WorldWideScience

Sample records for providing faculty development

  1. Faculty's Perception of Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, Kalyani; Moshynskyy, Anton; Sakai, Damon H.; Fong, Sheri F. T.

    2017-01-01

    Faculty Development (FD) is a vital component across the medical education continuum of undergraduate, postgraduate, and continuing medical education. However, the positioning of FD in medical institutions varies widely. The perceptions of faculty on FD should be examined in order to provide effective FD. The perceptions of faculty involved in…

  2. Integrating a Career Planning and Development Program into the Baccalaureate Nursing Curriculum: Part III. Impact on Faculty's Career Satisfaction and Confidence in Providing Student Career Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Janice; Spalding, Karen; Navarro, Justine; Gaitana, Gianina

    2015-11-25

    As career satisfaction has been identified as a predictor of retention of nurses across all sectors, it is important that career satisfaction of both new and experienced nursing faculty is recognized in academic settings. A study of a curriculum-based career planning and development (CPD) program was conducted to determine the program's effects on participating students, new graduate nurses, and faculty. This third in a series of three papers reports on how the CPD intervention affected faculty participants' sense of career satisfaction and confidence in their role as career educators and coaches. Faculty who participated in the intervention CPD intervention group reported an increase in confidence in their ability to provide career coaching and education to students. They further indicated that their own career development served to enhance career satisfaction; an outcome identified as a predictor of faculty career satisfaction. Study results suggest that interventions such as the one described in this paper can have a potentially positive impact in other settings as well.

  3. Professorship: A Faculty Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Todd M.; Davis, Jane F.

    1987-01-01

    A faculty development program at a traditionally black college was designed to enhance the ability of graduate faculty to supervise research activities of graduate students. Focus was on interpersonal problem solving in advisement and professional issues; classroom techniques of discussion teaching, case methods, and psychodrama encouraged the…

  4. Neonatology faculty development using simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Heather M; Hales, Roberta L

    2016-11-01

    The goal of faculty development activities is to supply the public with knowledgeable, skilled, and competent physicians who are prepared for high performance in the dynamic and complex healthcare environment. Current faculty development programs lack evidence-based support and are not sufficient to meet the professional needs of practicing physicians. Simulation activities for faculty development offer an alternative to traditional, teacher-centric educational offerings. Grounded in adult learning theory, simulation is a learner-centric, interactive, efficient, and effective method to train busy professionals. Many of the faculty development needs of clinical neonatologists can be met by participating in simulation-based activities that focus on technical skills, teamwork, leadership, communication, and patient safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Faculty Development through Cognitive Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, Mary Antony

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a faculty development project in which 12 teacher educators used the Cognitive Coaching model to engage in critical reflections about their teaching. Each identified an aspect of their teaching they wanted to improve and a colleague to serve as coach. Participants engaged in Cognitive Coaching cycles, consisting of planning…

  6. REFLECTIONS ON SCREENAGERS, FACULTY DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike K. MOULTON

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines a strategy for a faculty development program with respect to net-supported learning. Many universities and colleges are struggling with meeting the demands of a rapidly changing world. Reflections in this paper are based on experiences from the Norwegian University of Life Sciences. Attention has been given to the intelligent use of technology as a means of meeting pressing challenges. What does this mean? I ask a series of questions, the answers of which form the basis for a faculty development program. What qualities and skills should our graduates have? What consequences does this have for the way we approach teaching and learning? And what role does technology play? In short, we must focus on faculty training courses and the ensuing development cycles of trial, error, refinement and sharing. Guiding principles for these activities should be:1. It is about learning.2. It is about easy access.3. It is about emphasizing collaboration.4. It is about support.

  7. Faculty development and organizational systems behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, C E; Magelssen, D

    1990-06-01

    Faculty development is that process that fosters improvement in faculty members' skills in teaching and research and promotes their career advancement. This study investigated the association between organizational behavior in military medical centers and the faculty development of its medical corps officers assigned to teaching positions. Such organizational behaviors as defining tasks clearly and resolving conflicts satisfactorily correlated well with the faculty members' overall satisfaction and other parameters of good faculty development. The results suggest that a strong relationship exists between the organizational behavior of an institution and the sense of identity, productivity, and continued career growth of its individual faculty members.

  8. Faculty development: a 'field of dreams'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Yvonne; McLeod, Peter J; Boillat, Miriam; Meterissian, Sarkis; Elizov, Michelle; Macdonald, Mary Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Participants in faculty development workshops often comment that 'those who need faculty development the most attend the least'. The goals of this study were to explore the reasons why some clinical teachers do not participate in centralised faculty development activities and to learn how we can make faculty development programmes more relevant to teachers' needs. In 2006, we conducted focus groups with 16 clinical teachers, who had not participated in faculty development activities, to ascertain their perceptions of faculty development, reasons for non-participation and perceived barriers to involvement. Content analysis and team consensus guided the data interpretation. Focus group participants were aware of faculty development offerings and valued the goals of these activities. Important reasons for non-participation emerged: clinical reality, which included volume of work and lack of (protected) time; logistical issues, such as timing and the central location of organised activities; a perceived lack of financial reward and recognition for teaching, and a perceived lack of direction from, and connection to, the university. Clinical reality and logistical issues appeared to be greater deterrents to participation than faculty development goals, content or strategies. Moreover, when asked to discuss faculty development, teachers referred to their development as faculty members in the broadest sense, which included personal and career development. They also expressed the desire for clear guidance from the university, financial rewards and recognition for teaching, and a sense of 'belonging'. Faculty development programmes should try to address these organisational issues as well as teachers' personal and professional needs.

  9. Exploring Faculty Developers' Experiences to Inform Our Understanding of Competence in Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lindsay; Leslie, Karen; Panisko, Danny; Walsh, Allyn; Wong, Anne; Stubbs, Barbara; Mylopoulos, Maria

    2018-02-01

    Now a mainstay in medical education, faculty development has created the role of the faculty developer. However, faculty development research tends to overlook faculty developers' roles and experiences. This study aimed to develop an empirical understanding of faculty developer competence by digging deeper into the actions, experiences, and perceptions of faculty developers as they perform their facilitator role. A constructivist grounded theory approach guided observations of faculty development activities, field interviews, and formal interviews with 31 faculty developers across two academic institutions from 2013 to 2014. Analysis occurred alongside and informed data collection. Themes were identified using a constant comparison process. Consistent with the literature, findings highlighted the knowledge and skills of the faculty developer and the importance of context in the design and delivery of faculty development activities. Three novel processes (negotiating, constructing, and attuning) were identified that integrate the individual faculty developer, her context, and the evolution of her competence. These findings suggest that faculty developer competence is best understood as a situated construct. A faculty developer's ability to attune to, construct, and negotiate her environment can both enhance and minimize the impact of contextual variables as needed. Thus, faculty developers do not passively experience context; rather, they actively interact with their environment in ways that maximize their performance. Faculty developers should be trained for the adaptive, situated use of knowledge.

  10. Revisioning Faculty Development for Changing Times: The Foundation and Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licklider, Barbara L.; Fulton, Carol; Schnelker, Diane L.

    1998-01-01

    Provides an interactive model of faculty development which draws from research on adult education and staff development. Argues that in order to improve the quality of undergraduate education college administrators can no longer assume that faculty will learn their craft on their own; they must provide time, opportunity and support. Contains 1…

  11. The essential value of projects in faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusic, Maryellen E; Milner, Robert J; Tisdell, Elizabeth J; Taylor, Edward W; Quillen, David A; Thorndyke, Luanne E

    2010-09-01

    Projects--planned activities with specific goals and outcomes--have been used in faculty development programs to enhance participant learning and development. Projects have been employed most extensively in programs designed to develop faculty as educators. The authors review the literature and report the results of their 2008 study of the impact of projects within the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine Junior Faculty Development Program, a comprehensive faculty development program. Using a mixed-methods approach, the products of project work, the academic productivity of program graduates, and the impact of projects on career development were analyzed. Faculty who achieved the most progress on their projects reported the highest number of academic products related to their project and the highest number of overall academic achievements. Faculty perceived that their project had three major effects on their professional development: production of a tangible outcome, development of a career focus, and development of relationships with mentors and peers. On the basis of these findings and a review of the literature, the authors conclude that projects are an essential element of a faculty development program. Projects provide a foundation for future academic success by enabling junior faculty to develop and hone knowledge and skills, identify a career focus and gain recognition within their community, generate scholarship, allocate time to academic work, and establish supportive relationships and collaborative networks. A list of best practices to successfully incorporate projects within faculty development programs is provided.

  12. Workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Providing resources and support for new faculty to succeed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T. M.; Beane, R. J.; Macdonald, H.; Manduca, C. A.; Tewksbury, B. J.; Allen-King, R. M.; Yuretich, R.; Richardson, R. M.; Ormand, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    A vital strategy to educate future geoscientists is to support faculty at the beginning of their careers, thus catalyzing a career-long impact on the early-career faculty and on their future students. New faculty members are at a pivotal stage in their careers as they step from being research-focused graduate students and post-doctoral scholars, under the guidance of advisors, towards launching independent careers as professors. New faculty commonly, and not unexpectedly, feel overwhelmed as they face challenges to establish themselves in a new environment, prepare new courses, begin new research, and develop a network of support. The workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Teaching, Research, and Managing Your Career has been offered annually in the U.S. since 1999. The workshop is currently offered through the National Association of Geoscience Teachers On the Cutting Edge professional development program with support from the NSF, AGU and GSA. This five-day workshop, with associated web resources, offers guidance for incorporating evidence-based teaching practices, developing a research program, and managing professional responsibilities in balance with personal lives. The workshop design includes plenary and concurrent sessions, individual consultations, and personalized feedback from workshop participants and leaders. Since 1999, more than 850 U.S. faculty have attended the Early Career Geoscience Faculty workshop. Participants span a wide range of geoscience disciplines, and are in faculty positions at two-year colleges, four-year colleges, comprehensive universities and research universities. The percentages of women (~50%) and underrepresented participants (~8%) are higher than in the general geoscience faculty population. Multiple participants each year are starting positions after receiving all or part of their education outside the U.S. Collectively, participants report that they are better prepared to move forward with their careers as a result of

  13. Exploring Faculty Developers’ Experiences to Inform Our Understanding of Competence in Faculty Development

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Lindsay; Leslie, Karen; Panisko, Danny; Walsh, Allyn; Wong, Anne; Stubbs, Barbara; Mylopoulos, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Now a mainstay in medical education, faculty development has created the role of the faculty developer. However, faculty development research tends to overlook faculty developers’ roles and experiences. This study aimed to develop an empirical understanding of faculty developer competence by digging deeper into the actions, experiences, and perceptions of faculty developers as they perform their facilitator role. Method A constructivist grounded theory approach guided observations of ...

  14. Online Faculty Development and Assessment System (OFDAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Luis M.; Alegre, Olga M.

    2006-01-01

    The rapid growth of online learning has led to the development of faculty inservice evaluation models focused on quality improvement of degree programs. Based on current "best practices" of student online assessment, the Online Faculty Development and Assessment System (OFDAS), created at the Canary Islands, was designed to serve the…

  15. Faculty-led faculty development: evaluation and reflections on a distributed educational leadership model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzubeir, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    This report describes and explores the impact of a series of faculty-led faculty development programs underpinned by principles of distributed educational leadership. We aimed to prepare faculty for their roles as facilitators and assessors in a newly implemented problem-based (PBL) graduate entry medical program. We asked participants attending a series of faculty development programs to evaluate workshops attended using an in-house designed survey. Overall descriptive statistics for all workshops and qualitative feedback for PBL workshops alone were examined. It was concluded that clinical faculty who are not specialized in medical education can offer high-quality, well-accepted training for their peers. Faculty development, underpinned by a distributed leadership approach which supports learning organization tenets, imaginative, flexible and democratic approaches to developing and nurturing expertise at all levels of the organization, is likely to lead to improvements in medical education. Despite the limitations of the survey approach to evaluation of faculty development programs, the information provided is useful both as a basis for decision making and program improvement.

  16. A collaboration among health sciences schools to enhance faculty development in teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicat, Brigitte L; O'Kane Kreutzer, Kathy; Gary, Judy; Ivey, Carole K; Marlowe, Elizabeth P; Pellegrini, Joan M; Shuford, Veronica P; Simons, Dianne F

    2014-06-17

    Those involved in providing faculty development may be among only a few individuals for whom faculty development is an interest and priority within their work setting. Furthermore, funding to support faculty development is limited. In 2010, an interprofessional, self-formed, faculty learning community on faculty development in teaching was established to promote collaboration on faculty development initiatives that have transference to faculty members across disciplines and to share expertise and resources for wider impact. The organic structure and processes of the faculty learning community created an environment that has not only resulted in an increased offering of faculty development opportunities and resources across the health science campus, but has created a rich environment that combines the knowledge, innovation, and experience to promote collaborative efforts that benefit all. The background, structure, processes, successes, and lessons learned of the interprofessional faculty learning community on faculty development in teaching are described.

  17. What motivates occasional faculty developers to lead faculty development workshops? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Irby, David M

    2015-11-01

    The demand for faculty development is ongoing, and many medical schools will need to expand their pool of faculty developers to include physicians and scientists whose primary expertise is not education. Insight into what motivates occasional faculty developers can guide recruitment and retention strategies. This study was designed to understand the motivations of faculty developers who occasionally (one to three times each year) lead faculty development workshops. Qualitative data were collected in March and April 2012 from interviews with faculty developers who occasionally taught workshops from 2007 to 2012 in the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine's faculty development program. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed. The authors thematically analyzed the transcripts using a general inductive approach and developed codes sensitized by motivation theories. The authors interviewed 29/30 (97%) occasional faculty developers and identified five themes: mastery (desire to learn and develop professionally), relatedness (enjoyment of working with and learning from others), duty (sense of obligation to give back and be a good academic citizen), purpose (commitment to improving local teaching and ultimately patient care), and satisfaction (fun and enjoyment). Four of the themes the authors found are well addressed in motivation theory literature: mastery, relatedness, duty, and purpose. Whereas these four are motivators for occasional faculty developers, it is the fifth theme-satisfaction-that the authors feel is foundational and links the others together. Armed with this understanding, individuals leading faculty development programs can develop strategies to recruit and retain occasional faculty developers.

  18. A national study on the attitudes of Irish dental faculty members to faculty development.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, E M

    2010-02-01

    International studies suggest that dental faculty are resistant to the concept and practice of faculty development. This paper analyses the demographic and educational profile of Irish Dental Faculty, exploring their attitudes to educational initiatives.

  19. Faculty Development: An Imperative for the Nineties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nies, Joyce I.

    1990-01-01

    Budget constraints and changing enrollment patterns have expanded the concept of faculty development to include retraining. In home economics, retraining faculty for high demand areas such as hotel/restaurant management and fashion merchandising can be an efficient use of resources and an effective way to meet demand. (SK)

  20. Technology Professional Development and Instructional Technology Integration among Part-Time Faculty at Illinois Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohani, Behnam

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on exploring Illinois community college faculty development coordinators' perceptions about how they are implementing faculty technology professional development programs and providing technical support for part-time faculty in the Illinois community college systems. Also examined were part-time faculty perceptions of the degree…

  1. Research Resources Survey: Radiology Junior Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Votaw, John R

    2015-07-01

    To assess resources available to junior faculty in US academic radiology departments for research mentorship and funding opportunities and to determine if certain resources are more common in successful programs. An anonymous survey covering scientific environment and research mentorship and was sent to vice-chairs of research of radiology departments. Results were evaluated to identify practices of research programs with respect to mentorship, resources, and opportunities. Academy of Radiology Research's 2012 National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants and awards list was used to determine if environment and practices correlate with funding. There was a 51% response rate. A greater fraction of clinical faculty gets promoted from assistant to associate professor than research faculty. Research faculty overall submits more funding applications. Most programs support start-up costs and K-awards. Over half of the departments have a vice-chair for faculty development, and most have formal mentorship programs. Faculty members are expected to teach, engage in service, publish, and apply for and get research funding within 3 years of hire. Top-tier programs as judged by NIH awards have a combination of MDs who devote >50% effort to research and PhD faculty. Key factors holding back both clinical and research junior faculty development were motivation, resources, and time, although programs reported high availability of resources and support at the department level. Better marketing of resources for junior faculty, effort devoted to mentoring clinical faculty in research, and explicit milestones/expectations for achievement could enhance junior faculty success, promote interest in the clinician–scientist career path for radiologists, and lead to greater research success.

  2. Online learning for faculty development: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David A; Steinert, Yvonne

    2013-11-01

    With the growing presence of computers and Internet technologies in personal and professional lives, it seems prudent to consider how online learning has been and could be harnessed to promote faculty development. Discuss advantages and disadvantages of online faculty development, synthesize what is known from studies involving health professions faculty members, and identify next steps for practice and future research. We searched MEDLINE for studies describing online instruction for developing teaching, leadership, and research skills among health professions faculty, and synthesized these in a narrative review. We found 20 articles describing online faculty development initiatives for health professionals, including seven quantitative comparative studies, four studies utilizing defined qualitative methods, and nine descriptive studies reporting anecdotal lessons learned. These programs addressed diverse topics including clinical teaching, educational assessment, business administration, financial planning, and research skills. Most studies enrolled geographically-distant learners located in different cities, provinces, or countries. Evidence suggests that online faculty development is at least comparable to traditional training, but learner engagement and participation is highly variable. It appears that success is more likely when the course addresses a relevant need, facilitates communication and social interaction, and provides time to complete course activities. Although we identified several practical recommendations for success, the evidence base for online faculty development is sparse and insubstantial. Future research should include rigorous, programmatic, qualitative and quantitative investigations to understand the principles that govern faculty member engagement and success.

  3. Structured Annual Faculty Review Program Accelerates Professional Development and Promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley J. Robboy MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective observational study on faculty development analyzes the Duke University Pathology Department’s 18-year experience with a structured mentoring program involving 51 junior faculty members. The majority had MD degrees only (55%. The percentage of young women faculty hires before 1998 was 25%, increasing to 72% after 2005. Diversity also broadened from 9% with varied heritages before 1998 to 37% since then. The mentoring process pivoted on an annual review process. The reviews generally helped candidates focus much earlier, identified impediments they individually felt, and provided new avenues to gain a national reputation for academic excellence. National committee membership effectively helped gain national exposure. Thirty-eight percent of the mentees served on College of American Pathologists (CAP committees, exponential multiples of any other national society. Some used CAP resources to develop major programs, some becoming nationally and internationally recognized for their academic activities. Several faculty gained national recognition as thought leaders for publishing about work initiated to serve administrative needs in the Department. The review process identified the need for more protected time for research, issues with time constraints, and avoiding exploitation when collaborating with other departments. This review identified a rigorous faculty mentoring and review process that included annual career counseling, goal-oriented academic careers, monitored advancement to promotion, higher salaries, and national recognition. All contributed to high faculty satisfaction and low faculty turnover. We conclude that a rigorous annual faculty review program and its natural sequence, promotion, can greatly foster faculty satisfaction.

  4. Exploring Faculty Developers’ Experiences to Inform Our Understanding of Competence in Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Karen; Panisko, Danny; Walsh, Allyn; Wong, Anne; Stubbs, Barbara; Mylopoulos, Maria

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Now a mainstay in medical education, faculty development has created the role of the faculty developer. However, faculty development research tends to overlook faculty developers’ roles and experiences. This study aimed to develop an empirical understanding of faculty developer competence by digging deeper into the actions, experiences, and perceptions of faculty developers as they perform their facilitator role. Method A constructivist grounded theory approach guided observations of faculty development activities, field interviews, and formal interviews with 31 faculty developers across two academic institutions from 2013 to 2014. Analysis occurred alongside and informed data collection. Themes were identified using a constant comparison process. Results Consistent with the literature, findings highlighted the knowledge and skills of the faculty developer and the importance of context in the design and delivery of faculty development activities. Three novel processes (negotiating, constructing, and attuning) were identified that integrate the individual faculty developer, her context, and the evolution of her competence. Conclusions These findings suggest that faculty developer competence is best understood as a situated construct. A faculty developer’s ability to attune to, construct, and negotiate her environment can both enhance and minimize the impact of contextual variables as needed. Thus, faculty developers do not passively experience context; rather, they actively interact with their environment in ways that maximize their performance. Faculty developers should be trained for the adaptive, situated use of knowledge. PMID:28678104

  5. Promoting the teaching of critical thinking skills through faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Schneider-Mitchell, Gail; Graff, Randy

    2009-06-01

    Practical and effective faculty development programs are vital to individual and institutional success. However, there is little evidence that program outcomes result in instructional changes. The purpose of this study was to determine if and how faculty development would enhance participants' use of critical thinking skills in instruction. Seven faculty members from the University of Florida College of Dentistry and one faculty member from another health science college participated in six weekly two-hour faculty development sessions in spring 2007 that focused on enhancing critical thinking skills in instruction. Kaufman's and Rachal's principles of andragogy (adult learning) were used to design the sessions. Participants used learning journals to respond to four instructor-assigned prompts and provided one presentation to peers. With the use of qualitative methods, eight themes emerged across the learning journals: teaching goals, critical thinking, awareness of learners, planned instructional change, teaching efficacy, self-doubt, external challenges, and changes made. Five of eight participants incorporated critical thinking skills into their presentations at a mean level of 2.4 or higher on a 5-point scale using Paul and Elder's behavioral definition of critical thinking skills. Faculty development opportunities that cause participants to reason through learning journals, peer presentations, and group discussion demonstrated the incorporation of critical thinking concepts in 63 percent of this cohort group's presentations, suggesting that if evidence-based pedagogies are followed, instructional changes can result from faculty development.

  6. Leading Change: Faculty Development through Structured Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Painter

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There are relentless calls for innovation in higher education programs in response to media and policy-makers attention to such concerns as instructional quality, relevance to employment, costs, and time-to-degree. At the same time, the individual course remains the primary unit of instruction and there is little evidence of faculty development strategies to assist with changing core instructional practices. We faced that dilemma when we led an innovative doctoral program in educational leadership. Soon after beginning, we implemented a regular meeting of all faculty members teaching and advising in the program to address upcoming events and review student progress. Our retrospective analysis indicates that these meetings evolved as a practical and sustainable framework for faculty development in support of deep change for instructional practices. Here we describe the challenge of faculty development for change and draw lessons learned from our four years of leadership centered on experiential learning and community sense-making. We hope that program leaders who aspire to promote faculty development in conjunction with graduate program implementation will find these lessons useful.

  7. Career transition and dental school faculty development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Jeffery L; Hendricson, William D; Partida, Mary N; Rugh, John D; Littlefield, John H; Jacks, Mary E

    2013-11-01

    Academic dentistry, as a career track, is not attracting sufficient numbers of new recruits to maintain a corps of skilled dental educators. The Faculty Development Program (FDP) at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Dental School received federal funds to institute a 7-component program to enhance faculty recruitment and retention and provide training in skills associated with success in academics including:(1) a Teaching Excellence and Academic Skills (TExAS)Fellowship, (2) training in research methodology,evidence-based practice research, and information management, (3) an annual dental hygiene faculty development workshop for dental hygiene faculty, (4) a Teaching Honors Program and Academic Dental Careers Fellowship to cultivate students' interest in educational careers, (5) an Interprofessional Primary Care Rotation,(6) advanced education support toward a master's degree in public health, and (7) a key focus of the entire FDP, an annual Career Transition Workshop to facilitate movement from the practice arena to the educational arm of the profession.The Career Transition Workshop is a cap stone for the FDP; its goal is to build a bridge from practice to academic environment. It will provide guidance for private practice, public health, and military dentists and hygienists considering a career transition into academic dentistry. Topics will be addressed including: academic culture, preparation for the academic environment,academic responsibilities, terms of employment,compensation and benefits, career planning, and job search / interviewing. Instructors for the workshop will include dental school faculty who have transitioned from the practice, military, and public health sectors into dental education.Objectives of the Overall Faculty Development Program:• Provide training in teaching and research skills,career planning, and leadership in order to address faculty shortages in dental schools and under representation of minority

  8. The Experiences of Vietnamese University Faculty in Relation to Their Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuong, Tam T.; McLean, Gary N.

    2016-01-01

    As Vietnam higher education has explored ways to integrate into the international community, professional development of faculty is becoming a key element. However, there is a significant shortage of faculty development (FD) in Vietnam, resulting in a large gap in quality, quantity, and qualifications between Vietnamese faculty and their…

  9. Building the Minority Faculty Development Pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Paul E.; Ganey, James H.; Brown, Marc D.

    2003-01-01

    Describes efforts toward minority faculty development in dentistry, including those of Harlem Hospital-Columbia University School of Dentistry and Oral Surgery, the National Dental Association Foundation, and Bronx Lebanon Hospital Center. Explains that critical elements in the success of these programs are environment, selection criteria,…

  10. Writing for publication: faculty development initiative using social learning theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Bonnie K; Carter, Matt; Schuessler, Jenny B

    2012-01-01

    Demonstrating scholarly competency is an expectation for nurse faculty. However, there is hesitancy among some faculty to fully engage in scholarly activities. To strengthen a school of nursing's culture of scholarship, a faculty development writing initiative based on Social Learning Theory was implemented. The authors discuss this initiative to facilitate writing for publication productivity among faculty and the successful outcomes.

  11. Multimedia Bootcamp: a health sciences library provides basic training to promote faculty technology integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Ellen C

    2006-04-25

    Recent research has shown a backlash against the enthusiastic promotion of technological solutions as replacements for traditional educational content delivery. Many institutions, including the University of Virginia, have committed staff and resources to supporting state-of-the-art, showpiece educational technology projects. However, the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library has taken the approach of helping Health Sciences faculty be more comfortable using technology in incremental ways for instruction and research presentations. In July 2004, to raise awareness of self-service multimedia resources for instructional and professional development needs, the Library conducted a "Multimedia Bootcamp" for nine Health Sciences faculty and fellows. Case study. Program stewardship by a single Library faculty member contributed to the delivery of an integrated learning experience. The amount of time required to attend the sessions and complete homework was the maximum fellows had to devote to such pursuits. The benefit of introducing technology unfamiliar to most fellows allowed program instructors to start everyone at the same baseline while not appearing to pass judgment on the technology literacy skills of faculty. The combination of wrapping the program in the trappings of a fellowship and selecting fellows who could commit to a majority of scheduled sessions yielded strong commitment from participants as evidenced by high attendance and a 100% rate of assignment completion. Response rates to follow-up evaluation requests, as well as continued use of Media Studio resources and Library expertise for projects begun or conceived during Bootcamp, bode well for the long-term success of this program. An incremental approach to integrating technology with current practices in instruction and presentation provided a supportive yet energizing environment for Health Sciences faculty. Keys to this program were its faculty focus, traditional hands-on instruction, unrestricted

  12. Online role-playing for faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladhani, Zahra; Chhatwal, Jugesh; Vyas, Rashmi; Iqbal, Mobeen; Tan, Christina; Diserens, Deborah

    2011-03-01

    There has been a rapid growth of online teaching in the past few years, yet the implementation of role-play for formal educational activities in an online setting is growing more slowly. The use of online role-playing for the development of health professions educators is virtually un-documented in the literature. In the project reported here we use role-playing as a method to motivate and increase active participation in an online web-based discussion on community-based medical education (CBME). The Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education & Research (FAIMER(®) ) Institute hosts virtual group discussions for fellows as part of its fellowship programmes, in order to deepen their knowledge base in health professions education and research. In June 2008, a group of seven FAIMER(®) fellows and faculty members moderated an online discussion on CBME using an online role-play exercise with other fellows and faculty members. Out of a total of 102 fellows, 36 (35.3%) participated actively, which exceeded the typical percentage of list server participation. In addition, a rich discussion resulted in a comprehensive report on the goals, challenges, logistical components, role of Health Ministry policy and the possible ethical mandate of CBME in developing countries. Online role-play encouraged distributed participation among a highly diverse international group of participants, supporting the conclusion that role-playing can be used effectively with mid-career health professional faculty members in the online environment. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  13. Current Status of Family Medicine Faculty Development in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Paul R; Chege, Patrick; Dahlman, Bruce; Gibson, Christine; Evensen, Ann; Colon-Gonzalez, Maria C; Onguka, Stephanie; Lamptey, Roberta; Cayley, William E; Nguyen, Bich-May; Johnson, Brian; Getnet, Sawra; Hasnain, Memoona

    2017-03-01

    Reducing the shortage of primary care physicians in sub-Saharan Africa requires expansion of training programs in family medicine. Challenges remain in preparing, recruiting, and retaining faculty qualified to teach in these pioneering programs. Little is known about the unique faculty development needs of family medicine faculty within the sub-Saharan African context. The purpose of this study was to assess the current status and future needs for developing robust family medicine faculty in sub-Saharan Africa. The results are reported in two companion articles. A cross-sectional study design was used to conduct a qualitative needs assessment comprising 37 in-depth, semi-structured interviews of individual faculty trainers from postgraduate family medicine training programs in eight sub-Saharan African countries. Data were analyzed according to qualitative description. While faculty development opportunities in sub-Saharan Africa were identified, current faculty note many barriers to faculty development and limited participation in available programs. Faculty value teaching competency, but institutional structures do not provide adequate support. Sub-Saharan African family physicians and postgraduate trainee physicians value good teachers and recognize that clinical training alone does not provide all of the skills needed by educators. The current status of limited resources of institutions and individuals constrain faculty development efforts. Where faculty development opportunities do exist, they are too infrequent or otherwise inaccessible to provide trainers the necessary skills to help them succeed as educators.

  14. TOWARDS DEVELOPING A SUSTAINABLE FACULTY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM: An Initiative of an American Medical School in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahal, Boushra; Mansour, Nabil; Zaatari, Ghazi

    2015-01-01

    The American University of Beirut Faculty of Medicine (AUB-FM) strategy is to develop faculty members (fm) skills by sponsoring local and international scientific activities has been in place for over three decades, and remains dependent on individuals' efforts. In 2011-2012, Faculty Development Program (FDP) was introduced to develop faculty leadership, business skills in medicine, fulfill personal and professional goals, followed by a five-year plan to cover five themes: Management/Leadership, Marketing, Finance, Strategic Planning and Communications with the purpose of integrating these themes in medical practice. A survey was sent to all departments at AUB-FM in 2011 to assess needs and determine themes. Nine workshops were conducted, followed by post-workshop evaluation. 117 fm responded to needs assessment surveys. Respondents had on average 15 years in clinical practice, 50% with extensive to moderate administrative experience; 71% assumed administrative responsibilities at least once, 56% in leadership positions. Faculty attendance dropped midway from 69 to 19, although workshops were rated very good to excellent. Although faculty were interested in FDP, the drop in attendance might be attributed to: challenges to achieve personal and professional goals while struggling to fulfill their roles, satisfy promotion requirements and generate their income. FDP has to be aligned with FM strategic goals and faculty objectives, be complimentary to a faculty mentoring program, provide rewards, and be supported by a faculty progression tool.

  15. Faculty development programs for medical teachers in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANJAY ZODPEY

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: India has the highest number of medical colleges in the world and subsequently the higher number of medical teachers. There is a dire need of adopting a systematic approach to faculty development to enhance quality education to meet health challenges for 21st Century. This manuscript provides a landscape of faculty development programs in India, identifying gaps and opportunities for reforms in faculty development. Methods: Conventionally, FDPs are organized by medical colleges and universities through Basic Courses and Advanced Courses focusing on pedagogy. Medical Council of India is facilitating FDPs through 18 selected regional centers to enable medical teachers to avail modern education technology for teaching from July 2009. Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research has three Regional Institutes in India. Results: Recommendations include the need for formulating a national strategy for faculty development to not only enhance the quantity of medical teachers but also the quality of medical education; providing support for Departments of Medical Education/Regional Centers in terms of finance and staffing and incorporation of teaching skills in postgraduate training. Conclusion: Distance learning courses focusing on educational leadership and pedagogy for medical teachers can be an option to reach a wider audience. FDPs can be an asset in recruiting and retaining teachers as they offer valued professional development opportunities.

  16. Development of future faculty teaching skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penson, J B

    2010-01-01

    Doctoral and postdoctoral students considering a career as an educator would be well served by: (1) training in effective classroom communication skills, (2) the use of existing technology in teaching, (3) developing a new course or updating an existing course, and (4) availing themselves of campus teaching resources designed enhance their teaching portfolio. Universities need to place more attention on developing the teaching skills of their doctoral and postdoctoral students. This should include teaching methods and aids, communication skills, motivation, learning theory, testing, counselling and guidance, and course design. An important dimension from a guidance stand point is the conduct of a formal peer review process for beginning faculty.

  17. American Historical Association Faculty Development Program: Planning and Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Charles

    The planning and implementation processes of the Long Island Faculty Development Program are described. Originally sponsored by the American Historical Association's Faculty Development Program to improve history instruction, this project includes faculty representatives from four Long Island universities, colleges, and junior colleges. The…

  18. Not Dean School: Leadership Development for Faculty Where They Are

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks, Karrin E.; Shults, Christopher; Berg, James J.

    2018-01-01

    Leadership development for faculty often is designed as training for administration, but faculty demonstrate leadership in the classroom, in their departments, college-wide, and beyond. To fully realize and leverage this leadership potential, colleges must design opportunities for faculty to hone their knowledge and skills as active participants…

  19. Senior Faculty Careers and Personal Development: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Robert; And Others

    A total of 1,135 senior faculty from 6 institutions of higher education responded to a questionnaire designed to determine the relationships between personal and career development for senior college faculty and the similarities and differences in satisfaction among faculty from various disciplines. Responses from the questionnaire showed that…

  20. Faculty Development for Medical School Community-Based Faculty: A Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance Study Exploring Institutional Requirements and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drowos, Joanna; Baker, Suzanne; Harrison, Suzanne Leonard; Minor, Suzanne; Chessman, Alexander W; Baker, Dennis

    2017-08-01

    Community-based faculty play a large role in training medical students nationwide and require faculty development. The authors hypothesized that positive relationships exist between clerkships paying preceptors and requiring faculty development, and between protected clerkship directors' time and delivering face-to-face preceptor training, as well as with the number or length of community-based preceptor visits. Through under standing the quantity, delivery methods, barriers, and institutional support for faculty development provided to community-based preceptors teaching in family medicine clerkships, best practices can be developed. Data from the 2015 Council of Academic Family Medicine's Educational Research Alliance survey of Family Medicine Clerkship Directors were analyzed. The cross-sectional survey of clerkship directors is distributed annually to institutional representatives of U.S. and Canadian accredited medical schools. Survey questions focused on the requirements, delivery methods, barriers, and institutional support available for providing faculty development to community-based preceptors. Paying community-based preceptors was positively correlated with requiring faculty development in family medicine clerkships. The greatest barrier to providing faculty development was community-based preceptor time availability; however, face-to-face methods remain the most common delivery strategy. Many family medicine clerkship directors perform informal or no needs assessment in developing faculty development topics for community-based faculty. Providing payment to community preceptors may allow schools to enhance faculty development program activities and effectiveness. Medical schools could benefit from constructing a formal curriculum for faculty development, including formal preceptor needs assessment and program evaluation. Clerkship directors may consider recruiting and retaining community-based faculty by employing innovative faculty development delivery

  1. Motivation and Faculty Development: A Three-State Study of Presidential Perceptions of Faculty Professional Development Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Desna C.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the appropriate roles of community college faculty and administration in assuring access to meaningful faculty development opportunities. Describes this three-state study as using the motivational theories of Maslow and Porter to determine faculty qualities as perceived by college presidents. Contains seven references. Survey instrument…

  2. Job satisfaction and professional development of health information administration faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A W

    2000-01-01

    To provide seamless care for patients while the health care industry undergoes changes, an integrated health information system must be developed. This effort affects the roles and responsibilities of practitioners and educators in health information administration (HIA). The changes may affect job satisfaction of HIA educators as they prepare entry-level practitioners for emerging roles. A national survey of HIA faculty's job satisfaction used the JDI/JIG scales and a researcher-developed instrument. The survey asked what job, institutional, and individual factors were significantly related to overall job satisfaction, whether there is a relationship between organizational fit and overall job satisfaction, and whether HIA faculty were pursuing terminal degrees, and what incentives and impediments they found to do so. Response rate was 78%. These faculty were very satisfied with their jobs. Work, pay, supervision, and co-workers were significantly related to overall job satisfaction, with work and supervision accounting for 47% of the variance. Doctorally prepared faculty valued research more than did others, and tended to be in institutions perceived to value research. Although 79% reported that their institutions encouraged them to pursue advanced degrees, only 23.6% were pursuing doctorates. These findings may be useful in recruiting HIA practitioners into academia as well as for accreditation purposes.

  3. Observation and assessment of faculty development learning outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Childs, Gail Schneider; Graff, Randy A

    2010-11-01

    Prior research has found that participation in course offerings provides a means of professional development and results in changes to faculty beliefs and instructional practices. However, as with most professional development initiatives in education, little is known about the sustainability of these training efforts. The research question that guided this study was the following: Do professional development efforts in teaching result in observed learning outcomes among faculty members? In this study, teaching observations served as the primary data source. Twelve faculty members (six in the College of Dentistry and six in the College of Health and Human Performance) who completed two six-week teaching seminars in fall 2006 and spring 2007 or spring 2008 and summer 2008 were asked to participate in a classroom observation and an interview lasting no longer than forty-five minutes. Six dental faculty members and three faculty members from the College of Health and Human Performance agreed to participate in the study. Three standardized reviewers conducted these classroom observations during fall 2008, spring 2009, and summer 2009. An active teaching rubric was used to evaluate the class transcripts. The findings revealed that participants somewhat frequently to frequently used questions that were open-ended or checked for comprehension. Seven of nine instructors made extensive efforts to engage the students interactively throughout the teaching session. Six of the participants infused the description of actual or hypothetical cases to illustrate the connections between teaching and patient care, while six utilized reflective practices. Findings from the interviews corroborated the observations. Overall, the findings showed that participants demonstrated the integration of those strategies that were taught during the seminars, which were consistent with teaching critical thinking skills and showed that the learning acquired during professional development

  4. A formal mentorship program for faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackevicius, Cynthia A; Le, Jennifer; Nazer, Lama; Hess, Karl; Wang, Jeffrey; Law, Anandi V

    2014-06-17

    To describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of a formal mentorship program at a college of pharmacy. After extensive review of the mentorship literature within the health sciences, a formal mentorship program was developed between 2006 and 2008 to support and facilitate faculty development. The voluntary program was implemented after mentors received training, and mentors and protégés were matched and received an orientation. Evaluation consisted of conducting annual surveys and focus groups with mentors and protégés. Fifty-one mentor-protégé pairs were formed from 2009 to 2012. A large majority of the mentors (82.8%-96.9%) were satisfied with the mentorship program and its procedures. The majority of the protégés (≥70%) were satisfied with the mentorship program, mentor-protégé relationship, and program logistics. Both mentors and protégés reported that the protégés most needed guidance on time management, prioritization, and work-life balance. While there were no significant improvements in the proteges' number of grant submissions, retention rates, or success in promotion/tenure, the total number of peer-reviewed publications by junior faculty members was significantly higher after program implementation (mean of 7 per year vs 21 per year, p=0.03) in the college's pharmacy practice and administration department. A formal mentorship program was successful as measured by self-reported assessments of mentors and protégés.

  5. Faculty Satisfaction Questionnaire: Development, Validity, and Reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Ana Gil

    This study sought to design and test a survey instrument which examined college faculty satisfaction with their roles of teaching, research, and service. A panel of experts reviewed the Spanish and English versions of the 39 item survey for quality of items and grammatical accuracy. Thirty randomly selected faculty members from a population of 234…

  6. Development, implementation, and impact of a collaborative junior faculty engagement and professional growth program: The Young Faculty Leadership Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Adam; Smith, Jennifer; Caldwell, David; Horace, Alexis; Zagar, Michelle

    2018-03-01

    To develop, implement, and evaluate the effect of a faculty engagement and professional growth program targeted at junior faculty members. A faculty engagement and growth program based on adult learning theory was piloted in a clinical sciences department. Effect of the model was evaluated using a pre/post-survey evaluating faculty output and work engagement using the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES). Average number of publications/projects with cross-campus collaboration increased (0.58 versus 1.25, P = 0.03, 95%CI 0.059-1.264). Involvement in national/state organizations, number of accepted poster presentations, and grants submitted and/or funded all increased (p>0.05). Total UWES score increased (4.13 vs. 4.495 p = 0.21) with the greatest subscale increase in vigor (3.833 vs 4.347, P = 0.1). A faculty engagement and growth program targeting junior faculty members using adult learning theory as a framework may provide a novel and economic way for schools to support the development of these critical team members. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Student evaluation of teaching enhances faculty professional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty McDonald

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights the role of Web 2.0 technologies in sourcing ongoing information from university students in an effort to assist faculty in their continuous professional development (PD, with the ultimate goal of incrementally improving teaching and learning. On a semester basis, students use an online program called CoursEvals to provide their opinions about the course and its instructor. The collected data are used to inform the content and delivery of faculty PD workshops. The interactive nature of CoursEvals, with Web features that facilitate information sharing and interoperatibility with Blackboard, a learning/course management system, make it ideal for impacting higher education. Students can complete student evaluation of teaching (SEOT online from any location (university, home, mobile, or overseas. This paper underscores the interactive nature of the feedback process that allows faculty, administration, policy makers, and other stakeholders to participate in the ongoing improvement of teaching and learning. We see how Web 2.0 technologies can impact the teaching/learning nexus in higher education, how online forums and Blackboard bulletin boards have helped popularize Web 2.0 technologies, how online social interactions have escalated through wikis, blogs, emails, instant messaging, and audio and video clips, and how faculty can retrieve their personal SEOT at any time and use the information to self- or peer-evaluate at their convenience. Faculty can compare their SEOT over time to determine stability and monitor their classroom effectiveness. They can also address reliability and validity issues and use the information judiciously without making unnecessary generalizations. Researchers will find useful information supporting the impact of Web 2.0 technologies in higher education.

  8. Overview of Faculty Development Programs for Interprofessional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratka, Anna; Zorek, Joseph A; Meyer, Susan M

    2017-06-01

    Objectives. To describe characteristics of faculty development programs designed to facilitate interprofessional education, and to compile recommendations for development, delivery, and assessment of such faculty development programs. Methods. MEDLINE, CINAHL, ERIC, and Web of Science databases were searched using three keywords: faculty development, interprofessional education, and health professions. Articles meeting inclusion criteria were analyzed for emergent themes, including program design, delivery, participants, resources, and assessment. Results. Seventeen articles were identified for inclusion, yielding five characteristics of a successful program: institutional support; objectives and outcomes based on interprofessional competencies; focus on consensus-building and group facilitation skills; flexibility based on institution- and participant-specific characteristics; and incorporation of an assessment strategy. Conclusion. The themes and characteristics identified in this literature overview may support development of faculty development programs for interprofessional education. An advanced evidence base for interprofessional education faculty development programs is needed.

  9. Transferring learning from faculty development to the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Kim Z

    2014-12-01

    This study’s purpose was to better understand the transfer of learning by uncovering how various factors supported the integration of health information technology knowledge and skills gleaned from the Health Resources and Services Administration–funded faculty development programs into nursing education curricula. Through interviews with 20 participants from four programs, this study confirmed the importance of findings related to faculty, program, and work environment characteristics for supporting successful transfer of learning and substantiates a variety of other transfer-of-learning research. New or seldom discussed supportive individual characteristics were found, including leadership abilities, lifelong learning, ability to recognize limitations, persistence, creativity, and risk taking. The importance of networking, diversity of perspectives, postconference support, and teams in program designs were found to positively influence transfer. The variety of supportive factors and barriers in the participants’ work environments strengthens the assertions that transfer may be context dependent. Findings provided insight for recommendations to improve learning transfer. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Faculty Mentoring Undergraduates: The Nature, Development, and Benefits of Mentoring Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth McKinsey

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Educational research shows that close student-faculty interaction is a key factor in college student learning and success. Most literature on undergraduate mentoring, however, focuses on planned programs of mentoring for targeted groups of students by non-faculty professionals or student peers. Based on the research literature and student and faculty testimony from a residential liberal arts college, this article shows that unplanned “natural” mentoring can be crucial to student learning and development and illustrates some best practices. It advances understanding of faculty mentoring by differentiating it from teaching, characterizing several functional types of mentoring, and identifying the phases through which a mentoring relationship develops. Arguing that benefits to students, faculty, and institutions outweigh the risks and costs of mentoring, it is written for faculty who want to be better mentors and provides evidence that administrators should value and reward mentoring.

  11. Nudges, Pulls, and Serendipity: Multiple Pathways to Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockley, Denise; McDonald, Jeanette; Hoessler, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Building on the rich faculty development literature worldwide, recent scholarship on the advancement, professionalism, and career paths of individuals entering the field has received greater attention. Through focus group discussions, faculty developers from colleges and universities around the world shared their pathways into and through faculty…

  12. Empowering Faculty to Develop and Share Global Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, David

    2014-01-01

    As colleges seek to increase global knowledge within its students, it is important that faculty members are also offered opportunities to increase their own knowledge of global issues. This chapter discusses faculty development models for seminars abroad and how these seminars encourage the development of unique global study programs.

  13. Why Are Faculty Development Workshops a Waste of Time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Ronald A.

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses how to design and execute a faculty development workshop. The author first describes the characteristics of the faculty development event that can sabotage or facilitate attendance. They relate to: (a) format and frequency; (b) venues; (c) technical support; and (d) competing activities. Then, the author presents ten…

  14. Social Media and Mentoring in Biomedical Research Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruya, Stacey Alan; Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine how effective and collegial mentoring in biomedical research faculty development may be implemented and facilitated through social media. Method: The authors reviewed the literature for objectives, concerns, and limitations of career development for junior research faculty. They tabularized these as developmental goals, and…

  15. Peer observation of teaching as a faculty development tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sullivan Peter B

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peer observation of Teaching involves observers providing descriptive feedback to their peers on learning and teaching practice as a means to improve quality of teaching. This study employed and assessed peer observation as a constructive, developmental process for members of a Pediatric Teaching Faculty. Methods This study describes how peer observation was implemented as part of a teaching faculty development program and how it was perceived by teachers. The PoT process was divided into 4 stages: pre-observation meeting, observation, post-observation feedback and reflection. Particular care was taken to ensure that teachers understood that the observation and feedback was a developmental and not an evaluative process. Twenty teachers had their teaching peer observed by trained Faculty members and gave an e-mail ‘sound-bite’ of their perceptions of the process. Teaching activities included lectures, problem-based learning, small group teaching, case-based teaching and ward-based teaching sessions. Results Teachers were given detailed verbal and written feedback based on the observer’s and students’ observations. Teachers’ perceptions were that PoT was useful and relevant to their teaching practice. Teachers valued receiving feedback and viewed PoT as an opportunity for insight and reflection. The process of PoT was viewed as non-threatening and teachers thought that PoT enhanced the quality of their teaching, promoted professional development and was critical for Faculty development. Conclusions This study demonstrated that PoT can be used in a constructive way to improve course content and delivery, to support and encourage medical teachers, and to reinforce good teaching.

  16. Professional Development of Faculty: How Do We Know It Is Effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derting, T. L.; Ebert-May, D.; Hodder, J.

    2011-12-01

    Professional development (PD) of faculty has been an integral component of curriculum reform efforts in STEM. Traditionally, PD occurs through workshops that last from hours to several days. Regardless of the particular model of PD used during a workshop, its effectiveness is usually assessed through self-report surveys of faculty satisfaction, perceived learning, and reports of applications in faculty classrooms. My presentation focuses on ways of assessing the effectiveness of models of PD, with an emphasis on the need for objective measures of change in faculty teaching. The data that I present raise two significant questions about faculty PD. Are traditional approaches to faculty PD effective in changing classroom teaching practices and improving student learning? What evidence is needed to determine the effectiveness of different models of PD? Self-report data have been useful in identifying variables that can influence the extent to which faculty implement new teaching strategies. These variables include faculty beliefs about student learning, self-efficacy, level of dissatisfaction with student learning, departmental rewards for teaching and learning, time limitations, and peer interactions. Self-report data do not, however, provide a complete or necessarily accurate assessment of the impacts of PD on classroom practices and student learning. Objective assessment of teaching and learning is also necessary, yet seldom conducted. Two approaches to such assessment will be presented, one based on student performance and the other based on observations of faculty teaching. In multiple sections of a student-centered, inquiry-based course, learning gains were higher for students taught by faculty who were trained in student-centered teaching compared with faculty with no such training. In two national projects that focused on faculty PD, self-report data indicated that faculty increased their use of student-centered teaching following PD. Objective assessment

  17. Developing a Quality Improvement Process to Optimize Faculty Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merillat, Linda; Scheibmeir, Monica

    2016-01-01

    As part of a major shift to embed quality improvement processes within a School of Nursing at a medium-sized Midwestern university, a faculty enrichment program using a Plan-Do-Act-Study design was implemented. A central focus for the program was the development and maintenance of an online faculty resource center identified as "My Faculty…

  18. Incorporating Sustainability Content and Pedagogy through Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurney, Carol A.; Nash, Carole; Hartman, Christie-Joy B.; Brantmeier, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Key elements of a curriculum are presented for a faculty development program that integrated sustainability content with effective course design methodology across a variety of disciplines. The study aims to present self-reported impacts for a small number of faculty participants and their courses. Design/methodology/approach: A yearlong…

  19. Faculty Development Program Models to Advance Teaching and Learning Within Health Science Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Jason W.; Stein, Susan M.; MacLean, Linda Garrelts; Van Amburgh, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Within health science programs there has been a call for more faculty development, particularly for teaching and learning. The primary objectives of this review were to describe the current landscape for faculty development programs for teaching and learning and make recommendations for the implementation of new faculty development programs. A thorough search of the pertinent health science databases was conducted, including the Education Resource Information Center (ERIC), MEDLINE, and EMBASE, and faculty development books and relevant information found were reviewed in order to provide recommendations for best practices. Faculty development for teaching and learning comes in a variety of forms, from individuals charged to initiate activities to committees and centers. Faculty development has been effective in improving faculty perceptions on the value of teaching, increasing motivation and enthusiasm for teaching, increasing knowledge and behaviors, and disseminating skills. Several models exist that can be implemented to support faculty teaching development. Institutions need to make informed decisions about which plan could be most successfully implemented in their college or school. PMID:24954939

  20. Faculty development program models to advance teaching and learning within health science programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Jason W; Stein, Susan M; MacLean, Linda Garrelts; Van Amburgh, Jenny; Persky, Adam M

    2014-06-17

    Within health science programs there has been a call for more faculty development, particularly for teaching and learning. The primary objectives of this review were to describe the current landscape for faculty development programs for teaching and learning and make recommendations for the implementation of new faculty development programs. A thorough search of the pertinent health science databases was conducted, including the Education Resource Information Center (ERIC), MEDLINE, and EMBASE, and faculty development books and relevant information found were reviewed in order to provide recommendations for best practices. Faculty development for teaching and learning comes in a variety of forms, from individuals charged to initiate activities to committees and centers. Faculty development has been effective in improving faculty perceptions on the value of teaching, increasing motivation and enthusiasm for teaching, increasing knowledge and behaviors, and disseminating skills. Several models exist that can be implemented to support faculty teaching development. Institutions need to make informed decisions about which plan could be most successfully implemented in their college or school.

  1. Effective Collection Developers: Librarians or Faculty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidor, David L.; Futas, Elizabeth

    1988-01-01

    A study at the Emory University School of Business Administration library compared the effectiveness of faculty members and librarians as book selectors. Effectiveness was measured by comparing selected titles with the Baker list published by the Harvard Business School and with business periodical reviews, and by examining circulation records.…

  2. An assessment of the faculty development needs of junior clinical faculty in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Heather; Casaletto, Jennifer; Ankel, Felix; Young, Kelly D; Hockberger, Robert

    2008-07-01

    Academic physicians must be able to access the resources necessary to support their ongoing professional development and meet requirements for continued academic advancement. The authors sought to determine the self-perceived career development needs of junior clinical faculty in emergency medicine (EM) and the availability of educational resources to meet those needs. An educational "needs assessment" survey was distributed to 954 American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) members listed in the ACEP database as being faculty at EM residency programs in the United States and having graduated from an EM residency within the past 7 years. Respondents were asked to rank the importance of 22 areas of faculty development to their own professional growth and then to indicate whether educational resources in each area were available to them. Respondents were also asked to note the educational formats they prefer. A search for currently available resources in each topic area was undertaken and compared to the survey results. A total of 240 responses were received. Self-perceived career development needs were identified in the following areas: bedside teaching, lecture development, business skills, managerial skills, educational research, mentorship and career counseling, interpersonal skills, leadership skills, scholarly writing skills, physician wellness, and knowledge of the faculty development process. While a review of currently available educational resources revealed lectures, conferences, and online materials pertinent to most of these topics, a relative lack of resources in the areas of mentorship and physician wellness was identified. Junior clinical faculty in EM perceive a lack of educational resources in a number of areas of faculty development. The academic community of EM should strive to improve awareness of and access to currently existing resources and to develop additional resources to address the area of physician wellness. The lack of mentorship in

  3. Faculty development: if you build it, they will come.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Yvonne; Macdonald, Mary Ellen; Boillat, Miriam; Elizov, Michelle; Meterissian, Sarkis; Razack, Saleem; Ouellet, Marie-Noel; McLeod, Peter J

    2010-09-01

    The goals of this study were three-fold: to explore the reasons why some clinical teachers regularly attend centralised faculty development activities; to compare their responses with those of colleagues who do not attend, and to learn how we can make faculty development programmes more pertinent to teachers' needs. In 2008-2009, we conducted focus groups with 23 clinical teachers who had participated in faculty development activities on a regular basis in order to ascertain their perceptions of faculty development, reasons for participation, and perceived barriers against involvement. Thematic analysis and research team consensus guided the data interpretation. Reasons for regular participation included the perceptions that: faculty development enables personal and professional growth; learning and self-improvement are valued; workshop topics are viewed as relevant to teachers' needs; the opportunity to network with colleagues is appreciated, and initial positive experiences promote ongoing involvement. Barriers against participation mirrored those cited by non-attendees in an earlier study (e.g. volume of work, lack of time, logistical factors), but did not prevent participation. Suggestions for increasing participation included introducing a 'buddy system' for junior faculty members, an orientation workshop for new staff, and increased role-modelling and mentorship. The conceptualisation of faculty development as a means to achieve specific objectives and the desire for relevant programming that addresses current needs (i.e., expectancies), together with an appreciation of learning, self-improvement and networking with colleagues (i.e., values), were highlighted as reasons for participation by regular attendees. Medical educators should consider these 'lessons learned' in the design and delivery of faculty development offerings. They should also continue to explore the notion of faculty development as a social practice and the application of motivational

  4. A Multi-Institutional Longitudinal Faculty Development Program in Humanism Supports the Professional Development of Faculty Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, William T; Frankel, Richard M; Hafler, Janet P; Weil, Amy B; Gilligan, MaryAnn C; Litzelman, Debra K; Plews-Ogan, Margaret; Rider, Elizabeth A; Osterberg, Lars G; Dunne, Dana; May, Natalie B; Derse, Arthur R

    2017-12-01

    The authors describe the first 11 academic years (2005-2006 through 2016-2017) of a longitudinal, small-group faculty development program for strengthening humanistic teaching and role modeling at 30 U.S. and Canadian medical schools that continues today. During the yearlong program, small groups of participating faculty met twice monthly with a local facilitator for exercises in humanistic teaching, role modeling, and related topics that combined narrative reflection with skills training using experiential learning techniques. The program focused on the professional development of its participants. Thirty schools participated; 993 faculty, including some residents, completed the program.In evaluations, participating faculty at 13 of the schools scored significantly more positively as rated by learners on all dimensions of medical humanism than did matched controls. Qualitative analyses from several cohorts suggest many participants had progressed to more advanced stages of professional identity formation after completing the program. Strong engagement and attendance by faculty participants as well as the multimodal evaluation suggest that the program may serve as a model for others. Recently, most schools adopting the program have offered the curriculum annually to two or more groups of faculty participants to create sufficient numbers of trained faculty to positively influence humanistic teaching at the institution.The authors discuss the program's learning theory, outline its curriculum, reflect on the program's accomplishments and plans for the future, and state how faculty trained in such programs could lead institutional initiatives and foster positive change in humanistic professional development at all levels of medical education.

