Program in Supervisors' Ability to Provide Feedback on Residents' Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod Perron, Noelle; Nendaz, Mathieu; Louis-Simonet, Martine; Sommer, Johanna; Gut, Anne; Baroffio, Anne; Dolmans, Diana; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2013-01-01

    Teaching communication skills (CS) to residents during clinical practice remains problematic. Direct observation followed by feedback is a powerful way to teach CS in clinical practice. However, little is known about the effect of training on feedback skills in this field. Controlled studies are scarce as well as studies that go beyond…

  11. Morphological Computation of Haptic Perception of a Controllable Stiffness Probe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nantachai Sornkarn

    Full Text Available When people are asked to palpate a novel soft object to discern its physical properties such as texture, elasticity, and even non-homogeneity, they not only regulate probing behaviors, but also the co-contraction level of antagonistic muscles to control the mechanical impedance of fingers. It is suspected that such behavior tries to enhance haptic perception by regulating the function of mechanoreceptors at different depths of the fingertips and proprioceptive sensors such as tendon and spindle sensors located in muscles. In this paper, we designed and fabricated a novel two-degree of freedom variable stiffness indentation probe to investigate whether the regulation of internal stiffness, indentation, and probe sweeping velocity (PSV variables affect the accuracy of the depth estimation of stiff inclusions in an artificial silicon phantom using information gain metrics. Our experimental results provide new insights into not only the biological phenomena of haptic perception but also new opportunities to design and control soft robotic probes.

  12. Objective Assessment of Laparoscopic Force and Psychomotor Skills in a Novel Virtual Reality-Based Haptic Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, M S Raghu; Manivannan, Muniyandi; Manoharan, Govindan; Chandramohan, S M

    2016-01-01

    Most of the commercially available virtual reality-based laparoscopic simulators do not effectively evaluate combined psychomotor and force-based laparoscopic skills. Consequently, the lack of training on these critical skills leads to intraoperative errors. To assess the effectiveness of the novel virtual reality-based simulator, this study analyzed the combined psychomotor (i.e., motion or movement) and force skills of residents and expert surgeons. The study also examined the effectiveness of real-time visual force feedback and tool motion during training. Bimanual fundamental (i.e., probing, pulling, sweeping, grasping, and twisting) and complex tasks (i.e., tissue dissection) were evaluated. In both tasks, visual feedback on applied force and tool motion were provided. The skills of the participants while performing the early tasks were assessed with and without visual feedback. Participants performed 5 repetitions of fundamental and complex tasks. Reaction force and instrument acceleration were used as metrics. Surgical Gastroenterology, Government Stanley Medical College and Hospital; Institute of Surgical Gastroenterology, Madras Medical College and Rajiv Gandhi Government General Hospital. Residents (N = 25; postgraduates and surgeons with 4 and ≤10 years of laparoscopic surgery). Residents applied large forces compared with expert surgeons and performed abrupt tool movements (p < 0.001). However, visual + haptic feedback improved the performance of residents (p < 0.001). In complex tasks, visual + haptic feedback did not influence the applied force of expert surgeons, but influenced their tool motion (p < 0.001). Furthermore, in complex tissue sweeping task, expert surgeons applied more force, but were within the tissue damage limits. In both groups, exertion of large forces and abrupt tool motion were observed during grasping, probing or pulling, and tissue sweeping maneuvers (p < 0.001). Modern day curriculum-based training should evaluate the skills

  13. New approaches to provide feedback from nuclear and covariance data adjustment for effective improvement of evaluated nuclear data files

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmiotti, Giuseppe; Salvatores, Massimo; Hursin, Mathieu; Kodeli, Ivo; Gabrielli, Fabrizio; Hummel, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    A critical examination of the role of uncertainty assessment, target accuracies, role of integral experiment for validation and, consequently, of data adjustments methods is underway since several years at OECD-NEA, the objective being to provide criteria and practical approaches to use effectively the results of sensitivity analyses and cross section adjustments for feedback to evaluators and experimentalists in order to improve without ambiguities the knowledge of neutron cross sections, uncertainties, and correlations to be used in a wide range of applications and to meet new requirements and constraints for innovative reactor and fuel cycle system design. An approach will be described that expands as much as possible the use in the adjustment procedure of selected integral experiments that provide information on “elementary” phenomena, on separated individual physics effects related to specific isotopes or on specific energy ranges. An application to a large experimental data base has been performed and the results are discussed in the perspective of new evaluation projects like the CIELO initiative.

  14. New approaches to provide feedback from nuclear and covariance data adjustment for effective improvement of evaluated nuclear data files

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmiotti, Giuseppe; Salvatores, Massimo; Hursin, Mathieu; Kodeli, Ivo; Gabrielli, Fabrizio; Hummel, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    A critical examination of the role of uncertainty assessment, target accuracies, role of integral experiment for validation and, consequently, of data adjustments methods is underway since several years at OECD-NEA, the objective being to provide criteria and practical approaches to use effectively the results of sensitivity analyses and cross section adjustments for feedback to evaluators and experimentalists in order to improve without ambiguities the knowledge of neutron cross sections, uncertainties, and correlations to be used in a wide range of applications and to meet new requirements and constraints for innovative reactor and fuel cycle system design. An approach will be described that expands as much as possible the use in the adjustment procedure of selected integral experiments that provide information on "elementary" phenomena, on separated individual physics effects related to specific isotopes or on specific energy ranges. An application to a large experimental data base has been performed and the results are discussed in the perspective of new evaluation projects like the CIELO initiative.

  15. Development of haptic system for surgical robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Han Gyeol; Park, Jiong Min; Choi, Seung-Bok; Sohn, Jung Woo

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a new type of haptic system for surgical robot application is proposed and its performances are evaluated experimentally. The proposed haptic system consists of an effective master device and a precision slave robot. The master device has 3-DOF rotational motion as same as human wrist motion. It has lightweight structure with a gyro sensor and three small-sized MR brakes for position measurement and repulsive torque generation, respectively. The slave robot has 3-DOF rotational motion using servomotors, five bar linkage and a torque sensor is used to measure resistive torque. It has been experimentally demonstrated that the proposed haptic system has good performances on tracking control of desired position and repulsive torque. It can be concluded that the proposed haptic system can be effectively applied to the surgical robot system in real field.

  16. Improved Haptic Linear Lines for Better Movement Accuracy in Upper Limb Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Joan De Boeck; Lode Vanacken; Sofie Notelaers; Karin Coninx

    2012-01-01

    Force feedback has proven to be beneficial in the domain of robot-assisted rehabilitation. According to the patients' personal needs, the generated forces may either be used to assist, support, or oppose their movements. In our current research project, we focus onto the upper limb training for MS (multiple sclerosis) and CVA (cerebrovascular accident) patients, in which a basic building block to implement many rehabilitation exercises was found. This building block is a haptic linear path: a...

  17. Using Audience Response Technology to provide formative feedback on pharmacology performance for non-medical prescribing students--a preliminary evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostyn, Alison; Meade, Oonagh; Lymn, Joanne S

    2012-11-13

    . The significant correlation between ART response scores and student exam scores suggests that formative feedback can provide students with a useful reference point in terms of their level of exam-readiness.

  18. Strategies for providing upper extremity amputees with tactile and hand position feedback--moving closer to the bionic arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riso, R R

    1999-01-01

    A continuing challenge for prostheses developers is to replace the sensory function of the hand. This includes tactile sensitivity such as finger contact, grip force, object slippage, surface texture and temperature, as well as proprioceptive sense. One approach is sensory substitution whereby an intact sensory system such as vision, hearing or cutaneous sensation elsewhere on the body is used as an input channel for information related to the prosthesis. A second technique involves using electrical stimulation to deliver sensor derived information directly to the peripheral afferent nerves within the residual limb. Stimulation of the relevant afferent nerves can ultimately come closest to restoring the original sensory perceptions of the hand, and to this end, researchers have already demonstrated some degree of functionality of the transected sensory nerves in studies with amputee subjects. This paper provides an overview of different types of nerve interface components and the advantages and disadvantages of employing each of them in sensory feedback systems. Issues of sensory perception, neurophysiology and anatomy relevant to hand sensation and function are discussed with respect to the selection of the different types of nerve interfaces. The goal of this paper is to outline what can be accomplished for implementing sensation into artificial arms in the near term by applying what is present or presently attainable technology.

  19. Systematic review and meta-analysis of internet-delivered interventions providing personalized feedback for weight loss in overweight and obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrington, A; Newham, J J; Bell, R; Adamson, A; McColl, E; Araujo-Soares, V

    2016-06-01

    Obesity levels continue to rise annually. Face-to-face weight loss consultations have previously identified mixed effectiveness and face high demand with limited resources. Therefore, alternative interventions, such as internet-delivered interventions, warrant further investigation. The aim was to assess whether internet-delivered weight loss interventions providing personalized feedback were more effective for weight loss in overweight and obese adults in comparison with control groups receiving no personalized feedback. Nine databases were searched, and 12 studies were identified that met all inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis, identified participants receiving personalized feedback via internet-delivered interventions, had 2.13 kg mean difference (SMD) greater weight loss (and BMI change, waist circumference change and 5% weight loss) in comparison with control groups providing no personalized feedback. This was also true for results at 3 and 6-month time points but not for studies where interventions lasted ≥12 months. This suggests that personalized feedback may be an important behaviour change technique (BCT) to incorporate within internet-delivered weight loss interventions. However, meta-analysis results revealed no differences between internet-delivered weight loss interventions with personalized feedback and control interventions ≥12 months. Further investigation into longer term internet-delivered interventions is required to examine how weight loss could be maintained. Future research examining which BCTs are most effective for internet-delivered weight loss interventions is suggested. © 2016 World Obesity.

  20. Haptic interfaces: Hardware, software and human performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Mandayam A.

    1995-01-01

    Virtual environments are computer-generated synthetic environments with which a human user can interact to perform a wide variety of perceptual and motor tasks. At present, most of the virtual environment systems engage only the visual and auditory senses, and not the haptic sensorimotor system that conveys the sense of touch and feel of objects in the environment. Computer keyboards, mice, and trackballs constitute relatively simple haptic interfaces. Gloves and exoskeletons that track hand postures have more interaction capabilities and are available in the market. Although desktop and wearable force-reflecting devices have been built and implemented in research laboratories, the current capabilities of such devices are quite limited. To realize the full promise of virtual environments and teleoperation of remote systems, further developments of haptic interfaces are critical. In this paper, the status and research needs in human haptics, technology development and interactions between the two are described. In particular, the excellent performance characteristics of Phantom, a haptic interface recently developed at MIT, are highlighted. Realistic sensations of single point of contact interactions with objects of variable geometry (e.g., smooth, textured, polyhedral) and material properties (e.g., friction, impedance) in the context of a variety of tasks (e.g., needle biopsy, switch panels) achieved through this device are described and the associated issues in haptic rendering are discussed.

  1. Grouping by Proximity in Haptic Contour Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overvliet, Krista E.; Krampe, Ralf Th.; Wagemans, Johan

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the applicability of the Gestalt principle of perceptual grouping by proximity in the haptic modality. To do so, we investigated the influence of element proximity on haptic contour detection. In the course of four sessions ten participants performed a haptic contour detection task in which they freely explored a haptic random dot display that contained a contour in 50% of the trials. A contour was defined by a higher density of elements (raised dots), relative to the background surface. Proximity of the contour elements as well as the average proximity of background elements was systematically varied. We hypothesized that if proximity of contour elements influences haptic contour detection, detection will be more likely when contour elements are in closer proximity. This should be irrespective of the ratio with the proximity of the background elements. Results showed indeed that the closer the contour elements were, the higher the detection rates. Moreover, this was the case independent of the contour/background ratio. We conclude that the Gestalt law of proximity applies to haptic contour detection. PMID:23762364

  2. The Haptic Bracelets: Learning Multi-Limb Rhythm Skills from Haptic Stimuli While Reading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwer, A.; Holland, S.; Dalgleish, M.; Holland, S.; Wilkie, K.; Mulholland, P.; Seago, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Haptic Bracelets are a system designed to help people learn multi-limbed rhythms (which involve multiple simultaneous rhythmic patterns) while they carry out other tasks. The Haptic Bracelets consist of vibrotactiles attached to each wrist and ankle, together with a computer system to control

  3. The effect of force feedback on student reasoning about gravity, mass, force and motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussell, Linda

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether force feedback within a computer simulation had an effect on reasoning by fifth grade students about gravity, mass, force, and motion, concepts which can be difficult for learners to grasp. Few studies have been done on cognitive learning and haptic feedback, particularly with young learners, but there is an extensive base of literature on children's conceptions of science and a number of studies focus specifically on children's conceptions of force and motion. This case study used a computer-based paddleball simulation with guided inquiry as the primary stimulus. Within the simulation, the learner could adjust the mass of the ball and the gravitational force. The experimental group used the simulation with visual and force feedback; the control group used the simulation with visual feedback but without force feedback. The proposition was that there would be differences in reasoning between the experimental and control groups, with force feedback being helpful with concepts that are more obvious when felt. Participants were 34 fifth-grade students from three schools. Students completed a modal (visual, auditory, and haptic) learning preference assessment and a pretest. The sessions, including participant experimentation and interviews, were audio recorded and observed. The interviews were followed by a written posttest. These data were analyzed to determine whether there were differences based on treatment, learning style, demographics, prior gaming experience, force feedback experience, or prior knowledge. Work with the simulation, regardless of group, was found to increase students' understanding of key concepts. The experimental group appeared to benefit from the supplementary help that force feedback provided. Those in the experimental group scored higher on the posttest than those in the control group. The greatest difference between mean group scores was on a question concerning the effects of increased

  4. Force Sensitive Handles and Capacitive Touch Sensor for Driving a Flexible Haptic-Based Immersive System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Cugini

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present an approach that uses both two force sensitive handles (FSH and a flexible capacitive touch sensor (FCTS to drive a haptic-based immersive system. The immersive system has been developed as part of a multimodal interface for product design. The haptic interface consists of a strip that can be used by product designers to evaluate the quality of a 3D virtual shape by using touch, vision and hearing and, also, to interactively change the shape of the virtual object. Specifically, the user interacts with the FSH to move the virtual object and to appropriately position the haptic interface for retrieving the six degrees of freedom required for both manipulation and modification modalities. The FCTS allows the system to track the movement and position of the user’s fingers on the strip, which is used for rendering visual and sound feedback. Two evaluation experiments are described, which involve both the evaluation and the modification of a 3D shape. Results show that the use of the haptic strip for the evaluation of aesthetic shapes is effective and supports product designers in the appreciation of the aesthetic qualities of the shape.

  5. Research and Teaching: Exploring the Use of an Online Quiz Game to Provide Formative Feedback in a Large-Enrollment, Introductory Biochemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Rachel; Parrish, Jonathan; Wright, Adrienne; Gnarpe, Judy; Keenan, Louanne

    2015-01-01

    In a large-enrollment, introductory biochemistry course for nonmajors, the authors provide students with formative feedback through practice questions in PDF format. Recently, they investigated possible benefits of providing the practice questions via an online game (Brainspan). Participants were randomly assigned to either the online game group…

  6. Providing web-based feedback and social norms information to reduce student alcohol intake: a multisite investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewick, Bridgette M; West, Robert; Gill, Jan; O'May, Fiona; Mulhern, Brendan; Barkham, Michael; Hill, Andrew J

    2010-12-19

    Unhealthy alcohol use among university students is cause for concern, yet the level of help seeking behavior for alcohol use is low within the student population. Electronic brief interventions delivered via the Internet present an alternative to traditional treatments and could enable the delivery of interventions on a population basis. Further evidence is needed of the effectiveness of Internet-delivered interventions and of their generalizability across educational institutions. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness across 4 UK universities of a Web-based intervention for student alcohol use. In total, 1112 participants took part. Participants were stratified by educational institution, gender, age group, year of study, and self-reported weekly consumption of alcohol and randomly assigned to either the control arm or to the immediate or delayed intervention arms. Intervention participants gained access to the intervention between weeks 1 to 7 or weeks 8 to 15, respectively. The intervention provided electronic personalized feedback and social norms information on drinking behavior accessed by logging on to a website. Participants registered interest by completing a brief screening questionnaire and were then asked to complete 4 further assessments across the 24 weeks of the study. Assessments included a retrospective weekly drinking diary, the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), and a readiness-to-change algorithm. The outcome variable was the number of units of alcohol consumed in the last week. The effect of treatment arm and time on units consumed last week and average units consumed per drinking occasion were investigated using repeated measures multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). In addition, the data were modeled using a longitudinal regression with time points clustered within students. MANCOVA revealed a main effect of time on units of alcohol consumed over the last week. A longitudinal regression model showed an

  7. Impact of the feedback provided by a gastric electrical stimulation system on eating behavior and physical activity levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busetto, Luca; Torres, Antonio J; Morales-Conde, Salvador; Alarcón Del Agua, Isaias; Moretto, Carlo; Fierabracci, Paola; Rovera, Giuseppe; Segato, Gianni; Rubio, Miguel A; Favretti, Franco

    2017-03-01

    The closed-loop gastric electrical stimulation (CLGES) abiliti(®) system provides tailored gastric electrical stimulation activated by food entry into the stomach and sensor-based data to medical professionals. The aim of this study was to analyze behavior changes using sensor-based food intake and activity data in participants treated with the CLGES system. Food intake and activity data (3D accelerometer) were downloaded at baseline and monthly/bimonthly for 12 months in a subset of patients with obesity (N = 45) participating in a multicenter trial with CLGES. Measured food intake parameters included the number of intakes during allowed and disallowed periods, nighttime intakes, and between-meal snacks (average/d). Activity parameters included time in different levels of physical activity (min/d), sleep/sedentary (h/d), and estimated energy expenditure (EE). Weight loss at 12 months averaged 15.7 ± 7.7% of the baseline body weight. Stable reduction in the number of disallowed meals and between-meal snacks (P < 0.05), an increase in all levels of physical activity (P < 0.001), and an increase in activity-based EE (303 ± 53 kcal/d on average, P < 0.001) were seen. Significant improvement in eating and activity was seen in participants. It is hypothesized that feedback of the sensor-based data induced behavioral changes and contributed to weight loss in patients treated with CLGES. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  8. Effects of providing personalized feedback of child's obesity risk on mothers' food choices using a virtual reality buffet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, C M; Persky, S; Wagner, L K; Faith, M S; Ward, D S

    2013-10-01

    Providing personalized genetic-risk feedback of a child's susceptibility to adult-onset health conditions is a topic of considerable debate. Family health history (FHH), specifically parental overweight/obesity status, is a useful assessment for evaluating a child's genetic and environmental risk of becoming obese. It is unclear whether such risk information may influence parents' efforts to reduce their child's risk of obesity. To evaluate whether telling mothers the magnitude of their child's risk of becoming obese based on personal FHH influenced food choices for their young child from a virtual reality-based buffet restaurant. Overweight/obese mothers of a child aged 4-5 years who met eligibility criteria (N=221) were randomly assigned to one of three experimental arms, which emphasized different health information: arm 1, food safety control (Control); arm 2, behavioral-risk information (BRI) alone or arm 3, behavioral-risk information plus personal FHH-based risk assessment (BRI+FHH). Mothers donned a head-mounted display to be immersed in a virtual restaurant buffet, where they selected virtual food and beverages as a lunch for their child. Mothers who were randomized to BRI+FHH filled the index child's plate with an average of 45 fewer calories than those in the Control arm (Pparent). The influence of communicating a child's inherited risk of obesity on mothers' feeding practices may vary by the risk level conveyed. High-risk messages may best be coupled with strategies to increase mother's perceptions that efforts can be undertaken to reduce risk and build requisite behavioral skills to reduce risk.

  9. Providing 360-degree multisource feedback to nurse educators in the country of Georgia: a formative evaluation of acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeStephano, Christopher Carl; Crawford, Kimberley Anne; Jashi, Maia; Wold, Judith Lupo

    2014-06-01

    Due to insufficient nursing education standards in the country of Georgia, 15 health professionals participated in a USAID grant-funded nurse educator faculty development program. These educators then offered continuing education courses and taught more than 1,700 practicing Georgian nurses over 3 years. Using a 360-degree multisource feedback model (MSF), self, video, learner, peer, and program coordinator evaluations of teaching effectiveness were completed. After nurse educators reviewed their results and identified areas for improvement, a questionnaire about the perceived acceptability of teacher evaluations was completed. Of the 15 nurse educators, 93.3% indicated that nurse educators should receive feedback through self, learner, peer, and video evaluations, and 100% indicated that nurse educators should receive feedback from the program coordinator. The accuracy and usefulness of the program coordinator evaluation was rated the highest, whereas peer evaluation was rated the lowest. This study revealed that MSF was acceptable to Georgian nurse educators. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Internet-based tools to assess diet and provide feedback in chronic kidney disease stage IV: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Sameer; Arab, Lenore; Vargas, Roberto; Rastogi, Anjay; Ang, Alfonso; Shetty, Nidhi

    2013-03-01

    Successfully changing patients' dietary behavior is a challenging problem in the management of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We conducted a pilot study to test the feasibility and acceptability of an Internet-based, self-administered, dietary assessment tool equipped with instructional feedback, aimed at facilitating dietary adherence to disease-specific nutritional guidelines among CKD stage IV patients while reducing resource burdens on providers. Focus groups were used to develop a user-friendly dietary reporting format. The report was then calibrated to the dietary guidelines outlined by Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI) and incorporated into the assessment tool. Elements of the report were developed based on the "transtheoretical model of behavior change" theory, aimed at facilitating patients to enter the action stage of change. The tool was later deployed in a nephrology care site at an academic medical center, where 12 patients diagnosed with stage IV CKD (late-stage, predialysis) completed a dietary assessment before their provider encounter as well as questionnaires gauging their computer literacy, nutritional education history, nutritional knowledge and awareness, and acceptability of the tool. The report was made available to the provider during the clinical encounter, and both patient and physician perception of the report's utility was assessed after the encounter. Approximately 25% to 30% of the patients were severely noncompliant to the K/DOQI guidelines for each nutrient. Awareness about the role of diet in CKD management was widely variable, ranging from 0% to 58% of the patients over different nutrients. All of the patients successfully completed the Web-based dietary assessment. Eighty-four percent of the patients positively rated the tool on its ability to record the patients' dietary data, 58% noted the tool was always able to satisfactorily estimate portion sizes, and 50% thought the navigation was easy or very easy. Eleven

  11. A kinematic analysis of a haptic handheld stylus in a virtual environment: a study in healthy subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Sunnerhagen Katharina S; Broeren Jurgen; Rydmark Martin

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Virtual Reality provides new options for conducting motor assessment and training within computer-generated 3 dimensional environments. To date very little has been reported about normal performance in virtual environments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of a clinical procedure measuring trajectories with a haptic handheld stylus in a virtual environment and to establish normative data in healthy subjects using this haptic device. M...

  12. Poor haptic orientation discrimination in nonsighted children may reflect disruption of cross-sensory calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Monica; Sandini, Giulio; Martinoli, Cristina; Burr, David

    2010-02-09

    A long-standing question, going back at least 300 years to Berkeley's famous essay, is how sensory systems become calibrated with physical reality. We recently showed [1] that children younger than 8-10 years do not integrate visual and haptic information optimally, but that one or the other sense prevails: touch for size and vision for orientation discrimination. The sensory dominance may reflect crossmodal calibration of vision and touch, where the more accurate sense calibrates the other. This hypothesis leads to a clear prediction: that lack of clear vision at an early age should affect calibration of haptic orientation discrimination. We therefore measured size and orientation haptic discrimination thresholds in 17 congenitally visually impaired children (aged 5-19). Haptic orientation thresholds were greatly impaired compared with age-matched controls, whereas haptic size thresholds were at least as good, and often better. One child with a late-acquired visual impairment stood out with excellent orientation discrimination. The results provide strong support for our crossmodal calibration hypothesis.

