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Sample records for proton nmr chemical

  1. Nucleic acid helix structure determination from NMR proton chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werf, Ramon M. van der; Tessari, Marco; Wijmenga, Sybren S., E-mail: S.Wijmenga@science.ru.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Biophysical Chemistry, Institute of Molecules and Materials (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    We present a method for de novo derivation of the three-dimensional helix structure of nucleic acids using non-exchangeable proton chemical shifts as sole source of experimental restraints. The method is called chemical shift de novo structure derivation protocol employing singular value decomposition (CHEOPS) and uses iterative singular value decomposition to optimize the structure in helix parameter space. The correct performance of CHEOPS and its range of application are established via an extensive set of structure derivations using either simulated or experimental chemical shifts as input. The simulated input data are used to assess in a defined manner the effect of errors or limitations in the input data on the derived structures. We find that the RNA helix parameters can be determined with high accuracy. We finally demonstrate via three deposited RNA structures that experimental proton chemical shifts suffice to derive RNA helix structures with high precision and accuracy. CHEOPS provides, subject to further development, new directions for high-resolution NMR structure determination of nucleic acids.

  2. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-01-01

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110–120 kHz), 1 H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong 1 H– 1 H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow 1 H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) 1 H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about 1 H– 1 H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic-level structural and dynamical

  3. Database proton NMR chemical shifts for RNA signal assignment and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Shawn; Heng Xiao [University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (United States); Johnson, Bruce A., E-mail: bruce@onemoonscientific.com [University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Summers, Michael F., E-mail: summers@hhmi.umbc.edu [University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (United States)

    2013-01-15

    The Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank contains NMR chemical shift depositions for 132 RNAs and RNA-containing complexes. We have analyzed the {sup 1}H NMR chemical shifts reported for non-exchangeable protons of residues that reside within A-form helical regions of these RNAs. The analysis focused on the central base pair within a stretch of three adjacent base pairs (BP triplets), and included both Watson-Crick (WC; G:C, A:U) and G:U wobble pairs. Chemical shift values were included for all 4{sup 3} possible WC-BP triplets, as well as 137 additional triplets that contain one or more G:U wobbles. Sequence-dependent chemical shift correlations were identified, including correlations involving terminating base pairs within the triplets and canonical and non-canonical structures adjacent to the BP triplets (i.e. bulges, loops, WC and non-WC BPs), despite the fact that the NMR data were obtained under different conditions of pH, buffer, ionic strength, and temperature. A computer program (RNAShifts) was developed that enables convenient comparison of RNA {sup 1}H NMR assignments with database predictions, which should facilitate future signal assignment/validation efforts and enable rapid identification of non-canonical RNA structures and RNA-ligand/protein interaction sites.

  4. pH-Dependent spin state population and 19F NMR chemical shift via remote ligand protonation in an iron(ii) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudette, Alexandra I; Thorarinsdottir, Agnes E; Harris, T David

    2017-11-30

    An Fe II complex that features a pH-dependent spin state population, by virtue of a variable ligand protonation state, is described. This behavior leads to a highly pH-dependent 19 F NMR chemical shift with a sensitivity of 13.9(5) ppm per pH unit at 37 °C, thereby demonstrating the potential utility of the complex as a 19 F chemical shift-based pH sensor.

  5. Handbook of proton-NMR spectra and data index

    CERN Document Server

    Asahi Research Center Co, Ltd

    2013-01-01

    Handbook of Proton-NMR Spectra and Data: Index to Volumes 1-10 compiles four types of indexes used in charting the proton-NMR spectral database -Chemical Name Index, Molecular Formula Index, Substructure Index, and Chemical Shift Index. The Chemical Name Index compiles all chemical names in alphabetical order, followed by a spectrum number. When the desired organic compound cannot be found in the Chemical Name Index or its nomenclature is unclear, it becomes necessary to look for a compound by means of its molecular formula, hence the Molecular Formula Index. A unique notation system for repre

  6. New NMR method for measuring the difference between corresponding proton and deuterium chemical shifts: isotope effects on exchange equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, M.; Saunders, S.; Johnson, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    A convenient and accurate method is described for measuring the difference between a proton frequency and the corresponding deuterium frequency in its deuterated analogue relative to a reference system by using the deuterium lock in a Fourier-transform NMR spectrometer. This measurement is a sensitive way of measuring equilibrium isotope effects for hydrogen-deuterium exchange. A value of 1.60 per H-D pair is obtained for the equilibrium 2H 3 O + + 3D 2 O in equilibrium 2D 3 O + + 3H 2 O at 30 0 C in aqueous perchloric acid (HClO 4 ). 7 references, 2 tables

  7. Structural characterization of chemical warfare agent degradation products in decontamination solutions with proton band-selective (1)H-(31)P NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, Harri; Hakala, Ullastiina; Vanninen, Paula

    2010-06-15

    Decontamination solutions, which are usually composed of strong alkaline chemicals, are used for efficient detoxification of chemical warfare agents (CWAs). The analysis of CWA degradation products directly in decontamination solutions is challenging due to the nature of the matrix. Furthermore, occasionally an unforeseen degradation pathway can result in degradation products which could be eluded to in standard analyses. Here, we present the results of the application of proton band-selective (1)H-(31)P NMR spectroscopy, i.e., band-selective 1D (1)H-(31)P heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) and band-selective 2D (1)H-(31)P HSQC-total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY), for ester side chain characterization of organophosphorus nerve agent degradation products in decontamination solutions. The viability of the approach is demonstrated with a test mixture of typical degradation products of nerve agents sarin, soman, and VX. The proton band-selective (1)H-(31)P NMR spectroscopy is also applied in characterization of unusual degradation products of VX in GDS 2000 solution.

  8. Peptides containing internal residues of pyroglutamic acid: proton NMR characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    The proton NMR characteristics of internal pyroglutamic acid (Glp; 5-oxoproline) residues in seven tripeptides of the general structure Boc-Xxx-Glp-Yyy-NH 2 were studied. In general, the chemical shifts of several diagnostic protons moved downfield on going from the Glu-containing peptides (Boc-Xxx-Glu-Yyy-NH 2 ) to the corresponding Glp-containing peptides. The C-2 proton of the Xxx residue was shifted by about 1.1 ppm. The N-2 proton of the Yyy residue was shifted by about 0.5 ppm. The C-2 proton of the Glx residue itself was shifted by about 0.5 ppm. One of the Glx C-3 protons was also shifted by about 0.5 ppm, but the other remained essentially unchanged. Finally, the Glx C-4 protons were shifted by about 0.3 ppm. Internal Glu residues are readily converted chemically into internal Glp residues. This conversion also occurs as a side reaction during HP cleavage of the protecting group from Glu(OBzl) residues. The spontaneous fragmentation of serum proteins C3, C4 and λ 2 -macroglobulin under denaturing conditions is probably due to regioselective hydrolysis of an internal Glp residue formed in each of these proteins upon denaturation. These proton NMR characteristics may be useful in establishing the presence of internal Glp residues in synthetic and natural peptides

  9. Proton NMR imaging in experimental ischemic infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonanno, F.S.; Pykett, I.L.; Brady, T.J.; Vielma, J.; Burt, C.T.; Goldman, M.R.; Hinshaw, W.S.; Pohost, G.M.; Kistler, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images depict the distribution and concentration of mobile protons modified by the relaxation times T1 and T2. Using the steady-state-free-precession (SSFP) technique, serial coronal images were obtained sequentially over time in laboratory animals with experimental ischemic infarction. Image changes were evident as early as 2 hours after carotid artery ligation, and corresponded to areas of ischemic infarction noted pathologically. Resulting SSFP images in experimental stroke are contrasted to inversion-recovery NMR images in an illustrative patient with established cerebral infarction. Bulk T1 and T2 measurements were made in vitro in three groups of gerbils: normal, those with clinical evidence of infarction, and those clinically normal after carotid ligature. Infarcted hemispheres had significantly prolonged T1 and T2 (1.47 +/- .12 sec, 76.0 +/- 9.0 msec, respectively) when compared to the contralateral hemisphere (T1 . 1.28 +/- .05 sec, T2 . 58.7 +/- 3.9 msec) or to the other two groups. These data suggest that changes in NMR parameters occur and can be detected by NMR imaging as early as two hours after carotid artery ligation

  10. Proton NMR studies of functionalized nanoparticles in aqueous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataurova, Yulia Nikolaevna

    in high-resolution NMR spectra. This technique is selective for protons on the surface organic functional groups due to their motional averaging in solution. In this study, 1H solution NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the interface of the organic functional groups in D2O. The pKa for these functional groups covalently bound to the surface of nanoparticles was determined using an NMR-pH titration method based on the variation in the proton chemical shift for the alkyl group protons closest to the amine group with pH. The adsorption of toxic contaminants (chromate and arsenate anions) on the surface of functionalized silicalite-1 and mesoporous silica nanoparticles has been studied by 1H solution NMR spectroscopy. With this method, the surface bound contaminants are detected. The analysis of the intensity and position of these peaks allows quantitative assessment of the relative amounts of functional groups with adsorbed metal ions. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of solution NMR spectroscopy to the electronic environment and structure of the surface functional groups on porous nanomaterials.

  11. Proton and deuteron NMR study of PTFE ionomer membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, G; Pak, Y S [Dept. of Materials Science, McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    1992-02-01

    Proton and deuteron NMR have been conducted to investigate the ionic motion in perfluorinated ionomer membranes from Dow Chemical (XUS) and DuPont (Nafion{sup R}). Two proton relaxation peaks were found in the XUS specimen absorbed with H{sub 2}O. The major (narrow) peak presented a spin-lattice relaxation time (T{sub 1}) of 107 ms while the minor (broader) one gave much longer T{sub 1}. While the former was attributed to the water molecules involved in restricted motion, the latter was expected to be associated with the protons located in the vicinity of the sulfonate groups. Similar to the previous results from the others, only a single peak was detected in Nafion{sup R} in {sup 1}H spectra, indicating that the protons in the different environments were engaging rapid exchange within NMR time scale. In contrast to the inverse proportion dependence of the linewidth on the water sorption in Nafion{sup R}, the major line of the XUS membrane exhibited insensitive linewidth dependence on the variation of H{sub 2}O concentration. The difference was attributed to the existence of narrow breaths of the pores in XUS sample, such that free water contribution to the enhancement of proton mobility was limited. The {sup 2}H spectra of Nafion{sup R} were found to possess a doublet, due to nuclear quadrupolar interaction. Dow (XUS) membrane treated in at 100% relative humidity (RH) D{sub 2}O presented a single peak with the linewidth insensitive to the amount of heavy water absorbed. An additional rise emerged on the ''shoulder'' of this single peak when treated at 33% RH. It is concluded that XUS membrane does not provide strong hydrogen bonding to eliminate the rapid motion average over the nuclear quadrupole interaction. (orig.).

  12. Proton NMR relaxation in hydrous melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunstein, J.; Bacarella, A.L.; Benjamin, B.M.; Brown, L.L.; Girard, C.

    1976-01-01

    Pulse and continuous wave NMR measurements are reported for protons in hydrous melts of calcium nitrate at temperatures between -4 and 120 0 C. Although measured in different temperature ranges, spin-lattice (T 1 ) and spin-spin (T 2 ) relaxation times appear to be nearly equal to each other and proportional to the self-diffusion coefficients of solute metal cations such as Cd 2+ . At temperatures near 50 0 C, mean Arrhenius coefficients Δ H/sub T 1 / (kcal/mol) are 7.9, 7.3, and 4.8, respectively, for melts containing 2.8, 4.0, and 8.0 moles of water per mole of calcium nitrate, compared to 4.6 kcal/mol for pure water. Temperature dependence of T 1 and T 2 in Ca(NO 3 ) 2 -2.8 H 2 O between -4 and 120 0 C are non-Arrhenius and can be represented by a Fulcher-type equation with a ''zero mobility temperature'' (T 0 ) of 225 0 K, close to the value of T 0 for solute diffusion, electrical conductance and viscosity. Resolution of the relaxation rates into correlation times for intramolecular (rotational) and intermolecular (translational) diffusional motion is discussed in terms of the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound and more recent models for dipolar relaxation

  13. High resolution NMR theory and chemical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Edwin D

    1999-01-01

    High Resolution NMR provides a broad treatment of the principles and theory of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as it is used in the chemical sciences. It is written at an "intermediate" level, with mathematics used to augment, rather than replace, clear verbal descriptions of the phenomena. The book is intended to allow a graduate student, advanced undergraduate, or researcher to understand NMR at a fundamental level, and to see illustrations of the applications of NMR to the determination of the structure of small organic molecules and macromolecules, including proteins. Emphasis is on the study of NMR in liquids, but the treatment also includes high resolution NMR in the solid state and the principles of NMR imaging and localized spectroscopy. Careful attention is given to developing and interrelating four approaches - steady state energy levels, the rotating vector picture, the density matrix, and the product operator formalism. The presentation is based on the assumption that the reader has an acquaintan...

  14. Proton solvation and proton transfer in chemical and electrochemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengyel, S.; Conway, B.E.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter examines the proton solvation and characterization of the H 3 O + ion, proton transfer in chemical ionization processes in solution, continuous proton transfer in conductance processes, and proton transfer in electrode processes. Topics considered include the condition of the proton in solution, the molecular structure of the H 3 O + ion, thermodynamics of proton solvation, overall hydration energy of the proton, hydration of H 3 O + , deuteron solvation, partial molal entropy and volume and the entropy of proton hydration, proton solvation in alcoholic solutions, analogies to electrons in semiconductors, continuous proton transfer in conductance, definition and phenomenology of the unusual mobility of the proton in solution, solvent structure changes in relation to anomalous proton mobility, the kinetics of the proton-transfer event, theories of abnormal proton conductance, and the general theory of the contribution of transfer reactions to overall transport processes

  15. High resolution NMR theory and chemical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Edwin D

    2012-01-01

    High Resolution NMR: Theory and Chemical Applications discusses the principles and theory of nuclear magnetic resonance and how this concept is used in the chemical sciences. This book is written at an intermediate level, with mathematics used to augment verbal descriptions of the phenomena. This text pays attention to developing and interrelating four approaches - the steady state energy levels, the rotating vector picture, the density matrix, and the product operator formalism. The style of this book is based on the assumption that the reader has an acquaintance with the general principles of quantum mechanics, but no extensive background in quantum theory or proficiency in mathematics is required. This book begins with a description of the basic physics, together with a brief account of the historical development of the field. It looks at the study of NMR in liquids, including high resolution NMR in the solid state and the principles of NMR imaging and localized spectroscopy. This book is intended to assis...