  5. Evolution of faculty affairs and faculty development offices in U.S. medical schools: a 10-year follow-up survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnino, Roberta E; Reznik, Vivian; Thorndyke, Luanne A; Chatterjee, Archana; Ríos-Bedoya, Carlos F; Mylona, Elza; Nelson, Kathleen G; Weisman, Carol S; Morahan, Page S; Wadland, William C

    2013-09-01

    To determine how U.S. MD-granting medical schools manage, fund, and evaluate faculty affairs/development functions and to determine the evolution of these offices between 2000 and 2010. In December 2010, the authors invited faculty affairs designees at 131 U.S. MD-granting medical schools to complete a questionnaire developed by the Association of American Medical Colleges Group on Faculty Affairs, based on a 2000 survey. Schools were asked about core functions, budget, staffing, and performance metrics. The authors analyzed the data using descriptive statistics. A total of 111 schools (84.7%) responded. Fifty percent of the offices were established since 2000. Seventy-eight percent reported their top core function as administrative support for appointments, promotions, and tenure, as in 2000. Faculty policies, appointments, databases, governance support, grievance proceedings, management issues, and annual trend analyses continued as major functions. All 11 core functions identified in 2000 remain predominantly provided by central offices of faculty affairs, except support of major leadership searches. Web site communication emerged as a new core function. Similar to 2000, several other offices were responsible for some faculty development functions. Office size and budget correlated positively with size of the faculty and age of the office (P schools (31.5%) reported formally evaluating their faculty affairs office. The number of faculty affairs offices and their responsibilities have substantially increased since 2000. Most major core functions have not changed. These offices are now an established part of the central administration of most medical schools.

  6. Business schools' international networks for faculty development

    OpenAIRE

    Pennarola F.

    2008-01-01

    Business schools are facing ever increasing internationalization: students are far less homogenous than before, faculty members come from different countries, and teaching is carried out in second (or even third) languages. As a result business schools and their teachers wrestle with new challenges as these changes accelerate. Teaching and Learning at Business Schools brings together contributions from business school managers and educators involved in the International Teachers Programm...

  7. Community-based dental education and the importance of faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAndrew, Maureen

    2010-09-01

    Community-based dental education offers a variety of positive learning experiences for students while providing needed dental services for the underserved. More dental students are being instructed by a growing body of largely volunteer community-based faculty who practice in a wide range of community settings including community hospitals and clinics, nursing homes, and private practices. These geographically dispersed instructors may have little experience as educators. Their practice styles and their motivation to improve teaching effectiveness are likely to differ from the styles and motivation of school-based faculty members. Moreover, many dental schools have begun to emphasize practices that may be unfamiliar to community-based faculty such as evidence-based practice. Providing faculty development for them is challenging, yet crucial to the success of these programs and dental education in general. Fundamental elements that must be considered for effective community faculty development programming include fostering a culture of respect between school-based and community faculty members, basing programs on the actual needs of these educators, integrating principles of adult learning theory, and establishing ongoing institutional support. This article provides background on this movement, reviews the literature for faculty development programs geared specifically to community-based educators, makes recommendations for development programs for these dental educators, and includes suggestions for future research.

  8. Faculty Transformation in Curriculum Transformation: The Role of Faculty Development in Campus Internationalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, Elizabeth; Williams, Letitia

    2016-01-01

    Curriculum transformation is often cited as one of the key strategies for internationalizing higher education in the United States, and faculty members play a central role in this process. The purpose of the study we report here was to explore the potential for professional development initiatives to foster the transformation in perspectives…

  9. From Keller's MVP Model to Faculty Development Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svinicki, Marilla D.

    2017-01-01

    As faculty and faculty developers, we sometimes forget that the principles of learning and motivation that we apply to students also apply to us. This chapter illustrates how the MVP model can be used to create effective faculty development activities.

  10. Promoting Cultural Awareness: A Faculty Development Workshop on Cultural Competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Franco A; Macdonald, Mary Ellen; Razack, Saleem; Steinert, Yvonne

    2015-06-01

    An interdisciplinary faculty development workshop on cultural competency (CC) was implemented and evaluated for the Faculty of Medicine at McGill University. It consisted of a 4-hour workshop and 2 follow-up sessions. A reflective practice framework was used. The project was evaluated using the Multicultural Assessment Questionnaire (MAQ), evaluation forms completed by participants, and detailed field notes taken during the sessions. The workshop was attended by 49 faculty members with diverse professional backgrounds. Statistically significant improvements were measured using the MAQ. On a scale of 1 to 5 (5 = very useful) on the evaluation form, the majority of participants (76.1%) gave the workshop a score of 4 or 5 for overall usefulness. A thematic analysis of field-note data highlighted participant responses to specific activities in the workshop. Participants expressed a need for faculty development initiatives on CC such as this one. Copyright© by Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University.

  11. Faculty Development Effectiveness: Insights from a Program Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupma Wadhwa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Faculty development programs are often time and resource intensive. In order to accommodate time constrained clinicians a limited time commitment faculty development program was developed and was shown to be effective in improving participant’s scholarly productivity. Objectives. The objective of this study was to assess participants’ perceptions of why the faculty development program was effective in promoting scholarship in education. Methods. In-depth semistructured interviews of course participants were conducted a year after completing a faculty development program. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The transcriptions were coded independently by the investigators for dominant themes. The investigators held coding meetings to further refine the themes and discrepancies were handled by referring to the transcripts and reaching consensus. Results. The participants’ satisfaction with the course as described in the interviews correlated with the early satisfaction surveys. Reasons offered for this impact fell into four broad categories: course content, course format, social networking during the course, and the course facilitation coaching strategies to achieve goals. Conclusions. Course focusing on the process, experiential learning, and situating the course facilitator in the role of a functional mentor or coach to complete projects can be effective in facilitating behaviour change after faculty development programs.

  12. Online faculty development for creating E-learning materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebuhr, Virginia; Niebuhr, Bruce; Trumble, Julie; Urbani, Mary Jo

    2014-01-01

    Faculty who want to develop e-learning materials face pedagogical challenges of transforming instruction for the online environment, especially as many have never experienced online learning themselves. They face technical challenges of learning new software and time challenges of not all being able to be in the same place at the same time to learn these new skills. The objective of the Any Day Any Place Teaching (ADAPT) faculty development program was to create an online experience in which faculty could learn to produce e-learning materials. The ADAPT curriculum included units on instructional design, copyright principles and peer review, all for the online environment, and units on specific software tools. Participants experienced asynchronous and synchronous methods, including a learning management system, PC-based videoconferencing, online discussions, desktop sharing, an online toolbox and optional face-to-face labs. Project outcomes were e-learning materials developed and participants' evaluations of the experience. Likert scale responses for five instructional units (quantitative) were analyzed for distance from neutral using one-sample t-tests. Interview data (qualitative) were analyzed with assurance of data trustworthiness and thematic analysis techniques. Participants were 27 interprofessional faculty. They evaluated the program instruction as easy to access, engaging and logically presented. They reported increased confidence in new skills and increased awareness of copyright issues, yet continued to have time management challenges and remained uncomfortable about peer review. They produced 22 new instructional materials. Online faculty development methods are helpful for faculty learning to create e-learning materials. Recommendations are made to increase the success of such a faculty development program.

  13. Faculty Hiring and Development at BYU: Perspectives of a Recent Hire and Department Chair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, R. Steven

    2002-04-01

    I will present a personal perspective on the transition from an industrial to an academic physicist. For those planning on a similar transition, I will mention several things that were helpful in preparing myself, marketing myself, and adapting to an academic setting. For instance, a significant difference between academic and industrial physics is the responsibility of classroom teaching. Several things that proved particularly useful in improving my own teaching were mentoring teaching partnerships, student evaluations, help in the tenure and promotion process, and programs available from our Faculty Center. From my current perspective as a department chair, I will further discuss mentoring practices I have found helpful with other new faculty. These include such things as inviting mentors to participate with new faculty in development workshops and providing financial and other recognition for participation as a mentor. In addition to developing professional skills, I have found that good mentoring is particularly critical in encouraging new faculty to adapt to departmental culture. Finally, I will discuss ideas I have found helpful in successfully recruiting new faculty. This involves researching, identifying, and actively recruiting faculty we think will build our department. For us, it has not been sufficient to passively rely on responses from applicants to advertisements and word-of-mouth inquiries. Through careful hiring and effective mentoring, we have developed an excellent record of having our faculty being successful in the tenure process.

  14. Identifying psychological contract breaches to guide improvements in faculty recruitment, retention, and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirce, Gretchen L; Desselle, Shane P; Draugalis, JoLaine R; Spies, Alan R; Davis, Tamra S; Bolino, Mark

    2012-08-10

    To identify pharmacy faculty members' perceptions of psychological contract breaches that can be used to guide improvements in faculty recruitment, retention, and development. A list of psychological contract breaches was developed using a Delphi procedure involving a panel of experts assembled through purposive sampling. The Delphi consisted of 4 rounds, the first of which elicited examples of psychological contract breaches in an open-ended format. The ensuing 3 rounds consisting of a survey and anonymous feedback on aggregated group responses. Usable responses were obtained from 11 of 12 faculty members who completed the Delphi procedure. The final list of psychological contract breaches included 27 items, after modifications based on participant feedback in subsequent rounds. The psychological contract breach items generated in this study provide guidance for colleges and schools of pharmacy regarding important aspects of faculty recruitment, retention, and development.

  15. Differences in Faculty Development Needs: Implications for Educational Peer Review Program Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Kate E.; McKey, Colleen A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of faculty development in terms of the educational role is to assist faculty in becoming better educators. Educational peer review (EPR) is one method of faculty development. This article is based on a study that explored the different development needs of nursing faculty within a school of nursing at an Ontario university. The study…

  16. Professional Development For Community College Faculty: Lessons Learned From Intentional Mentoring Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A. R.; Charlevoix, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Geoscience Workforce Development Initiative at UNAVCO supports attracting, training, and professionally developing students, educators, and professionals in the geosciences. For the past 12 years, UNAVCO has managed the highly successful Research Experiences in Solid Earth Science for Students (RESESS) program, with the goal of increasing the diversity of students entering the geosciences. Beginning in 2015, UNAVCO added Geo-Launchpad (GLP), a summer research preparation internship for Colorado community college students to prepare them for independent research opportunities, facilitate career exploration in the geosciences, and provide community college faculty with professional development to facilitate effective mentoring of students. One core element of the Geo-Launchpad program is UNAVCO support for GLP faculty mentors. Each intern applies to the program with a faculty representative (mentor) from his or her home institution. This faculty mentor is engaged with the student throughout the summer via telephone, video chat, text message, or email. At the end of each of the past two summers, UNAVCO has hosted four GLP faculty mentors in Boulder for two days of professional development focused on intentional mentoring of students. Discussions focused on the distinction between mentoring and advising, and the array of career and professional opportunities available to students. Faculty mentors also met with the external evaluator during the mentor training and provided feedback on both their observations of their intern as well as the impact on their own professional experience. Initial outcomes include re-energizing the faculty mentors' commitment to teaching, as well as the opportunity for valuable networking activities. This presentation will focus on the ongoing efforts and outcomes of the novel faculty mentor professional development activities, and the impact these activities have on community college student engagement in the geosciences.

  17. A Discipline-Based Professional Development Faculty: A Case for Multiple-Site Collaborative Reform in the Disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson-Ross, Sally

    1998-01-01

    Describes a partnership among English-education faculty members and secondary English teachers, arguing that a multisite, discipline-based professional-development faculty provides an alternative for secondary-level Professional Development School principles-in-action. The paper discusses reform, departmentalization of high school and college…

  18. Project-based faculty development for e-learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Rashmi; Faith, Minnie; Selvakumar, Dhayakani; Pulimood, Anna; Lee, Mary

    2016-12-01

    The Christian Medical College, Vellore, in collaboration with Tufts University, Boston, conducted an advanced workshop in e-learning for medical faculty members in India. E-learning can enhance educational reforms for today's computer-literate generation, and keep faculty members up to speed in a rapidly changing world. The purpose of this paper is to report on the design and evaluation of a project-based faculty member development programme focused on developing faculty members as educators and as peer trainers who can use e-learning for educational reforms. During a 2-day workshop, 29 participants in groups of two or three developed 13 e-learning projects for implementation in their institutions. Evaluation of the workshop was through written feedback from the participants at the end of the workshop and by telephone interview with one participant from each project group at the end of one year. Content analysis of qualitative data was perfomed. The participants reported that they were motivated to implement e-learning projects and recognised the need for and usefulness of e-learning. The majority of projects (10 out of 13) that were implemented 'to some extent' or 'to a great extent' faced challenges with a lack of resources and administrative support, but faculty members were able to overcome them. E-learning can enhance educational reforms for today's computer-literate generation IMPLICATIONS: Designing feasible e-learning projects in small groups and obtaining hands-on experience with e-learning tools enhance the effectiveness of subsequent implementation. To successfully incorporate e-learning when designing educational reforms, faculty member training, continuing support and infrastructure facilities are essential. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Faculty Development for Fostering Clinical Reasoning Skills in Early Medical Students Using a Modified Bayesian Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addy, Tracie Marcella; Hafler, Janet; Galerneau, France

    2016-01-01

    Clinical reasoning is a necessary skill for medical students to acquire in the course of their education, and there is evidence that they can start this process at the undergraduate level. However, physician educators who are experts in their given fields may have difficulty conveying their complex thought processes to students. Providing faculty development that equips educators with tools to teach clinical reasoning may support skill development in early medical students. We provided faculty development on a modified Bayesian method of teaching clinical reasoning to clinician educators who facilitated small-group, case-based workshops with 2nd-year medical students. We interviewed them before and after the module regarding their perceptions on teaching clinical reasoning. We solicited feedback from the students about the effectiveness of the method in developing their clinical reasoning skills. We carried out this project during an institutional curriculum rebuild where clinical reasoning was a defined goal. At the time of the intervention, there was also increased involvement of the Teaching and Learning Center in elevating the status of teaching and learning. There was high overall satisfaction with the faculty development program. Both the faculty and the students described the modified Bayesian approach as effective in fostering the development of clinical reasoning skills. Through this work, we learned how to form a beneficial partnership between a clinician educator and Teaching and Learning Center to promote faculty development on a clinical reasoning teaching method for early medical students. We uncovered challenges faced by both faculty and early learners in this study. We observed that our faculty chose to utilize the method of teaching clinical reasoning in a variety of manners in the classroom. Despite obstacles and differing approaches utilized, we believe that this model can be emulated at other institutions to foster the development of clinical

  20. A Systematic Literature Review of Faculty Development for Teacher Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuong, Tam T.; Cole, S. Catherine; Zarestky, Jill

    2018-01-01

    Although ample literature exists regarding the effectiveness of faculty development (FD) activities, there is a gap in the literature synthesizing its outcomes. This review, using a predetermined review protocol, analyzed 22 publications on FD for teacher educators using Kirkpatrick's training evaluation taxonomy. We found that North American…

  1. Faculty Development and Quality Assurance in the EU ERAMIS Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathe Merceron

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the ERAMIS project is to create a
    network of Masters degrees “Informatics as a Second
    Competence” in nine beneficiary universities of Kazakhstan,
    Kyrgyzstan and Russia. This contribution presents how
    faculty development is organized and quality assurance
    implemented inside this project.

  2. On faculty development of STEM inclusive teaching practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewsbury, Bryan M

    2017-10-02

    Faculty development of inclusive teaching practices has become more common in response to significant differences in STEM student retention between underrepresented minorities in the USA and students from other ethnic groups. Approaches to solve this have shifted from focusing on student deficits to changing campus culture, including the mindsets of instructors who teach STEM courses. In this article, I argue that based on the literature informing the conceptual frameworks used for faculty development in inclusive teaching, faculty developers should reframe the message of their workshops to focus participants more on the scope of the journey, and shift the direction of overall efforts some to redevelop pedagogical training at the graduate and postdoc levels. Informed by historical as well as recent theories on the role of higher education to society, I highlight the areas of the literature that can effectively inform our current approaches to inclusion. I also briefly review the reasons why this approach is needed, and include suggestions for new faculty development approaches for long-term sustainable change in STEM inclusive education at the postsecondary level. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Enhancing Agency through Leadership Development Programs for Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Lindsey; O'Meara, KerryAnn

    2018-01-01

    The ADVANCE Leadership Fellows Program at the University of Maryland is a yearlong professional development program for faculty aspiring to or recently engaged in leadership roles. Data shows an increase in participants' sense of agency to become academic leaders following the program. We use a comprehensive data set, including program…

  4. Design Recommendations for Self-Paced Online Faculty Development Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzuto, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    An increased need for self-paced, online professional development opportunities in higher education has emerged from a variety of factors including dispersed geographic locations of faculty, full teaching loads, and institutional evaluation requirements. This article is a report of the examination of the design and evaluation of a self-paced…

  5. Faculty Professional Development for Quality Online Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou-Ray, Jennifer; Bentley, Courtney C.

    2015-01-01

    Meaningful technology use in education continues to improve given an increase in access to available technologies and professional development. For educators, professional development has focused on approaches for technology use that foster content-specific best practices and improve student learning in traditional classroom formats. Meaningful…

  6. Professional Development: Designing Initiatives to Meet the Needs of Online Faculty

    OpenAIRE

    Marquita Elliott; Nicole Rhoades; Christina M. Jackson; B. Jean Mandernach

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of online courses mandates an examination of the similarities – and differences – in the faculty training and development needs of those teaching online. With institutions facing increasingly limited resources, there is a need to prioritize faculty development initiatives that will encourage faculty participation. An examination of interest, attendance and completion rates of faculty development initiatives targeting online faculty revealed no distinct preferences in...

  7. faculties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardanov Rustam Sh.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes some of the psychological problems of the economic faculties’ students arising in the course of study of mathematical disciplines. These problems are primarily related with the lack of students’ awareness, misconception about the calculation methods in their future profession, low motivation and performance, math anxiety, etc. They makeadditional difficulties which impede successful mastering of sophisticated material. Based on the experience of mathematical disciplines teaching, the paper provides some possible solutions to these problems with the lecturer who has to play an important role. The lecturer should orientate students towards serious and profound knowledge of economic and mathematical methods, create conditions for students’ active participation in the educational process and provide them with comprehensive assistance in overcoming difficulties.

  8. Do communities of practice enhance faculty development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lum Kai Mun Abigail

    2016-12-01

    Discussion: CoP provide opportunities for actual application of knowledge, tools and social relationships. More studies are needed to demonstrate if these opportunities for actual application would lead to improved performance in health professions education, through deliberate efforts to design and deliver CoP׳s activities.

  9. Mid-Career Faculty Development in Academic Medicine: How Does It Impact Faculty and Institutional Vitality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campion, MaryAnn W.; Bhasin, Robina M.; Beaudette, Donald J.; Shann, Mary H.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Faculty vitality is integral to the advancement of higher education. Strengthening vitality is particularly important for midcareer faculty, who represent the largest and most dissatisfied segment. The demands of academic medicine appear to be another factor that may put faculty at risk of attrition. To address these issues, we initiated…

  10. Increasing faculty participation in resident education and providing cost-effective self-assessment module credit to faculty through resident-generated didactics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun; Malatesta, Theresa M; Anné, Pramila R; McAna, John; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Dicker, Adam P; Den, Robert B

    Board certified radiation oncologists and medical physicists are required to earn self-assessment module (SAM) continuing medical education (CME) credit, which may require travel costs or usage fees. Data indicate that faculty participation in resident teaching activities is beneficial to resident education. Our hypothesis was that providing the opportunity to earn SAM credit in resident didactics would increase faculty participation in and improve resident education. SAM applications, comprising CME certified category 1 resident didactic lectures and faculty-generated questions with respective answers, rationales, and references, were submitted to the American Board of Radiology for formal review. Surveys were distributed to assess main academic campus physician, affiliate campus physician, physicist, and radiation oncology resident impressions regarding the quality of the lectures. Survey responses were designed in Likert-scale format. Sign-test was performed with P motivation to attend resident didactics (P = .004). Residents reported an increased amount of time required to prepare lectures (P = .008). We are the first department, to our knowledge, to offer SAM credit to clinical faculty for participation in resident-generated didactics. Offering SAM credit at resident lectures is a cost-effective alternative to purchasing SAM resources, increases faculty attendance, and may improve the quality of radiation oncology resident education. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Strive, plan and reach the "Summit": the Faculty Development Program at the Ruth & Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castel, Orit Cohen; Nave, Rachel; Ganor, Margalit; Hasson-Gilad, Dalia R; Brika, Riva

    2010-04-01

    In recent years, faculty development has turned into a central component of medical education and a primary instrument in qualifying physicians to be teachers and educators. The faculty development program at the Ruth & Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine ("Summit" program) was established in order to improve teaching of the clinical professions, to create a community of medical teachers and educators and to develop leadership in medical education within the Faculty of Medicine. This article aims to describe the design, implementation and evaluation of the faculty development program in the Technion's Faculty of Medicine. The program was designed for a group of 20 clinical teachers, of various clinical professions, who had gained at least one year of undergraduate teaching experience and wished to develop a career in medical education. The program included seven monthly, eight-hour meetings throughout the academic year. Learning was based on small group discussions, interactive exercises, role-plays and simulations, self-directed reading and reflective writing. At the end of the final meeting, participants completed an evaluation form. Seventeen of the 20 participants (85%) graduated and received certificates. Learners' overall satisfaction was high. Graduates expressed high motivation to practice medical education within the Faculty of Medicine and reported that they gained new knowledge in medical education and skills regarding various aspects of teaching and learning, such as formulation of learning objectives, designing role plays, and providing effective feedback. The "Summit" program is an innovative initiative in the field of medical education in Israel. The program had a significant impact on participants' knowledge, teaching skills and attitudes. In order to ensure implementation of the acquired tools and skills, its shortterm and long-term effects on teaching behavior and the learning climate have yet to be demonstrated. In addition, it is necessary to

  12. An orientation to wellness for new faculty of medicine members: meeting a need in faculty development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Garielle E.; Bharwani, Aleem; Patel, Kamala D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the format, content, and effectiveness of a newly developed orientation to wellness workshop, and to explore participants’ overall perceptions. Methods This was a mixed methods study. Participants consisted of 47 new faculty of medicine members who attended one of the four workshops held between 2011 and 2013. Questionnaires were used to evaluate workshop characteristics (10 survey items; response scale 1=unacceptable to 7=outstanding), intention to change behavior (yes/no), and retrospective pre/post workshop self-efficacy (4 survey items; response scale 1=no confidence to 6=absolute confidence). Mean scores and standard deviations were calculated for the workshop characteristics. Pre/post workshop self-efficacy scores were compared using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Participants’ written qualitative feedback was coded using an inductive strategy to identify themes. Results There was strong support for the workshop characteristics with mean scores entirely above 6.00 (N=42). Thirty-one of 34 respondents (91%) expressed intention to change their behavior as a result of participating in the workshop. The post workshop self-efficacy scores (N=38 respondents) increased significantly for all four items (p<0.0001) compared to pre workshop ratings. Participants perceived the key workshop elements as the evidence-based content relevant to academic physicians, incorporation of practical tips and strategies, and an atmosphere conducive to discussion and experience sharing. Conclusions   Participants welcomed wellness as a focus of faculty development. Enhancing instruction around wellness has the potential to contribute positively to the professional competency and overall functioning of faculty of medicine members. PMID:27494833

  13. An orientation to wellness for new faculty of medicine members: meeting a need in faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Garielle E; Bharwani, Aleem; Patel, Kamala D; Lemaire, Jane B

    2016-08-04

    To evaluate the format, content, and effectiveness of a newly developed orientation to wellness workshop, and to explore participants' overall perceptions. This was a mixed methods study. Participants consisted of 47 new faculty of medicine members who attended one of the four workshops held between 2011 and 2013. Questionnaires were used to evaluate workshop characteristics (10 survey items; response scale 1=unacceptable to 7=outstanding), intention to change behavior (yes/no), and retrospective pre/post workshop self-efficacy (4 survey items; response scale 1=no confidence to 6=absolute confidence). Mean scores and standard deviations were calculated for the workshop characteristics. Pre/post workshop self-efficacy scores were compared using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Participants' written qualitative feedback was coded using an inductive strategy to identify themes. There was strong support for the workshop characteristics with mean scores entirely above 6.00 (N=42). Thirty-one of 34 respondents (91%) expressed intention to change their behavior as a result of participating in the workshop. The post workshop self-efficacy scores (N=38 respondents) increased significantly for all four items (p<0.0001) compared to pre workshop ratings. Participants perceived the key workshop elements as the evidence-based content relevant to academic physicians, incorporation of practical tips and strategies, and an atmosphere conducive to discussion and experience sharing.   Participants welcomed wellness as a focus of faculty development. Enhancing instruction around wellness has the potential to contribute positively to the professional competency and overall functioning of faculty of medicine members.

  14. Practice Brief: Faculty Perspectives on Professional Development to Improve Efficacy when Teaching Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye Jin; Roberts, Kelly D.; Stodden, Robert

    2012-01-01

    "Innovative and Sustainable Teaching Methods and Strategies" project staff provided professional development to instructional faculty to enhance their attitudes, knowledge, and skills in meeting the diverse needs of students with disabilities. This practice brief describes one of the professional development programs, delivered over the course of…

  15. Implementing the leadership development plans of faculty education fellows: a structured approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Ellen F; Wesner, Marilyn; Karnchanomai, Ornpawee; Haywood, Yolanda

    2012-09-01

    The literature about medical education faculty fellowship programs, which have grown in popularity, quantifies program characteristics, provides exemplars, and reports on delivery strategies. Evaluation is generally limited to satisfaction measures, with a few longitudinal studies of postprogram achievements, but none on the process of making these changes.The authors describe the development of faculty members' postfellowship leadership plans and a structured process to support plan implementation. They also compare the implementation of initiatives specified in individual leadership development plans of two cohorts of faculty. The participants were graduates of a fellowship program at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. One cohort participated in a structured process of monthly reciprocal peer coaching, followed by journaling and quarterly interviews with the program director; a second cohort functioned as a comparison with no structured process supporting them. (Study years are not provided because they could inadvertently lead to the identification of the participants.) Despite similar implementation challenges expressed by both cohorts, the cohort participating in the structured process implemented 23% more of their planned initiatives, including 2 times as many educational leadership initiatives and 3.5 times as many initiatives related to developing new curriculum. The combination of plan development, reciprocal peer coaching, journaling, and interview discussions provided faculty with focus, structure, and personal support. This structured process supporting leadership plan development and implementation can be easily transferred to other fellowship programs in medical education, adapted for use with residents and fellows, and used in similar development programs.

  16. Professional Development in an Online Context: Opportunities and Challenges from the Voices of College Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynants, Shelli; Dennis, Jessica

    2018-01-01

    Given the variety of learning and engagement needs of the increasingly diverse student population in higher education, flexible approaches to teaching are critical for improving student success. Professional development that provides faculty exposure to effective, evidence-based instructional strategies in an online context may enhance their…

  17. In Their Own Voices: Faculty Developers' Perceptions of Their Professional Identity and Knowledge Acquisition Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Christine E.

    2011-01-01

    As colleges and universities increase the focus on student learning, faculty development has taken a more prominent role in higher education (Barr & Tagg, 1995; Fink, 2003; Lieberman & Guskin, 2002). While a significant body of work on the practice of faculty development exists, research on faculty developers as professionals is limited. Several…

  18. A Women in Radiology Group Fosters Career Development for Faculty and Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetke-Udager, Kara; Knoepp, Ursula S; Maturen, Katherine E; Leschied, Jessica R; Chong, Suzanne; Klein, Katherine A; Kazerooni, Ella

    2018-07-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the outcomes of a women in radiology (WIR) group during the first 6 years of its existence, including members' satisfaction, activities, and differences based on seniority. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to group members. Survey questions were related to the usefulness of sessions, mentoring, professional opportunities, and camaraderie. Comparisons were made on the basis of training status and seniority. Continuous variables were compared using means, t tests, and correlations, and categoric variables were compared using counts, percentages, and chi-square tests or Mantel-Haenszel tests. Surveys were sent to 61 women, including trainees and faculty; the response rate was 49% (38% of trainees and 53% of faculty). Overall satisfaction score for WIR sessions was high (mean summary score, 1.42 ± 0.37 [SD], with 1 meaning very satisfied and 4 meaning very unsatisfied). Trainees and junior faculty were more likely than senior faculty to report expanded internal networking opportunities (94% vs 69%; p = 0.07), to have gained a mentor (67% vs 8%; p = 0.001), and to have increased research involvement (33% vs 0%; p = 0.02). Both groups were equally likely to have become mentors. Almost all respondents (93%) reported increased camaraderie among women in the department. A WIR group can provide career development tools for its members. In this study, trainees and junior faculty reported increased networking and research involvement and gaining a mentor but were equally likely as senior faculty to have become mentors. Most members reported increased camaraderie among women in the department. A WIR group may help to accelerate professional development among trainees and junior faculty, thereby contributing to a more diverse and enabled workforce.

  19. Professional Development: Designing Initiatives to Meet the Needs of Online Faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marquita Elliott

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of online courses mandates an examination of the similarities – and differences – in the faculty training and development needs of those teaching online. With institutions facing increasingly limited resources, there is a need to prioritize faculty development initiatives that will encourage faculty participation. An examination of interest, attendance and completion rates of faculty development initiatives targeting online faculty revealed no distinct preferences in relation to the focus or format of programs offered. The authors recommend offering flexibility and diversity in faculty development initiatives to accommodate the disparate needs of a remote, heterogeneous faculty population; as such, a sample needs assessment is offered to help guide faculty development programming to support online teaching.

  20. Impact of Faculty Development Workshops in Student-Centered Teaching Methodologies on Faculty Members' Teaching and Their Students' Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricio, Jorge A; Montt, Juan E; Ormeño, Andrea P; Del Real, Alberto J; Naranjo, Claudia A

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess, after one year, the impact of faculty development in teaching and learning skills focused on a learner-centered approach on faculty members' perceptions of and approaches to teaching and on their students' learning experiences and approaches. Before training (2014), all 176 faculty members at a dental school in Chile were invited to complete the Approaches to Teaching Inventory (ATI) to assess their teaching approaches (student- vs. teacher-focused). In 2015, all 496 students were invited to complete the Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F) to assess their learning approaches (deep or surface) and the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) to measure their teaching quality perceptions. Subsequently, faculty development workshops on student-centered teaching methodologies were delivered, followed by peer observation. In March 2016, all 176 faculty members and 491 students were invited to complete a second ATI (faculty) and R-SPQ-2 and CEQ (students). Before (2014) and after (2016) the training, 114 (65%) and 116 (66%) faculty members completed the ATI, respectively, and 89 (49%) of the then-181 faculty members completed the perceptions of skills development questionnaire in September 2016. In 2015, 373 students (75%) completed the R-SPQ-2F and CEQ; 412 (83%) completed both questionnaires in 2016. In 2014, the faculty results showed that student-focused teaching was significantly higher in preclinical and clinical courses than in the basic sciences. In 2016, teacher-focused teaching fell significantly; basic science teaching improved the most. Students in both the 2015 and 2016 cohorts had lower mean scores for deep learning approaches from year 1 on, while they increased their scores for surface learning. The students' perceptions of faculty members' good teaching, appropriate assessment, clear goals, and e-learning improved significantly, but perception of appropriate workload did not. Teaching and learning skills development

  1. Highly Relevant Mentoring (HRM) as a Faculty Development Model for Web-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Lorraine; Salyers, Vincent; Page, Aroha; Williams, Lynda; Albl, Liz; Hofsink, Clarence

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a faculty development model called the highly relevant mentoring (HRM) model; the model includes a framework as well as some practical strategies for meeting the professional development needs of faculty who teach web-based courses. The paper further emphasizes the need for faculty and administrative buy-in for HRM and…

  2. Professional Development: Designing Initiatives to Meet the Needs of Online Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Marquita; Rhoades, Nicole; Jackson, Christina M.; Mandernach, B. Jean

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of online courses mandates an examination of the similarities--and differences--in the faculty training and development needs of those teaching online. With institutions facing increasingly limited resources, there is a need to prioritize faculty development initiatives that will encourage faculty participation. An…

  3. Faculty development to improve teaching at a health sciences center: a needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarbecz, Mark; Russell, Cynthia K; Shreve, Robert G; Robinson, Melissa M; Scheid, Cheryl R

    2011-02-01

    There has been increasing interest at health science centers in improving the education of health professionals by offering faculty development activities. In 2007-08, as part of an effort to expand education-related faculty development offerings on campus, the University of Tennessee Health Science Center surveyed faculty members in an effort to identify faculty development activities that would be of interest. Factor analysis of survey data indicated that faculty interests in the areas of teaching and learning can be grouped into six dimensions: development of educational goals and objectives, the use of innovative teaching techniques, clinical teaching, improving traditional teaching skills, addressing teaching challenges, and facilitating participation. There were significant differences in the level of interest in education-related faculty development activities by academic rank and by the college of appointment. Full professors expressed somewhat less interest in faculty development activities than faculty members of lower ranks. Faculty members in the Colleges of Medicine and Dentistry expressed somewhat greater interest in faculty development to improve traditional teaching skills. The policy implications of the survey results are discussed, including the need for faculty development activities that target the needs of specific faculty groups.

  4. The Role of Servant Leadership in Faculty Development Programs: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Eric James

    2012-01-01

    The following note is that a review of existing literature pertaining to servant leadership and faculty development. Specifically, this work discussed delivering servant leadership to online faculty through the utilization of a faculty development program. The idea for this literature review stemmed from the author asking how an online academic…

  5. Crossing the patient-centered divide: transforming health care quality through enhanced faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Richard M; Eddins-Folensbee, Florence; Inui, Thomas S

    2011-04-01

    In the report "Crossing the Quality Chasm," the Institute of Medicine asserted that patient-centered care is one of the six domains of quality. In this article, the authors consider how the patient- and relationship-centered components of quality can be achieved in all aspects of medical care. They suggest that faculty development in three key areas-mindful practice, formation, and training in communication skills-is necessary to achieve patient- and relationship-centeredness.The authors first review the philosophical and scientific foundations of patient-centered and relationship-centered care. They next describe and provide concrete examples to illustrate the underlying theory and practices associated with each of the three faculty development areas. They then propose five key areas for faculty development in patient- and relationship-centered care: (1) making it a central competency in all health care interactions, (2) developing a national curriculum framework, (3) requiring performance metrics for professional development, (4) partnering with national health care organizations to disseminate the curriculum framework, and (5) preserving face-to-face educational methods for delivering key elements of the curriculum. Finally, the authors consider the issues faced in faculty development today in light of the medical education issues Abraham Flexner identified more than a century ago. © by the Association of American Medical Colleges.

  6. Student-Faculty Partnership in Explorations of Pedagogical Practice: A Threshold Concept in Academic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Sather, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Student-faculty partnerships position students as informants, participants, and change agents in collaboration with faculty members. Enacting one form of such collaboration, Bryn Mawr College's SaLT program pairs faculty members and undergraduate students in explorations of pedagogical practice. The program provides both context and case study for…

  7. Evaluation of a faculty development program aimed at increasing residents' active learning in lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desselle, Bonnie C; English, Robin; Hescock, George; Hauser, Andrea; Roy, Melissa; Yang, Tong; Chauvin, Sheila W

    2012-12-01

    Active engagement in the learning process is important to enhance learners' knowledge acquisition and retention and the development of their thinking skills. This study evaluated whether a 1-hour faculty development workshop increased the use of active teaching strategies and enhanced residents' active learning and thinking. Faculty teaching in a pediatrics residency participated in a 1-hour workshop (intervention) approximately 1 month before a scheduled lecture. Participants' responses to a preworkshop/postworkshop questionnaire targeted self-efficacy (confidence) for facilitating active learning and thinking and providing feedback about workshop quality. Trained observers assessed each lecture (3-month baseline phase and 3-month intervention phase) using an 8-item scale for use of active learning strategies and a 7-item scale for residents' engagement in active learning. Observers also assessed lecturer-resident interactions and the extent to which residents were asked to justify their answers. Responses to the workshop questionnaire (n  =  32/34; 94%) demonstrated effectiveness and increased confidence. Faculty in the intervention phase demonstrated increased use of interactive teaching strategies for 6 items, with 5 reaching statistical significance (P ≤ .01). Residents' active learning behaviors in lectures were higher in the intervention arm for all 7 items, with 5 reaching statistical significance. Faculty in the intervention group demonstrated increased use of higher-order questioning (P  =  .02) and solicited justifications for answers (P  =  .01). A 1-hour faculty development program increased faculty use of active learning strategies and residents' engagement in active learning during resident core curriculum lectures.

  8. A weekend program model for faculty development with primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerde, Craig L; Kokotailo, Patricia; Olson, Curtis A; Hla, Khin Mae

    2004-01-01

    Medical teachers are expected to be proficient at teaching students and residents about the changing health care system. The University of Wisconsin established a faculty development fellowship program to better prepare clinical teachers in family medicine, general pediatrics, and general internal medicine. This paper describes our fellowship program, presents data on program accomplishments, and discusses what we have learned. We developed a year-long series of five weekend workshops. A core group of faculty provided 2- to 4- hour sessions on topics including evidence-based medicine, physician leadership, advocacy, doctor-patient communication, quality, technology tools, and teaching skills. Evaluation data were used to shape the program, make improvements, and assess impact. Fellows self-assessed their ability to perform skills at the beginning and ending of the year; paired t tests were used to compare these changes. Attendance and program completion rates were more than 94% for the 84 fellows taught over 6 years. Individual sessions and the overall program were well-rated by fellows. Participants reported improvements in targeted skills; statistical analyses confirmed many significant pre-post improvements. To obtain high ratings, faculty must apply adult learning and active learning principles; lectures were not well tolerated. Initial technology skills were often low; computer labs needed many helpers. Participants needed extensive faculty support on their projects. It facilitated coordination and learning to have a core group of fellowship faculty who did most of the teaching. Graduates have become enthusiastic recruiters for new fellows. Our 5-weekend program has proven to be an effective faculty development model.

  9. Log In to Experiential Learning Theory: Supporting Web-Based Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, Selma; Choi, Sunhea; Brien, Sarah; Parry, Marcus

    2017-09-27

    For an increasingly busy and geographically dispersed faculty, the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Southampton, United Kingdom, developed a range of Web-based faculty development modules, based on Kolb's experiential learning cycle, to complement the faculty's face-to-face workshops. The objective of this study was to assess users' views and perceptions of the effectiveness of Web-based faculty development modules based on Kolb's experiential learning cycle. We explored (1) users' satisfaction with the modules, (2) whether Kolb's design framework supported users' learning, and (3) whether the design principle impacts their work as educators. We gathered data from users over a 3-year period using evaluation surveys built into each of the seven modules. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and responses to open-ended questions were analyzed using content analysis. Out of the 409 module users, 283 completed the survey (69.1% response rate). Over 80% of the users reported being satisfied or very satisfied with seven individual aspects of the modules. The findings suggest a strong synergy between the design features that users rated most highly and the key stages of Kolb's learning cycle. The use of simulations and videos to give the users an initial experience as well as the opportunity to "Have a go" and receive feedback in a safe environment were both considered particularly useful. In addition to providing an opportunity for reflection, many participants considered that the modules would enhance their roles as educators through: increasing their knowledge on various education topics and the required standards for medical training, and improving their skills in teaching and assessing students through practice and feedback and ultimately increasing their confidence. Kolb's theory-based design principle used for Web-based faculty development can support faculty to improve their skills and has impact on their role as educators

  10. Blended Learning for Faculty Professional Development Incorporating Knowledge Management Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    Adjunct faculty comprise a large percentage of part-time faculty for many colleges and universities today. Adjunct faculty are hired because they are experts in their content areas; however, this does not guarantee that they are skilled in effective classroom management. These instructors can become bewildered and frustrated because they lack the…

  11. The ties that bind: a network approach to creating a programme in faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lindsay; Reeves, Scott; Egan-Lee, Eileen; Leslie, Karen; Silver, Ivan

    2010-02-01

    Current trends in medical education reflect the changing health care environment. An increasingly large and diverse student population, a move to more distributed models of education, greater community involvement and an emphasis on social accountability, interprofessional education and student-centred approaches to learning necessitate new approaches to faculty development to help faculty members respond effectively to this rapidly changing landscape. Drawing upon the tenets of network theory and the broader organisational literature, we propose a 'fishhook' model of faculty development programme formation. The model is based on seven key factors which supported the successful formation of a centralised programme for faculty development that addressed many of the contemporary issues in medical education. These factors include: environmental readiness; commitment and vision of a mobiliser; recruitment of key stakeholders and leaders to committees; formation of a collaborative network structure; accumulation of networking capital; legitimacy, and flexibility. Our aim in creating this model is to provide a guide for other medical schools to consider when developing similar programmes. The model can be adapted to reflect the local goals, settings and cultures of other medical education contexts.

  12. NextUp: Intentional Faculty Leadership Development for All Ranks and Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashe, Diana L.; TenHuisen, Matthew L.

    2018-01-01

    While most academic leadership training focuses on department chairs and those already in or identified for those positions, the NextUp Faculty Leadership Development Fellows program includes faculty who are considering academic leadership of any kind in their careers. Sixty faculty members have joined NextUp; forty-one have graduated and 19 are…

  13. Mentorship programs for faculty development in academic general pediatric divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagishi, Jennifer; Dabrow, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Mentoring relationships have been shown to support academicians in areas of research, work/life balance, and promotion. Methods. General pediatric division chiefs accessed an electronic survey asking about mentorship relationships, their ability to create a mentorship program, and resources needed. Results. Dyadic mentorship programs were available at 53% of divisions. Peer mentorship programs were available at 27% of divisions. Overall, 84% of chiefs believed that dyadic mentorship would benefit their faculty. 91% of chiefs believed that peer mentorship would benefit their faculty. Chiefs were interested in starting peer (57%) or dyadic (55%) mentorship programs. Few divisions had a peer mentorship program available, whereas 24% already had a dyadic program. 43% of chiefs felt that they had the tools to start a program. Many tools are needed to create a program. Discussion. General pediatric division chiefs acknowledge the benefits of mentoring relationships, and some have programs in place. Many need tools to create them. Pediatric societies could facilitate this critical area of professional development.

  14. Log In to Experiential Learning Theory: Supporting Web-Based Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brien, Sarah; Parry, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    Background For an increasingly busy and geographically dispersed faculty, the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Southampton, United Kingdom, developed a range of Web-based faculty development modules, based on Kolb’s experiential learning cycle, to complement the faculty’s face-to-face workshops. Objective The objective of this study was to assess users’ views and perceptions of the effectiveness of Web-based faculty development modules based on Kolb’s experiential learning cycle. We explored (1) users’ satisfaction with the modules, (2) whether Kolb’s design framework supported users’ learning, and (3) whether the design principle impacts their work as educators. Methods We gathered data from users over a 3-year period using evaluation surveys built into each of the seven modules. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and responses to open-ended questions were analyzed using content analysis. Results Out of the 409 module users, 283 completed the survey (69.1% response rate). Over 80% of the users reported being satisfied or very satisfied with seven individual aspects of the modules. The findings suggest a strong synergy between the design features that users rated most highly and the key stages of Kolb’s learning cycle. The use of simulations and videos to give the users an initial experience as well as the opportunity to “Have a go” and receive feedback in a safe environment were both considered particularly useful. In addition to providing an opportunity for reflection, many participants considered that the modules would enhance their roles as educators through: increasing their knowledge on various education topics and the required standards for medical training, and improving their skills in teaching and assessing students through practice and feedback and ultimately increasing their confidence. Conclusions Kolb’s theory-based design principle used for Web-based faculty development can support faculty to

  15. Assisting in the Management of Faculty Role Stress: Recommendations for Faculty Developers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, K. Andrew R.; Levesque-Bristol, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Role theory is a sociological perspective that examines the ways in which interactions with others in a social environment can lead to role-related stress. Faculty may suffer from role-related stressors such as role conflict, ambiguity, and overload as they navigate the job facets of research, engagement, and teaching. This role stress can result…

  16. The Impact of a National Faculty Development Program Embedded Within an Academic Professional Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Constance D; Gusic, Maryellen E; Chandran, Latha

    2017-08-01

    A sizeable literature describes the effectiveness of institution-based faculty development programs in nurturing faculty educators as scholars, but national programs are less common and seldom evaluated. To fill this role, the Educational Scholars Program (ESP) was created within the Academic Pediatric Association (APA) in 2006. It is a national, three-year, cohort-based certification program focused on fostering educational scholarship. This article describes the development and outcomes of an innovative program embedded within the framework of a national professional organization, and offers a model for potential adaptation by similar organizations to enhance their support of educators.After 10 years, 171 scholars have enrolled in the ESP, and 50 faculty have participated. Scholars are assigned a faculty advisor and participate in three full-day sessions at a national meeting; online, interactive learning modules; and a mentored, scholarly project. The program receives support from the APA in four organizational frames: structural, human resource, political, and symbolic. The self-perceived scholarly proficiency of the scholars in Cohort 1 increased significantly over time, and their productivity and collaborations increased during and after the program. Scholars wrote enthusiastically about their experience in yearly and postprogram evaluations. In interviews, eight past APA presidents explained that the ESP strengthened the APA's mission, created new leaders, and provided a new model for other APA programs. Outcomes of the ESP suggest that a longitudinal faculty development program embedded within a national professional organization can create a social enterprise not only within the organization but also within the broader national community of educator-scholars.

  17. The Relationships between Faculty Preparation Programs and Teaching Assistant Development Programs. Preparing Future Faculty. Occasional Paper No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Stacey Lane

    This paper examines the relationship between teaching assistant (TA) development programs and faculty preparation programs, the commonalities between the two types of program, and the issues to be considered when making the transition from the former to the latter. It notes that many institutions adopted TA training programs in the 1980s in…

  18. Developing data literacy competencies to enhance faculty collaborations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don MacMillan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to align information literacy instruction with changing faculty and student needs, librarians must expand their skills and competencies beyond traditional information sources. In the sciences, this increasingly means integrating the data resources used by researchers into instruction for undergraduate students.  Open access data repositories allow students to work with more primary data than ever before, but only if they know how and where to look. This paper will describe the development of two information literacy workshops designed to scaffold student learning in the biological sciences across two second-year courses, detailing the long-term collaboration between a librarian and an instructor that now serves over 500 students per semester. In each workshop, students are guided through the discovery and analysis of life sciences data from multiple sites, encouraged to integrate text and data sources, and supported in completing research assignments.

  19. Anchoring a Mentoring Network in a New Faculty Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beane-Katner, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Intentional mentoring of the next generation of faculty is critical if they are to be successful teacher-scholars. The traditional model of one-on-one mentoring is insufficient given the changing demographics of next-generation faculty members, their particular expectations, the limited professional training they receive in graduate school, and…

  20. 'Uncrunching' time: medical schools' use of social media for faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahn, Peter S; Benjamin, Emelia J; Shanahan, Christopher W

    2013-06-27

    The difficulty of attracting attendance for in-person events is a problem common to all faculty development efforts. Social media holds the potential to disseminate information asynchronously while building a community through quick, easy-to-use formats. The authors sought to document creative uses of social media for faculty development in academic medical centers. In December 2011, the first author (P.S.C.) examined the websites of all 154 accredited medical schools in the United States and Canada for pages relevant to faculty development. The most popular social media sites and searched for accounts maintained by faculty developers in academic medicine were also visited. Several months later, in February 2012, a second investigator (C.W.S.) validated these data via an independent review. Twenty-two (22) medical schools (14.3%) employed at least one social media technology in support of faculty development. In total, 40 instances of social media tools were identified--the most popular platforms being Facebook (nine institutions), Twitter (eight institutions), and blogs (eight institutions). Four medical schools, in particular, have developed integrated strategies to engage faculty in online communities. Although relatively few medical schools have embraced social media to promote faculty development, the present range of such uses demonstrates the flexibility and affordability of the tools. The most popular tools incorporate well into faculty members' existing use of technology and require minimal additional effort. Additional research into the benefits of engaging faculty through social media may help overcome hesitation to invest in new technologies.

  1. The ASM-NSF Biology Scholars Program: An Evidence-Based Model for Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Amy L; Pribbenow, Christine M

    2016-05-01

    The American Society for Microbiology (ASM) established its ASM-NSF (National Science Foundation) Biology Scholars Program (BSP) to promote undergraduate education reform by 1) supporting biologists to implement evidence-based teaching practices, 2) engaging life science professional societies to facilitate biologists' leadership in scholarly teaching within the discipline, and 3) participating in a teaching community that fosters disciplinary-level science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) reform. Since 2005, the program has utilized year-long residency training to provide a continuum of learning and practice centered on principles from the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) to more than 270 participants ("scholars") from biology and multiple other disciplines. Additionally, the program has recruited 11 life science professional societies to support faculty development in SoTL and discipline-based education research (DBER). To identify the BSP's long-term outcomes and impacts, ASM engaged an external evaluator to conduct a study of the program's 2010-2014 scholars (n = 127) and society partners. The study methods included online surveys, focus groups, participant observation, and analysis of various documents. Study participants indicate that the program achieved its proposed goals relative to scholarship, professional society impact, leadership, community, and faculty professional development. Although participants also identified barriers that hindered elements of their BSP participation, findings suggest that the program was essential to their development as faculty and provides evidence of the BSP as a model for other societies seeking to advance undergraduate science education reform. The BSP is the longest-standing faculty development program sponsored by a collective group of life science societies. This collaboration promotes success across a fragmented system of more than 80 societies representing the life sciences and helps

  2. The ASM-NSF Biology Scholars Program: An Evidence-Based Model for Faculty Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L. Chang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The American Society for Microbiology (ASM established its ASM-NSF (National Science Foundation Biology Scholars Program (BSP to promote undergraduate education reform by 1 supporting biologists to implement evidence-based teaching practices, 2 engaging life science professional societies to facilitate biologists’ leadership in scholarly teaching within the discipline, and 3 participating in a teaching community that fosters disciplinary-level science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM reform. Since 2005, the program has utilized year-long residency training to provide a continuum of learning and practice centered on principles from the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL to more than 270 participants (“scholars” from biology and multiple other disciplines. Additionally, the program has recruited 11 life science professional societies to support faculty development in SoTL and discipline-based education research (DBER. To identify the BSP’s long-term outcomes and impacts, ASM engaged an external evaluator to conduct a study of the program’s 2010­–2014 scholars (n = 127 and society partners. The study methods included online surveys, focus groups, participant observation, and analysis of various documents. Study participants indicate that the program achieved its proposed goals relative to scholarship, professional society impact, leadership, community, and faculty professional development. Although participants also identified barriers that hindered elements of their BSP participation, findings suggest that the program was essential to their development as faculty and provides evidence of the BSP as a model for other societies seeking to advance undergraduate science education reform. The BSP is the longest-standing faculty development program sponsored by a collective group of life science societies. This collaboration promotes success across a fragmented system of more than 80 societies representing the life

  3. Communities of teaching practice in the workplace: Evaluation of a faculty development programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Marie-Louise; Huveneers, Wilma; Dolmans, Diana

    2016-08-01

    The focus of faculty development (FD) has recently shifted from individual and formal learning to formal and informal learning by a team of teachers in the workplace where the teaching is actually effected. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of a faculty development programme on teachers' educational workplace environment. We invited 23 teachers, who had successfully completed a University Teaching Qualification (UTQ) programme, to evaluate the faculty development programme and participate in focus group discussions. This UTQ programme spanned one year and covered 185 hours of formal and informal learning and training activities and formal coaching. After having obtained their UTQ, teachers reported that coaching enhances reflection and feedback, to participate more frequently in educational networks, which enhances consultation among teachers, increased awareness of organizational educational policies and more confidence in fulfilling educational tasks and activities. The evaluation of the UTQ programme demonstrated to enhance the development of a community of teachers at the workplace who share a passion for education and provide each other with support and feedback, which triggered a change in culture enhancing improvement of education. However, this did not hold for all teachers. Inhibiting factors hold sway, such as a prevailing commitment to research over education in some departments and a lack of interest in education by some department chairs.

  4. Professional Development Opportunities for Two-Year College Geoscience Faculty: Issues, Opportunities, and Successes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, E. M.; Macdonald, H.; McDaris, J. R.; Granshaw, F. D.; Wenner, J. M.; Hodder, J.; van der Hoeven Kraft, K.; Filson, R. H.; Guertin, L. A.; Wiese, K.

    2011-12-01

    Two-year colleges (2YCs) play a critical role in geoscience education in the United States. Nearly half of the undergraduate students who take introductory geoscience do so at a 2YC. With awide reach and diverse student populations, 2YCs may be key to producing a well-trained, diverse and sufficiently large geoscience workforce. However, faculty at 2YCs often face many barriers to professional development including lack of financial resources, heavy and inflexible teaching loads, lack of awareness of opportunities, and few professional development resources/events targeted at their needs. As an example, at the 2009 GSA meeting in Portland, fewer than 80 of the 6500 attendees were from community colleges, although this was more than twice the 2YC faculty attendance the previous year. Other issues include the isolation described by many 2YC geoscience faculty who may be the only full time geoscientist on a campus and challenges faced by adjunct faculty who may have even fewer opportunities for professional development and networking with other geoscience faculty. Over the past three years we have convened several workshops and events for 2YC geoscience faculty including technical sessions and a workshop on funding opportunities for 2YC faculty at GSA annual meetings, a field trip and networking event at the fall AGU meeting, a planning workshop that examined the role of 2YCs in geoscience education and in broadening participation in the geosciences, two workshops supporting use of the 'Math You Need, When You Need It' educational materials that included a majority of 2YC faculty, and marine science summer institutes offered by COSEE-Pacific Partnerships for 2YC faculty. Our experience indicates that 2YC faculty desire professional development opportunities when the experience is tailored to the needs and character of their students, programs, and institutions. The content of the professional development opportunity must be useful to 2YC faculty -workshops and

  5. Effect of Faculty Development Activities on Dental Hygiene Faculty Perceptions of and Teaching About Motivational Interviewing: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Michelle; Korte, Dina; Richards, Philip S; Saglik, Berna; Taichman, L Susan; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne E

    2017-08-01

    The aims of this pilot study were to assess dental hygiene faculty members' perceptions of the importance of motivational interviewing (MI) and their confidence in teaching students about MI and to determine the effect of MI training sessions on those perceptions. Participants were a convenience sample of all 16 dental hygiene faculty members who teach in the clinic at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry. Participants' perceptions were assessed prior to a workshop in MI (pretest), immediately after the workshop (posttest 1), and eight months after the workshop, at the end of the academic year (posttest 2). During the same period, some of the workshop participants took part in team grading sessions of audio recordings of student-patient MI interactions. The results showed that the majority of the faculty members perceived it was important to personally embrace the overall spirit of MI during patient care, and they were confident supporting students as well. Their ratings for embracing the spirit of MI increased from pretest to posttest 1, but slightly decreased at posttest 2. This trend was also seen in their assessment of the importance of and their confidence in teaching the eight MI strategies over time. Among the workshop participants, 56% were part of team grading; they reported the most helpful professional development activities overall were team grading (58%) and the workshop (25%). These results suggest the importance of making use of a variety of faculty development activities and of introducing appropriate follow-up to training sessions over time to ensure long-lasting effects. Future research using carefully designed, multi-institution, longitudinal studies is needed to determine the most effective ways to prepare dental hygiene faculty members to educate their students about MI.

  6. The Development, Implementation, and Assessment of an Innovative Faculty Mentoring Leadership Program

    OpenAIRE

    Tsen, Lawrence C.; Borus, Jonathan F.; Nadelson, Carol C.; Seely, Ellen W.; Haas, Audrey; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L.

    2012-01-01

    Effective mentoring is an important component of academic success. Few programs exist to both improve the effectiveness of established mentors and cultivate a multi-specialty mentoring community. In 2008, in response to a faculty survey on mentoring, leaders at Brigham and Women’s Hospital developed the Faculty Mentoring Leadership Program (FMLP) as a peer-learning experience for mid-career and senior faculty physician and scientist mentors to enhance their skills and leadership in mentoring ...

  7. Worlds Apart? International Students, Source-Based Writing, and Faculty Development Across the Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Greer Alison

    2016-01-01

    This study examined how English as a Second Language (ESL) and Writing program faculty at a professional liberal arts college partnered with faculty across the curriculum to help international students learn to write from sources and avoid unintentional plagiarism. Eight participants joined a series of action research professional development workshops. In these workshops, faculty focused on defining plagiarism in both academic and professional settings, designing culturally inclusive assignm...