  13. Adaptation effects in static postural control by providing simultaneous visual feedback of center of pressure and center of gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kenta; Mani, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Naoya; Sato, Yuki; Tanaka, Shintaro; Maejima, Hiroshi; Asaka, Tadayoshi

    2017-07-19

    The benefit of visual feedback of the center of pressure (COP) on quiet standing is still debatable. This study aimed to investigate the adaptation effects of visual feedback training using both the COP and center of gravity (COG) during quiet standing. Thirty-four healthy young adults were divided into three groups randomly (COP + COG, COP, and control groups). A force plate was used to calculate the coordinates of the COP in the anteroposterior (COPAP) and mediolateral (COPML) directions. A motion analysis system was used to calculate the coordinates of the center of mass (COM) in both directions (COMAP and COMML). The coordinates of the COG in the AP direction (COGAP) were obtained from the force plate signals. Augmented visual feedback was presented on a screen in the form of fluctuation circles in the vertical direction that moved upward as the COPAP and/or COGAP moved forward and vice versa. The COP + COG group received the real-time COPAP and COGAP feedback simultaneously, whereas the COP group received the real-time COPAP feedback only. The control group received no visual feedback. In the training session, the COP + COG group was required to maintain an even distance between the COPAP and COGAP and reduce the COGAP fluctuation, whereas the COP group was required to reduce the COPAP fluctuation while standing on a foam pad. In test sessions, participants were instructed to keep their standing posture as quiet as possible on the foam pad before (pre-session) and after (post-session) the training sessions. In the post-session, the velocity and root mean square of COMAP in the COP + COG group were lower than those in the control group. In addition, the absolute value of the sum of the COP - COM distances in the COP + COG group was lower than that in the COP group. Furthermore, positive correlations were found between the COMAP velocity and COP - COM parameters. The results suggest that the novel visual feedback training that

  14. Providing feedback following Leadership WalkRounds is associated with better patient safety culture, higher employee engagement and lower burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, J Bryan; Adair, Kathryn C; Leonard, Michael W; Frankel, Terri Christensen; Proulx, Joshua; Watson, Sam R; Magnus, Brooke; Bogan, Brittany; Jamal, Maleek; Schwendimann, Rene; Frankel, Allan S

    2017-10-09

    There is a poorly understood relationship between Leadership WalkRounds (WR) and domains such as safety culture, employee engagement, burnout and work-life balance. This cross-sectional survey study evaluated associations between receiving feedback about actions taken as a result of WR and healthcare worker assessments of patient safety culture, employee engagement, burnout and work-life balance, across 829 work settings. 16 797 of 23 853 administered surveys were returned (70.4%). 5497 (32.7% of total) reported that they had participated in WR, and 4074 (24.3%) reported that they participated in WR with feedback. Work settings reporting more WR with feedback had substantially higher safety culture domain scores (first vs fourth quartile Cohen's d range: 0.34-0.84; % increase range: 15-27) and significantly higher engagement scores for four of its six domains (first vs fourth quartile Cohen's d range: 0.02-0.76; % increase range: 0.48-0.70). This WR study of patient safety and organisational outcomes tested relationships with a comprehensive set of safety culture and engagement metrics in the largest sample of hospitals and respondents to date. Beyond measuring simply whether WRs occur, we examine WR with feedback, as WR being done well. We suggest that when WRs are conducted, acted on, and the results are fed back to those involved, the work setting is a better place to deliver and receive care as assessed across a broad range of metrics, including teamwork, safety, leadership, growth opportunities, participation in decision-making and the emotional exhaustion component of burnout. Whether WR with feedback is a manifestation of better norms, or a cause of these norms, is unknown, but the link is demonstrably potent. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Feedback: Breakfast of Champions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justman, Jeffrey J.

    Feedback is an important skill that people need to learn in life. Feedback is crucial in a public speaking class to improve speaking skills. Providing and receiving feedback is what champions feed on to be successful, thus feedback is called the "Breakfast of Champions." Feedback builds speakers' confidence. Providing in-depth feedback…

  16. Cutaneous Feedback of Fingertip Deformation and Vibration for Palpation in Robotic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacchierotti, Claudio; Prattichizzo, Domenico; Kuchenbecker, Katherine J

    2016-02-01

    Despite its expected clinical benefits, current teleoperated surgical robots do not provide the surgeon with haptic feedback largely because grounded forces can destabilize the system's closed-loop controller. This paper presents an alternative approach that enables the surgeon to feel fingertip contact deformations and vibrations while guaranteeing the teleoperator's stability. We implemented our cutaneous feedback solution on an Intuitive Surgical da Vinci Standard robot by mounting a SynTouch BioTac tactile sensor to the distal end of a surgical instrument and a custom cutaneous display to the corresponding master controller. As the user probes the remote environment, the contact deformations, dc pressure, and ac pressure (vibrations) sensed by the BioTac are directly mapped to input commands for the cutaneous device's motors using a model-free algorithm based on look-up tables. The cutaneous display continually moves, tilts, and vibrates a flat plate at the operator's fingertip to optimally reproduce the tactile sensations experienced by the BioTac. We tested the proposed approach by having eighteen subjects use the augmented da Vinci robot to palpate a heart model with no haptic feedback, only deformation feedback, and deformation plus vibration feedback. Fingertip deformation feedback significantly improved palpation performance by reducing the task completion time, the pressure exerted on the heart model, and the subject's absolute error in detecting the orientation of the embedded plastic stick. Vibration feedback significantly improved palpation performance only for the seven subjects who dragged the BioTac across the model, rather than pressing straight into it.

  17. Investigating the Practice of Providing Written Corrective Feedback Types by ESL Teachers at the Upper Secondary Level in High Performance Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Norasyikin

    2016-01-01

    The past few decades has seen the rapid development of WCF (written corrective feedback) study. The present study examined the practice of providing WCF by teachers. The aim of this study was to determine the types of WCF used by English teachers. The study is an explanatory sequential mixed-methods design using open-ended and close-ended survey…

  18. A Three-Axis Force Sensor for Dual Finger Haptic Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Salsedo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present the design process, the characterization and testing of a novel three-axis mechanical force sensor. This sensor is optimized for use in closed-loop force control of haptic devices with three degrees of freedom. In particular the sensor has been conceived for integration with a dual finger haptic interface that aims at simulating forces that occur during grasping and surface exploration. The sensing spring structure has been purposely designed in order to match force and layout specifications for the application. In this paper the design of the sensor is presented, starting from an analytic model that describes the characteristic matrix of the sensor. A procedure for designing an optimal overload protection mechanism is proposed. In the last part of the paper the authors describe the experimental characterization and the integrated test on a haptic hand exoskeleton showing the improvements in the controller performances provided by the inclusion of the force sensor.

  19. A Heuristic Force Model for Haptic Simulation of Nasogastric Tube Insertion Using Fuzzy Logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kup-Sze; He, Xue-Jian; Chiang, Vico C L; Deng, Zhaohong; Qin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Nasogastric tube (NGT) placement is an essential clinical skill. The training is conventionally performed on rubber mannequins albeit practical limitations. Computer simulation with haptic feedback can potentially offer a more realistic and accessible training method. However, the complex interactions between the tube and the nasogastric passage make it difficult to model the haptic feedback during NGT placement. In this paper, a fuzzy-logic-based approach is proposed to directly transfer the experience of clinicians in NGT placement into the simulation system. Based on their perception of the varying tactile sensation and the conditions during NGT placement, the membership functions and fuzzy rules are defined to develop the force model. Forces created using the model are then combined with friction forces to drive the haptic device and render the insertion forces in real time. A prototype simulator is developed based on the proposed force model and the implementation details are presented. The usability of the prototype is also evaluated by clinical teachers. The proposed methodology has the potential for developing computerized NGT placement training methods for clinical education. It is also applicable for simulation systems involving complicated force interactions or computation-expensive models.

  20. Providing time-discrete gait information by wearable feedback apparatus for lower-limb amputees: usability and functional validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crea, Simona; Cipriani, Christian; Donati, Marco; Carrozza, Maria Chiara; Vitiello, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Here we describe a novel wearable feedback apparatus for lower-limb amputees. The system is based on three modules: a pressure-sensitive insole for the measurement of the plantar pressure distribution under the prosthetic foot during gait, a computing unit for data processing and gait segmentation, and a set of vibrating elements placed on the thigh skin. The feedback strategy relies on the detection of specific gait-phase transitions of the amputated leg. Vibrating elements are activated in a time-discrete manner, simultaneously with the occurrence of the detected gait-phase transitions. Usability and effectiveness of the apparatus were successfully assessed through an experimental validation involving ten healthy volunteers.

  1. Enhancing emotion recognition in vips with haptic feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buimer, Hendrik; Bittner, Marian; Kostelijk, Tjerk; van der Geest, Thea; van Wezel, Richard Jack Anton; Zhao, Yan; Stephanidis, C

    2016-01-01

    The rise of smart technologies has created new opportunities to support blind and visually impaired persons (VIPs). One of the biggest problems we identified in our previous research on problems VIPs face during activities of daily life concerned the recognition of persons and their facial

  2. Using haptic feedback to increase seat belt use : traffic tech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The legacy of research on increasing seat belt use has : focused on enactment of seat belt legislation, public education, : high-visibility police enforcement, and seat belt : reminder systems. Several behavioral programs have : produced large, susta...

  3. Ambient visual information confers a context-specific, long-term benefit on memory for haptic scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualotto, Achille; Finucane, Ciara M; Newell, Fiona N

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the effects of indirect, ambient visual information on haptic spatial memory. Using touch only, participants first learned an array of objects arranged in a scene and were subsequently tested on their recognition of that scene which was always hidden from view. During haptic scene exploration, participants could either see the surrounding room or were blindfolded. We found a benefit in haptic memory performance only when ambient visual information was available in the early stages of the task but not when participants were initially blindfolded. Specifically, when ambient visual information was available a benefit on performance was found in a subsequent block of trials during which the participant was blindfolded (Experiment 1), and persisted over a delay of one week (Experiment 2). However, we found that the benefit for ambient visual information did not transfer to a novel environment (Experiment 3). In Experiment 4 we further investigated the nature of the visual information that improved haptic memory and found that geometric information about a surrounding (virtual) room rather than isolated object landmarks, facilitated haptic scene memory. Our results suggest that vision improves haptic memory for scenes by providing an environment-centred, allocentric reference frame for representing object location through touch. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Improved haptic interface for colonoscopy simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hyun Soo; Kim, Woo Seok; Ahn, Woojin; Lee, Doo Yong; Yi, Sun Young

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an improved haptic interface of the KAIST-Ewha colonoscopy simulator II. The haptic interface enables the distal portion of the colonoscope to be freely bent while guaranteeing enough workspace and reflective forces for colonoscopy simulation. Its force-torque sensor measures profiles of the user. Manipulation of the colonoscope tip is monitored by four deflection sensors, and triggers computation to render accurate graphic images corresponding to the angle knob rotation. Tack switches are attached on the valve-actuation buttons of the colonoscope to simulate air-injection or suction, and the corresponding deformation of the colon.

  5. Limited value of haptics in virtual reality laparoscopic cholecystectomy training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jonathan R; Leonard, Anthony C; Doarn, Charles R; Roesch, Matt J; Broderick, Timothy J

    2011-04-01

    Haptics is an expensive addition to virtual reality (VR) simulators, and the added value to training has not been proven. This study evaluated the benefit of haptics in VR laparoscopic surgery training for novices. The Simbionix LapMentor II haptic VR simulator was used in the study. Randomly, 33 laparoscopic novice students were placed in one of three groups: control, haptics-trained, or nonhaptics-trained group. The control group performed nine basic laparoscopy tasks and four cholecystectomy procedural tasks one time with haptics engaged at the default setting. The haptics group was trained to proficiency in the basic tasks and then performed each of the procedural tasks one time with haptics engaged. The nonhaptics group used the same training protocol except that haptics was disengaged. The proficiency values used were previously published expert values. Each group was assessed in the performance of 10 laparoscopic cholecystectomies (alternating with and without haptics). Performance was measured via automatically collected simulator data. The three groups exhibited no differences in terms of sex, education level, hand dominance, video game experience, surgical experience, and nonsurgical simulator experience. The number of attempts required to reach proficiency did not differ between the haptics- and nonhaptics-training groups. The haptics and nonhaptics groups exhibited no difference in performance. Both training groups outperformed the control group in number of movements as well as path length of the left instrument. In addition, the nonhaptics group outperformed the control group in total time. Haptics does not improve the efficiency or effectiveness of LapMentor II VR laparoscopic surgery training. The limited benefit and the significant cost of haptics suggest that haptics should not be included routinely in VR laparoscopic surgery training.

  6. Evaluating Author and User Experience for an Audio-Haptic System for Annotation of Physical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, James M; Miele, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    We describe three usability studies involving a prototype system for creation and haptic exploration of labeled locations on 3D objects. The system uses a computer, webcam, and fiducial markers to associate a physical 3D object in the camera's view with a predefined digital map of labeled locations ("hotspots"), and to do real-time finger tracking, allowing a blind or visually impaired user to explore the object and hear individual labels spoken as each hotspot is touched. This paper describes: (a) a formative study with blind users exploring pre-annotated objects to assess system usability and accuracy; (b) a focus group of blind participants who used the system and, through structured and unstructured discussion, provided feedback on its practicality, possible applications, and real-world potential; and (c) a formative study in which a sighted adult used the system to add labels to on-screen images of objects, demonstrating the practicality of remote annotation of 3D models. These studies and related literature suggest potential for future iterations of the system to benefit blind and visually impaired users in educational, professional, and recreational contexts.

  7. Evaluation of a haptics-based virtual reality temporal bone simulator for anatomy and surgery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Te-Yung; Wang, Pa-Chun; Liu, Chih-Hsien; Su, Mu-Chun; Yeh, Shih-Ching

    2014-02-01

    Virtual reality simulation training may improve knowledge of anatomy and surgical skills. We evaluated a 3-dimensional, haptic, virtual reality temporal bone simulator for dissection training. The subjects were 7 otolaryngology residents (3 training sessions each) and 7 medical students (1 training session each). The virtual reality temporal bone simulation station included a computer with software that was linked to a force-feedback hand stylus, and the system recorded performance and collisions with vital anatomic structures. Subjects performed virtual reality dissections and completed questionnaires after the training sessions. Residents and students had favorable responses to most questions of the technology acceptance model (TAM) questionnaire. The average TAM scores were above neutral for residents and medical students in all domains, and the average TAM score for residents was significantly higher for the usefulness domain and lower for the playful domain than students. The average satisfaction questionnaire for residents showed that residents had greater overall satisfaction with cadaver temporal bone dissection training than training with the virtual reality simulator or plastic temporal bone. For medical students, the average comprehension score was significantly increased from before to after training for all anatomic structures. Medical students had significantly more collisions with the dura than residents. The residents had similar mean performance scores after the first and third training sessions for all dissection procedures. The virtual reality temporal bone simulator provided satisfactory training for otolaryngology residents and medical students. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. A flexible tactile-feedback touch screen using transparent ferroelectric polymer film vibrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Woo-Eon; Moon, Yong-Ju; Park, Cheon-Ho; Choi, Seung Tae

    2014-07-01

    To provide tactile feedback on flexible touch screens, transparent relaxor ferroelectric polymer film vibrators were designed and fabricated in this study. The film vibrator can be integrated underneath a transparent cover film or glass, and can also produce acoustic waves that cause a tactile sensation on human fingertips. Poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene-chlorotrifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE-CTFE)] polymer was used as the relaxor ferroelectric polymer because it produces a large strain under applied electric fields, shows a fast response, and has excellent optical transparency. The natural frequency of this tactile-feedback touch screen was designed to be around 200-240 Hz, at which the haptic perception of human fingertips is the most sensitive; therefore, the resonance of the touch screen at its natural frequency provides maximum haptic sensation. A multilayered relaxor ferroelectric polymer film vibrator was also demonstrated to provide the same vibration power at reduced voltage. The flexible P(VDF-TrFE-CTFE) film vibrators developed in this study are expected to provide tactile sensation not only in large-area flat panel displays, but also in flexible displays and touch screens.

  9. Somato-motor haptic processing in posterior inner perisylvian region (SII/pIC) of the macaque monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Hiroaki; Fornia, Luca; Grandi, Laura Clara; Umiltà, Maria Alessandra; Gallese, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    The posterior inner perisylvian region including the secondary somatosensory cortex (area SII) and the adjacent region of posterior insular cortex (pIC) has been implicated in haptic processing by integrating somato-motor information during hand-manipulation, both in humans and in non-human primates. However, motor-related properties during hand-manipulation are still largely unknown. To investigate a motor-related activity in the hand region of SII/pIC, two macaque monkeys were trained to perform a hand-manipulation task, requiring 3 different grip types (precision grip, finger exploration, side grip) both in light and in dark conditions. Our results showed that 70% (n = 33/48) of task related neurons within SII/pIC were only activated during monkeys' active hand-manipulation. Of those 33 neurons, 15 (45%) began to discharge before hand-target contact, while the remaining neurons were tonically active after contact. Thirty-percent (n = 15/48) of studied neurons responded to both passive somatosensory stimulation and to the motor task. A consistent percentage of task-related neurons in SII/pIC was selectively activated during finger exploration (FE) and precision grasping (PG) execution, suggesting they play a pivotal role in control skilled finger movements. Furthermore, hand-manipulation-related neurons also responded when visual feedback was absent in the dark. Altogether, our results suggest that somato-motor neurons in SII/pIC likely contribute to haptic processing from the initial to the final phase of grasping and object manipulation. Such motor-related activity could also provide the somato-motor binding principle enabling the translation of diachronic somatosensory inputs into a coherent image of the explored object.

  10. Somato-motor haptic processing in posterior inner perisylvian region (SII/pIC of the macaque monkey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Ishida

    Full Text Available The posterior inner perisylvian region including the secondary somatosensory cortex (area SII and the adjacent region of posterior insular cortex (pIC has been implicated in haptic processing by integrating somato-motor information during hand-manipulation, both in humans and in non-human primates. However, motor-related properties during hand-manipulation are still largely unknown. To investigate a motor-related activity in the hand region of SII/pIC, two macaque monkeys were trained to perform a hand-manipulation task, requiring 3 different grip types (precision grip, finger exploration, side grip both in light and in dark conditions. Our results showed that 70% (n = 33/48 of task related neurons within SII/pIC were only activated during monkeys' active hand-manipulation. Of those 33 neurons, 15 (45% began to discharge before hand-target contact, while the remaining neurons were tonically active after contact. Thirty-percent (n = 15/48 of studied neurons responded to both passive somatosensory stimulation and to the motor task. A consistent percentage of task-related neurons in SII/pIC was selectively activated during finger exploration (FE and precision grasping (PG execution, suggesting they play a pivotal role in control skilled finger movements. Furthermore, hand-manipulation-related neurons also responded when visual feedback was absent in the dark. Altogether, our results suggest that somato-motor neurons in SII/pIC likely contribute to haptic processing from the initial to the final phase of grasping and object manipulation. Such motor-related activity could also provide the somato-motor binding principle enabling the translation of diachronic somatosensory inputs into a coherent image of the explored object.

  11. Mediating Haptic Exploratory Strategies in Children Who Have Visual Impairment and Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLinden, M.

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a synthesis of literature pertaining to the development of haptic exploratory strategies in children who have visual impairment and intellectual disabilities. The information received through such strategies assumes particular significance for these children, given the restricted information available through their visual…

  12. The Hedonic Haptics Player: A Wearable Device to Experience Vibrotactile Compositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boer, Laurens; Vallgårda, Anna; Cahill, Ben

    2017-01-01

    The Hedonic Haptics player is a portable wearable device that plays back vibrotactile compositions. It consists of three domes each of which houses a vibration motor providing vibrotactile sensations to the wearer. The domes are connected to a control unit the size of a small Walkman. The Hedonic...

  13. Social Touch Technology: A Survey of Haptic Technology for Social Touch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, Gijs

    2017-01-01

    This survey provides an overview of work on haptic technology for social touch. Social touch has been studied extensively in psychology and neuroscience. With the development of new technologies, it is now possible to engage in social touch at a distance or engage in social touch with artificial

  14. Slave-side devices for micromanipulation in a haptic teleoperation scenario

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Estevez Castillo, P.

    2012-01-01

    Haptic teleoperation is a promising approach for dealing with the manipulation of micro-objects, fabricated in small series or as prototypes, and in processes which are novel or uncertain. Human operators provide their ability to plan, understand and react when faced with unexpected situations

  15. A haptic floor for interaction and diagnostics with goal based tasks during virtual reality supported balance training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Krpič

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Balance training of patients after stroke is one of the primary tasks of physiotherapy after the hospitalization. It is based on the intensive training, which consists of simple, repetitive, goal-based tasks. The tasks are carried out by physiotherapists, who follow predefined protocols. Introduction of a standing frame and a virtual reality decrease the physical load and number of required physiotherapists. The patients benefit in terms of safety and increased motivation. Additional feedbackhaptic floor can enhance the virtual reality experience, add additional level of difficulty and could be also used for generating postural perturbations. The purpose of this article is to examine whether haptic information can be used to identify specific anomalies in dynamic posturography.Methods: The performance and stability of closed-loop system of the haptic floor were tested using frequency analysis. A postural response normative was set up from data assessed in four healthy individuals who were exposed to unexpected movements of the haptic floor in eight directions. Postural responses of a patient after stroke participating in virtual reality supported balance training, where collisions resulted in floor movements, were assessed and contrasted to the normative.Results: Haptic floor system was stable and controllable up to the frequency of 1.1 Hz, sufficient for the generation of postural perturbations. Responses obtained after perturbations in two major directions for a patient after stroke demonstrated noticeable deviations from the normative.Conclusions: Haptic floor design, together with a standing frame and a virtual reality used for balance training, enables an assessment of directionally specific postural responses. The system was designed to identify postural disorders during balance training and rehabilitation progress outside specialized clinics, e.g. at patient’s home.

  16. Giving Form to a Hedonic Haptics Player

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boer, Laurens; Vallgårda, Anna; Cahill, Ben

    2017-01-01

    In this pictorial we present the form-giving process of a Hedonic Haptic player, a wearable device that plays vibrotactile patterns on the body. We depict how we explored the aesthetics of the vibrotactile design space, how we constructed a platform as body of a hedonic experience, and how we...

  17. Local surface orientation dominates haptic curvature discrimination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijntjes, M.W.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831816; Sato, A.; Hayward, V.; Kappers, A.M.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07445370X

    2009-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that local surface orientation is a dominant source of information for haptic curvature perception in static conditions. We show that this dominance holds for dynamic touch, just as was shown earlier for static touch. Using an apparatus specifically developed for this

  18. Testing haptic sensations for spinal anesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-01-01

    Having identified key determinants of teaching and learning spinal anesthesia, it was necessary to characterize and render the haptic sensations (feeling of touch) associated with needle insertion in the lower back. The approach used is to match recreated sensations (eg, "pop" through skin or dura mater) with experts\\' perceptions of the equivalent clinical events.

  19. Haptic interventions as visual anthropology’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirstein Høgel, Arine

    2017-01-01

    This vignette arose in the course of a practice-led research project using “haptic interventions” to investigate contemporary consumption of cultural pasts and cultural difference. The vignette presents reworkings of unused and newly digitised archival material shot in the Persian Gulf in the 195...

  20. Representations of space based on haptic input

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidhoek, S.

    2005-01-01

    The present thesis focused on the representations of grasping space based on haptic input. We aimed at identifying their characteristics, and the underlying neurocognitive processes and mechanisms. To this end, we studied the systematic distortions in performance on several orientation perception

  1. Haptics Application in Dentistry: Is the Time Poised Yet?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Sulugodu Ramachandra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The essence of dental education is not only to impart knowledge but also to equip an aspiring clinician with all the para-phernalia to face most clinical situations if not all. What be-comes important here is the requirement that a student be not only observant but also have a precise idea of what a lesion or a surface should feel like under an instrument. No matter how far we have come in terms of pathogenesis and treatment of diseases of the oral cavity, there is still no one good way to teach a student about the tactile sense, be it while de-tecting calculus/caries or placing the incisions or detecting the smoothness of a restoration. Most often than not students learn these by a trial and error method. A not-so-recent development called Haptics may well be the answer to this predicament, at least in the near future. The concept which is extensively in use and indis-pensable in other fields like aviation, telecommunication etc is now making inroads into dentistry. It is essentially software which brings in the idea of giving the feedback response to applied force, be it simple exploration of caries or the fine pressure applied in placing an incision or an array of other areas/situations in dentistry where fine tactile sense becomes a prerequisite for intelligent diagnoses or cutting edge treatment procedures. The following write-up is an attempt to throw light on this new technology and the impact it may have on pre-clinical teaching in dentistry. The advantages, disadvantages be-tween manikin based dental simulators and haptics based dental simulators are also pre-sented.

  2. Haptic devices as a paradigm to enhance learning/function--theory and empirical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repperger, D W; Phillips, C A

    2010-01-01

    Haptics is a modern term employed to describe both afferent and efferent flows of forces with humans. The appropriate design of these force flow fields when coordinated with information to and from computers and other devices to physically challenged individuals can empower the performance of certain tasks previously not attainable. Extensive empirical work presented herein has demonstrated that proper augmentation of particular dynamic force fields, synchronised with certain cognitive tasks, can lead to improved functionality. More specifically, studies in spasticity, weaken responses and having delayed human response can benefit from these exposures to force fields applied suitably. From a theoretical perspective, the use of the well-known Fitts' law provides a unifying framework from which one can quantify the benefits derived from the proper exposure to force fields. Another area where haptics offers an exciting new platform to transfer information to and from humans includes subliminal haptics. This provides a paradigm to improve situational awareness and enhances control capability, where it may be missing previously. This article updates how haptics can be used in a variety of empirical settings to enhance learning, modulate human response to assist task completion, present a theoretical framework and improve the self-esteem of physically challenged individuals.

  3. Development of a visio-haptic integrated dental training simulation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konukseven, E Ilhan; Onder, M Ercument; Mumcuoglu, Erkan; Kisnisci, Reha Sukru

    2010-08-01

    The use of haptic devices in the medical field has become widespread in the last decade. In this study, a visio-haptic dental training system is developed using haptic and stereoscopic devices. Several advantages are offered by such a simulation system, including effective learning without any fear of making mistakes on a patient, possibility of repeating various dental operations, ease of evaluating student performance, and low-cost dental training even without an instructor. In this study, the biomechanical properties of enamel, dentin, pulp, and caries were modeled, and the parameters were fine-tuned to provide more realistic haptic sensations. Maxillary and mandibular dental arches and various dental instruments such as mouth mirror, probe, and dental drills were modeled in a 3D virtual environment. Probing and cavity preparation on teeth were implemented in the training system. Various graphical rendering methods (Surface Rendering in CPU, Iso-Surface Rendering, and Ray-Casting in GPU) were implemented and compared in performance. The implementation details and the software structure used are described. Finally, detailed performance tests by a group of dentists are conducted, and the results of these tests are presented. The performance tests found that dentists have a strong motivation to use the system and that in the aspects of usability, clarity, effectiveness, help/support provided, and satisfaction, the users' responses were above average.