  16. An NMR Protonation Study of Metal Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic Acid Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letkeman, Peter

    1979-01-01

    This experiment is suitable for an integrated laboratory course for senior chemistry majors. It introduces the student to a study of the relative basicity of different proton accepting sites. It serves as an opportunity to learn about nmr techniques and could extend to infrared, as well. (BB)

  17. Cation Hydration Constants by Proton NMR: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Studies the polarization effect on water by cations and anions. Describes an experiment to illustrate the polarization effect of sodium, lithium, calcium, and strontium ions on the water molecule in the hydration spheres of the ions. Analysis is performed by proton NMR. (MVL)

  18. Measuring proton shift tensors with ultrafast MAS NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Habeeba K; Bennett, David A; Iuga, Dinu; Titman, Jeremy J

    2013-10-01

    A new proton anisotropic-isotropic shift correlation experiment is described which operates with ultrafast MAS, resulting in good resolution of isotropic proton shifts in the detection dimension. The new experiment makes use of a recoupling sequence designed using symmetry principles which reintroduces the proton chemical shift anisotropy in the indirect dimension. The experiment has been used to measure the proton shift tensor parameters for the OH hydrogen-bonded protons in tyrosine·HCl and citric acid at Larmor frequencies of up to 850 MHz. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Techniques and approaches to proton NMR imaging of the head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pykett, I.L.; Buonanno, F.S.; Brady, T.J.; Kistler, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    The next few years will undoubtedly see a refinement of proton imaging technology and a broader data base will indicate to what extent proton relaxation parameters are able to detect and characterize disease. In addition, it is likely that imaging of other nuclei (e.g. 31 P, 23 Na, 19 F) will become a reality, although it must be stated that due to their inherently lower sensitivity to NMR detection and/or lower physiological concentration, clinical images of nuclei other than 1 H will undoubtedly have a low spatial resolution and may require relatively long imaging times. Nonetheless, herein lies the exciting possibility of non-invasive metabolic or functional imaging. The realm of NMR contrast agents is just beginning to be explored, and developments in high-speed imaging indicate useful applications in cardiology. So whilst improvements in image quality can be expected, as was the case with X-ray CT, the application of NMR in medicine will diversify to yield information of a more specifically functional nature. This, together with the very low attendant biological risk, heralds a bright future for NMR in clinical diagnosis

  20. Proton and deuterium NMR experiments in zero field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millar, J.M.

    1986-02-01

    High field solid-state NMR lineshapes suffer from inhomogeneous broadening since resonance frequencies are a function of molecular orientation. Time domain zero field NMR is a two-dimensional field-cycling technique which removes this broadening by probing the evolution of the spin system under zero applied field. The simplest version, the sudden transition experiment, induces zero field evolution by the sudden removal of the applied magnetic field. Theory and experimental results of this experiment and several variations using pulsed dc magnetic fuelds to initiate zero field evolution are presented. In particular, the pulsed indirect detection method allows detection of the zero field spectrum of one nuclear spin species via another (usually protons) by utilizing the level crossings which occur upon adiabatic demagnetization to zero field. Experimental examples of proton/deuteron systems are presented which demonstrate the method results in enhanced sensitivity relative to that obtained in sudden transition experiments performed directly on deuterium. High resolution 2 H NQR spectra of a series of benzoic acid derivatives are obtained using the sudden transition and indirect detection methods. Librational oscillations in the water molecules of barium chlorate monohydrate are studied using proton and deuterium ZF experiments. 177 refs., 88 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Conformation of antifreeze glycoproteins as determined from conformational energy calculations and fully assigned proton NMR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, C.A.; Rao, B.N.N.

    1986-01-01

    The 1 H NMR spectra of AFGP's ranging in molecular weight from 2600 to 30,000 Daltons isolated from several different species of polar fish have been measured. The spectrum of AFGP 1-4 from Pagothenia borchgrevinki with an average of 30 repeating subunits has a single resonance for each proton of the glycotripeptide repeating unit, (ala-[gal-(β-1→3) galNAc-(α--O-]thr-ala)/sub n/. Its 1 H NMR spectrum including resonances of the amide protons has been completely assigned. Coupling constants and nuclear Overhauser enhancements (n.O.e.) between protons on distant residues imply conformational order. The 2600 dalton molecular weight glycopeptides (AFGP-8) have pro in place of ala at certain specific points in the sequence and AFGP-8R of Eleginus gracilis has arg in place of one thr. The resonances of pro and arg were assigned by decoupling. The resonances of the carboxy and amino terminals have distinct chemical shifts and were assigned in AFGP-8 of Boreogadus saida by titration. n.O.e. between α--protons and amide protons of the adjacent residue (sequential n.O.e.) were used in assignments of additional resonances and to assign the distinctive resonances of thr followed by pro. Conformational energy calculations on the repeating glycotripeptide subunit of AFGP show that the α--glucosidic linkage has a fixed conformation while the β--linkage is less rigid. A conformational model for AFGP 1-4, which is based on the calculations has the peptide in an extended left-handed helix with three residues per turn similar to polyproline II. The model is consistent with CD data, amide proton coupling constants, temperature dependence of amide proton chemical shifts

  2. Synthesis and proton-NMR studies of oligonucleotides containing an apurinic (AP) site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raap, J.; Dreef, C.E.; van der Marel, G.A.; van Boom, J.H.; Hilbers, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    In order to elucidate the conformational properties of base-deleted oligodeoxyribonucleotides, the molecules d-CpS(pCpG)n (n = 1,2; S = sugar) were synthesized by the phosphotriester method and characterized by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Complete assignment of all non-exchangeable proton resonances of both compounds was obtained by 1D- and 2D-NMR techniques. In combination with computer simulation, these spectra yielded proton-proton and proton-phosphorus coupling constants of high accuracy. These data provide valuable information about the sugar and the backbone conformation. It appears that d-Cp1Sp2Cp3G4 does not form a duplex under any of the conditions studied. On the contrary, the base-deleted hexamer d-Cp1Sp2Cp3Gp4Cp5G6 occurs as a right-handed' staggered' DNA duplex at 280 K: the core of this duplex is formed by the residues C(3)-G(6); two 'dangling' residues C(1) and S(2) are located at the two 5'-ends of the duplex. The assignment of the corresponding imino proton resonances for [d-CpS(pCpG)2]2 was based on their thermal behavior: the line broadening of these resonances was studied as a function of temperature. The chemical shift and the number of imino proton resonances accord well with the number and type of Watson-Crick base pairs which can be formed in the staggered duplex described above. Thermodynamic parameters of duplex formation were obtained from an analysis of the chemical shift versus temperature profiles of aromatic base and H-1' protons. It is suggested that the cytosine ring of C(1) stacks, at least part of the time, with the guanine ring on the nucleotide residue, G(6), situated in the complementary strand. The binding of Lys-Trp-Lys to [d-CpS(pCpG)2]2 as well as to [d-CpGpCpG]1 was investigated

  3. NMR chemical shifts in amino acids: Effects of environments, electric field, and amine group rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Pfrommer, Bernd G.; Louie, Steven G.; Canning, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    The authors present calculations of NMR chemical shifts in crystalline phases of some representative amino acids such as glycine, alanine, and alanyl-alanine. To get an insight on how different environments affect the chemical shifts, they study the transition from the crystalline phase to completely isolated molecules of glycine. In the crystalline limit, the shifts are dominated by intermolecular hydrogen-bonds. In the molecular limit, however, dipole electric field effects dominate the behavior of the chemical shifts. They show that it is necessary to average the chemical shifts in glycine over geometries. Tensor components are analyzed to get the angle dependent proton chemical shifts, which is a more refined characterization method

  4. Characterization of mu s-ms dynamics of proteins using a combined analysis of N-15 NMR relaxation and chemical shift: Conformational exchange in plastocyanin induced by histidine protonations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, M. A. S.; Thuesen, Marianne Hallberg; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2004-01-01

    of the exchanging species can be determined independently of the relaxation rates. The applicability of the approach is demonstrated by a detailed analysis of the conformational exchange processes previously observed in the reduced form of the blue copper protein, plastocyanin from the cyanobacteria Anabaena......An approach is presented that allows a detailed, quantitative characterization of conformational exchange processes in proteins on the mus-ms time scale. The approach relies on a combined analysis of NMR relaxation rates and chemical shift changes and requires that the chemical shift...... quantitatively by the correlation between the R-ex terms and the corresponding chemical shift differences of the exchanging species. By this approach, the R-ex terms of N-15 nuclei belonging to contiguous regions in the protein could be assigned to the same exchange process. Furthermore, the analysis...

  5. Accessible surface area from NMR chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafsa, Noor E.; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S., E-mail: david.wishart@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Computing Science (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    Accessible surface area (ASA) is the surface area of an atom, amino acid or biomolecule that is exposed to solvent. The calculation of a molecule’s ASA requires three-dimensional coordinate data and the use of a “rolling ball” algorithm to both define and calculate the ASA. For polymers such as proteins, the ASA for individual amino acids is closely related to the hydrophobicity of the amino acid as well as its local secondary and tertiary structure. For proteins, ASA is a structural descriptor that can often be as informative as secondary structure. Consequently there has been considerable effort over the past two decades to try to predict ASA from protein sequence data and to use ASA information (derived from chemical modification studies) as a structure constraint. Recently it has become evident that protein chemical shifts are also sensitive to ASA. Given the potential utility of ASA estimates as structural constraints for NMR we decided to explore this relationship further. Using machine learning techniques (specifically a boosted tree regression model) we developed an algorithm called “ShiftASA” that combines chemical-shift and sequence derived features to accurately estimate per-residue fractional ASA values of water-soluble proteins. This method showed a correlation coefficient between predicted and experimental values of 0.79 when evaluated on a set of 65 independent test proteins, which was an 8.2 % improvement over the next best performing (sequence-only) method. On a separate test set of 92 proteins, ShiftASA reported a mean correlation coefficient of 0.82, which was 12.3 % better than the next best performing method. ShiftASA is available as a web server ( http://shiftasa.wishartlab.com http://shiftasa.wishartlab.com ) for submitting input queries for fractional ASA calculation.

  6. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Applications: Proton NMR In Biological Objects Subjected To Magic Angle Spinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2005-01-01

    Proton NMR in Biological Objects Submitted to Magic Angle Spinning, In Encyclopedia of Analytical Science, Second Edition (Paul J. Worsfold, Alan Townshend and Colin F. Poole, eds.), Elsevier, Oxford 6:333-342. Published January 1, 2005. Proposal Number 10896

  7. Evaluating amber force fields using computed NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koes, David R; Vries, John K

    2017-10-01

    NMR chemical shifts can be computed from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using a template matching approach and a library of conformers containing chemical shifts generated from ab initio quantum calculations. This approach has potential utility for evaluating the force fields that underlie these simulations. Imperfections in force fields generate flawed atomic coordinates. Chemical shifts obtained from flawed coordinates have errors that can be traced back to these imperfections. We use this approach to evaluate a series of AMBER force fields that have been refined over the course of two decades (ff94, ff96, ff99SB, ff14SB, ff14ipq, and ff15ipq). For each force field a series of MD simulations are carried out for eight model proteins. The calculated chemical shifts for the 1 H, 15 N, and 13 C a atoms are compared with experimental values. Initial evaluations are based on root mean squared (RMS) errors at the protein level. These results are further refined based on secondary structure and the types of atoms involved in nonbonded interactions. The best chemical shift for identifying force field differences is the shift associated with peptide protons. Examination of the model proteins on a residue by residue basis reveals that force field performance is highly dependent on residue position. Examination of the time course of nonbonded interactions at these sites provides explanations for chemical shift differences at the atomic coordinate level. Results show that the newer ff14ipq and ff15ipq force fields developed with the implicitly polarized charge method perform better than the older force fields. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. NMR studies of proton exchange kinetics in aqueous formaldehyde solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivlin, Michal; Eliav, Uzi; Navon, Gil

    2014-05-01

    Aqueous solutions of formaldehyde, formalin, are commonly used for tissue fixation and preservation. Treatment with formalin is known to shorten the tissue transverse relaxation time T2. Part of this shortening is due to the effect of formalin on the water T2. In the present work we show that the shortening of water T2 is a result of proton exchange between water and the major constituent of aqueous solutions of formaldehyde, methylene glycol. We report the observation of the signal of the hydroxyl protons of methylene glycol at 2ppm to high frequency of the water signal that can be seen at low temperatures and at pH range of 6.0±1.5 and, at conditions where it cannot be observed by the single pulse experiment, it can be detected indirectly through the water signal by the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) experiment. The above finding made it possible to obtain the exchange rate between the hydroxyl protons of the methylene glycol and water in aqueous formaldehyde solutions, either using the dispersion of the spin-lattice relaxation rate in the rotating frame (1/T1ρ) or, at the slow exchange regime, from the line width hydroxyl protons of methylene glycol. The exchange rate was ∼10(4)s(-1) at pH 7.4 and 37°C, the activation energy, 50.2kJ/mol and its pH dependence at 1.1°C was fitted to: k (s(-1))=520+6.5×10(7)[H(+)]+3.0×10(9)[OH(-)]. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Chemical shifts of oxygen-17 NMR in polyoxotungstates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazanskij, L.P.; Fedotov, M.A.; Spitsyn, V.I.

    1977-01-01

    17 O NMR spectra of aqueous solutions containing paratungstate BH 2 W 12 O 42 10- and metatungstate H 2 W 12 O 40 6- anions have been measured. On the basis of the obtained data a scale of chemical shifts for oxygen atoms connected by various bonds with tungsten atoms is suggested. The obtained data are compared with the Raman spectra of crystalline salts and their aqueous solutions. Chemical shifts of 17 O NMR spectra have been also measured in other heteropolyanions

  10. High-resolution proton and carbon-13 NMR of membranes: why sonicate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldfield, E.; Bowers, J.L.; Forbes, J.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have obtained high-field (11.7-T) proton and carbon-13 Fourier transform (FT) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of egg lecithin and egg lecithin-chloresterol (1:1) multibilayers, using magic-angle sample spinning (MASS) techniques, and sonicated egg lecithin and egg lecithin-cholesterol (1:1) vesicles, using conventional FT NMR methods. Resolution of the proton and carbon-13 MASS NMR spectra of the pure egg lecithin samples is essentially identical with that of sonicated samples, but spectra of the unsonicated lipid, using MASS, can be obtained very much faster than with the more dilute, sonicated systems. With the 1:1 lecithin-cholesterol system, proton MASS NMR spectra are virtually identical with conventional FT spectra of sonicated samples, while the 13 C NMR, the authors demonstrate that most 13 C nuclei in the cholesterol moiety can be monitored, even though these same nuclei are essentially invisible, i.e., are severely broadened, in the corresponding sonicated systems. In addition, 13 C MASS NMR spectra can again be recorded much faster than with sonicated samples, due to concentration effects. Taken together, these results strongly suggest there will seldom be need in the future to resort to ultransonic disruption of lipid bilayer membranes in order to obtain high-resolution proton or carbon-13 NMR spectra

  11. Proton conduction based on intracrystalline chemical reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuck, G.; Lechner, R.E.; Langer, K.