  8. Through the looking glass: how reflective learning influences the development of young faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Stacy; Bernstein, Lisa; Manning, Kimberly; Schneider, Jason; Kho, Anna; Brownfield, Erica; Branch, William T

    2011-01-01

    Faculty development is needed that will influence clinical teachers to better enable them to transmit humanistic values to their learners and colleagues. We sought to understand the processes whereby reflective learning influenced professional growth in a convenience sample of young faculty members. We analyzed appreciative inquiry narratives written over 4 years using the constant comparative method to identify major underlying themes and develop hypotheses concerning how reflective learning influenced participants in the faculty development program. Six of the participants and the facilitator were participant observers in the qualitative analysis. Group support, validation, and cohesion led to adoption of common values that informed the professional development of the participants over 4 years of the study. Common values influenced the group members as they progressed in their careers. Faculty development programs that focus on humanism and reflective learning can facilitate the growth of young faculty members by influencing their values and attitudes at crucial phases of their careers.

  9. THE ROLE OF SERVANT LEADERSHIP IN FACULTY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS: A Review of The Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric James RUSSELL

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The following note is that a review of existing literature pertaining to servant leadership and faculty development. Specifically, this work discussed delivering servant leadership to online faculty through the utilization of a faculty development program. The idea for this literature review stemmed from the author asking how an online academic administrator could utilize the practice of servant leadership in order to improve the overall online academic experience. The intent of the review involved discovering, through a review of the literature, a way of opening up a dialogue that can possibly drive future research studies regarding the practice of servant leadership to improve of the overall online academic teaching experience. In this work, the author conducted a literature review that identified strengths in both faculty development as well as practicing servant leadership within the online education modality. The literature identified the issue of faculty isolation as challenge for academic administrators and offered up faculty development as a possible solution to overcoming it. The findings of the work showed a benefit to bringing servant leadership practices into faculty development programs in order to improve the overall online teaching environment. The work generates future empirical research ideas regarding building community, the use of servant leadership, and faculty development programs.

  10. Development of a radiology faculty appraisal instrument by using critical incident interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J; Albanese, M A; Thakor, S K; Propeck, P A; Scanlan, K A

    1997-12-01

    To develop a valid and reliable radiology faculty appraisal instrument based on scientific methods. Fifteen radiology residents participated in critical incident interviewing. During a 1-hour interview, a resident was asked to describe five incidents each of effective and ineffective faculty behavior. Two investigators independently listened to the tape-recorded interviews, and two different investigators sorted the incidents into broad categories. A faculty appraisal instrument was developed by listing similar incidents under broad categories. A five-point rating scale was applied to each item. Content validity was assessed by resident and faculty critique of the appraisal instrument. A total of 168 incidents of faculty behavior were generated. The frequency with which similar incidents were reported was recorded. The most common behaviors reported were related to staff expertise and teaching. Interjudge reliability was good, as determined by computing K indices of agreement (overall K = 0.59). There was good agreement regarding instrument content validity among residents but not among faculty. Residents supported the use of the new appraisal instrument, but further tests of validity and reliability and faculty acceptance of the instrument will determine its usefulness as a tool for monitoring faculty teaching performance and making decisions regarding faculty promotion.

  11. Future of Family Medicine Faculty Development in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Paul R; Chege, Patrick; Dahlman, Bruce; Gibson, Christine; Evensen, Ann; Colon-Gonzalez, Maria C; Onguka, Stephanie; Lamptey, Roberta; Cayley, William E; Nguyen, Bich-May; Johnson, Brian; Getnet, Sawra; Hasnain, Memoona

    2017-03-01

    High-quality family medicine education is needed in sub-Saharan Africa to facilitate the future growth of primary care health systems. Current faculty educators recognize the value of dedicated teacher training and ongoing faculty development. However, they are constrained by inadequate faculty development program availability and institutional support. A cross-sectional study design was used to conduct a qualitative needs assessment comprised of 37 in-depth, semi-structured interviews of individual faculty trainers from postgraduate family medicine training programs in eight sub-Saharan African countries. Data were analyzed according to qualitative description. Informants described desired qualities for a family medicine educator in sub-Saharan Africa: (1) pedagogical expertise in topics and perspectives unique to family medicine, (2) engagement in self-directed, lifelong learning, and (3) exemplary character and behavior that inspires others. Informant recommendations to guide the development of faculty development programs include: (1) sustainability, partnership, and responsiveness to the needs of the institution, (2) intentional faculty development must begin early and be supported with high-quality mentorship, (3) presumptions of teaching competence based on clinical training must be overcome, and (4) evaluation and feedback are critical components of faculty development. High-quality faculty development in family medicine is critically important to the primary care workforce in sub-Saharan Africa. Our study describes specific needs and recommendations for family medicine faculty development in sub-Saharan Africa. Next steps include piloting and evaluating innovative models of faculty development that respond to specific institutional or regional needs.

  12. Faculty development to enhance humanistic teaching and role modeling: a collaborative study at eight institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, William T; Chou, Calvin L; Farber, Neil J; Hatem, David; Keenan, Craig; Makoul, Gregory; Quinn, Mariah; Salazar, William; Sillman, Jane; Stuber, Margaret; Wilkerson, LuAnn; Mathew, George; Fost, Michael

    2014-09-01

    There is increased emphasis on practicing humanism in medicine but explicit methods for faculty development in humanism are rare. We sought to demonstrate improved faculty teaching and role modeling of humanistic and professional values by participants in a multi-institutional faculty development program as rated by their learners in clinical settings compared to contemporaneous controls. Blinded learners in clinical settings rated their clinical teachers, either participants or controls, on the previously validated 10-item Humanistic Teaching Practices Effectiveness (HTPE) questionnaire. Groups of 7-9 participants at 8 academic medical centers completed an 18-month faculty development program. Participating faculty were chosen by program facilitators at each institution on the basis of being promising teachers, willing to participate in the longitudinal faculty development program. Our 18-month curriculum combined experiential learning of teaching skills with critical reflection using appreciative inquiry narratives about their experiences as teachers and other reflective discussions. The main outcome was the aggregate score of the ten items on the questionnaire at all institutions. The aggregate score favored participants over controls (P = 0.019) independently of gender, experience on faculty, specialty area, and/or overall teaching skills. Longitudinal, intensive faculty development that employs experiential learning and critical reflection likely enhances humanistic teaching and role modeling. Almost all participants completed the program. Results are generalizable to other schools.

  13. Comparing the Distance Learning-Related Course Development Approach and Faculty Support and Rewards Structure at AACSB Accredited Institutions between 2001 and 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Perreault, Ed.D.

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The study compared the support and rewards provided faculty members for online course teaching and the development approaches used at business schools accredited by AACSB between 2001 and 2006. Data were collected from 81 professors in 2001 and 140 professors in 2006. The professors were involved in developing or teaching online courses at AACSB business schools across the United States. The findings indicate that faculty members received limited support and are not taking advantage of training options. Faculty members are most likely rewarded for their involvement in distance learning through stipends based on the number of online sections taught. Little has changed during the five-year period in regards to course development. Faculty members continue to use an individual instead of a team approach to course development and most faculty members learned online course development and delivery techniques on their own.

  14. Innovative online faculty development utilizing the power of social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Melissa; Niebuhr, Virginia; D'Alessandro, Donna

    2013-01-01

    Faculty development (FD) is important for continued professional development, but expense and distance remain challenging. These challenges could be minimized by the free and asynchronous nature of social media (SM). We sought to determine the utility and effectiveness of conducting a national online FD activity on Facebook by assessing participants' perceptions and use and facilitators' challenges. An educational activity of a national FD program was managed on a closed Facebook group. Activities included postings of educational technology goals, abstracting an article, and commenting on peers' postings. Sources of quantitative data included the Facebook postings and the survey responses. Surveys before, after, and 6 months after the activity assessed knowledge, attitudes and self-reported behaviors. Sources of qualitative data were the open-ended survey questions and the content of the Facebook postings. All participants completed the FD activity and evaluations, yielding 38 postings and 115 comments. Before the activity, 88% had a personal Facebook account, 64% were somewhat/very confident using Facebook, 77% thought SM would be useful for professional networking, and 12% had used it professionally. Six months after the activity, professional usage had increased to 35%. Continued use of Facebook for future presentations of this FD activity was recommended by 76%. Qualitative analysis yielded 12 types of Facebook postings and 7 themes related to using SM for FD. Conducting a national FD activity on Facebook yielded excellent participation rates and positive participant impressions, and it affected professional usage. Facebook may become an additional tool in the educator's toolbox for FD as a result of its acceptability and accessibility. Copyright © 2013 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Assuring Student Learning Outcomes Achievement through Faculty Development: An Online University Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Shelia; Ewing, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Asynchronous discussions in the online teaching and learning environment significantly contributes to the achievement of student learning outcomes, which is dependent upon qualified and engaged faculty members. The discourse within this article addresses how an online university conducted faculty development through its unique Robust Learning…

  16. Developing a Multi-Dimensional Evaluation Framework for Faculty Teaching and Service Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Diane F.; Neely, Walter P.; Prenshaw, Penelope J.; Taylor, Patrick A.

    2015-01-01

    A task force was created in a small, AACSB-accredited business school to develop a more comprehensive set of standards for faculty performance. The task force relied heavily on faculty input to identify and describe key dimensions that capture effective teaching and service performance. The result is a multi-dimensional framework that will be used…

  17. A Brave New World: Imagining Faculty Development in the Global Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanZanten, Susan

    2015-01-01

    What might globalization and the demographic shift in Christianity mean for faculty development programs? What faculty members need most is the ability to imagine globalization as Christians. This article surveys and critiques the most powerful and persistent accounts in the current contest of narratives within the field of global education. These…

  18. Development of an Instrument to Measure Faculty's Information and Communication Technology Access (FICTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, Kamal Ahmed; Kale, Ugur; Curtis, Reagan; Akcaoglu, Mete; Bernstein, Malayna

    2018-01-01

    The phenomenon of "digital divide" is complex and multidimensional, extending beyond issues of physical access. The purpose of this study was to develop a scale to measure a range of factors related to digital divide among higher education faculty and to evaluate its reliability and validity. Faculty's Information and Communication…

  19. Finding Win-Win Forms of Economic Development Outreach: Shared Priorities of Business Faculty and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacdayan, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The mission statements of many public (taxpayer-supported) colleges promise economic development outreach to local business communities. Unfortunately, faculty may be hard-pressed to devote time to outreach. The author looks for specific outreach activities that garner strong support from both faculty and business representatives. The author…

  20. The Racial Stress of Membership: Development of the Faculty Inventory of Racialized Experiences in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Sherry; Stevenson, Howard C.

    2013-01-01

    Research on the experience of faculty of color in predominately White independent schools (PWIS) is limited. This study explored faculty of varying racial backgrounds and their initiation of, interactions with, and stress reactions to racial conflicts within the school settings using an online survey. Several measures were developed according to…

  1. Breaking through the glass ceiling: a survey of promotion rates of graduates of a primary care Faculty Development Fellowship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mindy A; Barry, Henry C; Dunn, Ruth Ann; Keefe, Carole; Weismantel, David

    2006-01-01

    Academic promotion has been difficult for women and faculty of minority race. We investigated whether completion of a faculty development fellowship would equalize promotion rates of female and minority graduates to those of male and white graduates. All graduates of the Michigan State University Primary Care Faculty Development Fellowship Program from 1989-1998 were sent a survey in 1999, which included questions about academic status and appointment. We compared application and follow-up survey data by gender and race/ethnicity. Telephone calls were made to nonrespondents. A total of 175 (88%) graduating fellows responded to the follow-up survey. Information on academic rank at entry and follow-up was obtained from 28 of 48 fellows with missing information on promotion. Male and female graduates achieved similar academic promotion at follow-up, but there was a trend toward lower promotion rates for minority faculty graduates compared to white graduates. In the multivariate analysis, however, only age, years in rank, initial rank, and type of appointment (academic versus clinical) were significant factors for promotion. Academic advancement is multifactorial and appears most related to time in rank, stage of life, and career choice. Faculty development programs may be most useful in providing skill development and career counseling.

  2. Mentoring from the Outside: The Role of a Peer Mentoring Community in the Development of Early Career Education Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottoms, SueAnn; Pegg, Jerine; Adams, Anne; Wu, Ke; Smith Risser, H.; Kern, Anne L.

    2013-01-01

    Developing an identity as a researcher and negotiating the expectations and responsibilities of academic life are challenges that many beginning education faculty face. Mentoring can provide support for this transition; however, traditional forms of mentoring may be unavailable, limited, or lack the specific components that individual mentees…

  3. Moving the Needle: The Effect of Faculty Development on Part-Time Teachers at a Technical College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proeber, Helen R.

    2012-01-01

    In the business division of the technical college in which this study occurred, there was a need to change the way part-time faculty prepared course syllabi. The implementation of a professional development workshop that focused on the components and necessity of the syllabus provided the teachers new information they needed to be prepared for the…

  4. Making a Difference: Library and Teaching Faculty Working Together to Develop Strategies in Dealing with Student Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammarella, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Student plagiarism is a problem affecting all colleges. Various strategies have been developed to deal with this situation. But, the collaborative efforts of subject faculty and librarians in creating a team approach towards plagiarism can produce positive results. Research shows that these relationships can provide structure to assignments…

  5. International Approaches to Renewable Energy Education--A Faculty Professional Development Case Study with Recommended Practices for STEM Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, Kenneth A.; Slowinski, Mary; Alfano, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Calls for increased international competency in U.S. college graduates and the global nature of the renewable energy industry require an exploration of how to incorporate a global perspective in STEM curricula, and how to best develop faculty providing them with global knowledge and skills necessary to update and improve existing teaching…

  6. Nursing Faculty Professional Development: A Study Using the National League for Nursing (NLN) Core Competencies for Nurse Educators for Development of Novice to Expert Nurse Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, Kari L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative research study was to identify core competencies that are most significant for nursing faculty to develop as they transition from novice to expert faculty. Professional development in a systematic approach may guide faculty to learn what is significant as they progress in the nurse faculty role. A quantitative…

  7. Assessing faculty professional development in STEM higher education: Sustainability of outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derting, Terry L; Ebert-May, Diane; Henkel, Timothy P; Maher, Jessica Middlemis; Arnold, Bryan; Passmore, Heather A

    2016-03-01

    We tested the effectiveness of Faculty Institutes for Reforming Science Teaching IV (FIRST), a professional development program for postdoctoral scholars, by conducting a study of program alumni. Faculty professional development programs are critical components of efforts to improve teaching and learning in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) disciplines, but reliable evidence of the sustained impacts of these programs is lacking. We used a paired design in which we matched a FIRST alumnus employed in a tenure-track position with a non-FIRST faculty member at the same institution. The members of a pair taught courses that were of similar size and level. To determine whether teaching practices of FIRST participants were more learner-centered than those of non-FIRST faculty, we compared faculty perceptions of their teaching strategies, perceptions of environmental factors that influence teaching, and actual teaching practice. Non-FIRST and FIRST faculty reported similar perceptions of their teaching strategies and teaching environment. FIRST faculty reported using active learning and interactive engagement in lecture sessions more frequently compared with non-FIRST faculty. Ratings from external reviewers also documented that FIRST faculty taught class sessions that were learner-centered, contrasting with the teacher-centered class sessions of most non-FIRST faculty. Despite marked differences in teaching practice, FIRST and non-FIRST participants used assessments that targeted lower-level cognitive skills. Our study demonstrated the effectiveness of the FIRST program and the empirical utility of comparison groups, where groups are well matched and controlled for contextual variables (for example, departments), for evaluating the effectiveness of professional development for subsequent teaching practices.

  8. Designing an orientation program for new faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holyfield, Lavern J; Berry, Charles W

    2008-12-01

    The Faculty Development Committee (FDC) at Baylor College of Dentistry (BCD) is charged with providing programs and activities that facilitate the success of existing faculty in the constantly changing environment of academia. In response to concerns regarding the challenges wrought by current and projected shortages of dental faculty across the nation, the FDC was prompted to assess development opportunities available to BCD faculty. A professional development resource that we found deficient was a formal, comprehensive orientation program for newly hired faculty. To guide the efforts of the committee in developing this program, a survey was designed and administered during an annual faculty retreat. Respondents were new and junior faculty, senior faculty, and some administrators. The results of the survey to determine requirements for new faculty orientation became the basis for formalizing BCD's new faculty orientation program. This article provides an overview of the new faculty orientation process from design to program implementation and describes the development and use of a faculty survey to determine the fundamental elements of a faculty development program, identification of essential individuals for designing/implementing the program, and implementation of a new faculty orientation program at BCD.

  9. Discipling scholars and teaching teachers – towards a Biblically-based understanding of faculty development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Botha

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Faculty development is often a life-long process which does not bear fruit in one tenure-track term. Christian colleges and universities need to recognise that more factors contribute to faculty development than only those added to faculty development programmes on university campuses. Challenging university lecturers and academic teachers to change, even to cumulative change over the span of a lifetime, is what faculty development is all about. In order to achieve this goal we need, however, to develop an atmosphere and an ethos on campus that is conducive to such growth and change. Such an ethos should be rooted in an integral Biblical view of the world, but primarily in a world view that sees both professors, lecturers and students as gifted and unique beings called to be followers of Christ – also in an academic environment

  10. Weaving leadership longitudinally: a qualitative study on faculty development

    OpenAIRE

    Joyce, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to explore if faculty who undertake teacher preparation, which has a leadership intervention across each module, are better prepared to take on educational leadership roles. Methods A cross sectional qualitative approach was used as part of a longitudinal evaluation of a program. The aim was to explore the perceptions of a purposive sample across three cohorts of students. Data was collected via semi-structured interviews and were analyzed by thema...

  11. Faculty Development on Clinical Teaching Skills: An Effective Model for the Busy Clinician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie B. Damp

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The authors developed and evaluated a faculty development program on clinical teaching skills to address barriers to participation and to impact teaching behaviors. Methods Four one-hour workshops were implemented over five months. Evaluation included participant satisfaction and pre/post self-assessment. Pre/post faculty teaching ratings by trainees were compared. Results A total of 82% of faculty ( N = 41 attended. Participants rated workshops highly (mean, 4.43/5.00. Self-assessment of skills and comfort with teaching activities improved. A total of 59% of residents and 40% of fellows felt that teaching received from participating faculty was highly effective. The majority observed targeted teaching behaviors by the faculty. Teaching ratings improved after the workshops ( P = 0.042. Conclusion Our series of short workshops during a standing conference time was associated with increased self-assessed skill and comfort and an increase in faculty ratings on teaching evaluations. Effective faculty development programs can be implemented in flexible formats and overcome common barriers to participation.

  12. Faculty Development on Clinical Teaching Skills: An Effective Model for the Busy Clinician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damp, Julie B.; Dewey, Charlene M.; Wells, Quinn; Horn, Leora; Kroop, Susan F.; Mendes, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The authors developed and evaluated a faculty development program on clinical teaching skills to address barriers to participation and to impact teaching behaviors. Methods Four one-hour workshops were implemented over five months. Evaluation included participant satisfaction and pre/post self-assessment. Pre/post faculty teaching ratings by trainees were compared. Results A total of 82% of faculty (N = 41) attended. Participants rated workshops highly (mean, 4.43/5.00). Self-assessment of skills and comfort with teaching activities improved. A total of 59% of residents and 40% of fellows felt that teaching received from participating faculty was highly effective. The majority observed targeted teaching behaviors by the faculty. Teaching ratings improved after the workshops (P = 0.042). Conclusion Our series of short workshops during a standing conference time was associated with increased self-assessed skill and comfort and an increase in faculty ratings on teaching evaluations. Effective faculty development programs can be implemented in flexible formats and overcome common barriers to participation. PMID:29349327

  13. Breaking the Cycle: Future Faculty Begin Teaching with Learner-Centered Strategies after Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert-May, Diane; Derting, Terry L.; Henkel, Timothy P.; Middlemis Maher, Jessica; Momsen, Jennifer L.; Arnold, Bryan; Passmore, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of reliable evidence for teaching practices after professional development is limited across science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines, making the identification of professional development “best practices” and effective models for change difficult. We aimed to determine the extent to which postdoctoral fellows (i.e., future biology faculty) believed in and implemented evidence-based pedagogies after completion of a 2-yr professional development program, Faculty Institutes for Reforming Science Teaching (FIRST IV). Postdocs (PDs) attended a 2-yr training program during which they completed self-report assessments of their beliefs about teaching and gains in pedagogical knowledge and experience, and they provided copies of class assessments and video recordings of their teaching. The PDs reported greater use of learner-centered compared with teacher-centered strategies. These data were consistent with the results of expert reviews of teaching videos. The majority of PDs (86%) received video ratings that documented active engagement of students and implementation of learner-centered classrooms. Despite practice of higher-level cognition in class sessions, the items used by the PDs on their assessments of learning focused on lower-level cognitive skills. We attributed the high success of the FIRST IV program to our focus on inexperienced teachers, an iterative process of teaching practice and reflection, and development of and teaching a full course. PMID:26033870

  14. A 10-year analysis of American Society For Radiation Oncology Junior Faculty Career Development Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimple, Randall J; Kao, Gary D

    2013-03-15

    Between 2000 and 2010, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) awarded 22 Junior Faculty Career Development Awards (JFA) totaling $4.4 million. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of these awards on the grantees' career development, including current position, publications, and subsequent independent grant funding. Each awardee was requested via email and telephone to provide an updated curriculum vitae, a National Institutes of Health (NIH) biosketch, and information regarding current position of employment. Twenty-one of the 22 JFA recipients complied. Reported grant funding was extracted from each candidate's CV, and the amounts of NIH grants obtained were confirmed via NIH REPORTER. Reported publications were confirmed via PubMed. All survey respondents (21 of 21) have remained in academic positions. Subsequent aggregate grant funding totaled more than $25 million (range, $0-$4.1 million), 5.9 times the initial investment. NIH grant funding totaled almost $15 million, 3 times the initial investment. Awardees have published an average of 34.6 publications (range, 0-123) for an overall rate of 4.5 papers/year (range, 1-11). ASTRO JFAs over the past decade have been strongly associated with grantees remaining in academic positions, success in attracting private and NIH grants, and publication productivity. In an era of dwindling federal research funding, the support provided by the ASTRO JFA may be especially helpful to support the research careers of promising junior faculty members. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A 10-Year Analysis of American Society for Radiation Oncology Junior Faculty Career Development Awards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimple, Randall J.; Kao, Gary D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Between 2000 and 2010, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) awarded 22 Junior Faculty Career Development Awards (JFA) totaling $4.4 million. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of these awards on the grantees' career development, including current position, publications, and subsequent independent grant funding. Methods: Each awardee was requested via email and telephone to provide an updated curriculum vitae, a National Institutes of Health (NIH) biosketch, and information regarding current position of employment. Twenty-one of the 22 JFA recipients complied. Reported grant funding was extracted from each candidate's CV, and the amounts of NIH grants obtained were confirmed via NIH REPORTER. Reported publications were confirmed via PubMed. Results: All survey respondents (21 of 21) have remained in academic positions. Subsequent aggregate grant funding totaled more than $25 million (range, $0-$4.1 million), 5.9 times the initial investment. NIH grant funding totaled almost $15 million, 3 times the initial investment. Awardees have published an average of 34.6 publications (range, 0-123) for an overall rate of 4.5 papers/year (range, 1-11). Conclusions: ASTRO JFAs over the past decade have been strongly associated with grantees remaining in academic positions, success in attracting private and NIH grants, and publication productivity. In an era of dwindling federal research funding, the support provided by the ASTRO JFA may be especially helpful to support the research careers of promising junior faculty members

  16. A 10-Year Analysis of American Society for Radiation Oncology Junior Faculty Career Development Awards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimple, Randall J., E-mail: rkimple@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Kao, Gary D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Between 2000 and 2010, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) awarded 22 Junior Faculty Career Development Awards (JFA) totaling $4.4 million. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of these awards on the grantees' career development, including current position, publications, and subsequent independent grant funding. Methods: Each awardee was requested via email and telephone to provide an updated curriculum vitae, a National Institutes of Health (NIH) biosketch, and information regarding current position of employment. Twenty-one of the 22 JFA recipients complied. Reported grant funding was extracted from each candidate's CV, and the amounts of NIH grants obtained were confirmed via NIH REPORTER. Reported publications were confirmed via PubMed. Results: All survey respondents (21 of 21) have remained in academic positions. Subsequent aggregate grant funding totaled more than $25 million (range, $0-$4.1 million), 5.9 times the initial investment. NIH grant funding totaled almost $15 million, 3 times the initial investment. Awardees have published an average of 34.6 publications (range, 0-123) for an overall rate of 4.5 papers/year (range, 1-11). Conclusions: ASTRO JFAs over the past decade have been strongly associated with grantees remaining in academic positions, success in attracting private and NIH grants, and publication productivity. In an era of dwindling federal research funding, the support provided by the ASTRO JFA may be especially helpful to support the research careers of promising junior faculty members.

  17. The Science Teaching Fellows Program: A Model for Online Faculty Development of Early Career Scientists Interested in Teaching?

    OpenAIRE

    Brancaccio-Taras, Loretta; Gull, Kelly A.; Ratti, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The American Society for Microbiology (ASM) has a history of providing a wide range of faculty development opportunities. Recently, ASM developed the Science Teaching Fellows Program (STF) for early career biologists and postdoctoral students to explore student-centered teaching and develop the skills needed to succeed in positions that have a significant teaching component. Participants were selected to STF through a competitive application process. The STF program consisted of a series of s...

  18. Assessing the Interactivity and Prescriptiveness of Faculty Professional Development Workshops: The Real-Time Professional Development Observation Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Alice; Turpen, Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Professional development workshops are one of the primary mechanisms used to help faculty improve their teaching, and draw in many STEM instructors every year. Although workshops serve a critical role in changing instructional practices within our community, we rarely assess workshops through careful consideration of how they engage faculty.…

  19. The VTLA System of Course Delivery and Faculty Development in Materials Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrettini, Robert; Roy, Rustum

    1996-01-01

    There is a national need for high-quality, upper division courses that address critical topics in materials synthesis, particularly those beyond the present expertise of the typical university department's faculty. A new project has been started to test a novel distance education and faculty development system, called Video Tape Live Audio (VTLA). This, if successful, would at once enlarge the national Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) student cohort studying material synthesis and develop faculty expertise at the receiving sites. The mechanics for the VTLA scheme are as follows: A course is designed in the field selected for emphasis and for which there is likely to be considerable demand, in this example 'Ceramic Materials Synthesis: Theory and Case Studies'. One of the very best researcher/teachers records lectures of TV studio quality with appropriate visuals. Universities and colleges which wish to offer the course agree to offer it at the same hour at least once a week. The videotaped lectures and accompanying text, readings and visuals are shipped to the professor in charge, who has an appropriate background. The professor arranges the classroom TV presentation equipment and supervises the course. Video lectures are played during regular course hours twice a week with time for discussion by the supervising professor. Typically the third weekly classroom period is scheduled by all sites at a common designated hour, during which the course author/presenter answers questions, provides greater depth, etc. on a live audio link to all course sites. Questions are submitted by fax and e-mail prior to the audio tutorial. coordinating professors at various sites have separate audio teleconferences at the beginning and end of the course, dealing with the philosophical and pedagogical approach to the course, content and mechanics. Following service once or twice as an 'apprentice' to the course, the coordinating professors may then offer it without the necessity

  20. On the Cutting Edge Professional Development Program: Workshop and Web Resources for Current and Future Geoscience Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, R.; Manduca, C. A.; Mogk, D. W.; Tewksbury, B. J.

    2004-12-01

    Recognizing that many college and university faculty receive little formal training in teaching, are largely unaware of advances in research on teaching and learning, and face a variety of challenges in advancing in academic careers, the National Science Foundation-funded program On the Cutting Edge provides professional development for current and future faculty in the geosciences at various stages in their careers. The program includes a series of six multi-day workshops, sessions and one-day workshops at professional meetings, and a website with information about workshop opportunities and a variety of resources that bring workshop content to faculty (http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops). The program helps faculty improve their teaching and their job satisfaction by providing resources on instructional methods, geoscience content, and strategies for career planning. Workshop and website resources address innovative and effective practices in teaching, course design, delivery of instructional materials, and career planning, as well as approaches for teaching particular topics and strategies for starting and maintaining a research program in various institutional settings. Each year, special workshops for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows interested in academic careers and for early career faculty complement offerings on course design and emerging topics that are open to the full geoscience community. These special workshops include sessions on topics such as dual careers, gender issues, family-work balance, interviewing and negotiating strategies. The workshops serve as opportunities for networking and community building, with participants building connections with other participants as well as workshop leaders. Workshop participants reflect the full range of institutional diversity as well as ethnic and racial diversity beyond that of the geoscience faculty workforce. More than 40 percent of the faculty participants are female. Of the faculty

  1. Cross-Cultural Interprofessional Faculty Development in Japan: Results of an Integrated Workshop for Clinical Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jeffrey G; Son, Daisuke; Miura, Wakako

    2017-12-01

    Faculty development programs, studied both home and abroad, have been shown to be helpful for enhancing the scholarly and academic work of nonacademic clinicians. Interprofessional education and faculty development efforts have been less well studied. This project investigated the effect of a well-studied faculty development program applied in an interprofessional fashion across health profession educators in medicine and nursing. A faculty cohort of nurse and physician educators at The University of Tokyo underwent training in the Stanford Faculty Development Center (SFDC) model of clinical teaching through a sequence of 7 workshops. The workshops were performed in English with all materials translated into Japanese. A validated, retrospective pretest and posttest instrument was used to measure study outcomes on global assessment of teaching abilities and specific teaching behaviors (STBs) at 1 and 12 months after intervention. Successful completion of Commitment to Change statements were also assessed at 12 months. In total, 19 faculty participants completed the study. All participants found the workshops valuable. For global assessment, significant improvement in self-reported teaching abilities was seen comparing the mean pretest scores of 27.26 (maximum score = 55, standard deviation [SD] = 8.61) with mean scores at both 1 month (36.81, SD = 7.48, P Japan. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Faculty professional development in emergent pedagogies for instructional innovation in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, M; Bender, D; Nadershahi, N

    2017-05-01

    Innovative pedagogies have significantly impacted health professions' education, dental education included. In this context, faculty, defined in this study as instructor in higher education, has been increasingly required to hone their instructional skills. The purpose of this exploratory study was to share the design, implementation and preliminary outcomes of two programmes to enhance dental faculty's instructional skills, the Teaching and Learning Seminar Series and the Course Director Orientation. Data sources included faculty and student surveys developed and administered by the researchers; data extracted from the learning management system; reports from the learning analytics tool; and classroom observations. Participants' satisfaction, self-reported learning, instructional behavioural change, and impact on student learning behaviours and institutional practice were assessed borrowing from Kirkpatrick's 4-level model of evaluation of professional development effectiveness. Initial findings showed that faculty in both programmes reported positive learning experiences. Participants reported that the programmes motivated them to improve instructional practice and improved their knowledge of instructional innovation. Some faculty reported implementation of new instructional strategies and tools, which helped create an active and interactive learning environment that was welcomed by their students. The study contributes to literature and best practice in health sciences faculty development in pedagogy and may guide other dental schools in designing professional development programmes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Quality and Accreditation Requirements for the Curriculum Development of Special Education Departments as Perceived by Faculty Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer A. Agail

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The current study aimed to determine the quality and accreditation requirements, according to the NCAAA, for the curriculum development of the departments of Special Education as perceived by faculty members. Moreover, the study aimed to determine the relationship between the faculty awareness and other factors such as, gender, academic rank, teaching experience, participation in curriculum development, attendance of workshop, and participation in program development committees. The researcher created a survey to answer the research questions. A sample of (45 faculty members was chosen randomly from three main universities: King Khalid university, Jazan University, and Najran University.  Statistical methods were used, including mean, frequencies, one sample t–test, one way ANOVA. The results indicated that the participants' awareness toward curriculum development requirements was generally very low, because of the limited number of faculty members and the newly established departments. It was recommended that quality culture should be disseminated, and moral and material support should be provided to the programs in these departments.  Keywords: Study programs, Quality, Accreditation, Special education.

  4. The Pedagogical Benefits of Enacting Positive Psychology Practices through a Student-Faculty Partnership Approach to Academic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Sather, Alison; Schlosser, Joel Alden; Sweeney, Abigail; Peterson, Laurel M.; Cassidy, Kimberly Wright; Colón García, Ana

    2018-01-01

    Academic development that supports the enactment of positive psychology practices through student-faculty pedagogical partnership can increase faculty confidence and capacity in their first year in a new institution. When student partners practice affirmation and encouragement of strengths-based growth, processes of faculty acclimation and…

  5. Rhett Talks: The development, implementation, and assessment of a faculty-in-residence program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healea, C Daryl; Ribera, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Student-faculty interactions outside the classroom have long been touted as beneficial to students' success at an institution of higher education. However, obstacles to realizing these interactions have also been well-documented. This case study profiles how student affairs administrators and faculty-in-residence overcame these obstacles to develop, implement, and assess an award-winning program for facilitating student-faculty interactions outside the classroom. Named after the Boston University (BU) mascot (Rhett the Boston terrier) and inspired by the popular online lecture series (TED Talks), Rhett Talks has met BU's unique campus needs, facilitated potent student-faculty interactions, and demonstrated effective partnering between student affairs and academic affairs.

  6. Development of an instrument to measure Faculty's information and communication technology access (FICTA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, Kamal Ahmed; Kale, Ugur; Curtis, Reagan; Akcaoglu, Mete; Bernstein, Malayna

    2018-01-01

    The phenomenon of "digital divide" is complex and multidimensional, extending beyond issues of physical access. The purpose of this study was to develop a scale to measure a range of factors related to digital divide among higher education faculty and to evaluate its reliability and validity. Faculty's Information and Communication Technology Access (FICTA) scale was tested and validated with 322 faculty teaching in public and private sector universities. Principal components analysis with varimax rotation confirmed an 8-factor solution corresponding to various dimensions of ICT access. The 57-item FICTA scale demonstrated good psychometric properties and offers researchers a tool to examine faculty's access to ICT at four levels - motivational, physical, skills, and usage access.

  7. A Cognitive Apprenticeship-Based Faculty Development Intervention for Emergency Medicine Educators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Merritt

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In just a few years of preparation, emergency medicine (EM trainees must achieve expertise across the broad spectrum of skills critical to the practice of the specialty. Though education occurs in many contexts, much learning occurs on the job, caring for patients under the guidance of clinical educators. The cognitive apprenticeship framework, originally described in primary and secondary education, has been applied to workplace-based medical training. The framework includes a variety of teaching methods: scaffolding, modeling, articulation, reflection, and exploration, applied in a safe learning environment. Without understanding these methods within a theoretical framework, faculty may not apply the methods optimally. Here we describe a faculty development intervention during which participants articulate, share, and practice their own applications of cognitive-apprenticeship methods to learners in EM. We summarize themes identified by workshop participants, and provide suggestions for tailoring the application of these methods to varying levels of EM learners. The cognitive-apprenticeship framework allows for a common understanding of the methods used in clinical teaching toward independence. Clinical educators should be encouraged to reflect critically on their methods, while being offered the opportunity to share and learn from others.

  8. Research University STEM Faculty Members' Motivation to Engage in Teaching Professional Development: Building the Choir Through an Appeal to Extrinsic Motivation and Ego

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwma-Gearhart, Jana

    2012-10-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative, grounded-theory-based study that explored the motivations of science and engineering faculty to engage in teaching professional development at a major research university. Faculty members were motivated to engage in teaching professional development due to extrinsic motivations, mainly a weakened professional ego, and sought to bring their teaching identities in better concordance with their researcher identities. The results pose a challenge to a body of research that has concluded that faculty must be intrinsically motivated to participate in teaching professional development. Results confirmed a pre-espoused theory of motivation, self-determination theory; a discussion of research literature consideration during grounded theory research is offered. A framework for motivating more faculty members at research universities to engage in teaching professional development is provided.

  9. School of Ice: An Advanced Professional Development Program for Geoscience Faculty at Minority-Serving Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, L. T.

    2017-12-01

    The School of Ice (SOI) program from the US Ice Drilling Program Office (IDPO) is designed for college faculty who teach at minority-serving institutions or historically black colleges and universities, but lessons learned transfer easily to any science course based on current research. The institute builds participants' background knowledge about ice core science and climate change while also providing experiences with activities and labs for transferring information to their students. After three years of highly successful workshops, our model has provided valuable lessons for creating powerful experiences for participants. This presentation will identify some of the key ideas including pairing researchers and educators as presenters; creating leadership teams capitalizing on partner strengths; building a science community willing to participate in education and outreach; and building participants' science content background knowledge and confidence while providing them with teaching models for transferring the knowledge to their students. Another important element is to demand teacher buy-in to ensure replication and dissemination. Also, IDPO's drilling technologies make it an ideal platform for intertwining engineering concepts and practices with science research to meet new science standards. In this session, we will share results of the institute evaluations including the impact on the educators as well as longitudinal analysis of data from interviews with past participants concerning continued impacts on their teaching, their courses and their students. Faculty who have attended this institute in the last three years have reported increases in their understanding of the content and how to teach it. They also report increased confidence in their ability to teach ice core science and climate change concepts. Elements of these successful workshops can inform both the development of college professional development and student courses, as well as the creation of

  10. Concerns and professional development needs of science faculty at Taibah University in adopting blended learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sarrani, Nauaf

    The purpose of this study was to obtain Science faculty concerns and professional development needs to adopt blended learning in their teaching at Taibah University. To answer these two research questions the survey instrument was designed to collect quantitative and qualitative data from close-ended and open-ended questions. The participants' general characteristics were first presented, then the quantitative measures were presented as the results of the null hypotheses. The data analysis for research question one revealed a statistically significant difference in the participants' concerns in adopting BL by their gender sig = .0015. The significances were found in stages one (sig = .000) and stage five (sig = .006) for female faculty. Therefore, null hypothesis 1.1 was rejected (There are no statistically significant differences between science faculty's gender and their concerns in adopting BL). The data analysis indicated also that there were no relationships between science faculty's age, academic rank, nationality, country of graduation and years of teaching experience and their concerns in adopting BL in their teaching, so the null hypotheses 1.2-7 were accepted (There are no statistically significant differences between Science faculty's age and their concerns in adopting BL, there are no statistically significant differences between Science faculty's academic rank and their concerns in adopting BL, there are no statistically significant differences between Science faculty's nationality and their concerns in adopting BL, there are no statistically significant differences between Science faculty's content area and their concerns in adopting BL, there are no statistically significant differences between Science faculty's country of graduation and their concerns in adopting BL and there are no statistically significant differences between Science faculty's years of teaching experience and their concerns in adopting BL). The data analyses for research question

  11. Faculty Perspective on Competency Development in Higher Education: An International Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Paloma Julia; Learreta, Begoña; Kober, Claudia; Tan, Irene

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to establish common ground on how faculty development should be instituted and the needs it should address on an international level, with its major focus being the development of competencies. A survey was developed and distributed to a sample of 764 university teaching professionals. Results show that 90% find…

  12. Connecticut State University System Initiative for Nanotechnology-Related Equipment, Faculty Development and Curriculum Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadbridge, Christine C. [Southern Connecticut State University

    2013-03-28

    DOE grant used for partial fulfillment of necessary laboratory equipment for course enrichment and new graduate programs in nanotechnology at the four institutions of the Connecticut State University System (CSUS). Equipment in this initial phase included variable pressure scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy elemental analysis capability [at Southern Connecticut State University]; power x-ray diffractometer [at Central Connecticut State University]; a spectrophotometer and spectrofluorimeter [at Eastern Connecticut State University; and a Raman Spectrometer [at Western Connecticut State University]. DOE's funding was allocated for purchase and installation of this scientific equipment and instrumentation. Subsequently, DOE funding was allocated to fund the curriculum, faculty development and travel necessary to continue development and implementation of the System's Graduate Certificate in Nanotechnology (GCNT) program and the ConnSCU Nanotechnology Center (ConnSCU-NC) at Southern Connecticut State University. All of the established outcomes have been successfully achieved. The courses and structure of the GCNT program have been determined and the program will be completely implemented in the fall of 2013. The instrumentation has been purchased, installed and has been utilized at each campus for the implementation of the nanotechnology courses, CSUS GCNT and the ConnSCU-NC. Additional outcomes for this grant include curriculum development for non-majors as well as faculty and student research.

  13. Breaking the cycle: future faculty begin teaching with learner-centered strategies after professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert-May, Diane; Derting, Terry L; Henkel, Timothy P; Middlemis Maher, Jessica; Momsen, Jennifer L; Arnold, Bryan; Passmore, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    The availability of reliable evidence for teaching practices after professional development is limited across science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines, making the identification of professional development "best practices" and effective models for change difficult. We aimed to determine the extent to which postdoctoral fellows (i.e., future biology faculty) believed in and implemented evidence-based pedagogies after completion of a 2-yr professional development program, Faculty Institutes for Reforming Science Teaching (FIRST IV). Postdocs (PDs) attended a 2-yr training program during which they completed self-report assessments of their beliefs about teaching and gains in pedagogical knowledge and experience, and they provided copies of class assessments and video recordings of their teaching. The PDs reported greater use of learner-centered compared with teacher-centered strategies. These data were consistent with the results of expert reviews of teaching videos. The majority of PDs (86%) received video ratings that documented active engagement of students and implementation of learner-centered classrooms. Despite practice of higher-level cognition in class sessions, the items used by the PDs on their assessments of learning focused on lower-level cognitive skills. We attributed the high success of the FIRST IV program to our focus on inexperienced teachers, an iterative process of teaching practice and reflection, and development of and teaching a full course. © 2015 D. Ebert-May et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  14. Where Do Soldiers Really Come From? A Faculty Development Workshop on Veteran-Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lypson, Monica L; Ross, Paula T; Zimmerman, Natalie; Goldrath, Kathryn E; Ravindranath, Divy

    2016-10-01

    Addressing the medical concerns of veterans in both civilian health care systems and the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system, where staff are familiar with issues of military reintegration, remains difficult but is increasingly important. In 2013, the authors developed and implemented a faculty development workshop for practicing clinicians using the documentary Where Soldiers Come From. The workshop included topics on unconscious bias, the service member trajectory, health care disparities, and strategies for overcoming barriers to treating veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury. The workshop engaged faculty in the following active-learning techniques: images in education; trigger video; critical thinking and reflective writing; think-pair-share; and large-group discussion. The workshop has been conducted at three locations with 46 health care professionals. Thirty-one of 37 (84%) participants who completed the workshop evaluation were VA employees. The evaluation results show 25/32 (78.1%) participants indicated the workshop activities changed their knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills; 22/34 (64.7%) stated they had a better understanding of how to develop a care plan for veterans; and 27/34 (79.4%) stated they gained a better understanding of how to prepare for issues around returning veterans. To address the issue of veteran-centered care education more broadly, the authors have developed a massive open online course for health professionals, using most of the content from this workshop, which will be offered in spring 2016. Another important next step will be to deliver this workshop to and collect evaluation data from non-VA providers.

  15. How we developed the GIM clinician-educator mentoring and scholarship program to assist faculty with promotion and scholarly work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Amanda; Yeh, Hsin Chieh; Bass, Eric B; Brancati, Frederick; Levine, David; Cofrancesco, Joseph

    2015-02-01

    Clinician Educators' (CEs) focus on patient care and teaching, yet many academic institutions require dissemination of scholarly work for advancement. This can be difficult for CEs. Our division developed the Clinician-Educator Mentoring and Scholarship Program (CEMSP) in an effort to assist CEs with scholarship, national reputation, recognition, promotion and job satisfaction. The key components are salary-supported director and co-director who coordinate the program and serve as overall mentors and link CEs and senior faculty, and a full-time Senior Research Coordinator to assist with all aspects of scholarship, a close relationship with the General Internal Medicine (GIM) Methods Core provides advanced statistical support. Funding for the program comes from GIM divisional resources. Perceived value was evaluated by assessing the number of manuscripts published, survey of faculty regarding usage and opinion of CEMSP, and a review of faculty promotions. Although impossible to attribute the contributions of an individual component, a program specifically aimed at helping GIM CE faculty publish scholarly projects, increase participation in national organizations and focus on career progression can have a positive impact.

  16. Development and Implementation of an Electronic Clinical Formative Assessment: Dental Faculty and Student Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkup, Michele L; Adams, Brooke N; Meadows, Melinda L; Jackson, Richard

    2016-06-01

    A traditional summative grading structure, used at Indiana University School of Dentistry (IUSD) for more than 30 years, was identified by faculty as outdated for assessing students' clinical performance. In an effort to change the status quo, a feedback-driven assessment was implemented in 2012 to provide a constructive assessment tool acceptable to both faculty and students. Building on the successful non-graded clinical evaluation employed at Baylor College of Dentistry, IUSD implemented a streamlined electronic formative feedback model (FFM) to assess students' daily clinical performance. An important addition to this evaluation tool was the inclusion of routine student self-assessment opportunities. The aim of this study was to determine faculty and student response to the new assessment instrument. Following training sessions, anonymous satisfaction surveys were examined for the three user groups: clinical faculty (60% response rate), third-year (D3) students (72% response rate), and fourth-year (D4) students (57% response rate). In the results, 70% of the responding faculty members preferred the FFM over the summative model; however, 61.8% of the D4 respondents preferred the summative model, reporting insufficient assessment time and low faculty participation. The two groups of students had different responses to the self-assessment component: 70.2% of the D4 respondents appreciated clinical self-assessment compared to 46% of the D3 respondents. Overall, while some components of the FFM assessment were well received, a phased approach to implementation may have facilitated a transition more acceptable to both faculty and students. Improvements are being made in an attempt to increase overall satisfaction.

  17. The development, implementation, and assessment of an innovative faculty mentoring leadership program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsen, Lawrence C; Borus, Jonathan F; Nadelson, Carol C; Seely, Ellen W; Haas, Audrey; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L

    2012-12-01

    Effective mentoring is an important component of academic success. Few programs exist to both improve the effectiveness of established mentors and cultivate a multispecialty mentoring community. In 2008, in response to a faculty survey on mentoring, leaders at Brigham and Women's Hospital developed the Faculty Mentoring Leadership Program as a peer learning experience for midcareer and senior faculty physician and scientist mentors to enhance their skills and leadership in mentoring and create a supportive community of mentors. A planning group representing key administrative, educational, clinical, and research mentorship constituencies designed the nine-month course.Participants met monthly for an hour and a half during lunchtime. Two cofacilitators engaged the diverse group of 16 participants in interactive discussions about cases based on the participants' experiences. While the cofacilitators discussed with the participants the dyadic mentor-mentee relationship, they specifically emphasized the value of engaging multiple mentors and establishing mentoring networks. In response to postsession and postcourse (both immediately and after six months) self-assessments, participants reported substantive gains in their mentoring confidence and effectiveness, experienced a renewed sense of enthusiasm for mentoring, and took initial steps to build a diverse network of mentoring relationships.In this article, the authors describe the rationale, design, implementation, assessment, and ongoing impact of this innovative faculty mentoring leadership program. They also share lessons learned for other institutions that are contemplating developing a similar faculty mentoring program.

  18. Impacts of a Faculty Abroad Experience on Teaching Style and Technology Use in a College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlin, M'Randa R.; Murphrey, Theresa Pesl; Lindner, James R.; Dooley, Kim E.

    2013-01-01

    Faculty abroad programs are becoming a popular method to provide faculty in colleges of agriculture with international experiences so they may internationalize their curricula. These programs also serve to provide experiential faculty development opportunities. Eight faculty members from Texas A&M University participated in a faculty abroad…

  19. Development of Model for Providing Feasible Scholarship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Dhika

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The current work focuses on the development of a model to determine a feasible scholarship recipient on the basis of the naiv¨e Bayes’ method using very simple and limited attributes. Those attributes are the applicants academic year, represented by their semester, academic performance, represented by their GPa, socioeconomic ability, which represented the economic capability to attend a higher education institution, and their level of social involvement. To establish and evaluate the model performance, empirical data are collected, and the data of 100 students are divided into 80 student data for the model training and the remaining of 20 student data are for the model testing. The results suggest that the model is capable to provide recommendations for the potential scholarship recipient at the level of accuracy of 95%.

  20. Faculty and Student Teams and National Laboratories: Expanding the Reach of Research Opportunities and Workforce Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackburn,N.; White, K.; Stegman, M.

    2009-08-05

    The Faculty and Student Teams (FaST) Program, a cooperative effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and the National Science Foundation (NSF), brings together collaborative research teams composed of a researcher at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and a faculty member with two or three undergraduate students from a college or university. Begun by the Department of Energy in 2000 with the primary goal of building research capacity at a faculty member's home institution, the FaST Program focuses its recruiting efforts on faculty from colleges and universities with limited research facilities and those institutions that serve populations under-represented in the fields of science, engineering and technology, particularly women and minorities. Once assembled, a FaST team spends a summer engaged in hands-on research working alongside a laboratory scientist. This intensely collaborative environment fosters sustainable relationships between the faulty members and BNL that allow faculty members and their BNL colleagues to submit joint proposals to federal agencies, publish papers in peer-reviewed journals, reform local curriculum, and develop new or expand existing research labs at their home institutions.

  1. Faculty Activity to Reach Consensus and Develop the SF-ROCKS Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, K.; White, L.

    2003-12-01

    City College of San Francisco with local high school teachers and their students (see session ED15 for high school student research results and program web site---http://sf-rocks.sfsu.edu---for more details). The program has created more cohesion among department faculty and has been an effective mechanism for engaging faculty and students from our range of Geoscience disciplines, and for providing college students with meaningful experiences in the discipline.

  2. Perspectives on the Present State and Future of Higher Education Faculty Development in Kazakhstan: Implications for National Human Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitova, Dinara

    2016-01-01

    The article aims at examining the present state of higher education faculty development in Kazakhstan in the context of multidimensional nationwide development reforms and exploring implications for the National Human Resource Development of the country. For the purpose of this research, theoretical human resource development (HRD) and…

  3. Dire need of changes in the methods for assessing university faculty productivity in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Ali Sibtain Farooq; Mohamed, Mona Adel

    2015-01-01

    Publishing has become a necessity for promotion of faculty in academia. The faculties in developing countries face considerable difficulties publishing due to their prime focus on clinical approaches and resources for proper research. This often leaves no room for the pressured clinicians but to pursue poor quality publications just for the sake of promotion when the time for their promotion comes. The authors suggest establishing separate promotion tracks besides research in these underprivileged areas in order to avoid infestation of original research with poor ones.

  4. Assessing a Faculty Development Program for the Adoption of Brain-Based Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavis, Catherine C.; Williams, Kimberly A.; Fallin, Jana; Barnes, Pamela K.; Fishback, Sarah J.; Thien, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Kansas State University designed a 20-month faculty development program with the goal of fostering broad, institution-wide adoption of teaching practices that focus on brain-based learning. Components of the program included annual teaching and learning workshops, reading and discussion groups based on content of a book about how the brain learns…

  5. Development of a Pedagogical Model to Help Engineering Faculty Design Interdisciplinary Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Maria; Foutz, Timothy; Thompson, Sidney; Singer, Kerri Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a model to help engineering faculty overcome the challenges they face when asked to design and implement interdisciplinary curricula. Researchers at a U.S. University worked with an Interdisciplinary Consultant Team and prepared a steering document with Guiding Principles and Essential Elements for the…

  6. Faculty Development for Advancing Community Engagement in Higher Education: Current Trends and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Marshall; Plaxton-Moore, Star

    2017-01-01

    This research involved the conduct of a conceptual review of 28 refereed journal articles and a survey of campus centers for community engagement staff to identify salient features and trends of existing faculty development programming designed to advance service-learning and community engagement in higher education. Results of this investigation…

  7. Welcoming and Restoring, Dwelling and Sending: Creating a Space for Hospitality in Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Marion H.

    2009-01-01

    Parker Palmer's (1983) often-quoted definition of teaching--"To teach is to create a space in which obedience to truth is practiced"--can be applied productively to work in faculty development. Exploring this notion is enhanced by the theological literature in hospitality, which can be viewed through Amy Oden's (2001) discussion of four movements…

  8. From Conception Through Delivery: Developing a Just and Equitable Faculty Maternity Leave Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untener, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    While much has been written on the need for faculty maternity leave policies in institutions of higher learning, the development of such policies is difficult given inherent administrative complexities and multiple approval processes. As a result, many institutions have either no policy or one that is inadequate or out of compliance with…

  9. Using Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) to Sustain Success in Faculty Development for Online Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrick, Sharon A.; Miller, Karen Hughes; Ziegler, Craig

    2015-01-01

    This article shares the curriculum and evaluation findings over four years for a faculty development program aimed at increasing skills in designing and teaching online courses. The University of Louisville's "Delphi U" is a four-day retreat style program covering 17 modules, each of which includes an exercise or activity. Over the four…

  10. Impact of a faculty development programme for teaching communication skills on participants' practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junod Perron, N.; Cullati, S.; Hudelson, P.; Nendaz, M.; Dolmans, D.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY: A 6-month faculty development programme was designed to improve supervisors' feedback to junior doctors on their clinical communication skills (CS) and included both CS and teaching skills training. The aim of this study was to assess supervisors' views on the impact of the

  11. Competency-Based Faculty Development in Community-Engaged Scholarship: A Diffusion of Innovation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Catherine; Doherty, William J.; Jones-Webb, Rhonda; Cook, Nancy; Dubrow, Gail; Mendenhall, Tai J.

    2012-01-01

    The authors utilized interviews, competency surveys, and document review to evaluate the effectiveness of a one-year, cohort-based faculty development pilot program, grounded in diffusion of innovations theory, and aimed at increasing competencies in community engagement and community-engaged scholarship. Five innovator participants designed the…

  12. Professional Development Amid Change: Fostering Academic Excellence and Faculty Productivity at Teaching-Intensive Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Mary A.; Ng, Laura E; Cooper, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The future of faculty development rests, in part, on forming guided "communities of practice" to foster the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL), which may enhance both scholarly productivity and pedagogical effectiveness. This article will discuss University of North Georgia's SoTL Academy, which bridges geographic and scheduling…

  13. Faculty Professional Development: Advancing Integrative Social Pedagogy Using ePortfolio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhika, Rajendra; Francis, Andrea; Miller, Dionne

    2013-01-01

    This article highlights the work of three faculty members across two different professional development seminars at LaGuardia Community College. It illustrates how their work was guided and is linked together by a common thread--the use of ePortfolio to foster integrative social pedagogy--as a result of their participation in these seminars. This…

  14. Designing faculty development to support the evaluation of resident competency in the intrinsic CanMEDS roles: practical outcomes of an assessment of program director needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puddester, Derek; MacDonald, Colla J; Clements, Debbie; Gaffney, Jane; Wiesenfeld, Lorne

    2015-06-05

    The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and the College of Family Physicians of Canada mandate that faculty members demonstrate they are evaluating residents on all CanMEDS (Canadian Medical Education Directions for Specialists) roles as part of the accreditation process. Postgraduate Medical Education at the University of Ottawa initiated a 5-year project to develop and implement a comprehensive system to assess the full spectrum of CanMEDS roles. This paper presents the findings from a needs assessment with Program Directors, in order to determine how postgraduate medical faculty can be motivated and supported to evaluate residents on the intrinsic CanMEDS roles. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with 60 Postgraduate Program Directors in the Faculty of Medicine. Transcribed interviews were analyzed using qualitative analysis. Once the researchers were satisfied the identified themes reflected the views of the participants, the data was assigned to categories to provide rich, detailed, and comprehensive information that would indicate what faculty need in order to effectively evaluate their residents on the intrinsic roles. Findings indicated faculty members need faculty development and shared point of care resources to support them with how to not only evaluate, but also teach, the intrinsic roles. Program Directors expressed the need to collaborate and share resources across departments and national specialty programs. Based on our findings, we designed and delivered workshops with companion eBooks to teach and evaluate residents at the point of care (Developing the Professional, Health Advocate and Scholar). Identifying stakeholder needs is essential for designing effective faculty development. By sharing resources, faculties can prevent 'reinventing the wheel' and collaborate to meet the Colleges' accreditation requirements more efficiently.