  4. Combining the formative with the summative: the development of a two-stage online test to encourage engagement and provide personal feedback in large classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Voelkel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this action research project was to improve student learning by encouraging more “time on task” and to improve self-assessment and feedback through the introduction of weekly online tests in a Year 2 lecture module in biological sciences. Initially voluntary online tests were offered to students and those who participated achieved higher exam marks than those who did not, but completion rate was low. Making the tests compulsory led to high completion rates, but class performance decreased, indicating that using the same assessment for formative and for summative purposes is not always beneficial for learning. Finally, these problems were resolved by introducing a two-stage approach: the first stage of each test was formative and provided prompt feedback. However, students had to achieve 80% to progress to the second summative stage of the test. The two-stage online tests led to significantly improved class performance. This novel test design ensures that students go through at least two attempts and therefore fully benefit from the learning opportunities presented by the formative stage. Two-stage online tests present the opportunity to provide regular feedback in large classes and to improve performance not only of good but also of “weak” students.

  5. How to improve prescription of inhaled salbutamol by providing standardised feedback on administration: a controlled intervention pilot study with follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neininger, Martina P; Kaune, Almuth; Bertsche, Astrid; Rink, Jessica; Musiol, Juliane; Frontini, Roberto; Prenzel, Freerk; Kiess, Wieland; Bertsche, Thilo

    2015-01-28

    The effectiveness of inhaled salbutamol in routine care depends particularly on prescribed dosage and applied inhalation technique. To achieve maximum effectiveness and to prevent drug-related problems, prescription and administration need to work in concert. We performed a controlled intervention pilot study with 4 consecutive groups in a general paediatric unit and assessed problems in salbutamol prescribing and administration. Control group [i]: Routine care without additional support. First intervention group [ii]: We carried out a teaching session for nurses aimed at preventing problems in inhalation technique. Independently from this, a pharmacist counselled physicians on problems in salbutamol prescribing. Second intervention group [iii]: Additionally to the first intervention, physicians received standardised feedback on the inhalation technique. Follow-up group [iv]: Subsequently, without any delay after the second intervention group had been completed, sustainability of the measures was assessed. We performed the chi-square test to calculate the level of significance with p ≤ 0.05 to indicate a statistically significant difference for the primary outcome. As we performed multiple testing, an adjusted p ≤ 0.01 according to Bonferroni correction was considered as significant. We included a total of 225 patients. By counselling the physicians, we reduced the number of patients with problems from 55% to 43% (control [i] vs. first intervention [ii], n.s.). With additional feedback to physicians, this number was further reduced to 25% ([i] vs. [iii], p < 0.001). In the follow-up [iv], the number rose again to 48% (p < 0.01 compared to feedback group). Teaching nurses, counselling physicians, and providing feedback on the quality of inhalation technique effectively reduced problems in salbutamol treatment. However, for success to be sustained, continuous support needs to be provided. German Clinical Trials register: DRKS00006792 .

  6. Memory for curvature of objects: Haptic touch vs. vision

    OpenAIRE

    Ittyerah, Miriam; Lawrence E Marks

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the role of vision and haptics in memory for stimulus objects that vary along the dimension of curvature. Experiment 1 measured haptic–haptic (T–T) and haptic–visual (T–V) discrimination of curvature in a short-term memory paradigm, using 30-second retention intervals containing five different interpolated tasks. Results showed poorest performance when the interpolated tasks required spatial processing or movement, thereby suggesting that haptic information about sh...

  7. Haptic sense and the politicization of contemporary image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarcisio Torres Silva

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, it is intended to propose a theoretical approach to the political effects of the sense of touch/haptic in order to understand to what extent the intensification of contemporary haptic experience contributes to create proximity and engagement among individuals overloaded by too much visual information offered by multiple media. At the end, it is mentioned the work of Brazilian artist Rodrigo Braga to exemplify the contemporary political use of haptic sense.

  8. A 4-DOF haptic master using ER fluid for minimally invasive surgery system application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jong-Seok; Han, Young-Min; Lee, Sang-Rock; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a novel 4-degrees-of-freedom (4-DOF) haptic master using a electrorheological (ER) fluid which is applicable to minimally invasive surgery (MIS) systems. By adopting a controllable ER fluid, the master can easily generate 4-DOF repulsive forces with the advantages of a simple mechanism and continuous force control capability. The proposed master consists of two actuators: an ER spherical joint for 3-DOF rotational motion and an ER piston device for 1-DOF translational motion. The generated torque/force models are mathematically derived by analyzing the mechanism geometry and using the Bingham characteristics of an ER Fluid. The haptic master is optimally designed and manufactured based on the mathematical torque/force models. The repulsive torque/force responses are experimentally evaluated and expressed by the first-order and second-order dynamic equations for each motion. A sliding mode controller (SMC), which is known to be robust to uncertainties, is then designed and empirically implemented to achieve the desired torque/force trajectories. It is demonstrated by presenting torque/force tracking results of both rotational and translational motions that the proposed 4-DOF ER haptic master integrated with the SMC can provide an effective haptic control performance for MIS applications.

  9. Towards a modified consumer haptic device for robotic-assisted fine-motor repetitive motion training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsbo, Susan E; Marr, Deborah; Streng, Taylor; Bay, Brian K; Norblad, A Walter

    2011-01-01

    To develop, test and evaluate affordable haptic technology to provide robotic-assisted repetitive motion fine-motor training. A haptic computer/user interface was modified by adding a pantograph to hold a pen and to increase the haptic workspace. Custom software moves a pen attached to the device through prescribed three-dimensional (3D) stroke sequences to create two-dimensional glyphs. The pen's position is recorded in 3D coordinates at 1 kHz. Twenty-one healthy child volunteers were taught a standard handwriting curriculum in a group setting, two times per week for 45-60 min each session over 8 wks. The curriculum was supplemented by the device under the supervision of occupational therapy students. Outcomes were measured using the Evaluation Tool of Children's Handwriting (ETCH), and the Beery-Buktenica Developmental Test of visual-motor integration. Word legibility made significant gains on near point copying task (p=0.04; effect size=0.95). Letter legibility made no significant improvement. One healthy volunteer with illegible handwriting improved significantly on 8 of 14 ETCH measures. The children found the device engaging, but made several recommendations to redesign the pantograph and scribing movements. A consumer haptic device can be modified for robotic-assisted repetitive motion training for children. The device is affordable, portable, and engaging. It is safe for healthy volunteers. Objective time-stamped data offer the potential for telerehabilitation between a remote therapist and the school or home. © 2011 Informa UK, Ltd.

  10. When Neuroscience 'Touches' Architecture: From Hapticity to a Supramodal Functioning of the Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papale, Paolo; Chiesi, Leonardo; Rampinini, Alessandra C; Pietrini, Pietro; Ricciardi, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades, the rapid growth of functional brain imaging methodologies allowed cognitive neuroscience to address open questions in philosophy and social sciences. At the same time, novel insights from cognitive neuroscience research have begun to influence various disciplines, leading to a turn to cognition and emotion in the fields of planning and architectural design. Since 2003, the Academy of Neuroscience for Architecture has been supporting 'neuro-architecture' as a way to connect neuroscience and the study of behavioral responses to the built environment. Among the many topics related to multisensory perceptual integration and embodiment, the concept of hapticity was recently introduced, suggesting a pivotal role of tactile perception and haptic imagery in architectural appraisal. Arguments have thus risen in favor of the existence of shared cognitive foundations between hapticity and the supramodal functional architecture of the human brain. Precisely, supramodality refers to the functional feature of defined brain regions to process and represent specific information content in a more abstract way, independently of the sensory modality conveying such information to the brain. Here, we highlight some commonalities and differences between the concepts of hapticity and supramodality according to the distinctive perspectives of architecture and cognitive neuroscience. This comparison and connection between these two different approaches may lead to novel observations in regard to people-environment relationships, and even provide empirical foundations for a renewed evidence-based design theory.

  11. When Neuroscience ‘Touches’ Architecture: From Hapticity to a Supramodal Functioning of the Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papale, Paolo; Chiesi, Leonardo; Rampinini, Alessandra C.; Pietrini, Pietro; Ricciardi, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades, the rapid growth of functional brain imaging methodologies allowed cognitive neuroscience to address open questions in philosophy and social sciences. At the same time, novel insights from cognitive neuroscience research have begun to influence various disciplines, leading to a turn to cognition and emotion in the fields of planning and architectural design. Since 2003, the Academy of Neuroscience for Architecture has been supporting ‘neuro-architecture’ as a way to connect neuroscience and the study of behavioral responses to the built environment. Among the many topics related to multisensory perceptual integration and embodiment, the concept of hapticity was recently introduced, suggesting a pivotal role of tactile perception and haptic imagery in architectural appraisal. Arguments have thus risen in favor of the existence of shared cognitive foundations between hapticity and the supramodal functional architecture of the human brain. Precisely, supramodality refers to the functional feature of defined brain regions to process and represent specific information content in a more abstract way, independently of the sensory modality conveying such information to the brain. Here, we highlight some commonalities and differences between the concepts of hapticity and supramodality according to the distinctive perspectives of architecture and cognitive neuroscience. This comparison and connection between these two different approaches may lead to novel observations in regard to people–environment relationships, and even provide empirical foundations for a renewed evidence-based design theory. PMID:27375542

  12. Vibrotactile perception assessment for a haptic interface on an antigravity suit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Sang Min; Lee, Kwangil; Kim, Daeho; Ji, Yong Gu

    2017-01-01

    Haptic technology is used in various fields to transmit information to the user with or without visual and auditory cues. This study aimed to provide preliminary data for use in developing a haptic interface for an antigravity (anti-G) suit. With the structural characteristics of the anti-G suit in mind, we determined five areas on the body (lower back, outer thighs, inner thighs, outer calves, and inner calves) on which to install ten bar-type eccentric rotating mass (ERM) motors as vibration actuators. To determine the design factors of the haptic anti-G suit, we conducted three experiments to find the absolute threshold, moderate intensity, and subjective assessments of vibrotactile stimuli. Twenty-six fighter pilots participated in the experiments, which were conducted in a fixed-based flight simulator. From the results of our study, we recommend 1) absolute thresholds of ∼11.98-15.84 Hz and 102.01-104.06 dB, 2) moderate intensities of 74.36 Hz and 126.98 dB for the lower back and 58.65 Hz and 122.37 dB for either side of the thighs and calves, and 3) subjective assessments of vibrotactile stimuli (displeasure, easy to perceive, and level of comfort). The results of this study will be useful for the design of a haptic anti-G suit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Development and implementation of an objective structured clinical examination to provide formative feedback on communication and interpersonal skills in geriatric training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Patricia; Chao, Serena; Russell, Matthew; Levine, Sharon; Fabiny, Anne

    2008-09-01

    Teaching and assessment of communication and interpersonal skills, one of the American Council for Graduate Medical Education-designated core competencies, is an important but difficult task in the training of physicians. Assessment of trainees offers an opportunity to provide explicit feedback on their skills and encourages learning. This article describes a pilot study in which clinician-educators affiliated with the geriatrics training programs at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Boston University Medical Center designed and piloted a novel Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) to assess the communication and interpersonal skills of medical, dental, and geriatric psychiatry fellows. The OSCE consisted of three stations where geriatricians and standardized patients evaluated candidates using specifically designed checklists and an abbreviated version of the Master Interview Rating Scale. Communication skills were assessed through performance of specific "real life" clinical tasks, such as obtaining a medical history, explaining a diagnosis and prognosis, giving therapeutic instructions, and counseling. Interpersonal skills were assessed through the effect of the communication between doctor and standardized patient on fostering trust, relieving anxiety, and establishing a therapeutic relationship. This pilot study demonstrated that the OSCE format of assessment provides a valid means of evaluating the communication and interpersonal skills of interdisciplinary geriatric trainees and provides a valuable forum for formative assessment and feedback. Given that geriatricians and non geriatricians involved in elder care both need communication and interpersonal skills, this novel OSCE can be used for assessment of these skills in trainees in diverse healthcare subspecialties.

  14. Follower-Centered Perspective on Feedback: Effects of Feedback Seeking on Identification and Feedback Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Zhenxing; Li, Miaomiao; Qi, Yaoyuan; Zhang, Na

    2017-01-01

    In the formation mechanism of the feedback environment, the existing research pays attention to external feedback sources and regards individuals as objects passively accepting feedback. Thus, the external source fails to realize the individuals’ need for feedback, and the feedback environment cannot provide them with useful information, leading to a feedback vacuum. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of feedback-seeking by different strategies on the supervisor-feedback environme...

  15. Supporting Early Childhood Educators' Use of Embedded Communication Strategies by Providing Feedback via Bug-in-Ear Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggie, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between coaching provided with bug-in-ear technology, the frequency of the early childhood educators' use of targeted communication strategies and children's expressive communication. Four multiple-baseline single-case design experiments were completed to evaluate these relationships.…

  16. Providing Feedback, Orientation and Opportunities for Reflection as Key Elements for Successful Mentoring Programs: Reviewing a Program for Future Business Education Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Riebenbauer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The introduction to teaching is critical for novice teachers. Near the end of their master’s program, students of Business Education and Development in Austria spend one semester at an assigned school. They are introduced to teaching, while being assisted by peer students, mentoring teachers, and a companion course. Mentors receive special training and preparation in advance, thus contributing to a high quality mentoring program. The program is organized threefold: (1 providing feedback, (2 opportunities for reflection and (3 career orientation. The purpose of this paper is to assess key elements of successful mentoring programs and to question which competences of mentors contribute most to the success of those programs. Between 2012 and 2015, 188 persons (student teachers and their mentors responded to an online survey at the end of their mentoring program. Additionally, data from a study (1,245 questionnaires regarding the student teachers’ perception of their own competence was utilized, allowing for a comparison of student teacher confidence in their abilities before and after the mentoring program. The present results provide insight into the key elements of successful mentoring programs; both from a student teacher’s and mentor’s perspective. During the semester, students showed an increase regarding their self-perception of their professional competences. It was found that students and mentoring teachers valued feedback after each lesson more than feedback in regular meetings. Opportunities for reflection (e.g. exchange with peer students, learning diaries were considered helpful. The mentoring program helped students to decide whether to become a teacher or not.

  17. Dynamic Investigation Test-rig on hAptics (DITA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannella, F.; Scalise, L.; Olivieri, E.; Memeo, M.; Caldwell, D. G.

    2013-09-01

    Research on tactile sensitivity has been conducted since the last century and many devices have been proposed to study in detail this sense through experimental tests. The sense of touch is essential in every-day life of human beings, but it can also play a fundamental role for the assessment of some neurological disabilities and pathologies. In fact, the level of tactile perception can provide information on the health state of the nervous system. In this paper, authors propose the design and development of a novel test apparatus, named DITA (Dynamic Investigation Test-rig on hAptics), aiming to provide the measurement of the tactile sensitivity trough the determination of the Just Noticeable Difference (JND) curve of a subject. The paper reports the solution adopted for the system design and the results obtained on the set of experiments carried out on volunteers.

  18. The effects of aging on haptic 2D shape recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overvliet, K.E.; Wagemans, J.; Krampe, R.T.

    2013-01-01

    We use the image-mediation model (Klatzky & Lederman, 1987) as a framework to investigate potential sources of adult age differences in the haptic recognition of two-dimensional (2D) shapes. This model states that the low-resolution, temporally sequential, haptic input is translated into a visual

  19. Haptic space processing - Allocentric and egocentric reference frames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappers, Astrid M L

    In this paper a haptic matching task is used to analyze haptic spatial processing. In various conditions, blindfolded participants were asked to make a test bar parallel to a reference bar. This always resulted in large but systematic deviations. It will be shown that the results can be described

  20. Haptic spatial configuration learning in deaf and hearing individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, R; Kappers, A.M.L.; Postma, A.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated haptic spatial configuration learning in deaf individuals, hearing sign language interpreters and hearing controls. In three trials, participants had to match ten shapes haptically to the cut-outs in a board as fast as possible. Deaf and hearing sign language users

  1. Multisensory Interactions between Auditory and Haptic Object Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassuba, Tanja; Menz, Mareike M; R�der, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    they matched a target object to a sample object within and across audition and touch. By introducing a delay between the presentation of sample and target stimuli, it was possible to dissociate haptic-to-auditory and auditory-to-haptic matching. We hypothesized that only semantically coherent auditory...... and haptic object features activate cortical regions that host unified conceptual object representations. The left fusiform gyrus (FG) and posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) showed increased activation during crossmodal matching of semantically congruent but not incongruent object stimuli. In the FG......, this effect was found for haptic-to-auditory and auditory-to-haptic matching, whereas the pSTS only displayed a crossmodal matching effect for congruent auditory targets. Auditory and somatosensory association cortices showed increased activity during crossmodal object matching which was, however, independent...

  2. Haptic palpation for medical simulation in virtual environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Sebastian; Kuhlen, Torsten

    2012-04-01

    Palpation is a physical examination technique where objects, e.g., organs or body parts, are touched with fingers to determine their size, shape, consistency and location. Many medical procedures utilize palpation as a supplementary interaction technique and it can be therefore considered as an essential basic method. However, palpation is mostly neglected in medical training simulators, with the exception of very specialized simulators that solely focus on palpation, e.g., for manual cancer detection. In this article we propose a novel approach to enable haptic palpation interaction for virtual reality-based medical simulators. The main contribution is an extensive user study conducted with a large group of medical experts. To provide a plausible simulation framework for this user study, we contribute a novel and detailed interaction algorithm for palpation with tissue dragging, which utilizes a multi-object force algorithm to support multiple layers of anatomy and a pulse force algorithm for simulation of an arterial pulse. Furthermore, we propose a modification for an off–the–shelf haptic device by adding a lightweight palpation pad to support a more realistic finger grip configuration for palpation tasks. The user study itself has been conducted on a medical training simulator prototype with a specific procedure from regional anesthesia, which strongly depends on palpation. The prototype utilizes a co-rotational finite-element approach for soft tissue simulation and provides bimanual interaction by combining the aforementioned techniques with needle insertion for the other hand. The results of the user study suggest reasonable face validity of the simulator prototype and in particular validate medical plausibility of the proposed palpation interaction algorithm.

  3. Audio Feedback -- Better Feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel, Susanne; Mello, Luciane V.

    2014-01-01

    National Student Survey (NSS) results show that many students are dissatisfied with the amount and quality of feedback they get for their work. This study reports on two case studies in which we tried to address these issues by introducing audio feedback to one undergraduate (UG) and one postgraduate (PG) class, respectively. In case study one…

  4. Social Touch Technology: A Survey of Haptic Technology for Social Touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Gijs

    2017-01-01

    This survey provides an overview of work on haptic technology for social touch. Social touch has been studied extensively in psychology and neuroscience. With the development of new technologies, it is now possible to engage in social touch at a distance or engage in social touch with artificial social agents. Social touch research has inspired research into technology mediated social touch, and this line of research has found effects similar to actual social touch. The importance of haptic stimulus qualities, multimodal cues, and contextual factors in technology mediated social touch is discussed. This survey is concluded by reflecting on the current state of research into social touch technology, and providing suggestions for future research and applications.

  5. Enhancing Mediated Interpersonal Communication through Affective Haptics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsetserukou, Dzmitry; Neviarouskaya, Alena; Prendinger, Helmut; Kawakami, Naoki; Ishizuka, Mitsuru; Tachi, Susumu

    Driven by the motivation to enhance emotionally immersive experience of real-time messaging in 3D virtual world Second Life, we are proposing a conceptually novel approach to reinforcing (intensifying) own feelings and reproducing (simulating) the emotions felt by the partner through specially designed system, iFeel_IM!. In the paper we are describing the development of novel haptic devices (HaptiHeart, HaptiHug, HaptiTickler, HaptiCooler, and HaptiWarmer) integrated into iFeel_IM! system, which architecture is presented in detail.

  6. A brain-computer interface with vibrotactile biofeedback for haptic information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acharya Soumyadipta

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been suggested that Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI may one day be suitable for controlling a neuroprosthesis. For closed-loop operation of BCI, a tactile feedback channel that is compatible with neuroprosthetic applications is desired. Operation of an EEG-based BCI using only vibrotactile feedback, a commonly used method to convey haptic senses of contact and pressure, is demonstrated with a high level of accuracy. Methods A Mu-rhythm based BCI using a motor imagery paradigm was used to control the position of a virtual cursor. The cursor position was shown visually as well as transmitted haptically by modulating the intensity of a vibrotactile stimulus to the upper limb. A total of six subjects operated the BCI in a two-stage targeting task, receiving only vibrotactile biofeedback of performance. The location of the vibration was also systematically varied between the left and right arms to investigate location-dependent effects on performance. Results and Conclusion Subjects are able to control the BCI using only vibrotactile feedback with an average accuracy of 56% and as high as 72%. These accuracies are significantly higher than the 15% predicted by random chance if the subject had no voluntary control of their Mu-rhythm. The results of this study demonstrate that vibrotactile feedback is an effective biofeedback modality to operate a BCI using motor imagery. In addition, the study shows that placement of the vibrotactile stimulation on the biceps ipsilateral or contralateral to the motor imagery introduces a significant bias in the BCI accuracy. This bias is consistent with a drop in performance generated by stimulation of the contralateral limb. Users demonstrated the capability to overcome this bias with training.

  7. A ?virtually minimal? visuo-haptic training of attention in severe traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Dvorkin, Assaf Y; Ramaiya, Milan; Eric B Larson; Zollman, Felise S; Hsu, Nancy; Pacini, Sonia; Shah, Amit; Patton, James L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although common during the early stages of recovery from severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), attention deficits have been scarcely investigated. Encouraging evidence suggests beneficial effects of attention training in more chronic and higher functioning patients. Interactive technology may provide new opportunities for rehabilitation in inpatients who are earlier in their recovery. Methods We designed a ?virtually minimal? approach using robot-rendered haptics in a virtual enviro...

  8. Integrating Cadaver Needle Forces Into a Haptic Robotic Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepley, David F; Yovanoff, Mary A; Mirkin, Katelin A; Miller, Scarlett R; Han, David C; Moore, Jason Z

    2018-03-01

    Accurate force simulation is essential to haptic simulators for surgical training. Factors such as tissue inhomogeneity pose unique challenges for simulating needle forces. To aid in the development of haptic needle insertion simulators, a handheld force sensing syringe was created to measure the motion and forces of needle insertions. Five needle insertions were performed into the neck of a cadaver using the force sensing syringe. Based on these measurements a piecewise exponential needle force characterization, was implemented into a haptic central venous catheterization (CVC) simulator. The haptic simulator was evaluated through a survey of expert surgeons, fellows, and residents. The maximum needle insertion forces measured ranged from 2.02 N to 1.20 N. With this information, four characterizations were created representing average, muscular, obese, and thin patients. The median survey results showed that users statistically agreed that "the robotic system made me sensitive to how patient anatomy impacts the force required to advance needles in the human body." The force sensing syringe captured force and position information. The information gained from this syringe was able to be implemented into a haptic simulator for CVC insertions, showing its utility. Survey results showed that experts, fellows, and residents had an overall positive outlook on the haptic simulator's ability to teach haptic skills.

  9. Enhancing realism in virtual environments by simulating the audio-haptic sensation of walking on ground surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahl, Rolf; Serafin, Stefania; Nilsson, Niels Christian

    2012-01-01

    overlooking a canyon. Subjects were asked to visit the environment wearing an head-mounted display and a custom made pair of sandals enhanced with sensors and actuators. A 12-channels surround sound system delivered a soundscape which was consistent with the visual environment. Passive haptics was provided...

  10. Contribution to the modeling and the identification of haptic interfaces; Contribution a la modelisation et a l'identification des interfaces haptiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janot, A

    2007-12-15

    This thesis focuses on the modeling and the identification of haptic interfaces using cable drive. An haptic interface is a force feedback device, which enables its user to interact with a virtual world or a remote environment explored by a slave system. It aims at the matching between the forces and displacements given by the user and those applied to virtual world. Usually, haptic interfaces make use of a mechanical actuated structure whose distal link is equipped with a handle. When manipulating this handle to interact with explored world, the user feels the apparent mass, compliance and friction of the interface. This distortion introduced between the operator and the virtual world must be modeled and identified to enhance the design of the interface and develop appropriate control laws. The first approach has been to adapt the modeling and identification methods of rigid and localized flexibilities robots to haptic interfaces. The identification technique makes use of the inverse dynamic model and the linear least squares with the measurements of joint torques and positions. This approach is validated on a single degree of freedom and a three degree of freedom haptic devices. A new identification method needing only torque data is proposed. It is based on a closed loop simulation using the direct dynamic model. The optimal parameters minimize the 2 norms of the error between the actual torque and the simulated torque assuming the same control law and the same tracking trajectory. This non linear least squares problem dramatically is simplified using the inverse model to calculate the simulated torque. This method is validated on the single degree of freedom haptic device and the SCARA robot. (author)

  11. Intelligent Avatar on E-Learning Using Facial Expression an Haptic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hoirul Basori

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available he process of introducing emotion can be improved through three-dimensional (3D tutoring system. The problem that still not solved is how to provide realistic tutor (avatar in virtual environment. This paper propose an approach to teach children on understanding emotion sensation through facial expression and sense of touch (haptic.The algorithm is created by calculating constant factor (f based on maximum value of RGB and magnitude force then magnitude force range will be associated into particular colour. The Integration process will be started from rendering the facial expression then followed by adjusting the vibration power to emotion value. The result that achieved on experiment, it show around 71% students agree with the classification of magnitude force into emotion representation. Respondents commented that high magnitude force create similar sensation when respondents feel anger, while low magnitude force is more relaxing to respondents. Respondents also said that haptic and facial expression is very interactive and realistic.