    2002-01-01

    Proton conductivity in M 3 H(SeO 4 ) 2 crystals (M=K, Rb, Cs) is shown to be due to a dynamic disorder in the form of an intracrystalline chemical equilibrium reaction: alternation between the association of the monomers [HSeO 4 ] 1- and [SeO 4 ] 2- resulting in the dimer [H(SeO 4 ) 2 ] 3- (H-bond formation) and the dissociation of the latter into the two monomers (H-bond breaking). By a combination of quasielastic neutron scattering and FTIR spectroscopy, reaction rates were obtained, as well as rates of proton exchange between selenate ions, leading to diffusion. The results demonstrate that this reaction plays a central role in the mechanism of proton transport in these solid-state protonic conductors. (orig.)

  12. Proton NMR studies of creatine in human erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchel, P W; Chapman, B E [Sydney Univ. (Australia). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1983-09-01

    Proton spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to measure the relative levels of some metabolites in intact human erythrocytes that had been fractionated by density gradient centrifugation. Age dependent changes in the concentrations of free glycine, choline and ergothioneine were seen for the first time, while glutathione was essentially invariant. In addition, there was a 10-fold decrease in creatine levels from the youngest to oldest cells. This confirms earlier reports and provides a simple explanation for the variable creatine resonance intensities seen in spectra obtained from different erythrocyte samples prepared from the same donor. The different chemical shifts of the methylene resonances of creatine and creatine phosphate was demonstrated and hence confirmed that the bulk of the creatine in intact erythrocytes is not phosphorylated. The chemical shift difference enabled the monitoring of the creatine phosphokinase catalysed reaction in lysates to which the rabbit muscle enzyme had been added. This experiment indicated that the enzyme is not significantly inhibited by factors in the lysates, and introduced a new means of assaying the in situ activity of the enzyme.

  13. Proton NMR studies of creatine in human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchel, P.W.; Chapman, B.E.

    1983-01-01

    Proton spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to measure the relative levels of some metabolites in intact human erythrocytes that had been fractionated by density gradient centrifugation. Age dependent changes in the concentrations of free glycine, choline and ergothioneine were seen for the first time, while glutathione was essentially invariant. In addition, there was a 10-fold decrease in creatine levels from the youngest to oldest cells. This confirms earlier reports and provides a simple explanation for the variable creatine resonance intensities seen in spectra obtained from different erythrocyte samples prepared from the same donor. The different chemical shifts of the methylene resonances of creatine and creatine phosphate was demonstrated and hence confirmed that the bulk of the creatine in intact erythrocytes is not phosphorylated. The chemical shift difference enabled the monitoring of the creatine phosphokinase catalysed reaction in lysates to which the rabbit muscle enzyme had been added. This experiment indicated that the enzyme is not significantly inhibited by factors in the lysates, and introduced a new means of assaying the in situ activity of the enzyme. (author)

  14. Hydroxy protons as structural probes to reveal hydrogen bonding properties of polyols in aqueous solution by NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruc, Gizem; Varnali, Tereza; Bekiroglu, Somer

    2018-05-01

    The solution properties of ethylene glycol (ethane-1,2-diol), glycerol (propane-1,2,3-triol), erythritol ((2R,3S)-butane-1,2,3,4-tetraol), D-xylitol ((2R,3r,4S)-pentane-1,2,3,4,5-pentaol), D-mannitol ((2R,3R,4R,5R)-hexane-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexaol), and D-sorbitol ((2S,3R,4R,5R)-hexane-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexaol), constituting a subgroup of polyalcohols/polyols of maximum six carbon atoms have been investigated using 1H NMR chemical shifts, coupling constants, temperature coefficients, and chemical exchange rates of hydroxy protons in aqueous medium. Relative within a molecule, minimum two-fold difference in rate of exchange values and higher temperature dependence of chemical shifts of the hydroxy protons on terminal carbon atoms confirm that sustainable hydrogen bonding interactions is accentuated for the hydroxyl groups on secondary carbons. Compared to the primary carbons i.e. terminal ones, the hydroxy protons on second and third carbon atoms exhibit much lower rate of exchange and smaller temperature coefficients, indicating that they are further involved in transient hydrogen bonding interactions. Scalar 3JOH,CH-couplings ranging between 3.9 and 7.2 Hz imply that the hydroxyl groups are practically in free rotation regime. Examination of the chemical shift differences with respect to the shift of glycol hydroxy proton reveals that the disparity between terminal and inner hydroxyl groups disclosed by the exchange rates and temperature coefficients is sustained with the exception of 0.003 and 0.053 ppm for O(3)H of mannitol and O(5)H of sorbitol respectively. The experimental findings have been augmented by quantum chemical calculations targeting theoretical NMR chemical shifts, as well as the conformational analysis of the structures.

  15. Relative Configuration of Natural Products Using NMR Chemical Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    By comparing calculated with experimental NMR chemical shifts, we were able to determine the relative configurations of three monoterpene diastereomers produced by the walkingstick Anisomorpha buprestoides. The combined RMSDs of both 1H and 13C quantum chemically calculated shifts were able to predi...

  16. Proton NMR study of α-MnH 0.06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloninin, A. V.; Skripov, A. V.; Buzlukov, A. L.; Antonov, V. E.; Antonova, T. E.

    2004-07-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and spin-lattice relaxation rates for the solid solution α-MnH 0.06 have been measured over the temperature range 11-297 K and the resonance frequency range 20-90 MHz. A considerable shift and broadening of the proton NMR line and a sharp peak of the spin-lattice relaxation rate are observed near 130 K. These effects are attributed to the onset of antiferromagnetic ordering below the Néel temperature TN≈130 K. The proton NMR line does not disappear in the antiferromagnetic phase; this suggests a small magnitude of the local magnetic fields at H-sites in α-MnH 0.06. The spin-lattice relaxation rate in the paramagnetic phase is dominated by the effects of spin fluctuations.

  17. /sup 1/H-NMR chemical shift imaging suitable for low field systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Etsuji; Onodera, Takashi; Shiono, Hidemi; Kohno, Hideki

    1986-12-01

    An echo-time encoding proton NMR chemical shift imaging proposed by Dixon is extended to be applicable to low filed systems. The method utilizes the small phase angle between magnetic vectors of water and lipid protons to decrease the signal decays with spin-spin relaxation. The inevitable phase error caused by the static field inhomogeneity is corrected by using phase images of phantom measured under the same conditions as the actual measurements. The experiments were carried out using CuSO/sub 4/ doped water and vegetable oil at 0.5 T. Two chemical shift images could be clearly resolved with only one scan when the field inhomogeneity was larger than the chemical shift difference.

  18. Unraveling the meaning of chemical shifts in protein NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berjanskii, Mark V; Wishart, David S

    2017-11-01

    Chemical shifts are among the most informative parameters in protein NMR. They provide wealth of information about protein secondary and tertiary structure, protein flexibility, and protein-ligand binding. In this report, we review the progress in interpreting and utilizing protein chemical shifts that has occurred over the past 25years, with a particular focus on the large body of work arising from our group and other Canadian NMR laboratories. More specifically, this review focuses on describing, assessing, and providing some historical context for various chemical shift-based methods to: (1) determine protein secondary and super-secondary structure; (2) derive protein torsion angles; (3) assess protein flexibility; (4) predict residue accessible surface area; (5) refine 3D protein structures; (6) determine 3D protein structures and (7) characterize intrinsically disordered proteins. This review also briefly covers some of the methods that we previously developed to predict chemical shifts from 3D protein structures and/or protein sequence data. It is hoped that this review will help to increase awareness of the considerable utility of NMR chemical shifts in structural biology and facilitate more widespread adoption of chemical-shift based methods by the NMR spectroscopists, structural biologists, protein biophysicists, and biochemists worldwide. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biophysics in Canada, edited by Lewis Kay, John Baenziger, Albert Berghuis and Peter Tieleman. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Spin coherence transfer in chemical transformations monitoredNMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anwar, Sabieh M.; Hilty, Christian; Chu, Chester; Bouchard,Louis-S.; Pierce, Kimberly L.; Pines, Alexander

    2006-07-31

    We demonstrate the use of micro-scale nuclear magneticresonance (NMR) for studying the transfer of spin coherence innon-equilibrium chemical processes, using spatially separated NMRencoding and detection coils. As an example, we provide the map ofchemical shift correlations for the amino acid alanine as it transitionsfrom the zwitterionic to the anionic form. Our method is unique in thesense that it allows us to track the chemical migration of encodednuclear spins during the course of chemical transformations.

  20. Two- and three-dimensional proton NMR studies of apo-neocarzinostatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiaolian Gao; Burkhart, W.

    1991-01-01

    Neocarzinostatin (NCS) is an antitumor protein from Streptomyces carzinostaticus that is identical in apo-protein sequence with mitomalcin (MMC) from Streptomyces malayensis. The authors describe the use of apo-NCS as a model system for applying combined two-and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) proton NMR spectroscopy to the structure determination of proteins without isotope labeling. Strategies aimed at accurately assigning overlapped 2D cross-peaks by using semiautomated combined 2D and 3D data analysis are developed. Using this approach, they have assigned 99% of the protons, including those of the side chains, and identified about 1,270 intra- and interresidue proton-proton interactions (fixed distances are not included) in apo-NCS. Comparing these results with those reported recently on 2D NMR studies of apo-NCS demonstrated advantages of proton 3D NMR spectroscopy in protein spectral assignments. They are able to obtain more complete proton resonance and secondary structural assignments and find several misassignments in the earlier report. Strategies utilized in this work should be useful for developing automation procedures for spectral assignments

  1. Introduction to the conformational investigation of peptides and proteins by using two-dimensional proton NMR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, J.M.; Macquaire, F.

    1991-01-01

    This report presents the elementary bases for an initiation to the conformational study of peptides and proteins by using two-dimensional proton NMR experiments. First, some general features of protein structures are summarized. A second chapter is devoted to the basic NMR experiments and to the spectral parameters which provide a structural information. This description is illustrated by NMR spectra of peptides. The third chapter concerns the most standard two-dimensional proton NMR experiments and their use for a conformational study of peptides and proteins. Lastly, an example of NMR structural investigation of a peptide is reported [fr

  2. Amide proton exchange rates of a bound pepsin inhibitor determined by isotope-edited proton NMR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesik, S.W.; Luly, J.R.; Stein, H.H.; BaMaung, N.

    1987-01-01

    From a series of isotope-edited proton NMR spectra, amide proton exchange rates were measured at 20 C, 30 C, and 40 0 C for a tightly bound 15 N-labeled tripeptide inhibitor of porcine pepsin (IC50 = 1.7 X 10(-) M). Markedly different NH exchange rates were observed for the three amide protons of the bound inhibitor. The P1 NH exchanged much more slowly than the P2 NH and P3 NH. These results are discussed in terms of the relative solvent accessibility in the active site and the role of the NH protons of the inhibitor for hydrogen bonding to the enzyme. In this study a useful approach is demonstrated for obtaining NH exchange rates on ligands bound to biomacromolecules, the knowledge of which could be of potential utility in the design of therapeutically useful nonpeptide enzyme inhibitors from peptide leads

  3. Solid-state NMR analysis of membrane proteins and protein aggregates by proton detected spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Donghua H.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Comellas, Gemma; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Tang, Ming; Shah, Gautam J.; Brea, Elliott J.; Lemkau, Luisel R.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state NMR has emerged as an important tool for structural biology and chemistry, capable of solving atomic-resolution structures for proteins in membrane-bound and aggregated states. Proton detection methods have been recently realized under fast magic-angle spinning conditions, providing large sensitivity enhancements for efficient examination of uniformly labeled proteins. The first and often most challenging step of protein structure determination by NMR is the site-specific resonance assignment. Here we demonstrate resonance assignments based on high-sensitivity proton-detected three-dimensional experiments for samples of different physical states, including a fully-protonated small protein (GB1, 6 kDa), a deuterated microcrystalline protein (DsbA, 21 kDa), a membrane protein (DsbB, 20 kDa) prepared in a lipid environment, and the extended core of a fibrillar protein (α-synuclein, 14 kDa). In our implementation of these experiments, including CONH, CO(CA)NH, CANH, CA(CO)NH, CBCANH, and CBCA(CO)NH, dipolar-based polarization transfer methods have been chosen for optimal efficiency for relatively high protonation levels (full protonation or 100 % amide proton), fast magic-angle spinning conditions (40 kHz) and moderate proton decoupling power levels. Each H–N pair correlates exclusively to either intra- or inter-residue carbons, but not both, to maximize spectral resolution. Experiment time can be reduced by at least a factor of 10 by using proton detection in comparison to carbon detection. These high-sensitivity experiments are especially important for membrane proteins, which often have rather low expression yield. Proton-detection based experiments are expected to play an important role in accelerating protein structure elucidation by solid-state NMR with the improved sensitivity and resolution.

  4. Enhanced NMR signal detection of imino protons in RNA molecules containing 3' dangling nucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amborski, Andrew N.; Johnson, Philip E.