  15. Mentorship Programs for Faculty Development in Academic General Pediatric Divisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Takagishi

    2011-01-01

    Discussion. General pediatric division chiefs acknowledge the benefits of mentoring relationships, and some have programs in place. Many need tools to create them. Pediatric societies could facilitate this critical area of professional development.

  16. On the Cutting Edge: Face-to-Face and Virtual Professional Development for Current and Future Geoscience Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, H.; Manduca, C. A.; Mogk, D. W.; Tewksbury, B. J.; Iverson, E. A.; Kirk, K. B.; Beane, R. J.; McConnell, D.; Wiese, K.; Wysession, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    On the Cutting Edge, a comprehensive, discipline-wide professional development program for current and future geoscience faculty, aims to develop a geoscience professoriate committed to high-quality instruction based on currency in scientific knowledge, good pedagogic practice, and research on learning. Our program provides an integrated workshop series and online teaching resources. Since 2002, we have offered more than 80 face-to-face workshops, virtual workshops and webinars, and hybrid events. Participants come from two-year colleges and four-year colleges and universities. The workshop series is designed to address the needs of faculty in all career stages at the full spectrum of institutions and covering the breadth of the geoscience curriculum. We select timely and compelling topics and create opportunities of interest to faculty. We offer workshops on course design, new geoscience research and pedagogical topics, core geoscience curriculum topics, and introductory courses as well as workshops for early career faculty and for future faculty. Our workshops are designed to model good teaching practice. We set workshop goals that guide workshop planning and evaluation. Workshops are interactive, emphasize participant learning, provide opportunities for participants to interact and share experience/knowledge, provide good resources, give participants time to reflect and to develop action plans, and help transform their ideas about teaching. We emphasize the importance of adaptation in the context of their specific situations. For virtual workshops and webinars we use icebreakers and other structured interactions to build a comfortable workshop community; promote interaction through features on webinar software, chat-aided question and answer, small-group synchronous interactions, and/or discussion boards; plan detailed schedules for workshop events; use asynchronous discussions and recordings of synchronous events given that participants are busy with their

  17. Faculty development projects for international health professions educators: Vehicles for institutional change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, William P; Friedman, Stacey R; Diserens, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Projects are an important tool in faculty development, and project emphasis may offer insights into perceived education priorities. Impact of projects has been focused on individuals, not institutions or health. Education innovation projects of Fellows in an international faculty development program were examined to better understand perceived needs in health professions education and institutional impact of projects. Four hundred and thirty-five projects were analyzed to identify focus areas. Fellows were asked to identify changes in their schools and communities resulting from their projects. New education methods and curriculum change were common project focus areas. Regional differences were evident with a higher percentage of education methods projects by Fellows residing in India (52%), compared with South Africa (25%) and Brazil (24%). Fifty-six percent of projects were incorporated into the curriculum and/or incorporated as institutional policy. One-third to two-thirds of respondents noted improved teaching quality, collaboration, education research interest, assessment, student performance, and curriculum alignment with community health needs. National differences in project focus may offer insight into local conditions and needs. High rates of diffusion of projects and impact on faculty, students, and curriculum suggest that faculty development projects may be a strategy for institutional change in resource limited environments.

  18. Survey of outcomes in a faculty development program on simulation pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Young Sook; Kim, Mi Kang; Tangkawanich, Thitiarpha

    2016-06-01

    Although many nursing programs use simulation as a teaching-learning modality, there are few systematic approaches to help nursing educators learn this pedagogy. This study evaluates the effects of a simulation pedagogy nursing faculty development program on participants' learning perceptions using a retrospective pre-course and post-course design. Sixteen Thai participants completed a two-day nursing faculty development program on simulation pedagogy. Thirteen questionnaires were used in the final analysis. The participants' self-perceived learning about simulation teaching showed significant post-course improvement. On a five-point Likert scale, the composite mean attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control scores, as well as intention to use a simulator, showed a significant post-course increase. A faculty development program on simulation pedagogy induced favorable learning and attitudes. Further studies must test how faculty performance affects the cognitive, emotional, and social dimensions of learning in a simulation-based learning domain. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. The Academic Development of Education Faculty: Looking Back, Looking Ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Randolph; da Costa, Jose

    2007-01-01

    A 2003 study about the lives of retired leaders in teacher education reminds us of the significant role that others play in the academic development of professors of education. That study also reveals significant changes in the nature of our work as teacher educators. The authors stress the need for universities to pay greater attention to the…

  20. Black Female Faculty Success and Early Career Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Tamara Bertrand; Osborne-Lampkin, La'Tara

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, a number of Black female junior scholars have participated in an early career professional development program designed to address socialization issues through individual and small group mentoring. This descriptive qualitative study investigated scholars' perceptions of the importance and effectiveness of a research…

  1. New Frontiers: Exploring the Power and Possibilities of the Unconference as a Transformative Approach to Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Enoch; Bessette, Lee Skallerup

    2016-01-01

    In the spirit of exploration, this paper discusses the what, why and how of unconferencing and explores its implications as a transformative approach to faculty development in higher education. The authors define an unconference faculty development experience as: a less-structured opportunity for participants to learn and grow by sharing…

  2. Assessing the interactivity and prescriptiveness of faculty professional development workshops: The real-time professional development observation tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Alice; Turpen, Chandra

    2016-12-01

    Professional development workshops are one of the primary mechanisms used to help faculty improve their teaching, and draw in many STEM instructors every year. Although workshops serve a critical role in changing instructional practices within our community, we rarely assess workshops through careful consideration of how they engage faculty. Initial evidence suggests that workshop leaders often overlook central tenets of education research that are well established in classroom contexts, such as the role of interactivity in enabling student learning [S. Freeman et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 111, 8410 (2014)]. As such, there is a need to develop more robust, evidence-based models of how best to support faculty learning in professional development contexts, and to actively support workshop leaders in relating their design decisions to familiar ideas from other educational contexts. In response to these needs, we have developed an observation tool, the real-time professional development observation tool (R-PDOT), to document the form and focus of faculty engagement during workshops. In this paper, we describe the motivation and methodological considerations behind the development of the R-PDOT, justify our decisions to highlight particular aspects of workshop sessions, and demonstrate how the R-PDOT can be used to analyze three sessions from the Physics and Astronomy New Faculty Workshop. We also justify the accessibility and potential utility of the R-PDOT output as a reflective tool using preliminary data from interviews with workshop leaders, and consider the roles the R-PDOT could play in supporting future research on faculty professional development.

  3. The Quality of Educational Services Provided by the Arab Academy– Faculty of Finance and Banking from Graduate Students' Perspective, Sana’a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman Alsharjabi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this Study was to investigate the opinions of graduate students on the level of quality of educational services at the Faculty of Finance and Banking in Sana’a. The researchers used a questionnaire to collect the data. The questionnaire consisted of six sections: textbooks, instructional aids, library services, faculty, admission and registration procedures, and infrastructure. The main research question focused the level of the quality educational services provided at the faculty of Finance and Banking in Sana’a. The population of the study consisted of 379 students where 150 were randomly selected.  To answer the research question, the researchers used  the descriptive method. to The research results showed that the  students had a high satisfaction level of the services provided. In addition, the results showed that there were no differences among graduate students’ opinions based on gender, age, program, area of specialization, and payment of tuition fees. Keywords: Service quality, Faculty of finance and banking, Graduate studies.

  4. Faculty Mentorship: Making It Work Across the Career Continuum Through Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Formal Mentorship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jennifer B; Douglas, Dianna H

    2018-04-06

    Mentoring is a way to foster personal and professional career development within professional disciplines such as nursing. The National League for Nursing has described the nurse faculty role as multidimensional and difficult to balance. A school of nursing implemented a faculty mentorship program focused on the school's core values: caring, professionalism, respect, integrity, diversity, and excellence (CPRIDE). This program combines traditional and nontraditional mentoring models to create an environment in which junior faculty form relationships with senior faculty who possess expertise in a particular field.

  5. Expert clinician to clinical teacher: developing a faculty academy and mentoring initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Tina P; Hinderer, Katherine A; Jarosinski, Judith M; Mister, Brenda J; Seldomridge, Lisa A

    2013-07-01

    The lack of sufficient numbers of qualified nursing faculty to prepare nursing students for entry into the field of nursing is of national and international concern. Recruiting expert clinicians and preparing them as clinical teachers is one approach to addressing the faculty shortage. Adequate training for the new role is paramount to promote job satisfaction and reduce attrition. Various models for orienting and preparing expert nurse clinicians as clinical educators are reported in the literature with little consensus or research to support a single approach. This paper describes a collaborative effort to prepare experienced registered nurse clinicians for new roles as part-time clinical faculty. Using a blend of learning strategies (face-to-face, online, simulation, and group mentoring sessions), this training experience was designed to cover content while promoting discussion of issues and challenges and providing much-needed mentorship. Outcomes include 12 new clinical faculty, 25% from groups underrepresented in nursing, with nine newly employed as part-time clinical teachers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Faculty Lives: Vitality and Change. A Study of the Foundation's Grants in Faculty Development, 1979-1984. A Northwest Area Foundation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, R. Eugene

    Faculty development projects funded by the Northwest Area Foundation are described. While some projects addressed retrenchment and the nature and structure of academic careers, others involved multi-institutional strategies. Types of projects and institutions are: new teaching and administrative competencies (College of Saint Scholastica, Mary…

  7. Helping Children Develop Resiliency: Providing Supportive Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersey, Katharine C.; Malley, Catherine Robertson

    2005-01-01

    Helping children develop resiliency begins with positive, meaningful connections between teachers and students. This article defines the importance of encouraging children to develop characteristics related to resiliency including confidence in their ability to bounce back from setbacks, overcome challenges and frustrations. Furthermore, critical…

  8. Reconstructing Faculty Roles to Align with Self- Authorship Development: The Gentle Art of Stepping Back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A. Day

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Student development has connections to important academic purposes in higher education (King, Baxter Magolda, Barber, Kendall Brown & Lindsay, 2009. In particular, a growing body of work on self-authorship, a social-constructive theory of development, has demonstrated relevance to the purposes of higher education (Baxter Magolda, 2001; King & Baxter Magolda, 2004. The conditions which support self-authorship development in academic settings have been studied in detail, drawing attention to what King et al. (2009 frame as developmentally effective educational experiences. Explorations of self-authorship development in academic settings have focused on students’ experiences and outcomes. The classroom experiences of faculty, particularly those working outside institutional initiatives, to support self-authorship have received less attention. This study used a theory-driven (Baxter Magolda, 2001; Pizzolato, 2005, practice-based research framework, to explore a faculty-student affairs collaboration through participant observation as the collaborators sought to align their teaching practices with the tenets of self-authorship development in the context of a senior undergraduate course in Service-Learning. Four themes emerged, which have relevance for those who wish to consider student personal and academic development concurrently. We argue that individual faculty members can collaborate with student affairs professionals and use self-authorship theory to expand their constructions of what it means to be a “good professor” by approaching teaching as a mirror image of the self-authorship journey traveled by students.

  9. The Outcomes of Chinese Visiting Scholars' Experiences at Canadian Universities: Implications for Faculty Development at Chinese Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qin; Jiang, Yumei

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the outcomes of the overseas experiences of Chinese visiting scholars and the implications of visiting scholar programs for faculty development at Chinese universities. On the basis of semi-structured interviews with 17 returned Chinese visiting scholars who spent six to 12 months in a faculty of education at one of five…

  10. A Model for Using a Concept Inventory as a Tool for Students' Assessment and Faculty Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbach-Ad, Gili; McAdams, Katherine C.; Benson, Spencer; Briken, Volker; Cathcart, Laura; Chase, Michael; El-Sayed, Najib M.; Frauwirth, Kenneth; Fredericksen, Brenda; Joseph, Sam W.; Lee, Vincent; McIver, Kevin S.; Mosser, David; Quimby, B. Booth; Shields, Patricia; Song, Wenxia; Stein, Daniel C.; Stewart, Richard; Thompson, Katerina V.; Smith, Ann C.

    2010-01-01

    This essay describes how the use of a concept inventory has enhanced professional development and curriculum reform efforts of a faculty teaching community. The Host Pathogen Interactions (HPI) teaching team is composed of research and teaching faculty with expertise in HPI who share the goal of improving the learning experience of students in…

  11. Concerns and Professional Development Needs of Faculty at King Abdul-Aziz University in Saudi Arabia in Adopting Online Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Bakor

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate concerns regarding the adoption of online teaching as expressed by faculty and instructors in six departments in the College of Arts and Humanities at King Abdulaziz University. Additionally, it investigated faculty professional development needs in adopting online teaching. The data in this study were…

  12. Constructing a Shared Mental Model for Faculty Development for the Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favreau, Michele A; Tewksbury, Linda; Lupi, Carla; Cutrer, William B; Jokela, Janet A; Yarris, Lalena M

    2017-06-01

    In 2014, the Association of American Medical Colleges identified 13 Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency (Core EPAs), which are activities that entering residents might be expected to perform without direct supervision. This work included the creation of an interinstitutional concept group focused on faculty development efforts, as the processes and tools for teaching and assessing entrustability in undergraduate medical education (UME) are still evolving. In this article, the authors describe a conceptual framework for entrustment that they developed to better prepare all educators involved in entrustment decision making in UME. This framework applies to faculty with limited or longitudinal contact with medical students and to those who contribute to entrustment development or render summative entrustment decisions.The authors describe a shared mental model for entrustment that they developed, based on a critical synthesis of the EPA literature, to serve as a guide for UME faculty development efforts. This model includes four dimensions for Core EPA faculty development: (1) observation skills in authentic settings (workplace-based assessments), (2) coaching and feedback skills, (3) self-assessment and reflection skills, and (4) peer guidance skills developed through a community of practice. These dimensions form a conceptual foundation for meaningful faculty participation in entrustment decision making.The authors also differentiate between the UME learning environment and the graduate medical education learning environment to highlight distinct challenges and opportunities for faculty development in UME settings. They conclude with recommendations and research questions for future Core EPA faculty development efforts.

  13. Writing for publication in medical education: the benefits of a faculty development workshop and peer writing group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Yvonne; McLeod, Peter J; Liben, Stephen; Snell, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Although educational innovations in medical education are increasing in number, many educators do not submit their ideas for publication. The goal of this initiative was to assist faculty members write about their educational innovations. Twenty-four faculty members participated in this intervention, which consisted of a half-day workshop, three peer writing groups, and independent study. We assessed the impact of this intervention through post-workshop evaluations, a one-year follow-up questionnaire, tracking of manuscript submissions, and an analysis of curriculum vitae. The workshop evaluations and one-year follow-up demonstrated that participants valued the workshop small groups, self-instructional workbook, and peer support and feedback provided by the peer writing groups. One year later, nine participants submitted a total of 14 manuscripts, 11 of which were accepted for publication. In addition, 10 participants presented a total of 38 abstracts at educational meetings. Five years later, we reviewed the curriculum vitae of all participants who had published or presented their educational innovation. Although the total number of publications remained the same, the number of educationally-related publications and presentations at scientific meetings increased considerably. A faculty development workshop and peer writing group can facilitate writing productivity and presentations of scholarly work in medical education.

  14. Science Faculty Belief Systems in a Professional Development Program: Inquiry in College Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Kristen L.; Friedrichsen, Patricia J.

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how science faculty members' belief systems about inquiry-based teaching changed through their experience in a professional development program. The program was designed to support early career science faculty in learning about inquiry and incorporating an inquiry-based approach to teaching laboratories. Data sources for this qualitative study included three semi-structured interviews, observations during the program and during faculty members' implementation in their courses, and a researcher's journal. In the first phase of data analysis, we created profiles for each of the four participants. Next, we developed assertions, and tested for confirming and disconfirming evidence across the profiles. The assertions indicated that, through the professional development program, participants' knowledge and beliefs about inquiry-based teaching shifted, placing more value on student-directed learning and classroom inquiry. Participants who were internally motivated to participate and held incoming positive attitudes toward the mini-journal inquiry-based approach were more likely to incorporate the approach in their future practice. Students' responses played a critical role in participants' belief systems and their decision to continue using the inquiry-based format. The findings from this study have implications for professional development design.

  15. Library Research Instruction for Doctor of Ministry Students: Outcomes of Instruction Provided by a Theological Librarian and by a Program Faculty Member

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles D. Kamilos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At some seminaries the question of who is more effective teaching library research is an open question.  There are two camps of thought: (1 that the program faculty member is more effective in providing library research instruction as he or she is intimately engaged in the subject of the course(s, or (2 that the theological librarian is more effective in providing library research instruction as he or she is more familiar with the scope of resources that are available, as well as how to obtain “hard to get” resources.   What began as a librarian’s interest in determining the extent to which Doctor of Ministry (DMin students begin their research using Google, resulted in the development of a survey.  Given the interesting results returned from the first survey in fall of 2008, the survey was conducted again in the fall of 2011.  The results of the comparative data led to the discovery of some useful data that will be used to adjust future instruction sessions for DMin students.  The results of the surveys indicated that the instruction provided by the theological librarian was more effective as students were more prepared to obtain and use resources most likely to provide the best information for course projects. Additionally, following the instruction of library research skills by the librarian (2011 survey, DMin students were more likely to begin the search process for information resources using university provided catalogs and databases than what was reported in the 2008 survey. The responses to the two surveys piqued interest regarding both eBook use during the research process and the reduction of research frustration to be addressed in a follow-up survey to be given in 2014, results of which we hope to report in a future article.

  16. Study of Faculty Viewpoints on Challenges and Factors Influencing Curriculum Development/Revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Bhat

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Curriculum Development (CD is an on-going process and not just a product. It must be responsive to changing values and expectations in education if it has to remain useful. Aim: To investigate the perspectives of educators on challenges and factors affecting the curriculum development/revision in health profession education courses. Materials and Methods: Mixed method approach was used for data collection. The faculties involved in curriculum development/revision were administered structured validated questionnaire (n=8, in depth interviews (n=3 and focus group discussion (n=3. Rigor was ensured through triangulation of data. The questionnaire data was analysed using descriptive statistics. Results: Faculties opined that 87.5% of courses are running successfully, 75% developed curriculum as team, 50% expressed that all stake holders were involved and 75% CD process did not turn out to be an organised approach. Needs assessment was not done in every course and some faculties did not have prior experience in CD. Time allotted was just sufficient and planning was fair. The allocation of finance and resources were just adequate. Team work and cooperation followed by qualified expert panel were the leading facilitating factors whereas lack of awareness on steps involved in CD and infrastructure were the significant hindering contributors. About 87.5% expressed their concern that addition of new courses affected their basic course they had to teach. Global requirements were not taken into account in several courses but reasonable number of courses was adequately monitored. Conclusion: Formal training of faculty in CD must be made mandatory in any health profession education. Understanding the facilitating and hindering factors with systematic monitoring of each step would impact the outcome of a program.

  17. Assessing the impact of faculty development fellowship in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Sedigheh; Kojuri, Javad

    2012-02-01

    Changing concepts of education have led many medical schools to design educational programs to enhance teaching skills, as traditional approaches cannot fulfill the current students' needs. The educational development of medical faculty members has recently received impetus in Iran and the Eastern Mediterranean region. The aim of this study was to investigate whether participation in a faculty development program reinforced new teaching skills. A teacher-training program was designed at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences to help medical instructors improve their teaching skills. The program, imparted in workshop format, covered effective teaching methods, feedback, knowledge assessment, and time management. Program sessions lasted four hours, four days each week for one month. Instruction was in the form of lectures, group discussions, case simulations, video presentations, and role-playing. All participants in the study (n = 219) belonged to the academic staff of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The participants highly rated the quality of the program. They felt that the educational intervention was appropriate and had a positive impact on their knowledge (P effectiveness of the program in strengthening the participants' teaching ability showed that students noticed significant improvements in the participants' teaching abilities (P effect on medical teachers' competencies, and we suggest that our educational intervention is effective in achieving its aims. Further research should investigate whether this faculty development program actually results in improved teaching performance.

  18. Imagine Something Different: How a Group Approach to Scholarly Faculty Development Can Turn Joy-Stealing Competition Into Scholarly Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Kathleen T

    As academic institutions across the country raise the scholarly bar for retention, promotion, and tenure, academic leaders are being asked to scholar-ready nursing faculty. With the retirement of senior scholars and too few scholar-mentors to go around, leaders often find themselves squeezed between scholarly expectations on the rise and faculty groups less than ready to meet those expectations. Today's nursing faculty present a formidable scholarly development challenge. A diverse mix of master's-prepared clinicians and recent graduates from doctor of philosophy and doctor of nursing practice programs, they come with a broad range of scholarly learning needs. These inequities not only leave many faculty feeling like scholar-impostors but also they can breed competitions that erode collegial bonds and sow the seeds of incivilities that steal scholarly joy, slow scholarly progress, and stress academic workplaces. What if leaders began imagining something different for themselves and with faculty groups? This is what can happen when leaders expand their perspective on scholarly faculty development from individual challenge to collective responsibility. More essay than research paper, this article describes how scholarly joy-stealing patterns can infiltrate faculty groups, shares thought leaders' visions for supportive scholarly communities, and offers strategies leaders can use to invite faculty groups to co-create cultures of scholarly caring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Adherence to Trained Standards After a Faculty Development Workshop on “Teaching With Simulated Patients”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freytag, Julia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, faculty development programs to improve teaching quality are considered to be very important by medical educators from all over the world. However, the assessment of the impact of such programs rarely exceeds tests of participants’ knowledge gain or self-assessments of their teaching behavior. It remains unclear what exactly is expected of the attending faculty and how the transfer to practice may be measured more comprehensively and accurately. Method: This study evaluates how specific teaching standards were applied after a workshop (10 teaching units focusing on teaching communication skills with simulated patients. Trained observers used a validated checklist to observe 60 teaching sessions (held by 60 different teachers of a communication skills course integrating simulated patients. Additionally, we assessed the amount of time that had passed since their participation in the workshop and asked them to rate the importance of communication and social skills in medical education. Results: The observations showed that more than two thirds of teaching standards were met by at least 75% of teachers. Fulfillment of standards was significantly connected to teachers’ rating of the importance of communication and social skills (=-.21, =.03. In addition, the results suggest a slight decrease in the amount of fulfilled standards over time (=-.14, =.15. Conclusions: Teachers' adherence to basic teaching standards was already satisfying after a one-day workshop. More complex issues need to be re-addressed in further faculty development courses with a special focus on teachers’ attitude towards teaching. In future, continuing evaluations of the transfer of knowledge and skills from faculty development courses into practice, preferably including pre-tests or control groups, are needed.

  20. Developing a Culture of Assessment through a Faculty Learning Community: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlitz, Stephanie A.; O'Connor, Margaret; Pang, Yanhui; Stryker, Deborah; Markell, Stephen; Krupp, Ethan; Byers, Celina; Jones, Sheila Dove; Redfern, Alicia King

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how a diverse, interdisciplinary team of faculty formed a topic-based faculty learning community. Following an introduction to faculty learning communities and a brief discussion of their benefit to faculty engaged in the process of adopting new technology, we explain how our team, through a competitive mini-grant…

  1. Developing Partnerships between Higher Education Faculty, K-12 Science Teachers, and School Administrators via MSP initiatives: The RITES Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulkins, J. L.; Kortz, K. M.; Murray, D. P.

    2011-12-01

    The Rhode Island Technology Enhanced Science Project (RITES) is a NSF-funded Math and Science Partnership (MSP) project that seeks to improve science education. RITES is, at its core, a unique partnership that fosters relationships between middle and high school science teachers, district and school administrators, higher education (HE) faculty members, and science education researchers. Their common goal is to enhance scientific inquiry, increase classroom technology usage, and improve state level science test scores. In one of the more visible examples of this partnership, middle and high school science teachers work closely with HE science faculty partners to design and teach professional development (PD) workshops. The PD sessions focus on technology-enhanced scientific investigations (e.g. use of probes, online simulations, etc.), exemplify inquiry-based instruction, and relate expert content knowledge. Teachers from these sessions express substantial satisfaction in the program, report increased comfort levels in teaching the presented materials (both via post-workshop surveys), and show significant gains in content knowledge (via pre-post assessments). Other benefits to this kind of partnership, in which K-12 and HE teachers are considered equals, include: 1) K-12 teachers are empowered through interactions with HE faculty and other science teachers in the state; 2) HE instructors become more informed not only about good pedagogical practices, but also practical aspects of teaching science such as engaging students; and 3) the PD sessions tend to be much stronger than ones designed and presented solely by HE scientists, for while HE instructors provide content expertise, K-12 teachers provide expertise in K-12 classroom practice and implementation. Lastly, the partnership is mutually beneficial for the partners involved because both sides learn practical ways to teach science and inquiry at different levels. In addition to HE faculty and K-12 science teacher

  2. Interprofessional faculty development: integration of oral health into the geriatric diabetes curriculum, from theory to practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dounis G

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Georgia Dounis,1 Marcia Ditmyer,2 Susan VanBeuge,3 Sue Schuerman,4 Mildred McClain,1 Kiki Dounis,1,5 Connie Mobley21Department of Clinical Sciences, 2Department of Biomedical Sciences, 3Department of Physiological Nursing, 4Department of Physical Therapy, University of Nevada Las Vegas School of Dental Medicine, Las Vegas, NV, USA; 5Department of Family Medicine, University of Nevada School of Medicine, Reno, NV, USABackground: Health care workforce shortages and an increase demand for health care services by an older demographic challenged by oral–systemic conditions are being recognized across health care systems. Demands are placed on health care professionals to render coordinated delivery of services. Management of oral–systemic conditions requires a trained health care workforce to render interprofessional patient-centered and coordinated delivery of health care services. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the effectiveness of an interprofessional health care faculty training program.Methods: A statewide comprehensive type 2 diabetes training program was developed and offered to multidisciplinary health care faculty using innovative educational methods. Video-recorded clinically simulated patient encounters concentrated on the oral–systemic interactions between type 2 diabetes and comorbidities. Post-encounter instructors facilitated debriefing focused on preconceptions, self-assessment, and peer discussions, to develop a joint interprofessional care plan. Furthermore, the health care faculty explored nonhierarchical opportunities to bridge common health care themes and concepts, as well as opportunities to translate information into classroom instruction and patient care.Results: Thirty-six health care faculty from six disciplines completed the pre-research and post-research assessment survey to evaluate attitudes, knowledge, and perceptions following the interprofessional health care faculty training program. Post

  3. State-of-the-Art Pediatric Hypnosis Training: Remodeling Curriculum and Refining Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohen, Daniel P; Kaiser, Pamela; Olness, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Training in pediatric hypnosis has been part of clinical hypnosis education in the United States since 1976. Workshops expanded over time and are now taught by highly experienced pediatric clinicians across the globe. In 1987, a small vanguard of North American faculty, academic pediatricians, and pediatric psychologists taught a 3-day pediatric hypnosis workshop at the national meeting of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics (SDBP). This model of annual tri-level concurrent workshops (introductory, intermediate, and advanced) was sponsored by the SDBP for 24 years. In 2009, the National Pediatric Hypnosis Training Institute (NPHTI) assembled, and in 2010, offered its first annual workshops. This article documents this history of pediatric hypnosis education and describes NPHTI's remodeling and ongoing refinement toward a state-of-the-art curriculum with innovative methodology based upon (1) current research about adult experiential and small group learning; (2) design principles for presentations that maximize adult learning and memory; and (3) evaluations by participants and faculty. These underpinnings-including clinical training videos, individualized learning choices, emphasis on personalized, goal-oriented sessions, and advances in faculty selection, and ongoing development-are applicable to adult training models. Integration of developmental and self-regulation strategies may be more unique to pediatric hypnosis skills training programs. The conclusion proposes expansion of pediatric hypnosis education and elimination of related barriers toward goals that all children learn self-hypnosis (SH) for mind-body health.

  4. Impact of the On the Cutting Edge Professional Development Program on U.S. Geoscience Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduca, C. A.; Iverson, E. A.; Czujko, R.; Macdonald, H.; Mogk, D. W.; Tewksbury, B. J.; McLaughlin, J.; Sanford, C.; Greenseid, L.; Luxenberg, M.

    2011-12-01

    Transforming STEM education from a dominantly lecture-based format focused on facts to classrooms where students engage with the process of understanding the world through science is a primary goal of faculty development. On the Cutting Edge seeks to support this transformation by using workshops and a website to build a community of geoscience faculty who learn from one another. In order to assess the impact of the On the Cutting Edge program, we surveyed 5917 U.S. geoscience faculty in 2009 and received 2874 completed responses (49% response rate). We looked at the differences in responses between workshop participants who also use the website, website users who have not attended a Cutting Edge workshop, and survey respondents who had neither attended a Cutting Edge workshop nor used the Cutting Edge website. The number of respondents who had attended a Cutting Edge workshop and had not used the website was too small to analyze. Courses described by Cutting Edge workshop participants make significantly less use of lecture and more use of small group discussion and in-class activities. While all faculty respondents routinely update their courses, workshop participants are more likely to have changed their teaching methods in the two years leading up to the survey. When making changes to their teaching methods, workshop participants are more likely than other populations to seek information about teaching on the web, consult journal articles about teaching, and seek advice from colleagues outside their department and from nationally known leaders in geoscience education. Workshop participants are also more likely to tell a colleague when they do something that is particularly successful in class. End-of-workshop survey and follow-up interview data indicate that participants leave workshops reinvigorated, with a new or renewed commitment to student-centered teaching, and that they make use of the website as they implement ideas for changing their teaching following

  5. The Surgery Innovation and Entrepreneurship Development Program (SIEDP): An Experiential Learning Program for Surgery Faculty to Ideate and Implement Innovations in Health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servoss, Jonathan; Chang, Connie; Olson, David; Ward, Kevin R; Mulholland, Michael W; Cohen, Mark S

    2017-10-05

    Surgeons are continually engaged in the incorporation of new technologies in their practice. In the operating room and beyond, they combine technical skill with creative problem solving to improve tools and techniques for patient care, making them natural innovators. However, despite their innovative tendencies, education on entrepreneurship and commercialization is severely lacking. Moreover, with increasing pressure to meet productivity metrics, their availability to learn the complexities of commercialization is limited. To address these challenges, we designed the Surgery Innovation and Entrepreneurship Development Program (SIEDP) with the objective to advance faculty innovations, develop new departmental innovation initiatives, and improve faculty education in the area of innovation, entrepreneurship, and commercialization. The SIEDP is a first-of-its-kind experiential learning program specifically designed for busy clinical and research faculty in a major academic surgery department. Participants ideated and formed teams around health care innovations as they progressed through a 9-month curriculum of expert guest lectures and interactive workshops. A postprogram evaluation and outcome tracking method was used to evaluate attainment of educational objectives and project development milestones. The Department of Surgery, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Eleven surgery faculty of varying academic rank and surgical subspecialties. The program generated 2 faculty startup companies, 1 departmental commercial product, 3 patent disclosures, and 3 innovations that received additional funding. All participants in the program reported a significant increase in their understanding of innovation and entrepreneurship and that participation was a worthwhile faculty development activity. Despite the various challenges and time constraints of surgical practices, programs like SIEDP can educate surgeons and other academicians on innovation

  6. Does formal mentoring for faculty members matter? A survey of clinical faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylona, Elza; Brubaker, Linda; Williams, Valerie N; Novielli, Karen D; Lyness, Jeffrey M; Pollart, Susan M; Dandar, Valerie; Bunton, Sarah A

    2016-06-01

    Mentoring relationships, for all medical school faculty members, are an important component of lifelong development and education, yet an understanding of mentoring among medical school clinical faculty members is incomplete. This study examined associations between formal mentoring relationships and aspects of faculty members' engagement and satisfaction. It then explored the variability of these associations across subgroups of clinical faculty members to understand the status of mentoring and outcomes of mentoring relationships. The authors hypothesised that academic clinical faculty members currently in formal mentoring relationships experience enhanced employee engagement and satisfaction with their department and institution. Medical school faculty members at 26 self-selected USA institutions participated in the 2011-2014 Faculty Forward Engagement Survey. Responses from clinical faculty members were analysed for relationships between mentoring status and perceptions of engagement by faculty members. Of the 11 953 clinical faculty respondents, almost one-third reported having a formal mentoring relationship (30%; 3529). Most mentored faculty indicated the relationship was important (86%; n = 3027), and over three-fourths were satisfied with their mentoring experience (77%; n = 2722). Mentored faculty members across ranks reported significantly higher levels of satisfaction and more positive perceptions of their roles in the organisation. Faculty members who were not receiving mentoring reported significantly less satisfaction with their workplace environment and lower overall satisfaction. Mentored clinical faculty members have significantly greater satisfaction with their department and institution. This multi-institutional study provides evidence that fostering mentoring opportunities may facilitate faculty members' satisfaction and engagement, which, in turn, may help medical schools retain high-quality faculty staff committed to the multidimensional

  7. Development and Implementation of a Peer Mentoring Program for Early Career Gerontological Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Ashley Leak; Brody, Ab; Perez, Adriana; Shillam, Casey; Edelman, Linda S.; Bond, Stewart M.; Foster, Victoria; Siegel, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In conjunction with the National Hartford Centers of Gerontological Nursing Excellence (NHCGNE), formerly known as the Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Initiative (BAGNC), the Hartford Gerontological Nursing Leaders (HGNL) developed and executed a program beginning in 2011 to enhance both (a) the experience of newly selected scholars and fellows to the NHCGNE and (b) the ongoing professional development of the HGNL. The purpose of this article is to describe key strategies used to develop and execute the mentoring program and to present the formative and summative program evaluation. Design The program was launched in January 2011 with seven peer mentor and mentee matches. In June 2012, the peer mentoring committee solicited feedback on the development of the peer mentoring program and changes were made for the subsequent cohorts. Findings An additional 12 matches were made in the following 2 years (2012 and 2013), for a total of 31 matches to date. We have learned several key lessons from our three cohorts regarding how to structure, implement, and carefully evaluate a peer mentoring program. Conclusions Informal evaluation of our peer mentoring program noted several challenges for both peer mentors and mentees. Having knowledge of and addressing those challenges may increase the overall quality and effectiveness of peer mentoring programs and, in turn, benefit academic nursing by strengthening the faculty workforce. Clinical Relevance Findings from development and implementation of a peer mentoring program for gerontological faculty could lead to new and adaptable programs in a variety of clinical and education settings. PMID:25808927

  8. Development and implementation of a peer mentoring program for early career gerontological faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Ashley Leak; Aizer Brody, Abraham; Perez, Adriana; Shillam, Casey; Edelman, Linda S; Bond, Stewart M; Foster, Victoria; Siegel, Elena O

    2015-05-01

    The Hartford Gerontological Nursing Leaders (HGNL) formerly known as the Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Initiative (BAGNC), in conjunction with the National Hartford Centers of Gerontological Nursing Excellence (NHCGNE), developed and executed a peer mentoring program beginning in 2011 to enhance both (a) the experience of newly selected scholars and fellows to the NHCGNE and (b) the ongoing professional development of HGNL members. The purpose of this article is to describe key strategies used to develop and execute the peer mentoring program and to present formative program evaluation. The program was launched in January 2011 with seven peer mentor and mentee matches. In June 2012, the peer mentoring committee solicited feedback on the development of the peer mentoring program and changes were made for the subsequent cohorts. An additional 12 matches were made in the following 2 years (2012 and 2013), for a total of 31 matches to date. We have learned several key lessons from our three cohorts regarding how to structure, implement, and carefully evaluate a peer mentoring program. Informal evaluation of our peer mentoring program noted several challenges for both peer mentors and mentees. Having knowledge of and addressing those challenges may increase the overall quality and effectiveness of peer mentoring programs and, in turn, benefit academic nursing by strengthening the faculty workforce. Findings from development and implementation of a peer mentoring program for gerontological faculty could lead to new and adaptable programs in a variety of clinical and education settings. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  9. Impact of a faculty development programme for teaching communication skills on participants' practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod Perron, Noelle; Cullati, Stephane; Hudelson, Patricia; Nendaz, Mathieu; Dolmans, Diana; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2014-05-01

    A 6-month faculty development programme was designed to improve supervisors' feedback to junior doctors on their clinical communication skills (CS) and included both CS and teaching skills training. The aim of this study was to assess supervisors' views on the impact of the programme on their subsequent teaching and communication practice. 28 clinical supervisors at the Geneva University Hospitals, from either inpatient or outpatient settings (general internists or primary care specialists), undertook a six-session faculty development programme, between 2009 and 2011, and each completed a short questionnaire before and 1 month after the course. Between 3 and 6 months after the course, the participants were interviewed about their views on the impact of the course on their practice using a semistructured interview. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. The percentage of participants who reported teaching CS at least once a week had increased from 5/26 (19%) to 8/26 (30%), p=0.07. Participants reported using teaching skills, especially giving structured feedback. Use of newly acquired teaching skills was more likely when participants had protected time for teaching or were involved in formal teaching activities. Even participants who reported minimal teaching activity found the newly acquired CS to be useful, both with their own patients and in other professional situations. The few participants who explicitly reported teaching regularly CS in practice had generally become formal teachers in CS training. A faculty development programme on how to teach CS is perceived to be useful by clinical supervisors to acquire new skills, but using them in the workplace appears to depend on creation of a supportive environment with protected time for teaching. Involving supervisors in formal communication teaching may be one way to ensure continued use of newly learned teaching skills.

  10. The Science Teaching Fellows Program: A Model for Online Faculty Development of Early Career Scientists Interested in Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancaccio-Taras, Loretta; Gull, Kelly A; Ratti, Claudia

    2016-12-01

    The American Society for Microbiology (ASM) has a history of providing a wide range of faculty development opportunities. Recently, ASM developed the Science Teaching Fellows Program (STF) for early career biologists and postdoctoral students to explore student-centered teaching and develop the skills needed to succeed in positions that have a significant teaching component. Participants were selected to STF through a competitive application process. The STF program consisted of a series of six webinars. In preparation for each webinar, participants completed a pre-webinar assignment. After each webinar, fellows practiced what they learned by completing a post-webinar assignment. In a survey used to assess the impact of STF, participants reported greater knowledge of the webinar-based instructional topics and a sense of being part of an educational community and were more confident about varied teaching methods.

  11. The Teacher-Scholar Project: how to help faculty groups develop scholarly skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Kathleen T; Hurst, Helen; Leigh, Gwen; Oberleitner, Melinda Granger; Poirrier, Gail P

    2009-01-01

    Nursing education's challenge in the new millennium is to prepare all nurses as scholars. With many nurse educators feeling like impostors when it comes to scholarship, this is no small task. Turning the millenial challenge into an opportunity, this article describes how a collaborative faculty development initiative is turning a National League for Nursing Center of Excellence school's "scholar-impostors" into teacher-scholars. This Teacher-Scholar Project will interest those in teaching intensive schools of nursing or in teaching tracks in research-intensive institutions.

  12. Development of a Medical Humanities Program at Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine, Nova Scotia, Canada, 1992-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jock

    2003-10-01

    The Medical Humanities Program at Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine in Nova Scotia, Canada, was initiated in 1992 to incorporate the medical humanities into the learning and experiences of medical students. The goal of the program was to gain acceptance as an integral part of the medical school. The program assumed a broad concept of the medical humanities that includes medical history, literature, music, art, multiculturalism, philosophy, epistemology, theology, anthropology, professionalism, history of alternative therapies, writing, storytelling, health law, international medicine, and ethics. Phase I of the program has provided the same elective and research opportunities in the medical humanities that are available to the students in clinical and basic sciences, and has encouraged and legitimized the involvement of the humanities in the life and learning of the medical student through a wide array of programs and activities. Phase II will focus on further incorporation of the humanities into the curriculum. Phase III will be the development of a graduate program in medical humanities to train more faculty who will incorporate the humanities into their teaching and into the development of education programs.

  13. MVP and Faculty Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theall, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This chapter considers faculty evaluation and motivational and volitional issues. The focus is on the ways in which faculty evaluation influences not only faculty attitudes and beliefs but also willingness to engage in professional development and instructional improvement programs. Recommendations for effective practice that enhances motivation…

  14. The evaluation of the professional development of English faculties from their own vision of excellence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel González González

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The general objective of this paper is to offer a system of teaching excellence indicators for the faculties of English as a foreign language in Cuba to guide their evaluation, training and professional development, considering the different stages of their academic career. Quality studies have been highly demanded in the educational field in the last decade. Accreditation processes and systems have been created and implemented to evaluate the excellence of teaching at universities worldwide. Cuban universities are not apart from that reality, facultiesʼ professional development is an important element to be considered however no indicators have been defined to evaluate and guide their performance. The model adopted in this research is the descriptive one. It was carried out in three stages so as to describe the vision of excellence professors of English in Cuba have of their professional development and the indicators they consider valid to evaluate their own work. For the analysis of the qualitative information we have carried out a deep content analysis and to analyze the quantitative information we used SSPS.

  15. An exploratory study of the relationship between faculty & residents’ current use of social media and their intention to use social media for professional development

    OpenAIRE

    Loo, May Eng; Lim, Yong Hao; Wong, Wai Ling Brenda; Lee, Yee Mun

    2017-01-01

    Background:Social media applications provide useful platforms for professional development among doctors. Given that the main determinants of doctors’ intention to use social media for development are perceived usefulness and ease of use, this study examines if these determinants are moderated by patterns of current social media use.Summary of Work187 faculty and residents (38% response rate) completed an online questionnaire on their current social media use and perception of social media fo...

  16. Basic essential education program (BEEP: a brief introductory faculty development course for medical teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Madan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physicians have a unique role in teaching future physicians and allied health professionals. Yet, most medical doctors have limited instruction in this critical component of their daily activity. Methods: This study was a prospective cohort study of the effectiveness of a local teaching program at two teaching hospitals for junior faculty. Based on a needs analysis and literature review, the teaching program was developed in an accessible and compact format of six consecutive, one-hour "lunch and learn" sessions, held locally over a six week period. Pre-post questionnaires and focus groups were used to evaluate the program. Results: Participants reported being satisfied with the course as whole, particularly in respect to the format and location. There was an improvement in their knowledge in all content areas covered. The greatest benefits were derived from fostering a community of practice and having the opportunity to role play and simulate teaching skills. An attitudinal change towards teaching was noted. Conclusions: A brief, local faculty development program was effective in enhancing physicians’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes in teaching.

  17. Diversity in academic medicine no. 1 case for minority faculty development today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivet, Marc A; Taylor, Vera S; Butts, Gary C; Strelnick, A Hal; Herbert-Carter, Janice; Fry-Johnson, Yvonne W; Smith, Quentin T; Rust, George; Kondwani, Kofi

    2008-12-01

    For the past 20 years, the percentage of the American population consisting of nonwhite minorities has been steadily increasing. By 2050, these nonwhite minorities, taken together, are expected to become the majority. Meanwhile, despite almost 50 years of efforts to increase the representation of minorities in the healthcare professions, such representation remains grossly deficient. Among the underrepresented minorities are African and Hispanic Americans; Native Americans, Alaskans, and Pacific Islanders (including Hawaiians); and certain Asians (including Hmong, Vietnamese, and Cambodians). The underrepresentation of underrepresented minorities in the healthcare professions has a profoundly negative effect on public health, including serious racial and ethnic health disparities. These can be reduced only by increased recruitment and development of both underrepresented minority medical students and underrepresented minority medical school administrators and faculty. Underrepresented minority faculty development is deterred by barriers resulting from years of systematic segregation, discrimination, tradition, culture, and elitism in academic medicine. If these barriers can be overcome, the rewards will be great: improvements in public health, an expansion of the contemporary medical research agenda, and improvements in the teaching of both underrepresented minority and non-underrepresented minority students.

  18. Scholarly productivity for nursing clinical track faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschannen, Dana; Anderson, Christine; Strobbe, Stephen; Bay, Esther; Bigelow, April; Dahlem, Chin Hwa Gina Y; Gosselin, Ann K; Pollard, Jennifer; Seng, Julia S

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have yielded substantial advancement by clinical track faculty in cohort expansion and collective contributions to the discipline of nursing. As a result, standards for progression and promotion for clinical faculty need to be more fully developed, articulated, and disseminated. Our school formed a task force to examine benchmarks for the progression and promotion of clinical faculty across schools of nursing, with the goal of guiding faculty, reviewers, and decision makers about what constitutes excellence in scholarly productivity. Results from analyses of curriculum vitae of clinical professors or associate professors at six universities with high research activity revealed a variety of productivity among clinical track members, which included notable diversity in the types of scholarly products. Findings from this project help quantify types of scholarship for clinical faculty at the time of promotion. This work provides a springboard for greater understanding of the contributions of clinical track faculty to nursing practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Coaching the Coach: A Program for Development of Faculty Portfolio Coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopechek, Jack; Bardales, Cheryl; Lash, A Todd; Walker, Curtis; Pfeil, Sheryl; Ledford, Cynthia H

    2017-01-01

    Faculty coaching is recognized as an essential element for effective use of portfolios in undergraduate medical education, yet best practices for training these coaches are uncertain. New portfolio coaches participated in a multifaceted training program that included orienting modules, a 7.5-hr training workshop featuring analysis of reflective writing, an Observed Structured Teaching Exercise (OSTE), and subsequent longitudinal coaches' meetings for timely task training. Four desired coaching skills were emphasized in the initial training: creating a safe environment, explicitly using performance data, asking questions that elicit reflection, and guiding the student to develop future goals and plans. We collected and analyzed several outcomes: (a) coaches' self-assessment at key intervals, (b) open-ended written responses to three coaching vignettes, (c) video recordings of the OSTE, and (d) subsequent student evaluation of the coach. In an attempt to capture learning from the workshop, both the responses to written vignettes and the video-recorded encounters were coded for presence or absence of the four desired skills. Our portfolio and coaching program was instituted as part of a major undergraduate medical education reform. A new cohort of 25 coaches is enrolled with each matriculating student class, and each coach is assigned to work individually with 8-10 students, forming a coaching relationship that continues over 4 years. Coaches are compensated at 5% full-time equivalent. On coach self-assessment, the majority of coaches reported significant improvement in their perceived ability to assess a student's level of reflection, enhance reflection, use performance data, and guide a student to develop goals and plans. After two semesters, coach perception of improved abilities persisted. Students rated coaches as excellent (82%), reporting that coaches created safe environments (99%), promoted insight (92%), and aided in goal setting (97%). Written responses to

  20. Impact of faculty development programs for positive behavioural changes among teachers: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuh Shing Lee

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Faculty development (FD is essential to prepare faculty members to become effective teachers to meet the challenges in medical education. Despite the growth of FD programmes, most evaluations were often conducted using short questionnaires to assess participants’ satisfaction immediately after they attended a programme. Consequently, there were calls for more rigorous evaluations based on observed changes in participants’ behaviours. Hence, this study aims to explore how the FD workshops run by the Centre for Medical Education, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore have impacted behavioural changes in the educators. Methods We followed up with the educators at least half a year after they have attended the workshops. With limited literature as reference, we initiated a small-scale case-study research design involving semi-structured interviews with six educators which was triangulated with three focus group discussions with their students. This allowed us to explore behavioural changes among the educators as well as evaluate the feasibility of this research methodology. Results We identified three emerging categories among the educators: ignorance to awareness, from intuition to confirmation and expansion, and from individualism to community of practice. Conclusion Although FD have placed much emphasis on teaching and learning approaches, we found that the teacher-student interaction or human character components (passionate, willing to sacrifice, are open to feedback in becoming a good educator are lacking in our FD workshops.

  1. Faculty development of university teachers: analysis and systematization of the concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba MADINABEITIA EZKURRA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Faculty development of university teachers is recognized as a relevant factor for improving the quality of education in higher education institutions. However, behind this term different conceptions and practices are hiding. This article aims to analyze this concept over time and to understand deeply the complexity of their meanings, for which we will focus on socio-historical production contexts and on scientific research. To this end, it has been made a bibliographical review of the most relevant Anglo-Saxon literature in this educational field. The analysis allows us to conclude that it has been moving from an approach oriented to supporting teachers in their development as teachers, professionals and/or academics, towards another, focused on promoting effective teaching and learning processes at micro and macro level. These challenges highlight the need to foster broader visions that, beyond teachers, focus on institutions, frameworks, and infrastructures that target teaching and learning.

  2. Preparing Interprofessional Faculty to Be Humanistic Mentors for Medical Students: The GW-Gold Mentor Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, Benjamin; Plack, Margaret M; Simmens, Samuel J

    2018-01-01

    The GW-Gold Humanistic Mentor Development Program addresses the challenge faced by medical schools to educate faculty to prepare students for humanistic practice. Grounded in Branch's Teaching Professional and Humanistic Values model, the program prepares interprofessional faculty mentoring teams in humanistic communities of practice. The teams consist of physician-psychosocial professional pairs, each mentoring a small student group in their professional development course. Through GW-Gold workshops, faculty mentors develop interprofessional humanistic communities of practice, preparing them to lead second such communities with their students. This article describes the program and its evaluation. To assess outcomes and better understand the mentor experience, we used a mixed-method validating triangulation design consisting of simultaneous collection of quantitative (mentor and student surveys) and qualitative (open-ended survey questions and focus group) data. Data were analyzed in parallel and merged at the point of interpretation, allowing for triangulation and validation of outcomes. Mentors rated the program highly, gained confidence in their humanistic skills, and received high scores from students. Three themes emerged that validated program design, confirmed outcomes, and expanded on the mentor experience: (1) Interprofessional faculty communities developed through observation, collaboration, reflection, and dialogue; (2) Humanistic mentors created safe environments for student engagement; and (3) Engaging in interprofessional humanistic communities of practice expanded mentors' personal and professional identities. Outcomes support the value of the GW-Gold program's distinctive features in preparing faculty to sustain humanism in medical education: an interprofessional approach and small communities of practice built on humanistic values.

  3. Research reports: The 1980 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. [aeronautical research and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, B. F. (Editor); Kent, M. I. (Editor); Dozier, J. (Editor); Karr, G. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The Summer Faculty Fellowship Research Program objectives are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants and institutions; and to contribute to the research objectives at the NASA centers. The Faculty Fellows engaged in research projects commensurate with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague.

  4. Developing a Medical School Curriculum for Psychological, Moral, and Spiritual Wellness: Student and Faculty Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christine M; Epstein-Peterson, Zachary D; Bandini, Julia; Amobi, Ada; Cahill, Jonathan; Enzinger, Andrea; Noveroske, Sarah; Peteet, John; Balboni, Tracy; Balboni, Michael J

    2016-11-01

    Although many studies have addressed the integration of a religion and/or spirituality curriculum into medical school training, few describe the process of curriculum development based on qualitative data from students and faculty. The aim of this study is to explore the perspectives of medical students and chaplaincy trainees regarding the development of a curriculum to facilitate reflection on moral and spiritual dimensions of caring for the critically ill and to train students in self-care practices that promote professionalism. Research staff conducted semiscripted and one-on-one interviews and focus groups. Respondents also completed a short and self-reported demographic questionnaire. Participants included 44 students and faculty members from Harvard Medical School and Harvard Divinity School, specifically senior medical students and divinity school students who have undergone chaplaincy training. Two major qualitative themes emerged: curriculum format and curriculum content. Inter-rater reliability was high (kappa = 0.75). With regard to curriculum format, most participants supported the curriculum being longitudinal, elective, and experiential. With regard to curriculum content, five subthemes emerged: personal religious and/or spiritual (R/S) growth, professional integration of R/S values, addressing patient needs, structural and/or institutional dynamics within the health care system, and controversial social issues. Qualitative findings of this study suggest that development of a future medical school curriculum on R/S and wellness should be elective, longitudinal, and experiential and should focus on the impact and integration of R/S values and self-care practices within self, care for patients, and the medical team. Future research is necessary to study the efficacy of these curricula once implemented. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Self-Observation and Peer Feedback as a Faculty Development Approach for Problem-Based Learning Tutors: A Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Irène; James, Richard W; Bischof, Paul; Baroffio, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Good teaching requires spontaneous, immediate, and appropriate action in response to various situations. It is even more crucial in problem-based learning (PBL) tutorials, as the tutors, while directing students toward the identification and attainment of learning objectives, must stimulate them to contribute to the process and provide them with constructive feedback. PBL tutors in medicine lack opportunities to receive feedback from their peers on their teaching strategies. Moreover, as tutorials provide little or no time to stop and think, more could be learned by reflecting on the experience than from the experience itself. We designed and evaluated a faculty development approach to developing PBL tutors that combined self-reflection and peer feedback processes, both powerful techniques for improving performance in education. We developed an observation instrument for PBL facilitation to be used both by tutors to self-observe and reflect on own teaching strategies and by peers to observe and provide feedback to tutors. Twenty PBL sessions were video-recorded. Tutors completed the instrument immediately after their PBL session and again while watching their video-recorded session (self-observation). A group of three observers completed the instrument while watching each recorded session and provided feedback to each tutor (peer observation and feedback). We investigated tutors' perceptions of the feasibility and acceptability of the approach and gathered data on its effectiveness in enhancing tutors' facilitation skills. The preclinical medical curriculum at the University of Geneva is essentially taught by PBL. A new program of faculty development based on self-observation and peer feedback was offered to voluntary tutors and evaluated. Our results suggest that self-observation and peer feedback, supported by an instrument, can be effective in enhancing tutors' facilitation skills. Reflection on self-observation raised teachers' awareness of the effectiveness of

  6. Developing a comprehensive faculty development program to promote interprofessional education, practice and research at a free-standing academic health science center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrader, Sarah; Mauldin, Mary; Hammad, Sammar; Mitcham, Maralynee; Blue, Amy

    2015-03-01

    There is an on-going transformation in health professions education to prepare students to function as competent members of an interprofessional team in order to increase patient safety and improve patient care. Various methods of health education and practice directed toward students have been implemented, yet descriptions of faculty development initiatives designed to advance interprofessional education and practice are scarce. This article describes a faculty development program at the Medical University of South Carolina, USA, based on the conceptual framework of adult transformational learning theory. Three components comprise the faculty development program: an institute, fellowship and teaching series. Evaluations of the three components indicate that the faculty development program aided in the sustainability of the university's interprofessional program, and built capacity for improvement and growth in interprofessional endeavors.

  7. Faculty Development for Simulation Programs: Five Issues for the Future of Debriefing Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Adan; Grant, Vincent; Dieckmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    STATEMENT: Debriefing is widely recognized as a critically important element of simulation-based education. Simulation educators obtain and/or seek debriefing training from various sources, including workshops at conferences, simulation educator courses, formal fellowships in debriefings, or thro...... be used to improve debriefing quality within programs? (5) How can we individualize debriefing training opportunities to the learning needs of our educators?......STATEMENT: Debriefing is widely recognized as a critically important element of simulation-based education. Simulation educators obtain and/or seek debriefing training from various sources, including workshops at conferences, simulation educator courses, formal fellowships in debriefings......, or through advanced degrees. Although there are many options available for debriefing training, little is known about how faculty development opportunities should be structured to maintain and enhance the quality of debriefing within simulation programs. In this article, we discuss 5 key issues to help shape...

  8. Two-Year Institution Part-Time Nurse Faculty Experiences During Role Transition and Identity Development: A Phenomenological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Rhoda A

    This study explored two-year institution part-time nurse faculty's perceptions of their experiences during their role transitions from nurses in clinical practice to part-time clinical instructors. Part-time nurse faculty enter academia as expert clinicians, but most have little or no training in the pedagogy of effective student learning. A phenomenological study was used to explore the faculty role transition experiences. Findings support the proposition that six participants transitioned from their expert clinician to instructor identities; however, two continue in the process. Critical to this process are relationships with individuals in their environments, past and present experiences, the incentive to learn to be better instructors, and the importance of support and training. A model emerged, Process of Role Transition and Professional Identity Formation for Part-Time Clinical Instructors at Two-Year Institutions, that is potentially useful for administrators in developing individualized orientation and professional development programs.