  12. Haptic Interface for UAV Teleoperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, T.M.

    2009-01-01

    In the teleoperation of an uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV), the human operator is physically separated from the vehicle and lacks various multiple-sensory information such as sound, motions, and vibrations of the airframe. The operator is usually only provided with visual information, e.g., from

  13. Rendered and Characterized Closed-Loop Accuracy of Impedance-Type Haptic Displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonnese, Nick; Siu, Alexa F; Abbott, Caroline M; Okamura, Allison M

    2015-01-01

    Impedance-type kinesthetic haptic displays aim to render arbitrary desired dynamics to a human operator using force feedback. To render realistic virtual environments, the difference between desired and rendered dynamics must be small. In this paper, we analyze the closed-loop dynamics of haptic displays for three common virtual environments: a spring, a damper, and a spring-damper, including the effects of time delay and low-pass filtering. Using a linear model, we identify important parameters for the rendered dynamics in terms of effective impedances, a conceptual tool that decomposes the displays closed-loop impedance into components with physical analogs. Our results establish bandwidth limits for rendering effective stiffness and damping. The effective stiffness bandwidth is limited by the virtual stiffness and device mass, and the effective damping bandwidth is limited by the cut-off frequency of the low-pass filter which filters the device velocity estimate. We show that a general system impedance can be characterized by a mass, damper, and spring optimally by the solution to a convex optimization problem, and we present a quantitative metric, the Average Distortion Error (ADE), to describe the fidelity of this model. Time delay has no significant effect on characterized stiffness, and reduces characterized damping by the product of virtual stiffness and total time delay. Reducing the low-pass filter cut-off frequency reduces the characterized damping. Experimental data gathered with a Phantom Premium 1.5 validates the theoretical analysis. We also conducted human user experiments to investigate the effects of time delay and low-pass filtering on perceived stiffness and damping. Similar to the characterized dynamics results, we observed no significant effect of time delay on perceived stiffness, and increasing time delay resulted in reduced perceived damping. Lower filter cut-off frequencies resulted in lower perceived damping. This work informs haptic

  14. Can dancers suppress the haptically mediated interpersonal entrainment during rhythmic sway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofianidis, George; Elliott, Mark T; Wing, Alan M; Hatzitaki, Vassilia

    2014-07-01

    Interpersonal entrainment emerges spontaneously when partners performing rhythmic movements together exchange sensory feedback about the other's movements. In this study, we asked whether couples of expert dancers, non-dancers and mixed couples can suppress the spontaneous haptically mediated inter-personal entrainment when their rhythmic sway is paced by differing metronome tempos. Fifty-four young participants formed three types of couples: nine dancer couples, consisting of individuals with at least eight years systematic practice in traditional Greek dance; nine non-dancer couples, consisting of individuals with no prior experience in dance and nine mixed couples, consisting of one dancer and one novice partner. Partners swayed rhythmically for 60 s, at different pacing frequencies (one at 0.25 Hz and the other at 0.35 Hz) under three haptic contact conditions: no contact between them; light fingertip touch established in the 2nd trial segment (30 s); and light fingertip touch released in the 2nd trial segment (30 s). Spectral analysis of the antero-posterior center of pressure displacement revealed that light touch increased the deviation of the dominant from the target (pacing) sway frequency, decreased the proportion of the signal's power at the target frequency and increased the coherence between the partners' sway signals (inter-personal coherence). These effects were specific to the mixed group whereas touch interference was weaker in non-dancers and absent in dancers. In addition, the coherence between the trial segments (intra-personal coherence) significantly decreased with touch only for the non-dancer while it remained unchanged for the dancer partner of the mixed group suggesting that the dancer was leading the non-dancer partner. It is concluded that systematic practice with traditional dance can modulate the spontaneous tendency towards haptically mediated interpersonal entrainment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. ISO's work on tactile and haptic interaction guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Carter, J.; Andrew, I.

    2006-01-01

    Tactile and haptic interaction is becoming increasingly important both in assistive technologies and in special purpose computing environments. While considerable research exists, the current lack of ergonomic standards in this area results in many systems being developed without sufficient concerns

  16. Topographic modelling of haptic properties of tissue products

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosén, Bengt-Göran; Fall, A; Rosén, S; Farbrot, A; Bergström, P.L

    2014-01-01

    The way a product or material feels when touched, haptics, has been shown to be a property that plays an important role when consumers determine the quality of products For tissue products in constant...

  17. Temporal Modulations of Contact Force during Haptic Surface Exploration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mueller, Stephanie; Martin, Sven; Schwarz, Michael; Grunwald, Martin

    2016-01-01

    .... Perception depends on the exploratory movements as well as influencing them. While this seems to be common sense, scientifically we know very little about the temporal dynamics during haptic exploration...

  18. Haptic communication for manipulator tooling operations in hazardous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counsell, Michael S.; Barnes, David P.

    1999-11-01

    This paper presents a summary of the design and integration of a haptic interface with a nuclear industry accepted control system and manipulator. The control system is a UK Robotics Advanced Teleoperation Controller and the manipulator is a Schilling Titan II hydraulic arm. Operator performance has been studied for peg in the hole, grinding and drilling tasks, both with and without haptic communication. The results of these experiments are presented.

  19. A hybrid rugosity mesostructure (HRM) for rendering fine haptic detail

    OpenAIRE

    Theoktisto Colmenares, Victor Arturo; Fairén González, Marta; Navazo Álvaro, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    The haptic rendering of surface mesostructure (fine relief features) in dense triangle meshes requires special structures, equipment, and high sampling rates for detailed perception of rugged models. Some approaches simulate haptic texture at a lower processing cost, but at the expense of fidelity of perception. We propose a better method for rendering fine surface detail by using image-based Hybrid Rugosity Mesostructures (HRMs), composed of paired maps of piece-wise heightfield displacement...

  20. Probabilistic Classification of Grasping Behaviours Using Visuo-Haptic Perception

    OpenAIRE

    S. Hosseini; Faria, Diego,; Lobo, Jorge; Dias, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Part 9: Perceptional Systems; International audience; This paper presents a novel approach to visuo-haptic perception of grasping/manipulative tasks. The proposed approach is founded on a hierarchical Bayesian model which integrates the visual information with the haptic data to reach a reasonable percept of what is happening in grasping tasks. The primary goal of the approach is to identify what type of grasping behaviour is being performed by the human subject, and as a secondary goal, to s...

  1. Haptic object perception: spatial dimensionality and relation to vision

    OpenAIRE

    Klatzky, Roberta L.; Lederman, Susan J.

    2011-01-01

    Enabled by the remarkable dexterity of the human hand, specialized haptic exploration is a hallmark of object perception by touch. Haptic exploration normally takes place in a spatial world that is three-dimensional; nevertheless, stimuli of reduced spatial dimensionality are also used to display spatial information. This paper examines the consequences of full (three-dimensional) versus reduced (two-dimensional) spatial dimensionality for object processing by touch, particularly in compariso...

  2. Haptic-Based Neurorehabilitation in Poststroke Patients: A Feasibility Prospective Multicentre Trial for Robotics Hand Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud Albasini, Omar A.; Oboe, Roberto; Tonin, Paolo; Paolucci, Stefano; Sandrini, Giorgio; Piron, Lamberto

    2013-01-01

    Background. Haptic robots allow the exploitation of known motor learning mechanisms, representing a valuable option for motor treatment after stroke. The aim of this feasibility multicentre study was to test the clinical efficacy of a haptic prototype, for the recovery of hand function after stroke. Methods. A prospective pilot clinical trial was planned on 15 consecutive patients enrolled in 3 rehabilitation centre in Italy. All the framework features of the haptic robot (e.g., control loop, external communication, and graphic rendering for virtual reality) were implemented into a real-time MATLAB/Simulink environment, controlling a five-bar linkage able to provide forces up to 20 [N] at the end effector, used for finger and hand rehabilitation therapies. Clinical (i.e., Fugl-Meyer upper extremity scale; nine hold pegboard test) and kinematics (i.e., time; velocity; jerk metric; normalized jerk of standard movements) outcomes were assessed before and after treatment to detect changes in patients' motor performance. Reorganization of cortical activation was detected in one patient by fMRI. Results and Conclusions. All patients showed significant improvements in both clinical and kinematic outcomes. Additionally, fMRI results suggest that the proposed approach may promote a better cortical activation in the brain. PMID:24319496

  3. Haptic-Based Neurorehabilitation in Poststroke Patients: A Feasibility Prospective Multicentre Trial for Robotics Hand Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Turolla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Haptic robots allow the exploitation of known motorlearning mechanisms, representing a valuable option for motor treatment after stroke. The aim of this feasibility multicentre study was to test the clinical efficacy of a haptic prototype, for the recovery of hand function after stroke. Methods. A prospective pilot clinical trial was planned on 15 consecutive patients enrolled in 3 rehabilitation centre in Italy. All the framework features of the haptic robot (e.g., control loop, external communication, and graphic rendering for virtual reality were implemented into a real-time MATLAB/Simulink environment, controlling a five-bar linkage able to provide forces up to 20 [N] at the end effector, used for finger and hand rehabilitation therapies. Clinical (i.e., Fugl-Meyer upper extremity scale; nine hold pegboard test and kinematics (i.e., time; velocity; jerk metric; normalized jerk of standard movements outcomes were assessed before and after treatment to detect changes in patients' motor performance. Reorganization of cortical activation was detected in one patient by fMRI. Results and Conclusions. All patients showed significant improvements in both clinical and kinematic outcomes. Additionally, fMRI results suggest that the proposed approach may promote a better cortical activation in the brain.

  4. Haptic-based neurorehabilitation in poststroke patients: a feasibility prospective multicentre trial for robotics hand rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turolla, Andrea; Daud Albasini, Omar A; Oboe, Roberto; Agostini, Michela; Tonin, Paolo; Paolucci, Stefano; Sandrini, Giorgio; Venneri, Annalena; Piron, Lamberto

    2013-01-01

    Background. Haptic robots allow the exploitation of known motor learning mechanisms, representing a valuable option for motor treatment after stroke. The aim of this feasibility multicentre study was to test the clinical efficacy of a haptic prototype, for the recovery of hand function after stroke. Methods. A prospective pilot clinical trial was planned on 15 consecutive patients enrolled in 3 rehabilitation centre in Italy. All the framework features of the haptic robot (e.g., control loop, external communication, and graphic rendering for virtual reality) were implemented into a real-time MATLAB/Simulink environment, controlling a five-bar linkage able to provide forces up to 20 [N] at the end effector, used for finger and hand rehabilitation therapies. Clinical (i.e., Fugl-Meyer upper extremity scale; nine hold pegboard test) and kinematics (i.e., time; velocity; jerk metric; normalized jerk of standard movements) outcomes were assessed before and after treatment to detect changes in patients' motor performance. Reorganization of cortical activation was detected in one patient by fMRI. Results and Conclusions. All patients showed significant improvements in both clinical and kinematic outcomes. Additionally, fMRI results suggest that the proposed approach may promote a better cortical activation in the brain.

  5. Cortical mechanisms underlying sensorimotor enhancement promoted by walking with haptic inputs in a virtual environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangani, Samir; Lamontagne, Anouk; Fung, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Sensorimotor integration is a complex process in the central nervous system that produces task-specific motor output based on selective and rapid integration of sensory information from multiple sources. This chapter reviews briefly the role of haptic cues in postural control during tandem stance and locomotion, focusing on sensorimotor enhancement of locomotion post stroke. The use of mixed-reality systems incorporating both haptic cues and virtual reality technology in gait rehabilitation post stroke is discussed. Over the last decade, researchers and clinicians have shown evidence of cerebral reorganization that underlies functional recovery after stroke based on results from neuroimaging techniques such as positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging. These imaging modalities are however limited in their capacity to measure cortical changes during extensive body motions in upright stance. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) on the other hand provides a unique opportunity to measure cortical activity associated with postural control during locomotion. Evidence of cortical changes associated with sensorimotor enhancement induced by haptic touch during locomotion is revealed through fNIRS in a pilot study involving healthy individuals and a case study involving a chronic stroke patient. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Design of high-fidelity haptic display for one-dimensional force reflection applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Brent; Rosenberg, Louis B.

    1995-12-01

    This paper discusses the development of a virtual reality platform for the simulation of medical procedures which involve needle insertion into human tissue. The paper's focus is the hardware and software requirements for haptic display of a particular medical procedure known as epidural analgesia. To perform this delicate manual procedure, an anesthesiologist must carefully guide a needle through various layers of tissue using only haptic cues for guidance. As a simplifying aspect for the simulator design, all motions and forces involved in the task occur along a fixed line once insertion begins. To create a haptic representation of this procedure, we have explored both physical modeling and perceptual modeling techniques. A preliminary physical model was built based on CT-scan data of the operative site. A preliminary perceptual model was built based on current training techniques for the procedure provided by a skilled instructor. We compare and contrast these two modeling methods and discuss the implications of each. We select and defend the perceptual model as a superior approach for the epidural analgesia simulator.

  7. A Vehicle Haptic Steering by Wire System Based on High Gain GPI Observers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rodriguez-Angeles

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A vehicle steering by wire (SBW haptic system based on high gain generalized proportional integral (GPI observers is introduced. The observers are considered for the estimation of dynamic perturbations that are present at the tire and steering wheel. To ensure efficient tracking between the commanded steering wheel angle and the tire orientation angle, the estimated perturbations are on line canceled. As to provide a haptic interface with the driver, the estimated dynamic effects at the steering rack are fed back to the steering wheel, yielding a master-slave haptic system with bilateral communication. For implementation purposes few sensors and minimum knowledge of the dynamic model are required, which is a major advantage compared to other approaches. Only position tracking errors are fed back, while all other signals are estimated by the high gain GPI observers. The scheme is robust to uncertainty on the input gain and cancels dynamic perturbation effects such as friction and aligning forces on the tire. Experimental results are presented on a prototype platform.

  8. Feedback Valence Affects Auditory Perceptual Learning Independently of Feedback Probability

    OpenAIRE

    Amitay, Sygal; Moore, David R.; Molloy, Katharine; Halliday, Lorna F.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that negative feedback is more effective in driving learning than positive feedback. We investigated the effect on learning of providing varying amounts of negative and positive feedback while listeners attempted to discriminate between three identical tones; an impossible task that nevertheless produces robust learning. Four feedback conditions were compared during training: 90% positive feedback or 10% negative feedback informed the participants that they wer...

  9. Comparing Intravenous Insertion Instructional Methods with Haptic Simulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenora A. McWilliams

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The objective of this review was to compare traditional intravenous (IV insertion instructional methods with the use of haptic IV simulators. Design. An integrative research design was used to analyze the current literature. Data Sources. A search was conducted using key words intravenous (IV insertion or cannulation or venipuncture and simulation from 2000 to 2015 in the English language. The databases included Academic Search Complete, CINAHL Complete, Education Resource Information Center, and Medline. Review Methods. Whittemore and Knafl’s (2005 strategies were used to critique the articles for themes and similarities. Results. Comparisons of outcomes between traditional IV instructional methods and the use of haptic IV simulators continue to show various results. Positive results indicate that the use of the haptic IV simulator decreases both band constriction and total procedure time. While students are satisfied with practicing on the haptic simulators, they still desire faculty involvement. Conclusion. Combining the haptic IV simulator with practical experience on the IV arm may be the best practice for learning IV insertion. Research employing active learning strategies while using a haptic IV simulator during the learning process may reduce cost and faculty time.

  10. Influence of Auditory and Haptic Stimulation in Visual Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunichi Kawabata

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available While many studies have shown that visual information affects perception in the other modalities, little is known about how auditory and haptic information affect visual perception. In this study, we investigated how auditory, haptic, or auditory and haptic stimulation affects visual perception. We used a behavioral task based on the subjects observing the phenomenon of two identical visual objects moving toward each other, overlapping and then continuing their original motion. Subjects may perceive the objects as either streaming each other or bouncing and reversing their direction of motion. With only visual motion stimulus, subjects usually report the objects as streaming, whereas if a sound or flash is played when the objects touch each other, subjects report the objects as bouncing (Bounce-Inducing Effect. In this study, “auditory stimulation”, “haptic stimulation” or “haptic and auditory stimulation” were presented at various times relative to the visual overlap of objects. Our result shows the bouncing rate when haptic and auditory stimulation were presented were the highest. This result suggests that the Bounce-Inducing Effect is enhanced by simultaneous modality presentation to visual motion. In the future, a neuroscience approach (eg, TMS, fMRI may be required to elucidate the brain mechanism in this study.

  11. Combining the formative with the summative: the development of a twostage online test to encourage engagement and provide personal feedback in large classes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Susanne Voelkel

    2013-01-01

      The aim of this action research project was to improve student learning by encouraging more "time on task" and to improve self-assessment and feedback through the introduction of weekly online tests...

  12. Combining the formative with the summative: the development of a two-stage online test to encourage engagement and provide personal feedback in large classes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Voelkel, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this action research project was to improve student learning by encouraging more "time on task" and to improve self-assessment and feedback through the introduction of weekly online tests...

  13. AR Feels "Softer" than VR: Haptic Perception of Stiffness in Augmented versus Virtual Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffary, Yoren; Le Gouis, Benoit; Marchal, Maud; Argelaguet, Ferran; Arnaldi, Bruno; Lecuyer, Anatole

    2017-11-01

    Does it feel the same when you touch an object in Augmented Reality (AR) or in Virtual Reality (VR)? In this paper we study and compare the haptic perception of stiffness of a virtual object in two situations: (1) a purely virtual environment versus (2) a real and augmented environment. We have designed an experimental setup based on a Microsoft HoloLens and a haptic force-feedback device, enabling to press a virtual piston, and compare its stiffness successively in either Augmented Reality (the virtual piston is surrounded by several real objects all located inside a cardboard box) or in Virtual Reality (the same virtual piston is displayed in a fully virtual scene composed of the same other objects). We have conducted a psychophysical experiment with 12 participants. Our results show a surprising bias in perception between the two conditions. The virtual piston is on average perceived stiffer in the VR condition compared to the AR condition. For instance, when the piston had the same stiffness in AR and VR, participants would select the VR piston as the stiffer one in 60% of cases. This suggests a psychological effect as if objects in AR would feel "softer" than in pure VR. Taken together, our results open new perspectives on perception in AR versus VR, and pave the way to future studies aiming at characterizing potential perceptual biases.

  14. A kinematic analysis of a haptic handheld stylus in a virtual environment: a study in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunnerhagen Katharina S

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virtual Reality provides new options for conducting motor assessment and training within computer-generated 3 dimensional environments. To date very little has been reported about normal performance in virtual environments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of a clinical procedure measuring trajectories with a haptic handheld stylus in a virtual environment and to establish normative data in healthy subjects using this haptic device. Methods Fifty-eight normal subjects; aged from 20 to 69, performed 3 dimensional hand movements in a virtual environment using a haptic device on three occasions within one week. Test-retest stability and standardized normative data were obtained for all subjects. Results No difference was found between test and retest. The limits of agreement revealed that changes in an individual's performance could not be detected. There was a training effect between the first test occasion and the third test occasion. Normative data are presented. Conclusion A new test was developed for recording the kinematics of the handheld haptic stylus in a virtual environment. The normative data will be used for purposes of comparison in future assessments, such as before and after training of persons with neurological deficits.

  15. A kinematic analysis of a haptic handheld stylus in a virtual environment: a study in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeren, Jurgen; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S; Rydmark, Martin

    2007-05-09

    Virtual Reality provides new options for conducting motor assessment and training within computer-generated 3 dimensional environments. To date very little has been reported about normal performance in virtual environments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of a clinical procedure measuring trajectories with a haptic handheld stylus in a virtual environment and to establish normative data in healthy subjects using this haptic device. Fifty-eight normal subjects; aged from 20 to 69, performed 3 dimensional hand movements in a virtual environment using a haptic device on three occasions within one week. Test-retest stability and standardized normative data were obtained for all subjects. No difference was found between test and retest. The limits of agreement revealed that changes in an individual's performance could not be detected. There was a training effect between the first test occasion and the third test occasion. Normative data are presented. A new test was developed for recording the kinematics of the handheld haptic stylus in a virtual environment. The normative data will be used for purposes of comparison in future assessments, such as before and after training of persons with neurological deficits.

  16. Should drivers be operating within an automation-free bandwidth? Evaluating haptic steering support systems with different levels of authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petermeijer, Sebastiaan M; Abbink, David A; de Winter, Joost C F

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare continuous versus bandwidth haptic steering guidance in terms of lane-keeping behavior, aftereffects, and satisfaction. An important human factors question is whether operators should be supported continuously or only when tolerance limits are exceeded. We aimed to clarify this issue for haptic steering guidance by investigating costs and benefits of both approaches in a driving simulator. Thirty-two participants drove five trials, each with a different level of haptic support: no guidance (Manual); guidance outside a 0.5-m bandwidth (Band1); a hysteresis version of Band1, which guided back to the lane center once triggered (Band2); continuous guidance (Cont); and Cont with double feedback gain (ContS). Participants performed a reaction time task while driving. Toward the end of each trial, the guidance was unexpectedly disabled to investigate aftereffects. All four guidance systems prevented large lateral errors (>0.7 m). Cont and especially ContS yielded smaller lateral errors and higher time to line crossing than Manual, Band1, and Band2. Cont and ContS yielded short-lasting aftereffects, whereas Band1 and Band2 did not. Cont yielded higher self-reported satisfaction and faster reaction times than Band1. Continuous and bandwidth guidance both prevent large driver errors. Continuous guidance yields improved performance and satisfaction over bandwidth guidance at the cost of aftereffects and variability in driver torque (indicating human-automation conflicts). The presented results are useful for designers of haptic guidance systems and support critical thinking about the costs and benefits of automation support systems.

  17. Method and device for intraoperative imaging of lumpectomy specimens to provide feedback to breast surgeon for prompt re-excision during the same procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, Andrzej; Hemingway, Susan; Kort, Kara; de la Rosa, Gustavo; Adhikary, Ravi; Masrani, Deepa; Feiglin, David; O'Connell, Avice; Nagarajan, Mahesh; Yang, Chien-Chun; Wismüller, Axel

    2014-03-01

    Breast conserving therapy (BCT) of breast cancer is now widely accepted due to improved cosmetic outcome and improved patients' quality of life. One of the critical issues in performing breast-conserving surgery is trying to achieve microscopically clear surgical margins while maintaining excellent cosmesis. Unfortunately, unacceptably close or positive surgical margins occur in at least 20-25% of all patients undergoing BCT requiring repeat surgical excision days or weeks later, as permanent histopathology routinely takes days to complete. Our aim is to develop a better method for intraoperative imaging of non-palpable breast malignancies excised by wire or needle localization. Providing non-deformed three dimensional imaging of the excised breast tissue should allow more accurate assessment of tumor margins and consequently allow further excision at the time of initial surgery thus limiting the enormous financial and emotional burden of additional surgery. We have designed and constructed a device that allows preservation of the excised breast tissue in its natural anatomic position relative to the breast as it is imaged to assess adequate excision. We performed initial tests with needle-guided lumpectomy specimens using micro-CT and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Our device consists of a plastic sphere inside a cylindrical holder. The surgeon inserts a freshly excised piece of breast tissue into the sphere and matches its anatomic orientation with the fiducial markers on the sphere. A custom-shaped foam is placed inside the sphere to prevent specimen deformation due to gravity. DBT followed by micro-CT images of the specimen were obtained. We confirmed that our device preserved spatial orientation of the excised breast tissue and that the location error was lower than 10mm and 10 degrees. The initial obtained results indicate that breast lesions containing microcalcifications allow a good 3D imaging of margins providing immediate intraoperative feedback for

  18. Strategies for effective feedback

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kritek, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    Provision of regular feedback to trainees on clinical performance by supervising providers is increasingly recognized as an essential component of undergraduate and graduate health sciences education...

  19. Haptic Addition to a Visual Menu Selection Interface Controlled by an In-Vehicle Rotary Device

    OpenAIRE

    Camilla Grane; Peter Bengtsson

    2012-01-01

    Today, several vehicles are equipped with a visual display combined with a haptic rotary device for handling in-vehicle information system tasks while driving. This experimental study investigates whether a haptic addition to a visual interface interferes with or supports secondary task performance and whether haptic information could be used without taking eyes off road. Four interfaces were compared during simulated driving: visual only, partly corresponding visual-haptic, fully correspondi...