    2008-01-01

    We present a method for improving the quality of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra involving exchangeable protons near the base of the stem of RNA hairpin molecules. NMR spectra of five different RNA hairpins were compared. These hairpins consisted of a native RNA structure and four molecules each having different unpaired, or dangling, nucleotides at the 3' end. NMR experiments were acquired in water for each construct and the quality of the imino proton spectral regions were examined. The imino resonances near the base of the stem of the wild type RNA structure were not observed due to breathing motions. However, a significant increase in spectral quality for molecules with dangling 3' adenosine or guanosine nucleotides was observed, with imino protons detected in these constructs that were not observed in the wild type construct. A modest improvement in spectral quality was seen for the construct with a 3' unpaired uridine, whereas no significant improvement was observed for a 3' unpaired cytidine. This improvement in NMR spectral quality mirrors the increased thermodynamic stability observed for 3' unpaired nucleotides which is dependant on the stacking interactions of these nucleotides against the base of the stem. The use of a dangling 3' adenosine nucleotide represents an easy method to significantly improve the quality of NMR spectra of RNA molecules

  5. NMR evidence for protonated tetraethyl p-tert-butylcalix[4]arene tetracacetate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kříž, Jaroslav; Dybal, Jiří; Makrlík, E.; Vaňura, P.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 7 (2007), s. 1321-1326 ISSN 0137- 5083 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : calix[4]arene * protonation * NMR * acetonitrile Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.483, year: 2007

  6. NMR imaging: A 'chemical' microscope for coal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, D.C.; Dieckman, S.L.; Gopalsami, N.; Botto, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a new three-dimensional (3-D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging technique for spatially mapping proton distributions in whole coals and solvent-swollen coal samples. The technique is based on a 3-D back-projection protocol for data acquisition, and a reconstruction technique based on 3-D Radon transform inversion. In principle, the 3-D methodology provides higher spatial resolution of solid materials than is possible with conventional slice-selection protocols. The applicability of 3-D NMR imaging has been demonstrated by mapping the maceral phases in Utah Blind Canyon (APCS number-sign 6) coal and the distribution of mobile phases in Utah coal swollen with deuterated and protic pyridine. 7 refs., 5 figs

  7. Probabilistic validation of protein NMR chemical shift assignments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dashti, Hesam; Tonelli, Marco; Lee, Woonghee; Westler, William M.; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Ulrich, Eldon L.; Markley, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Data validation plays an important role in ensuring the reliability and reproducibility of studies. NMR investigations of the functional properties, dynamics, chemical kinetics, and structures of proteins depend critically on the correctness of chemical shift assignments. We present a novel probabilistic method named ARECA for validating chemical shift assignments that relies on the nuclear Overhauser effect data. ARECA has been evaluated through its application to 26 case studies and has been shown to be complementary to, and usually more reliable than, approaches based on chemical shift databases. ARECA is available online at http://areca.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ http://areca.nmrfam.wisc.edu/

  8. Probabilistic validation of protein NMR chemical shift assignments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dashti, Hesam [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Graduate Program in Biophysics, Biochemistry Department (United States); Tonelli, Marco; Lee, Woonghee; Westler, William M.; Cornilescu, Gabriel [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Biochemistry Department, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (United States); Ulrich, Eldon L. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, BioMagResBank, Biochemistry Department (United States); Markley, John L., E-mail: markley@nmrfam.wisc.edu, E-mail: jmarkley@wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Biochemistry Department, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Data validation plays an important role in ensuring the reliability and reproducibility of studies. NMR investigations of the functional properties, dynamics, chemical kinetics, and structures of proteins depend critically on the correctness of chemical shift assignments. We present a novel probabilistic method named ARECA for validating chemical shift assignments that relies on the nuclear Overhauser effect data. ARECA has been evaluated through its application to 26 case studies and has been shown to be complementary to, and usually more reliable than, approaches based on chemical shift databases. ARECA is available online at http://areca.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ http://areca.nmrfam.wisc.edu/.

  9. Line-narrowing in proton-detected nitrogen-14 NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavadini, Simone; Vitzthum, Veronika; Ulzega, Simone; Abraham, Anuji; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    In solids spinning at the magic angle, the indirect detection of single-quantum (SQ) and double-quantum (DQ) 14N spectra ( I = 1) via spy nuclei S = 1/2 such as protons can be achieved in the manner of heteronuclear single- or multiple-quantum correlation (HSQC or HMQC) spectroscopy. The HMQC method relies on the excitation of two-spin coherences of the type T11IT11S and T21IT11S at the beginning of the evolution interval t1. The spectra obtained by Fourier transformation from t1 to ω1 may be broadened by the homogenous decay of the transverse terms of the spy nuclei S. This broadening is mostly due to homonuclear dipolar S- S' interactions between the proton spy nuclei. In this work we have investigated the possibility of inserting rotor-synchronized symmetry-based C or R sequences and decoupling schemes such as Phase-Modulated Lee-Goldburg (PMLG) sequences in the evolution period. These schemes reduce the homonuclear proton-proton interactions and lead to an enhancement of the resolution of both SQ and DQ proton-detected 14N HMQC spectra. In addition, we have investigated the combination of HSQC with symmetry-based sequences and PMLG and shown that the highest resolution in the 14N dimension is achieved by using HSQC in combination with symmetry-based sequences of the R-type. We show improvements in resolution in samples of L-alanine and the tripeptide ala-ala-gly (AAG). In particular, for L-alanine the width of the 14N SQ peak is reduced from 2 to 1.2 kHz, in agreement with simulations. We report accurate measurements of quadrupolar coupling constants and asymmetry parameters for amide 14N in AAG peptide bonds.

  10. Proton transfer and hydrogen bonding in the organic solid state: a combined XRD/XPS/ssNMR study of 17 organic acid-base complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Joanna S; Byard, Stephen J; Seaton, Colin C; Sadiq, Ghazala; Davey, Roger J; Schroeder, Sven L M

    2014-01-21

    The properties of nitrogen centres acting either as hydrogen-bond or Brønsted acceptors in solid molecular acid-base complexes have been probed by N 1s X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as well as (15)N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) spectroscopy and are interpreted with reference to local crystallographic structure information provided by X-ray diffraction (XRD). We have previously shown that the strong chemical shift of the N 1s binding energy associated with the protonation of nitrogen centres unequivocally distinguishes protonated (salt) from hydrogen-bonded (co-crystal) nitrogen species. This result is further supported by significant ssNMR shifts to low frequency, which occur with proton transfer from the acid to the base component. Generally, only minor chemical shifts occur upon co-crystal formation, unless a strong hydrogen bond is formed. CASTEP density functional theory (DFT) calculations of (15)N ssNMR isotropic chemical shifts correlate well with the experimental data, confirming that computational predictions of H-bond strengths and associated ssNMR chemical shifts allow the identification of salt and co-crystal structures (NMR crystallography). The excellent agreement between the conclusions drawn by XPS and the combined CASTEP/ssNMR investigations opens up a reliable avenue for local structure characterization in molecular systems even in the absence of crystal structure information, for example for non-crystalline or amorphous matter. The range of 17 different systems investigated in this study demonstrates the generic nature of this approach, which will be applicable to many other molecular materials in organic, physical, and materials chemistry.

  11. Proton NMR studies on Megaphaera elsdenii flavodoxin : structure elucidation by 2D-NMR and implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mierlo, van C.

    1990-01-01

    1H NMR techniques have been applied for a thorough study of the uncrystallizable Megasphaera elsdenii flavodoxin in its three redox states. The aim of the research project described in this thesis was to obtain answers regarding questions

  12. Anatomising proton NMR spectra with pure shift 2D J-spectroscopy: A cautionary tale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraly, Peter; Foroozandeh, Mohammadali; Nilsson, Mathias; Morris, Gareth A.

    2017-09-01

    Analysis of proton NMR spectra has been a key tool in structure determination for over 60 years. A classic tool is 2D J-spectroscopy, but common problems are the difficulty of obtaining the absorption mode lineshapes needed for accurate results, and the need for a 45° shear of the final 2D spectrum. A novel 2D NMR method is reported here that allows straightforward determination of homonuclear couplings, using a modified version of the PSYCHE method to suppress couplings in the direct dimension. The method illustrates the need for care when combining pure shift data acquisition with multiple pulse methods.

  13. Analysis of human muscle extracts by proton NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatasubramanian, P.N.; Barany, M.; Arus, C.

    1986-01-01

    Perchloric acid extracts were prepared from pooled human muscle biopsies from patients diagnosed with scoliosis (SCOL) and cerebral palsy (CP). After neutralization with KOH and removal of perchlorate, the extracts were concentrated by freeze drying and dissolved in 2 H 2 O to contain 120 O.D. units at 280 nm per 0.5 ml. 1 H NMR spectroscopy was performed with the 5 mm probe of a Varian XL300 instrument. Creatine, lactate, carnosine, and choline were the major resonances in the one-dimensional spectra of both extracts. With creatine as reference, 2.5-fold more lactate was found in SCOL than in CP, and a much smaller difference was also found in their carnosine content. Two-dimensional COSY comparison revealed several differences between the two extracts. Taurine, N-acetyl glutamate, glycerophosphoryl choline (or phosphoryl choline) and an unidentified spot were present only in the extract from SCOL but not in that from CP. On the other hand, aspartate, hydroxy-proline, carnitine and glycerophosphoryl ethanolamine were only present in CP but absent in SCOL. Alanine, cysteine, lysine and arginine appeared in both extracts without an apparent intensity difference

  14. Non-destructive ripeness sensing by using proton NMR [Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Seong In; Krutz, G.W.; Stroshine, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    More than 80 kinds of fruits and vegetables are available in the United States. But only about 6 of them have their quality standards (Dull, 1986). In the 1990 Fresh Trends survey (Zind, 1990), consumers were asked to rate 16 characteristics important to their decision to purchase fresh produce. The four top ranking factors were ripeness/freshness, taste/flavor, appearance/condition and nutritional value. Of these surveyed, 96% rated ripeness/freshness as extremely important or very important. Therefore, the development of reliable grading or sorting techniques for fresh commodities is essential. Determination of fruit quality often involves cutting and tasting. Non-destructive quality control in fruit and vegetables is a goal of growers and distributors, as well as the food processing industry. Many nondestructive techniques have been evaluated including soft x-ray, optical transmission, near infrared radiation, and machine vision. However, there are few reports of successful non-destructive measurement of sugar content directly in fruit. Higher quality fruit could be harvested and available to consumers if a nondestructive sensor that detects ripeness level directly by measuring sugar content were available. Using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) principle is the possibility. A nondestructive ripeness (or sweetness) sensor for fruit quality control can be developed with the proton NMR principle (Cho, 1989). Several feasibility studies were necessary for the ripeness sensor development. Main objectives in this paper was to investigate the feasibilities (1) to detect ripeness (or sweetness level) of raw fruit tissue with an high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (200 MHz) and (2) to measure sugar content of intact fruit with a low resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (10 MHz). 7 refs., 4 figs

  15. Non-destructive Ripeness Sensing by Using Proton NMR [Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seong In; Krutz, G. W.; Stroshine, R. L.; Bellon, V.

    1990-01-01

    More than 80 kinds of fruits and vegetables are available in the United States. But only about 6 of them have their quality standards (Dull, 1986). In the 1990 Fresh Trends survey (Zind, 1990), consumers were asked to rate 16 characteristics important to their decision to purchase fresh produce. The four top ranking factors were ripeness/freshness, taste/flavor, appearance/condition and nutritional value. Of these surveyed, 96% rated ripeness/freshness as extremely important or very important. Therefore, the development of reliable grading or sorting techniques for fresh commodities is essential. Determination of fruit quality often involves cutting and tasting. Non-destructive quality control in fruit and vegetables is a goal of growers and distributors, as well as the food processing industry. Many nondestructive techniques have been evaluated including soft x-ray, optical transmission, near infrared radiation, and machine vision. However, there are few reports of successful non-destructive measurement of sugar content directly in fruit. Higher quality fruit could be harvested and available to consumers if a nondestructive sensor that detects ripeness level directly by measuring sugar content were available. Using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) principle is the possibility. A nondestructive ripeness (or sweetness) sensor for fruit quality control can be developed with the proton NMR principle (Cho, 1989). Several feasibility studies were necessary for the ripeness sensor development. Main objectives in this paper was to investigate the feasibilities (1) to detect ripeness (or sweetness level) of raw fruit tissue with an high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (200 MHz) and (2) to measure sugar content of intact fruit with a low resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (10 MHz).

  16. High-resolution proton NMR spectroscopy of cerebrospinal fluid: methodological issues and potential clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriat, M.; Nicoli, F.; Vion-Dury, J.; Confort-Gouny, S.; Cozzone, P.J.; Nicoli, F.; Gastaut, J.L.; Dano, P.; Grisoli, F.

    1991-01-01

    High resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a new analytical technique which allows to readily identify and quantitate a variety of key metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in relation to normal and pathological brain activity. Proton NMR spectroscopy can be performed on native CSF, with or without addition of exchange reagent (NH 4 Cl). The analysis of native CSF provides qualitative information (identification) of metabolites or xenobiotics present in the fluid. Alternately, CSF can be lyophilized and dissolved in deuterated water. This concentration offers 2 advantages: additional compounds are detected and a precise quantification of all CSF metabolites can be obtained. Both protocols require a very small volume of CFS (1-2 ml). The high informational content available on the NMR spectra of CSF, the ease-of-use of NMR spectroscopy and its cost effectiveness concur to predict that this analytical approach will keep developing to completement the array of existing tests which are already routinely performed on CSF. 6 figs [fr

  17. A probabilistic approach for validating protein NMR chemical shift assignments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bowei; Wang, Yunjun; Wishart, David S.

    2010-01-01

    It has been estimated that more than 20% of the proteins in the BMRB are improperly referenced and that about 1% of all chemical shift assignments are mis-assigned. These statistics also reflect the likelihood that any newly assigned protein will have shift assignment or shift referencing errors. The relatively high frequency of these errors continues to be a concern for the biomolecular NMR community. While several programs do exist to detect and/or correct chemical shift mis-referencing or chemical shift mis-assignments, most can only do one, or the other. The one program (SHIFTCOR) that is capable of handling both chemical shift mis-referencing and mis-assignments, requires the 3D structure coordinates of the target protein. Given that chemical shift mis-assignments and chemical shift re-referencing issues should ideally be addressed prior to 3D structure determination, there is a clear need to develop a structure-independent approach. Here, we present a new structure-independent protocol, which is based on using residue-specific and secondary structure-specific chemical shift distributions calculated over small (3-6 residue) fragments to identify mis-assigned resonances. The method is also able to identify and re-reference mis-referenced chemical shift assignments. Comparisons against existing re-referencing or mis-assignment detection programs show that the method is as good or superior to existing approaches. The protocol described here has been implemented into a freely available Java program called 'Probabilistic Approach for protein Nmr Assignment Validation (PANAV)' and as a web server (http://redpoll.pharmacy.ualberta.ca/PANAVhttp://redpoll.pharmacy.ualberta.ca/PANAV) which can be used to validate and/or correct as well as re-reference assigned protein chemical shifts.