  9. Faculty Mentoring Undergraduates: The Nature, Development, and Benefits of Mentoring Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinsey, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Educational research shows that close student-faculty interaction is a key factor in college student learning and success. Most literature on undergraduate mentoring, however, focuses on planned programs of mentoring for targeted groups of students by non-faculty professionals or student peers. Based on the research literature and student and…

  10. Technology, Learning, and the Classroom: Longitudinal Evaluation of a Faculty Development Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Karen; Bolliger, Doris

    2012-01-01

    Technology, Learning, and the Classroom, a workshop designed to jump-start faculty's use of instructional technology in face-to-face classrooms, was offered as a week-long intensive workshop and once-a-week session over a semester. Faculty were interviewed five years after participation to determine the longitudinal effects, differences in opinion…

  11. Academic Leadership Forum on Faculty Workload, Engagement, and Development. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    WCET, 2011

    2011-01-01

    A select group of academic officers and deans from institutions (all sectors) whose programs are primarily online and whose teaching faculty differ considerably from traditional faculty participated in the Academic Leadership Forum, October 26, 2011, held in conjunction with WCET's (WICHE Cooperative for Educational Technologies') Annual Meeting.…

  12. Developing dental faculty for the future: ADEA/AAL Institute for Teaching and Learning, 2006-09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haden, N Karl; Hendricson, William D; Killip, John W; O'Neill, Paula N; Reed, Michael J; Weinstein, George; Williams, John N; Valachovic, Richard W

    2009-11-01

    This report summarizes the history and curriculum of the American Dental Education Association/Academy for Academic Leadership Institute for Teaching and Learning (ADEA/AAL ITL) Program for Dental School Faculty, describes participant feedback, and reviews how the program serves the faculty development initiatives of the American Dental Education Association. The fifty-hour program (6.5 days), conducted in two phases at collaborating dental schools, enhances core academic competencies of new and transitional faculty, including faculty members whose responsibilities include predoctoral, allied, and postdoctoral dental education. The program's mission is to prepare participants to become more effective teachers and develop other skills that will facilitate confidence, job satisfaction, and professional growth in the academic environment. From 2005 to 2009, 174 individuals graduated from the program, representing forty-three schools of dentistry in the United States and Canada and twenty-nine private practices. A total of forty scholarships have been awarded to participants by the American Academy of Periodontology Foundation, the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, and the American Association of Orthodontists. In an online survey completed by 75 percent of ADEA/AAL ITL participants, 99 percent indicated they were positive or highly positive about their learning experience in this faculty development program. Ninety-six percent stated that the program had been important or very important in their effectiveness as a teacher. In 2010, the program will be held at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Dentistry, with phase I occurring on August 19-22, 2010, and phase II on October 22-24, 2010. In summary, the ADEA/AAL ITL is addressing an unmet need through a formal professional development program designed to help new and potential faculty members thrive as educators and become future leaders in academic health care.

  13. Extent of Implementing Accreditation and Quality Assurance Standards in Azal University of Human Development from the Faculty Members’ Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Zain Saleh ALSadi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The research aimed to find out how far accreditation and quality assurance standards in Azal University for human development are implemented from the perspective of faculty members. To achieve this objective, to the researchers adopted descriptive analytical approach techniques. The research population was all the teaching staff at the university; and the sample consisted of (94 faculty members, (48.45 % of the total number of the population. A questionnaire was designed to collect data relevant to the testing of the research objectives. The questionnaire consisted of two parts: the first included the personal data, while the second part included the standards of accreditation and quality assurance. The study revealed the following results: The mean of implementing standards as a whole was (3.44, the standard deviation (0.76, and the extent of the using the standards was (high. There were no significant differences between the research participants’ responses about the extent of using the standards due to the variables (gender – Qualification – college type – years of teaching experience. In light of the results of the study, a set of recommendations were presented, including the need to provide the necessary requirements for implementing accreditation and quality assurance standards, whether material, human or financial resources, and creating a positive conducive learning environment to be suitable and ready for a complete implementation of quality standards. One of the main suggestions made by the research was to conduct a similar study on government and private universities and community colleges in Yemen. Keywords: Quality Assurance and accreditation; Azal University of Human Development.

  14. Use of qualitative analysis to supplement program evaluation of a faculty development program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas V Chacko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Generally for Program Evaluation of workshops, a structured questionnaire is used to measure learner satisfaction and learning and it yields results in quantitative terms and if there are open-ended questions, it yields a long list of responses which the evaluator finds it difficult to use. Hence, we used qualitative research methods to supplement it for a holistic understanding of the quality and extent of their learning. Materials and Methods: A faculty development program was used opportunistically to gather data using open-ended questions designed to elicit "thick descriptions" about their learning. Using the Grounded Theory approach where the data drives further analysis, data analysis was done by faculty in three groups using inductive reasoning leading to emergence of themes and categories of responses. The commonalities in the themes that emerged independently in the three groups as well as member checking to seek their agreement with the group′s observation of the primary data were used to ensure validity of the findings. Results: Themes and categories of new learning in terms of knowledge, skills, attitudes and processes emerged which gives a better understanding of the extent of the learning and its applicability to future professional tasks. The open-ended questions encouraging participants to give "thick description" of their learning yielded many quotable quotes which indicate the quality of their learning. Conclusion: The use of open-ended questions and qualitative research method of data analysis using the Grounded Theory approach helps in holistic understanding of the focus and quality of learning that is not usually possible through quantitative research methods. Hence, it is recommended that when understanding of the extent and quality of learning is important, traditional method of program evaluation should be supplemented with qualitative research methods as they are more effective in convincing decision

  15. Evaluation of an international faculty development program for developing countries in Asia: the Seoul Intensive Course for Medical Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hwan; Yoon, Hyun Bae; Sung, Minsun; Yoo, Dong-Mi; Hwang, Jinyoung; Kim, Eun Jung; Lee, Seunghee; Shin, Jwa-Seop

    2015-12-18

    The issue of collaboration in medical education is becoming prominent. Some faculty development programs have suggested an approach for promoting collaboration on a global level. However, non-English-speaking developing countries in Asia, especially in Southeast Asia, do not take advantage of them due to their unique context, such as language and culture. To address these issues, Seoul National University College of Medicine initiated a 6-week international faculty development program called the "Seoul Intensive Course for Medical Educators" for 16 fellows from five Asian countries (Cambodia, Laos, Mongolia, Myanmar, and Vietnam). The aim of this study is to report the evaluation results of the outcome of the program and discuss better ways of collaborating with developing countries. Three levels of collaboration-intraorganizational, intranational, and international-were central initiatives of the program. Prior to setting up the program details, we first established four design principles, following which the contents, materials, and facilitators were determined to maintain consistency with the design principles. The evaluation of the program was done with Kirkpatrick's four-level model. Most of the evaluation data for level 1 were collected by two questionnaires, the post-module survey and the post-program survey. Portfolios and progress reports were mainly used to collect outcome data for levels 2 and 3, respectively. The reaction was generally positive throughout the program and there was a significant correlation between satisfaction and relevance to one's job or needs. Despite the fellows' propensity for overestimating themselves, both the evaluators and fellows reported that there was significant improvement in learning. Opinions on the impact or urgency of the topics were slightly different from country to country; however, the answers regarding feasibility were fairly similar. Moreover, we could observe from the post-program progress reports that the

  16. Learning how to "teach one": A needs assessment of the state of faculty development within the Consortium of the American College of Surgeons Accredited Education Institutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paige, John T; Khamis, Nehal N; Cooper, Jeffrey B

    2017-11-01

    Developing faculty competencies in curriculum development, teaching, and assessment using simulation is critical for the success of the Consortium of the American College of Surgeons Accredited Education Institutes program. The state of and needs for faculty development in the Accredited Education Institute community are unknown currently. The Faculty Development Committee of the Consortium of the Accredited Education Institutes conducted a survey of Accredited Education Institutes to ascertain what types of practices are used currently, with what frequency, and what needs are perceived for further programs and courses to guide the plan of action for the Faculty Development Committee. The Faculty Development Committee created a 20-question survey with quantitative and qualitative items aimed at gathering data about practices of faculty development and needs within the Consortium of Accredited Education Institutes. The survey was sent to all 83 Accredited Education Institutes program leaders via Survey Monkey in January 2015 with 2 follow-up reminders. Quantitative data were compiled and analyzed using descriptive statistics, and qualitative data were interpreted for common themes. Fifty-four out of the 83 programs (65%) responded to the survey. Two-thirds of the programs had from 1 to 30 faculty teaching at their Accredited Education Institutes. More than three-quarters of the programs taught general surgery, emergency medicine, or obstetrics/gynecology. More than 60% of programs had some form of faculty development, but 91% reported a need to expand their offerings for faculty development with "extreme value" for debriefing skills (70%), assessment (47%), feedback (40%), and curriculum development (40%). Accredited Education Institutes felt that the Consortium could assist with faculty development through such activities as the provision of online resources, sharing of best practices, provision of a blueprint for development of a faculty curriculum and information

  17. STEM Faculty as Learners in Pedagogical Reform and the Role of Research Articles as Professional Development Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulnix, Amy B.

    2016-01-01

    Discipline-based education research (DBER) publications are opportunities for professional development around science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education reform. Learning theory tells us these publications could be more impactful if authors, reviewers, and editors pay greater attention to linking principles and practice. This approach, which considers faculty as learners and STEM education reform as content, has the potential to better support faculty members because it promotes a deeper understanding of the reasons why a pedagogical change is effective. This depth of understanding is necessary for faculty members to successfully transfer new knowledge to their own contexts. A challenge ahead for the emergent learning sciences is to better integrate findings from across sister disciplines; DBER reports can take a step in that direction while improving their usefulness for instructors. PMID:27810872

  18. Development of the acquisition model of online information resources at Faculty of Medicine Library, Khon Kaen University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanapaisal, Soodjai; Thanapaisal, Chaiwit

    2013-09-01

    Faculty of Medicine Library, Khon Kaen University started to acquire online information resources since 2001 with the subscriptions to 2 databases. Nowadays it has 29 items of subscriptions and the expenses on online information resources reach to 17 million baht, more than 70 percent of the information resources budget, serving the academic purposes of the Faculty of Medicine. The problems of online information resources acquisition fall into 4 categories, and lead to 4 aspects conforming the model of the acquisition, comparing or benchmarking with the 4 selected medical school libraries in Bangkok, Chiang Mai, and Songkhla, and discussion with some other Thai and foreign libraries. The acquisition model of online information resources is developed from those problems and proposed for Faculty of Medicine Library, Khon Kaen University as well as for any medical libraries which prefer.

  19. The CIRTL Network: A Professional Development Network for Future STEM Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, B. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching, and Learning (CIRTL) is an NSF Center for Learning and Teaching in higher education using the professional development of graduate students and post-doctoral scholars as the leverage point to develop a national STEM faculty committed to implementing and advancing effective teaching practices for diverse student audiences as part of successful professional careers. The goal of CIRTL is to improve the STEM learning of all students at every college and university, and thereby to increase the diversity in STEM fields and the STEM literacy of the nation. The CIRTL network seeks to support change at a number of levels to support its goals: individual, classroom, institutional, and national. To bring about change, which is never easy, the CIRTL network has developed a conceptual model or change model that is thought to support the program objectives. Three central concepts, Teaching-as-Research, Learning Communities, and Learning-through-Diversity, underlie the design of all CIRTL activities. STEM faculty use research methods to systematically and reflectively improve learning outcomes. This work is done within a community of shared learning and discovery, and explicitly recognizes that effective teaching capitalizes on the rich array of experiences, backgrounds, and skills among the students and instructors to enhance the learning of all. This model is being refined and tested through a networked-design experiment, where the model is tested in diverse settings. Established in fall 2006, the CIRTL Network comprises the University of Colorado at Boulder (CU), Howard University, Michigan State University, Texas A&M University, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The diversity of these institutions is by design: private/public; large/moderate size; majority-/minority-serving; geographic location. This talk will describe the theoretical constructs and efficacy of Teaching-as Research as a

  20. The impact of a faculty learning community on professional and personal development: the facilitator training program of the American Academy on Communication in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Calvin L; Hirschmann, Krista; Fortin, Auguste H; Lichstein, Peter R

    2014-07-01

    Relationship-centered care attends to the entire network of human relationships essential to patient care. Few faculty development programs prepare faculty to teach principles and skills in relationship-centered care. One exception is the Facilitator Training Program (FTP), a 25-year-old training program of the American Academy on Communication in Healthcare. The authors surveyed FTP graduates to determine the efficacy of its curriculum and the most important elements for participants' learning. In 2007, surveys containing quantitative and narrative elements were distributed to 51 FTP graduates. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The authors analyzed narratives using Burke's dramatistic pentad as a qualitative framework to delineate how interrelated themes interacted in the FTP. Forty-seven respondents (92%) identified two essential acts that happened in the program: an iterative learning process, leading to heightened personal awareness and group facilitation skills; and longevity of learning and effect on career. The structure of the program's learning community provided the scene, and the agents were the participants, who provided support and contributed to mutual success. Methods of developing skills in personal awareness, group facilitation, teaching, and feedback constituted agency. The purpose was to learn skills and to join a community to share common values. The FTP is a learning community that provided faculty with skills in principles of relationship-centered care. Four further features that describe elements of this successful faculty-based learning community are achievement of self-identified goals, distance learning modalities, opportunities to safely discuss workplace issues outside the workplace, and self-renewing membership.

  1. Development of Mobile Learning in Faculty of Economics, Bina Nusantara University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herru Darmadi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The research wanted to find the workflow and solution by developing m-learning object for Android and iOS-based smartphone and tablet that supported interactive multimedia. The research began with analysis, design, implementation, and evaluation. Currently, the learning objects were not compatible with mobile devices. To overcome this problem, the research focused on designing the instructional design for m-learning and the development of interactive multimedia. Instructional design was created by the collaboration of the subject matter expert and instructional designer. M-learning was designed using UML and developed using Adobe AIR technology. The implementation of this research was a prototype of m-learning for concept of cost in Faculty of Economics, Bina Nusantara University. Then, the evaluation was conducted by distributing m-learning object to 32 selected students by simple random sampling in their first week of lectures in February 2014. The observation was conducted during m-learning object installation and initial learning process. At the end of the second week of the experiment, summative assessment and questionnaire were given to students. The results show that m-learning object is compatible with mobile devices. The students also say that m-learning is easy to use and helpful for their learning.

  2. Faculty Transitions in Online Delivery: Make or Buy? Tips for Developing a "New to You" Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney-Klinger, Kelly; Vanevenhoven, Jeff; Wagner, Richard; Chenoweth, John

    2014-01-01

    In the last few decades, teaching courses online has become a standard practice at many colleges and universities. Although technologies and pedagogies have changed rapidly during this time, developing an online course is still a labor and time-intensive undertaking. With changes in staffing and course offerings, faculty are often faced with…

  3. A Faculty Development Program Integrating Cross-Cultural Care into a Gastrointestinal Pathophysiology Tutorial Benefits Students, Tutors, and the Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Helen M.; Leffler, Daniel A.; Peters, Antoinette S.; Llerena-Quinn, Roxana; Nambudiri, Vinod E.; White, Augustus A., III; Hayward, Jane N.; Pelletier, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    A specific faculty development program for tutors to teach cross-cultural care in a preclinical gastrointestinal pathophysiology course with weekly longitudinal followup sessions was designed in 2007 and conducted in the same manner over a 6-yr period. Anonymous student evaluations of how "frequently" the course and the tutor were…

  4. Implementation of Global Development Education into the Curriculum at the Faculty of Economics and Management, Slovak University of Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svitacová, Eva; Mravcová, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The new phenomenon of global development education (GDE) has gradually penetrated the curricula in Slovakia. For the purpose of more comprehensively preparing future economic actors, who will operate in the new global economic and social environment, we have decided to incorporate this topic into the curriculum at the Faculty of Economics and…

  5. Education for Sustainable Development: Assessment of the Current Situation at the Faculty of Engineering of Notre Dame University--Louaize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Talal; Harb, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing need to incorporate educational sustainable development (ESD) principles into engineering education. This paper identifies engineering competencies within the Faculty of Engineering at Notre Dame University--Louaize and the means to shift towards sustainability. ESD tools are used to carry the analysis, keeping in mind the…

  6. Vaccination: Developing and implementing a competency-based-curriculum at the Medical Faculty of LMU Munich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogel, B.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Germany medical students should gain proficiency and specific skills in the vaccination field. Especially important is the efficient communication of scientific results about vaccinations to the community, in order to give professional counseling with a complete overview about therapeutic options.Aim of the project: The aim of this project is to set up a vaccination-related curriculum in the Medical Faculty at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich. The structure of the curriculum is based on the National catalogue for competency-based learning objectives in the field of vaccination (Nationaler Kompetenzbasierter Lernzielekatalog Medizin NKLM. Through this curriculum, the students will not only acquire the classical educational skills concerning vaccination in theory and practice, but they will also learn how to become independent in the decision-making process and counseling. Moreover, the students will become aware of consequences of action related to this specific topic.Methods: According to defined guidelines, an analysis was performed on courses, which are currently offered by the university. A separate analysis of the NKLM was carried out. Both analyses identified the active courses related to the topic of vaccination as well as the NKLM learning objectives. The match between the topics taught in current courses and the NKLM learning objectives identified gaps concerning the teaching of specific content. Courses were modified in order to implement the missing NKLM learning objectives.Results: These analyses identified 24 vaccination-related courses, which are currently taught at the University. Meanwhile, 35 learning objectives on vaccination were identified in the NKLM catalogue. Four of which were identified as not yet part of the teaching program. In summary, this interdisciplinary work enabled the development of a new vaccination-related curriculum, including 35 learning objectives, which are now implemented in

  7. Gateway to Quality: Online Professional Development for Family Childcare Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durden, Tonia; Mincemoyer, Claudia; Crandall, Leslie; Alviz, Kit; Garcia, Aileen

    2016-01-01

    High-quality family childcare (FCC) can positively influence all areas of a child's growth and development. Thus, it is important to invest in efforts to increase quality, including providing professional development to enhance the skills of those caring for children in their homes. This study explores the characteristics of FCC providers who…

  8. Understanding Emotional Development: Helping Early Childhood Providers Better Support Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Nicole Megan

    2012-01-01

    This article is intended to provide early childhood providers with a concise overview of emerging emotional development in young children (birth-5), the important role of primary caregivers, and the link between parenting, emotional development, and behavior. Specific suggestions that have been shared with urban Head Start mothers are offered,…

  9. Using a partnership between academic faculty and a physical therapist liaison to develop a framework for an evidence-based journal club: a discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Tricia M; Richter, Randy R; Frese, Tracy

    2009-12-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) in rehabilitation is increasingly recognized as important. Despite the importance of EBP, physical therapists' knowledge of EBP varies. Journal clubs have been used to educate clinicians about EBP. This discussion paper describes the partnership between academic faculty members and a physical therapist at a community hospital, and the process used to develop a framework to implement an evidence-based journal club. The partnership blended the expertise of academic faculty members and a physical therapist with knowledge of EBP who served as the liaison between members of the partnership team and the clinicians at the community hospital. The three-step framework developed enabled the clinicians to learn about critical appraisal, participate in guided practice of critical appraisal with the liaison, and lead critical appraisal of a paper with the assistance of the liaison as needed. This process could be easily replicated by other partnerships between academic faculty members and clinicians. Developing partnerships like the one described enables academicians to provide service to the profession, may enhance physical therapists' knowledge of the principles of EBP and may encourage EBP.

  10. Medical Teachers' Humanistic Perspective on Pedagogy: A New Starting Point for Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jenny; Yates, Lyn; McColl, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the perspectives on pedagogy held by medical teachers in hospitals. The teachers were interviewed after they had been observed in both clinical and classroom settings. The study showed the teachers' reliance on the relational aspects of pedagogy more than on technical pedagogical knowledge. Teachers referred to their aims and approaches as "interactive," but this does not refer to any deliberate pedagogical design or acts. Asking questions was the technique used most commonly but not always skillfully, and they cited influences from the past rather than the present or the future. This research suggests the pedagogic approach of these medical teachers is "humanistic." It emphasizes personal and interpersonal factors, meaningful learning, and the affective, as well as cognitive aspects of clinical knowledge. It also captures a commitment to nonthreatening, nonhumiliating environments. Acknowledgment of this particular pedagogical perspective, it is argued, could better connect the health professional teachers with the education and development missions of universities, professional bodies, and governments. The teachers' expressed values and goals offer a new starting point for faculty development. Their reliance on the relational over the technical and on their own biographical experience, could be more respectfully valued and addressed to advance a more productive balance with the technical pedagogical elements that often concern educationalists, researchers, and administrators.

  11. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars Program: An opportunity for junior nurse faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, Maren J.; Goodman, Janice H.; Thomas, Tami L.; Roberson, Donna

    2014-01-01

    The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program provides promising junior faculty extramural funding, expert mentoring, and the training needed to be successful in the academic role. The Nurse Faculty Scholars program, which admitted its first cohort in 2008, is designed to address the nursing faculty shortage by enhancing leadership, educational, and research skills in junior nursing faculty. This article provides an overview of the program, its purpose, and its eligibility requirements. The authors give strategies for selecting mentors, developing the written application, and preparing for an oral interview. Finally, the authors provide an analysis of funded institutions, research design and methods from current and recently funded projects, and rank and positions held by nursing mentors. PMID:22818282

  12. Research University STEM Faculty Members' Motivation to Engage in Teaching Professional Development: Building the Choir through an Appeal to Extrinsic Motivation and Ego

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwma-Gearhart, Jana

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative, grounded-theory-based study that explored the motivations of science and engineering faculty to engage in teaching professional development at a major research university. Faculty members were motivated to engage in teaching professional development due to extrinsic motivations, mainly a weakened professional…

  13. Lean Belt Certification: Pathway for Student, Resident, and Faculty Development and Scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elghouche, Alhasan N; Lobo, Brian C; Wannemuehler, Todd J; Johnson, Kimberly E; Matt, Bruce H; Woodward-Hagg, Heather K; Kokoska, Mimi S

    2016-05-01

    Since July 2013, 20 trainee participants have completed the quality improvement curriculum within the Indiana University Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, including 7 otolaryngology residents, 6 otolaryngology-bound medical students, and 7 psychiatry residents. Nine faculty and staff attended. Participants were highly satisfied with the quality and effectiveness of the program. Following program implementation, 2 otolaryngology residents and 2 medical students initiated their own quality improvement projects. Lean training directly resulted in oral and poster presentations at national conferences, journal publications, and institutional research and quality awards. Students completing the program established a local affiliate group of an international health care quality organization. Quality improvement training can be successfully incorporated into residency training with overwhelming program satisfaction and results in greater scholarly and professional development for motivated participants. The skillset acquired by participants leads to projects that improve patient care, increase value, and justify equipment and personnel retention and expansion. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  14. [A contribution to the needs assessment of faculty development measures in medical schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raupach, Tobias; Spering, Christopher; Bäumler, Christine; Burckhardt, Gerhard; Trümper, Lorenz; Pukrop, Tobias

    2009-11-15

    In addition to patient care and research activity, physicians working in medical school hospitals serve as teachers in undergraduate medical education. However, teaching qualifications of German university hospital physicians have not been studied in great detail. In January 2009, medical students as well as physicians involved in medical teaching at Göttingen Medical School, Germany, were invited to complete an online survey addressing their views on clinical teachers' educational skills. In addition, physicians' motivation to engage in pedagogical training was assessed. During a 12-day period, 359 students and 126 physicians involved in undergraduate medical education completed the survey. The latter did not feel well prepared for their teaching activities. At the same time, they expressed the willingness to improve their teaching skills. Students felt that, across all instructional methods, teachers would benefit from teacher training programs. In order to improve undergraduate education for future physicians, politicians and local representatives alike must set the scene for the implementation of faculty development measures in German medical schools.

  15. Guiding curriculum development of a national research training program in thrombosis medicine: A needs assessment involving faculty and trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeith, Leslie; Carrier, Marc; Shivakumar, Sudeep; Langlois, Nicole; Le Gal, Gregoire; Harris, Ilene; Gonsalves, Carol

    2018-02-01

    Several barriers exist for training and retention of clinician scientists, including difficulty in navigating research-related tasks in the workplace and insufficient mentorship. Our aim was to identify what core research knowledge and skills are important for the success of clinician scientists in thrombosis research, and trainees' perceived confidence in those skills, in order to develop a targeted educational intervention. A pre-tested online survey was administered to trainees and research faculty of the Canadian thrombosis research network, CanVECTOR, between September 2016 and June 2017. The importance (research faculty) and confidence (trainees) of 45 research knowledge/skills were measured using a 5-point Likert scale. The survey response rate was 49% (28/57) for research faculty and 100% (10/10) for trainees. All research faculty rated developing a good research question, grant writing and writing strategies for successful publication as 'very' or 'extremely' important for trainees to learn to better transition in becoming independent researchers. Other important areas included practical aspects of research. A qualitative thematic analysis of open text responses identified 'time management' and 'leadership and teamwork' as additional important research skills. Confidence reported for each topic varied across trainees. There were three research knowledge and/or skills that ≥75% of research faculty deemed highly important and ≥50% of trainees reported lacking confidence in: grant writing, the peer-review grant process, and knowledge translation strategies. Developing a good research question, communicating research ideas and results and the practical aspects of research are important areas to focus future efforts in thrombosis research training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Faculty development initiatives designed to promote leadership in medical education. A BEME systematic review: BEME Guide No. 19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Yvonne; Naismith, Laura; Mann, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Due to the increasing complexity of medical education and practice, the preparation of healthcare professionals for leadership roles and responsibilities has become increasingly important. To date, the literature on faculty development designed to promote leadership in medical education has not been reviewed in a systematic fashion. The objective of this review is to synthesize the existing evidence that addresses the following question: 'What are the effects of faculty development interventions designed to improve leadership abilities on the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of faculty members in medicine and on the institutions in which they work?' The search, which covered the period 1980-2009, included six databases (Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, ERIC, and ABI/Inform) and used the following keywords: faculty development; in-service training; doctor; medic; physician; faculty; leadership; management; administration; executive; and change agent. Hand searches were also conducted, and expert recommendations were solicited. Articles with a focus on faculty development to improve leadership, targeting basic science and clinical faculty members, were reviewed. All study designs that included outcome data beyond participant satisfaction were examined. From an initial 687 unique records, 48 articles met the review criteria in three broad categories: (1) reports in which leadership was the primary focus of the intervention; (2) reports in which leadership was a component of a broader focus on educational development; and (3) reports in which leadership was a component of a broader focus on academic career development. Data were extracted by three coders using the standardized Best Evidence Medical Education coding sheet adapted for our use. One reviewer coded all of the articles, and two reviewers each coded half of the dataset. Coding differences were resolved through discussion. Data were synthesized using Kirkpatrick's four levels of educational outcomes

  17. ASSESSMENT OF A MULTINATIONAL ONLINE FACULTY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ON ONLINE TEACHING: REFLECTIONS OF CANDIDATE E-TUTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muge ADNAN

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Teaching online requires different skills, roles and competencies for online instructors compared to teaching in traditional learning environments. Universities should offer ongoing support in various forms to help academic staff through their online journey. This paper provides insights into a multinational faculty development program for teaching online, elaborating on results of expectancy and satisfaction surveys. From a local program to a subproject within the Swiss National Science Foundation Project Scopes, e-Tutor aimed at expanding competencies in online lecturing and providing OER material for training colleagues. Designed in the form of a descriptive case study, this research was conducted with 34 attendees of e-Tutor. Data was collected using an e-learning readiness and expectancy questionnaire, and open-ended questions after the program to measure satisfaction. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the survey data and content analysis for open-ended data. Participants considered e-Tutor a well-planned and targeted program with good theoretical and practical balance. Duration of such courses, opportunities for adaptation to real-life situations, and localization of the content are areas to be explored further. For future studies, it would also be interesting to see whether participants can apply their newly acquired knowledge and skills to create efficient online learning environments.

  18. Use of critical incidents to develop a rating form for resident evaluation of faculty teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Cynthia; Novielli, Karen; Paskin, David; Brigham, Timothy; Kairys, John; Kane, Gregory; Veloski, Jon

    2006-12-01

    Monitoring the teaching effectiveness of attending physicians is important to enhancing the quality of graduate medical education. We used a critical incident technique with 35 residents representing a cross-section of programmes in a teaching hospital to develop a 23-item rating form. We obtained ratings of 11 attending physicians in internal medicine and general surgery from 54 residents. We performed linear and logistic regression analysis to relate the items on the form to the residents' overall ratings of the attending physicians and the programme directors' ratings of the attending physicians. The residents rated the attending physicians highly in most areas, but lower in provision of feedback, clarity of written communication and cost-effectiveness in making clinical decisions. When we used the residents' overall ratings as the criterion, the most important aspects of attending physicians' teaching were clarity of written communication, cost-effectiveness, commitment of time and energy and whether the resident would refer a family member or friend to the physician. When we used the programme directors' ratings as the criterion, the additional important aspects of performance were concern for the residents' professional well-being, knowledge of the literature and the delivery of clear verbal and written communication. The critical incident technique can be used to develop an instrument that demonstrates content and construct validity. We found that residents consider commitment of time to teaching and clinical effectiveness to be the most important dimensions of faculty teaching. Other important dimensions include written and verbal communication, cost-effectiveness and concern for residents' professional development.

  19. Role of Faculty Development Forums in Virtual Teaching Environment: A Case Study of Marketing Research & Case Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwan Saleem Sandhu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The online learning has broadened the teaching spectrum from Face-to-Face to virtual environment, and this move has brought traditional teacher-centered instruction to learner-centered instruction. This paradigm shift appears to place demands on faculty to modify faculty’s instruction roles that are different from those encountered in Face-to-Face teaching. This study explores the role of faculty development forum in improving the virtual teaching skills of academic staff members in an online university. The study has used single holistic case study approach, and the data from nine respondents have been collected through an interview schedule divided into four sections of 1 Basic Information, 2 Presentation Skills, 3 Subject Knowledge and 4 Research Orientation as per the objectives of the study. It can be theorized from the findings of the study that in virtual environments where faculty members lack the learning opportunities and exposure available in the conventional environments such forums prove to be very effective in capacity building of the faculty.

  20. Identification and Development of Items Comprising Organizational Citizenship Behaviors Among Pharmacy Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desselle, Shane P; Semsick, Gretchen R

    2016-12-25

    Objective. Identify behaviors that can compose a measure of organizational citizenship by pharmacy faculty. Methods. A four-round, modified Delphi procedure using open-ended questions (Round 1) was conducted with 13 panelists from pharmacy academia. The items generated were evaluated and refined for inclusion in subsequent rounds. A consensus was reached after completing four rounds. Results. The panel produced a set of 26 items indicative of extra-role behaviors by faculty colleagues considered to compose a measure of citizenship, which is an expressed manifestation of collegiality. Conclusions. The items generated require testing for validation and reliability in a large sample to create a measure of organizational citizenship. Even prior to doing so, the list of items can serve as a resource for mentorship of junior and senior faculty alike.

  1. Identification and Development of Items Comprising Organizational Citizenship Behaviors Among Pharmacy Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semsick, Gretchen R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Identify behaviors that can compose a measure of organizational citizenship by pharmacy faculty. Methods. A four-round, modified Delphi procedure using open-ended questions (Round 1) was conducted with 13 panelists from pharmacy academia. The items generated were evaluated and refined for inclusion in subsequent rounds. A consensus was reached after completing four rounds. Results. The panel produced a set of 26 items indicative of extra-role behaviors by faculty colleagues considered to compose a measure of citizenship, which is an expressed manifestation of collegiality. Conclusions. The items generated require testing for validation and reliability in a large sample to create a measure of organizational citizenship. Even prior to doing so, the list of items can serve as a resource for mentorship of junior and senior faculty alike. PMID:28179717

  2. An analysis of zoo and aquarium provided teacher professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubarek-Sandor, Joy

    Informal science institutions are a significant provider of science teacher professional development. As pressure continues to critically analyze the work of teachers and their effectiveness in the classroom, it is important to understand how informal science institutions contribute to effective change in teacher science content knowledge and pedagogy. This research study analyzed zoo and aquarium provided teacher professional development to respond to the research questions: How do zoos and aquaria determine and assess their goals for teacher professional development? How do these goals align with effective teacher change for science content knowledge and pedagogy? Theoretical frameworks for high quality teacher professional development, effective evaluation of teacher professional development, and learning in informal science settings guided the research. The sample for the study was AZA accredited zoos and aquariums providing teacher professional development (N=107). Data collection consisted of an online questionnaire, follow-up interviews, and content analysis of teacher professional development artifacts. Analysis revealed that by and large zoos and aquariums are lacking in their provision of science teacher professional development. Most professional development focuses on content or resources, neglecting pedagogy. Assessments mismatch the goals and rely heavily on self-report and satisfaction measures. The results demonstrate a marked difference between those zoos and aquariums that are larger in capacity versus those that are medium to small in size. This may be an area of research for the future, as well as analyzing the education resources produced by zoos and aquariums as these were emphasized heavily as a way they serve teachers.

  3. The effect of a bidirectional exchange on faculty and institutional development in a global health collaboration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin E Bodnar

    Full Text Available The MUYU Collaboration is a partnership between Mulago Hospital-Makerere University College of Health Sciences (M-MakCHS, in Kampala, Uganda, and the Yale University School of Medicine. The program allows Ugandan junior faculty to receive up to 1 year of subspecialty training within the Yale hospital system. The authors performed a qualitative study to assess the effects of this program on participants, as well as on M-MakCHS as an institution.Data was collected via semi-structured interviews with exchange participants. Eight participants (67% of those eligible as of 4/2012 completed interviews. Study authors performed data analysis using standard qualitative data analysis techniques.Analysis revealed themes addressing the benefits, difficulties, and opportunities for improvement of the program. Interviewees described the main benefit of the program as its effect on their fund of knowledge. Participants also described positive effects on their clinical practice and on medical education at M-MakCHS. Most respondents cited financial issues as the primary difficulty of participation. Post-participation difficulties included resource limitations and confronting longstanding institutional and cultural habits. Suggestions for programmatic improvement included expansion of the program, ensuring appropriate management of pre-departure expectations, and refinement of program mentoring structures. Participants also voiced interest in expanding post-exchange programming to ensure both the use of and the maintenance of new capacity.The MUYU Collaboration has benefitted both program participants and M-MakCHS, though these benefits remain difficult to quantify. This study supports the assertion that resource-poor to resource-rich exchanges have the potential to provide significant benefits to the resource-poor partner.

  4. Connection between Organizational Culture and Development of Achievement Motive of Students of the Faculty of Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubulj, Milan; Arsenijevi, Olja; Simic, Jelena

    2011-01-01

    The authors of this paper are engaged in studying the organizational culture and achievement motive, by carrying out their studies among the students of the Faculty of Management in Novi Sad, AP Vojvodina, Serbia. The problem of this paper's research was set by the question: is there a connection of a dominantly present organizational culture and…

  5. Developing Humanities Collections in the Digital Age: Exploring Humanities Faculty Engagement with Electronic and Print Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachaluba, Sarah Buck; Brady, Jessica Evans; Critten, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This article is based on quantitative and qualitative research examining humanities scholars' understandings of the advantages and disadvantages of print versus electronic information resources. It explores how humanities' faculty members at Florida State University (FSU) use print and electronic resources, as well as how they perceive these…

  6. Research Faculty Development: An Historical Perspective and Ideas for a Successful Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutkiewicz, Randy R.

    2012-01-01

    What does it take to be successful as a tenure-track research faculty member in a School of Medicine? What are the elements necessary to run a successful laboratory? How does one find the resources and help to know what is important for promotion and tenure? Most training in graduate school or in clinical fellowships does not answer these…

  7. A Faculty Development Program for Change and Growth. [and] Leadership Institute for Continuing Professional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Daniel W.; Queeney, Donna S.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the Nebraska University Program for Renewal of Faculty is to foster systematic, planned change benefiting the individual and the institution. Penn State and Harvard Universities initiated the Leadership Institute for Continuing Professional Education to enable participants to discuss issues common to professional continuing…

  8. Developing Effective Guidelines for Faculty Teaching First-Year University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Irene; Leslie, Donald; Moore, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    First-year university students are a diverse group of individuals with various abilities and needs. Failure of the university and its teaching faculty to meet the needs of first-year students may result in abandonment of the pursuit of a degree. This project informs instructors about the practices that strengthen a learning-centred approach and…

  9. On Doctoral Student Development: Exploring Faculty Mentoring in the Shaping of African American Doctoral Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the influence of faculty mentorship in the shaping of African American doctoral student success. A case analysis framework is used to investigate the belief systems that doctoral students held about their doctoral experience. Data collection involved a one-phase semi-structured interview protocol used to gather information…

  10. Faculty Internships for Hospitality Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Christine; Hales, Jonathan A; Wiener, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Internships can help hospitality faculty build industry relationships while also ensuring the best and most current training for their students. Many hospitality organizations have structured faculty internships available or are willing to work with faculty to provide individualized internship opportunities. Career and technical educators in…

  11. The lived experience of part-time baccalaureate nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazza, Elizabeth A; Shellenbarger, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Hiring part-time nursing faculty may impact students, faculty careers, and the institution. Yet, little has been studied, particularly in nursing, regarding the experiences of these faculty. This hermeneutic phenomenological study seeks to understand the lived experience of being a part-time faculty member in a baccalaureate nursing program. Through purposive and snowball sampling, nine nursing faculty in part-time positions in northeastern baccalaureate nursing programs participated in in-depth personal interviews. Four themes were uncovered during data analysis, including achieving the dream, a group divided, for the love of the students, and jump in and figure it out. Results of the study seem to indicate that the experience of being a part-time faculty differs in several ways from being a full-time faculty. Understanding part-time faculty experiences provides insight into faculty needs, issues, and concerns while facilitating the development of research-based recruitment and retention strategies. Recommendations for those involved in nursing education, including nursing faculty and administrators, are provided. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of a system to provide diagnostics-while-drilling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, Jack LeRoy; Jacobson, Ronald David; Finger, John Travis; Mansure, Arthur James; Knudsen, Steven Dell

    2003-06-01

    This report describes development of a system that provides high-speed, real-time downhole data while drilling. Background of the project, its benefits, major technical challenges, test planning, and test results are covered by relatively brief descriptions in the body of the report, with some topics presented in more detail in the attached appendices.

  13. Can Tablet Computers Enhance Faculty Teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Aditee P; Whicker, Shari A; Benjamin, Robert W; Hawley, Jeffrey; McGann, Kathleen A

    2015-06-01

    Learner benefits of tablet computer use have been demonstrated, yet there is little evidence regarding faculty tablet use for teaching. Our study sought to determine if supplying faculty with tablet computers and peer mentoring provided benefits to learners and faculty beyond that of non-tablet-based teaching modalities. We provided faculty with tablet computers and three 2-hour peer-mentoring workshops on tablet-based teaching. Faculty used tablets to teach, in addition to their current, non-tablet-based methods. Presurveys, postsurveys, and monthly faculty surveys assessed feasibility, utilization, and comparisons to current modalities. Learner surveys assessed perceived effectiveness and comparisons to current modalities. All feedback received from open-ended questions was reviewed by the authors and organized into categories. Of 15 eligible faculty, 14 participated. Each participant attended at least 2 of the 3 workshops, with 10 to 12 participants at each workshop. All participants found the workshops useful, and reported that the new tablet-based teaching modality added value beyond that of current teaching methods. Respondents developed the following tablet-based outputs: presentations, photo galleries, evaluation tools, and online modules. Of the outputs, 60% were used in the ambulatory clinics, 33% in intensive care unit bedside teaching rounds, and 7% in inpatient medical unit bedside teaching rounds. Learners reported that common benefits of tablet computers were: improved access/convenience (41%), improved interactive learning (38%), and improved bedside teaching and patient care (13%). A common barrier faculty identified was inconsistent wireless access (14%), while no barriers were identified by the majority of learners. Providing faculty with tablet computers and having peer-mentoring workshops to discuss their use was feasible and added value.

  14. How do social networks and faculty development courses affect clinical supervisors' adoption of a medical education innovation? An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jippes, Erik; Steinert, Yvonne; Pols, Jan; Achterkamp, Marjolein C; van Engelen, Jo M L; Brand, Paul L P

    2013-03-01

    To examine the impact of social networks and a two-day faculty development course on clinical supervisors' adoption of an educational innovation. During 2007-2010, 571 residents and 613 clinical supervisors in four specialties in the Netherlands were invited to complete a Web-based questionnaire. Residents rated their clinical supervisors' adoption of an educational innovation, the use of structured and constructive (S&C) feedback. Clinical supervisors self-assessed their adoption of this innovation and rated their communication intensity with other clinical supervisors in their department. For each supervisor, a centrality score was calculated, representing the extent to which the supervisor was connected to departmental colleagues. The authors analyzed the effects of supervisor centrality and participation in a two-day Teach-the-Teacher course on the degree of innovation adoption using hierarchical linear modeling, adjusting for age, gender, and attitude toward the S&C feedback innovation. Respondents included 370 (60%) supervisors and 357 (63%) residents. Although Teach-the-Teacher course participation (n=172; 46.5%) was significantly related to supervisors' self-assessments of adoption (P=.001), it had no effect on residents' assessments of supervisors' adoption (P=.371). Supervisor centrality was significantly related to innovation adoption in both residents' assessments (P=.023) and supervisors' self-assessments (P=.024). A clinical supervisor's social network may be as important as faculty development course participation in determining whether the supervisor adopts an educational innovation. Faculty development initiatives should use faculty members' social networks to improve the adoption of educational innovations and help build and maintain communities of practice.

  15. Development of a Mobile App for Family Planning Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsall, Viannella; Rogers, Jennifer; Witt, Jacki; Song, Sejun; Nguyen, Hoang Duc Huy; Kelly, Patricia

    To provide an overview of lessons learned during the development process of an app for iOS and Android based on national recommendations for providing quality family planning services. After a review of existing apps was conducted to determine whether an app of clinical recommendations for family planning existed, a team of clinicians, training specialists, and app developers created a resource app by first drafting a comprehensive content map. A prototype of the app was then pilot tested using smart tablets by a volunteer convenience sample of women's healthcare professionals. Outcomes measured included usability, acceptability, download analytics, and satisfaction by clinicians as reported through an investigator-developed tool. Sixty-nine professionals tested a prototype of the app, and completed a user satisfaction tool. Overall, user feedback was positive, and a zoom function was added to the final version as a result of the pilot test. Within 3 months of being publicly available, the app was downloaded 677 times, with 97% of downloads occurring on smart phones, 76% downloads occurring on iOS devices, and 24% on Android devices. This trend persisted throughout the following 3 months. Clinicians with an interest in developing an app should consider a team approach to development, pilot test the app prior to wider distribution, and develop a web-based version of the app to be used by clinicians who are unable to access smart devices in their practice setting.

  16. The Relationship between Management, Career Planning and Career Development of Medical and Non-medical Faculty Members of Kohgiluyeh and Boyerahmad Province, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    G Sajjadikhah; S Salajegheh

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background & aim: There are many mechanisms for the development of human resources, which career development is one of its central components. The aim of this study was to determine the factors related to career development faculty members (Medical and Non-medical) of Kohgiluyeh and Boyer-Ahmad province, Iran. Methods: The present paper was a cross-sectional, descriptive correlation method study.  The study population consisted of 535 faculty members (medical, govern...

  17. An Investigation of Faculty Perceptions of the Use of a Student Evaluation of Faculty Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulgham, Julie Cordell

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the faculty perception of the use of a student evaluation of faculty instrument. The areas considered were use of the current Student Evaluation of Faculty (SEF) instrument to measure teaching effectiveness; use of the current instrument for annual faculty review; faculty involvement in developing the instrument; utilizing…

  18. Factors that affect implementation of web-based faculty evaluation forms: residents' perspectives from a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, S H; Ali, S K; Sadaf, S

    2010-08-01

    A web-based evaluation system for residents to provide feedback on faculty was piloted in four training programs at the Aga Khan University prior to institution-wide implementation. Of the four programs, less than 50% of forms were submitted by residents of three programs while more than 70% of forms were submitted by the residents of one program. This study was conducted to identify reasons for the varying participation rates of the four programs with a view to improving the system. A qualitative approach was employed using focus group discussions (FGDs). Volunteers were invited and three groups of eight to ten residents each were formed. Participants for FGDs were selected from all residency years. FGDs were used to identify residents' perceptions regarding the web-based faculty evaluation system and to identify residents' problems and concerns with completing the web-based faculty evaluating forms. Technical issues in completing and submitting the forms online were identified to be the main deterrents to completing the evaluation forms. Non-accessibility of a resource person for resolving technical problems with the software and the burden of taking time out to complete the forms were considered as limiting factors by many residents. Residents recommended a focused orientation session to the new system within the departments. Residents' confidence and support are key to promoting adequate participation in web-based evaluations. Focused orientation sessions, reinforcement, reminders, assurances of confidentiality, and removal of technical glitches should help to improve resident participation.

  19. Physics and Astronomy New Faculty Workshops: 20 Years of Workshops and 2000 Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilborn, Robert

    Most college and university new faculty members start their teaching careers with almost no formal training in pedagogy. To address this issue, the American Association of Physics Teachers, the American Astronomical Society, and the American Physical Society have been offering since 1996 workshops for physics and astronomy new faculty members (and in recent years for experienced faculty members as well). The workshops introduce faculty members to a variety of interactive engagement teaching (IET) methods and the evidence for their effectiveness, embedded in a framework of general professional development. Currently the workshops engage about 50% of the new tenure-track hires in physics and astronomy. The workshops are quite successful in making the participants aware of IET methods and motivating them to implement them in their classes. However, about 1/3 of the participants stop using IET methods within a year or two. The faculty members cite (a) lack of time and energy to change, (b) content coverage concerns, and (c) difficulty getting students engaged as reasons for their discontinuance. To help overcome these barriers, we have introduced faculty online learning communities (FOLCs). The FOLCs provide peer support and advice through webinars and coaching from more experienced faculty members. Recommendations based on the workshops and the experiences of the participants can enhance the teaching effectiveness of future physics and astronomy faculty members. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant 1431638.

  20. Commentary: Racism and Bias in Health Professions Education: How Educators, Faculty Developers, and Researchers Can Make a Difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karani, Reena; Varpio, Lara; May, Win; Horsley, Tanya; Chenault, John; Miller, Karen Hughes; O'Brien, Bridget

    2017-11-01

    The Research in Medical Education (RIME) Program Planning Committee is committed to advancing scholarship in and promoting dialogue about the critical issues of racism and bias in health professions education (HPE). From the call for studies focused on underrepresented learners and faculty in medicine to the invited 2016 RIME plenary address by Dr. Camara Jones, the committee strongly believes that dismantling racism is critical to the future of HPE.The evidence is glaring: Dramatic racial and ethnic health disparities persist in the United States, people of color remain deeply underrepresented in medical school and academic health systems as faculty, learner experiences across the medical education continuum are fraught with bias, and current approaches to teaching perpetuate stereotypes and insufficiently challenge structural inequities. To achieve racial justice in HPE, academic medicine must commit to leveraging positions of influence and contributing from these positions. In this Commentary, the authors consider three roles (educator, faculty developer, and researcher) represented by the community of scholars and pose potential research questions as well as suggestions for advancing educational research relevant to eliminating racism and bias in HPE.

  1. Analysis of educational research at a medical faculty in Germany and suggestions for strategic development – a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prediger, Sarah; Harendza, Sigrid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evidence-based medical education is playing an increasingly important role in the choice of didactic methods and the development of medical curricula and assessments. In Germany, a growing number of educational research projects has accompanied an ongoing change in the medical education process. The aim of this project was to assess medical education research activities at one medical faculty to develop procedural recommendations for the support and development of best evidence medical education. Methods: Using a newly developed online questionnaire, the 65 institutes and departments of the medical faculty of Hamburg University at Hamburg University Medical-Center (UKE) were asked to report their medical education research and service projects, medical education publications, medical education theses, financial support for educational projects, and supportive structures that they would consider helpful in the future. The data were grouped, and a SWOT analysis was performed. Results: In total, 60 scientists who were involved in 112 medical education research publications between 1998 and 2014 were identified at the UKE. Twenty-five of them had published at least one manuscript as first or last author. Thirty-three UKE institutions were involved in educational service or research projects at the time of the study, and 75.8% of them received internal or external funding. Regular educational research meetings and the acquisition of co-operation partners were mentioned most frequently as beneficial supportive structures for the future. Conclusion: An analysis to define the status quo of medical education research at a medical faculty seems to be a helpful first step for the development of a strategy and structure to further support researchers in medical education. PMID:27990467

  2. Analysis of educational research at a medical faculty in Germany and suggestions for strategic development - a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prediger, Sarah; Harendza, Sigrid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evidence-based medical education is playing an increasingly important role in the choice of didactic methods and the development of medical curricula and assessments. In Germany, a growing number of educational research projects has accompanied an ongoing change in the medical education process. The aim of this project was to assess medical education research activities at one medical faculty to develop procedural recommendations for the support and development of best evidence medical education. Methods: Using a newly developed online questionnaire, the 65 institutes and departments of the medical faculty of Hamburg University at Hamburg University Medical-Center (UKE) were asked to report their medical education research and service projects, medical education publications, medical education theses, financial support for educational projects, and supportive structures that they would consider helpful in the future. The data were grouped, and a SWOT analysis was performed. Results: In total, 60 scientists who were involved in 112 medical education research publications between 1998 and 2014 were identified at the UKE. Twenty-five of them had published at least one manuscript as first or last author. Thirty-three UKE institutions were involved in educational service or research projects at the time of the study, and 75.8% of them received internal or external funding. Regular educational research meetings and the acquisition of co-operation partners were mentioned most frequently as beneficial supportive structures for the future. Conclusion: An analysis to define the status quo of medical education research at a medical faculty seems to be a helpful first step for the development of a strategy and structure to further support researchers in medical education.

  3. Provider Opinions Regarding the Development of a Stigma-Reduction Intervention Tailored for Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Dinesh; Corrigan, Patrick; Drummond, Karen L.; Porchia, Sylvia; Sullivan, Greer

    2016-01-01

    Interventions involving contact with a person who has recovered from mental illness are most effective at reducing stigma. This study sought input from health care providers to inform the design of a contact intervention intended to reduce provider stigma toward persons with serious mental illness. Using a purposive sampling strategy, data were…

  4. Ecological marketing as instrument of steady development providing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Zamula

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic influence upon environment and its results cause ecological disbalance of a natural system, destroy of biological connection between a human being and nature. That’s why it’s necessary to protect environment from pollution. To realize this task we have to involve some economical sciences as well. Consequently, our researches are directed to the determination of the place of ecological marketing so that an enterprise could reach the principles of the concept of steady development through the harmonization of interests of producers of goods concerning to the receiving of desirable income amount, consumers concerning to satisfaction of their needs and a society as a whole about reaching a steady development. The article determines the tasks of ecological marketing as an instrument for providing the realization of principles of the steady development concept paying special attention to its constituents such as economical, ecological, and social. The author determines the advantages of implementation of the ecological marketing which allows to get definite competitive advantages at the market and create a positive image of its trade mark and its produce among customers. It is proved that the maximum synthesis of interests of economics and ecology is one of the ways of biosphere protection and reaching a steady development of all the countries and a society as a whole.

  5. Supporting Faculty Development in Hospital Medicine: Design and Implementation of a Personalized Structured Mentoring Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarur, Amulya; O'Neill, Regina M; Lawton, Donna; Greenwald, Jeffrey L

    2018-02-01

    The guidance of a mentor can have a tremendous influence on the careers of academic physicians. The lack of mentorship in the relatively young field of hospital medicine has been documented, but the efficacy of formalized mentorship programs has not been well studied. We implemented and evaluated a structured mentorship program for junior faculty at a large academic medical center. Of the 16 mentees who participated in the mentorship program, 14 (88%) completed preintervention surveys and 10 (63%) completed postintervention surveys. After completing the program, there was a statistically significant improvement in overall satisfaction within 5 specific domains: career planning, professional connectedness, self-reflection, research skills, and mentoring skills. All mentees reported that they would recommend that all hospital medicine faculty participate in similar mentorship programs. In this small, single-center pilot study, we found that the addition of a structured mentorship program based on training sessions that focus on best practices in mentoring was feasible and led to increased satisfaction in certain career domains among early-career hospitalists. Larger prospective studies with a longer follow-up are needed to assess the generalizability and durability of our findings. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  6. Marketing faculty of Bucharest Economic Studies University: historic landmarks, present and future developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Călin Petrică Vegheş

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to present the main events that left their mark on the history and evolution of the Marketing Faculty of Bucharest Economic Studies University, an academic body that this will mark its 10th anniversary this fall. As the only school dedicated exclusively to the study of marketing in Romania, as well as one of the few exclusively marketing schools in Europe, the history of the Marketing Department and, subsequently, of the Marketing Faculty overlaps in the last four decades with that of Romanian marketing higher education, as well as with the graduate transformation of Romania’s economy to a post-industrial, information-based and customer centric economy. Part of Economic Sciences domain, marketing contains a set of concepts, tools, methods and techniques through which the organization, irrespective of its profile, analyzes the environment where it lives (marketing research, sets goals and strategies to be achieved (strategic marketing planning, design and execute operational activities (marketing programs in order to maximize profits and to satisfy customer’s and society’s needs at the required level. Marketing as a strategic and operational area, captures the interest of Romanian managers and specialists of international organizations, being a source of competitive advantage and positioning of the company and its portfolio brands, in the mind and soul of current and potential customers

  7. Global faculty development: lessons learned from the Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research (FAIMER) initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, William P

    2014-08-01

    Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research (FAIMER) faculty development programs have operated since 2001 and are designed to overcome many of the challenges inherent in global health collaborations, including alignment with local needs, avoiding persistent dependency, and development of trust. FAIMER fellowship programs, developed for midcareer faculty members in all health professions from around the world, share goals of strengthening knowledge and skills in education leadership, education methods, and project management and evaluation. Building community is another explicit goal that allows participants to support and learn from each other.The author recommends several practices for successful international collaborations based on 13 years of experience with FAIMER fellowships. These include using authentic education projects to maintain alignment with local needs and apply newly acquired knowledge and skills, teaching leadership across cultures with careful communication and adaptation of concepts to local environments, cultivating a strong field of health professions education to promote diffusion of ideas and advocate for policy change, intentionally promoting field development and leadership to reduce dependency, giving generously of time and resources, learning from others as much as teaching others, and recognizing that effective partnerships revolve around personal relationships to build trust. These strategies have enabled the FAIMER fellowship programs to stay aligned with local needs, reduce dependency, and maintain trust.

  8. Development of a Web-Based Indoor Navigation System Using an Accelerometer and Gyroscope: A Case Study at The Faculty of Natural Sciences of Comenius University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štefanička, Tomáš; Ďuračiová, Renata; Seres, Csaba

    2017-12-01

    As a complex of buildings, the Faculty of Natural Sciences of the Comenius University in Bratislava tends to be difficult to navigate in spite of its size. An indoor navigation application could potentially save a lot of time and frustration. There are currently numerous technologies used in indoor navigation systems. Some of them focus on a high degree of precision and require significant financial investment; others provide only static information about a current location. In this paper we focused on the determination of an approximate location using inertial measurement systems available on most smartphones, i.e., a gyroscope and an accelerometer. The actual position of the device was calculated using "a walk detection method" based on a delayed lack of motion. We have developed an indoor navigation application that relies solely on open source JavaScript libraries to visualize the interior of the building and calculate the shortest path utilizing Dijsktra's routing algorithm. The application logic is located on the client side, so the software is able to work offline. Our solution represents an accessible lowcost and platform-independent web application that can significantly improve navigation at the Faculty of Natural Sciences. Although our application has been developed on a specific building complex, it could be used in other interiors as well.