  20. Soft Robotic Haptic Interface with Variable Stiffness for Rehabilitation of Neurologically Impaired Hand Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Sebastian

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The human hand comprises complex sensorimotor functions that can be impaired by neurological diseases and traumatic injuries. Effective rehabilitation can bring the impaired hand back to a functional state because of the plasticity of the central nervous system to relearn and remodel the lost synapses in the brain. Current rehabilitation therapies focus on strengthening motor skills, such as grasping, employ multiple objects of varying stiffness so that affected persons can experience a wide range of strength training. These devices have limited range of stiffness due to the rigid mechanisms employed in their variable stiffness actuators. This paper presents a novel soft robotic haptic device for neuromuscular rehabilitation of the hand, which is designed to offer adjustable stiffness and can be utilized in both clinical and home settings. The device eliminates the need for multiple objects by employing a pneumatic soft structure made with highly compliant materials that act as the actuator of the haptic interface. It is made with interchangeable sleeves that can be customized to include materials of varying stiffness to increase the upper limit of the stiffness range. The device is fabricated using existing 3D printing technologies, and polymer molding and casting techniques, thus keeping the cost low and throughput high. The haptic interface is linked to either an open-loop system that allows for an increased pressure during usage or closed-loop system that provides pressure regulation in accordance to the stiffness the user specifies. Preliminary evaluation is performed to characterize the effective controllable region of variance in stiffness. It was found that the region of controllable stiffness was between points 3 and 7, where the stiffness appeared to plateau with each increase in pressure. The two control systems are tested to derive relationships between internal pressure, grasping force exertion on the surface, and displacement using

  1. Learning to perform a new movement with robotic assistance: comparison of haptic guidance and visual demonstration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinkensmeyer DJ

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanical guidance with a robotic device is a candidate technique for teaching people desired movement patterns during motor rehabilitation, surgery, and sports training, but it is unclear how effective this approach is as compared to visual demonstration alone. Further, little is known about motor learning and retention involved with either robot-mediated mechanical guidance or visual demonstration alone. Methods Healthy subjects (n = 20 attempted to reproduce a novel three-dimensional path after practicing it with mechanical guidance from a robot. Subjects viewed their arm as the robot guided it, so this "haptic guidance" training condition provided both somatosensory and visual input. Learning was compared to reproducing the movement following only visual observation of the robot moving along the path, with the hand in the lap (the "visual demonstration" training condition. Retention was assessed periodically by instructing the subjects to reproduce the path without robotic demonstration. Results Subjects improved in ability to reproduce the path following practice in the haptic guidance or visual demonstration training conditions, as evidenced by a 30–40% decrease in spatial error across 126 movement attempts in each condition. Performance gains were not significantly different between the two techniques, but there was a nearly significant trend for the visual demonstration condition to be better than the haptic guidance condition (p = 0.09. The 95% confidence interval of the mean difference between the techniques was at most 25% of the absolute error in the last cycle. When asked to reproduce the path repeatedly following either training condition, the subjects' performance degraded significantly over the course of a few trials. The tracing errors were not random, but instead were consistent with a systematic evolution toward another path, as if being drawn to an "attractor path". Conclusion These results indicate

  2. New tools for sculpting cranial implants in a shared haptic augmented reality environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Zhuming; Evenhouse, Ray; Leigh, Jason; Charbel, Fady; Rasmussen, Mary

    2006-01-01

    New volumetric tools were developed for the design and fabrication of high quality cranial implants from patient CT data. These virtual tools replace time consuming physical sculpting, mold making and casting steps. The implant is designed by medical professionals in tele-immersive collaboration. Virtual clay is added in the virtual defect area on the CT data using the adding tool. With force feedback the modeler can feel the edge of the defect and fill only the space where no bone is present. A carving tool and a smoothing tool are then used to sculpt and refine the implant. To make a physical evaluation, the skull with simulated defect and the implant are fabricated via stereolithography to allow neurosurgeons to evaluate the quality of the implant. Initial tests demonstrate a very high quality fit. These new haptic volumetric sculpting tools are a critical component of a comprehensive tele-immersive system.

  3. Development of Remote-Type Haptic Catheter Sensor System using Piezoelectric Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruta, Mineyuki; Murayama, Yoshinobu; Omata, Sadao

    This study describes the development of Remote-Type Haptic Catheter Sensor System which enables the mechanical property evaluation of a blood vessel. This system consists of a feedback circuit and a piezoelectric ultrasound transducer, and is operated based on a phase shift method so that the entire system oscillates at its inherent resonance frequency. Ultrasound reflected by the blood vessel makes a phase shift of the resonance system depending on the acoustic impedance of the reflector. The phase shift is then measured as a change in resonance frequency of the system; therefore, the detection resolution is highly improved. The correlation between the acoustic impedance and the resonance frequency change of the sensor system was demonstrated using silicone rubbers, metals and actual blood vessels from a pig. The performance of the sensor was also examined using vessel shaped phantom model. Finally, the discussion surveys a possibility of the novel sensor system in an application for intra vascular diagnosis.

  4. A Haptic Guided Robotic System for Endoscope Positioning and Holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabuk, Burak; Ceylan, Savas; Anik, Ihsan; Tugasaygi, Mehtap; Kizir, Selcuk

    2015-01-01

    To determine the feasibility, advantages, and disadvantages of using a robot for holding and maneuvering the endoscope in transnasal transsphenoidal surgery. The system used in this study was a Stewart Platform based robotic system that was developed by Kocaeli University Department of Mechatronics Engineering for positioning and holding of endoscope. After the first use on an artificial head model, the system was used on six fresh postmortem bodies that were provided by the Morgue Specialization Department of the Forensic Medicine Institute (Istanbul, Turkey). The setup required for robotic system was easy, the time for registration procedure and setup of the robot takes 15 minutes. The resistance was felt on haptic arm in case of contact or friction with adjacent tissues. The adaptation process was shorter with the mouse to manipulate the endoscope. The endoscopic transsphenoidal approach was achieved with the robotic system. The endoscope was guided to the sphenoid ostium with the help of the robotic arm. This robotic system can be used in endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery as an endoscope positioner and holder. The robot is able to change the position easily with the help of an assistant and prevents tremor, and provides a better field of vision for work.

  5. Memory for curvature of objects: Haptic touch vs. vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittyerah, Miriam; Marks, Lawrence E.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined the role of vision and haptics in memory for stimulus objects that vary along the dimension of curvature. Experiment 1 measured haptic–haptic (T–T) and haptic–visual (T–V) discrimination of curvature in a short-term memory paradigm, using 30-second retention intervals containing five different interpolated tasks. Results showed poorest performance when the interpolated tasks required spatial processing or movement, thereby suggesting that haptic information about shape is encoded in a spatial-motor representation. Experiment 2 compared visual–visual (V–V) and visual–haptic (V–T) short-term memory, again using 30-second delay intervals. The results of the ANOVA failed to show a significant effect of intervening activity. Intra-modal visual performance and cross-modal performance were similar. Comparing the four modality conditions (inter-modal V–T, T–V; intra-modal V–V, T–T, by combining the data of Experiments 1 and 2), in a global analysis, showed a reliable interaction between intervening activity and experiment (modality). Although there appears to be a general tendency for spatial and movement activities to exert the most deleterious effects overall, the patterns are not identical when the initial stimulus is encoded haptically (Experiment 1) and visually (Experiment 2). PMID:17535462

  6. Frictional Compliant Haptic Contact and Deformation of Soft Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naci Zafer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with compliant haptic contact and deformation of soft objects. A human soft fingertip model is considered to act as the haptic interface and is brought into contact with and deforms a discrete surface. A nonlinear constitutive law is developed in predicting normal forces and, for the haptic display of surface texture, motions along the surface are also resisted at various rates by accounting for dynamic Lund-Grenoble (LuGre frictional forces. For the soft fingertip to apply forces over an area larger than a point, normal and frictional forces are distributed around the soft fingertip contact location on the deforming surface. The distribution is realized based on a kernel smoothing function and by a nonlinear spring-damper net around the contact point. Experiments conducted demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of our approach in real-time haptic rendering of a kidney surface. The resistive (interaction forces are applied at the user fingertip bone edge. A 3-DoF parallel robotic manipulator equipped with a constraint based controller is used for the implementation. By rendering forces both in lateral and normal directions, the designed haptic interface system allows the user to realistically feel both the geometrical and mechanical (nonlinear properties of the deforming kidney.

  7. Combining the Formative with the Summative: The Development of a Two-Stage Online Test to Encourage Engagement and Provide Personal Feedback in Large Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this action research project was to improve student learning by encouraging more "time on task" and to improve self-assessment and feedback through the introduction of weekly online tests in a Year 2 lecture module in biological sciences. Initially voluntary online tests were offered to students and those who participated…

  8. Situated Formative Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukassen, Niels Bech; Wahl, Christian; Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    This study addresses the conceptual challenge of providing students with good quality feedback to enhance student learning in an online community of practice (COP). The aim of the study is to identify feedback mechanisms in a virtual learning environment (VLE) and to create a full formative...... feedback episode (FFE) through an online dialogue. The paper argues that dialogue is crucial for student learning and that feedback is not only something the teacher gives to the student. Viewing good quality feedback as social, situated, formative, emphasis is put on the establishment of dialogue. We...... refer to this type of feedback as, Situated Formative Feedback (SFF). As a basis for exploring, identifying and discussing relevant aspects of SFF the paper analyses qualitative data from a Moodle dialogue. Data are embedded in the qualitative analytic program Nvivo and are analysed with a system...

  9. Controllable surface haptics via particle jamming and pneumatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Andrew A; Okamura, Allison M

    2015-01-01

    The combination of particle jamming and pneumatics allows the simultaneous control of shape and mechanical properties in a tactile display. A hollow silicone membrane is molded into an array of thin cells, each filled with coffee grounds such that adjusting the vacuum level in any individual cell rapidly switches it between flexible and rigid states. The array clamps over a pressure-regulated air chamber with internal mechanisms designed to pin the nodes between cells at any given height. Various sequences of cell vacuuming, node pinning, and chamber pressurization allow the surface to balloon into a variety of shapes. Experiments were performed to expand existing physical models of jamming at the inter-particle level to define the rheological characteristics of jammed systems from a macroscopic perspective, relevant to force-displacement interactions that would be experienced by human users. Force-displacement data show that a jammed cell in compression fits a Maxwell model and a cell deflected in the center while supported only at the edges fits a Zener model, each with stiffness and damping parameters that increase at higher levels of applied vacuum. This provides framework to tune and control the mechanical properties of a jamming haptic interface.

  10. Haptic-Multimodal Flight Control System Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Kenneth H.; Schutte, Paul C.; Williams, Ralph A.

    2011-01-01

    The rapidly advancing capabilities of autonomous aircraft suggest a future where many of the responsibilities of today s pilot transition to the vehicle, transforming the pilot s job into something akin to driving a car or simply being a passenger. Notionally, this transition will reduce the specialized skills, training, and attention required of the human user while improving safety and performance. However, our experience with highly automated aircraft highlights many challenges to this transition including: lack of automation resilience; adverse human-automation interaction under stress; and the difficulty of developing certification standards and methods of compliance for complex systems performing critical functions traditionally performed by the pilot (e.g., sense and avoid vs. see and avoid). Recognizing these opportunities and realities, researchers at NASA Langley are developing a haptic-multimodal flight control (HFC) system concept that can serve as a bridge between today s state of the art aircraft that are highly automated but have little autonomy and can only be operated safely by highly trained experts (i.e., pilots) to a future in which non-experts (e.g., drivers) can safely and reliably use autonomous aircraft to perform a variety of missions. This paper reviews the motivation and theoretical basis of the HFC system, describes its current state of development, and presents results from two pilot-in-the-loop simulation studies. These preliminary studies suggest the HFC reshapes human-automation interaction in a way well-suited to revolutionary ease-of-use.

  11. Directly Printable Flexible Strain Sensors for Bending and Contact Feedback of Soft Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Elgeneidy

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a fully printable sensorized bending actuator that can be calibrated to provide reliable bending feedback and simple contact detection. A soft bending actuator following a pleated morphology, as well as a flexible resistive strain sensor, were directly 3D printed using easily accessible FDM printer hardware with a dual-extrusion tool head. The flexible sensor was directly welded to the bending actuator’s body and systematically tested to characterize and evaluate its response under variable input pressure. A signal conditioning circuit was developed to enhance the quality of the sensory feedback, and flexible conductive threads were used for wiring. The sensorized actuator’s response was then calibrated using a vision system to convert the sensory readings to real bending angle values. The empirical relationship was derived using linear regression and validated at untrained input conditions to evaluate its accuracy. Furthermore, the sensorized actuator was tested in a constrained setup that prevents bending, to evaluate the potential of using the same sensor for simple contact detection by comparing the constrained and free-bending responses at the same input pressures. The results of this work demonstrated how a dual-extrusion FDM printing process can be tuned to directly print highly customizable flexible strain sensors that were able to provide reliable bending feedback and basic contact detection. The addition of such sensing capability to bending actuators enhances their functionality and reliability for applications such as controlled soft grasping, flexible wearables, and haptic devices.

  12. Fusion of Haptic and Gesture Sensors for Rehabilitation of Bimanual Coordination and Dexterous Manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningbo Yu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Disabilities after neural injury, such as stroke, bring tremendous burden to patients, families and society. Besides the conventional constrained-induced training with a paretic arm, bilateral rehabilitation training involves both the ipsilateral and contralateral sides of the neural injury, fitting well with the fact that both arms are needed in common activities of daily living (ADLs, and can promote good functional recovery. In this work, the fusion of a gesture sensor and a haptic sensor with force feedback capabilities has enabled a bilateral rehabilitation training therapy. The Leap Motion gesture sensor detects the motion of the healthy hand, and the omega.7 device can detect and assist the paretic hand, according to the designed cooperative task paradigm, as much as needed, with active force feedback to accomplish the manipulation task. A virtual scenario has been built up, and the motion and force data facilitate instantaneous visual and audio feedback, as well as further analysis of the functional capabilities of the patient. This task-oriented bimanual training paradigm recruits the sensory, motor and cognitive aspects of the patient into one loop, encourages the active involvement of the patients into rehabilitation training, strengthens the cooperation of both the healthy and impaired hands, challenges the dexterous manipulation capability of the paretic hand, suits easy of use at home or centralized institutions and, thus, promises effective potentials for rehabilitation training.

  13. Fusion of Haptic and Gesture Sensors for Rehabilitation of Bimanual Coordination and Dexterous Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ningbo; Xu, Chang; Li, Huanshuai; Wang, Kui; Wang, Liancheng; Liu, Jingtai

    2016-01-01

    Disabilities after neural injury, such as stroke, bring tremendous burden to patients, families and society. Besides the conventional constrained-induced training with a paretic arm, bilateral rehabilitation training involves both the ipsilateral and contralateral sides of the neural injury, fitting well with the fact that both arms are needed in common activities of daily living (ADLs), and can promote good functional recovery. In this work, the fusion of a gesture sensor and a haptic sensor with force feedback capabilities has enabled a bilateral rehabilitation training therapy. The Leap Motion gesture sensor detects the motion of the healthy hand, and the omega.7 device can detect and assist the paretic hand, according to the designed cooperative task paradigm, as much as needed, with active force feedback to accomplish the manipulation task. A virtual scenario has been built up, and the motion and force data facilitate instantaneous visual and audio feedback, as well as further analysis of the functional capabilities of the patient. This task-oriented bimanual training paradigm recruits the sensory, motor and cognitive aspects of the patient into one loop, encourages the active involvement of the patients into rehabilitation training, strengthens the cooperation of both the healthy and impaired hands, challenges the dexterous manipulation capability of the paretic hand, suits easy of use at home or centralized institutions and, thus, promises effective potentials for rehabilitation training. PMID:26999149

  14. Direct and indirect haptic calibration of visual size judgments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Gori

    Full Text Available It has long been suspected that touch plays a fundamental role in the calibration of visual perception, and much recent evidence supports this idea. However, as the haptic exploration workspace is limited by the kinematics of the body, the contribution of haptic information to the calibration process should occur only within the region of the haptic workspace reachable by a limb (peripersonal space. To test this hypothesis we evaluated visual size perception and showed that it is indeed more accurate inside the peripersonal space. We then show that allowing subjects to touch the (unseen stimulus after observation restores accurate size perception; the accuracy persists for some time, implying that calibration has occurred. Finally, we show that observing an actor grasp the object also produces accurate (and lasting size perception, suggesting that the calibration can also occur indirectly by observing goal-directed actions, implicating the involvement of the "mirror system".

  15. Calibration, registration, and synchronization for high precision augmented reality haptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harders, Matthias; Bianchi, Gérald; Knoerlein, Benjamin; Székely, Gábor

    2009-01-01

    In our current research we examine the application of visuo-haptic augmented reality setups in medical training. To this end, highly accurate calibration, system stability, and low latency are indispensable prerequisites. These are necessary to maintain user immersion and avoid breaks in presence which potentially diminish the training outcome. In this paper we describe the developed calibration methods for visuo-haptic integration, the hybrid tracking technique for stable alignment of the augmentation, and the distributed framework ensuring low latency and component synchronization. Finally, we outline an early prototype system based on the multimodal augmented reality framework. The latter allows colocated visuo-haptic interaction with real and virtual scene components in a simplified open surgery setting.

  16. Communicating Emotion through Haptic Design: A Study Using Physical Keys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellerup, Marie Kjær; Larsen, Anne Cathrine; Maier, Anja

    2014-01-01

    and prototypes of four ‘haptically enhanced’ (physical) keys were created. Types of keys selected include home, bicycle, hobby, and basement. An experiment with ten participants was conducted, using word association and a software to elicit product emotions (PrEmo). Results show a mapping between the designer’s......This paper explores how designers may communicate with the users of their products through haptic design. More specifically, how tactile properties of materials evoke emotions such as satisfaction, joy, or disgust. A research through design approach has been followed; mood- and material boards...... intent and the user’s inference. We conclude that it is thus viable to communicate emotions using haptic design. Moreover, we found that when using their sense of touch, participants’ previous positive or negative memories and experiences were projected onto the objects....

  17. Haptic spatial configuration learning in deaf and hearing individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick van Dijk

    Full Text Available The present study investigated haptic spatial configuration learning in deaf individuals, hearing sign language interpreters and hearing controls. In three trials, participants had to match ten shapes haptically to the cut-outs in a board as fast as possible. Deaf and hearing sign language users outperformed the hearing controls. A similar difference was observed for a rotated version of the board. The groups did not differ, however, on a free relocation trial. Though a significant sign language experience advantage was observed, comparison to results from a previous study testing the same task in a group of blind individuals showed it to be smaller than the advantage observed for the blind group. These results are discussed in terms of how sign language experience and sensory deprivation benefit haptic spatial configuration processing.

  18. Feedback Valence Affects Auditory Perceptual Learning Independently of Feedback Probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitay, Sygal; Moore, David R.; Molloy, Katharine; Halliday, Lorna F.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that negative feedback is more effective in driving learning than positive feedback. We investigated the effect on learning of providing varying amounts of negative and positive feedback while listeners attempted to discriminate between three identical tones; an impossible task that nevertheless produces robust learning. Four feedback conditions were compared during training: 90% positive feedback or 10% negative feedback informed the participants that they were doing equally well, while 10% positive or 90% negative feedback informed them they were doing equally badly. In all conditions the feedback was random in relation to the listeners’ responses (because the task was to discriminate three identical tones), yet both the valence (negative vs. positive) and the probability of feedback (10% vs. 90%) affected learning. Feedback that informed listeners they were doing badly resulted in better post-training performance than feedback that informed them they were doing well, independent of valence. In addition, positive feedback during training resulted in better post-training performance than negative feedback, but only positive feedback indicating listeners were doing badly on the task resulted in learning. As we have previously speculated, feedback that better reflected the difficulty of the task was more effective in driving learning than feedback that suggested performance was better than it should have been given perceived task difficulty. But contrary to expectations, positive feedback was more effective than negative feedback in driving learning. Feedback thus had two separable effects on learning: feedback valence affected motivation on a subjectively difficult task, and learning occurred only when feedback probability reflected the subjective difficulty. To optimize learning, training programs need to take into consideration both feedback valence and probability. PMID:25946173

  19. On the edge: haptic discrimination of edge sharpness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy L Skinner

    Full Text Available The increasing ubiquity of haptic displays (e.g., smart phones and tablets necessitates a better understanding of the perceptual capabilities of the human haptic system. Haptic displays will soon be capable of locally deforming to create simple 3D shapes. This study investigated the sensitivity of our haptic system to a fundamental component of shapes: edges. A novel set of eight high quality shape stimuli with test edges that varied in sharpness were fabricated in a 3D printer. In a two alternative, forced choice task, blindfolded participants were presented with two of these shapes side by side (one the reference, the other selected randomly from the remaining set of seven and after actively exploring the test edge of each shape with the tip of their index finger, reported which shape had the sharper edge. We used a model selection approach to fit optimal psychometric functions to performance data, and from these obtained just noticeable differences and Weber fractions. In Experiment 1, participants performed the task with four different references. With sharpness defined as the angle at which one surface meets the horizontal plane, the four JNDs closely followed Weber's Law, giving a Weber fraction of 0.11. Comparisons to previously reported Weber fractions from other haptic manipulations (e.g. amplitude of vibration suggests we are sufficiently sensitive to changes in edge sharpness for this to be of potential utility in the design of future haptic displays. In Experiment 2, two groups of participants performed the task with a single reference but different exploration strategies; one was limited to a single touch, the other unconstrained and free to explore as they wished. As predicted, the JND in the free exploration condition was lower than that in the single touch condition, indicating exploration strategy affects sensitivity to edge sharpness.

  20. Encouraging residents to seek feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delva, Dianne; Sargeant, Joan; Miller, Stephen; Holland, Joanna; Alexiadis Brown, Peggy; Leblanc, Constance; Lightfoot, Kathryn; Mann, Karen

    2013-12-01

    To explore resident and faculty perceptions of the feedback process, especially residents' feedback-seeking activities. We conducted focus groups of faculty and residents exploring experiences in giving and receiving feedback, feedback-seeking, and suggestions to support feedback-seeking. Using qualitative methods and an iterative process, all authors analyzed the transcribed audiotapes to identify and confirm themes. Emerging themes fit a framework situating resident feedback-seeking as dependent on four central factors: (1) learning/workplace culture, (2) relationships, (3) purpose/quality of feedback, (4) emotional responses to feedback. Residents and faculty agreed on many supports and barriers to feedback-seeking. Strengthening the workplace/learning culture through longitudinal experiences, use of feedback forms and explicit expectations for residents to seek feedback, coupled with providing a sense of safety and adequate time for observation and providing feedback were suggested. Tensions between faculty and resident perceptions regarding feedback-seeking related to fear of being found deficient, the emotional costs related to corrective feedback and perceptions that completing clinical work is more valued than learning. Resident feedback-seeking is influenced by multiple factors requiring attention to both faculty and learner roles. Further study of specific influences and strategies to mitigate the tensions will inform how best to support residents in seeking feedback.

  1. Haptic Manipulation of Deformable Objects in Hybrid Bilateral Teleoperation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Ibarra-Zannatha

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is the integration of a virtual environment containing a deformable object, manipulated by an open kinematical chain virtual slave robot, to a bilateral teleoperation scheme based on a real haptic device. The virtual environment of this hybrid bilateral teleoperation system combines collision detection algorithms, dynamical, kinematical and geometrical models with a position–position and/or force–position bilateral control algorithm, to produce on the operator side the reflected forces corresponding to the virtual mechanical interactions, through a haptic device. Contact teleoperation task over the virtual environment with a flexible object is implemented and analysed.

  2. Evaluation of wearable haptic systems for the fingers in Augmented Reality applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chinello, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Although Augmented Reality (AR) has been around for almost five decades, only recently we have witnessed AR systems and applications entering in our everyday life. Representative examples of this technological revolution are the smartphone games “Pok´emon GO” and “Ingress” or the Google Translate...... real-time sign interpretation app. Even if AR applications are already quite compelling and widespread, users are still not able to physically interact with the computer-generated reality. In this respect, wearable haptics can provide the compelling illusion of touching the superimposed virtual objects...

  3. A novel remote center of motion mechanism for the force-reflective master robot of haptic tele-surgery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadavand, Mostafa; Mirbagheri, Alireza; Behzadipour, Saeed; Farahmand, Farzam

    2014-06-01

    An effective master robot for haptic tele-surgery applications needs to provide a solution for the inversed movements of the surgical tool, in addition to sufficient workspace and manipulability, with minimal moving inertia. A novel 4 + 1-DOF mechanism was proposed, based on a triple parallelogram linkage, which provided a Remote Center of Motion (RCM) at the back of the user's hand. The kinematics of the robot was analyzed and a prototype was fabricated and evaluated by experimental tests. With a RCM at the back of the user's hand the actuators far from the end effector, the robot could produce the sensation of hand-inside surgery with minimal moving inertia. The target workspace was achieved with an acceptable manipulability. The trajectory tracking experiments revealed small errors, due to backlash at the joints. The proposed mechanism meets the basic requirements of an effective master robot for haptic tele-surgery applications. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Haptic computer-assisted patient-specific preoperative planning for orthopedic fractures surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovler, I; Joskowicz, L; Weil, Y A; Khoury, A; Kronman, A; Mosheiff, R; Liebergall, M; Salavarrieta, J

    2015-10-01

    The aim of orthopedic trauma surgery is to restore the anatomy and function of displaced bone fragments to support osteosynthesis. For complex cases, including pelvic bone and multi-fragment femoral neck and distal radius fractures, preoperative planning with a CT scan is indicated. The planning consists of (1) fracture reduction-determining the locations and anatomical sites of origin of the fractured bone fragments and (2) fracture fixation-selecting and placing fixation screws and plates. The current bone fragment manipulation, hardware selection, and positioning processes based on 2D slices and a computer mouse are time-consuming and require a technician. We present a novel 3D haptic-based system for patient-specific preoperative planning of orthopedic fracture surgery based on CT scans. The system provides the surgeon with an interactive, intuitive, and comprehensive, planning tool that supports fracture reduction and fixation. Its unique features include: (1) two-hand haptic manipulation of 3D bone fragments and fixation hardware models; (2) 3D stereoscopic visualization and multiple viewing modes; (3) ligaments and pivot motion constraints to facilitate fracture reduction; (4) semiautomatic and automatic fracture reduction modes; and (5) interactive custom fixation plate creation to fit the bone morphology. We evaluate our system with two experimental studies: (1) accuracy and repeatability of manual fracture reduction and (2) accuracy of our automatic virtual bone fracture reduction method. The surgeons achieved a mean accuracy of less than 1 mm for the manual reduction and 1.8 mm (std [Formula: see text] 1.1 mm) for the automatic reduction. 3D haptic-based patient-specific preoperative planning of orthopedic fracture surgery from CT scans is useful and accurate and may have significant advantages for evaluating and planning complex fractures surgery.