  18. The calculation of proton chemical shifts in hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, Raymond J [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-12-31

    Novel extension of the CHARGE3 semi-empirical calculation of the partial atomic charges in molecules are described which allow the accurate calculation of the proton chemical shifts of a variety of acyclic alkanes. This simple scheme predicts the proton chemical shifts of all the simple alkanes, cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexanes, norbornane, trans-decalin and trans perhydrophenanthrene, comprising a range of chemical shifts from 0.3 to 2.2 {delta} with the known substituent chemical shifts of other functional groups this could allow the general prediction of proton chemical shifts in a simple and useful format. (author) 13 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Towards automatic metabolomic profiling of high-resolution one-dimensional proton NMR spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercier, Pascal; Lewis, Michael J.; Chang, David, E-mail: dchang@chenomx.com [Chenomx Inc (Canada); Baker, David [Pfizer Inc (United States); Wishart, David S. [University of Alberta, Department of Computing Science and Biological Sciences (Canada)

    2011-04-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Mass Spectroscopy (MS) are the two most common spectroscopic analytical techniques employed in metabolomics. The large spectral datasets generated by NMR and MS are often analyzed using data reduction techniques like Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Although rapid, these methods are susceptible to solvent and matrix effects, high rates of false positives, lack of reproducibility and limited data transferability from one platform to the next. Given these limitations, a growing trend in both NMR and MS-based metabolomics is towards targeted profiling or 'quantitative' metabolomics, wherein compounds are identified and quantified via spectral fitting prior to any statistical analysis. Despite the obvious advantages of this method, targeted profiling is hindered by the time required to perform manual or computer-assisted spectral fitting. In an effort to increase data analysis throughput for NMR-based metabolomics, we have developed an automatic method for identifying and quantifying metabolites in one-dimensional (1D) proton NMR spectra. This new algorithm is capable of using carefully constructed reference spectra and optimizing thousands of variables to reconstruct experimental NMR spectra of biofluids using rules and concepts derived from physical chemistry and NMR theory. The automated profiling program has been tested against spectra of synthetic mixtures as well as biological spectra of urine, serum and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF). Our results indicate that the algorithm can correctly identify compounds with high fidelity in each biofluid sample (except for urine). Furthermore, the metabolite concentrations exhibit a very high correlation with both simulated and manually-detected values.

  20. Towards automatic metabolomic profiling of high-resolution one-dimensional proton NMR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercier, Pascal; Lewis, Michael J.; Chang, David; Baker, David; Wishart, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Mass Spectroscopy (MS) are the two most common spectroscopic analytical techniques employed in metabolomics. The large spectral datasets generated by NMR and MS are often analyzed using data reduction techniques like Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Although rapid, these methods are susceptible to solvent and matrix effects, high rates of false positives, lack of reproducibility and limited data transferability from one platform to the next. Given these limitations, a growing trend in both NMR and MS-based metabolomics is towards targeted profiling or “quantitative” metabolomics, wherein compounds are identified and quantified via spectral fitting prior to any statistical analysis. Despite the obvious advantages of this method, targeted profiling is hindered by the time required to perform manual or computer-assisted spectral fitting. In an effort to increase data analysis throughput for NMR-based metabolomics, we have developed an automatic method for identifying and quantifying metabolites in one-dimensional (1D) proton NMR spectra. This new algorithm is capable of using carefully constructed reference spectra and optimizing thousands of variables to reconstruct experimental NMR spectra of biofluids using rules and concepts derived from physical chemistry and NMR theory. The automated profiling program has been tested against spectra of synthetic mixtures as well as biological spectra of urine, serum and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF). Our results indicate that the algorithm can correctly identify compounds with high fidelity in each biofluid sample (except for urine). Furthermore, the metabolite concentrations exhibit a very high correlation with both simulated and manually-detected values.

  1. Use of acetimidation in the NMR identification of neurophysin lysine protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardana, V.; Breslow, E.

    1986-01-01

    Acetimidation of the two lysine residues of neurophysin (NP) results in localized changes in the proton magnetic resonance spectrum, allowing identification of lysine side-chain resonances. Neither peptide-binding nor protein self-association appeared to be significantly altered by acetimidation. Additionally, no significant effect of either peptide-binding or self-association on lysine epsilon-CH 2 protons was seen. However, dimerization-induced NMR changes in the 1.6-1.8 ppm region, associated with lysine β,γ,σ protons, were altered in the acetimidated protein. In particular, while the spectrum of the acetimidated NP monomer was almost identical to that of the native protein, a shoulder at 1.72 ppm in the native protein dimer was shifted upfield in the modified dimer. Additionally the direction of NMR shifts in the 1.6-1.8 ppm region normally associated with peptide binding to the NP dimer appeared to be reversed in the acetimidated protein. Binding-induced and dimerization-induced changes in all other regions of the spectrum were identical in the native and modified proteins. These results suggest that one or both NP lysine residues may be near the dimer subunit interface and indicate an effect of peptide-binding on lysine side-chain environment

  2. Implementation of the NMR CHEmical Shift Covariance Analysis (CHESCA): A Chemical Biologist's Approach to Allostery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulton, Stephen; Selvaratnam, Rajeevan; Ahmed, Rashik; Melacini, Giuseppe

    2018-01-01

    Mapping allosteric sites is emerging as one of the central challenges in physiology, pathology, and pharmacology. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is ideally suited to map allosteric sites, given its ability to sense at atomic resolution the dynamics underlying allostery. Here, we focus specifically on the NMR CHEmical Shift Covariance Analysis (CHESCA), in which allosteric systems are interrogated through a targeted library of perturbations (e.g., mutations and/or analogs of the allosteric effector ligand). The atomic resolution readout for the response to such perturbation library is provided by NMR chemical shifts. These are then subject to statistical correlation and covariance analyses resulting in clusters of allosterically coupled residues that exhibit concerted responses to the common set of perturbations. This chapter provides a description of how each step in the CHESCA is implemented, starting from the selection of the perturbation library and ending with an overview of different clustering options.

  3. Chemical exchange in novel spirobicyclic zwitterionic Janovsky complexes using dynamic 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culf, A S; Cuperlović-Culf, M; Ouellette, R J

    2009-02-01

    Highly coloured Janovsky complexes have been known for over 120 years, being used in many colourimetric analytical procedures. In this present study, two novel and stable nitrocyclohexadienyl spirobicyclic, zwitterionic Janovsky anionic hydantoin sigma-complexes, rac-1,3-diisopropyl-6-nitro-2,4-dioxo-1,3-diazaspiro[4.5]deca-6,9-dien-8-ylideneazinate, ammonium internal salt (1) and 1,3-diisopropyl-2,4-dioxo-1,3-diazaspiro[4.5]deca-6,9-dien-8-ylideneazinate, ammonium internal salt (2) have been prepared and characterised by NMR, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and UV/visible methods. For the p-mononitro-substituted complex (2), we discovered chemical exchange behaviour using 1D saturation transfer and 2D exchange spectroscopy (EXSY) (1)H NMR techniques. The coalescence temperature was determined to be 62 degrees C in d(3)-acetonitrile. Analysis of these data provided a Gibbs free energy of activation, DeltaG double dagger, of + 67 kJ mole(-1), a rate constant, k, coalescence of 220 Hz and an equilibrium constant, K(eqm), of 0.98 as estimates of the exchange process in this solvent. Of the two mechanisms proposed for this fluxional behaviour, ring opening to a substituted benzene or proton exchange, a further theoretical modelling study of 1D (1)H NMR spectra was able to confirm that simple proton exchange between the two nitrogen sites of the hydantoin ring provided an accurate simulation of the observed experimental evidence. Interestingly, the o,p-dinitro-substituted complex (1) did not show any chemical exchange behaviour up to 150 degrees C in d(3)-acetonitrile (to 75 degrees C) and d(6)-dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Molecular modelling at the MM2 level suggests that steric collisions of an N-acyl isopropyl substituent of the hydantoin ring with the ortho-nitro group of the spirofused cyclohexadienyl ring prevents the proposed proton exchange mechanism occurring in this case. 2008 Crown in the right of Canada. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Development of 19F-NMR chemical shift detection of DNA B-Z equilibrium using 19F-NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, S; Yang, H; Hirata, C; Kersaudy, F; Fujimoto, K

    2017-06-28

    Various DNA conformational changes are in correlation with biological events. In particular, DNA B-Z equilibrium showed a high correlation with translation and transcription. In this study, we developed a DNA probe containing 5-trifluoromethylcytidine or 5-trifluoromethylthymidine to detect DNA B-Z equilibrium using 19 F-NMR. Its probe enabled the quantitative detection of B-, Z-, and ss-DNA based on 19 F-NMR chemical shift change.

  5. Characterization of pH titration shifts for all the nonlabile proton resonances in a protein by two-dimensional NMR: The case of mouse epidermal growth factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohda, Daisuke; Sawada, Toshie; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko

    1991-01-01

    The pH titration shifts for all the nonlabile proton resonances in a 53-residue protein (mouse epidermal growth factor) were measured in the p 2 H range 1.5-9 with two-dimensional (2D) 1 H NMR. The 2D NMR pH titration experiment made it possible to determine the pK values for all the ionizable group which were titrated in the pH range 1.5-9 in the protein. The pK values of the nine ionizable groups (α-amino group, four Asp, two Glu, one His, and α-carboxyl group) were found to be near their normal values. The 2D titration experiment also provided a detailed description of the pH-dependent behavior of the proton chemical shifts and enabled us to characterize the pH-dependent changes of protein conformation. Analysis of the pH-dependent shifts of ca. 200 proton resonances offered evidence of conformational changes in slightly basic pH solution: The deprotonation of the N-terminal α-amino group induced a widespread conformational change over the β-sheet structure in the protein, while the effects of deprotonation of the His22 imidazole group were relatively localized. The authors found that the 2D NMR pH titration experiment is a powerful tool for investigating the structural and dynamic properties of proteins

  6. New insight into hydration and aging mechanisms of paper by the line shape analysis of proton NMR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallamace, D.; Vasi, S.; Missori, M.; Corsaro, C.

    2016-01-01

    The action of water within biological systems is strictly linked either with their physical chemical properties and with their functions. Cellulose is one of the most studied biopolymers due to its biological importance and its wide use in manufactured products. Among them, paper is mainly constituted by an almost equimolar ratio of cellulose and water. Therefore the study of the behavior of water within pristine and aged paper samples can help to shed light on the degradation mechanisms that irremediably act over time and spoil paper. In this work we present Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments on modern paper samples made of pure cellulose not aged and artificially aged as well as on ancient paper samples made in 1413 in Perpignan (France). The line shape parameters of the proton NMR spectra were studied as a function of the hydration content. Results indicate that water in aged samples is progressively involved in the hydration of the byproducts of cellulose degradation. This enhances the degradation process itself through the progressive consumption of the cellulose amorphous regions.

  7. Membrane lipids protected from oxidation by red wine tannins: a proton NMR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Aurélien L; Jobin, Marie-Lise; Buchoux, Sébastien; Grélard, Axelle; Dufourc, Erick J; Géan, Julie

    2014-12-01

    Dietary polyphenols widespread in vegetables and beverages like red wine and tea have been reported to possess antioxidant properties that could have positive effects on human health. In this study, we propose a new in situ and non-invasive method based on proton liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to determine the antioxidant efficiency of red wine tannins on a twice-unsaturated phospholipid, 1,2-dilinoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLiPC), embedded in a membrane model. Four tannins were studied: (+)-catechin (C), (-)-epicatechin (EC), (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG), and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). The lipid degradation kinetics was determined by measuring the loss of the bis-allylic protons during oxidation induced by a radical initiator, 2,2'-Azobis(2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride (AAPH). The antioxidant efficiency, i.e. the ability of tannins to slow down the lipid oxidation rate, was shown to be higher for galloylated tannins, ECG and EGCG. Furthermore, the mixture of four tannins was more efficient than the most effective tannin, EGCG, demonstrating a synergistic effect. To better understand the antioxidant action mechanism of polyphenols on lipid membranes, the tannin location was investigated by NMR and molecular dynamics. A correlation between antioxidant action of tannins and their location at the membrane interface (inserted at the glycerol backbone level) could thus be established. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneeland, J.B.; Lee, B.C.P.; Whalen, J.P.; Knowles, R.J.R.; Cahill, P.T.

    1984-01-01

    Although still quite new, NMR imaging has already emerged as a safe, noninvasive, painless, and effective diagnostic modality requiring no ionizing radiation. Also, NMR appears already to have established itself as the method of choice for the examination of the brain spinal cord (excluding herniated disks). Another area in which NMR excels is in the examination of the pelvis. The use of surface coils offers the promise of visualizing structures with resolution unobtainable by any other means. In addition, NMR, with its superb visualization of vascular structures and potential ability to measure flow, may soon revolutionize the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. Finally, NMR, through biochemically and physiologically based T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ indices or through spectroscopy, may provide a means of monitoring therapeutic response so as to permit tailoring of treatment to the individual patient. In short, NMR is today probably at the same stage as the x-ray was in Roentgen's day

  9. Relativistic force field: parametric computations of proton-proton coupling constants in (1)H NMR spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2014-09-05

    Spin-spin coupling constants in (1)H NMR carry a wealth of structural information and offer a powerful tool for deciphering molecular structures. However, accurate ab initio or DFT calculations of spin-spin coupling constants have been very challenging and expensive. Scaling of (easy) Fermi contacts, fc, especially in the context of recent findings by Bally and Rablen (Bally, T.; Rablen, P. R. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 4818), offers a framework for achieving practical evaluation of spin-spin coupling constants. We report a faster and more precise parametrization approach utilizing a new basis set for hydrogen atoms optimized in conjunction with (i) inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries, (ii) inexpensive 4-31G basis set for carbon atoms in fc calculations, and (iii) individual parametrization for different atom types/hybridizations, not unlike a force field in molecular mechanics, but designed for the fc's. With the training set of 608 experimental constants we achieved rmsd <0.19 Hz. The methodology performs very well as we illustrate with a set of complex organic natural products, including strychnine (rmsd 0.19 Hz), morphine (rmsd 0.24 Hz), etc. This precision is achieved with much shorter computational times: accurate spin-spin coupling constants for the two conformers of strychnine were computed in parallel on two 16-core nodes of a Linux cluster within 10 min.

  10. Prediction of proton chemical shifts in RNA - Their use in structure refinement and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cromsigt, Jenny A.M.T.C.; Hilbers, Cees W.; Wijmenga, Sybren S.