  9. Stress and strain provide positional and directional cues in development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behruz Bozorg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The morphogenesis of organs necessarily involves mechanical interactions and changes in mechanical properties of a tissue. A long standing question is how such changes are directed on a cellular scale while being coordinated at a tissular scale. Growing evidence suggests that mechanical cues are participating in the control of growth and morphogenesis during development. We introduce a mechanical model that represents the deposition of cellulose fibers in primary plant walls. In the model both the degree of material anisotropy and the anisotropy direction are regulated by stress anisotropy. We show that the finite element shell model and the simpler triangular biquadratic springs approach provide equally adequate descriptions of cell mechanics in tissue pressure simulations of the epidermis. In a growing organ, where circumferentially organized fibers act as a main controller of longitudinal growth, we show that the fiber direction can be correlated with both the maximal stress direction and the direction orthogonal to the maximal strain direction. However, when dynamic updates of the fiber direction are introduced, the mechanical stress provides a robust directional cue for the circumferential organization of the fibers, whereas the orthogonal to maximal strain model leads to an unstable situation where the fibers reorient longitudinally. Our investigation of the more complex shape and growth patterns in the shoot apical meristem where new organs are initiated shows that a stress based feedback on fiber directions is capable of reproducing the main features of in vivo cellulose fiber directions, deformations and material properties in different regions of the shoot. In particular, we show that this purely mechanical model can create radially distinct regions such that cells expand slowly and isotropically in the central zone while cells at the periphery expand more quickly and in the radial direction, which is a well established growth pattern

  10. Stress and strain provide positional and directional cues in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorg, Behruz; Krupinski, Pawel; Jönsson, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The morphogenesis of organs necessarily involves mechanical interactions and changes in mechanical properties of a tissue. A long standing question is how such changes are directed on a cellular scale while being coordinated at a tissular scale. Growing evidence suggests that mechanical cues are participating in the control of growth and morphogenesis during development. We introduce a mechanical model that represents the deposition of cellulose fibers in primary plant walls. In the model both the degree of material anisotropy and the anisotropy direction are regulated by stress anisotropy. We show that the finite element shell model and the simpler triangular biquadratic springs approach provide equally adequate descriptions of cell mechanics in tissue pressure simulations of the epidermis. In a growing organ, where circumferentially organized fibers act as a main controller of longitudinal growth, we show that the fiber direction can be correlated with both the maximal stress direction and the direction orthogonal to the maximal strain direction. However, when dynamic updates of the fiber direction are introduced, the mechanical stress provides a robust directional cue for the circumferential organization of the fibers, whereas the orthogonal to maximal strain model leads to an unstable situation where the fibers reorient longitudinally. Our investigation of the more complex shape and growth patterns in the shoot apical meristem where new organs are initiated shows that a stress based feedback on fiber directions is capable of reproducing the main features of in vivo cellulose fiber directions, deformations and material properties in different regions of the shoot. In particular, we show that this purely mechanical model can create radially distinct regions such that cells expand slowly and isotropically in the central zone while cells at the periphery expand more quickly and in the radial direction, which is a well established growth pattern in the meristem.

  11. Information technology - a tool for development of the teaching process at the faculty of medicine, university of sarajevo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Begic, Edin

    2015-04-01

    Information Technologies, taking slow steps, have found its application in the teaching process of Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo. Online availability of the teaching content is mainly intended for users of the Bologna process. The aim was to present the level of use of information technologies at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo, comparing two systems, old system and the Bologna process, and to present new ways of improving the teaching process, using information technology. The study included the period from 2012 to 2014, and included 365 students from the old system and the Bologna Process. Study had prospective character. Students of the old system are older than students of the Bologna process. In both systems higher number of female students is significantly present. All students have their own computers, usually using the Office software package and web browsers. Visits of social networks were the most common reason for which they used computers. On question if they know to work with databases, 14.6% of students of the old system responded positively and 26.2% of students of the Bologna process answered the same. Students feel that working with databases is necessary to work in primary health care. On the question of the degree of computerization at the university, there were significant differences between the two systems (p process were more interested in the introduction of information technology, than students of old system. 68.7% of students of the Bologna process of generation 2013-2014, and 71.3% of generation 2014-2015, believed that the subject of Medical Informatics, the same or similar name, should be included in the new reform teaching process of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo. Information technologies can help the development of the teaching process, and represent attractive and accessible tool in the process of modernization and progress.

  12. Lessons from Providing Professional Development in Remote Sensing for Community College Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Two-year colleges and Tribal colleges are important centers for workforce education and training. A professional development program funded by the National Science Foundation's Advanced Technological Education Program, 2007-2011 and 2012-2015, is providing the resources needed by instructors at those colleges to develop courses and programs in remote sensing. The highly successful program, "Integrated Geospatial Education and Technology Training-Remote Sensing (iGETT-RS)" will complete its currently funded work in May 2015. 76 instructors of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) from all over the country will have been served. Each of them will have spent 18 months on the project, participating in two Summer Institutes at NASA and USGS and in monthly webinars on science and technology of remote sensing. iGETT-RS participants have created their own exercises and "concept modules" for the classroom, and many have created new courses and new programs across the country. As the external evaluator for iGETT-RS expressed it, the impact on project participants can "only be described as transformational." Viewers of this presentation will learn about the iGETT-RS project design and approach; successes, failures and lessons learned by the staff; and how to access the workshop materials and participant-authored classroom resources. Viewers will also learn about the Geospatial Technology Competency Model at the US Department of Labor, and about specifications for the Remote Sensing Model Course recently developed by the National Geospatial Technology Center to provide invaluable frameworks for faculty, students, administrators and employers.

  13. The Development Of A Diagnostic Reading Test Of English For The Students Of Medical Faculty, Brawijaya University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indah Winarni

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a diagnostic test of multiple choice reading comprehension as an initial stage in developing teaching materials for medical students learning English. Sample texts were collected from all the departments in the faculty. Selection of relevant texts involved the participation of some subject lecturers. Sixty one items were developed from fifteen texts to be reduced to forty items after pilot testing. Face validity was improved. The main trial was carried out to twenty nine students and item analysis was carried out. The test showed low level of concurrent validity and the internal consistency showed a moderate level of reliability. The low level of concurrent validity was suspected to result from the test being too difficult for the testees as the item analysis had revealed.

  14. A mentor development program for clinical translational science faculty leads to sustained, improved confidence in mentoring skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Mitchell D; Steinauer, Jody E; Khalili, Mandana; Huang, Laurence; Kahn, James S; Lee, Kathryn A; Creasman, Jennifer; Brown, Jeanette S

    2012-08-01

    Mentorship is crucial for academic productivity and advancement for clinical and translational (CT) science faculty. However, little is known about the long-term effects of mentor training programs. The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), Clinical and Translational Science Institute launched a Mentor Development Program (MDP) in 2007 for CT faculty. We report on an evaluation of the first three cohorts of graduates from the MDP. In 2010, all Mentors in Training (MITs) who completed the MDP from 2007 to 2009 (n= 38) were asked to complete an evaluation of their mentoring skills and knowledge; all MITs (100%) completed the evaluation. Two-thirds of MDP graduates reported that they often apply knowledge, attitudes, or skills obtained in the MDP to their mentoring. Nearly all graduates (97%) considered being a mentor important to their career satisfaction. Graduates were also asked about the MDP's impact on specific mentoring skills; 95% agreed that the MDP helped them to become a better mentor and to focus their mentoring goals. We also describe a number of new initiatives to support mentoring at UCSF that have evolved from the MDP. To our knowledge, this is the first evaluation of the long-term impact of a mentor training program for CT researchers. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Faculty Work as Philanthropy or Philanthropy as Faculty Work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cagla Okten

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Employing Robert Payton’s (1988 definition of philanthropy, “Voluntary action for the public good” (p. 4, Faculty Work and the Public Good:  Philanthropy, Engagement, and Academic Professionalism offers a fresh look at faculty work as philanthropy. The purpose of this review essay is to provide a brief review of some of the key propositions in this book and to explore how faculty work as philanthropy may be understood in non-U.S. cultural contexts. We start our exploration of faculty work as philanthropy in non-U.S. contexts by examining this construct in the U.S. as presented by Faculty Work and the Public Good and by laying out key forces that it sets forth as shaping faculty work as philanthropic practice: institutional structure and employment frameworks, resource constraints, and discretionary constraints.

  16. Africa's Quest for Long-Term Development: Does NEPAD Provide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The formulation of the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD) in 2001 and its adoption by the African Union (AU) as the continent's blueprint policy document for development engendered a lot of optimism. This optimism resulted partly from the willingness of African governments to voluntarily undertake what the ...

  17. Providing Effective Professional Development: Lessons from the Eisenhower Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Andrew C.; Garet, Michael S.; Desimone, Laura M.; Birman, Beatrice F.

    2003-01-01

    Reports on two studies evaluating the effectiveness of the federal government's Eisenhower Professional Development Program. Describes high quality professional development of in-service teachers, changes in teaching practice, six key practices identified in literature, and the relationship between district policies and the quality of professional…

  18. Informative providing of processes of development on industrial enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Kalinichenko, L.

    2010-01-01

    Information is definite by the basic resource of activity of enterprises. Suggestion in relation to the selection of informative subsystems of strategic, tactical, operative management is borne. The list of indexes in relation to estimation of the informative providing of functional processes of enterprise is offered.

  19. High School Child Development Courses Provide a Valuable Apprenticeship

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCombie, Sally M.

    2009-01-01

    The current media are laden with reports of the many significant problems facing today's youth. In fact, parenting has become a national topic of discussion. Parenting instruction, a responsibility that had previously rested in the home, has become part of educational curricula. Courses in child development are offered for high school students in…

  20. Role of Faculty Development Forums in Virtual Teaching Environment: A Case Study of Marketing Research & Case Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Rizwan Saleem; Hussain, Sajid

    2016-01-01

    The online learning has broadened the teaching spectrum from Face-to-Face to virtual environment, and this move has brought traditional teacher-centered instruction to learner-centered instruction. This paradigm shift appears to place demands on faculty to modify faculty's instruction roles that are different from those encountered in Face-to-Face…

  1. Development of ethical practices and social responsibility in dental education at the university of Chile: student and faculty perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcota, M; Ruiz de Gauna, P; González, F E

    2013-02-01

    The authors argue that dental curricula in Latin America are noted for providing highly technical and individualistic training that may fail to address society's problems or instil in the dentist the idea that he/she has a social responsibility to contribute to his/her community. This study's main objectives were to determine whether the curriculum and the faculty teaching practices of the School of Dentistry at the University of Chile contribute to its students' commitment to ethical and social responsibility. This was a qualitative study that investigated the perceptions of sixteen subjects (eight students and eight faculty members). Data were collected in thorough deep interviews. The interview process model conceptualised and organised the information into sets of dimensions and categories. The dimensions studied were ethical commitment and social responsibility. The categories assessed within ethical commitment were honesty, tolerance, responsibility and respect. In the social responsibility dimension, the categories were solidarity, teamwork and concern for and communication with the patient. Analysis of the textual data was performed using a method of content analysis based upon constructed qualitative matrices. Our results show that students and scholars alike realise that ethical commitment and a sense of social responsibility are not promoted in the curriculum. They do, however, recognise the importance of these qualities in dental practitioners. These results indicate that the current curriculum and teaching practices used in our School of Dentistry need to be reviewed and that programmes promoting professionals' commitment to their role in society need to be implemented. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. The impact of a faculty development programme for health professions educators in sub-Saharan Africa: an archival study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, José M; Bezuidenhout, Juanita; Burch, Vanessa C; Mthembu, Sindi; Rowe, Michael; Tan, Christina; Van Wyk, Jacqueline; Van Heerden, Ben

    2015-03-03

    In 2008 the sub-Saharan FAIMER Regional Institute launched a faculty development programme aimed at enhancing the academic and research capacity of health professions educators working in sub-Saharan Africa. This two-year programme, a combination of residential and distance learning activities, focuses on developing the leadership, project management and programme evaluation skills of participants as well as teaching the key principles of health professions education-curriculum design, teaching and learning and assessment. Participants also gain first-hand research experience by designing and conducting an education innovation project in their home institutions. This study was conducted to determine the perceptions of participants regarding the personal and professional impact of the SAFRI programme. A retrospective document review, which included data about fellows who completed the programme between 2008 and 2011, was performed. Data included fellows' descriptions of their expectations, reflections on achievements and information shared on an online discussion forum. Data were analysed using Kirkpatrick's evaluation framework. Participants (n=61) came from 10 African countries and included a wide range of health professions educators. Five key themes about the impact of the SAFRI programme were identified: (1) belonging to a community of practice, (2) personal development, (3) professional development, (4) capacity development, and (5) tools/strategies for project management and/or advancement. The SAFRI programme has a positive developmental impact on both participants and their respective institutions.

  3. The Role of Financial Sector in Providing Sustainable Development Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokareva, G. F.; Shalina, O. I.; Barkova, E. E.

    2018-01-01

    The article contains the analysis of the current ecological situation in the Republic of Bashkortostan as an oil production region of Russia. It was emerged that the decrease in emissions from means of transport caused by change in the calculation methodology. The statistical data on environmental control costs and payments for the use of natural resources in the Russian Federation for the period from 2008 to 2016 years have been analyzed. The measures aimed to create favorable conditions for the sustainable social and economic development of the region have been determined. The authors proposed alternative sources of financing the environmental protection: the issuance of ecological («green») bonds and the attraction of ecological deposits to finance environment-oriented investment projects. The main significant investment directions of the funds, obtained due to the emission of domestic ecological loan bonds, corporate ecological bonds and concessional environment-oriented bonds have been identified.

  4. APA Summit on Medical Student Education Task Force on Informatics and Technology: Steps to Enhance the Use of Technology in Education through Faculty Development, Funding and Change Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Donald M.; Benjamin, Sheldon; Briscoe, Gregory; Hales, Deborah J.; Boland, Robert J.; Luo, John S.; Chan, Carlyle H.; Kennedy, Robert S.; Karlinsky, Harry; Gordon, Daniel B.; Yellowlees, Peter M.; Yager, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This article provides an overview of how trainees, faculty, and institutions use technology for acquiring knowledge, skills, and attitudes for practicing modern medicine. Method: The authors reviewed the literature on medical education, technology, and change, and identify the key themes and make recommendations for implementing…

  5. Meeting the Late-Career Needs of Faculty Transitioning Through Retirement: One Institution's Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Joanna M; Felice, Marianne E; Ockene, Judith K; Milner, Robert J; Congdon, John L; Tosi, Stephen; Thorndyke, Luanne E

    2018-03-01

    Medical school faculty are aging, but few academic health centers are adequately prepared with policies, programs, and resources (PPR) to assist late-career faculty. The authors sought to examine cultural barriers to successful retirement and create alignment between individual and institutional needs and tasks through PPR that embrace the contributions of senior faculty while enabling retirement transitions at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, 2013-2017. Faculty 50 or older were surveyed, programs at other institutions and from the literature (multiple fields) were reviewed, and senior faculty and leaders, including retired faculty, were engaged to develop and implement PPR. Cultural barriers were found to be significant, and a multipronged, multiyear strategy to address these barriers, which sequentially added PPR to support faculty, was put in place. A comprehensive framework of sequenced PPR was developed to address the needs and tasks of late-career transitions within three distinct phases: pre-retirement, retirement, and post-retirement. This sequential introduction approach has led to important outcomes for all three of the retirement phases, including reduction of cultural barriers, a policy that has been useful in assessing viability of proposed phased retirement plans, transparent and realistic discussions about financial issues, and consideration of roles that retired faculty can provide. The authors are tracking the issues mentioned in consultations and efficacy of succession planning, and will be resurveying faculty to further refine their work. This framework approach could serve as a template for other academic health centers to address late-career faculty development.

  6. The Effect of Perceived Spiritual Leadership on Envy Management of Faculty Members through the Role of Professional Development Mediation and Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haris, Zarin Daneshvar; Saidabadi, Reza Yousefi; Niazazari, Kiumars

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: the present study aimed to investigate the effect of perceived spiritual leadership on envy management of faculty members of Islamic Azad Universities of East Azerbaijan province through the role of professional development mediation and job satisfaction. Methodology: this study was a descriptive and correlational study that was conducted…

  7. Quantifying Faculty Productivity in Japan: Development and Application of the Achievement-Motivated Key Performance Indicator. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.8.16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aida, Misako; Watanabe, Satoshi P.

    2016-01-01

    Universities throughout the world are trending toward more performance based methods to capture their strengths, weaknesses and productivity. Hiroshima University has developed an integrated objective measure for quantifying multifaceted faculty activities, namely the "Achievement-Motivated Key Performance Indicator" (A-KPI), in order to…

  8. Reconstructing Faculty Roles to Align with Self-Authorship Development: The Gentle Art of Stepping Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Deborah A.; Lane, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Student development has connections to important academic purposes in higher education (King, Baxter Magolda, Barber, Kendall Brown & Lindsay, 2009). In particular, a growing body of work on self-authorship, a social-constructive theory of development, has demonstrated relevance to the purposes of higher education (Baxter Magolda, 2001; King…

  9. Effect of Faculty Member's Use of Twitter as Informal Professional Development during a Preservice Teacher Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Educators have increasingly turned to Twitter as a means for receiving professional development and building and sustaining professional learning communities. This paper reports the results of a study of 82 undergraduate preservice teachers and their attitudes regarding Twitter as a medium for informal professional development support during their…

  10. Using a student-faculty collaborative learning model to teach grant development in graduate nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Nancy L; Phillips, Kathleen M; Hymer, Regina; Acquaviva, Kimberly D; Schumann, Mary Jean

    2014-05-01

    Graduate nurses are employed in clinical, research, educational, and policy roles. As leaders, they are expected to develop and sustain projects that support translating research to practice and policy. Funding to support initiatives is tight and requires innovative solutions to cover salaries, benefits, equipment purchases, and other program expenses. In an effort to teach grant writing while developing skilled leaders who are effective and competitive in securing funds, the George Washington University School of Nursing offers a graduate-level grant writing course. In the summer of 2011, a collaborative learning model was developed within the course. The joint approach was foundational to securing an Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality grant to support development and implementation of a patient engagement project by the Nursing Alliance for Quality Care. This article describes the project and offers hints for those seeking to develop a collaborative educational experience that affords new leadership skills for RNs from all backgrounds. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Training Sessional Academic Staff to Provide Quality Feedback on University Students' Assessment: Lessons from a Faculty of Law Learning and Teaching Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Kelly; Bell, Tamara; Dwyer, Angela

    2017-01-01

    The quality of feedback provided to university students has long been recognised as the most important predictor of student learning and satisfaction. However, providing quality feedback to students is challenging in the current context, in which universities increasingly rely on casualised and inexperienced academic staff to assess undergraduate…

  12. Aligning Education With Health Care Transformation: Identifying a Shared Mental Model of "New" Faculty Competencies for Academic Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, Jed D; Ahluwalia, Amarpreet; Hamilton, Maria; Wolf, Heidi; Wolpaw, Daniel R; Thompson, Britta M

    2018-02-01

    To develop a potential competency framework for faculty development programs aligned with the needs of faculty in academic health centers (AHCs). In 2014 and 2015, the authors interviewed 23 health system leaders and analyzed transcripts using constant comparative analysis and thematic analysis. They coded competencies and curricular concepts into subcategories. Lead investigators reviewed drafts of the categorization themes and subthemes related to gaps in faculty knowledge and skills, collapsed and combined competency domains, and resolved disagreements via discussion. Through analysis, the authors identified four themes. The first was core functional competencies and curricular domains for conceptual learning, including patient-centered care, health care processes, clinical informatics, population and public health, policy and payment, value-based care, and health system improvement. The second was the need for foundational competency domains, including systems thinking, change agency/management, teaming, and leadership. The third theme was paradigm shifts in how academic faculty should approach health care, categorized into four areas: delivery, transformation, provider characteristics and skills, and education. The fourth theme was the need for faculty to be aware of challenges in the culture of AHCs as an influential context for change. This broad competency framework for faculty development programs expands existing curricula by including a comprehensive scope of health systems science content and skills. AHC leaders can use these results to better align faculty education with the real-time needs of their health systems. Future work should focus on optimal prioritization and methods for teaching.

  13. Effect Of Accounting Lecturer Lecturer Commitment To The Development Of Professional Accounting Empirical Study Lecturer Accounting Faculty Of Economics University Of Muhammadiyah Tangerang 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endraria

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of the study in which the researcher is interested in conducting research by taking the title The Effect of Commitment Against Lecturer - Lecturer in Accounting Accounting Profession Development Empirical Study of Accounting Lecturer Faculty of Economics University of Muhammadiyah Tangerang in 2013 . This research was conducted at the Faculty of Economics University of Muhammadiyah Tangerang is located at Independence Pioneer Road I No.33 Cikokol Tangerang City. The experiment was conducted at the research site easily accessible for the author. The method used in this research is descriptive quantitative methods which aim to describe the descriptive method of data distribution of each variable.There are significant accounting lecturers commitment to the development of the accounting profession Empirical Study of Accounting Lecturer Faculty of Economics University of Muhammadiyah Tangerang in 2013 this is evidenced by the results of hypothesis testing that has been done obtained tcount ttable value 5.7193 and with a significance level of 5 and df n - 2 40-2 38 is equal to 1.686 with the statement concluded that t count t table. Thus Ha Ho accepted and rejected. The conclusion was that there are significant accounting lecturers commitment to the development of the accounting profession Empirical Study of Accounting Lecturer Faculty of Economics University of Muhammadiyah Tangerang in 2013. As for advice to be conveyed in this study is the government as a regulator should be able to evaluate the development of the accounting profession especially in Indonesia with the influence of commitment accounting lecturers are expected to improve and develop the accounting profession especially in the Faculty of Economics University of Muhammadiyah Tangerang.

  14. Debriefing as an opportunity to develop emotional competence in health profession students: Faculty, be prepared!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho-Filho, Marco A.; Schaafsma, Evelyn S.; Tio, René A.

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: In this article, we want to share our perspective on how simulation sessions could contribute to change reality, building a safe environment in which facilitators can role-modeling students to develop emotional competence. Noteworthy, acknowledging and legitimating emotions are also essential

  15. The Case for the Generalist in Rural Development. Peace Corps Faculty Paper No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodge, George C.

    Veraguas province, Panama, is an example of the need to have generalists, not specialists, deal with the interrelated aspects of rural areas in developing nations. Intricate connections between living standards, agricultural production, market and credit structures, land tenure, the political system, the social structure, education, health,…

  16. The Role of Pedagogical Variables in Intercultural Development: A Study of Faculty-Led Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spenader, Allison J.; Retka, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    Study abroad is often regarded as an important curricular component for supporting intercultural development among college students. While creating rich cross-cultural experiences for students is of primary concern, it remains unclear exactly which programmatic features of study abroad influence intercultural growth in a positive way. Consensus…

  17. Faculty Development in Higher Education: Long-Term Impact of a Summer Teaching and Learning Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persellin, Diane; Goodrick, Terry

    2010-01-01

    Past participants of the Associated Colleges of the South Summer Teaching and Learning Workshop were surveyed to determine long-term impact of this type of professional development experience. Results indicate a large majority of participants across rank and academic discipline continued to view the workshop as effective and valued feedback from…

  18. A Faculty Development Program can result in an improvement of the quality and output in medical education, basic sciences and clinical research and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieter, Peter Erich

    2009-07-01

    The Carl Gustav Carus Faculty of Medicine, University of Technology Dresden, Germany, was founded in 1993 after the reunification of Germany. In 1999, a reform process of medical education was started together with Harvard Medical International.The traditional teacher- and discipline-centred curriculum was displaced by a student-centred, interdisciplinary and integrative curriculum, which has been named Dresden Integrative Patient/Problem-Oriented Learning (DIPOL). The reform process was accompanied and supported by a parallel-ongoing Faculty Development Program. In 2004, a Quality Management Program in medical education was implemented, and in 2005 medical education received DIN EN ISO 9001:2000 certification. Quality Management Program and DIN EN ISO 9001:2000 certification were/are unique for the 34 medical schools in Germany.The students play a very important strategic role in all processes. They are members in all committees like the Faculty Board, the Board of Study Affairs (with equal representation) and the ongoing audits in the Quality Management Program. The Faculty Development program, including a reform in medical education, the establishment of the Quality Management program and the certification, resulted in an improvement of the quality and output of medical education and was accompanied in an improvement of the quality and output of basic sciences and clinical research and interdisciplinary patient care.

  19. Work-Life Resources for Faculty

    OpenAIRE

    Layne, Peggy

    2013-01-01

    Work-life balance means something different for each faculty member, but the overarching goal is to create a welcoming and supportive environment for all faculty members so they can succeed and are not required to make unacceptable choices between family and career. Retention of a talented faculty workforce is not just a matter of good start-up packages and opportunities for professional development, but also programs and policies that allow faculty members the flexibility to manage family an...

  20. Creating, curating, and sharing online faculty development resources: the medical education in cases series experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Teresa M; Thoma, Brent; Lin, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    It is difficult to engage clinicians in continuing medical education that does not focus on clinical expertise. Evolving online technologies (e.g., massive open online courses [MOOCs]) are disrupting and transforming medical education, but few online nonclinical professional development resources exist. In August 2013, the Academic Life in Emergency Medicine Web site launched the Medical Education in Cases (MEdIC) series to engage clinicians in an online professional development exercise. Each month, a complex, realistic scenario featuring a nonclinical medical education dilemma is published with accompanying discussion questions. A weeklong discussion is moderated on Twitter and the Web site. This discussion is curated to create a community commentary, which is published alongside presolicited expert responses. Case resources are available for download. The first six MEdIC cases (published August 2013-January 2014) emphasized different CanMEDS and/or Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education competencies. Median reader engagement metrics (interquartile range 25%-75%) in the first week following publication were 861 (634-1,114) pageviews, 767 (518-953) unique visitors from 326 (218-405) cities in 45 (32-50) countries, 30 (24-39) comments, 52 (40-56) tweets, 17 (13-30) Facebook Likes, and 5 (5-7) Google Plus +1s. The MEdIC series is proof of concept that online activities can engage clinicians in nonclinical professional development. The early experience suggests the connectivist nature of MEdIC allows for crowdsourcing solutions to ill-defined problems via the wisdom of readers. This methodology may also be effective for other nonclinical and medical education topics.

  1. The use of abstract paintings and narratives to foster reflective capacity in medical educators: a multinational faculty development workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkabi, Khaled; Wald, Hedy S; Cohen Castel, Orit

    2014-01-01

    Reflective capacity is integral to core healthcare professional practice competencies. Reflection plays a central role in teacher education as reflecting on teaching behaviours with critical analysis can potentially improve teaching practice. The humanities including narrative and the visual arts can serve as a valuable tool for fostering reflection. We conducted a multinational faculty development workshop aiming to enhance reflective capacity in medical educators by using a combination of abstract paintings and narratives. Twenty-three family physicians or physicians-in-training from 10 countries participated in the workshop. Qualitative assessment of the workshop showed that the combined use of art and narrative was well received and perceived as contributing to the reflective exercise. Participants generally felt that viewing abstract paintings had facilitated a valuable mood transformation and prepared them emotionally for the reflective writing. Our analysis found that the following themes emerged from participants’ responses: (1) narratives from different countries are similar; (2) the use of art helped access feelings; (3) viewing abstract paintings facilitated next steps; (4) writing reflective narratives promoted examination of educational challenges, compassion for self and other, and building an action plan; and (5) sharing of narrative was helpful for fostering active listening and appreciating multiple perspectives. Future research might include comparing outcomes for a group participating in arts–narrative-based workshops with those of a control group using only reflective narrative or in combination with figurative art, and implementing a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods of assessment. PMID:24273319

  2. Collaboration between science teacher educators and science faculty from arts and sciences for the purpose of developing a middle childhood science teacher education program: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Gayle A.

    1998-12-01

    The science teacher educators at a midwestern university set a goal to establish a collaborative relationship between themselves and representatives from the College of Arts & Sciences for the purpose of developing a middle childhood science education program. The coming together of these two faculties provided a unique opportunity to explore the issues and experiences that emerge as such a collaborative relationship is formed. In order to gain a holistic perspective of the collaboration, a phenomenological case study design and methods were utilized. The study took a qualitative approach to allow the experiences and issues to emerge in a naturalistic manner. The question, 'What are the issues and experiences that emerge as science teacher educators and science faculty attempt to form a collaborative relationship for the purpose of developing a middle childhood science teacher program?' was answered by gathering a wealth of data. These data were collected by means of semi-structured interviews, observations and written document reviews. An overall picture was painted of the case by means of heuristic, phenomenological, and issues analyses. The researcher followed Moustakas' Phases of Heuristic Research to answer the questions 'What does science mean to me?' and 'What are my beliefs about the issues guiding this case?' prior to completing the phenomenological analysis. The phenomenological analysis followed Moustakas' 'Modification of the Van Kaam Methods of Analysis of Phenomenological Data'. This inquiry showed that the participants in this study came to the collaboration for many different reasons and ideas about the purpose for such a relationship. The participants also had very different ideas about how such a relationship should be conducted. These differences combined to create some issues that affected the development of curriculum and instruction. The issues involved the lack of (a) mutual respect for the work of the partners, (b) understanding about the

  3. Using concept mapping for faculty development in the context of pedagogic frailty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara de Benito

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The quality of teaching does not depend exclusively on the knowledge and experience of teachers, but also on the contextual variables that go along with the teaching (attitude, objectives, students, resources, etc. or dimensions of pedagogic frailty (regulative and instructional discourse, pedagogy and discipline, research teaching nexus and locus of control. Identifying these variables may help to enhance teaching. A procedure for the capture, representation and transfer of knowledge between peers regarding active didactic methodologies supported by Information and Communication Technologies (ICT was applied in a case study research. The data were represented by concept maps. The aim was to identify variables that affect Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK, the use of technology in teaching and pedagogic frailty, through the analysis of the interrelations among the concept maps.The analysis of the maps shows the implementation of many innovations with ICT (project-based learning, service-learning, collaborative learning, their positive aspects and the difficulties in carrying them out. The teachers involved pointed out some factors that contribute to the development of pedagogic frailty, including the number of students in each class, the organization of teaching, the motivation, among others, and as conditions for a greater progress in innovative educational experiments using ICT.

  4. Development of atomic spectroscopy methods in geological institutes of Faculty of Natural Sciences Comenius University and Slovak Academy of Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medved, E.

    1998-01-01

    Development of atomic spectrochemistry methods in Geological Institute of Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University (GI FNS CU) is connected with its establishment in 1957. Its instrumental equipment and location resulted from the already existing Laboratory in the Chair for Mineralogy and Crystallography of FNS CU. In Geological Institute of Slovak Academy of Science (GI SAS) the development of atomic spectroscopy methods started later, only since 1963, when the Member of Academy, Prof. RNDr. B. Cambel, DrSc. became its director. In both institutes the methods of atomic emission spectrography were used as first. A new quality in the development started since 1969 when the Institutes moved to common buildings in Petrzalka (Bratislava), the first atomic absorption spectrometers were acquired and the Institutes were 'strengthened' by coming of Prof. Ing. E. Plsko, DrSc. In the following years the Institutes started to collaborate with some other organisations which were equipped with new facilities, e.g. in 1975 with X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, electron microprobe and in 1985 with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer. This enabled to improve essentially the quality of research activities of both institutes in the chemical characterisation of geological materials, as well as in pedagogical work (students practice, diploma works and dissertations). In the present time characterized by new economic conditions a reduction of GI SAS laboratory activities has been realised. The laboratories of the GI FNS CU have, thanks to their director Ing. V. Stresko, PhD. shown also hence-forward a rich research, pedagogical and society activities what can be documented by numerous publications, citations, obtained awards, representations in professional societies and commissions, local and foreign advisory boards, accreditation boards etc. (author)

  5. Addressing Clinical Faculty Need: Creating a Process and Evaluation for Peer Review of Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Y. Moon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe the evolving process and evaluate the perceived value of peer review for clinical faculty. Methods: Using a 5-point Likert scale, clinical faculty rated the value of an electronic peer review process by completing an electronic 30 item survey across six areas of clinical faculty practice-related activity. Based on feedback, modifications were made and faculty were re-surveyed the following year. Results: Initially, 78% of faculty found peer review to be beneficial, mostly in the area of practice development and portions of practice dissemination. After modifications, 45% found peer review to be beneficial. Conclusions: Clinical faculty are challenged to leverage their practice into teaching and scholarly activities; however, clinical faculty often need feedback to accomplish this. Although the peer review process was designed to address perceived needs of clinical faculty, the process is dynamic and needs further refinement. Overall, clinical faculty find value in a peer review process. This evaluation of peer review illustrates the challenges to provide feedback across six key areas of clinical faculty activity.   Type: Original Research

  6. Women Faculty, Higher Education, and the Recreation/Leisure Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Karla A.; Harrolle, Michelle; Rich, Samantha; Moretz, Janell

    2012-01-01

    Women represent growing numbers of faculty members in higher education as well as in recreation/leisure departments. The purpose of this study is to describe the career development of women faculty in recreation-related areas and to offer implications for faculty development and the preparation of future faculty. Data were collected from women who…

  7. Technology Adoption in Higher Education: Overcoming Anxiety through Faculty Bootcamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Terri; Wisniewski, Mary Ann; Kuhlemeyer, Greg; Isaacs, Gerald; Krzykowski, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    The reluctance to design and teach online courses in higher education is often attributed to technology anxiety in faculty. This article documents a faculty development model that has successfully helped faculty overcome this obstacle. "Bootcamps," faculty development programs held at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI, were specifically and…

  8. Group dynamics and social interaction in a South Asian online learning forum for faculty development of medical teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anshu; Sharma, M; Burdick, W P; Singh, T

    2010-04-01

    Group dynamics of online medical faculty development programs have not been analyzed and reported in literature. Knowledge of the types of content of posted messages will help to understand group dynamics and promote participation in an asynchronous learning environment. This paper assesses group dynamics and social interactivity in an online learning environment for medical teachers in the South Asian context. Participants of a medical education fellowship program conducted by the Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research (FAIMER) Regional Institute at Christian Medical College, Ludhiana (CMCL) in India interact on a listserv called the Mentoring-Learning Web (ML-Web). Monthly topics for online discussion are chosen by fellows through a standard tool called "multi-voting". Fellows volunteer to moderate sessions and direct the pace of the discussion. We analyzed the content and process of the discussion of one particular month. The emails were categorized as those that reflected cognitive presence (dealing with construction and exploration of knowledge), teacher presence (dealing with instructional material and learning resources), and social presence, or were administrative in nature. Social emails were further classified as: affective, cohesive and interactive. Social emails constituted one-third of the total emails. Another one-quarter of the emails dealt with sharing of resources and teacher presence, while cognitive emails comprised 36.2% of the total. More than half of the social emails were affective, while a little less than one-third were cohesive. Social posts are an inevitable part of online learning. These posts promote bonding between learners and contribute to better interaction and collaboration in online learning. Moderators should be aware of their presence and use them as tools to promote interactivity.

  9. Participation in a Multi-Institutional Curriculum Development Project Changed Science Faculty Knowledge and Beliefs about Teaching Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Deborah A.; Borda, Emily J.; Hanley, Daniel M.; Landel, Carolyn C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant pressure to reform science teaching and learning in K12 schools, and a concurrent call to reform undergraduate courses, higher education science content courses have remained relatively static. Higher education science faculty have few opportunities to explore research on how people learn, examine state or national science…

  10. International Education in the 21st Century: The Importance of Faculty in Developing Study Abroad Research Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giedt, Todd; Gokcek, Gigi; Ghosh, Jayati

    2015-01-01

    This paper argues for a reimagining of education abroad that fuses short-term programming with some kind of experiential research component led by home campus disciplinary faculty, especially those in the sciences, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields, in order to better integrate the study abroad program into the core undergraduate…

  11. Employee Assistance Programs in Higher Education. Alcohol, Mental Health and Professional Development Programming for Faculty and Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoreson, Richard W., Ed.; Hosokawa, Elizabeth P., Ed.

    The promotion of employee assistance programs (EAP) in higher education is considered in 24 chapters, with an emphasis on enhancing resources and the academic environment for faculty and staff. Seven topical areas are addressed: history of EAP; characteristics of higher education; alcoholism and other risks in the academic life-style; EAP models…

  12. Balancing the Roles of a Family Medicine Residency Faculty: A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Randall; Sudano, Laura; Siler, Anne; Trimble, Kristopher

    2016-05-01

    Great variety exists in the roles that family medicine residency faculty fill in the lives of their residents. A family medicine-specific model has never been created to describe and promote effective training relationships. This research aims to create a consensus model for faculty development, ethics education, and policy creation. Using a modified grounded theory methods, researchers conducted phone interviews with 22 key informants from US family medicine residencies. Data were analyzed to delineate faculty roles, common role conflicts, and ethical principles for avoiding and managing role conflicts. Key informants were asked to apply their experience and preferences to adapt an existing model to fit with family medicine residency settings. The primary result of this research is the creation of a family medicine-specific model that describes faculty roles and provides insight into how to manage role conflicts with residents. Primary faculty roles include Role Model, Advisor, Teacher, Supervisor, and Evaluator. Secondary faculty roles include Friendly Colleague, Wellness Supporter, and Helping Hand. The secondary roles exist on a continuum from disengaged to enmeshed. When not balanced, the secondary roles can detract from the primary roles. Differences were found between role expectations of physician versus behavioral science faculty and larger/university/urban residencies versus smaller/community/rural residencies. Diversity of opinion exists related to the types of roles that are appropriate for family medicine faculty to maintain with residents. This new model is a first attempt to build consensus in the field and has application to faculty development, ethics education, and policy creation.

  13. The Academy for Future Science Faculty: randomized controlled trial of theory-driven coaching to shape development and diversity of early-career scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakore, Bhoomi K; Naffziger-Hirsch, Michelle E; Richardson, Jennifer L; Williams, Simon N; McGee, Richard

    2014-08-02

    Approaches to training biomedical scientists have created a talented research community. However, they have failed to create a professional workforce that includes many racial and ethnic minorities and women in proportion to their representation in the population or in PhD training. This is particularly true at the faculty level. Explanations for the absence of diversity in faculty ranks can be found in social science theories that reveal processes by which individuals develop identities, experiences, and skills required to be seen as legitimate within the profession. Using the social science theories of Communities of Practice, Social Cognitive Career Theory, identity formation, and cultural capital, we have developed and are testing a novel coaching-based model to address some of the limitations of previous diversity approaches. This coaching intervention (The Academy for Future Science Faculty) includes annual in-person meetings of students and trained faculty Career Coaches, along with ongoing virtual coaching, group meetings and communication. The model is being tested as a randomized controlled trial with two cohorts of biomedical PhD students from across the U.S., one recruited at the start of their PhDs and one nearing completion. Stratification into the experimental and control groups, and to coaching groups within the experimental arms, achieved equal numbers of students by race, ethnicity and gender to the extent possible. A fundamental design element of the Academy is to teach and make visible the social science principles which highly influence scientific advancement, as well as acknowledging the extra challenges faced by underrepresented groups working to be seen as legitimate within the scientific communities. The strategy being tested is based upon a novel application of the well-established principles of deploying highly skilled coaches, selected and trained for their ability to develop talents of others. This coaching model is intended to be a

  14. Faculty Perception of Support to Do Their Job Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Charissa K.; Osgood, Aurea K.; Cigrand, Dawnette L.; Dunbar, Ann-Marie L.

    2015-01-01

    Research has commonly suggested that adequate and appropriate mentoring and faculty perception of support for a work-life balance are important factors in the recruitment, development, and retention of university faculty. To better understand the role of these factors in faculty job performance at teaching universities, faculty from such a…

  15. Engineering Integration: Building a Quick and Effective Faculty Seminar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Peterson

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the spring of 2010, the Science & Engineering Library of the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities partnered with the Information Literacy Librarian and offered a faculty seminar to the College of Science and Engineering. The seminar’s goals included 1. refreshing and expanding faculty’s knowledge of information and 21st century literacies and 2. creating a community of faculty committed to developing student skills in finding, evaluating and synthesizing information in their academic coursework and into their professional careers. Overall, the seminar increased faculty understanding of services and expertise of the libraries, and 21st century literacies. It also developed and strengthened ties between individual faculty members and their subject librarians, leading to a mix of outcomes from a faculty member partnering on a grant the Libraries applied for to course integrated instruction sessions to faculty participating in an e-textbook pilot. This seminar provides a strong model for re-framing information literacy in the context of teaching and learning in science and engineering, giving librarians an opportunity to strengthen relationships and increase liaison effectiveness.

  16. A Faculty Development Session or Resident as Teacher Session for Clinical and Clinical Teaching Techniques; Part 2 of 2: Engaging Learners with Effective Clinical Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Boysen-Osborn

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This workshop is intended for faculty members in an emergency medicine (or other residency program, but is also appropriate for chief residents and medical student clerkship educators. Introduction: Faculty development sessions are required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and enhance the learning environment within residency programs. Resident as teacher sessions are important in helping residents transition from junior learners to supervisors of medical students and junior residents. Part I of this two-part workshop introduces learners to effective techniques to engaging learners with clinical and bedside teaching. Objectives: By the end of this workshop, the learner will: 1 describe and implement nine new clinical teaching techniques; 2 implement clinical teaching techniques specific to junior and senior resident learners. Methods: This educational session is uses several blended instructional methods, including team- based learning (modified, the flipped classroom, audience response systems, pause procedures.

  17. The Relationship between Management, Career Planning and Career Development of Medical and Non-medical Faculty Members of Kohgiluyeh and Boyerahmad Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Sajjadikhah

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: There are many mechanisms for the development of human resources, which career development is one of its central components. The aim of this study was to determine the factors related to career development faculty members (Medical and Non-medical of Kohgiluyeh and Boyer-Ahmad province, Iran. Methods: The present paper was a cross-sectional, descriptive correlation method study.  The study population consisted of 535 faculty members (medical, government, NGOs in Kohgiluyeh and Boyer province, Iran, of which 400 participants were randomly selected for the present study. Data were collected through standard questionnaires as a research tool, of career development, career planning and career management for data analysis and statistical tests including linear regression, t-test, regression, and correlation coefficient was used. Results: Career development status and its related factors (Career management and career planning scientific faculty members was desirable. The findings show that between career planning and career management, career development, a significant positive correlation was observed (P

  1. The Needs Assessment in order to develop the Service of Psychological Lab and Counseling Center, Department of Educational Psychology and Guidance, the Faculty of Education, Mahasarakham University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaiporn Pongpisanrat

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the needs assessment in order to develop the service of Psychological Lab and Counseling Center, Department of Educational Psychology and Guidance, the Faculty of Education, Mahasarakham University. This study aimed to compare the realistic service and the desirable service, as well as, to explore the directions to improve the service of Psychological Lab and Counseling Center among the service recipients based on their gender, age range, and field of studies. A total sample of 150 participants were service recipients; college students, lecturers, staff during the first semester academic year 2014 until the first semester academic year 2015. The instruments used included: the Questionnaire on needs assessment of the development of Psychological Lab and Counseling Center, and a focus group discussion. Frequency distribution, percentage, means, standard deviation, and variance were used to analyze the data. The needs assessment results showed as follows: 1 Overall the realistic basis of Psychological Lab and Counseling Center service was in an “above level of needs” while “the highest level of needs” was found in the desirable qualification. After having divided into categories, the result yielded an “above level” on the realistic basis of the counselor characteristics, task planning, and facility arrangement. For the desired qualification, the results showed that the needs on the counselors’ characteristics, task planning, and facility arrangement were identified as at a highest level of needs. 2 No differences were found on the realistic basis needs of the clients, the services provided, gender, and age range of the clients although they responded differently to the questionnaire. The clients who responded to the questionnaire from different field of studies showed the different needs of services provided in the realistic basis significantly at the level of .05 in which the General Sciences

  2. Characteristics of Social and Administrative Sciences graduate programs and strategies for student recruitment and future faculty development in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrick, Salisa C; Kamal, Khalid M; Moczygemba, Leticia R; Breland, Michelle L; Heaton, Pamela C

    2013-01-01

    The rising demand of faculty in Social and Administrative Sciences (SAS) in pharmacy in the United States heightens the need to increase the number of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) graduates in SAS who choose to pursue an academic career. To describe the characteristics of SAS graduate programs and graduate students and identify strategies for student recruitment and future faculty development. An Internet survey (phase I) with key informants (graduate program officers/department chairs) and semistructured telephone interviews (phase II) with phase I respondents were used. Items solicited data on recruitment strategies, number of students, stipends, support, and other relevant issues pertaining to graduate program administration. Descriptive statistics were tabulated. Of the 40 SAS graduate programs identified and contacted, 24 completed the Internet survey (response rate [RR]=60.0%) and, of these, 16 completed the telephone interview (RR=66.7%). At the time of the survey, the median number of graduate students with a U.S.-based PharmD degree was 3. An average annual stipend for graduate assistants was $20,825. The average time to PhD degree completion was 4.57 years, and approximately 31% of PhD graduates entered academia. Various strategies for recruitment and future faculty development were identified and documented. Findings allow SAS graduate programs to benchmark against other institutions with respect to their own achievement/strategies to remain competitive in student recruitment and development. Additional research is needed to determine the success of various recruitment strategies and identify potential new ones. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Transforming Roles: Canadian Academic Librarians Embedded in Faculty Research Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Shailoo; Waldie, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Academic librarians have always played an important role in providing research services and research-skills development to faculty in higher education. But that role is evolving to include the academic librarian as a unique and necessary research partner, practitioner, and participant in collaborative, grant-funded research projects. This article…

  4. Clearing House for Junior Colleges: Adjunct Faculty in Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Elizabeth

    1995-01-01

    Examines the literature on improving job satisfaction for community college adjunct faculty, providing an annotated bibliography of seven ERIC documents. Suggests that orientation programs to campus policies, professional development workshops, increased salaries and benefits, and job security all serve to increase the level of adjunct job…

  5. Nursing Faculty Members' Perspectives of Faculty-to-Faculty Workplace Incivility among Nursing Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Kimberly S.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, nursing faculty incivility has been a searing topic of research. Nursing research included studies on incivility among nursing students, incivility between nursing students and nursing faculty, and incivility in the clinical setting. However, literature specifically on nursing faculty incivility was limited. This descriptive,…

  6. The Faculty at Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Jack H.; Bowen, Howard R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent changes in the quality of faculty life were traced, and the consequences of these changes for the future of higher education are assessed. Shifts in the faculty's demographic characteristics, compensation, work environment, status, and morale, and in the quality of new faculty are discussed. (MLW)

  7. Communication Faculty Internships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Dirk C.

    2001-01-01

    Offers a first-hand account of a faculty internship at a major international public relations firm. Discusses the internship host and the intern's duties; faculty internship advantages and benefits; and faculty internship disadvantages and limitations. Considers 10 experiential realizations stemming from the author's internship experience. (SR)

  8. Internal dental school environmental factors promoting faculty survival and success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masella, Richard S

    2005-04-01

    A career in dental academics offers ample rewards and challenges. To promote successful careers in dental education, prospective and new dental faculty should possess a realistic view of the dental school work environment, akin to the informed consent so valuable to patients and doctors. Self-assessment of personal strengths and weaknesses provides helpful information in matching faculty applicants with appropriate dental schools. Essential prehiring information also includes a written job description detailing duties and responsibilities, professional development opportunities, and job performance evaluation protocol. Prehiring awareness of what constitutes excellence in job performance will aid new faculty in allotting time to productive venues. New faculty should not rely solely on professional expertise to advance careers. Research and regular peer-reviewed publications are necessary elements in academic career success, along with the ability to secure governmental, private foundation, and corporate grant support. Tactful self-promotion and self-definition to the dental school community are faculty responsibilities, along with substantial peer collaboration. The recruitment period is a singular opportunity to secure job benefits and privileges. It is also the time to gain knowledge of institutional culture and assess administrative and faculty willingness to collaborate on teaching, research, professional development, and attainment of change. Powerful people within dental schools and parent institutions may influence faculty careers and should be identified and carefully treated. The time may come to leave one's position for employment at a different dental school or to step down from full-time academics. Nonetheless, the world of dental and health professional education in 2005 is rapidly expanding and offers unlimited opportunities to dedicated, talented, and informed educators.

  9. Quality of faculty, students, curriculum and resources for nursing doctoral education in Korea: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Ja; Lee, Hyeonkyeong; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Ahn, Yang-Heui; Kim, Euisook; Yun, Soon-Nyoung; Lee, Kwang-Ja

    2010-03-01

    The rapidly increasing number of nursing doctoral programs has caused concern about the quality of nursing doctoral education, including in Korea. To describe the perceived quality of Korean nursing doctoral education in faculty, student, curriculum and resources. Focus group. Fourteen Korean nursing doctoral programs that are research focused and include coursework. Four groups of deans, faculty, students and graduates; students completed three semesters of doctoral program; and graduates completed doctoral programs within the most recent 3 years. Focus groups examined the strengths and weaknesses of faculty, students, curriculum, and resources. Faculty strengths were universities' recognition of faculty research/scholarship and the ability of faculty to attract extramural funding. Faculty weaknesses were aging faculty; high faculty workload; insufficient number of faculty; and teaching without expertise in nursing theories. Student strengths were diverse student backgrounds; multidisciplinary dissertation committee members, and opportunities to socialize with peers and graduates/faculty. Students' weaknesses were overproduction of PhDs with low academic quality; a lower number and quality of doctoral applicants; and lack of full-time students. Curriculum strengths were focusing on specific research areas; emphasis on research ethics; and multidisciplinary courses. Curriculum weaknesses were insufficient time for curriculum development; inadequate courses for core research competencies; and a lack of linkage between theory and practice. Resources strengths were inter-institutional courses with credit transfer. Weaknesses were diminished university financial support for graduate students and limited access to school facilities. Variations in participant groups (providers [deans and faculty] vs. receivers [students and graduates]) and geographical location (capital city vs. regional) were noted on all the four components. The quality characteristics of faculty

  10. Planning for Internationalization By Investing in Faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa K. Childress

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last half century, major world events have prompted higher education institutions to develop internationalization plans. In order engage faculty in internationalization, higher education scholars and practitioners have recommended that internationalization plans include allocated resources, such as budgets for academic exchanges, faculty development workshops, and international curricular development and research grants (Olson, Green, & Hill, 2006; Paige, 2005; Siaya & Hayward, 2003. Yet, a frequently cited obstacle to faculty engagement in internationalization plans is lack of funding (Backman, 1984; Bond, 2003; Ellingboe, 1998; Green & Olson, 2003; Steers & Ungsen, 1992; Woolston, 1983. A cross-case analysis reveals that differential investment leads to faculty engagement in internationalization plans. This article discusses how two institutions developed funds from a variety of sources and institutional levels to engage faculty in an institutional planning process. This study offers implications for institutional planning, resource dependency theory, and internationalization.

  11. The intercultural competence learning lab : a training initiative for intercultural competences development of faculty as a precondition for intercultural competences development of students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poel, Marcel H.; Jones, Elspeth; Coelen, Robert; Beelen, Jos; de Wit, Hans

    2016-01-01

    “So why do we assume our teachers pull at the right end of the rope?” This question was raised during a discussion concerning the intercultural competences of our faculty in comparison to the perceived disappointing level of intercultural competences of our graduates. Intercultural competence

  12. 38 CFR 21.382 - Training and staff development for personnel providing assistance under Chapter 31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Training and staff....382 Training and staff development for personnel providing assistance under Chapter 31. (a) General. VA shall provide a program of ongoing professional training and development for staff of the VR&E...

  13. Who Provides Professional Development? A Study of Professional Development in Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Donald; Reynolds, Dudley; Toledo, Will; Abu-Tineh, Abdullah Mohammad Hamdan

    2016-01-01

    This paper argues that understanding what is offered as professional development frames what matters in English language teaching in a national education system. Analyzing these offerings articulates the values and perceptions of the work environment in which teachers live professionally. The "Learning4Teaching" ("L4T") project…

  14. A Development of a Knowledge Management Model of Supervision of Practicum Students in Early Childhood Education, Faculty of Education, Mahasarakham University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikunyarphat Rangsriborwornkul

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to develop a model of knowledge management of supervision of practicum students in early childhood education. The target groups were 1 four supervisors in Early Childhood Education program, faculty of Education, Mahasarakham University and 2 thirty-three fifth-year practicum students in early childhood education practicing in professional experience at schools which located in Mahasarakham, Khonkaen, and Roi-Et provinces. The research tool was a survey form of supervision of practicum students. Content analysis was used. The research findings showed that 1 a development of the knowledge management model of supervision of practicum students in early childhood education contained 3 phases: phase I – studying need assessment, phase II – developing a model and phase III – conclusion and 2 data from the survey form of knowledge management of supervision categorized into two aspects, namely, appropriate practices and inappropriate practices.

  15. Multidisciplinary Mentoring Programs to Enhance Junior Faculty Research Grant Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freel, Stephanie A; Smith, Paige C; Burns, Ebony N; Downer, Joanna B; Brown, Ann J; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2017-10-01

    Junior faculty face challenges in establishing independent research careers. Declining funding combined with a shift to multidisciplinary, collaborative science necessitates new mentorship models and enhanced institutional support. Two multidisciplinary mentorship programs to promote grant success for junior faculty were established at the Duke University School of Medicine beginning in 2011. These four-month programs-the Path to Independence Program (PtIP) for National Institutes of Health (NIH) R applicants and the K Club for NIH K applicants-use multiple senior faculty mentors and professional grant-writing staff to provide a 20-hour joint curriculum comprising a series of lectures, hands-on workshops, career development counseling, peer groups, and an internal study section. In March 2016, the authors analyzed the success rate for all NIH grants submitted by participants since program enrollment. In a 2015 postprogram survey, participants rated their feelings of support and competency across six skill factors. From October 2011 to March 2016, the programs engaged 265 senior faculty mentors, 145 PtIP participants, and 138 K Club participants. Success rates for NIH grant applications were 28% (61 awards/220 decisions) for PtIP participants-an increase over the 2010 Duke University junior faculty baseline of 11%-and 64% (38/59) for K Club participants. Respondents reported significantly increased feelings of support and self-ratings for each competency post program. The authors plan to expand the breadth of both the mentorship pool and faculty served. Broad implementation of similar programs elsewhere could bolster success, satisfaction, and retention of junior faculty investigators.

  16. Innovation of University Teaching Faculty Management Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuzheng; Wang, Boyu

    2015-01-01

    With the deepening of university reform in China, the traditional teaching faculty management mode has been exposed more and more defects. To make innovation of the university teaching faculty management mode becomes the voice of the times. Universities should conduct careful research on this issue in the development. Starting from the…

  17. Factors Affecting Faculty Web Portal Usability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringula, Rex P.; Basa, Roselle S.

    2011-01-01

    The study investigated the factors that might significantly affect web portal usability. Results of the study were intended to serve as inputs for faculty web portal development of the University of the East-Manila. Descriptive statistics utilized questionnaire data from 82 faculty members. The data showed that most of the respondents were…

  18. Faculty Perceptions about Barriers to Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Joel

    2007-01-01

    Faculty may perceive many barriers to active learning in their classrooms. Four groups of participants in a faculty development workshop were asked to list their perceived barriers to active learning. Many of the problems identified were present on more than one list. The barriers fall into three categories: student characteristics, issues…

  19. A Call for Faculty Reengagement in Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinberg, Nalsey

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author, as a faculty member drawn into administrative service over the past decade, describes how economic and fiscal challenges have steadily eroded, if not entirely eliminated, the crucial tenets of shared faculty and institutional governance. She sees this development as an academic form of the "shock doctrine" eloquently…

  20. Disability on campus: a perspective from faculty and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigaki, Cheryl L; Anderson, Kim M; Howald, Carol L; Henson, Lee; Gregg, Bonnie E

    2012-01-01

    To identify employee perceptions regarding disability-related workplace issues in Institutions of Higher Education (IHE). Faculty and staff (N=1,144) at a large, Midwestern university. A voluntary on-line survey of disability-related employment issues was developed by the university's Chancellor's Committee of Persons with Disabilities. Item responses were analyzed using descriptive and Pearson chi-square statistical methods. Fifteen percent of faculty and staff respondents were found to have disabilities, with 26% reporting experience of job discrimination, and 20% reporting harassment because of their disability. Results indicated significant differences on gender, employment standing (i.e., faculty or staff) and disability status (i.e., with or without a disability), in regard to perceptions of disability acceptance, campus accessibility, disability awareness, ADA policy, and knowledge of work accommodation procedures. Recommendations for IHEs are provided to promote a welcoming and inclusive campus that ultimately supports work success for persons with a disability.

  1. Advancing Climate Literacy through Investment in Science Education Faculty, and Future and Current Science Teachers: Providing Professional Learning, Instructional Materials, and a Model for Locally-Relevant and Culturally-Responsive Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halversen, C.; Apple, J. K.; McDonnell, J. D.; Weiss, E.