  5. Binding in haptics: integration of "what" and "where" information in working memory for active touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delogu, Franco; Bergmann Tiest, Wouter M; Nijboer, Tanja C W; Kappers, Astrid M L; Postma, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Information about the identity and the location of perceptual objects can be automatically integrated in perception and working memory (WM). Contrasting results in visual and auditory WM studies indicate that the characteristics of feature-to-location binding can vary according to the sensory modality of the input. The present study provides first evidence of binding between "what" and "where" information in WM for haptic stimuli. In an old-new recognition task, blindfolded participants were presented in their peripersonal space with sequences of three haptic stimuli varying in texture and location. They were then required to judge if a single probe stimulus was previously included in the sequence. Recall was measured both in a condition in which both texture and location were relevant for the task (Experiment 1) and in two conditions where only one feature had to be recalled (Experiment 2). Results showed that when both features were task-relevant, even if the association of location and texture was neither necessary nor required to perform the task, participants exhibited a recall advantage in conditions in which the location and the texture of the target probe was kept unaltered between encoding and recall. By contrast, when only one feature was task-relevant, the concurrent feature did not influence the recall of the target feature. We conclude that attention to feature binding is not necessary for the emergence of feature integration in haptic WM. For binding to take place, however, it is necessary to encode and maintain in memory both the identity and the location of items.

  6. Binding in haptics: integration of "what" and "where" information in working memory for active touch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Delogu

    Full Text Available Information about the identity and the location of perceptual objects can be automatically integrated in perception and working memory (WM. Contrasting results in visual and auditory WM studies indicate that the characteristics of feature-to-location binding can vary according to the sensory modality of the input. The present study provides first evidence of binding between "what" and "where" information in WM for haptic stimuli. In an old-new recognition task, blindfolded participants were presented in their peripersonal space with sequences of three haptic stimuli varying in texture and location. They were then required to judge if a single probe stimulus was previously included in the sequence. Recall was measured both in a condition in which both texture and location were relevant for the task (Experiment 1 and in two conditions where only one feature had to be recalled (Experiment 2. Results showed that when both features were task-relevant, even if the association of location and texture was neither necessary nor required to perform the task, participants exhibited a recall advantage in conditions in which the location and the texture of the target probe was kept unaltered between encoding and recall. By contrast, when only one feature was task-relevant, the concurrent feature did not influence the recall of the target feature. We conclude that attention to feature binding is not necessary for the emergence of feature integration in haptic WM. For binding to take place, however, it is necessary to encode and maintain in memory both the identity and the location of items.

  7. Target contact and exploration strategies in haptic search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Polanen, V.; Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2014-01-01

    In a haptic search task, one has to detect the presence of a target among distractors using the sense of touch. A salient target can be detected faster than a non-salient target. However, little is known about the exploration strategies that are used, especially in 3D search tasks where items are

  8. Teaching Bovine Abdominal Anatomy: Use of a Haptic Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnison, Tierney; Forrest, Neil David; Frean, Stephen Philip; Baillie, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Traditional methods of teaching anatomy to undergraduate medical and veterinary students are being challenged and need to adapt to modern concerns and requirements. There is a move away from the use of cadavers to new technologies as a way of complementing the traditional approaches and addressing resource and ethical problems. Haptic (touch)…

  9. Haptic perception disambiguates visual perception of 3D shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijntjes, M.W.A.; Volcic, R.; Pont, S.C.; Koenderink, J.J.; Kappers, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the influence of haptics on visual perception of three-dimensional shape. Observers were shown pictures of an oblate spheroid in two different orientations. A gauge-figure task was used to measure their perception of the global shape. In the first two sessions only vision was used. The

  10. Haptic perception disambiguates visual perception of 3D shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijntjes, Maarten W A; Volcic, Robert; Pont, Sylvia C.; Koenderink, Jan J.; Kappers, Astrid M L

    We studied the influence of haptics on visual perception of three-dimensional shape. Observers were shown pictures of an oblate spheroid in two different orientations. A gauge-figure task was used to measure their perception of the global shape. In the first two sessions only vision was used. The

  11. The mere exposure effect in the domain of haptics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Jakesch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Zajonc showed that the attitude towards stimuli that one had been previously exposed to is more positive than towards novel stimuli. This mere exposure effect (MEE has been tested extensively using various visual stimuli. Research on the MEE is sparse, however, for other sensory modalities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used objects of two material categories (stone and wood and two complexity levels (simple and complex to test the influence of exposure frequency (F0 = novel stimuli, F2 = stimuli exposed twice, F10 = stimuli exposed ten times under two sensory modalities (haptics only and haptics & vision. Effects of exposure frequency were found for high complex stimuli with significantly increasing liking from F0 to F2 and F10, but only for the stone category. Analysis of "Need for Touch" data showed the MEE in participants with high need for touch, which suggests different sensitivity or saturation levels of MEE. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This different sensitivity or saturation levels might also reflect the effects of expertise on the haptic evaluation of objects. It seems that haptic and cross-modal MEEs are influenced by factors similar to those in the visual domain indicating a common cognitive basis.

  12. The mere exposure effect in the domain of haptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakesch, Martina; Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2012-01-01

    Zajonc showed that the attitude towards stimuli that one had been previously exposed to is more positive than towards novel stimuli. This mere exposure effect (MEE) has been tested extensively using various visual stimuli. Research on the MEE is sparse, however, for other sensory modalities. We used objects of two material categories (stone and wood) and two complexity levels (simple and complex) to test the influence of exposure frequency (F0 = novel stimuli, F2 = stimuli exposed twice, F10 = stimuli exposed ten times) under two sensory modalities (haptics only and haptics & vision). Effects of exposure frequency were found for high complex stimuli with significantly increasing liking from F0 to F2 and F10, but only for the stone category. Analysis of "Need for Touch" data showed the MEE in participants with high need for touch, which suggests different sensitivity or saturation levels of MEE. This different sensitivity or saturation levels might also reflect the effects of expertise on the haptic evaluation of objects. It seems that haptic and cross-modal MEEs are influenced by factors similar to those in the visual domain indicating a common cognitive basis.

  13. Towards a standard on evaluation of tactile/haptic interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinclair, I.; Carter, J.; Kassner, S.; Erp, J.B.F. van; Weber, G.; Elliott, L.; Andrew, I.

    2012-01-01

    Tactile and haptic interaction is becoming increasingly important; ergonomic standards can ensure that systems are designed with sufficient concern for ergonomics and interoperability. ISO (through working group TC159/SC4/WG9) is developing international standards in this subject area, dual-tracked

  14. Illusory rotation in the haptic perception of a moving bar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappers, A.M.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07445370X; Kluit, Z.M.

    2011-01-01

    Haptic matching of the orientation of bars separated by a horizontal distance leads to large systematic deviations (eg Kappers and Koenderink, 1999 Perception 28 781–795). A bar on the right side has to be rotated clockwise in order to be perceived as parallel to a bar at the left side. This finding

  15. ISO's work on guidance for Haptic and tactile interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Kern, T.A.

    2008-01-01

    Tactile and haptic interaction is becoming increasingly important and is no longer restricted to assistive technologies and special purpose computing environments. The technology has gone through numerous breakthroughs and replications and is now entering a period of developing empiricism, the phase

  16. Short-term plasticity of visuo-haptic object recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassuba, Tanja; Klinge, Corinna; Hölig, Cordula

    2014-01-01

    repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to perturb neural processing in left LO immediately before subjects performed a visuo-haptic delayed-match-to-sample task during fMRI. In this task, subjects had to match sample (S1) and target (S2) objects presented sequentially within or across vision and...

  17. Subject-specific distortions in haptic perception of force direction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, F.E.; Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Gabrielse, F.L.; Lagerberg, B.W.J.; Verhoogt, T.K.; Wolfs, B.G.A.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2014-01-01

    In a previous study, we found that the accuracy of human haptic perception of force direction is not very high. We also found an effect of physical force direction on the error subjects made, resulting in ‘error patterns’. In the current study, we assessed the between- and within-subject variation

  18. Haptic Interaction of Touch and Proprioception: Implications for Neuroprosthetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rincon Gonzalez, L.; Warren, J.P.; Meller, D.M.; Helms Tillary, S.I.

    2011-01-01

    Somatosensation is divided into multiple discrete modalities that we think of separably: e.g., tactile, proprioceptive, and temperature sensation. However, in processes such as haptics, those modalities all interact. If one intended to artificially generate a sensation that could be used for

  19. The virtual haptic back: A simulation for training in palpatory diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eland David C

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Models and simulations are finding increased roles in medical education. The Virtual Haptic Back (VHB is a virtual reality simulation of the mechanical properties of the human back designed as an aid to teaching clinical palpatory diagnosis. Methods Eighty-nine first year medical students of the Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine carried out six, 15-minute practice sessions with the VHB, plus tests before and after the sessions in order to monitor progress in identifying regions of simulated abnormal tissue compliance. Students palpated with two digits, fingers or thumbs, by placing them in gimbaled thimbles at the ends of PHANToM 3.0® haptic interface arms. The interface simulated the contours and compliance of the back surface by the action of electric motors. The motors limited the compression of the virtual tissues induced by the palpating fingers, by generating counterforces. Users could see the position of their fingers with respect to the back on a video monitor just behind the plane of the haptic back. The abnormal region varied randomly among 12 locations between trials. During the practice sessions student users received immediate feedback following each trial, indicating either a correct choice or the actual location of the abnormality if an incorrect choice had been made. This allowed the user to feel the actual abnormality before going on to the next trial. Changes in accuracy, speed and Weber fraction across practice sessions were analyzed using a repeated measures analysis of variance. Results Students improved in accuracy and speed of diagnosis with practice. The smallest difference in simulated tissue compliance users were able to detect improved from 28% (SD = 9.5% to 14% (SD = 4.4% during the practice sessions while average detection time decreased from 39 (SD = 19.8 to 17 (SD = 11.7 seconds. When asked in anonymous evaluation questionnaires if they judged the VHB practice to be helpful to

  20. The use of haptic interfaces and web services in crystallography: an application for a 'screen to beam' interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Andrew E; Soares, Alexei S; Owen, Robin L; Snell, Edward H

    2016-12-01

    Haptic interfaces have become common in consumer electronics. They enable easy interaction and information entry without the use of a mouse or keyboard. The work presented here illustrates the application of a haptic interface to crystallization screening in order to provide a natural means for visualizing and selecting results. By linking this to a cloud-based database and web-based application program interface, the same application shifts the approach from 'point and click' to 'touch and share', where results can be selected, annotated and discussed collaboratively. In the crystallographic application, given a suitable crystallization plate, beamline and robotic end effector, the resulting information can be used to close the loop between screening and X-ray analysis, allowing a direct and efficient 'screen to beam' approach. The application is not limited to the area of crystallization screening; 'touch and share' can be used by any information-rich scientific analysis and geographically distributed collaboration.

  1. Human haptic perception is interrupted by explorative stops of milliseconds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eGrunwald

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The explorative scanning movements of the hands have been compared to those of the eyes. The visual process is known to be composed of alternating phases of saccadic eye movements and fixation pauses. Descriptive results suggest that during the haptic exploration of objects short movement pauses occur as well. The goal of the present study was to detect these explorative stops (ES during one-handed and two-handed haptic explorations of various objects and patterns, and to measure their duration. Additionally, the associations between the following variables were analyzed: a between mean exploration time and duration of ES, b between certain stimulus features and ES frequency, and c the duration of ES during the course of exploration. Methods: Five different experiments were used. The first two experiments were classical recognition tasks of unknown haptic stimuli (A and of common objects (B. In experiment C space-position information of angle legs had to be perceived and reproduced. For experiments D and E the PHANToM haptic device was used for the exploration of virtual (D and real (E sunken reliefs. Results: In each experiment we observed explorative stops of different average durations. For experiment A: 329.50 ms, experiment B: 67.47 ms, experiment C: 189.92 ms, experiment D: 186.17 ms and experiment E: 140.02 ms. Significant correlations were observed between exploration time and the duration of the ES. Also, ES occurred more frequently, but not exclusively, at defined stimulus features like corners, curves and the endpoints of lines. However, explorative stops do not occur every time a stimulus feature is explored. Conclusions: We assume that ES are a general aspect of human haptic exploration processes. We have tried to interpret the occurrence and duration of ES with respect to the Hypotheses-Rebuild-Model and the Limited Capacity Control System theory.

  2. Haptic fMRI: Reliability and performance of electromagnetic haptic interfaces for motion and force neuroimaging experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Samir; Zhu, Jack; Goyal, Deeksha; Khatib, Oussama

    2017-07-01

    Haptic interfaces compatible with functional magnetic resonance imaging (Haptic fMRI) promise to enable rich motor neuroscience experiments that study how humans perform complex manipulation tasks. Here, we present a large-scale study (176 scans runs, 33 scan sessions) that characterizes the reliability and performance of one such electromagnetically actuated device, Haptic fMRI Interface 3 (HFI-3). We outline engineering advances that ensured HFI-3 did not interfere with fMRI measurements. Observed fMRI temporal noise levels with HFI-3 operating were at the fMRI baseline (0.8% noise to signal). We also present results from HFI-3 experiments demonstrating that high resolution fMRI can be used to study spatio-temporal patterns of fMRI blood oxygenation dependent (BOLD) activation. These experiments include motor planning, goal-directed reaching, and visually-guided force control. Observed fMRI responses are consistent with existing literature, which supports Haptic fMRI's effectiveness at studying the brain's motor regions.

  3. The Impact of Simultaneously Applying Normal Stress and Vibrotactile Stimulation for Feedback of Exteroceptive Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza Motamedi, M; Otis, Martin; Duchaine, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    Commercially available prosthetic hands do not convey any tactile information, forcing amputees to rely solely on visual attention. A promising solution to this problem is haptics, which could lead to new prostheses in which tactile information is conveyed between the amputee and the artificial limb. However, the haptic feedback must be optimized so that amputees can use it effectively; and although several studies have examined how specific haptic feedback systems can transmit certain types of tactile information, there has not yet been much research on the effects of superposing two or more types of feedback at the same location, which might prove to be more effective than using a single type of feedback alone. This paper investigates how the simultaneous application of two different types of haptic feedback-vibration and normal stress-impacts the human sensory perception of each separate feedback type. These stimuli were applied to glabrous skin on the forearms of 14 participants. Our experiments tested whether participants experienced more accurate sensory perception, compared to vibration or normal stress alone, when vibration was applied at the same time as the normal stress, at either the same location, or at a different location 6 cm away. Results indicate that although participants' perception of the normal stress diminished when vibration was applied at the same location, the same combination improved their perception of the vibration. Apparently, vibration has a negative impact upon the ability to perceive normal stress, whether applied at the same or a different location; whereas the opposite is true for the effect of normal stress upon the perception of vibration.

  4. An additive-factors design to disambiguate neuronal and areal convergence: measuring multisensory interactions between audio, visual, and haptic sensory streams using fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Ryan A; Kim, Sunah; James, Thomas W

    2009-09-01

    It can be shown empirically and theoretically that inferences based on established metrics used to assess multisensory integration with BOLD fMRI data, such as superadditivity, are dependent on the particular experimental situation. For example, the law of inverse effectiveness shows that the likelihood of finding superadditivity in a known multisensory region increases with decreasing stimulus discriminability. In this paper, we suggest that Sternberg's additive-factors design allows for an unbiased assessment of multisensory integration. Through the manipulation of signal-to-noise ratio as an additive factor, we have identified networks of cortical regions that show properties of audio-visual or visuo-haptic neuronal convergence. These networks contained previously identified multisensory regions and also many new regions, for example, the caudate nucleus for audio-visual integration, and the fusiform gyrus for visuo-haptic integration. A comparison of integrative networks across audio-visual and visuo-haptic conditions showed very little overlap, suggesting that neural mechanisms of integration are unique to particular sensory pairings. Our results provide evidence for the utility of the additive-factors approach by demonstrating its effectiveness across modality (vision, audition, and haptics), stimulus type (speech and non-speech), experimental design (blocked and event-related), method of analysis (SPM and ROI), and experimenter-chosen baseline. The additive-factors approach provides a method for investigating multisensory interactions that goes beyond what can be achieved with more established metric-based, subtraction-type methods.

  5. Vision holds a greater share in visuo-haptic object recognition than touch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassuba, Tanja; Klinge, Corinna; Hölig, Cordula

    2013-01-01

    activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging while healthy individuals performed a delayed-match-to-sample task. We manipulated identity matching of sample and target objects: We hypothesized that only coherent visual and haptic object features would activate unified object representations......The integration of visual and haptic input can facilitate object recognition. Yet, vision might dominate visuo-haptic interactions as it is more effective than haptics in processing several object features in parallel and recognizing objects outside of reaching space. The maximum likelihood...... approach of multisensory integration would predict that haptics as the less efficient sense for object recognition gains more from integrating additional visual information than vice versa. To test for asymmetries between vision and touch in visuo-haptic interactions, we measured regional changes in brain...

  6. Online feedback op schriftelijk werk: betere feedback in minder tijd.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, B.A.M.; van der Hulst, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Feedback is a powerful teaching technic to raise students’ performance, provided that the feedback is informative on how to improve, is given in a timely manner and students have the opportunity to act upon it. Therefore, many institutions want their students to receive feedback on their performance

  7. Hybrid Rugosity Mesostructures (HRMs) for fast and accurate rendering of fine haptic detail

    OpenAIRE

    Theoktisto, Víctor; Fairén González, Marta; Navazo Álvaro, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    The haptic rendering of surface mesostructure (fine relief features) in dense triangle meshes requires special structures, equipment, and high sampling rates for detailed perception of rugged models. Low cost approaches render haptic texture at the expense of fidelity of perception. We propose a faster method for surface haptic rendering using image-based Hybrid Rugosity Mesostructures (HRMs), paired maps with per-face heightfield displacements and normal maps, which are layered on top of a m...

  8. Haptic-Based Neurorehabilitation in Poststroke Patients: A Feasibility Prospective Multicentre Trial for Robotics Hand Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Turolla; Omar A. Daud Albasini; Roberto Oboe; Michela Agostini; Paolo Tonin; Stefano Paolucci; Giorgio Sandrini; Annalena Venneri; Lamberto Piron

    2013-01-01

    Background. Haptic robots allow the exploitation of known motor learning mechanisms, representing a valuable option for motor treatment after stroke. The aim of this feasibility multicentre study was to test the clinical efficacy of a haptic prototype, for the recovery of hand function after stroke. Methods. A prospective pilot clinical trial was planned on 15 consecutive patients enrolled in 3 rehabilitation centre in Italy. All the framework features of the haptic robot (e.g., control loop,...

  9. Haptic Exploration in Humans and Machines: Attribute Integration and Machine Recognition/Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-30

    established that the haptic system has remarkable capabilities for object recognition. We define haptics as purposive touch. The basic tactual system...demonstrated that texture and hardness information are both highly salient to haptic explorers who are learning about an objpct’s properties. Shape was...hand. In G. Bower (Ed.), The Psychology of Learning and Motivation, vol. 21, pp.121-151. Klatzky, R.L., Lederman, S., & Reed, C. (1987). There’s more

  10. Wearable Haptic Systems for the Fingertip and the Hand: Taxonomy, Review, and Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Pacchierotti, Claudio; Sinclair, Stephen; Solazzi, Massimiliano; Frisoli, Antonio; Hayward, Vincent; Prattichizzo, Domenico

    2017-01-01

    International audience; In the last decade, we have witnessed a drastic change in the form factor of audio and vision technologies, from heavy and grounded machines to lightweight devices that naturally fit our bodies. However, only recently, haptic systems have started to be designed with wearability in mind. The wearability of haptic systems enables novel forms of communication, cooperation, and integration between humans and machines. Wearable haptic interfaces are capable of communicating...

  11. Validation of the updated ArthroS simulator: face and construct validity of a passive haptic virtual reality simulator with novel performance metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfjeld Roberts, Patrick; Guyver, Paul; Baldwin, Mathew; Akhtar, Kash; Alvand, Abtin; Price, Andrew J; Rees, Jonathan L

    2017-02-01

    To assess the construct and face validity of ArthroS, a passive haptic VR simulator. A secondary aim was to evaluate the novel performance metrics produced by this simulator. Two groups of 30 participants, each divided into novice, intermediate or expert based on arthroscopic experience, completed three separate tasks on either the knee or shoulder module of the simulator. Performance was recorded using 12 automatically generated performance metrics and video footage of the arthroscopic procedures. The videos were blindly assessed using a validated global rating scale (GRS). Participants completed a survey about the simulator's realism and training utility. This new simulator demonstrated construct validity of its tasks when evaluated against a GRS (p ≤ 0.003 in all cases). Regarding it's automatically generated performance metrics, established outputs such as time taken (p ≤ 0.001) and instrument path length (p ≤ 0.007) also demonstrated good construct validity. However, two-thirds of the proposed 'novel metrics' the simulator reports could not distinguish participants based on arthroscopic experience. Face validity assessment rated the simulator as a realistic and useful tool for trainees, but the passive haptic feedback (a key feature of this simulator) is rated as less realistic. The ArthroS simulator has good task construct validity based on established objective outputs, but some of the novel performance metrics could not distinguish between surgical experience. The passive haptic feedback of the simulator also needs improvement. If simulators could offer automated and validated performance feedback, this would facilitate improvements in the delivery of training by allowing trainees to practise and self-assess.

  12. Formativ Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldahl, Kirsten Kofod

    Denne bog undersøger, hvordan lærere kan anvende feedback til at forbedre undervisningen i klasselokalet. I denne sammenhæng har John Hattie, professor ved Melbourne Universitet, udviklet en model for feedback, hvilken er baseret på synteser af meta-analyser. I 2009 udgav han bogen "Visible...

  13. Breaking it down is better: haptic decomposition of complex movements aids in robot-assisted motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Julius; Spencer, Steven J; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2012-05-01

    Training with haptic guidance has been proposed as a technique for learning complex movements in rehabilitation and sports, but it is unclear how to best deliver guidance-based training. Here, we hypothesized that breaking down a complex movement, similar to a tennis backhand, into simpler parts and then using haptic feedback from a robotic exoskeleton would help the motor system learn the movement. We also examined how the particular form of the decomposition affected learning. Three groups of unimpaired participants trained with the target arm movement broken down in three ways: 1) elbow flexion/extension and the unified shoulder motion independently ("anatomical" decomposition), 2) three component shoulder motions in Euler coordinates and elbow flexion/extension ("Euler" decomposition), or 3) the motion of the tip of the elbow and motion of the hand with respect to the elbow, independently ("visual" decomposition). A control group practiced the same number of movements, but experienced the target motion only, achieving eight times more direct practice with this motion. Despite less experience with the target motion, part training was better, but only when the arm trajectory was decomposed into anatomical components. Varying robotic movement training to include practice of simpler, anatomically-isolated motions may enhance its efficacy.

  14. Starting Block Performance in Sprinters: A Statistical Method for Identifying Discriminative Parameters of the Performance and an Analysis of the Effect of Providing Feedback over a 6-Week Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, Sylvie; Basset, Fabien A; Mbourou, Ginette A; Favérial, Jérôme; Teasdale, Normand

    2005-06-01

    (a) to examine if kinetic and kinematic parameters of the sprint start could differentiate elite from sub-elite sprinters and, (b) to investigate whether providing feedback (FB) about selected parameters could improve starting block performance of intermediate sprinters over a 6-week training period. Twelve male sprinters, assigned to an elite or a sub-elite group, participated in Experiment 1. Eight intermediate sprinters participated in Experiment 2. All athletes were required to perform three sprint starts at maximum intensity followed by a 10-m run. To detect differences between elite and sub-elite groups, comparisons were made using t-tests for independent samples. Parameters reaching a significant group difference were retained for the linear discriminant analysis (LDA). The LDA yielded four discriminative kinetic parameters. Feedback about these selected parameters was given to sprinters in Experiment 2. For this experiment, data acquisition was divided into three periods. The first six sessions were without specific FB, whereas the following six sessions were enriched by kinetic FB. Finally, athletes underwent a retention session (without FB) 4 weeks after the twelfth session. Even though differences were found in the time to front peak force, the time to rear peak force, and the front peak force in the retention session, the results of the present study showed that providing FB about selected kinetic parameters differentiating elite from sub-elite sprinters did not improve the starting block performance of intermediate sprinters. Key PointsThe linear discriminative analysis allows the identification of starting block parameters differentiating elite from sub-elite athletes.6-week of feedback does not alter starting block performance in training context.The present results failed to confirm previous studies since feedback did not improve targeted kinetic parameters of the complex motor task in real-world context.