    2001-01-01

    An analysis is presented of experimental versus calculated chemical shifts of the non-exchangeable protons for 28 RNA structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank, covering a wide range of structural building blocks. We have used existing models for ring-current and magnetic-anisotropy contributions to calculate the proton chemical shifts from the structures. Two different parameter sets were tried: (i) parameters derived by Ribas-Prado and Giessner-Prettre (GP set) [(1981) J. Mol. Struct.,76, 81-92.]; (ii) parameters derived by Case [(1995) J. Biomol. NMR, 6, 341-346]. Both sets lead to similar results. The detailed analysis was carried using the GP set. The root-mean-square-deviation between the predicted and observed chemical shifts of the complete database is 0.16 ppm with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.79. For protons in the usually well-defined A-helix environment these numbers are, 0.08 ppm and 0.96, respectively. As a result of this good correspondence, a reliable analysis could be made of the structural dependencies of the 1 H chemical shifts revealing their physical origin. For example, a down-field shift of either H2' or H3' or both indicates a high-syn/syn χ-angle. In an A-helix it is essentially the 5'-neighbor that affects the chemical shifts of H5, H6 and H8 protons. The H5, H6 and H8 resonances can therefore be assigned in an A-helix on the basis of their observed chemical shifts. In general, the chemical shifts were found to be quite sensitive to structural changes. We therefore propose that a comparison between calculated and observed 1 H chemical shifts is a good tool for validation and refinement of structures derived from NOEs and J-couplings

  11. NMR imaging studies of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Z.R.; Zhang, P.Z.; Ding, G.L.; Li, L.Y.; Ye, C.H. [University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-06-01

    The permeation transportation and swelling behavior of solvents into coal are investigated by NMR imaging using pyridine-d{sub 5} and acetone-d{sub 6}. Images of coal swollen with deuterated solvents illuminate proton distributions of mobile phases within the coal macromolecular networks. More information about the chemical and physical structure of coal can be obtained using NMR imaging techniques.

  12. Correlation of the antimicrobial activity of salicylaldehydes with broadening of the NMR signal of the hydroxyl proton. Possible involvement of proton exchange processes in the antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elo, Hannu; Kuure, Matti; Pelttari, Eila

    2015-03-06

    Certain substituted salicylaldehydes are potent antibacterial and antifungal agents and some of them merit consideration as potential chemotherapeutic agents against Candida infections, but their mechanism of action has remained obscure. We report here a distinct correlation between broadening of the NMR signal of the hydroxyl proton of salicylaldehydes and their activity against several types of bacteria and fungi. When proton NMR spectra of the compounds were determined using hexadeuterodimethylsulfoxide as solvent and the height of the OH proton signal was measured, using the signal of the aldehyde proton as an internal standard, it was discovered that a prerequisite of potent antimicrobial activity is that the proton signal is either unobservable or relatively very low, i.e. that it is extremely broadened. Thus, none of the congeners whose OH proton signal was high were potent antimicrobial agents. Some congeners that gave a very low OH signal were, however, essentially inactive against the microbes, indicating that although drastic broadening of the OH signal appears to be a prerequisite, also other (so far unknown) factors are needed for high antimicrobial activity. Because broadening of the hydroxyl proton signal is related to the speed of the proton exchange process(es) involving that proton, proton exchange may be involved in the mechanism of action of the compounds. Further studies are needed to analyze the relative importance of different factors (such as electronic effects, strength of the internal hydrogen bond, co-planarity of the ring and the formyl group) that determine the rates of those processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. NMR Study of Solvation Effect on Geometry of Proton-Bound Homodimers of Increasing Size

    KAUST Repository

    Gurinov, Andrei A.; Denisov, Gleb S.; Borissova, Alexandra O.; Goloveshkin, Alexander S.; Greindl, Julian; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Shenderovich, Ilya G.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen bond geometries in the proton-bound homodimers of quinoline and acridine derivatives in an aprotic polar solution have been experimentally studied using 1H NMR at 120 K. The reported results show that increase of the dielec-tric permittivity of the medium results in contraction of the N…N distance. The degree of contraction depends on the homodimer's size and its substituent-specific solvation features. Neither of these effects can be reproduced using conven-tional implicit solvent models employed in computational studies. In general, the N…N distance in the homodimers of pyridine, quinoline, and acridine derivatives decreases in the sequence gas phase > solid state > polar solvent.

  14. NMR Study of Solvation Effect on Geometry of Proton-Bound Homodimers of Increasing Size

    KAUST Repository

    Gurinov, Andrei A.

    2017-10-24

    Hydrogen bond geometries in the proton-bound homodimers of quinoline and acridine derivatives in an aprotic polar solution have been experimentally studied using 1H NMR at 120 K. The reported results show that increase of the dielec-tric permittivity of the medium results in contraction of the N…N distance. The degree of contraction depends on the homodimer\\'s size and its substituent-specific solvation features. Neither of these effects can be reproduced using conven-tional implicit solvent models employed in computational studies. In general, the N…N distance in the homodimers of pyridine, quinoline, and acridine derivatives decreases in the sequence gas phase > solid state > polar solvent.

  15. NMR determination of the order parameter in proton and deuteron glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinc, R.; Dolinsek, J.; Zalar, B.

    1989-01-01

    The inhomogeneous broadening of the ND + deuteron, O-D--O deuteron and 87 Rb quadrapole perturbed NMR spectra in Rb 0.56 (ND 4 ) 0.44 D 2 PO 4 is used for a direct determination of the Edwards-Anderson pseudo-spin glass order parameter. The data provide strong support for a model where the basic difference between magnetic spin glasses and proton or deuteron glasses is the presence of an inherent random field resulting from substitutional disorder which linearly couples to the O-D--O pseudo spins. In these systems we do not deal with a transition from a paraelectric to a pseudo-spin glass phase but rather with a transition from an ergodic pseudo-spin glass phase with a single order parameter q to a non-ergodic pseudo-spin glass phase with an infinite number of order parameters. (author). 11 refs.; 6 figs

  16. Response of melanoma tumor phospholipid metabolism to chloroethyle nitrosourea: a high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morvan, Daniel; Demidem, Aïcha; Madelmont, Jean-Claude

    2003-07-01

    Phospholipid metabolism is tightly involved in tumor growth regulation and tumor cell survival. The response of phospholipid metabolism to chloroethyle nitrosourea treatment is investigated in a murine B16 melanoma model. Measurements of phospholipid derivatives are performed on intact tumor tissue samples using one- and two-dimensional proton NMR spectroscopy. During the tumor growth inhibition phase under treatment, tumors overexpress phosphocholine, phosphoethanolamine, glycerophosphocholine and glycerophosphoethanolamine, whereas phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine levels are maintained to control levels. During re-growth, which remained quantitatively much below control growth, chloroethyle nitrosourea-treated melanoma tumors overexpress phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine only. In treated melanoma, phosphatidylcholine levels show an inverse relationship with tumor growth rates. In conclusion, chloroethyle nitrosourea-treated melanoma tumors maintain their phosphatidylcholine levels and exhibit transformed phospholipid metabolism phenotype, by mechanisms that could participate in tumor cell survival.

  17. TU-EF-BRA-01: NMR and Proton Density MRI of the 1D Patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolbarst, A.

    2015-01-01

    NMR, and Proton Density MRI of the 1D Patient - Anthony Wolbarst Net Voxel Magnetization, m(x,t). T1-MRI; The MRI Device - Lisa Lemen ‘Classical’ NMR; FID Imaging in 1D via k-Space - Nathan Yanasak Spin-Echo; S-E/Spin Warp in a 2D Slice - Ronald Price Magnetic resonance imaging not only reveals the structural, anatomic details of the body, as does CT, but also it can provide information on the physiological status and pathologies of its tissues, like nuclear medicine. It can display high-quality slice and 3D images of organs and vessels viewed from any perspective, with resolution better than 1 mm. MRI is perhaps most extraordinary and notable for the plethora of ways in which it can create unique forms of image contrast, reflective of fundamentally different biophysical phenomena. As with ultrasound, there is no risk from ionizing radiation to the patient or staff, since no X-rays or radioactive nuclei are involved. Instead, MRI harnesses magnetic fields and radio waves to probe the stable nuclei of the ordinary hydrogen atoms (isolated protons) occurring in water and lipid molecules within and around cells. MRI consists, in essence, of creating spatial maps of the electromagnetic environments around these hydrogen nuclei. Spatial variations in the proton milieus can be related to clinical differences in the biochemical and physiological properties and conditions of the associated tissues. Imaging of proton density (PD), and of the tissue proton spin relaxation times known as T1 and T2, all can reveal important clinical information, but they do so with approaches so dissimilar from one another that each is chosen for only certain clinical situations. T1 and T2 in a voxel are determined by different aspects of the rotations and other motions of the water and lipid molecules involved, as constrained by the local biophysical surroundings within and between its cells – and they, in turn, depend on the type of tissue and its state of health. Three other common

  18. TU-EF-BRA-01: NMR and Proton Density MRI of the 1D Patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolbarst, A. [Univ Kentucky (United States)

    2015-06-15

    NMR, and Proton Density MRI of the 1D Patient - Anthony Wolbarst Net Voxel Magnetization, m(x,t). T1-MRI; The MRI Device - Lisa Lemen ‘Classical’ NMR; FID Imaging in 1D via k-Space - Nathan Yanasak Spin-Echo; S-E/Spin Warp in a 2D Slice - Ronald Price Magnetic resonance imaging not only reveals the structural, anatomic details of the body, as does CT, but also it can provide information on the physiological status and pathologies of its tissues, like nuclear medicine. It can display high-quality slice and 3D images of organs and vessels viewed from any perspective, with resolution better than 1 mm. MRI is perhaps most extraordinary and notable for the plethora of ways in which it can create unique forms of image contrast, reflective of fundamentally different biophysical phenomena. As with ultrasound, there is no risk from ionizing radiation to the patient or staff, since no X-rays or radioactive nuclei are involved. Instead, MRI harnesses magnetic fields and radio waves to probe the stable nuclei of the ordinary hydrogen atoms (isolated protons) occurring in water and lipid molecules within and around cells. MRI consists, in essence, of creating spatial maps of the electromagnetic environments around these hydrogen nuclei. Spatial variations in the proton milieus can be related to clinical differences in the biochemical and physiological properties and conditions of the associated tissues. Imaging of proton density (PD), and of the tissue proton spin relaxation times known as T1 and T2, all can reveal important clinical information, but they do so with approaches so dissimilar from one another that each is chosen for only certain clinical situations. T1 and T2 in a voxel are determined by different aspects of the rotations and other motions of the water and lipid molecules involved, as constrained by the local biophysical surroundings within and between its cells – and they, in turn, depend on the type of tissue and its state of health. Three other common

  19. Protein folding kinetics by combined use of rapid mixing techniques and NMR observation of individual amide protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roder, H.; Wuethrich, K.

    1986-01-01

    A method to be used for experimental studies of protein folding introduced by Schmid and Baldwin, which is based on the competition between amide hydrogen exchange and protein refolding, was extended by using rapid mixing techniques and 1 H NMR to provide site-resolved kinetic information on the early phases of protein structure acquisition. In this method, a protonated solution of the unfolded protein is rapidly mixed with a deuterated buffer solution at conditions assuring protein refolding in the mixture. This simultaneously initiates the exchange of unprotected amide protons with solvent deuterium and the refolding of protein segments which can protect amide groups from further exchange. After variable reaction times the amide proton exchange is quenched while folding to the native form continues to completion. By using 1 H NMR, the extent of exchange at individual amide sites is then measured in the refolded protein. Competition experiments at variable reaction times or variable pH indicate the time at which each amide group is protected in the refolding process. This technique was applied to the basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, for which sequence-specific assignments of the amide proton NMR lines had previously been obtained. For eight individual amide protons located in the beta-sheet and the C-terminal alpha-helix of this protein, apparent refolding rates in the range from 15 s-1 to 60 s-1 were observed. These rates are on the time scale of the fast folding phase observed with optical probes

  20. NMR study of conformational exchange and double-well proton potential in intramolecular hydrogen bonds in monoanions of succinic acid and derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Tolstoy, Peter M; Koeppe, B; Denisov, Gleb S; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2011-09-08

    We present a (1)H, (2)H, and (13)C NMR study of the monoanions of succinic (1), meso- and rac-dimethylsuccinic (2, 3), and methylsuccinic (4) acids (with tetraalkylammonium as the counterion) dissolved in CDF(3)/CDF(2)Cl at 300-120 K. In all four monoanions, the carboxylic groups are linked by a short intramolecular OHO hydrogen bond revealed by the bridging-proton chemical shift of about 20 ppm. We show that the flexibility of the carbon skeleton allows for two gauche isomers in monoanions 1, 2, and 4, interconverting through experimental energy barriers of 10-15 kcal/mol (the process itself and the energy barrier are also reproduced in MP2/6-311++G** calculations). In 3, one of the gauche forms is absent because of the steric repulsion of the methyl groups. In all four monoanions, the bridging proton is located in a double-well potential and subject, at least to some extent, to proton tautomerism, for which we estimate the two proton positions to be separated by ca. 0.2 Å. In 1 and 3, the proton potential is symmetric. In 2, slowing the conformational interconversion introduces an asymmetry to the proton potential, an effect that might be strong enough even to synchronize the proton tautomerism with the interconversion of the two gauche forms. In 4, the asymmetry of the proton potential is due to the asymmetric substitution. The intramolecular H-bond is likely to remain intact during the interconversion of the gauche forms in 1, 3, and 4, whereas the situation in 2 is less clear.

  1. Detection of early gamma-postirradiation effects in murine spleen by proton NMR relaxation times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebrowska, G; Lewa, C J; Ramee, M P; Husson, F; De Certaines, J D

    2001-01-01

    It was our aim to evaluate the potential of proton relaxation times for the early detection of radiation-induced spleen changes. Female Swiss mice were irradiated with doses ranging from 0.05 Gy to 4 Gy. The body weight, the spleen weight and the spleen water content of single animals were determined. Measurements of longitudinal (T1) and transversal (T2) proton relaxation times of the spleen samples were performed in a 0.47 T spectrometer. Histological examinations of the control and irradiated organs were performed. NMR measurements during the first five days after irradiation showed that total body gamma-irradiation with doses from 1.5 Gy to 4 Gy results in decreasing T1 of the murine spleen. Significant shortening in T2 was observed for the spleen of animals irradiated with a dose of 4 Gy. Histological examinations demonstrated subnormal architecture in slices derived from animals irradiated with 2 Gy and 4 Gy. The fluctuations of the spleen T1 and T2 of irradiated mice are correlated with relative spleen weight and can be used to estimate radiation induced changes in this organ.

  2. Histidine side-chain dynamics and protonation monitored by C-13 CPMG NMR relaxation dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, M. A. S.; Yilmaz, A.; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2009-01-01

    the chemical shift titration experiments, and the CPMG derived exchange rates agree with those obtained previously from N-15 backbone relaxation measurements. Compared to measurements of backbone nuclei, C-13(epsilon 1) dispersion provides a more direct method to monitor interchanging protonation states...... or other kinds of conformational changes of histidine side chains or their environment. Advantages and shortcomings of using the C-13(epsilon 1) dispersion experiments in combination with chemical shift titration experiments to obtain information on exchange dynamics of the histidine side chains...