    2014-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) call for 5th grade students to "obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect Earth's resources and environment". Achieving this, and other objectives in NGSS, will require changes in the educational system for both students and teachers. Teachers need access to high quality instructional materials and continuous professional learning opportunities starting in pre-service education. Students need highly engaging and authentic learning experiences focused on content that is strategically interwoven with science practices. Pre-service and early career teachers, even at the secondary level, often have relatively weak understandings of the complex Earth systems science required for understanding climate change and hold alternative ideas and naïve beliefs about the nature of science. These naïve understandings cause difficulties in portraying and teaching science, especially considering what is being called for in NGSS. The ACLIPSE program focuses on middle school pre-service science teachers and education faculty because: (1) the concepts that underlie climate change align well with the disciplinary core ideas and practices in NGSS for middle grades; and (2) middle school is a critical time for capturing students interest in science as student engagement by eighth grade is the most effective predictor of student pursuit of science in high school and college. Capturing student attention at this age is critical for recruitment to STEM careers and lifelong climate literacy. THE ACLIPSE program uses cutting edge research and technology in ocean observing systems to provide educators with new tools to engage students that will lead to deeper understanding of the interactions between the ocean and climate systems. Establishing authentic, meaningful connections between indigenous and place-based, and technological climate observations will help generate a more holistic perspective

  2. Faculty Development for Small-Group-Teaching with Simulated Patients (SP) - Design and Evaluation of a Competency-based Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzer, Henrike; Freytag, Julia; Sonntag, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The introduction of innovative teaching formats and methods in medical education requires a specific didactic training for teachers to use complicated formats effectively. This paper describes preliminary considerations, design, implementation and evaluation of a skills-based workshop (7,5 hours long) for teaching with simulated patients. The aim is to describe the essential components for a lasting effect of the workshop so that the concept can be adapted to other contexts. Method: We present the theoretical framework, the objectives, the didactic methodology and the implementation of the workshop. The evaluation of the workshop was carried out using questionnaires. First the participants (teachers of the faculty of medicine, clinical and science subjects) were asked to estimate how well they felt prepared for small group teaching immediately after workshop. Later, after some teaching experience of their own, they gave feedback again as a part of the general evaluation of the semester. Results: In the course of three years 27 trainings were conducted and evaluated with a total of 275 participants. In the context of semester evaluation 452 questionnaires were evaluated on the quality of training. Conclusion: The evaluation shows that participants appreciate the concept of the workshop and also feel sufficiently well prepared. As a limitation it must be said that this is so far only the lecturers' self-assessment. Nevertheless, it can be stated that even a one-day workshop with a stringent teaching concept shows long term results regarding innovative teaching methods.

  3. A Snapshot of Organizational Climate: Perceptions of Extension Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tower, Leslie E.; Bowen, Elaine; Alkadry, Mohamad G.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a snapshot of the perceptions of workplace climate of Extension faculty at a land-grant, research-high activity university, compared with the perceptions of non-Extension faculty at the same university. An online survey was conducted with a validated instrument. The response rate for university faculty was 44% (968); the…

  4. Accounting Faculty Internships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Christopher

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Accounting professionals, business college accrediting bodies, and even accounting academics themselves acknowledge that there is a disconnect between academe and the rigors and requirements of the accounting profession. Among the suggestions proposed in the literature to reduce this gap is the faculty internship, where accounting faculty members work within the field as accountants. Heretofore, individual case studies report benefits of such internships that accrue to a variety of stakeholder groups beyond just the faculty intern and include the academic institution, students, and accounting profession through faculty internships. This research seeks wider support for these benefits. This descriptive study involved surveying a sample of accounting faculty members to get their opinions about the benefits and drawbacks of faculty internships, and to determine the level of use of faculty internships in accounting. In all, 128 usable responses were obtained, representing a 14.6% response rate. The results of this study reveal that although most faculty members acknowledge the benefits cited in the literature, too few take advantage of faculty internships.

  5. Self-Study Guide for Florida VPK Provider Improvement Plan Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Beth M.; Mazzeo, Debbie; Smith, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    This Self-Study Guide has been developed to support Florida Voluntary Prekindergarten Providers (VPK) who are required to complete an improvement plan process (i.e., low-performing providers). The guide has sections that can be used during both the process of selecting target areas for an improvement plan and the process of implementing new or…

  6. "Heidelberg standard examination" and "Heidelberg standard procedures" - Development of faculty-wide standards for physical examination techniques and clinical procedures in undergraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikendei, C; Ganschow, P; Groener, J B; Huwendiek, S; Köchel, A; Köhl-Hackert, N; Pjontek, R; Rodrian, J; Scheibe, F; Stadler, A-K; Steiner, T; Stiepak, J; Tabatabai, J; Utz, A; Kadmon, M

    2016-01-01

    The competent physical examination of patients and the safe and professional implementation of clinical procedures constitute essential components of medical practice in nearly all areas of medicine. The central objective of the projects "Heidelberg standard examination" and "Heidelberg standard procedures", which were initiated by students, was to establish uniform interdisciplinary standards for physical examination and clinical procedures, and to distribute them in coordination with all clinical disciplines at the Heidelberg University Hospital. The presented project report illuminates the background of the initiative and its methodological implementation. Moreover, it describes the multimedia documentation in the form of pocketbooks and a multimedia internet-based platform, as well as the integration into the curriculum. The project presentation aims to provide orientation and action guidelines to facilitate similar processes in other faculties.

  7. Faculty workload and collegial support related to proportion of part-time faculty composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D A

    1995-10-01

    -time faculty should be further developed and researched under more controlled conditions. Case studies of arrangements that make part-time faculty use beneficial are needed. Other variables such as leadership style, scholarly productivity, and morale and their relationship to the proportion of part-time faculty employed in the nursing program should be investigated.

  8. A grey DEMATEL approach to develop third-party logistics provider selection criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Govindan, Kannan; Khodaverdi, Roohollah; Vafadarnikjoo, Amin

    2016-01-01

    - The paper's results help managers of automotive industries, particularly in developing countries, to outsource logistics activities to 3PL providers effectively and to create a significant competitive advantage. Originality/value - The main contributions of this paper are twofold. First, this paper proposes...... an integrated grey DEMATEL method to consider interdependent relationships among the 3PL provider selection criteria. Second, this study is one of the first studies to consider 3PL provider selection in a developing country like Iran....... identifies important criteria for 3PL provider selection and evaluation, and the purpose of this paper is to select 3PL providers from the viewpoint of firms which were already outsourcing their logistics services. Design/methodology/approach - This study utilized the grey decision-making trial...

  9. Just Ask: Using Faculty Input to Inform Communication Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann-Longtin, Krista; Palmer, Megan M.; Welch, Julie L.; Walvoord, Emily C.; Dankoski, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Faculty members today are bombarded with information, yet limited in time and attention. Managing communication with faculty is an increasingly important function of faculty development offices. This study explored how communication frameworks can be paired with web design principles and attention economics to increase the effectiveness of…

  10. A New Take on Program Planning: A Faculty Competencies Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Rania; Kinch, Amy Fowler

    2016-01-01

    Building on previous studies on the changing nature of faculty work, this article presents a conceptual framework for faculty professional success. The authors report on the perceptions of 300 faculty development professionals regarding the importance of skills in nine competency domains: teaching; research; leadership; diversity, inclusion and…

  11. Evaluation of Adjunct Faculty in Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langen, Jill M.

    2011-01-01

    The role that part-time faculty play in higher education is changing. No longer are part-time faculty used on an occasional basis at a few institutions. These individuals now play a critical part in the delivery of higher education to students. This study was developed to answer questions regarding how the performance of adjunct faculty is…

  12. Faculty Viewpoints on Teaching Quantway®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Howington

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantway is a quantitative reasoning-based pathway for developmental math that has been developed as an alternative to the traditional remedial algebra sequence. To explore the experiences of faculty involved with Quantway, we interviewed eight individuals who have taught the course in the past year to survey their attitudes and opinions about students in their classes, the materials and pedagogies in use, and the collegial interaction of networked faculty. Faculty were selected with the intention of gathering a broad set of opinions resulting from differences of location, experience, and other factors. In this paper, we summarize those interviews by identifying common themes reported by the faculty that highlight strengths and challenges of teaching Quantway. Themes include perceptions about changes in student engagement and attitudes as well as changes in their own mindset; the evolution of teaching strategies and materials used inside and outside the classroom; and the relevance of connections between faculty at different institutions involved in the project.

  13. Faculty ethics: ideal principles with practical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reybold, L Earle

    2009-01-01

    Ethics in higher education is the subject of intense public attention, with considerable focus on faculty roles and responsibilities. Media reports and scholarly research have documented egregious misconduct that includes plagiarism, falsification of data, illicit teacher-student relationships, and grading bias. These accounts of wrongdoing often portray faculty ethicality as only a legal issue of obeying rules and regulations, especially in the teaching and research roles. My discussion challenges this narrow perspective and argues that characterizations of faculty ethicality should take into account broader expectations for professionalism such as collegiality, respect, and freedom of inquiry. First, I review the general principles of faculty ethics developed by the American Association of University Professors, as well as professional codes of ethics in specific professional fields. Second, I juxtapose the experiences of women and minority faculty members in relation to these general codes of ethics. This section examines three issues that particularly affect women and minority faculty experiences of ethicality: "chilly and alienating" academic climates, "cultural taxation" of minority identity, and the snare of conventional reward systems. Third, I suggest practical strategies to reconcile faculty practice with codes of ethics. My challenge is to the faculty as a community of practice to engage professional ethics as social and political events, not just legal and moral failures.

  14. Faculty Handbook. Regis College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regis Coll., Weston, MA.

    Regis College policies and procedures are described in this 1976 faculty handbook. Chapter 1 covers college organization and governance, including roles of academic officers and committees. Specific faculty data are presented in Chapter 2, such as definition of academic ranks and titles, recruitment and appointment, promotion, tenure, review,…

  15. Supporting Faculty Grassroots Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezar, Adrianna; Lester, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Various factors are making faculty leadership challenging including the rise in part-time and non-tenure-track faculty, the increasing pressure to publish and teach more courses and adopt new technologies and pedagogies, increasing standards for tenure and promotion, ascension of academic capitalism, and heavy service roles for women and people of…

  16. Faculty Retirement Transitions Revitalized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ummersen, Claire; Duranleau, Lauren; McLaughlin, Jean

    2013-01-01

    It has been almost ten years since the American Council on Education (ACE) began to raise awareness of the importance of workplace flexibility in faculty careers and to encourage colleges and universities to support faculty in better integrating their professional and personal lives. With the generous support of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, ACE…

  17. CBE Faculty and Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    About Us Research Staff Edward Arens Fred Bauman Gail Brager Darryl Dickerhoff Ali Ghahramani Partners Facilities Graduate Programs Visiting Scholar Program Careers CBE Faculty and Staff CBE is an performance of buildings. The core research group for CBE includes faculty and research staff members

  18. The Joint Council on Thoracic Surgery Education (JCTSE) "Educate the Educators" Faculty Development Course: Analysis of the First 5 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Stephen C; Vaporciyan, Ara A; Mark, Rebecca J; DaRosa, Deborah A; Stritter, Frank T; Sullivan, Maura E; Verrier, Edward D

    2016-12-01

    Since 2010, the Joint Council on Thoracic Surgery Education, Inc (JCTSE) has sponsored an annual "Educate the Educators" (EtE) course. The goal is to provide United States academic cardiothoracic surgeons (CTS) the fundamentals of teaching skills, educational curriculum development, and using education for academic advancement. This report describes the course development and evaluation along with attendee's self-assessment of skills through the first 5 years of the program. The content of this 2½-day course was based on needs assessment surveys of CTS and residents attending annual meetings in 2009. From 2010 to 2014, EtE was offered to all CTS at training programs approved by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Course content was evaluated by using end-of-course evaluation forms. A 5-point Likert scale (1 = poor, 5 = excellent) was used to obtain composite assessment mean scores for the 5 years on course variables, session presentations, and self-assessments. With 963 known academic CTS in the United States, 156 (16.3%) have attended, representing 70 of 72 training programs (97%), and 1 international surgeon attended. There were also 7 program coordinators. Ratings of core course contents ranged from 4.4 to 4.8, accompanied with highly complementary comments. Through self-assessment, skills and knowledge in all content areas statistically improved significantly. The effect of the course was evaluated with a follow-up survey in which responders rated the program 4.3 on the usefulness of the information for their career and 3.9 for educational productivity. The EtE program offers an excellent opportunity for academic CTS to enhance their teaching skills, develop educational activities, and prepare for academic promotion. With its unique networking and mentorship environment, the EtE program is an important resource in the evolution of cardiothoracic surgical training in the United States. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons

  19. A University Libraries Faculty Perspective on the Role of the Department Head in Faculty Performance: A Grounded Theory Approach. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Dana W. R.

    This qualitative study examined the perceptions that university library faculty members hold regarding the role of the department head in promoting faculty growth and development. Four faculty members at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln were interviewed. Axial coding of the individuals' perceptions revealed six categories of perceived roles for…

  20. Guiding Principles for Student Leadership Development in the Doctor of Pharmacy Program to Assist Administrators and Faculty Members in Implementing or Refining Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Cynthia J.; Janke, Kristin K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To assist administrators and faculty members in colleges and schools of pharmacy by gathering expert opinion to frame, direct, and support investments in student leadership development. Methods. Twenty-six leadership instructors participated in a 3-round, online, modified Delphi process to define doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) student leadership instruction. Round 1 asked open-ended questions about leadership knowledge, skills, and attitudes to begin the generation of student leadership development guiding principles and competencies. Statements were identified as guiding principles when they were perceived as foundational to the instructional approach. Round 2 grouped responses for agreement rating and comment. Group consensus with a statement as a guiding principle was set prospectively at 80%. Round 3 allowed rating and comment on guidelines, modified from feedback in round 2, that did not meet consensus. The principles were verified by identifying common contemporary leadership development approaches in the literature. Results. Twelve guiding principles, related to concepts of leadership and educational philosophy, were defined and could be linked to contemporary leadership development thought. These guiding principles describe the motivation for teaching leadership, the fundamental precepts of student leadership development, and the core tenets for leadership instruction. Conclusions. Expert opinion gathered using a Delphi process resulted in guiding principles that help to address many of the fundamental questions that arise when implementing or refining leadership curricula. The principles identified are supported by common contemporary leadership development thought. PMID:24371345

  1. Guiding principles for student leadership development in the doctor of pharmacy program to assist administrators and faculty members in implementing or refining curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynor, Andrew P; Boyle, Cynthia J; Janke, Kristin K

    2013-12-16

    To assist administrators and faculty members in colleges and schools of pharmacy by gathering expert opinion to frame, direct, and support investments in student leadership development. Twenty-six leadership instructors participated in a 3-round, online, modified Delphi process to define doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) student leadership instruction. Round 1 asked open-ended questions about leadership knowledge, skills, and attitudes to begin the generation of student leadership development guiding principles and competencies. Statements were identified as guiding principles when they were perceived as foundational to the instructional approach. Round 2 grouped responses for agreement rating and comment. Group consensus with a statement as a guiding principle was set prospectively at 80%. Round 3 allowed rating and comment on guidelines, modified from feedback in round 2, that did not meet consensus. The principles were verified by identifying common contemporary leadership development approaches in the literature. Twelve guiding principles, related to concepts of leadership and educational philosophy, were defined and could be linked to contemporary leadership development thought. These guiding principles describe the motivation for teaching leadership, the fundamental precepts of student leadership development, and the core tenets for leadership instruction. Expert opinion gathered using a Delphi process resulted in guiding principles that help to address many of the fundamental questions that arise when implementing or refining leadership curricula. The principles identified are supported by common contemporary leadership development thought.

  2. Faculty Ownership of the Assurance of Learning Process: Determinants of Faculty Engagement and Continuing Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Michael J.; Rexeisen, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Although this article provides further evidence of serious impediments to faculty ownership of assurance of learning, including inadequate and misaligned resources, the results indicate that faculty can be energized to become actively engaged in the assurance of learning (AOL) process, particularly when they believe that AOL results are useful and…

  3. Approaches to health-care provider education and professional development in perinatal depression: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legere, Laura E; Wallace, Katherine; Bowen, Angela; McQueen, Karen; Montgomery, Phyllis; Evans, Marilyn

    2017-07-24

    Perinatal depression is the most common mental illness experienced by pregnant and postpartum women, yet it is often under-detected and under-treated. Some researchers suggest this may be partly influenced by a lack of education and professional development on perinatal depression among health-care providers, which can negatively affect care and contribute to stigmatization of women experiencing altered mood. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review is to provide a synthesis of educational and professional development needs and strategies for health-care providers in perinatal depression. A systematic search of the literature was conducted in seven academic health databases using selected keywords. The search was limited to primary studies and reviews published in English between January 2006 and May/June 2015, with a focus on perinatal depression education and professional development for health-care providers. Studies were screened for inclusion by two reviewers and tie-broken by a third. Studies that met inclusion criteria were quality appraised and data extracted. Results from the studies are reported through narrative synthesis. Two thousand one hundred five studies were returned from the search, with 1790 remaining after duplicate removal. Ultimately, 12 studies of moderate and weak quality met inclusion criteria. The studies encompassed quantitative (n = 11) and qualitative (n = 1) designs, none of which were reviews, and addressed educational needs identified by health-care providers (n = 5) and strategies for professional development in perinatal mental health (n = 7). Consistently, providers identified a lack of formal education in perinatal mental health and the need for further professional development. Although the professional development interventions were diverse, the majority focused on promoting identification of perinatal depression and demonstrated modest effectiveness in improving various outcomes. This systematic review reveals a

  4. What's in It for Me? Maintenance of Certification as an Incentive for Faculty Supervision of Resident Quality Improvement Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbluth, Glenn; Tabas, Jeffrey A; Baron, Robert B

    2016-01-01

    Residents are required to engage in quality improvement (QI) activities, which requires faculty engagement. Because of increasing program requirements and clinical demands, faculty may be resistant to taking on additional teaching and supervisory responsibilities without incentives. The authors sought to create an authentic benefit for University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Pediatrics Residency Training Program faculty who supervise pediatrics residents' QI projects by offering maintenance of certification (MOC) Part 4 (Performance in Practice) credit. The authors identified MOC as an ideal framework to both more actively engage faculty who were supervising QI projects and provide incentives for doing so. To this end, in 2011, the authors designed an MOC portfolio program which included faculty development, active supervision of residents, and QI projects designed to improve patient care. The UCSF Pediatrics Residency Training Program's Portfolio Sponsor application was approved by the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) in 2012, and faculty whose projects were included in the application were granted MOC Part 4 credit. As of December 2013, six faculty had received MOC Part 4 credit for their supervision of residents' QI projects. Based largely on the success of this program, UCSF has transitioned to the MOC portfolio program administered through the American Board of Medical Specialties, which allows the organization to offer MOC Part 4 credit from multiple specialty boards including the ABP. This may require refinements to screening, over sight, and reporting structures to ensure the MOC standards are met. Ongoing faculty development will be essential.

  5. A management framework for training providers to improve skills development in the workplace

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    D.Ed. A skills revolution was launched in the South African workplace by the Department of Labour in 1998. Various skills development legislation were introduced to meet international standards, redress skills imbalances, curb skills shortages and improve the general skills in the current workforce. Training providers were the drivers of workplace training, yet are now displaced by skills authorities, such as the SET As, the ETQAs and SAQA. While the custody of skills development is placed...

  6. Development of energy-saving technologies providing comfortable microclimate conditions for mining

    OpenAIRE

    Б. П. Казаков; Л. Ю. Левин; А. В. Шалимов; А. В. Зайцев

    2017-01-01

    The paper contains analysis of natural and technogenic factors influencing properties of mine atmosphere, defining level of mining safety and probability of emergencies. Main trends in development of energy-saving technologies providing comfortable microclimate conditions are highlighted. A complex of methods and mathematical models has been developed to carry out aerologic and thermophysical calculations. Main ways of improvement for existing calculation methods of stationary and non-station...

  7. A management framework for training providers to improve workplace skills development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Govender

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Deputy President, Ms Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, says a skills revolution is necessary for South Africa’s (SA skills crisis. The SA skills revolution began with the skills legislation of 1998-9 when the Departments of Labour (DOL and Education (DOE intended a seamless, integrated approach to rapid skills development. The National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS, the Sector Education and Training Providers (SETAs, the South African Qualifications Authorities (SAQA and the National Qualifications Framework (NQF were established to drive the human resource and skills development revolutionary strategy. The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of the 2001-3 research investigating an internal management framework for training providers, employers and managers to accelerate workplace skills development. Design/Methodology/Approach: An integrated, multi-method research model was employed to gather empirical evidence on skills practices. A robust quantitative survey was conducted within 600 organisations. Simultaneously, rich, descriptive data was gathered from managers and employees using a structured qualitative interview strategy. The integrated data pool was factor analysed. The research findings, conclusion and recommended framework were reported in a PhD thesis. Findings: The research findings reveal major gaps in the effectiveness of SA training providers to radically accelerate and improve workplace skills development as per national skills legislation, implementation and management criteria. Implications: If the skills revolution in SA is to succeed, training providers especially, must become less complacent, more assertive and fully equipped when participating in the skills development arena. Originality/Value: Via this research, training providers will gain critical, reflective insight into their management framework for meeting skills legislative criteria and for managing training interventions and skills projects.

  8. Examining the Satisfaction Levels of Continual Professional Development Provided by a Rural Accounting Professional Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halabi, Abdel K.

    2014-01-01

    The Society for the Provision of Education in Rural Australia (SPERA) recognises education as a lifelong process, and there is a need for continuing education and training to be available to rural communities. This paper examines the satisfaction levels of accounting continual professional development (CPD) when provided by a rural accounting…

  9. Providing Authentic Leadership Opportunities through Collaboratively Developed Internships: A University-School District Partnership Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havard, Timothy S.; Morgan, Joyce; Patrick, Lynne

    2010-01-01

    Programs designed to develop future educational leaders must include practical learning experiences that connect the theoretical content of university coursework with the realities of the K-12 workplace. Internships, which offer a common method of providing these experiences, have been generally lacking in the degree to which aspiring leaders…

  10. Psychosocial Influences upon the Workforce and Professional Development Participation of Family Child Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Rebecca Anne; Wiley, Angela R.; A. Koziol, Natalie; Magerko, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Family child care is commonly used in the US by families, including by those receiving child care subsidies. Psychosocial influences upon the workforce and professional development participation of family child care providers (FCCPs) have implications for the investment of public dollars that aim to improve quality and stability of…

  11. Why Learner-Centered New Faculty Orientations Matter: Organizational Culture and Faculty Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Whitney; Lemus, Daisy; Knotts, Greg; Oh, Janet

    2016-01-01

    A learner-centered New Faculty Orientation (NFO) can be a powerful way to immediately engage new faculty and develop their organizational identification to the institution and its values. Unfortunately, some NFOs do not model a learner-centered philosophy and miss opportunities to establish a collaborative and celebratory tone. In this paper, we…

  12. Dynamic transcriptional profiling provides insights into tuberous root development in Rehmannia glutinosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng eSun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Rehmannia glutinosa, a herb of the Scrophulariaceae family, is widely cultivated in the Northern part of China. The tuberous root has well known medicinal properties; however, yield and quality are threatened by abiotic and biotic stresses. Understanding the molecular process of tuberous root development may help identify novel targets for its control. In the present study, we used Illumina sequencing and de novo assembly strategies to obtain a reference transcriptome that is relevant to tuberous root development. We then conducted RNA-seq quantification analysis to determine gene expression profiles of the adventitious root (AR, thickening adventitious root (TAR, and the developing tuberous root (DTR. Expression profiling identified a total of 6,974 differentially expressed unigenes during root developmental. Bioinformatics analysis and gene expression profiling revealed changes in phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, starch and sucrose metabolism, and plant hormone biosynthesis during root development. Moreover, we identified and allocated putative functions to the genes involved in tuberous root development, including genes related to major carbohydrate metabolism, hormone metabolism, and transcription regulation. The present study provides the initial description of gene expression profiles of AR, TAR, and DTR, which facilitates identification of genes of interest. Moreover, our work provides insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying tuberous root development and may assist in the design and development of improved breeding schemes for different R. glutinosa varieties through genetic manipulation.

  13. Development of STEADI: a fall prevention resource for health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Judy A; Phelan, Elizabeth A

    2013-09-01

    Falls among people aged ≥65 years are the leading cause of both injury deaths and emergency department visits for trauma. Research shows that many falls are preventable. In the clinical setting, an effective fall intervention involves assessing and addressing an individual's fall risk factors. This individualized approach is recommended in the American and British Geriatrics Societies' (AGS/BGS) practice guideline. This article describes the development of STEADI (Stopping Elderly Accidents, Deaths, and Injuries), a fall prevention tool kit that contains an array of health care provider resources for assessing and addressing fall risk in clinical settings. As researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Injury Center, we reviewed relevant literature and conducted in-depth interviews with health care providers to determine current knowledge and practices related to older adult fall prevention. We developed draft resources based on the AGS/BGS guideline, incorporated provider input, and addressed identified knowledge and practice gaps. Draft resources were reviewed by six focus groups of health care providers and revised. The completed STEADI tool kit, Preventing Falls in Older Patients-A Provider Tool Kit, is designed to help health care providers incorporate fall risk assessment and individualized fall interventions into routine clinical practice and to link clinical care with community-based fall prevention programs.

  14. A Reference Architecture for Providing Tools as a Service to Support Global Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chauhan, Aufeef

    2014-01-01

    -computing paradigm for addressing above-mentioned issues by providing a framework to select appropriate tools as well as associated services and reference architecture of the cloud-enabled middleware platform that allows on demand provisioning of software engineering Tools as a Service (TaaS) with focus......Global Software Development (GSD) teams encounter challenges that are associated with distribution of software development activities across multiple geographic regions. The limited support for performing collaborative development and engineering activities and lack of sufficient support......-based solutions. The restricted ability of the organizations to have desired alignment of tools with software engineering and development processes results in administrative and managerial overhead that incur increased development cost and poor product quality. Moreover, stakeholders involved in the projects have...

  15. Women in Academic Medicine: Measuring Stereotype Threat Among Junior Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassiotto, Magali; Hamel, Elizabeth Otto; Ku, Manwai; Correll, Shelley; Grewal, Daisy; Lavori, Philip; Periyakoil, V J; Reiss, Allan; Sandborg, Christy; Walton, Gregory; Winkleby, Marilyn; Valantine, Hannah

    2016-03-01

    Gender stereotypes in science impede supportive environments for women. Research suggests that women's perceptions of these environments are influenced by stereotype threat (ST): anxiety faced in situations where one may be evaluated using negative stereotypes. This study developed and tested ST metrics for first time use with junior faculty in academic medicine. Under a 2012 National Institutes of Health Pathfinder Award, Stanford School of Medicine's Office of Diversity and Leadership, working with experienced clinicians, social scientists, and epidemiologists, developed and administered ST measures to a representative group of junior faculty. 174 School of Medicine junior faculty were recruited (62% women, 38% men; 75% assistant professors, 25% instructors; 50% white, 40% Asian, 10% underrepresented minority). Women reported greater susceptibility to ST than did men across all items including ST vulnerability (p gender identification (p women reported lower beliefs in advancement (p = 0.021); however, they had similar career interest and identification, felt just as connected to colleagues, and were equally likely to pursue careers outside academia (all p > 0.42). Innovative ST metrics can provide a more complete picture of academic medical center environments. While junior women faculty are susceptible to ST, they may not yet experience all of its consequences in their early careers. As such, ST metrics offer a tool for evaluating institutional initiatives to increase supportive environments for women in academic medicine.

  16. Do chiropractic college faculty understand informed consent: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hondras Maria A

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to survey full-time faculty at a single chiropractic college concerning their knowledge of Institutional Review Board (IRB policies in their institution as they pertain to educational research. Methods All full-time faculty were invited to participate in an anonymous survey. Four scenarios involving educational research were described and respondents were asked to select from three possible courses of action for each. In addition, respondents were queried about their knowledge of IRB policies, how they learned of these policies and about their years of service and departmental assignments. Results The response rate was 55%. In no scenario did the level of correct answers by all respondents score higher than 41% and in most, the scores were closer to just under 1 in 3. Sixty-five percent of respondents indicated they were unsure whether Palmer had any policies in place at all, while 4% felt that no such policies were in place. Just over one-quarter (27% were correct in noting that students can decline consent, while more than half (54% did not know whether there were any procedures governing student consent. Conclusion Palmer faculty have only modest understanding about institutional policies regarding the IRB and human subject research, especially pertaining to educational research. The institution needs to develop methods to provide knowledge and training to faculty. The results from this pilot study will be instrumental in developing better protocols for a study designed to survey the entire chiropractic academic community.

  17. Faculty Experiences of Merger and Organizational Change in a Social Work Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedoyin, A Christson; Miller, Monte; Jackson, Mary S; Dodor, Bernice; Hall, Kristen

    2016-01-01

    Social work programs are experiencing unprecedented organizational changes due to budget cuts, dwindling resources, global, and technological challenges. However, there is limited information in the literature about the merger experiences of faculty in social work programs. On one hand undergoing merger and reorganization provides the opportunity to reorganize, reprioritize, re-assess, develop strategies, and explore previously untapped opportunities for social work programs. Conversely, merger experiences have caused frustration, intention to quit, confusion, and loss of professional identity for social work faculty. In this article the authors utilize a journaling method and sense-making approach of the merger experiences of some of the faculty members of a social work program in the United States. The authors suggest a framework to understand how the faculty confronted the challenges, overcame the pitfalls, and maximized the opportunities offered during the merger and organizational change process.

  18. Development and evaluation of CAHPS survey items assessing how well healthcare providers address health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidmer, Beverly A; Brach, Cindy; Hays, Ron D

    2012-09-01

    The complexity of health information often exceeds patients' skills to understand and use it. To develop survey items assessing how well healthcare providers communicate health information. Domains and items for the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) Item Set for Addressing Health Literacy were identified through an environmental scan and input from stakeholders. The draft item set was translated into Spanish and pretested in both English and Spanish. The revised item set was field tested with a randomly selected sample of adult patients from 2 sites using mail and telephonic data collection. Item-scale correlations, confirmatory factor analysis, and internal consistency reliability estimates were estimated to assess how well the survey items performed and identify composite measures. Finally, we regressed the CAHPS global rating of the provider item on the CAHPS core communication composite and the new health literacy composites. A total of 601 completed surveys were obtained (52% response rate). Two composite measures were identified: (1) Communication to Improve Health Literacy (16 items); and (2) How Well Providers Communicate About Medicines (6 items). These 2 composites were significantly uniquely associated with the global rating of the provider (communication to improve health literacy: PLiteracy composite accounted for 90% of the variance of the original 16-item composite. This study provides support for reliability and validity of the CAHPS Item Set for Addressing Health Literacy. These items can serve to assess whether healthcare providers have communicated effectively with their patients and as a tool for quality improvement.

  19. The Effect of Using a Program Based on Cooperative Learning Strategy on Developing some Oral Communication Skills of Students, at English Department, Faculty of Education, Sana'a University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuheer, Khaled Mohsen Mohammed

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of study is to investigate the effective of using a cooperative learning strategy STAD-based program on developing some oral communication skills of second level students, English Department, Faculty of Education, Sana'a University. Based on literature review, related studies and a panel of jury members' point of view, a list of 5 oral…

  20. Degree of Practice of Emotional and Spiritual Education by Faculty Members of Tafila Technical University and Its Role in Development of Self-Behavior from the Perspective of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraimeen, Hani; Al-Mhasnah, Abd Al Raheem

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to identify the practice of emotional and spiritual education by faculty members of Tafila Technical University and its relation in development of students' self-behavior, a notion that includes some aspects of self-emotions, behavior control, and emotional control and to guide a person towards achievement, excellence, in light of…

  1. `Learning Experience' Provided by Science Teaching Practice in a Classroom and the Development of Students' Competences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, J. Bernardino; Branco, Julia; Jimenez-Aleixandre, Maria Pilar

    2011-11-01

    According to the literature, there is a very important corpus of knowledge that allows for the investigation of some dimensions of `learning experience' provided to students, in relation to epistemic, pedagogical and meta-cognitive practices. However, in the literature, there is little investigation into the invariance (or not) of the characteristics of students' learning experience while being taught a scientific subject by the same teacher. This paper suggests that the relationship between the learning experience provided and the competences developed is not properly highlighted. This paper analyses the learning experience provided to students in epistemic, pedagogical and meta-cognitive terms. The students were taught the proprieties and applications of light by one teacher, in three classes, over 7 weeks. We analysed the data in each referred learning experience, using a pre-defined category system. The students' competences were evaluated by a competence test. The epistemic demand of each item and the students' performances were also analysed. Our findings point to the non invariance of learning experiences provided to students and the influence of some dimensions of learning experiences provided in the development of certain competences. These findings and their implications are contextualized and discussed.

  2. Students' Assessment and Self-assessment of Nursing Clinical Faculty Competencies: Important Feedback in Clinical Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovrić, Robert; Prlić, Nada; Zec, Davor; Pušeljić, Silvija; Žvanut, Boštjan

    2015-01-01

    The students' assessment of clinical faculty competencies and the faculty members' self-assessment can provide important information about nursing clinical education. The aim of this study was to identify the differences between the students' assessment of the clinical faculty member's competencies and the faculty member's self-assessment. These differences can reveal interesting insights relevant for improving clinical practice.

  3. An Examination of the Relationship between Professional Development Providers' Epistemological and Nature of Science Beliefs and Their Professional Development Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Arriola, Alfonso

    In the last twenty years in US science education, professional development has emphasized the need to change science instruction from a direct instruction model to a more participatory and constructivist learning model. The result of these reform efforts has seen an increase in science education professional development that is focused on providing teaching strategies that promote inquiry learning to learn science content. Given these reform efforts and teacher responses to professional development, research seems to indicate that whether teachers actually change their practice may depend on the teachers' basic epistemological beliefs about the nature of science. The person who builds the bridge between teacher beliefs and teacher practice is the designer and facilitator of science teacher professional development. Even though these designers and facilitators of professional development are critical to science teacher change, few have studied how these professionals approach their work and what influence their beliefs have on their professional development activities. Eight developers and designers of science education professional development participated in this study through interviews and the completion of an online questionnaire. To examine the relationship between professional development providers' science beliefs and their design, development, and implementation of professional development experiences for science teachers, this study used the Views on Science Education Questionnaire (VOSE), and interview transcripts as well as analysis of the documents from teacher professional development experiences. Through a basic interpretive qualitative analysis, the predominant themes that emerged from this study suggest that the nature of science is often equated with the practice of science, personal beliefs about the nature of science have a minimal impact on the design of professional development experiences, current reform efforts in science education have a

  4. Faculty Perception of Support to Do Their Job Well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charissa K. Eaton, PhD

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Research has commonly suggested that adequate and appropriate mentoring and faculty perception of support for a work-life balance are important factors in the recruitment, development, and retention of university faculty. To better understand the role of these factors in faculty job performance at teaching universities, faculty from such a university were surveyed about their experiences with these forms of support and the factors that influenced their perception of the ability to do their job well. Results indicate that faculty mentoring was an important predictor for support at the department level. Additionally, perceived work-life balance was a significant factor at the college and university levels.

  5. ORGANIZING OF MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING IN THE FORMING OF INFORMATION BASE OF BUILDING ENTERPRISES PROVIDING DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadiia Pylypiv

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the impact of organization of managerial accounting on formation of informational base on the local (level of the individual enterprise, regional, disciplinary and national levels in the context of providing stable economic development for building enterprises. Based on our findings, we built a cognitive map of such an influence, which shows itself through different spheres, such as: economic, ecological and social, and will enjoy informational requests of management for improving of effectiveness of management system of such kind of  enterprises. Keywords: managerial accounting, organization, provision, stable economic development, building enterprises

  6. Creating a Curriculum for Training Health Profession Faculty Leaders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mitchell, Pamela H; Robins, Lynne S; Schaad, Dotiglas

    2005-01-01

    .... They synthesized materials about patient safety and interprofessional collaboration to provide faculty with tools for assessing and improving their current teaching practices that influence patient safety. Results...

  7. Using the cloud to provide telemedicine services in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liezel Cilliers

    2014-11-01

    Objectives: The aim of the article is to provide critical success factors (CSF that will enable the deployment of telemedicine in the cloud in order to improve health care services in developing countries. Methods: A thorough literature review was performed of peer reviewed articles in order to identify possible barriers for telemedicine to be deployed in the cloud. Furthermore, the Technology Organization Environmental Model was used in order to group the barriers according to the various factors and, from this process, critical success factors were formulated for consideration. Conclusion: Five critical success factors were formulated in order to implement telemedicine making use of the cloud in developing countries. These include having a national integrated plan for telemedicine; promoting best practices within a legislation framework; involving the end user; providing education to improve levels of telemedicine awareness amongst staff and patients, and addressing technological issues.

  8. Are doctor of pharmacy curricula in developing countries adequate to train graduates to provide pharmaceutical care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramalingam Peraman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD program is a new dimension of pharmacy education in developing countries. The PharmD graduates are expected to participate in patient health care by providing pharmaceutical care. The graduates should have enough necessary clinical knowledge, competitiveness and skills in community, hospital and clinical pharmacy related services. There is a need of curriculum that fit into the program outcome that helps to attain graduate competency. Programs in India, Pakistan, Iran and Nepal were reviewed based on the available literature. Even though it is evident that the PharmD curriculum in developing countries has made an attempt to provide patient-oriented approach for pharmacists, the existing curriculum, training and orientation have several pitfalls. It needs assessment, evaluation and improvement.

  9. Developing and implementing a monitoring programme: recommendations provided by the MODERN project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, S.; Bergmans, A.; Garcia-Sineriz, J.L.; Breen, B.; Jobmann, M.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The successful implementation of a repository programme relies on both the technical aspects of a sound safety strategy, and scientific and engineering excellence, as well as on social aspects such as public acceptance. Monitoring has the potential to contribute to both of these aspects and thus to play an important role as national radioactive waste disposal programmes move forward towards safe and accepted implementation of geological disposal. The main goal of the 'Monitoring Developments for Safe Repository Operation and staged Closure' (MoDeRn) Project is to take the state-of-the-art of broadly accepted, main monitoring objectives and to develop these to a level of description that is closer to the actual implementation of monitoring during the staged approach of the disposal process. It should be noted that the MoDeRn project recognizes the diversity of monitoring activities that will be required in a repository, in particular related to operational safety, nuclear safeguards and environmental impact assessment. The projects emphasis, however, is on monitoring conducted to verify expected repository system evolutions - i.e. evolutions of the natural environment and the engineered system - during a phase of progressive construction, operation and closure that may last on the order of a century. This serves the purpose of confirming and possibly enhancing the prior license basis for safety and pre-closure management options. Achieving this goal includes analysis of whether the implementation of a realistic monitoring programme is likely to address expert and lay stakeholder expectations (objectives), to provide an understanding of monitoring activities and available technologies that can be implemented in a repository context (feasibility), and to provide recommendations for related, future stakeholder engagement activities (social acceptance). These are carried out by the 18 project partners representing 12

  10. ET4ET: A Large-Scale Faculty Professional Development Program on Effective Integration of Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Sahana; Iyer, Sridhar; Warriem, Jayakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Educators have recommended that the affordances provided by ICTs should be used to promote student-centered constructivist learning. While the actual use of ICT in education has increased, not much change has occurred in terms of the pedagogical practices followed. Information transmission models of teaching are still being followed, albeit with…

  11. Faculty Perceptions of Effective Practices for Utilizing a Framework to Develop a Concept-Based Curriculum in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magorian, Kathryn G.

    2013-01-01

    All programs of healthcare education face increasing change and daunting challenges to prepare new graduates for the real world of practice as care providers in complex systems. The necessity for change in nursing education is at a critical level, called on from a variety of sources. New nurses must be able to enter practice as competent, safe,…

  12. Development of the ultrasonography learning model for undergraduate medical students: A case study of the Faculty of Medicine, Burapha University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sornsupha Limchareon

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: By adding hands-on ultrasound experience using live patients proctored by radiologists for final year medical students, in the space of 2 weeks, an effective ultrasound learning model for undergraduate medical students can be provided. This model should be considered in the curricular design.

  13. In-vivo job development training among peer providers of homeless veterans supported employment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ni; Dolce, Joni; Rio, John; Heitzmann, Carma; Loving, Samantha

    2016-06-01

    This column describes a goal-oriented, time-limited in vivo coaching/training approach for skills building among peer veterans vocational rehabilitation specialists of the Homeless Veteran Supported Employment Program (HVSEP). Planning, implementing, and evaluating the training approach for peer providers was intended, ultimately, to support veterans in their goal of returning to community competitive employment. The description draws from the training experience that aimed to improve the ability of peer providers to increase both rates of employment and wages of the homeless veterans using their services. Training peers using an in vivo training approach provided a unique opportunity for the veterans to improve their job development skills with a focus to support employment outcomes for the service users. Peers who received training also expressed that learning skills through an in vivo training approach was more engaging than typical classroom trainings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Developing Proper Systems for Successful Cloud Computing Implementation Using Fuzzy ARAS Method (Case Study: University of Tehran Faculty of New Science and Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Heidaryd Dahooie

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Given the increasing requirements of communication and the need for advanced network-based technologies, cloud computing has been suggested as a perfect strategy to achieve these objectives. Yet, despite the development of computing applications and the increased number of alternatives, it is quite a difficult task to select the exact software platform for the implementation of cloud computing arrangements. In this line, the present paper aimed to develop a scientific framework as how to select the proper software for successful cloud computing implantation at the infrastructure level. First through a review on the related literature and using experts’ opinions, the software selection criteria were extracted. Based on the framework proposed here, the interval-valued fuzzy ARAS method was then employed for weighting and prioritizing specified alternatives. This model was applied by the Faculty of New Sciences and Technologies of Tehran University in order to select proper software platforms from among five alternatives. The results revealed that the OpenStack cloud operating system has been selected as the best alternative, most probably because this platform demonstrates significant achievement for its merits such as high level of performance, reliability and security, stability, and usability.

  15. MOOCs and their Effect on the Institution: Experiences in Course Design, Delivery and Evaluation; Research; Faculty Development; Unbundling and Credits for MOOCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Kiers

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Four years after the introduction of MOOCs – which were proclaimed to be «the end of education as we know it» in 2012 – the role and effect of these free, online courses is becoming clearer. The online means of delivery to the heterogeneous audiences of MOOCs have enabled and compelled instructors and course teams to develop innovative and flexible learning materials. We can analyse the data on the study behaviour of learners to identify which course elements are effective. In addition, the integration of elements of MOOCs in campus education has resulted in promising outcomes and positive reactions from both students and teachers. On the level of the institution, we also see the effect of MOOCs: ranging from new possibilities in communication and branding, to new needs for faculty development and the support organisation. Furthermore, MOOCs play a role in the unbundling of education, e.g. the learning experience and the assessment tasks now can be uncoupled and may be delivered by different institutions and by different means: the learning experience may be in the form of a MOOC and the assessment may be a written exam at an institution.

  16. Long-term development of nuclear maintenance service provider in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androjna, A.; Racic, Z.; Balazic, D.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, most utilities have been facing a challenge of optimizing maintenance costs, while maintaining or improving equipment reliability. As the equipment ages and maintenance skills within the plant staff may decline due to a generation exchange, the challenge becomes even stronger. Consequently, many plants are looking for possible solutions through partnering with maintenance service providers. The fact that there is only one nuclear power plant in Slovenia hinders the development of local maintenance contractors to some extent. Additionally, they have to face everincreasing technical and organizational requirements while a longer fuel cycle and shorter outage durations result in a narrower annual scope of outage activities. In such circumstances, it may be very difficult for local maintenance service providers to retain and improve skills and qualifications in the long run. Even more so, since they also face the need to rejuvenate their staff and the interest of subcontractors to participate diminishes. The paper presents a case on long-term development issues as experienced by NUMIP, the leading Slovenian nuclear maintenance service provider. Above all, we would like to contribute to a better understanding of efficient local maintenance support. NUMIP's future strategic options are explored in light of possible partnering relationship with the nuclear power plant, based on trust, win-win attitude and continuous improvement. Long-term benefits of the proposed partnering are indicated for both parties, the nuclear power plant and the local maintenance service provider. (author)

  17. Estimating the development assistance for health provided to faith-based organizations, 1990-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haakenstad, Annie; Johnson, Elizabeth; Graves, Casey; Olivier, Jill; Duff, Jean; Dieleman, Joseph L

    2015-01-01

    Faith-based organizations (FBOs) have been active in the health sector for decades. Recently, the role of FBOs in global health has been of increased interest. However, little is known about the magnitude and trends in development assistance for health (DAH) channeled through these organizations. Data were collected from the 21 most recent editions of the Report of Voluntary Agencies. These reports provide information on the revenue and expenditure of organizations. Project-level data were also collected and reviewed from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. More than 1,900 non-governmental organizations received funds from at least one of these three organizations. Background information on these organizations was examined by two independent reviewers to identify the amount of funding channeled through FBOs. In 2013, total spending by the FBOs identified in the VolAg amounted to US$1.53 billion. In 1990, FB0s spent 34.1% of total DAH provided by private voluntary organizations reported in the VolAg. In 2013, FBOs expended 31.0%. Funds provided by the Global Fund to FBOs have grown since 2002, amounting to $80.9 million in 2011, or 16.7% of the Global Fund's contributions to NGOs. In 2011, the Gates Foundation's contributions to FBOs amounted to $7.1 million, or 1.1% of the total provided to NGOs. Development assistance partners exhibit a range of preferences with respect to the amount of funds provided to FBOs. Overall, estimates show that FBOS have maintained a substantial and consistent share over time, in line with overall spending in global health on NGOs. These estimates provide the foundation for further research on the spending trends and effectiveness of FBOs in global health.

  18. Initial development of the recovery-oriented services assessment: A collaboration with peer-provider consultants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodge, Amy C; Kuhn, Wendy; Earley, Juli; Stevens Manser, Stacey

    2018-06-01

    The Recovery Self-Assessment (RSA) is a reliable and valid tool used to measure recovery-oriented services. Recent studies, however, suggest that the length and reading level of the RSA makes its routine use in service settings difficult. Recognizing the importance of including people with lived experience of a mental health challenge in research processes and the need to enhance the utility of tools that measure recovery-oriented services, this paper describes an innovative researcher-peer provider consultant multistep process used to revise the provider version of the RSA to create a new instrument-the Recovery-Oriented Services Assessment (ROSA). The authors conducted an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) with principal axis factoring extraction and direct oblimin rotation to evaluate the underlying structure of the provider RSA using data from mental health employees (n = 323). To triangulate the findings of the EFA, quantitative and qualitative data were collected from peer provider consultants (n = 9) on the importance of and language of RSA items. EFA results indicated that a 1-factor solution provided the best fit and explained 48% of the total variance. Consultants triangulated EFA results and recommended the addition of 2 items and language revisions. These results were used to develop the ROSA-a 15-item instrument measuring recovery-oriented services with accessible language. Two versions of the ROSA were developed: a staff version and a people-in-services version. The ROSA may provide organizations with a more accessible way to measure the extent to which their services are recovery oriented. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Estimating the development assistance for health provided to faith-based organizations, 1990-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Haakenstad

    Full Text Available Faith-based organizations (FBOs have been active in the health sector for decades. Recently, the role of FBOs in global health has been of increased interest. However, little is known about the magnitude and trends in development assistance for health (DAH channeled through these organizations.Data were collected from the 21 most recent editions of the Report of Voluntary Agencies. These reports provide information on the revenue and expenditure of organizations. Project-level data were also collected and reviewed from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. More than 1,900 non-governmental organizations received funds from at least one of these three organizations. Background information on these organizations was examined by two independent reviewers to identify the amount of funding channeled through FBOs.In 2013, total spending by the FBOs identified in the VolAg amounted to US$1.53 billion. In 1990, FB0s spent 34.1% of total DAH provided by private voluntary organizations reported in the VolAg. In 2013, FBOs expended 31.0%. Funds provided by the Global Fund to FBOs have grown since 2002, amounting to $80.9 million in 2011, or 16.7% of the Global Fund's contributions to NGOs. In 2011, the Gates Foundation's contributions to FBOs amounted to $7.1 million, or 1.1% of the total provided to NGOs.Development assistance partners exhibit a range of preferences with respect to the amount of funds provided to FBOs. Overall, estimates show that FBOS have maintained a substantial and consistent share over time, in line with overall spending in global health on NGOs. These estimates provide the foundation for further research on the spending trends and effectiveness of FBOs in global health.

  20. Estimating the Development Assistance for Health Provided to Faith-Based Organizations, 1990–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haakenstad, Annie; Johnson, Elizabeth; Graves, Casey; Olivier, Jill; Duff, Jean; Dieleman, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Faith-based organizations (FBOs) have been active in the health sector for decades. Recently, the role of FBOs in global health has been of increased interest. However, little is known about the magnitude and trends in development assistance for health (DAH) channeled through these organizations. Material and Methods Data were collected from the 21 most recent editions of the Report of Voluntary Agencies. These reports provide information on the revenue and expenditure of organizations. Project-level data were also collected and reviewed from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. More than 1,900 non-governmental organizations received funds from at least one of these three organizations. Background information on these organizations was examined by two independent reviewers to identify the amount of funding channeled through FBOs. Results In 2013, total spending by the FBOs identified in the VolAg amounted to US$1.53 billion. In 1990, FB0s spent 34.1% of total DAH provided by private voluntary organizations reported in the VolAg. In 2013, FBOs expended 31.0%. Funds provided by the Global Fund to FBOs have grown since 2002, amounting to $80.9 million in 2011, or 16.7% of the Global Fund’s contributions to NGOs. In 2011, the Gates Foundation’s contributions to FBOs amounted to $7.1 million, or 1.1% of the total provided to NGOs. Conclusion Development assistance partners exhibit a range of preferences with respect to the amount of funds provided to FBOs. Overall, estimates show that FBOS have maintained a substantial and consistent share over time, in line with overall spending in global health on NGOs. These estimates provide the foundation for further research on the spending trends and effectiveness of FBOs in global health. PMID:26042731

  1. Main directions of providing of industrial enterprises effective development and conditions of their choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Zhuravlev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Difficulties in managing the effective development of an industrial enterprise is largely due to the lack of complex tools to measure it, which is aggravated by the lack of identification of the factors that affect the food industry enterprises. In the article, we investigated directions of providing of industrial enterprises effective development and determined conditions of their choice depending on organizational assets and enterprise’s added value dynamics. For every possible combination, we offered certain mechanism of effective development: internal – by means of enterprise’s self-potential activation, and external – by means of deep, moderate or shallow integration. Deep integration means full merger of the enterprise and is recommended in case of critical level of enterprise’s potential. Moderate integration is implemented by purchase of controlling block of shares and is carried out in case of critical or high enterprise’s potential combined with growth of added value. Shallow integration can be used in any combination of resources and added value and is implemented on a contractual basis without institutional and legal change. The concept of directions of providing of industrial enterprises development, that we worked out, is of applicable character and can be used by industrial enterprises regardless field and specific character of industry. Implementation of offered measures will provide industrial enterprises effective development, which will help to form organizational assets base of Russian economics, which is a powerful driver of modernization of Russian industrial enterprises and economics as a whole.

  2. STEM Faculty as Learners in Pedagogical Reform and the Role of Research Articles as Professional Development Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulnix, Amy B.

    2016-01-01

    Discipline-based education research (DBER) publications are opportunities for professional development around science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education reform. Learning theory tells us these publications could be more impactful if authors, reviewers, and editors pay greater attention to linking principles and practice.…

  3. A four-step model: Initiating writing development at faculty level using Master’s thesis workshops as a vehicle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tine Wirenfeldt; Jensen, Eva Naur; Bay, Gina

    , librarians, student’s teachers) as well as a method to gain insight into students’ experiences and needs across departments (in this case in the form of 354 written student evaluations). The model has, to a slightly surprising degree, shown potential to motivate departments to continue to focus on developing...

  4. Critical Success Factors for E-Learning in Developing Countries: A Comparative Analysis between ICT Experts and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuasiri, Wannasiri; Xaymoungkhoun, Oudone; Zo, Hangjung; Rho, Jae Jeung; Ciganek, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    This study identifies the critical success factors that influence the acceptance of e-learning systems in developing countries. E-learning is a popular mode of delivering educational materials in higher education by universities throughout the world. This study identifies multiple factors that influence the success of e-learning systems from the…

  5. The Role of Personalized Professional Learning as a Motivational Factor for College Faculty to Engage in Ongoing Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Martin A., Sr.

    2016-01-01

    Professional development is a vital activity in postsecondary educational institutions that is specifically intended to improve the participants' skill set as educators. Personalized education, differentiated instruction, and adaptive learning are widely discussed as being powerful tools to reach students, but are largely outward facing and not…

  6. Developing and providing an online (web-based) clinical research design course in Japan: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Glenn T; Mulligan, Roseann; Baba, Kazuyoshi

    2011-04-01

    This article reports on the lessons learned while teaching an 8-week-long online course about the principles of clinical research design in Japan. Student activity data and how it relates to performance in the course are presented. As prolog, this article focuses on the barriers and solutions to creating and delivering a web-based course and it lists and discusses the most common concerns that educators often have about this process, namely, cost of the system and time requirement of the faculty. Options that must be considered when selecting the support software and hardware needed to conduct live streaming lecture, online video-based conference course are presented. The ancillary role of e-mail based distribution lists as an essential instruction tool within an interactive, instructor-supervised online course is discussed. This article then discusses the inclusion of active learning elements within an online course as well as the pros and cons regarding open-book versus closed book, proctored testing. Lastly, copyright issues the online instructor should know about are discussed. The student tracking data show that as the course progresses, students will reduce the number for page viewings. We speculate that this reduction is due to a combination of conflicting priorities plus increasing efficiency of the students at extracting the critical information. The article also concludes that software and hardware costs to deliver an online course are relatively minor but the faculty's time requirement is initially substantially higher than teaching in a conventional face-to-face course. Copyright © 2011 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of Innovative Technology to Provide Low-Cost Surface Atmospheric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Paul; Steinson, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Accurate and reliable real-time monitoring and dissemination of observations of surface weather conditions is critical for a variety of societal applications. Applications that provide local and regional information about temperature, precipitation, moisture, and winds, for example, are important for agriculture, water resource monitoring, health, and monitoring of hazard weather conditions. In many regions in Africa (and other global locations), surface weather stations are sparsely located and/or of poor quality. Existing stations have often been sited incorrectly, not well-maintained, and have limited communications established at the site for real-time monitoring. The US National Weather Service (NWS) International Activities Office (IAO) in partnership with University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR)/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA) has started an initiative to develop and deploy low-cost weather instrumentation in sparsely observed regions of the world. The goal is to provide observations for environmental monitoring, and early warning alert systems that can be deployed at weather services in developing countries. Instrumentation is being designed using innovative new technologies such as 3D printers, Raspberry Pi computing systems, and wireless communications. The initial effort is focused on designing a surface network using GIS-based tools, deploying an initial network in Zambia, and providing training to Zambia Meteorological Department (ZMD) staff. The presentation will provide an overview of the project concepts, design of the low cost instrumentation, and initial experiences deploying a surface network deployment in Zambia.

  8. A Study of Faculty Approaches to Teaching Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Michael Ryan

    Chemistry education researchers have not adequately studied teaching and learning experiences at all levels in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum leaving gaps in discipline-based STEM education communities understanding about how the upper- division curricula works (National Research Council, 2012b; Towns, 2013). This study explored faculty approaches to teaching in upper-division physical chemistry course settings using an interview-based methodology. Two conceptualizations of approaches to teaching emerged from a phenomenographic analysis of interview transcripts: (1) faculty beliefs about the purposes for teaching physical chemistry and (2) their conceptions of their role as an instructor in these course settings. Faculty who reported beliefs predominantly centered on helping students develop conceptual knowledge and problem-solving skills in physical chemistry often worked with didactic models of teaching, which emphasized the transfer of expert knowledge to students. When faculty expressed beliefs that were more inclusive of conceptual, epistemic, and social learning goals in science education they often described more student-centered models of teaching and learning, which put more responsibilities on them to facilitate students' interactive engagement with the material and peers during regularly scheduled class time. Knowledge of faculty thinking, as evinced in a rich description of their accounts of their experience, provides researchers and professional developers with useful information about the potential opportunities or barriers that exist for helping faculty align their beliefs and goals for teaching with research-based instructional strategies.