  15. A Journey towards Sustainable Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, Allyson; Young, Charlotte; Davey, Tamzyn; Fitzgerald, Lisa

    2018-01-01

    Meeting students' expectations associated with the provision of feedback is a perennial challenge for tertiary education. Efforts to provide comprehensive, timely feedback within our own first year undergraduate public health courses have not always met students' expectations. In response, we sought to develop peer feedback activities to support…

  16. Haptic two-dimensional shape identification in children, adolescents, and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overvliet, Krista E; Krampe, Ralf Th

    2017-11-02

    We investigated the influence of image mediation (the process that translates tactile information into a visual image) on the development of haptic two-dimensional (2D) shape identification in 78 participants from five different age groups: preschoolers (4-5 years), first graders (6-7 years), fifth graders (10-11 years), young adolescents (12-13 years), and young adults (18-28 years). Participants attempted to haptically recognize everyday objects (three-dimensional [3D] haptic condition) and tangible line drawings (2D haptic condition) and to recognize objects presented through a serial visual "peek hole" version of the haptic line drawing task (2D visual condition). All groups were excellent at 3D haptic identification. However, preschoolers and first graders scored low in both visual and haptic line drawing tasks. From fifth grade onward, participants were reliably better at the visual peek hole task compared with the haptic line drawing task, which improved only gradually in young adolescent and adult age groups. We argue that both the spatial reference frame and working memory capacity constrain image mediation and children's increasing abilities to correctly haptically identify 2D shapes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Depth Camera-Based 3D Hand Gesture Controls with Immersive Tactile Feedback for Natural Mid-Air Gesture Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwangtaek Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vision-based hand gesture interactions are natural and intuitive when interacting with computers, since we naturally exploit gestures to communicate with other people. However, it is agreed that users suffer from discomfort and fatigue when using gesture-controlled interfaces, due to the lack of physical feedback. To solve the problem, we propose a novel complete solution of a hand gesture control system employing immersive tactile feedback to the user’s hand. For this goal, we first developed a fast and accurate hand-tracking algorithm with a Kinect sensor using the proposed MLBP (modified local binary pattern that can efficiently analyze 3D shapes in depth images. The superiority of our tracking method was verified in terms of tracking accuracy and speed by comparing with existing methods, Natural Interaction Technology for End-user (NITE, 3D Hand Tracker and CamShift. As the second step, a new tactile feedback technology with a piezoelectric actuator has been developed and integrated into the developed hand tracking algorithm, including the DTW (dynamic time warping gesture recognition algorithm for a complete solution of an immersive gesture control system. The quantitative and qualitative evaluations of the integrated system were conducted with human subjects, and the results demonstrate that our gesture control with tactile feedback is a promising technology compared to a vision-based gesture control system that has typically no feedback for the user’s gesture inputs. Our study provides researchers and designers with informative guidelines to develop more natural gesture control systems or immersive user interfaces with haptic feedback.

  18. Depth camera-based 3D hand gesture controls with immersive tactile feedback for natural mid-air gesture interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwangtaek; Kim, Joongrock; Choi, Jaesung; Kim, Junghyun; Lee, Sangyoun

    2015-01-08

    Vision-based hand gesture interactions are natural and intuitive when interacting with computers, since we naturally exploit gestures to communicate with other people. However, it is agreed that users suffer from discomfort and fatigue when using gesture-controlled interfaces, due to the lack of physical feedback. To solve the problem, we propose a novel complete solution of a hand gesture control system employing immersive tactile feedback to the user's hand. For this goal, we first developed a fast and accurate hand-tracking algorithm with a Kinect sensor using the proposed MLBP (modified local binary pattern) that can efficiently analyze 3D shapes in depth images. The superiority of our tracking method was verified in terms of tracking accuracy and speed by comparing with existing methods, Natural Interaction Technology for End-user (NITE), 3D Hand Tracker and CamShift. As the second step, a new tactile feedback technology with a piezoelectric actuator has been developed and integrated into the developed hand tracking algorithm, including the DTW (dynamic time warping) gesture recognition algorithm for a complete solution of an immersive gesture control system. The quantitative and qualitative evaluations of the integrated system were conducted with human subjects, and the results demonstrate that our gesture control with tactile feedback is a promising technology compared to a vision-based gesture control system that has typically no feedback for the user's gesture inputs. Our study provides researchers and designers with informative guidelines to develop more natural gesture control systems or immersive user interfaces with haptic feedback.

  19. Listening to white noise counteracts visual and haptic pseudoneglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Lega, Carlotta; Vecchi, Tomaso; Vallar, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Neurologically intact individuals usually show a leftward bias in line bisection, a tendency known as "pseudoneglect", likely reflecting a right-hemisphere dominance in controlling the allocation of spatial attention. Studies in brain-damaged patients with left visuospatial neglect have reported that auditory stimulation may reduce the deficit, both in a spatially dependent and in a spatially independent way. Here we show for the first time that the concurrent binaural presentation of auditory white noise affects healthy individuals' performance in both visual and haptic bisection, reducing their leftward error. We suggest that this effect depends on the noise boosting alertness and restoring the hemispheric activation balance. Our data clearly show that task-irrelevant auditory noise crossmodally affects the allocation of spatial resources in both the haptic and the visual space; future research may clarify whether these effects are specific for the type of auditory stimulation.

  20. The Effect of Trial-by-trial Adaptation on Conflicts in Haptic Shared Control for Free-Air Teleoperation Tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, A. W.; Wildenbeest, J. G. W.; Boessenkool, H.; Abbink, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    Haptic shared control can improve execution of teleoperation and driving tasks. However, shared control designs may suffer from conflicts between individual human operators and constant haptic assistance when their desired trajectories differ, leading to momentarily increased forces, discomfort or

  1. Control of 4-DOF MR haptic master for medical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jong-Seok; Choi, Seung-Hyun; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2014-03-01

    In this work, magnetorheological (MR) based haptic master for robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery (RMIS) is proposed and analyzed. Using a controllable MR fluid, the masters can generate a reflection force with the 4-DOF motion. The proposed master consists of two actuators: MR clutch featuring gimbal mechanism for 2-DOF rotational motion (X and Y axes) and MR clutch attached at gripper of gimbal structures for 1-DOF rotational motion (Z axis) and 1-DOF translational motion. After analyzing the dynamic motion by integrating mechanical and physical properties of the actuators, torque model of the proposed haptic master is derived. For realization of master-slave system, an encoder which can measure position information is integrated with the MR haptic master. In the RMIS system, the measured position is converted as a command signal and sent to the slave robot. In this work, slave and organ of patient are modeled in virtual space. In order to embody a human organ into virtual space, a volumetric deformable object is mathematically formulated by a shape retaining chain linked (S-chain) model. Accordingly, the haptic architecture is established by incorporating the virtual slave with the master device in which the reflection force and desired position originated from the object of the virtual slave and operator of the master, respectively, are transferred to each other. In order to achieve the desired force trajectories, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is designed and implemented. It has been demonstrated that the effective tracking control performance for the desired motion of reflection force is well presented in time domain.

  2. Towards observable haptics: Novel sensors for capturing tactile interaction patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Kõiva, Risto

    2014-01-01

    Touch is one of the primary senses humans use when performing coordinated interaction, but the lack of a sense of touch in the majority of contemporary interactive technical systems, such as robots, which operate in non-deterministic environments, results in interactions that can at best be described as clumsy. Observing human haptics and extracting the salient information from the gathered data is not only relevant if we are to try to understand the involved underlying cognitive processe...

  3. Coincidence avoidance principle in surface haptic interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Steven G.; Klatzky, Roberta L.; Peshkin, Michael A.; Colgate, James Edward

    2015-01-01

    When multiple fingertips experience force sensations, how does the brain interpret the combined sensation? In particular, under what conditions are the sensations perceived as separate or, alternatively, as an integrated whole? In this work, we used a custom force-feedback device to display force signals to two fingertips (index finger and thumb) as they traveled along collinear paths. Each finger experienced a pattern of forces that, taken individually, produced illusory virtual bumps, and subjects reported whether they felt zero, one, or two bumps. We varied the spatial separation between these bump-like force-feedback regions, from being much greater than the finger span to nearly exactly the finger span. When the bump spacing was the same as the finger span, subjects tended to report only one bump. We found that the results are consistent with a quantitative model of perception in which the brain selects a structural interpretation of force signals that relies on minimizing coincidence stemming from accidental alignments between fingertips and inferred surface structures. PMID:25675477

  4. Strategies for effective feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritek, Patricia A

    2015-04-01

    Provision of regular feedback to trainees on clinical performance by supervising providers is increasingly recognized as an essential component of undergraduate and graduate health sciences education; however, many individuals have not been formally trained in this pedagogical skill. At the bedside or in the clinic, effective performance feedback can be accomplished by following four key steps. Begin by setting expectations that incorporate the trainee's personal goals and external objectives. Delineate how and when you will provide feedback to the learner. Next, directly observe the trainee's performance. This can be challenging while engaged on a busy clinical service, but a focus on discrete activities or interactions (e.g., family meeting, intravascular volume assessment using bedside ultrasound, or obtaining informed consent) is helpful. The third step is to plan and prioritize the feedback session. Feedback is most effective when given in a timely fashion and delivered in a safe environment. Limit the issues addressed because learners often disengage if confronted with too many deficiencies. Finally, when delivering feedback, begin by listening to the trainee's self-evaluation and then take a balanced approach. Describe in detail what the trainee does well and discuss opportunities for improvement with emphasis on specific, modifiable behaviors. The feedback loop is completed with a plan for follow-up reassessment. Through the use of these relatively simple practices, both the trainee and teacher can have a more productive learning experience.

  5. Pitch height modulates visual and haptic bisection performance in musicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlotta eLega

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Consistent evidence suggests that pitch height may be represented in a spatial format, having both a vertical and an horizontal representation. The spatial representation of pitch height results into response compatibility effects for which high pitch tones are preferentially associated to up-right responses, and low pitch tones are preferentially associated to down-left responses (i.e., the SMARC effect, with the strength of these associations depending on individuals’ musical skills. In this study we investigated whether listening to tones of different pitch affects the representation of external space, as assessed in a visual and haptic line bisection paradigm, in musicians and non musicians. Low and high pitch tones affected the bisection performance in musicians differently, both when pitch was relevant and irrelevant for the task, and in both the visual and the haptic modality. No effect of pitch height was observed on the bisection performance of non musicians. Moreover, our data also show that musicians present a (supramodal rightward bisection bias in both the visual and the haptic modality, extending previous findings limited to the visual modality, and consistent with the idea that intense practice with musical notation and bimanual instrument training affects hemispheric lateralization.

  6. Personalized Learning in Medical Education: Designing a User Interface for a Dynamic Haptic Robotic Trainer for Central Venous Catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yovanoff, Mary; Pepley, David; Mirkin, Katelin; Moore, Jason; Han, David; Miller, Scarlett

    2017-09-01

    While Virtual Reality (VR) has emerged as a viable method for training new medical residents, it has not yet reached all areas of training. One area lacking such development is surgical residency programs where there are large learning curves associated with skill development. In order to address this gap, a Dynamic Haptic Robotic Trainer (DHRT) was developed to help train surgical residents in the placement of ultrasound guided Internal Jugular Central Venous Catheters and to incorporate personalized learning. In order to accomplish this, a 2-part study was conducted to: (1) systematically analyze the feedback given to 18 third year medical students by trained professionals to identify the items necessary for a personalized learning system and (2) develop and experimentally test the usability of the personalized learning interface within the DHRT system. The results can be used to inform the design of VR and personalized learning systems within the medical community.

  7. HSP v2: Haptic Signal Processing with Extensions for Physical Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overholt, Daniel; Kontogeorgakopoulos, Alexandros; Berdahl, Edgar

    2010-01-01

    The Haptic Signal Processing (HSP) platform aims to enable musicians to easily design and perform with digital haptic musical instruments [1]. In this paper, we present some new objects introduced in version v2 for modeling of musical dynamical systems such as resonators and vibrating strings...

  8. A comparison of haptic material perception in blind and sighted individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Elisabeth; Wiebel, Christiane B; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2015-10-01

    We investigated material perception in blind participants to explore the influence of visual experience on material representations and the relationship between visual and haptic material perception. In a previous study with sighted participants, we had found participants' visual and haptic judgments of material properties to be very similar (Baumgartner, Wiebel, & Gegenfurtner, 2013). In a categorization task, however, visual exploration had led to higher categorization accuracy than haptic exploration. Here, we asked congenitally blind participants to explore different materials haptically and rate several material properties in order to assess the role of the visual sense for the emergence of haptic material perception. Principal components analyses combined with a procrustes superimposition showed that the material representations of blind and blindfolded sighted participants were highly similar. We also measured haptic categorization performance, which was equal for the two groups. We conclude that haptic material representations can emerge independently of visual experience, and that there are no advantages for either group of observers in haptic categorization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Differential effects of non-informative vision and visual interference on haptic spatial processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volcic, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831808; Rheede, J.J.; Postma, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/08621182X; Kappers, A.M.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07445370X

    2008-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effects of non-informative vision and visual interference upon haptic spatial processing, which supposedly derives from an interaction between an allocentric and egocentric reference frame. To this end, a haptic parallelity task served as baseline

  10. Differential effects of non-informative vision and visual interference on haptic spatial processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volcic, Robert; Van Rheede, Joram J.; Postma, Albert; Kappers, Astrid M L

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effects of non-informative vision and visual interference upon haptic spatial processing, which supposedly derives from an interaction between an allocentric and egocentric reference frame. To this end, a haptic parallelity task served as baseline

  11. Identification of virtual grounds using virtual reality haptic shoes and sound synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serafin, Stefania; Turchet, Luca; Nordahl, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    We describe a system which simulates in real-time the auditory and haptic sensation of walking on different surfaces. The system is based on physical models, that drive both the haptic and audio synthesizers, and a pair of shoes enhanced with sensors and actuators. In a discrimination experiment,...

  12. 78 FR 23593 - Certain Mobile Electronic Devices Incorporating Haptics; Termination of Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-19

    ... COMMISSION Certain Mobile Electronic Devices Incorporating Haptics; Termination of Investigation AGENCY: U.S... within the United States after importation of certain mobile electronic devices incorporating haptics....usitc.gov . The public record for this investigation may be viewed on the Commission's electronic docket...

  13. Haptic shared control improves hot cell remote handling despite controller inaccuracies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosterhout, J.; Abbink, D. A.; Koning, J. F.; Boessenkool, H.; Wildenbeest, J. G. W.; Heemskerk, C. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    A promising solution to improve task performance in ITER hot cell remote handling is the use of haptic shared control. Haptic shared control can assist the human operator along a safe and optimal path with continuous guiding forces from an intelligent autonomous controller. Previous research tested

  14. Obstacle Crossing Differences Between Blind and Blindfolded Subjects After Haptic Exploration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forner-Cordero, A.; Garcia, V.D.; Rodrigues, S.T.; Duysens, J.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the ability of blind people to cross obstacles after they have explored haptically their size and position. Long-term absence of vision may affect spatial cognition in the blind while their extensive experience with the use of haptic information for guidance may lead to

  15. Intercontinental haptic teleoperation of a flying vehicle: A step towards real-time applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mersha, A.Y.; Hou, X.; Mahony, R.; Stramigioli, Stefano; Corke, P.; Carloni, Raffaella

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the theory and practice for a stable haptic teleoperation of a flying vehicle. It extends passivity-based control framework for haptic teleoperation of aerial vehicles in the longest intercontinental setting that presents great challenges. The practicality of the control

  16. Design of a New MR Compatible Haptic Interface with Six Actuated Degrees of Freedom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ergin, Mehmet Alper; Kühne, Markus; Thielscher, Axel

    2014-01-01

    . Existing MR-compatible haptic interfaces are restricted to maximum three actuated degrees of freedom. We propose an MR-compatible haptic interface with six actuated degrees of freedom to be able to study human brain mechanisms of natural pick-and-place movements including arm transport. In this work, we...

  17. Haptic wearables as sensory replacement, sensory augmentation and trainer - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shull, Peter B; Damian, Dana D

    2015-07-20

    Sensory impairments decrease quality of life and can slow or hinder rehabilitation. Small, computationally powerful electronics have enabled the recent development of wearable systems aimed to improve function for individuals with sensory impairments. The purpose of this review is to synthesize current haptic wearable research for clinical applications involving sensory impairments. We define haptic wearables as untethered, ungrounded body worn devices that interact with skin directly or through clothing and can be used in natural environments outside a laboratory. Results of this review are categorized by degree of sensory impairment. Total impairment, such as in an amputee, blind, or deaf individual, involves haptics acting as sensory replacement; partial impairment, as is common in rehabilitation, involves haptics as sensory augmentation; and no impairment involves haptics as trainer. This review found that wearable haptic devices improved function for a variety of clinical applications including: rehabilitation, prosthetics, vestibular loss, osteoarthritis, vision loss and hearing loss. Future haptic wearables development should focus on clinical needs, intuitive and multimodal haptic displays, low energy demands, and biomechanical compliance for long-term usage.

  18. The Haptic iPod: passive learning of multi-limb rhythm skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwer, A.; Dalgleish, M.; Holland, S.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experiments showed that the use of haptic vibrotactile devices can support the learning of multi-limb rhythms [Holland et al., 2010]. These experiments centred on a tool called the Haptic Drum Kit, which uses vibrotactiles attached to wrists and ankles, together with a computer system that

  19. Perceptual Grouping in Haptic Search: The Influence of Proximity, Similarity, and Good Continuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overvliet, Krista E.; Krampe, Ralf Th.; Wagemans, Johan

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a haptic search experiment to investigate the influence of the Gestalt principles of proximity, similarity, and good continuation. We expected faster search when the distractors could be grouped. We chose edges at different orientations as stimuli because they are processed similarly in the haptic and visual modality. We therefore…

  20. Haptic Cues Used for Outdoor Wayfinding by Individuals with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsoklenis, Athanasios; Papadopoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The study presented here examines which haptic cues individuals with visual impairments use more frequently and determines which of these cues are deemed by these individuals to be the most important for way-finding in urban environments. It also investigates the ways in which these haptic cues are used by individuals with visual…

  1. Allocentric and egocentric reference frames in the processing of three-dimensional haptic space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volcic, R.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    The main goal of our study is to gain insight into the reference frames involved in three-dimensional haptic spatial processing. Previous research has shown that two-dimensional haptic spatial processing is prone to large systematic deviations. A weighted average model that identifies the

  2. Intramodal and cross-modal discrimination of curvature: Haptic touch versus vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittyerah, Miriam; Marks, Lawrence E.

    2008-01-01

    A total of 60 subjects, 20 in each experimental condition, gave ‘same-different’ judgments to pairs of stimuli differing in radius of curvature. Stimuli were presented intramodally to vision, intramodally to haptic touch, and cross-modally to vision and haptic touch. Results showed that performance, quantified by the measure d’, differed among the three modality conditions, being best in vision and poorest in haptics, with cross-modal performance falling roughly mid-way between. Unimodal visual performance exceeded cross-modal performance by about one d’ unit, and cross-modal performance similarly exceeded unimodal haptic performance by about one d’ unit. The study reveals the relative differences in the discrimination of curvatures of objects in vision and haptics. PMID:18504512

  3. Haptic device development based on electro static force of cellulose electro active paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Gyu-young; Kim, Sang-Youn; Jang, Sang-Dong; Kim, Dong-Gu; Kim, Jaehwan

    2011-04-01

    Haptic is one of well-considered device which is suitable for demanding virtual reality applications such as medical equipment, mobile devices, the online marketing and so on. Nowadays, many of concepts for haptic devices have been suggested to meet the demand of industries. Cellulose has received much attention as an emerging smart material, named as electro-active paper (EAPap). The EAPap is attractive for mobile haptic devices due to its unique characteristics in terms of low actuation power, suitability for thin devices and transparency. In this paper, we suggest a new concept of haptic actuator with the use of cellulose EAPap. Its performance is evaluated depending on various actuation conditions. As a result, cellulose electrostatic force actuator shows a large output displacement and fast response, which is suitable for mobile haptic devices.

  4. STARTING BLOCK PERFORMANCE IN SPRINTERS: A STATISTICAL METHOD FOR IDENTIFYING DISCRIMINATIVE PARAMETERS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND AN ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF PROVIDING FEEDBACK OVER A 6-WEEK PERIOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Fortier

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was twofold: (a to examine if kinetic and kinematic parameters of the sprint start could differentiate elite from sub-elite sprinters and, (b to investigate whether providing feedback (FB about selected parameters could improve starting block performance of intermediate sprinters over a 6-week training period. Twelve male sprinters, assigned to an elite or a sub-elite group, participated in Experiment 1. Eight intermediate sprinters participated in Experiment 2. All athletes were required to perform three sprint starts at maximum intensity followed by a 10-m run. To detect differences between elite and sub-elite groups, comparisons were made using t-tests for independent samples. Parameters reaching a significant group difference were retained for the linear discriminant analysis (LDA. The LDA yielded four discriminative kinetic parameters. Feedback about these selected parameters was given to sprinters in Experiment 2. For this experiment, data acquisition was divided into three periods. The first six sessions were without specific FB, whereas the following six sessions were enriched by kinetic FB. Finally, athletes underwent a retention session (without FB 4 weeks after the twelfth session. Even though differences were found in the time to front peak force, the time to rear peak force, and the front peak force in the retention session, the results of the present study showed that providing FB about selected kinetic parameters differentiating elite from sub-elite sprinters did not improve the starting block performance of intermediate sprinters

  5. Development of a haptic interface for motor rehabilitation therapy using augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrios-Serrano, Carlos; Bonilla, Isela; Vigueras-Gomez, Flavio; Mendoza, Marco

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a robot-assisted therapy system is presented, mainly focused on the improvement of fine movements of patients with motor deficits of upper limbs. This system combines the use of a haptic device with an augmented reality environment, where a kind of occupational therapy exercises are implemented. The main goal of the system is to provide an extra motivation to patients, who are stimulated visually and tactilely into a scene that mixes elements of real and virtual worlds. Additionally, using the norm of tracking error, it is possible to quantitatively measure the performance of the patient during a therapy session, likewise, it is possible to obtain information such as runtime and the followed path.

  6. Haptic-2D: A new haptic test battery assessing the tactual abilities of sighted and visually impaired children and adolescents with two-dimensional raised materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazella, Anaïs; Albaret, Jean-Michel; Picard, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    To fill an important gap in the psychometric assessment of children and adolescents with impaired vision, we designed a new battery of haptic tests, called Haptic-2D, for visually impaired and sighted individuals aged five to 18 years. Unlike existing batteries, ours uses only two-dimensional raised materials that participants explore using active touch. It is composed of 11 haptic tests, measuring scanning skills, tactile discrimination skills, spatial comprehension skills, short-term tactile memory, and comprehension of tactile pictures. We administered this battery to 138 participants, half of whom were sighted (n=69), and half visually impaired (blind, n=16; low vision, n=53). Results indicated a significant main effect of age on haptic scores, but no main effect of vision or Age × Vision interaction effect. Reliability of test items was satisfactory (Cronbach's alpha, α=0.51-0.84). Convergent validity was good, as shown by a significant correlation (age partialled out) between total haptic scores and scores on the B101 test (rp=0.51, n=47). Discriminant validity was also satisfactory, as attested by a lower but still significant partial correlation between total haptic scores and the raw score on the verbal WISC (rp=0.43, n=62). Finally, test-retest reliability was good (rs=0.93, n=12; interval of one to two months). This new psychometric tool should prove useful to practitioners working with young people with impaired vision. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. GIVING AND RECEIVING CONSTRUCTIVE FEEDBACK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ірина Олійник

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article scrutinizes the notion of feedback applicable in classrooms where team teaching is provided. The experience of giving and receiving feedback has been a good practice in cooperation between a U.S. Peace Corps volunteer and a Ukrainian counterpart. Giving and receiving feedback is an effective means of classroom observation that provides better insight into the process of teaching a foreign language. The article discusses the stages of feedback and explicates the notion of sharing experience between two teachers working simultaneously in the same classroom. The guidelines for giving and receiving feedback have been provided as well as the most commonly used vocabulary items have been listed. It has been proved that mutual feedback leads to improving teaching methods and using various teaching styles and techniques.

  8. Haptic perception of object curvature in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Konczak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The haptic perception of the curvature of an object is essential for adequate object manipulation and critical for our guidance of actions. This study investigated how the ability to perceive the curvature of an object is altered by Parkinson's disease (PD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eight healthy subjects and 11 patients with mild to moderate PD had to judge, without vision, the curvature of a virtual "box" created by a robotic manipulandum. Their hands were either moved passively along a defined curved path or they actively explored the curved curvature of a virtual wall. The curvature was either concave or convex (bulging to the left or right and was judged in two locations of the hand workspace--a left workspace location, where the curved hand path was associated with curved shoulder and elbow joint paths, and a right workspace location in which these joint paths were nearly linear. After exploring the curvature of the virtual object, subjects had to judge whether the curvature was concave or convex. Based on these data, thresholds for curvature sensitivity were established. The main findings of the study are: First, 9 out 11 PD patients (82% showed elevated thresholds for detecting convex curvatures in at least one test condition. The respective median threshold for the PD group was increased by 343% when compared to the control group. Second, when distal hand paths became less associated with proximal joint paths (right workspace, haptic acuity was reduced substantially in both groups. Third, sensitivity to hand trajectory curvature was not improved during active exploration in either group. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate that PD is associated with a decreased acuity of the haptic sense, which may occur already at an early stage of the disease.