  3. Amide proton solvent protection in amylin fibrils probed by quenched hydrogen exchange NMR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei T Alexandrescu

    Full Text Available Amylin is an endocrine hormone that accumulates in amyloid plaques in patients with advanced type 2 diabetes. The amyloid plaques have been implicated in the destruction of pancreatic β-cells, which synthesize amylin and insulin. To better characterize the secondary structure of amylin in amyloid fibrils we assigned the NMR spectrum of the unfolded state in 95% DMSO and used a quenched hydrogen-deuterium exchange technique to look at amide proton solvent protection in the fibrils. In this technique, partially exchanged fibrils are dissolved in 95% DMSO and information about amide proton occupancy in the fibrils is determined from DMSO-denatured monomers. Hydrogen exchange lifetimes at pH 7.6 and 37°C vary between ∼5 h for the unstructured N-terminus to 600 h for amide protons in the two β-strands that form inter-molecular hydrogen bonds between amylin monomers along the length of the fibril. Based on the protection data we conclude that residues A8-H18 and I26-Y37 comprise the two β-strands in amylin fibrils. There is variation in protection within the β-strands, particularly for strand β1 where only residues F15-H18 are strongly protected. Differences in protection appear to be due to restrictions on backbone dynamics imposed by the packing of two-layers of C2-symmetry-related β-hairpins in the protofilament structure, with strand β1 positioned on the surface and β2 in the interior.

  4. Two-dimensional NMR studies of squash family inhibitors. Sequence-specific proton assignments and secondary structure of reactive-site hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krisnamoorthi, R.; Yuxi Gong; Chanlan Sun Lin (Kansas State Univ., Manhattan (United States)); VanderVelde, D. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence (United States))

    1992-01-28

    The solution structure of reactive-site hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III (CMTI-III*) was investigated by two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy. CMTI-III*, prepared by reacting CMTI-III with trypsin which cleaved the Arg5-Ile6 peptide bond, had the two fragments held together by a disulfide linkage. Sequence-specific {sup 1}H NMR resonance assignments were made for all the 29 amino acid residues of the protein. The secondary structure of CMTI-III*, as deduced from NOESY cross peaks and identification of slowly exchanging hydrogens, contains two turns, a 3{sub 10}-helix, and a triple-stranded {beta}-sheet. Sequential proton assignments were also made for the virgin inhibitor, CMTI-III, at pH 4.71, 30C. Comparison of backbone hydrogen chemical shifts of CMTI-III and CMTI-III* revealed significant changes for residues located far away from the reactive-site region as well as for those located near it, indicating tertiary structural changes that are transmitted through most of the 29 residues of the inhibitor protein. These chemical shift changes were relatively small compared to changes that occurred upon hydrolysis of the reactive-site peptide bond between Arg 5 and Ile6 in CMTI-III.

  5. Conformational analysis of the chemical shifts for molecules containing diastereotopic methylene protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Quantum chemistry SCF/GIAO calculations were carried out on a set of compounds containing diastereotopic protons. Five molecules, including recently synthesized 1,3-di(2,3-epoxypropoxy)benzene, containing the chiral or pro-chiral center and the neighboring methylene group, were chosen. The rotational averages (i.e. normalized averages with respect to the rotation about the torsional angle τ with the exponential energy weight at temperature T) calculated individually for each of the methylene protons in 1,3-di(2,3-epoxypropoxy)benzene differ by ca. 0.6 ppm, which is significantly less than the value calculated for the lowest energy conformer. This value turned out to be low enough to guarantee the proper ordering of theoretical chemical shifts, supporting the interpretation of the 1H NMR spectrum of this important compound. The rotational averages of chemical shifts for methylene protons for a given type of conformer are shown to be essentially equal to the Boltzmann averages (here, the population-weighted averages for the individual conformers representing minima on the E( τ) cross-section). The calculated Boltzmann averages in the representative conformational space may exhibit completely different ordering as compared to the chemical shifts calculated for the lowest-energy conformer. This is especially true in the case of molecules, for which no significant steric effects are present. In this case, only Boltzmann averages account for the experimental pattern of proton signals. In addition, better overall agreement with experiment (lower value of the root-mean-square deviation between calculated and measured chemical shifts) is typically obtained when Boltzmann averages are used.

  6. Dynamic domains of amyloid fibrils can be site-specifically assigned with proton detected 3D NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, Alexander S.; Siemer, Ansgar B., E-mail: asiemer@usc.edu [Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Several amyloid fibrils have cores framed by highly dynamic, intrinsically disordered, domains that can play important roles for function and toxicity. To study these domains in detail using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, site-specific resonance assignments are required. Although the rapid dynamics of these domains lead to considerable averaging of orientation-dependent NMR interactions and thereby line-narrowing, the proton linewidths observed in these samples is far larger than what is regularly observed in solution. Here, we show that it is nevertheless possible to record 3D HNCO, HNCA, and HNcoCA spectra on these intrinsically disordered domains and to obtain site-specific assignments.

  7. Dynamic domains of amyloid fibrils can be site-specifically assigned with proton detected 3D NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, Alexander S.; Siemer, Ansgar B.

    2016-01-01

    Several amyloid fibrils have cores framed by highly dynamic, intrinsically disordered, domains that can play important roles for function and toxicity. To study these domains in detail using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, site-specific resonance assignments are required. Although the rapid dynamics of these domains lead to considerable averaging of orientation-dependent NMR interactions and thereby line-narrowing, the proton linewidths observed in these samples is far larger than what is regularly observed in solution. Here, we show that it is nevertheless possible to record 3D HNCO, HNCA, and HNcoCA spectra on these intrinsically disordered domains and to obtain site-specific assignments.

  8. Reaction pathways of proton transfer in hydrogen-bonded phenol-carboxylate complexes explored by combined UV-vis and NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeppe, Benjamin; Tolstoy, Peter M; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2011-05-25

    Combined low-temperature NMR/UV-vis spectroscopy (UVNMR), where optical and NMR spectra are measured in the NMR spectrometer under the same conditions, has been set up and applied to the study of H-bonded anions A··H··X(-) (AH = 1-(13)C-2-chloro-4-nitrophenol, X(-) = 15 carboxylic acid anions, 5 phenolates, Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), and BF(4)(-)). In this series, H is shifted from A to X, modeling the proton-transfer pathway. The (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts and the H/D isotope effects on the latter provide information about averaged H-bond geometries. At the same time, red shifts of the π-π* UV-vis absorption bands are observed which correlate with the averaged H-bond geometries. However, on the UV-vis time scale, different tautomeric states and solvent configurations are in slow exchange. The combined data sets indicate that the proton transfer starts with a H-bond compression and a displacement of the proton toward the H-bond center, involving single-well configurations A-H···X(-). In the strong H-bond regime, coexisting tautomers A··H···X(-) and A(-)···H··X are observed by UV. Their geometries and statistical weights change continuously when the basicity of X(-) is increased. Finally, again a series of single-well structures of the type A(-)···H-X is observed. Interestingly, the UV-vis absorption bands are broadened inhomogeneously because of a distribution of H-bond geometries arising from different solvent configurations.

  9. An extrapolation scheme for solid-state NMR chemical shift calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Takahito

    2017-06-01

    Conventional quantum chemical and solid-state physical approaches include several problems to accurately calculate solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) properties. We propose a reliable computational scheme for solid-state NMR chemical shifts using an extrapolation scheme that retains the advantages of these approaches but reduces their disadvantages. Our scheme can satisfactorily yield solid-state NMR magnetic shielding constants. The estimated values have only a small dependence on the low-level density functional theory calculation with the extrapolation scheme. Thus, our approach is efficient because the rough calculation can be performed in the extrapolation scheme.

  10. Proton chemical shift imaging after myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, A.; Doyle, M.; Pohost, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to test whether chemical shift imaging could detect spatially the lipids known to accumulate in myocardium after an ischemic insult. Seven dogs underwent a 24-hour coronary artery occlusion. Hearts were removed and imaged ex vivo by the Dixon method (1.5 T), and myocardial samples were obtained for high-resolution H-1 spectroscopy. Lipid images revealed regions of increased signal intensity in the periphery f the myocardial infarction. The zones of high lipid signal corresponded to zones with elevated mobile lipids as detected by H-1 spectroscopy

  11. Use of proton-enhanced, natural abundance /sup 13/C NMR to study the molecular dynamics of model and biological membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornell, B A [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, North Ryde (Australia). Div. of Food Research; Keniry, M [Sydney Univ. (Australia). Dept. of Physical Chemistry; Hiller, R G [Macquarie Univ., North Ryde (Australia). School of Biological Sciences; Smith, R [La Trobe Univ., Bundoora (Australia). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1980-06-16

    Proton-enhanced NMR of the natural abundance /sup 13/C nuclei is used to study the lipid mobility in dispersions containing cholesterol, the polypeptide gramicidin A, and in membrane proparations derived from spinach chloroplasts and bovine brain myelin.

  12. Metabolic profiling of vitamin C deficiency in Gulo-/- mice using proton NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duggan, Gavin E. [University of Calgary, Biochemistry Research Group, Department of Biological Sciences (Canada); Joan Miller, B.; Jirik, Frank R. [University of Calgary, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health (Canada); Vogel, Hans J., E-mail: vogel@ucalgary.ca [University of Calgary, Biochemistry Research Group, Department of Biological Sciences (Canada)

    2011-04-15

    Nutrient deficiencies are an ongoing problem in many populations and ascorbic acid is a key vitamin whose mild or acute absence leads to a number of conditions including the famously debilitating scurvy. As such, the biochemical effects of ascorbate deficiency merit ongoing scrutiny, and the Gulo knockout mouse provides a useful model for the metabolomic examination of vitamin C deficiency. Like humans, these animals are incapable of synthesizing ascorbic acid but with dietary supplements are otherwise healthy and grow normally. In this study, all vitamin C sources were removed after weaning from the diet of Gulo-/- mice (n = 7) and wild type controls (n = 7) for 12 weeks before collection of serum. A replicate study was performed with similar parameters but animals were harvested pre-symptomatically after 2-3 weeks. The serum concentration of 50 metabolites was determined by quantitative profiling of 1D proton NMR spectra. Multivariate statistical models were used to describe metabolic changes as compared to control animals; replicate study animals were used for external validation of the resulting models. The results of the study highlight the metabolites and pathways known to require ascorbate for proper flux.

  13. Metabolic profiling of vitamin C deficiency in Gulo−/− mice using proton NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duggan, Gavin E.; Joan Miller, B.; Jirik, Frank R.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2011-01-01

    Nutrient deficiencies are an ongoing problem in many populations and ascorbic acid is a key vitamin whose mild or acute absence leads to a number of conditions including the famously debilitating scurvy. As such, the biochemical effects of ascorbate deficiency merit ongoing scrutiny, and the Gulo knockout mouse provides a useful model for the metabolomic examination of vitamin C deficiency. Like humans, these animals are incapable of synthesizing ascorbic acid but with dietary supplements are otherwise healthy and grow normally. In this study, all vitamin C sources were removed after weaning from the diet of Gulo−/− mice (n = 7) and wild type controls (n = 7) for 12 weeks before collection of serum. A replicate study was performed with similar parameters but animals were harvested pre-symptomatically after 2–3 weeks. The serum concentration of 50 metabolites was determined by quantitative profiling of 1D proton NMR spectra. Multivariate statistical models were used to describe metabolic changes as compared to control animals; replicate study animals were used for external validation of the resulting models. The results of the study highlight the metabolites and pathways known to require ascorbate for proper flux.

  14. Hairpin and duplex formation in DNA fragments CCAATTTTGG, CCAATTTTTTGG, and CCATTTTTGG: a proton NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pramanik, P.; Kanhouwa, N.; Kan, L.

    1988-01-01

    Three DNA fragments, CCAATTTTGG (1), CCAATTTTTTGG (2), AND CCATTTTTGG (3), were studied by proton NMR spectroscopy in aqueous solution. All these oligodeoxyribonucleotides contain common sequences at the 5' and 3' ends (5'-CCA and TGG-3'). 2 as well as 3 forms only hairpin structures with four unpaired thymidylyl units, four and three base pair stems, respectively, in neutral solution under low and high NaCl concentrations. At high salt concentration the oligomer 1 forms a duplex structure with -TT- internal loop. On the other hand, the same oligomer forms a stable hairpin structure at low salt and low strand concentrations at pH 7. The hairpin structure of 1 has a stem containing only three base pairs (CCA x TGG) and a loop containing four nucleotides (-ATTT-) that includes a dissociated A x T base pair. The two secondary structures of 1 coexist in an aqueous solution containing 0.1 M NaCl, at pH 7. The equilibrium shifts to the hairpin side when the temperature is raised. The stabilities and base-stacking modes of all three oligonucleotides in tow different structures are reported

  15. NMR studies on the chemical alteration of soil organic matter precursors during controlled charring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knicker, Heike

    2010-05-01

    Beside the production of volatiles, vegetation fire transforms various amounts of labile organic components into recalcitrant dark colored and highly aromatic structures. They are incorporated into soils and are assumed to represent an important sink within the global carbon cycle. In order to elucidate the real importance of PyOM as a C-sink, a good understanding of its chemistry is crucial. Although several 'Black Carbon' (BC) models are reported, a commonly accepted view of the chemistry involved in its formation is still missing. Its biogeochemical recalcitrance is commonly associated with a highly condensed aromatic structure. However, recent studies indicated that this view may be oversimplified for PyOM derived from vegetation fire. In order to bring some more light on the structural properties of PyOM produced during vegetation fire, charred plant residues and model chars derived from typical plant macromolecules (casein, cellulose, lignin and condensed tannins) were subjected to controlled charring under oxic conditions (350°C and 450°C) and then characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Subsequently, the chemical features of the PyOM were related to its chemical recalcitrance as determined by chemical oxidation with acid potassium dichromate. Charring cellulose (350°C, 8 min) yielded in a low C-recovery (11%). Treating casein in the same way resulted in a survival of 62% of its C and 46% of its N. Comparable high C-recoveries are reported for lignin. After charring Lolium perenne, 34% of its N and C were recovered. NMR-spectroscopic studies revealed that for this sample most of the charred N and C occurred in pyrrole-type structures. Our studies further indicate that the aromatic skeleton of char accumulating after a vegetation fire must contain remains of the lignin backbone and considerable contributions of furans and anhydrosugars from thermally altered cellulose. Enhancing the temperature during the

  16. Mechanism of adenylate kinase. Demonstration of a functional relationship between aspartate 93 and Mg2+ by site-directed mutagenesis and proton, phosphorus-31, and magnesium-25 NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Honggao; Tsai, Mingdaw

    1991-01-01

    Earlier magnetic resonance studies suggested no direct interaction between Mg 2+ ions and adenylate kinase (AK) in the AK·MgATP (adenosine 5'-triphosphate) complex. However, recent NMR studies concluded that the carboxylate of aspartate 119 accepts a hydrogen bond from a water ligand of the bound Mg 2+ ion in the muscle AK · MgATP complex. On the other hand, in the 2.6-angstrom crystal structure of the yeast AK·MgAP 5 A [P 1 , P 5 -bis(5'-adenosyl)pentaphosphate] complex, the Mg 2+ ion is in proximity to aspartate 93. Substitution of Asp-93 with alanine resulted in no change in dissociation constants, 4-fold increases in K m , and a 650-fold decrease in k cat . Notable changes have been observed in the chemical shifts of the aromatic protons of histidine 36 and a few other aromatic residues. However, the results of detailed analyses of the free enzymes and the AK·MgAP 5 A complexes by one- and two-dimensional NMR suggested that the changes are due to localized perturbations. Thus it is concluded that Asp-93 stabilizes the transition state by ca. 3.9 kcal/mol. Other results raised the question of whether Mg 2+ could bind to D93A·nucleotide complexes, which was then probed by 25 MgNMR. The results suggest that Mg 2+ does bind to the D93A·AP 5 A complex, but possibly only weakly

  17. One-azabicyclic compounds. 22. Stereochemistry and /sup 13/C NMR spectra of salts of pyrrolizidine and its homologs with protonic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subbotin, O.A.; Skvortsov, I.M.