  9. Development and Validation of Quality Criteria for Providing Patient- and Family-centered Injury Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Jamie M; Burton, Rachael; Butler, Barb L; Dyer, Dianne; Evans, David C; Felteau, Melissa; Gruen, Russell L; Jaffe, Kenneth M; Kortbeek, John; Lang, Eddy; Lougheed, Val; Moore, Lynne; Narciso, Michelle; Oxland, Peter; Rivara, Frederick P; Roberts, Derek; Sarakbi, Diana; Vine, Karen; Stelfox, Henry T

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the content validity of quality criteria for providing patient- and family-centered injury care. Quality criteria have been developed for clinical injury care, but not patient- and family-centered injury care. Using a modified Research AND Development Corporation (RAND)/University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Appropriateness Methodology, a panel of 16 patients, family members, injury and quality of care experts serially rated and revised criteria for patient- and family-centered injury care identified from patient and family focus groups. The criteria were then sent to 384 verified trauma centers in the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand for evaluation. A total of 46 criteria were rated and revised by the panel over 4 rounds of review producing 14 criteria related to clinical care (n = 4; transitions of care, pain management, patient safety, provider competence), communication (n = 3; information for patients/families; communication of discharge plans to patients/families, communication between hospital and community providers), holistic care (n = 4; patient hygiene, kindness and respect, family access to patient, social and spiritual support) and end-of-life care (n = 3; decision making, end-of-life care, family follow-up). Medical directors, managers, or coordinators representing 254 trauma centers (66% response rate) rated 12 criteria to be important (95% of responses) for patient- and family-centered injury care. Fewer centers rated family access to the patient (80%) and family follow-up after patient death (65%) to be important criteria. Fourteen-candidate quality criteria for patient- and family-centered injury care were developed and shown to have content validity. These may be used to guide quality improvement practices.

  10. What Is the Role of Informal Healthcare Providers in Developing Countries? A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhinaraset, May; Ingram, Matthew; Lofthouse, Heather Kinlaw; Montagu, Dominic

    2013-01-01

    Informal health care providers (IPs) comprise a significant component of health systems in developing nations. Yet little is known about the most basic characteristics of performance, cost, quality, utilization, and size of this sector. To address this gap we conducted a comprehensive literature review on the informal health care sector in developing countries. We searched for studies published since 2000 through electronic databases PubMed, Google Scholar, and relevant grey literature from The New York Academy of Medicine, The World Bank, The Center for Global Development, USAID, SHOPS (formerly PSP-One), The World Health Organization, DFID, Human Resources for Health Global Resource Center. In total, 334 articles were retrieved, and 122 met inclusion criteria and chosen for data abstraction. Results indicate that IPs make up a significant portion of the healthcare sector globally, with almost half of studies (48%) from Sub-Saharan Africa. Utilization estimates from 24 studies in the literature of IP for healthcare services ranged from 9% to 90% of all healthcare interactions, depending on the country, the disease in question, and methods of measurement. IPs operate in a variety of health areas, although baseline information on quality is notably incomplete and poor quality of care is generally assumed. There was a wide variation in how quality of care is measured. The review found that IPs reported inadequate drug provision, poor adherence to clinical national guidelines, and that there were gaps in knowledge and provider practice; however, studies also found that the formal sector also reported poor provider practices. Reasons for using IPs included convenience, affordability, and social and cultural effects. Recommendations from the literature amount to a call for more engagement with the IP sector. IPs are a large component of nearly all developing country health systems. Research and policies of engagement are needed. PMID:23405101

  11. The development of web program for providing RI-biomics technical information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KI, Na Kyung; Kim, Joo Yeon; Jang, Sol Ah; Park, Tai Jin

    2014-01-01

    For designing the model of the web program, the demand survey for the technology and information has been performed for the students of the related departments, industrialists and researchers. And, the survey, such as advantages and disadvantages, for the current situations has been examined through comparison and analysis by the establishment type and operational process for the present operating web programs having the similar functions in Korea. The contents and web program for the technology and information system have been also developed by the question investigation and the expert opinions. This system for RI-Biomics has been developed by focusing the convenience for the information provision and the information search as the first constructing direction. Information has been collected by the operator in our institute and making contract with Global Trend Briefing of KISTI in Korea. The information collection in the web program has been designed as the direction regularly provided with RSS. Information has been then analyzed by constructing the expert pool provided from the advisory committee for the technology and information, and using them. The publicity for this web program has been performed by webzines and then it is noted that the publicity programs such as some events should be regularly developed when expanded and advanced to a community in future

  12. MODEL OF PROVIDING WITH DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY FOR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN AN ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kuzkin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Subject of research. The paper presents research and instructional tools for assessment of providing with the development strategy for information technologies in an organization. Method. The corresponding assessment model is developed which takes into consideration IT-processes equilibrium according to selected efficiency factors of information technologies application. Basic results. The model peculiarity resides in applying neuro-fuzzy approximators where the conclusion is drawn upon fuzzy logic, and membership functions are adjusted through the use of neural networks. For the adequacy testing of the suggested model, due diligence result analysis has been carried out for the IT-strategy executed in the “Navigator” group of companies at the stage of implementation and support of new technologies and production methods. Data visualization with a circle diagram is applied for the comparative evaluation of the analysis results. The chosen model adequacy is proved by the agreement between predictive assessments for IT-strategy performance targets derived by means of the fuzzy cognitive model over 12 months planning horizon and the real values of these targets upon the expiry of the given planning term. Practical significance. The developed model application gives the possibility to solve the problem of sustainability assessment for the process of providing the required IT-strategy realization level based upon the fuzzy cognitive map analysis and to reveal IT-objectives changing tendencies for an organization over the stated planning interval.

  13. Development of the ultrasonography learning model for undergraduate medical students: A case study of the Faculty of Medicine, Burapha University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limchareon, Sornsupha; Asawaworarit, Nattawat; Klinwichit, Wethaka; Dinchuthai, Pakaphun

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound technology is generally considered to be reliable and widely used by physicians today. Therefore, given the efficacy and popularity of the technology, the need for quality ultrasound education is evident. Ultrasound training for undergraduate medical students has been increasingly incorporated into school curriculums, but the teaching methods can vary significantly among medical schools. Among many different choices, one effective teaching model was proposed which added hands-on ultrasound experience on live patients that was supervised by radiologists in the last clinical year. A 2-week radiology elective course was offered for 6(th)-year medical students at Burapha University Hospital, Chonburi, Thailand in the academic year 2014. Fourteen medical students participated in the elective course. Additionally, students who chose radiology as their elective were provided an ultrasound experience on live patients in real-life clinical settings. All 6(th)-year medical students then completed a 25-ultrasound image quiz, and completed a questionnaire at the end of the academic year. The ultrasound test scores were compared between the elective and nonelective students. The students' background characteristics were determined by a grade point average and the ultrasound experience was determined by the number of scans. These were collected, and analyzed to establish their relationship with the ultrasound test scores. The students' opinions were also surveyed. Fourteen medical students participated in the elective course. The ultrasound test scores in the elective group were significantly higher than those in the nonelective group (p=0.013). The students' background characteristics and ultrasound experience had no significant relationship with the ultrasound test scores. By adding hands-on ultrasound experience using live patients proctored by radiologists for final year medical students, in the space of 2 weeks, an effective ultrasound learning model for

  14. The Influence of Pre-Match Logical Stimulus for Applying and Developing Strategy to Basketball Team of Faculty of Medicine Universitas Padjadjaran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razif Fiil Ikhlas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Logical game is rarely used in sport program as a menu for athletes to prepare their condition in pre-match to improve their cognitive performance. The athletes who have good cognitive performance can think, analyze and solve the problem appeared. Griffith builds a method to improve the athletes’ performance by stimulating their cognitive resources. This study aimed to know the influence of pre-match logical stimulus in applying and developing strategy in basketball players. Methods: The subject of this study was the basketball team players of Faculty of Medicine Universitas Padjadjaran; they were chosen by total sampling based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Then, they were divided into two groups randomly: control and exposed groups. Both groups will be compared based on the score of each item (in total of 17 items. The assessed items were technique and tactics in the game of basketball. This study was conducted in November 2012 for three weeks. The collected data were analyzed using paired-T test. Results: Score increased significantly (p<0.05 in all items for first to third from four times of data retrieval in the exposed group, whereas in the control group, score decreased significantly (p<0.05 in all items for first to third from four times of data retrieval. Conclusions: Pre-match logical stimulus can improve the performance, especially technique and tactic in the basketball game.

  15. Development of a recovery education program for inpatient mental health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Ping; Krupa, Terry; Lysaght, Rosemary; McCay, Elizabeth; Piat, Myra

    2014-12-01

    Mental health system transformation toward a recovery-orientation has created a demand for education to equip providers with recovery competencies. This report describes the development of a recovery education program designed specifically for inpatient providers. Part 1 of the education is a self-learning program introducing recovery concepts and a recovery competency framework; Part 2 is a group-learning program focusing on real-life dilemmas and applying the Appreciative Inquiry approach to address these clinical dilemmas. A pilot study with a pretest/posttest design was used to evaluate the program. Participants included 26 inpatient multidisciplinary providers from 3 hospitals. The results showed participants' improvement on recovery knowledge (z = -2.55, p = .011) after the self-learning program. Evaluations of the group-learning program were high (4.21 out of 5). These results support continued efforts to refine the program. Inpatient providers could use this program to lead interprofessional practice in promoting recovery. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. Local self-government potential in sustainable development of region providing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Y. Bobrovska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ongoing decentralization of power in Ukraine enhances abilities of each region to independently choose their development path and use their own resources. It requires reviewing and updating of mechanisms and instruments of local government and public administration projected to increase the sustainability of development. This necessitates further research of issues of this extremely complex phenomenon. The problem of sustainable development of the regions and their internal capacities over the past decades has attracted the attention of many Ukrainian scientists. They considered the question of the essence and characteristics of this phenomenon, categorical apparatus, and formed approaches to the assessment of the state etc. Existing scientific researchers provided an opportunity for better understanding and deepening of the issues of processes of development formation, becoming the basis for further research. The purpose of the article is the definition of the potential of local governments in the sustainable development of the region, finding approaches for improving management and rational use of resources to enhance the regional development. Development of regions is the scope of display of results and public nature of local self-government. However, the results which are achieved by regional development and its level of sustainability do not meet the needs of society. The results of ongoing reforms, their economic, environmental and social significance do not correspond to spent resources and efforts of society. Strategies of regions for the transition to sustainable development are not systematic. To search for answers and ways to address the issues of the article attempts to identify common root causes in the organization of local government, the underlying increase its impact in the direction of creating conditions and ensure the flow of sustainable regional development through research and their potential influential factors. It is

  17. Developing Indicators of Service Quality Provided for Cardiovascular Patients Hospitalized in Cardiac Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saber Azami-Aghdash

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiovascular diseases are among the most prevalent chronic diseases leading to high degrees of mortality and morbidity worldwide and in Iran. The aim of the current study was to determine and develop appropriate indicators for evaluating provided service quality for cardiovascular patients admitted to Cardiac Care Units (CCU in Iran. Methods: In order to determine the indicators for evaluating provided service quality, a four-stage process including reviewing systematic review articles in premier bibliographic databases, interview, performing two rounds of Delphi technique, and holding experts panel by attendance of experts in different fields was adopted. Finally, after recognizing relevant indicators in resources, these indicators were finalized during various stages using ideas of 27 experts in different fields. Results: Among 2800 found articles in the text reviewing phase, 21 articles, which had completely mentioned relevant indicators, were studied and 48 related indicators were extracted. After two interviews with a cardiologist and an epidemiologist, 32 items of the indicators were omitted and replaced by 27 indicators coping with the conditions of Iranian hospitals. Finally, 43 indicators were added into the Delphi phase and after 2 rounds of Delphi with 18 specialists, 7 cases were excluded due to their low scores of applicability. In the experts’ panel stage, 6 items were also omitted and 10 new indicators were developed to replace them. Eventually, 40 indicators were finalized. Conclusion: In this study, some proper indicators for evaluating provided service quality for CCU admissions in Iran were determined. Considering the informative richness of these indicators, they can be used by managers, policy makers, health service providers, and also insurance agencies in order to improve the quality of services, decisions, and policies.

  18. Infection control and quality assurance of health services provided in ICU: development of an ICU website.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diomidous, Marianna; Ponirou, Paraskevi; Mpizopoulou, Zoi; Tzalera, Vaia; Mechili, Aggelos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the infections control methods in ICU as well as the issue of quality in health services provided, as they constitute an important quality assurance indicator. Moreover, nowadays the causes of Nosocomial infections are known and so do the measures for their control. There is a need however for an information resource that will promote specialized and general guidelines. The measures include the appropriate use of gloves, cleaning and disinfection of the ICU environment and hand washing which is the most important of all. Therefore an effort was made to develop an easy to navigate webpage with practical and comprehensible clinical guidelines. Additionally, it gives to all visitors the opportunity for further information research with the use of the included links. For the development of the web side existing clinical guide lines were scrutinizes as well as studies that concern the effectiveness of the measures mentioned and for the identification of quality assurance criteria.

  19. Current status of system development to provide databases of nuclides migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Yasushi; Isogai, Takeshi; Suyama, Tadahiro; Shibata, Masahiro; Yui, Mikazu; Jintoku, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    JNC has developed databases of nuclides migration for safety assessment of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository, and they have been used in the second progress report to present the technical reliability of HLW geological disposal system in Japan. The technical level and applicability of databases have been highly evaluated even overseas. To provide the databases broadly over the world and to promote the use of the databases, we have performed the followings: 1) development of tools to convert the database format from geochemical code PHREEQE to PHREEQC, GWB and EQ3/6 and 2) set up a web site (http://migrationdb.jnc.go.jp) which enables the public to access to the databases. As a result, the number of database users has significantly increased. Additionally, a number of useful comments from the users can be applied to modification and/or update of databases. (author)

  20. Molecular underpinnings of prefrontal cortex development in rodents provide insights into the etiology of neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, D; Martens, G J M; Kolk, S M

    2015-07-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC), seat of the highest-order cognitive functions, constitutes a conglomerate of highly specialized brain areas and has been implicated to have a role in the onset and installation of various neurodevelopmental disorders. The development of a properly functioning PFC is directed by transcription factors, guidance cues and other regulatory molecules and requires the intricate and temporal orchestration of a number of developmental processes. Disturbance or failure of any of these processes causing neurodevelopmental abnormalities within the PFC may contribute to several of the cognitive deficits seen in patients with neurodevelopmental disorders. In this review, we elaborate on the specific processes underlying prefrontal development, such as induction and patterning of the prefrontal area, proliferation, migration and axonal guidance of medial prefrontal progenitors, and their eventual efferent and afferent connections. We furthermore integrate for the first time the available knowledge from genome-wide studies that have revealed genes linked to neurodevelopmental disorders with experimental molecular evidence in rodents. The integrated data suggest that the pathogenic variants in the neurodevelopmental disorder-associated genes induce prefrontal cytoarchitectonical impairments. This enhances our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of prefrontal (mis)development underlying the four major neurodevelopmental disorders in humans, that is, intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia, and may thus provide clues for the development of novel therapies.

  1. Getting fit for practice: an innovative paediatric clinical placement provided physiotherapy students opportunities for skill development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Nora; Bruder, Andrea; Taylor, Nicholas F; Angelo, Tom

    2013-06-01

    Negative attitudes to disability among physiotherapy students in paediatric placements might be addressed by providing clinical placement opportunities for students early in their course. The aim of this qualitative research study was to explore what physiotherapy students reported learning from an innovative paediatric placement option. Qualitative research with in-depth interviews. Seventeen first and second year physiotherapy students (15 women, 2 men; mean age 19.9 (SD 1.4) years) who took part in the clinical education experience. The experience comprised a student-led progressive resistance training programme performed twice a week for 10 weeks at a community gymnasium with an adolescent with Down syndrome. In-depth interviews were completed after the 10-week programme and were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and independently coded by two researchers. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Two themes emerged from the data, one about being a student mentor and the second about skill development and application. The physiotherapy students indicated the programme was a challenging yet rewarding experience, and that they gained an increased appreciation of disability. They reported developing and applying a range of communication, professional and physiotherapy specific skills. The results suggest that the clinical experience provided physiotherapy students with opportunities to learn clinical skills, generic professional skills, and better understand disability in young people. Many of the learning outcomes identified by the participating students align with desired graduate capabilities and required professional competencies. Copyright © 2012 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of Innovative Technology to Provide Low-Cost Surface Atmospheric Observations in Data Sparse Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Paul; Steinson, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Accurate and reliable real-time monitoring and dissemination of observations of surface weather conditions is critical for a variety of societal applications. Applications that provide local and regional information about temperature, precipitation, moisture, and winds, for example, are important for agriculture, water resource monitoring, health, and monitoring of hazard weather conditions. In many regions of the World, surface weather stations are sparsely located and/or of poor quality. Existing stations have often been sited incorrectly, not well-maintained, and have limited communications established at the site for real-time monitoring. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR)/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), with support from USAID, has started an initiative to develop and deploy low-cost weather instrumentation in sparsely observed regions of the world. The project is focused on improving weather observations for environmental monitoring and early warning alert systems on a regional to global scale. Instrumentation that has been developed use innovative new technologies such as 3D printers, Raspberry Pi computing systems, and wireless communications. The goal of the project is to make the weather station designs, software, and processing tools an open community resource. The weather stations can be built locally by agencies, through educational institutions, and residential communities as a citizen effort to augment existing networks to improve detection of natural hazards for disaster risk reduction. The presentation will provide an overview of the open source weather station technology and evaluation of sensor observations for the initial networks that have been deployed in Africa.

  3. Defining a mismatch: differences in usage of social networking sites between medical students and the faculty who teach them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisson, Gregory E; Fisher, Matthew J; LaBelle, Mark W; Kozmic, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    Use of social networking sites (SNS) by medical students is increasing, and some students lack awareness of pitfalls arising from the intersection of social networking and medicine. Many institutions have developed guidelines on using SNS, but they are insufficient for students. Educators need new methods to train students on the appropriate use of this technology, but more information is needed before implementing change. Differences in SNS usage between students and faculty were examined. The goal was to evaluate four content areas: SNS usage patterns, attitudes regarding activity on SNS, experience with patient interactions online, and awareness of institutional guidelines on use of SNS. A cross-sectional survey took place at Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, in 2012. Participants included all students and a cohort of faculty who teach them in a class on professionalism. The response rate was 42% by students (300/711) and 78% by faculty (31/40). Of the students, 94% use SNS, compared to 48% of faculty. Students were more likely than faculty to display content they would not want patients to see (57% vs. 27%), report seeing inappropriate content on colleagues' SNS profiles (64% vs. 42%), and ignore harmful postings by colleagues (25% vs. 7%). Faculty were more likely than students to have been approached by patients on SNS (53% vs. 3%). Most participants were unlikely to conduct Internet searches on patients. Students are more likely than faculty to use SNS and use it very differently than faculty. Students would benefit from training on appropriate use of SNS. Topics that should be addressed include editing one's online presence, managing friend requests from patients, dealing with colleagues who post harmful content, conducting Internet searches on patients, and discussion of boundaries to identify potential harms associated with SNS usage. Differences in usage between students and faculty raise questions if faculty are well suited to

  4. A model of sustainable development of scientific research health institutions, providing high-tech medical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Yu. Bedoreva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of sustainability is relevant for all types of businesses and organizations. Long-term development has always been and remains one of the most difficult tasks faced by organizations. The implementation the provisions of international standards ISO series 9000 has proven to be effective. The ISO standards are concentrated on the global experience for sustainable success of organizations. The standards incorporated all the rational that has been accumulated in this field of knowledge and practice. These standards not only eliminate technical barriers in collaboration and have established standardized approaches, but also serve as a valuable source of international experience and ready management solutions. They became a practical guide for the creation of management systems for sustainable development in organizations of different spheres of activity.Problem and purpose. The article presents the author’s approach to the problem of sustainable development health of the organization. The purpose of this article is to examine the approaches to management for sustainable success of organizations and to describe a model of sustainable development applied in research healthcare institutions providing high-tech medical care.Methodology. The study used general scientific methods of empirical and theoretical knowledge, general logical methods and techniques and methods of system analysis, comparison, analogy, generalization, the materials research for the development of medical organizations.The main results of our work are to first develop the technique of complex estimation of activity of the scientific-research institutions of health and deploy key elements of the management system that allows the level of maturity of the management system of the institution to be set in order to identify its strengths and weaknesses, and to identify areas for improvements and innovation, and to set priorities for determining the sequence of action when

  5. Effect of field notes on confidence and perceived competence: survey of faculty and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Tom; Brennan, Amy; Brailovsky, Carlos

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of field notes in assessing teachers' confidence and perceived competence, and the effect of field notes on residents' perceptions of their development of competence. A faculty and resident survey completed 5 years after field notes were introduced into the program. Five Dalhousie University family medicine sites--Fredericton, Moncton, and Saint John in New Brunswick, and Halifax and Sydney in Nova Scotia. First- and second-year family medicine residents (as of May 2009) and core family medicine faculty. Residents' outcome measures included beliefs about the effects of field notes on performance, learning, reflection, clinical skills development, and feedback received. Faculty outcome measures included beliefs about the effect of field notes on guiding feedback, teaching, and reflection on clinical practice. Forty of 88 residents (45.5%) participated. Fifteen of 50 faculty (30.0%) participated, which only permitted a discussion of trends for faculty. Residents believed field note-directed feedback reinforced their performance (81.1%), helped them learn (67.6%), helped them reflect on practice and learning (66.7%), and focused the feedback they received, making it more useful (62.2%) (P note-directed feedback helped with clinical skills development (P notes helped to provide more focused (86.7%) and effective feedback (78.6%), improved teaching (75.0%), and encouraged reflection on their own clinical practice (73.3%). Most surveyed residents believed field note use improved the feedback they received and helped them to develop competence through improved performance, learning, reflection, and clinical skills development. The trends from faculty information suggested faculty believed field notes were an effective teaching, feedback, and reflection tool.

  6. How faculty members experience workplace-based assessment rater training: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Jennifer R; Conforti, Lisa N; Bernabeo, Elizabeth; Iobst, William; Holmboe, Eric

    2015-07-01

    Direct observation of clinical skills is a common approach in workplace-based assessment (WBA). Despite widespread use of the mini-clinical evaluation exercise (mini-CEX), faculty development efforts are typically required to improve assessment quality. Little consensus exists regarding the most effective training methods, and few studies explore faculty members' reactions to rater training. This study was conducted to qualitatively explore the experiences of faculty staff with two rater training approaches - performance dimension training (PDT) and a modified approach to frame of reference training (FoRT) - to elucidate how such faculty development can be optimally designed. In a qualitative study of a multifaceted intervention using complex intervention principles, 45 out-patient resident faculty preceptors from 26 US internal medicine residency programmes participated in a rater training faculty development programme. All participants were interviewed individually and in focus groups during and after the programme to elicit how the training influenced their approach to assessment. A constructivist grounded theory approach was used to analyse the data. Many participants perceived that rater training positively influenced their approach to direct observation and feedback, their ability to use entrustment as the standard for assessment, and their own clinical skills. However, barriers to implementation and change included: (i) a preference for holistic assessment over frameworks; (ii) challenges in defining competence; (iii) difficulty in changing one's approach to assessment, and (iv) concerns about institutional culture and buy-in. Rater training using PDT and a modified approach to FoRT can provide faculty staff with assessment skills that are congruent with principles of criterion-referenced assessment and entrustment, and foundational principles of competency-based education, while providing them with opportunities to reflect on their own clinical skills

  7. Portfolio-Associated Faculty: A Qualitative Analysis of Successful Behaviors from the Perspective of the Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Kopechek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. While some aspects of what makes for an effective portfolio program are known, little is published about what students value in the faculty-student-portfolio relationship. Lack of student buy-in and faculty engagement can be significant challenges. The purpose of this study was to identify behaviors and types of engagement that students value in their relationships with portfolio-associated faculty. Methods. Medical students (174 participating in the Ohio State University College of Medicine Portfolio Program described behaviors observed in their portfolio-associated faculty in a survey completed at the end of the first year of their four-year program. Narrative responses were coded and categorized into themes, followed by member checking. Results. A total of 324 comments from 169 students were analyzed. Four themes were identified: (1 creating a supportive environment; (2 inspiring academic and professional growth; (3 investing time in students; and (4 providing advice and direction. Conclusions. The themes identified suggest that students value certain types of coaching and mentoring behaviors from their portfolio-associated faculty. The themes and their specific subcategories may be useful in making decisions regarding program development and guiding recruitment and training of these faculty coaches.

  8. Effectiveness of faculty training to enhance clinical evaluation of student competence in ethical reasoning and professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Carole; Bowen, Denise; Paarmann, Carlene

    2007-08-01

    This study evaluated the short- and long-term effectiveness of faculty training to enhance clinical evaluation of ethical reasoning and professionalism in a baccalaureate dental hygiene program. Ethics, values, and professionalism are best measured in contexts comparable to practice; therefore, authentic evaluation is desirable for assessing these areas of competence. Methods were the following: 1) a faculty development workshop implementing a core values-based clinical evaluation system for assessing students' professional judgment; 2) subsequent evaluation of the clinical faculty's use of core values for grading and providing written comments related to students' professional judgment during patient care for three academic years; and 3) evaluation of program outcomes assessments regarding clinical learning experiences related to ethics and professionalism domains. Results revealed the clinical faculty's evaluation of professional judgment during patient care was enhanced by training; written comments more frequently related to core values defined in the American Dental Hygienists' Association (ADHA) Code of Ethics; and faculty members reported more confidence and comfort evaluating professional judgment after implementation of this evaluation system and receiving training in its application. Students were more positive in outcomes assessments about their competency and learning experiences related to professionalism and ethics. This article shares one approach for enhancing clinical faculty's authentic evaluation of student competence in ethical reasoning and professionalism.

  9. What students learn about professionalism from faculty stories: an "appreciative inquiry" approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaintance, Jennifer L; Arnold, Louise; Thompson, George S

    2010-01-01

    To develop a method for teaching professionalism by enabling students and faculty members to share positive examples of professionalism in a comfortable environment that reflects the authentic experiences of physicians. Medical educators struggle with the teaching of professionalism. Professionalism definitions can guide what they teach, but they must also consider how they teach it, and constructs such as explicit role modeling, situated learning, and appreciative inquiry provide appropriate models. The project consisted of students interviewing faculty members about their experiences with professionalism and then reflecting on and writing about the teachers' stories. In 2004, 62 students interviewed 33 faculty members, and 193 students observed the interviews. Using a project Web site, 36 students wrote 132 narratives based on the faculty's stories, and each student offered his or her reflections on one narrative. The authors analyzed the content of the narratives and reflections via an iterative process of independent coding and discussion to resolve disagreements. Results showed that the narratives were rich and generally positive; they illustrated a broad range of the principles contained in many definitions of professionalism: humanism, accountability, altruism, and excellence. The students' reflections demonstrated awareness of the same major principles of professionalism that the faculty conveyed. The reflections served to spark new ideas about professionalism, reinforce the values of professionalism, deepen students' relationships with the faculty, and heighten students' commitment to behaving professionally. Narrative storytelling, as a variant of appreciative inquiry, seems to be effective in deepening students' understanding and appreciation of professionalism.

  10. Instructional Practices in Introductory Geoscience Courses: Results of a National Faculty Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, R.; Manduca, C. A.; Mogk, D. W.; Tewksbury, B. J.

    2004-12-01

    The NAGT professional development program "On the Cutting Edge" recently surveyed 7000 geoscience faculty in the United States to develop a snapshot of current instructional practices in undergraduate geoscience courses, faculty strategies for learning new content and new teaching approaches, and faculty involvement in the geoscience education community. Over 2200 faculty responded to the survey which was conducted by the American Institute of Physics. Results for introductory courses (814 responses) indicate that lecture is the most common teaching strategy used in courses of all sizes. Many faculty incorporate some interactive activities in their courses. Most commonly, they use questioning, demonstrations, discussions, and in-class exercises. Less common, but not rare, are small group discussion or think-pair-share and classroom debates or role-playing. Activities involving problem solving, using quantitative skills, working with data and primarily literature, and structured collaboration are incorporated by many faculty in introductory courses, suggesting efforts to teach the process of science. Activities in which students address a problem of national or local interest, analyze their own data, or address problems of their own design are less common but not rare. Field experiences are common but not ubiquitous for students in introductory courses. A wide variety of assessment strategies are used in introductory courses of all sizes, including exams, quizzes, problem sets, papers, oral presentations, and portfolios. While papers are used for assessment more extensively in small classes, a significant number of faculty use papers in large classes (greater than 81 students). A majority of faculty use rubrics in grading. Faculty report that in the past two years, approximately one-third have made changes in the content of their introductory courses while just under half have changed the teaching methods they use. While faculty learn about both new content and

  11. Development of guidance and methodical documents for providing the decommissioning of radiation-hazardous objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermakov, A.

    2015-01-01

    Federal Center for Nuclear and Radiation Safety (JSC FCNRS) developed and approbated guidance and methodical documents for providing the facility to radiologically safe status in the course of Building B decommissioning activity at JSC VNIINM (A.A. Bochvar High-Technology Scientific Research Institute for Inorganic Materials). The scope of application of the documents developed is as follows: - preliminary segregation of radwaste into streams during its collection and preparation for removal from facilities/sites under decommissioning; - express assessment of specific activity (activity) of radwaste generated in the course of dismantling and decontamination activities; - radiological survey of premises and building structures following completion of dismantling and decontamination activities; - SRW processing (compaction, reduction in size), packaging, characterisation and containerisation in order to reduce risks of spread of radioactive contamination. Documents that have been developed can be used both at nuclear facilities/ sites similar to the JSC VNIINM Building B in terms of work stages and types of waste to be generated, and other facilities/ sites taking into consideration their peculiarities. (author)

  12. Marshall Space Flight Center Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six, N. F.; Damiani, R. (Compiler)

    2017-01-01

    The 2017 Marshall Faculty Fellowship Program involved 21 faculty in the laboratories and departments at Marshall Space Flight Center. These faculty engineers and scientists worked with NASA collaborators on NASA projects, bringing new perspectives and solutions to bear. This Technical Memorandum is a compilation of the research reports of the 2017 Marshall Faculty Fellowship program, along with the Program Announcement (Appendix A) and the Program Description (Appendix B). The research affected the following six areas: (1) Materials (2) Propulsion (3) Instrumentation (4) Spacecraft systems (5) Vehicle systems (6) Space science The materials investigations included composite structures, printing electronic circuits, degradation of materials by energetic particles, friction stir welding, Martian and Lunar regolith for in-situ construction, and polymers for additive manufacturing. Propulsion studies were completed on electric sails and low-power arcjets for use with green propellants. Instrumentation research involved heat pipes, neutrino detectors, and remote sensing. Spacecraft systems research was conducted on wireless technologies, layered pressure vessels, and two-phase flow. Vehicle systems studies were performed on life support-biofilm buildup and landing systems. In the space science area, the excitation of electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves observed by the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission provided insight regarding the propagation of these waves. Our goal is to continue the Marshall Faculty Fellowship Program funded by Center internal project offices. Faculty Fellows in this 2017 program represented the following minority-serving institutions: Alabama A&M University and Oglala Lakota College.

  13. A Pc-interface module has been developed that provides an easy way to interface PC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rifai, Ahmad; Gunawan, Usep Setia

    2003-01-01

    A pc-interface module has been developed that provides an easy way to interface PC with I/O devices. This MSC51 micro controller based module accepts series of commands from a personal computer through a serial port. The commands are defined to easily control 24 I/O lines available on the module. These lines can be individually used as either input or output that make the module very verstile. A command is received by the module on ASCII string basis. Each character sent to the module will give an interrupt. The firmware's interrupt handler will store the character in a buffer until end of command character arrives. The firmware then parses and interpreters the command and responses accordingly

  14. MARKETING STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT FOR A COMPANIES PROVIDING SPECIAL EQUIPMENT SERVICES IN NOVOSIBIRSK REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaeva N. A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In Russia some companies didn’t have a marketing strategy yet, but marketing is very important part of company management. In the case of the absence of the marketing strategy, a director risks to fill the storage by goods with no demand, or to try to do some useless services, to encounter with unknown competing goods, or to reduce some successful operations. In the article was developed methodic techniques and economic-mathematical models for creating the marketing strategy for companies providing special equipment service in Novosibirsk region. Using the proposed models and methods was created marketing strategy for «TC Athena» with regard to the sphere of activity of the company.

  15. Providing Effective Professional Development for Teachers through the Lunar Workshops for Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canipe, Marti; Buxner, Sanlyn; Jones, Andrea; Hsu, Brooke; Shaner, Andy; Bleacher, Lora

    2014-11-01

    In order to integrate current scientific discoveries in the classroom, K-12 teachers benefit from professional development and support. The Lunar Workshops for Educators is a series of weeklong workshops for grade 6-9 science teachers focused on lunar science and exploration, sponsored by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and conducted by the LRO Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) Team. The Lunar Workshops for Educators, have provided this professional development for teachers for the last five years. Program evaluation includes pre- and post- content tests and surveys related to classroom practice, daily surveys, and follow-up surveys conducted during the academic year following the summer workshops to assess how the knowledge and skills learned at the workshop are being used in the classroom. The evaluation of the workshop shows that the participants increased their overall knowledge of lunar science and exploration. Additionally, they gained knowledge about student misconceptions related to the Moon and ways to address those misconceptions. The workshops impacted the ways teachers taught about the Moon by providing them with resources to teach about the Moon and increased confidence in teaching about these topics. Participants reported ways that the workshop impacted their teaching practices beyond teaching about the Moon, encouraging them to include more inquiry and other teaching techniques demonstrated in the workshops in their science classes. Overall, the program evaluation has shown the Lunar Workshops for Educators are effective at increasing teachers’ knowledge about the Moon and use of inquiry-based teaching into their classrooms. Additionally, the program supports participant teachers in integrating current scientific discoveries into their classrooms.

  16. Inclusive Development through Providing Vertical Housing for Low Income Family in Yogyakarta Urban Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rini Rachmawati

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Inclusive development is mean to accommodate the marginalized people, most of whom are the poor with problem of fulfilling their need of housing. The government has tried hard to meet the need of housing by constructing rusunawa. This paper is aimed at describing about the provision and uses of rusunawa, both in cities and peri urban area by studying the cases in the City of Yogyakarta, Sleman Regency, and Bantul Regency. The study was conducted by doing observation and both structured and in-depth interviews. The research results show that rusunawa was viewed as one solutions to help low-income family in fulfilling their need of housing. In some cases in the City of Yogyakarta, rusunawa plays an important role in preventing the settlement along both sides of rivers from becoming slum areas. Rusunawa in both Regencies of Sleman and Bantul are located near the city so it is easy for the settlers to get to their workplace. The construction of rusunawa has also paid attention to the disabled by providing special facilities. The same case is providing playground for children and facilities for early education for young kids. However, there have not been special facilities for the elderly and pregnant women.

  17. CESAME: Providing High Quality Professional Development in Science and Mathematics for K-12 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Paul

    2002-04-01

    It is appropriate that after almost half a century of Science and Mathematics education reform we take a look back and a peek forward to understand the present state of this wonderfully complex system. Each of the components of this system including teaching, professional development, assessment, content and the district K-12 curriculum all need to work together if we hope to provide quality science, mathematics and technology education for ALL students. How do the state and national standards drive the system? How do state policies on student testing and teacher licensure come into play? How do we improve the preparation, retention and job satisfaction of our K-12 teachers? What initiatives have made or are making a difference? What else needs to be done? What can the physics community do to support local efforts? This job is too big for any single organization or individual but we each can contribute to the effort. Our Center at Northeastern University, with support from the National Science Foundation, has a sharply defined focus: to get high quality, research-based instructional materials into the hands of K-12 classroom teachers and provide the support they need to use the materials effectively in their classrooms.

  18. The Hellenic Open University: providing opportunities for personal and professional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Koziori

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines and discusses the position of the Hellenic Open University (HOU as the main provider of higher adult education via Open and Distance Education (ODE in Greece, and the role it plays both locally and internationally. It also attempts a clear, albeit brief, presentation of the structure and organisation of the MEd course for English as a Foreign Language (EFL teachers provided by the HOU, which along with a postgraduate course in ODE, were the first courses offered by the HOU in 1998 when it admitted its first students. Such presentation is followed by a discussion of the true training and developmental nature of the course based on the elements constituting O’Brien’s EROTI model. Finally, suggestions are made with regard to the improvement of the postgraduate course under examination so as the effects thereof are granted permanence status and, therefore, being really beneficial for its participants, who then will not only be able to constantly pursue their personal and professional development through a reflective approach to teacher education, but also integrate more learner-centred techniques in their daily practice for the benefit of their students.

  19. Task-evoked pupillometry provides a window into the development of short-term memory capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Elizabeth L.; Miller Singley, Alison T.; Peckham, Andrew D.; Johnson, Sheri L.; Bunge, Silvia A.

    2014-01-01

    The capacity to keep multiple items in short-term memory (STM) improves over childhood and provides the foundation for the development of multiple cognitive abilities. The goal of this study was to measure the extent to which age differences in STM capacity are related to differences in task engagement during encoding. Children (n = 69, mean age = 10.6 years) and adults (n = 54, mean age = 27.5 years) performed two STM tasks: the forward digit span test from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) and a novel eyetracking digit span task designed to overload STM capacity. Building on prior research showing that task-evoked pupil dilation can be used as a real-time index of task engagement, we measured changes in pupil dilation while participants encoded long sequences of digits for subsequent recall. As expected, adults outperformed children on both STM tasks. We found similar patterns of pupil dilation while children and adults listened to the first six digits on our STM overload task, after which the adults' pupils continued to dilate and the children's began to constrict, suggesting that the children had reached their cognitive limits and that they had begun to disengage from the task. Indeed, the point at which pupil dilation peaked at encoding was a significant predictor of WISC forward span, and this relationship held even after partialing out recall performance on the STM overload task. These findings indicate that sustained task engagement at encoding is an important component of the development of STM. PMID:24659980

  20. Task-evoked pupillometry provides a window into the development of short-term memory capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Elizabeth L; Miller Singley, Alison T; Peckham, Andrew D; Johnson, Sheri L; Bunge, Silvia A

    2014-01-01

    The capacity to keep multiple items in short-term memory (STM) improves over childhood and provides the foundation for the development of multiple cognitive abilities. The goal of this study was to measure the extent to which age differences in STM capacity are related to differences in task engagement during encoding. Children (n = 69, mean age = 10.6 years) and adults (n = 54, mean age = 27.5 years) performed two STM tasks: the forward digit span test from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) and a novel eyetracking digit span task designed to overload STM capacity. Building on prior research showing that task-evoked pupil dilation can be used as a real-time index of task engagement, we measured changes in pupil dilation while participants encoded long sequences of digits for subsequent recall. As expected, adults outperformed children on both STM tasks. We found similar patterns of pupil dilation while children and adults listened to the first six digits on our STM overload task, after which the adults' pupils continued to dilate and the children's began to constrict, suggesting that the children had reached their cognitive limits and that they had begun to disengage from the task. Indeed, the point at which pupil dilation peaked at encoding was a significant predictor of WISC forward span, and this relationship held even after partialing out recall performance on the STM overload task. These findings indicate that sustained task engagement at encoding is an important component of the development of STM.

  1. Mentoring Nontenured Track Nursing Faculty: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Deborah; Shieh, Carol; McLennon, Susan M; Pike, Caitlin; Hartman, Taylor; Shah, Hena

    The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the effectiveness of mentoring strategies for nursing faculty progression and productivity in the nontenure track at institutions of higher education. Sixty articles were included in the review. Findings revealed that nontenure track nursing faculty require planned programs and mentoring strategies unique to their role and abilities. Schools of nursing can improve on faculty progression, scholarship, and career growth by providing structured mentoring activity.

  2. Development of energy-saving technologies providing comfortable microclimate conditions for mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Б. П. Казаков

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains analysis of natural and technogenic factors influencing properties of mine atmosphere, defining level of mining safety and probability of emergencies. Main trends in development of energy-saving technologies providing comfortable microclimate conditions are highlighted. A complex of methods and mathematical models has been developed to carry out aerologic and thermophysical calculations. Main ways of improvement for existing calculation methods of stationary and non-stationary air distribution have been defined: use of ejection draught sources to organize recirculation ventilation; accounting of depression losses at working intersections; inertance impact of  air streams and mined-out spaces for modeling transitory emergency scenarios. Based on the calculation algorithm of airflow rate distribution in the mine network, processing method has been developed for the results of air-depressive surveys under conditions of data shortage. Processes of dust transfer have been modeled in view of its coagulation and settlement, as well as interaction with water drops in case of wet dust prevention. A method to calculate intensity of water evaporation and condensation has been suggested, which allows to forecast time, duration and quantity of precipitation and its migration inside the mine during winter season. Solving the problem of heat exchange between mine airflow and timbering of the ventilation shaft in a conjugation formulation permits to estimate depression value of natural draught and conditions of convective balance between air streams. Normalization of microclimatic parameters for mine atmosphere is forecasted for the use of heat-exchange units either heating or cooling and dehumidifying ventilation air. Algorithms are presented that permit to minimize ventilation energy demands at the stages of mine design and exploitation.

  3. CHALLENGES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF GLAUCOMA IN A DEVELOPING COUNTRY; A QUALITATIVE STUDY OF PROVIDERS' PERSPECTIVES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adekoya, B J; Adepoju, F G; Moshood, K F; Balarabe, A H

    2015-01-01

    of patient satisfaction, complications of surgery, and negative publicity. Even though the challenges in the management of glaucoma in developing countries are many, they are not insurmountable. There is need for concerted and integrated efforts involving all cadres of eye care practitioners, patients, institutions and governments to address this important eye disease. Improved awareness, provision of adequate equipment, availability and affordability of medications, need for training and retraining of eye care providers are all important measures that can lead to better management of the glaucoma patient.

  4. Your Faculty, Reluctantly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trower, Cathy A.

    2000-01-01

    Notes a decline in numbers of doctoral students interested in academic careers and identifies six negatives of an academic career. Reports on a survey of 2,000 doctoral candidates and junior faculty that found that quality of life factors more important to respondents than tenure and salary, especially important were the institution's geographic…

  5. EQUATING FACULTY LOADS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OOSTING, KENNETH W.

    AT ALPENA COMMUNITY COLLEGE, A NORMAL TEACHING LOAD FOR ANY FACULTY MEMBER IS 14-16 SEMESTER HOURS, WITH 75-125 STUDENTS AND 2-3 PREPARATIONS. VARIATIONS FROM THE SCHEDULE ARE IN ACCORDANCE WITH SPECIFIC FORMULAS RELATING TO TOTAL MEMBERS OF STUDENTS, NUMBERS OF PREPARATIONS, ASSIGNMENT TO ENGLISH COMPOSITION CLASSES, NEW COURSES, AND CLASSES…

  6. Using Data in the Classroom: Resources for Undergraduate Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduca, C. A.

    2003-12-01

    On-line access to geoscience data and tools for data visualization and analysis are creating exciting new opportunities for engaging undergraduate students with data. The National Science Digital Library (NSDL) and DLESE both include access to data and tools as fundamental aspects of their vision and are currently striving to support faculty in using data in their courses. The Using Data in the College/University Classroom Workgroup at the 2003 DLESE Annual meeting brought together data providers, resource developers, and faculty to discuss issues surrounding data access and use in the undergraduate classroom. In order to improve understanding among these diverse viewpoints, workgroup participants created concept maps showing the relationships between data and education. These maps and other highlights of the working group discussion are available at http://swiki.dlese.org/ReportOut2003/26. The working group discussions built on substantial existing resources including: 2001 Report of the DLESE Data Access Working Group bringing together data providers and tool developers (www.dlese.org/documents/reports/meeting/Feb_01/dawg20801 _outcomes.html); 2002 Using Data in the Classroom workshop bringing together faculty from across the disciplines (serc.carleton.edu/research_education/usingdata/workshop02/); 2003 Using Data in the Classroom report describing current uses of data in undergraduate science courses and faculty needs for data access and tools (serc.carleton.edu/ research_education/usingdata/report.html); NSDL Using Data in the Classroom Portal providing access to data, tools, teaching materials, and a discussion of pedagogic and development issues and opportunites for community contribution to these collections (serc.carleton.edu/research_education/usingdata/); Starting Point "Teaching with Models" site supporting faculty teaching at the entry level in using mathematical, statistical, and other types of models in their courses (serc

  7. Collateral Opportunity for Increased Faculty Collaboration and Development through a Mentored Critical Thinking and Writing Exercise in a Dental School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Terry E.; Lyon, Lucinda J.

    2011-01-01

    This essay examines the collateral benefits to faculty from a guided learning literature review project for students. We describe a 3-year continuum of project creation and refinement designed to foster critical thinking and writing for second year dental students at the University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry. We discuss…

  8. A Model Policy on Employment, Professional Development, Institutional Integration, and Evaluation of Part-Time Faculty in the Public Two-Year College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, Holly M.

    2014-01-01

    For years, researchers and part-time faculty advocacy organizations have addressed the distinctive circumstances surrounding the inequitable workforce situation that continues to plague higher education. Regardless of the vast research that focuses on how and why the situation remains unchanged, few institutions have been proactive in seeking a…

  9. Finding a Seat at the Table Meeting the Pedagogical Needs of Adjunct Faculty in the Community College the Development and Implementation of a Staff Training Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spigelmyer, Frances Erickson

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study via an action research design explored adjunct faculty pedagogical perceptions at Butler County Community College (BC3) in Butler, Pennsylvania. Based on a preliminary study by the researcher, adjunct survey data was analyzed to determine if there was a need for pedagogy training and, if so, what adjuncts believed that…

  10. The Development and Validation of an Instrument for Assessing College Students' Perceptions of Faculty Knowledge in Technology-Supported Class Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ching-Lin; Chuang, Hsueh-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Research in the area of educational technology has argued that the technological pedagogical content knowledge of faculty is crucial to addressing the challenge of teaching in higher education in the digital age, which is characterized by the common use of instructional technology in college classrooms and the ubiquitous presence of computing on…

  11. The Faculty Role in Advocacy: What, Why, and How

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Scott

    2015-04-01

    The Capitol Hill environment is completely unlike that in the halls of academia, and advocating for science policy requires a style of communication quite different from scientific discourse. Nevertheless, the experience, while challenging, can be extremely rewarding, and change how one approaches changing our educational system. Fortunately, there are a growing number of resources that faculty can draw upon to make the process easier and more effective. I will discuss my first trip to Capitol Hill, including the details of setting up and managing appointments with congressional aides, and the resources I found useful during my visit. I'll also describe the initial culture shock and how I quickly came to appreciate the intensity and clarity of the visits. In addition to providing a roadmap for other faculty wishing to advocate for science policy, I'll describe additional resources that are in development.

  12. An alternative path to improving university Earth science teaching and developing the geoscience workforce: Postdoctoral research faculty involvement in clinical teacher preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirakparvar, N. A.; Sessa, J.; Ustunisik, G. K.; Nadeau, P. A.; Flores, K. E.; Ebel, D. S.

    2013-12-01

    It is estimated that by the year 2020 relative to 2009, there will be 28% more Earth Science jobs paying ≥ $75,000/year1 in the U.S.A. These jobs will require advanced degrees, but compared to all arts and science advanced degrees, the number of physical science M.S. and Ph.D. awarded per year decreased from 2.5% in 1980 to 1.5% in 20092. This decline is reflected on a smaller scale and at a younger age: in the New York City school system only 36% of all 8th graders have basic proficiency in science 3. These figures indicate that the lack achievement in science starts at a young age and then extends into higher education. Research has shown that students in grades 7 - 12 4,5 and in university level courses 6 both respond positively to high quality science teaching. However, much attention is focused on improving science teaching in grades 7- 12, whereas at many universities lower level science courses are taught by junior research and contingent faculty who typically lack formal training, and sometimes interest, in effective teaching. The danger here is that students might enter university intending to pursue geoscience degrees, but then encounter ineffective instructors, causing them to lose interest in geoscience and thus pursue other disciplines. The crux of the matter becomes how to improve the quality of university-level geoscience teaching, without losing sight of the major benchmark of success for research faculty - scholarly publications reporting innovative research results. In most cases, it would not be feasible to sidetrack the research goals of early career scientists by placing them into a formal teacher preparation program. But what happens when postdoctoral research scientists take an active role in clinical teacher preparation as part of their research appointments? The American Museum of Natural History's Masters of Arts in Teaching (AMNH-MAT) urban residency pilot program utilizes a unique approach to grade 7 - 12 Earth Science teacher

  13. Providing Elementary Teachers in South Texas with Professional Development to Improve Earth Science Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, H.; Ellins, K. K.

    2011-12-01

    Through three years of participation in the TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution, an NSF-sponsored teacher professional development program, my knowledge of earth science, new pedagogical approaches, and confidence has improved dramatically. I have also received instructional materials and learned how to access high quality online resources and use a variety of web-based tools. In this session, I will share my experiences and report on how I used my own learning to help both teachers and students to become more earth science literate individuals. Earth Science test scores at the elementary level throughout South Texas are consistently low in comparison to other regions in the state. The majority of the teachers lack the content-knowledge, confidence, or experience to teach Earth Sciences. My TXESS Revolution experience helped me to understand the needs of these teachers and to identify teaching resources that would be useful to them. Particularly noteworthy are TERC's EarthLabs: Earth System Science and GLOBE activities. Although these Earthlab investigations are designed for high schools students, I demonstrated how they could be adapted for elementary students. As a result, I have provided professional development in the Earth Sciences to about 300 South Texas elementary teachers. TXESS Revolution has also equipped me to empower the students I teach. My students this past year presented their challenge Legacy Cycle Project to the community. The TXESS Revolution teamed up with the Texas Water Development Board to deliver training on the implementation of a new online challenged-based curriculum called the Water Exploration Legacy Cycles. This training gave me the tools to guide my students learning through authentic scientific research. To carry out their challenge, students researched an area of interest, read literature, consulted with experts in the field, consider different prospective, and presented their final products via PowerPoint, poster

  14. New technological developments provide deep-sea sediment density flow insights: the Monterey Coordinated Canyon Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, T. C.; Kieft, B.; Chaffey, M. R.; Wolfson-Schwehr, M.; Herlien, R.; Bird, L.; Klimov, D.; Paull, C. K.; Gwiazda, R.; Lundsten, E. M.; Anderson, K.; Caress, D. W.; Sumner, E. J.; Simmons, S.; Parsons, D. R.; Talling, P.; Rosenberger, K. J.; Xu, J.; Maier, K. L.; Gales, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    The Monterey Coordinated Canyon Experiment (CCE) deployed an array of instruments along the Monterey Canyon floor to characterize the structure, velocity and frequency of sediment flows. CCE utilized novel technologies developed at MBARI to capture sediment flow data in unprecedented detail. 1. The Seafloor Instrument Node (SIN) at 1850 meters depth housed 3 ADCPs at 3 different frequencies, CTD, current meter, oxygen optode, fluorometer/backscatter sensor, and logged data at 10 second intervals or faster. The SIN included an acoustic modem for communication with shore through a Wave Glider relay, and provided high-resolution measurements of three flow events during three successive deployments over 1.5 years. 2. Beachball-sized Benthic Event Detectors (BEDs) were deployed on or under the seafloor to measure the characteristics of sediment density flows. Each BED recorded data from a pressure sensor and a 3-axis accelerometer and gyro to characterize motions during transport events (e.g. tumble vs rotation). An acoustic modem capable of operating through more than a meter of sediment enabled communications with a ship or autonomous surface vehicle. Multiple BEDs were deployed at various depths in the canyon during CCE, detecting and measuring many transport events; one BED moved 9 km down canyon in 50 minutes during one event. 3. Wave Glider Hot Spot (HS), equipped with acoustic and RF modems, acted as data relay between SIN, BEDs and shore, and acoustically located BEDs after sediment density flows.. In some cases HS relayed BED motion data to shore within a few hours of the event. HS provided an acoustic console to the SIN, allowing shore-based users to check SIN health and status, perform maintenance, etc. 4. Mapping operations were conducted 4 times at the SIN site to quantify depositional and erosional patterns, utilizing a prototype ultra-high-resolution mapping system on the ROV Doc Ricketts. The system consists of a 400-kHz Reson 7125 multibeam sonar, a 3

  15. Task-evoked pupillometry provides a window into the development of short-term memory capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth L. Johnson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The capacity to keep multiple items in short-term memory (STM improves over childhood and provides the foundation for the development of multiple cognitive abilities. The goal of this study was to measure the extent to which age differences in STM capacity are related to differences in task engagement during encoding. Children (n = 69, mean age = 10.5 years and adults (n = 54, mean age = 27.5 years performed two STM tasks: the forward digit span test from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC and a novel eyetracking digit span task designed to overload STM capacity. Building on prior research showing that task-evoked pupil dilation can be used as a real-time index of task engagement, we measured changes in pupil dilation while participants encoded long sequences of digits for subsequent recall. As expected, adults outperformed children on both STM tasks. We found similar patterns of pupil dilation while children and adults listened to the first six digits on our STM Overload task, after which the adults’ pupils continued to dilate and the children’s began to constrict, suggesting that the children had reached their cognitive limits and that they had begun to disengage attention from the task. Indeed, the point at which pupil dilation peaked at encoding was a significant predictor of WISC forward span, and this relationship held even after partialing out recall performance on the STM Overload task. These findings indicate that sustained task engagement at encoding is an important component of the development of STM.

  16. Ubiquitous Total Station Development using Smartphone, RSSI and Laser Sensor providing service to Ubi-GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Shoushtari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The growing trend in technological advances and Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS has targeted for intelligent human lives. Accordingly, Ubiquitous Computing Approach was proposed by Mark Weiser. This paper proposes an ubiquitous surveying solution in Geometrics and surveying field. Ubiquitous Surveying provides cost-effective, smart and available surveying techniques while traditional surveying equipment are so expensive and have small availability specially in indoor and daily surveying jobs. In order to have a smart surveying instrument, different information technology methods and tools like Triangle method, Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI method and laser sensor are used. These new ways in combine with surveying equations introduces a modern surveying equipment called Ubi-Total Station that also employed different sensors embedded in smartphone and mobile stand. RSSI-based localization and Triangle method technique are easy and well known methods to predict the position of an unknown node in indoor environments whereas additional measures are required for a sufficient accuracy. In this paper the main goal is to introduce the Ubiquitous Total Station as a development in smart and ubiquitous GIS. In order to public use of the surveying equipment, design and implementation of this instrument has been done. Conceptual model of Smartphone-based system is designed for this study and based on this model, an Android application as a first sample is developed. Finally the evaluations shows that absolute errors in X and Y calculation are 0.028 and 0.057 meter respectively. Also RMSE of 0.26 was calculated in RSSI method for distance measurement. The high price of traditional equipment and their requirement for professional surveyors has given way to intelligent surveying. In the suggested system, smartphones can be used as tools for positioning and coordinating geometric information of objects.

  17. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jan T. M.; Shrimpton, Paul C.

    2016-07-01

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990’s. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10’s of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners.

  18. Creating Enabling Environment for Student Engagement: Faculty Practices of Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassum, Shanaz Hussein; Gul, Raisa Begum

    2017-01-01

    Critical thinking (CT) is considered an important attribute in practice disciplines and faculty members in nursing, medicine, and education are expected to facilitate the development of CT in their graduates so that these individuals can be critical, reflective, competent, and caring professionals and service providers. When students are actively…

  19. Survey Tools for Faculty to Quickly Assess Multidisciplinary Team Dynamics in Capstone Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solnosky, Ryan; Fairchild, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    Many engineering faculty have limited skills and/or assessment tools to evaluate team dynamics in multidisciplinary team-based capstone courses. Rapidly deployable tools are needed here to provide proactive feedback to teams to facilitate deeper learning. Two surveys were developed based on industrial and organizational psychology theories around…

  20. Regional Development Fueled by Entrepreneurial Ventures Providing KIBS – Case Study on Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Alecsandru Strat

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the current research paper is to analyze the evolution of the knowledge intensive business services sector from Romania, for the period 2008-2014, from a territorial point of view and to assess its impact in the general economic development. Using a time series of Gini coefficients and other quantitative instruments, the paper provides clear evidences that, during the 2008-2014 period, the domain has increased its concentration, Bucharest and the 10 most attractive counties being responsible for over 88% from the field’s activity at national level, in 2014. Another important fact is that Bucharest which is responsible for almost 66% of the field’s activity, in 2008, is diminishing constantly its importance during the analyzed period. Using panel regression, the presented research brings clear evidence that the main characteristics of the field (KIBS sector: number of companies, total turnover and number of employees can be used, as independent variables, in econometric models designed to estimate the size of the economy of the Romanian counties.