  9. New geometric data structures for collision detection and haptics

    CERN Document Server

    Weller, René

    2013-01-01

    Starting with novel algorithms for optimally updating bounding volume hierarchies of objects undergoing arbitrary deformations, the author presents a new data structure that allows, for the first time, the computation of the penetration volume. The penetration volume is related to the water displacement of the overlapping region, and thus corresponds to a physically motivated and continuous force. The practicability of the approaches used is shown by realizing new applications in the field of robotics and haptics, including a user study that evaluates the influence of the degrees of freedom in

  10. Fast feedback for linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Allison, S.; Gromme, T.; Grossberg, P.; Himel, T.; Krauter, K.; MacKenzie, R.; Minty, M.; Sass, R. [and others

    1995-05-01

    A fast feedback system provides beam stabilization for the SLC. As the SLC is in some sense a prototype for future linear colliders, this system may be a prototype for future feedbacks. The SLC provides a good base of experience for feedback requirements and capabilities as well as a testing ground for performance characteristics. The feedback system controls a wide variety of machine parameters throughout the SLC and associated experiments, including regulation of beam position, angle, energy, intensity and timing parameters. The design and applications of the system are described, in addition to results of recent performance studies.

  11. Advanced 3D Human Simulation Components with Thermal/Haptic Feedback and Tissue Deformation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In integrating the following three significant components for its research/research and development (R/R&D) effort, the power of this candidate Phase I project...

  12. Improving Precision in Navigating Laparoscopic Surgery Instruments toward a Planar Target Using Haptic and Visual Feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, Thomas; Szewczyk, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    The poor ergonomics of laparoscopic surgery is a widely recognized source of difficulty for surgeons, leading to sub-optimal performance on their part and sometimes injury to the patient. The main recognized causes for such degraded performance are lost and distorted perception of interaction forces and degraded instrument navigation capabilities. The latter, due mainly to losses in visual and kinesthetic depth perception and modified hand-eye coordination, can prevent precise navigation of i...

  13. Advanced 3D Human Simulation Components with Thermal/Haptic Feedback and Tissue Deformation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In integrating the following three significant components for its research/research and development (R/R&D) effort, the power of this candidate Phase II project...

  14. Visuo-Haptic Mixed Reality with Unobstructed Tool-Hand Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosco, Francesco; Garre, Carlos; Bruno, Fabio; Muzzupappa, Maurizio; Otaduy, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Visuo-haptic mixed reality consists of adding to a real scene the ability to see and touch virtual objects. It requires the use of see-through display technology for visually mixing real and virtual objects, and haptic devices for adding haptic interaction with the virtual objects. Unfortunately, the use of commodity haptic devices poses obstruction and misalignment issues that complicate the correct integration of a virtual tool and the user's real hand in the mixed reality scene. In this work, we propose a novel mixed reality paradigm where it is possible to touch and see virtual objects in combination with a real scene, using commodity haptic devices, and with a visually consistent integration of the user's hand and the virtual tool. We discuss the visual obstruction and misalignment issues introduced by commodity haptic devices, and then propose a solution that relies on four simple technical steps: color-based segmentation of the hand, tracking-based segmentation of the haptic device, background repainting using image-based models, and misalignment-free compositing of the user's hand. We have developed a successful proof-of-concept implementation, where a user can touch virtual objects and interact with them in the context of a real scene, and we have evaluated the impact on user performance of obstruction and misalignment correction.

  15. Effect of Redundant Haptic Information on Task Performance During Visuo-Tactile Task Interruption and Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Seung Moon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have revealed that interruption induces disruptive influences on the performance of cognitive tasks. While much research has focused on the use of multimodal channels to reduce the cost of interruption, few studies have utilized haptic information as more than an associative cue. In the present study, we utilized a multimodal task interruption scenario involving the simultaneous presentation of visual information and haptic stimuli in order to investigate how the combined stimuli affect performance on the primary task (cost of interruption. Participants were asked to perform a two-back visuo-tactile task, in which visual and haptic stimuli were presented simultaneously, which was interrupted by a secondary task that also utilized visual and haptic stimuli. Four experimental conditions were evaluated: (1 paired information (visual stimulus + paired haptic stimulus with interruption; (2 paired information without interruption; (3 non-paired information (visual stimulus + non-paired haptic stimulus with interruption; and (4 non-paired information without interruption. Our findings indicate that, within a visuo-tactile task environment, redundant haptic information may not only increase accuracy on the primary task but also reduce the cost of interruption in terms of accuracy. These results suggest a new way of understanding the task recovery process within a multimodal environment.

  16. The effects of haptic input on biomechanical and neurophysiological parameters of walking: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Alison R; Hauck, Laura; Moraes, Renato; Sibley, Kathryn M

    2017-10-01

    Walking is an important component of daily life requiring sensorimotor integration to be successful. Adding haptic input via light touch or anchors has been shown to improve standing balance; however, the effect of adding haptic input on walking is not clear. This scoping review systematically summarizes the current evidence regarding the addition of haptic input on walking in adults. Following an established protocol, relevant studies were identified using indexed data bases (Medline, EMBASE, PsychINFO, Google Scholar) and hand searches of published review articles on related topics. 644 references were identified and screened by a minimum of two independent researchers before data was extracted from 17 studies. A modified TREND tool was used to assess quality of the references which showed that the majority of studies were of moderate or high quality. Results show that adding haptic input changes walking behaviour. In particular, there is an immediate reduction in variability of gait step parameters and whole body stability, as well as a decrease in lower limb muscle activity. The effect of added haptic input on reflex modulation may depend on the limb of interest (i.e., upper or lower limb). Many studies did not clearly describe the amount and/or direction of haptic input applied. This information is needed to replicate and/or advance their results. More investigations into the use and design of the haptic tools, the attentional demands of adding haptic input, and clarity on short-term effects are needed. In addition, more is research needed to determine whether adding haptic input has significant, lasting benefits that may translate to fall prevention efforts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The Art of Giving Online Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibold, Nancyruth; Schwarz, Laura Marie

    2015-01-01

    The cultivation of providing online feedback that is positive, effective, and enhances the learning experience is a valuable educator skill. Acquisition of the art of providing feedback is through education, practice, and faculty development. This article provides information about the best practices for delivering online feedback to learners. An…

  18. Universal haptic drive: a robot for arm and wrist rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblak, Jakob; Cikajlo, Imre; Matjacić, Zlatko

    2010-06-01

    In this paper we present a universal haptic drive (UHD), a device that enables rehabilitation of either arm ("ARM" mode) or wrist ("WRIST" mode) movement in two degrees-of-freedom. The mode of training depends on the selected mechanical configuration, which depends on locking/unlocking of a passive universal joint. Actuation of the device is accomplished by utilizing a series elastic actuation principle, which enables use of off-the-shelf mechanical and actuation components. A proportional force control scheme, needed for implementation of impedance control based movement training, was implemented. The device performance in terms of achievable lower and upper bound of viable impedance range was evaluated through adequately chosen sinusoidal movement in eight directions of a planar movement for the "ARM" mode and in eight directions of a combined wrist flexion/extension and forearm pronation/supination movement for the "WRIST" mode. Additionally, suitability of the universal haptic drive for movement training was tested in a series of training sessions conducted with a chronic stroke subject. The results have shown that reliable and repeatable performance can be achieved in both modes of operation for all tested directions.

  19. HAPTIC DEVICES AND TACTILE EXPERIENCES IN MUSEUM EXHIBITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Comes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Museums all around the globe are starting to adopt advanced technologies that enable the visitors to interact with digital replicas of their collections and artworks. Immersive and interactive virtual reality applications represent one of the most appealing and most used technologies within modern museum exhibitions areas. Using these types of applications the visitors can have access to additional layers of information which can be presented in different languages and presented to the visitor when they demand it using advanced digital interactivity. But the major drawback of these applications is that they don’t allow the users to experience tactile exploration regarding the shapes and ornaments of the cultural heritage artefacts. People are programmed to gather and receive sensory information using their sight, hearing but also using tactile experiences. In order to enable tactile experiences within museum exhibitions, modern technologies such as haptic devices can be installed to enable the visitors to examine the shape of the 3D digital replicas of real artefacts. This paper presents a case study of a haptic device instalment within a museum exhibition that can enable real time tactile exploration of digitized artefacts.

  20. Physics-Based Haptic Simulation of Bone Machining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbabtafti, M; Moghaddam, M; Nahvi, A; Mahvash, M; Richardson, B; Shirinzadeh, B

    2011-01-01

    We present a physics-based training simulator for bone machining. Based on experimental studies, the energy required to remove a unit volume of bone is a constant for every particular bone material. We use this physical principle to obtain the forces required to remove bone material with a milling tool rotating at high speed. The rotating blades of the tool are modeled as a set of small cutting elements. The force of interaction between a cutting element and bone is calculated from the energy required to remove a bone chip with an estimated thickness and known material stiffness. The total force acting on the cutter at a particular instant is obtained by integrating the differential forces over all cutting elements engaged. A voxel representation is used to represent the virtual bone and removed chips for calculating forces of machining. We use voxels that carry bone material properties to represent the volumetric haptic body and to apply underlying physical changes during machining. Experimental results of machining samples of a real bone confirm the force model. A real-time haptic implementation of the method in a dental training simulator is described.

  1. The medium of haptic perception: a tensegrity hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turvey, Michael T; Fonseca, Sérgio T

    2014-01-01

    For any given animal, the sources of mechanical disturbances inducing tissue deformation define environment from the perspective of the animal's haptic perceptual system. The system's achievements include perceiving the body, attachments to the body, and the surfaces and substances adjacent to the body. Among the perceptual systems, it stands alone in having no defined medium. There is no articulated functional equivalent to air and water, the media that make possible the energy transmissions and diffusions underpinning the other perceptual systems. To identify the haptic system's medium the authors focus on connective tissue and the conjunction of muscular, connective tissue net, and skeletal (MCS) as the body's proper characterization. The challenge is a biophysical formulation of MCS as a continuum that, similar to air and water, is homogeneous and isotropic. The authors hypothesized a multifractal tensegrity (MFT) with the shape and stability of the constituents of each scale, from individual cell to whole body, derivative of continuous tension and discontinuous compression. Each component tensegrity of MFT is an adjustive-receptive unit, and the array of tensions in MFT is information about MCS. The authors extend the MFT hypothesis to body-brain linkages, and to limb perception phenomena attendant to amputation, vibration, anesthesia, neuropathy, and microgravity.

  2. Repeated palpatory training of medical students on the Virtual Haptic Back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Kapil; Howell, John N; Conatser, Robert R; Williams, Robert L

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of simulation-based training has been accepted with great success in many fields including medicine. Most of the simulation research and development in medicine has focused on surgery. There has been some development of hardware based biomechanical models of sections of human anatomy, such as pelvic exam simulators. More recently, with the advances in haptics technology, software and hardware based simulators are being developed for the previously ignored area of palpatory diagnosis. The Virtual Haptic Back (VHB) is a simulator based on virtual reality and haptics that is currently being used to train medical students in palpatory diagnosis. This study examined the effect of repeating the training on the VHB.

  3. The effect of providing feedback on inhaler technique and adherence from an electronic audio recording device, INCA®, in a community pharmacy setting: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Susan Mary; MacHale, Elaine; Sulaiman, Imran; Holmes, Martin; Hughes, Cian; D'Arcy, Shona; Rapcan, Viliam; Taylor, Terence; Boland, Fiona; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Reilly, Richard B; Ryder, Sheila A; Costello, Richard W

    2016-05-04

    Poor adherence to inhaled medication may lead to inadequate symptom control in patients with respiratory disease. In practice it can be difficult to identify poor adherence. We designed an acoustic recording device, the INCA® (INhaler Compliance Assessment) device, which, when attached to an inhaler, identifies and records the time and technique of inhaler use, thereby providing objective longitudinal data on an individual's adherence to inhaled medication. This study will test the hypothesis that providing objective, personalised, visual feedback on adherence to patients in combination with a tailored educational intervention in a community pharmacy setting, improves adherence more effectively than education alone. The study is a prospective, cluster randomised, parallel-group, multi-site study conducted over 6 months. The study is designed to compare current best practice in care (i.e. routine inhaler technique training) with the use of the INCA® device for respiratory patients in a community pharmacy setting. Pharmacies are the unit of randomisation and on enrolment to the study they will be allocated by the lead researcher to one of the three study groups (intervention, comparator or control groups) using a computer-generated list of random numbers. Given the nature of the intervention neither pharmacists nor participants can be blinded. The intervention group will receive feedback from the acoustic recording device on inhaler technique and adherence three times over a 6-month period along with inhaler technique training at each of these times. The comparator group will also receive training in inhaler use three times over the 6-month study period but no feedback on their habitual performance. The control group will receive usual care (i.e. the safe supply of medicines and advice on their use). The primary outcome is the rate of participant adherence to their inhaled medication, defined as the proportion of correctly taken doses of medication at the correct

  4. Electroencephalogy (EEG) Feedback in Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-26

    Electroencephalogy ( EEG ) Feedback In Decision- Making The goal of this project is to investigate whether Electroencephalogy ( EEG ) can provide useful...feedback when training rapid decision-making. More specifically, EEG will allow us to provide online feedback about the neural decision processes...Electroencephalogy ( EEG ) Feedback In Decision-Making Report Title The goal of this project is to investigate whether Electroencephalogy ( EEG ) can provide useful

  5. Three-dimensional printed haptic model from a prenatal surface-rendered oropalatal sonographic view: a new tool in the surgical planning of cleft lip/palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicot, R; Couly, G; Ferri, J; Levaillant, J-M

    2018-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound has significantly improved prenatal screening and perinatal care in the area of cleft lip/palate and other deformities, providing essential preoperative information to the surgical team. However, current 3D reconstruction modalities are limited primarily to display on a two-dimensional surface. In contrast, a 3D printed haptic model allows both the surgeon and the parents to develop a better understanding of the anatomy and the surgical procedure through the ability to interact directly with the printed model. The production of a 3D printed haptic model of cleft lip and palate obtained from a surface-rendered oropalatal sonographic view is presented here. The development of this 3D printed haptic model will allow the surgical team to perform preoperative planning with a highly accurate medical model, and it therefore represents a new tool in the management of cleft lip/palate. It also provides better prenatal information for the parents. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Emotional feedback for mobile devices

    CERN Document Server

    Seebode, Julia

    2015-01-01

    This book investigates the functional adequacy as well as the affective impression made by feedback messages on mobile devices. It presents an easily adoptable experimental setup to examine context effects on various feedback messages, and applies it to auditory, tactile and auditory-tactile feedback messages. This approach provides insights into the relationship between the affective impression and functional applicability of these messages as well as an understanding of the influence of unimodal components on the perception of multimodal feedback messages. The developed paradigm can also be extended to investigate other aspects of context and used to investigate feedback messages in modalities other than those presented. The book uses questionnaires implemented on a Smartphone, which can easily be adopted for field studies to broaden the scope even wider. Finally, the book offers guidelines for the design of system feedback.

  7. Offering effective feedback to trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskander, Morkos

    2015-01-01

    Effective feedback on performance is an integral part of clinical training. It allows the trainee to critically reflect on their development, as well as enable the teacher to chart progress and detect areas for development. In order to provide effective feedback, we need to take into account the performance itself, but also the setting where feedback is offered, and the expected outcomes of the encounter. As ever, negative feedback remains more difficult to give and receive, and as such requires a greater degree of delicacy to produce a positive result.

  8. Development of the Teacher Feedback Observation Scheme: evaluating the quality of feedback in peer groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thurlings, Marieke; Vermeulen, Marjan; Kreijns, Karel; Bastiaens, Theo; Stijnen, Sjef

    2018-01-01

    Research suggests that feedback is an essential element in learning. This study focuses on feedback that teachers provide in reciprocal peer groups to improve their performance in the classroom. The Teacher Feedback Observation Scheme (TFOS) was developed to identify feedback patterns, which

  9. Integrating Sensitizing Labs in an Educational Design Process for Haptic Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Akner-Koler

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available New design methods for educating designers are needed to adapt the attributes of haptic interaction to fit the embodied experience of the users. This paper presents educationally framed aesthetic sensitizing labs: 1 a material-lab exploring the tactile and haptic structures of materials, 2 a vibrotactile-lab exploring actuators directly on the body and 3 a combined materials- and vibrotactile-lab embedded in materials. These labs were integrated in a design course that supports a non-linear design process for embodied explorative and experimental activities that feed into an emerging gestalt. A co-design process was developed in collaboration with researchers and users who developed positioning and communications systems for people with deafblindness. Conclusion: the labs helped to discern attributes of haptic interactions which supported designing scenarios and prototypes showing novel ways to understand and shape haptic interaction.

  10. 77 FR 20847 - Certain Mobile Electronic Devices Incorporating Haptics; Institution of Investigation Pursuant to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... haptics by reason of infringement of certain claims of U.S. Patent No. 6,429,846 (``the `846 patent''); U... Trademark Office of a certificate of correction in response to the currently pending correction request. The...

  11. On First Impression of the Teaching Materials which used Haptic Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Manabu

    The virtual reality (VR) is one in the intelligence information communications technologies. As the application to the education field of VR, we construct a support system for the penmanship using the haptic display. We evaluated the first impression.

  12. Remote haptic perception of slanted surfaces shows the same scale expansion as visual perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Dennis M; McManama, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Previous work has shown that overestimates of geographic slant depend on the modality used (verbal or haptic). Recently, that line of reasoning has come into question for many reasons, not the least of which is that the typical method used for measuring "action" has been the use of a palm board, which is not well calibrated to any type of action toward slanted surfaces. In the present work, we investigated how a remote haptic task that has been well calibrated to action in previous work is related to verbal overestimates of slanted surfaces that are out of reach. The results show that haptic estimates are perceptually equivalent to the verbal overestimates that have been found in numerous previous studies. This work shows that the haptic perceptual system is scaled in the same way as the visual perceptual system for estimating the orientation of slanted surfaces that are out of reach.

  13. 77 FR 15390 - Certain Mobile Electronic Devices Incorporating Haptics; Receipt of Amended Complaint...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Mobile Electronic Devices Incorporating Haptics; Receipt of Amended Complaint; Solicitation of Comments Relating to the Public Interest AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION...

  14. A "virtually minimal" visuo-haptic training of attention in severe traumatic brain injury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dvorkin, Assaf Y; Ramaiya, Milan; Larson, Eric B; Zollman, Felise S; Hsu, Nancy; Pacini, Sonia; Shah, Amit; Patton, James L

    2013-01-01

    .... We designed a "virtually minimal" approach using robot-rendered haptics in a virtual environment to train severely injured inpatients in the early stages of recovery to sustain attention to a visuo-motor task...

  15. Design of a Magnetic Resonance-Safe Haptic Wrist Manipulator for Movement Disorder Diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bode, Dyon; Mugge, Winfred; Schouten, Alfred C.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Bour, Lo J.; van der Helm, Frans C. T.; Lammertse, Piet

    2017-01-01

    Tremor, characterized by involuntary and rhythmical movements, is the most common movement disorder. Tremor can have peripheral and central oscillatory components which properly assessed may improve diagnostics. A magnetic resonance (MR)-safe haptic wrist manipulator enables simultaneous measurement

  16. The impact of haptic learning in telemanipulator-assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Stephan; Holzhey, David; Strauss, Gero; Burgert, Oliver; Falk, Volkmar

    2007-10-01

    The use of a telemanipulator requires special training and surgical performance is associated with a learning curve. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the potential value of Haptic-Visual over Visual-Only passive Training in telemanipulator-assisted surgery. Two telemanipulator consoles (da Vinci, Intuitive Surgical) were linked through an Application Programer's Interface allowing the applicant at the training console to register the position and passively follow the motions of the instructor's master telemanipulators (MTMs) at the master console (Haptic-Visual Learning group, HVL). The applicant could not actively interfere with the MTM movements. Both the trainee and the instructor shared the same 3-dimensional vision. Alternatively, subjects received only standard visual training without touching the MTMs (Visual-Only Learning group, VL). A standardized demonstration of tasks and the system was given for both groups. Participants (n=20) without previous experience with telemanipulation performed a set of various tasks in a randomized order. Study end points were time and accuracy required to perform the different task. The first task, with moving items to appropriate locations, showed differences in time to perform the task [mean: 4:06 min (HVL) vs. 5:16 min (VL) (P=0.2)] and accuracy differed among groups [mean number of errors 1.7 (VL) vs. 1.3 (HVL) P=0.38]. With more challenging tasks [cut out round figures (cut) and performing double dot suture lines (sti)] the number of errors was less in the HVL group [mean: 1.1 errors (cut) (P=0.05) and 1.8 errors (sti) (P=0.26)] compared with the VL group [mean: 1.8 errors (cut) and 2.3 errors (sti)]. In addition, the time to perform the tasks decreased in the HVL group with mean: 5.42 minutes (cut) (P=0.26) and 9.41 minutes (sti) (P=0.36) compared with the VL group with mean: 7.09 minutes (cut) and 11.43 minutes (sti). This study demonstrated the impact of haptic-visual passive learning in telemanipulator

  17. Haptic Holography: Acoustic Space and the Evolution of the Whole Message

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, N.

    2013-02-01

    The paper argues that the Haptic Holography Work Station is an example of a medium that fit's with McLuhan's notion of Acoustic Space, that is it is a medium which stimulates more than one sense of perception at a time. As a result, the Haptic Holography Work Station transmits information about the subject much more rapidly than other media that precedes it, be it text, photography or television.

  18. Cognitive and tactile factors affecting human haptic performance in later life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Kalisch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vision and haptics are the key modalities by which humans perceive objects and interact with their environment in a target-oriented manner. Both modalities share higher-order neural resources and the mechanisms required for object exploration. Compared to vision, the understanding of haptic information processing is still rudimentary. Although it is known that haptic performance, similar to many other skills, decreases in old age, the underlying mechanisms are not clear. It is yet to be determined to what extent this decrease is related to the age-related loss of tactile acuity or cognitive capacity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the haptic performance of 81 older adults by means of a cross-modal object recognition test. Additionally, we assessed the subjects' tactile acuity with an apparatus-based two-point discrimination paradigm, and their cognitive performance by means of the non-verbal Raven-Standard-Progressive matrices test. As expected, there was a significant age-related decline in performance on all 3 tests. With the exception of tactile acuity, this decline was found to be more distinct in female subjects. Correlation analyses revealed a strong relationship between haptic and cognitive performance for all subjects. Tactile performance, on the contrary, was only significantly correlated with male subjects' haptic performance. CONCLUSIONS: Haptic object recognition is a demanding task in old age, especially when it comes to the exploration of complex, unfamiliar objects. Our data support a disproportionately higher impact of cognition on haptic performance as compared to the impact of tactile acuity. Our findings are in agreement with studies reporting an increase in co-variation between individual sensory performance and general cognitive functioning in old age.

  19. Skin-Inspired Haptic Memory Arrays with an Electrically Reconfigurable Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bowen; Wang, Hong; Liu, Yaqing; Qi, Dianpeng; Liu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Hua; Yu, Jiancan; Sherburne, Matthew; Wang, Zhaohui; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-02-24

    Skin-inspired haptic-memory devices, which can retain pressure information after the removel of external pressure by virtue of the nonvolatile nature of the memory devices, are achieved. The rise of haptic-memory devices will allow for mimicry of human sensory memory, opening new avenues for the design of next-generation high-performance sensing devices and systems. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Risk factors for anterior capsule contraction syndrome with polypropylene or poly(methyl methacrylate) haptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, S P; Pavilack, M A

    1999-10-01

    To determine the effect of haptic composition on the development of anterior capsule contraction syndrome (CCS) requiring neodymium: YAG anterior capsulotomy. Ophthalmology practice in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA. This retrospective study covered a 30 month period during which 1 surgeon discontinued implanting AMO SI-30NB intraocular lenses (IOLs) with polypropylene haptics (n = 216) in favor of SI-40NB IOLs with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) haptics (n = 127). The transition was motivated by the suspicion that the PMMA haptics would maintain the capsulorhexis opening better and reduce the need for an anterior capsulotomy. Three eyes with SI-30NB IOLs (1.4%) required anterior capsulotomies; 2 eyes had preoperative pseudoexfoliation syndrome and required the capsulotomy within 3 months of surgery. Three eyes with SI-40NB IOLs (2.4%) required anterior capsulotomies within 4 months; 2 eyes had preoperative pseudoexfoliation syndrome and 1 had traumatic zonular weakness. The incidence of anterior capsulotomy did not differ significantly between the 2 IOL populations (P > .5), although preoperative pseudoexfoliation syndrome was a significant risk factor in both groups (P PMMA haptics of the SI-40NB IOL did not differ significantly in their ability to prevent CCS requiring anterior capsulotomy. Regardless of IOL haptic composition, eyes with preoperative zonular weakness associated with pseudoexfoliation syndrome or ocular trauma can develop CCS within 3 months of surgery and should, therefore, be followed closely in the early postoperative weeks to minimize the sequelae of anterior capsule fibrosis.