    1986-06-01

    /sup 13/C NMR spectra were obtained for pyrrolizidinium salts and their homologs and their signals were assigned. With the exception of highly strained cis-3,8-H-cis-5,8-H-3,5-dimethylpyrrolizidine (VI), all the bases studied upon their direct mixing with CF/sub 3/CO/sub 2/H form salts only with cis-fused rings in the cation. Mixtures of salts with cis- and trans-fused pyrrolizidinium fragments are formed upon the reaction of cis-3,8-H-methyl- (III) and cis-3,8-H-cis-5,8-H-3,5-dimethylpyrrolizidine (VI) under conditions close to those for kinetically-controlled amine protonation. The /sup 13/C NMR spectra of the isomeric pyrrolizidinium salts obtained as a result of the absorption of base VI by sulfuric acid were used to evaluate the conformational equilibrium in the starting compound VI. The /sup 13/C NMR chemical shifts of unsubstituted trans-fused pyrrolizidinium salts were predicted.

  18. Quinones from plants of northeastern Brazil: structural diversity, chemical transformations, NMR data and biological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Telma L G; Monte, Francisco J Q; Santos, Allana Kellen L; Fonseca, Aluisio M; Santos, Hélcio S; Oliveira, Mailcar F; Costa, Sonia M O; Pessoa, Otilia D L; Braz-Filho, Raimundo

    2007-05-20

    The present review focus in quinones found in species of Brazilian northeastern Capraria biflora, Lippia sidoides, Lippia microphylla and Tabebuia serratifolia. The review cover ethnopharmacological aspects including photography of species, chemical structure feature, NMR datea and biological properties. Chemical transformations of lapachol to form enamine derivatives and biological activities are discussed.

  19. Chemical freeze-out study in proton-proton collisions at RHIC and LHC energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Sabita; Mishra, Debadeepti; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Chatterjee, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Particle multiplicities measured at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) facilities can be used to understand the chemical freeze-out dynamics. At chemical freeze-out (CFO), inelastic collisions cease and the freeze-out parameters can be determined using measured particle multiplicities within the framework of a statistical model. The statistical model has proven to be quite successful in describing the particle production from elementary p-p and e"+e"- collisions up to heavy-ion collisions. It helps to do a systematic study of the centrality and energy dependence of freeze-out parameters in heavy-ion collisions from lower SPS to higher LHC energies. The new data at LHC along with the RHIC data can be used to do such a systematic study in proton-proton collisions

  20. Ground-state magnetization of the molecular cluster Mn12O12-acetate as seen by proton NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Kumagai, K.; Jang, Z. H.; Lascialfari, A.; Borsa, F.; Gatteschi, D.

    2000-01-01

    1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements have been carried out in Mn 12 O 12 -acetate clusters at low temperature in order to investigate microscopically the static and dynamic magnetic properties of the molecule in its high-spin S=10 ground state. Below liquid helium temperature it is found that the local hyperfine fields at the proton sites are static as expected for the very slow superparamagnetic relaxation of Mn 12 O 12 at low temperature. The magnitude and distribution of the hyperfine fields can be reproduced to a good approximation by considering only the dipolar interaction of protons with the local Mn magnetic moments and by assigning the magnitude and orientation of the local moments of the different Mn 3+ and Mn 4+ ions according to an accepted coupling scheme for the total S=10 ground state. The relaxation time of the macroscopic magnetization of the cluster was measured by monitoring the change of the intensity of the 1 H-NMR shifted lines following inversion of the applied magnetic field. This is possible because the sudden change of the field orientation changes the sign of the shift of the NMR lines in the proton spectrum. Although important differences are noticed, the relaxation time of the magnetization as measured indirectly by the 1 H-NMR method is comparable to the one obtained directly with a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. In particular we could reproduce the minima in the relaxation time as a function of magnetic field at the fields for level crossing, minima which are considered to be a signature of the quantum tunneling of the magnetization

  1. 13C-NMR chemical shift databases as a quick tool to evaluate structural models of humic substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyrop Albers, Christian; Hansen, Poul Erik

    2010-01-01

    Models for humic and fulvic acids are discussed based on 13C liquid state NMR spectra combined with results from elemental analysis and titration studies. The analysis of NMR spectra is based on a full reconstruction of the NMR spectrum done with help of 13C-NMR data bases by adding up chemical...... side missing structural elements in the models can be suggested. A number of proposed structures for humic and fulvic acids are discussed based on the above analysis....

  2. A robust algorithm for optimizing protein structures with NMR chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berjanskii, Mark; Arndt, David; Liang, Yongjie; Wishart, David S., E-mail: david.wishart@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Computing Science (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Over the past decade, a number of methods have been developed to determine the approximate structure of proteins using minimal NMR experimental information such as chemical shifts alone, sparse NOEs alone or a combination of comparative modeling data and chemical shifts. However, there have been relatively few methods that allow these approximate models to be substantively refined or improved using the available NMR chemical shift data. Here, we present a novel method, called Chemical Shift driven Genetic Algorithm for biased Molecular Dynamics (CS-GAMDy), for the robust optimization of protein structures using experimental NMR chemical shifts. The method incorporates knowledge-based scoring functions and structural information derived from NMR chemical shifts via a unique combination of multi-objective MD biasing, a genetic algorithm, and the widely used XPLOR molecular modelling language. Using this approach, we demonstrate that CS-GAMDy is able to refine and/or fold models that are as much as 10 Å (RMSD) away from the correct structure using only NMR chemical shift data. CS-GAMDy is also able to refine of a wide range of approximate or mildly erroneous protein structures to more closely match the known/correct structure and the known/correct chemical shifts. We believe CS-GAMDy will allow protein models generated by sparse restraint or chemical-shift-only methods to achieve sufficiently high quality to be considered fully refined and “PDB worthy”. The CS-GAMDy algorithm is explained in detail and its performance is compared over a range of refinement scenarios with several commonly used protein structure refinement protocols. The program has been designed to be easily installed and easily used and is available at http://www.gamdy.ca http://www.gamdy.ca.

  3. Complete 1H NMR spectral analysis of ten chemical markers of Ginkgo biloba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, José G; Lankin, David C; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F

    2012-08-01

    The complete and unambiguous (1)H NMR assignments of ten marker constituents of Ginkgo biloba are described. The comprehensive (1)H NMR profiles (fingerprints) of ginkgolide A, ginkgolide B, ginkgolide C, ginkgolide J, bilobalide, quercetin, kaempferol, isorhamnetin, isoquercetin, and rutin in DMSO-d(6) were obtained through the examination of 1D (1)H NMR and 2D (1)H,(1)H-COSY data, in combination with (1)H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). The computational analysis of discrete spin systems allowed a detailed characterization of all the (1)H NMR signals in terms of chemical shifts (δ(H)) and spin-spin coupling constants (J(HH)), regardless of signal overlap and higher order coupling effects. The capability of the HiFSA-generated (1)H fingerprints to reproduce experimental (1)H NMR spectra at different field strengths was also evaluated. As a result of this analysis, a revised set of (1)H NMR parameters for all ten phytoconstituents was assembled. Furthermore, precise (1)H NMR assignments of the sugar moieties of isoquercetin and rutin are reported for the first time. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Identifying secondary structures in proteins using NMR chemical shift 3D correlation maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Amrita; Dorai, Kavita

    2013-06-01

    NMR chemical shifts are accurate indicators of molecular environment and have been extensively used as aids in protein structure determination. This work focuses on creating empirical 3D correlation maps of backbone chemical shift nuclei for use as identifiers of secondary structure elements in proteins. A correlated database of backbone nuclei chemical shifts was constructed from experimental structural data gathered from entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) as well as isotropic chemical shift values from the RefDB database. Rigorous statistical analysis of the maps led to the conclusion that specific correlations between triplets of backbone chemical shifts are best able to differentiate between different secondary structures such as α-helices, β-strands and turns. The method is compared with similar techniques that use NMR chemical shift information as aids in biomolecular structure determination and performs well in tests done on experimental data determined for different types of proteins, including large multi-domain proteins and membrane proteins.

  5. Cyclohexanecarbonitriles: Assigning Configurations at Quaternary Centers From 13C NMR CN Chemical Shifts.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guoqing

    2009-01-01

    13C NMR chemical shifts of the nitrile carbon in cyclohexanecarbonitriles directly correlate with the configuration of the quaternary, nitrile-bearing stereocenter. Comparing 13C NMR chemical shifts for over 200 cyclohexanecarbonitriles reveals that equatorially oriented nitriles resonate 3.3 ppm downfield, on average, from their axial counterparts. Pairs of axial/equatorial diastereomers varying only at the nitrile-bearing carbon consistently exhibit downfield shifts of δ 0.4–7.2 for the equatorial nitrile carbon, even in angularly substituted decalins and hydrindanes. PMID:19348434

  6. Proton NMR investigation of heme pocket mobility in hemoglobin via hydrogen isotope exchange kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic mobility of heme cavity, the active site of Hb, was investigated by analyzing the hydrogen isotope exchange kinetics of the proximal histidyl ring NH of various kinds of Hbs with the aid of the high field Fourier Transform 1 H NMR spectroscopy. The exchange reaction occurs faster in oxy or R-state Hb than in deoxy or T-state Hb and there exists a good correlation between the oxygen affinity of Hb and the heme pocket mobility reflected in the hydrogen exchange rate. The effect of pH on the exchange is dramatically different for the two subunits of Hb A. Studying the exchange characteristics of mutant Hbs and chemically modified Hbs not only showed the existence of three well-defined localized paths for transmission of conformational changes between different heme pockets through a 1 b 2 subunit interface, but also indicated that the heme pocket mobility is regulated by the quaternary state of Hb as well as by the ligation state of Hb. Finally, the effect of the quaternary state on the heme pocket mobility is separated from that of the ligation by following the exchange reactions in Hbs where only their quaternary structure transition can be achieved without changing their ligation states by adjusting experimental conditions such as adding inositol hexaphosphate

  7. Proton NMR relaxivity of blood samples in the presence of some gadolinium and dysprosium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coroiu, I.; Darabont, Al.; Bogdan, M.

    1999-01-01

    The use of some new compounds in MRI tissue and blood characterisation based on nuclear spin relaxation time measurements cannot be sustained until the molecular sources of these variations are understood. Tissues and blood are complex molecular systems with complex NMR properties. A better comprehension of the molecular basis of relaxation offers the possibility to predict the changes expected for a given pathology. The purpose of this contribution is to evidence the different relaxation characteristics of some gadolinium and dysprosium compounds in the presence and absence of the blood and to give a possible explanation about the molecular processes that cause occurrence of changes. Some gadolinium and dysprosium compounds such as: Gd-CIT (gadolinium citrate), Dy-DTPA (DTPA-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid), iron oxide - gadolinium oxide (or dysprosium oxide)- dextran complexes were prepared. The longitudinal T 1 -1 and transverse T 2 -1 'relaxation rates' measurements have been carried out as a function of molar concentrations. All measurements have been made at room temperature (about 25 deg.C) and the proton Larmor frequency ν o = 90 MHz. The pulsed NMR spectrometer utilised was a commercial Bruker SXP4/100 spectrometer. Transverse relaxation rate measurements have been made using the Carr-Purcell method, while longitudinal relaxation rate measurements using the inversion recovery pulse sequence, 180 angle-τ-90 angle. The accuracy was about 2-3% for the longitudinal relaxation rates and about 5-7% for the transverse relaxation rates. R 1 and R 2 relaxivities, in mM -1 s -1 were determined from the least square determination of the slopes of plots 1/T 1,2 versus compound molar concentration, using at least five independent measurements at several concentrations between 0 and 2 mM. Increased R 2 relaxivity observed for dysprosium compounds in the blood presence can be explained by PRE effect. The largest gain in R 2 relaxivity seems to imply a noncovalent

  8. Chemical Rescue of Enzymes: Proton Transfer in Mutants of Human Carbonic Anhydrase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, C. Mark; Castillo, Norberto; Taraphder, Srabani; Tu, Chingkuang; McKenna, Robert; Silverman, David N.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2011-01-01

    In human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) the mutation of position 64 from histidine to alanine (H64A) disrupts the rate limiting proton transfer (PT) event, resulting in a reduction of the catalytic activity of the enzyme as compared to the wild-type. Potential of mean force (PMF) calculations utilizing the multistate empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) methodology for H64A HCA II give a PT free energy barrier significantly higher than that found in the wild-type enzyme. This high barrier, determined in the absence of exogenous buffer and assuming no additional ionizable residues in the PT pathway, indicates the likelihood of alternate enzyme pathways that utilize either ionizable enzyme residues (self-rescue) and/or exogenous buffers (chemical rescue). It has been shown experimentally that the catalytic activity of H64A HCA II can be chemically rescued to near wild type levels by the addition of the exogenous buffer 4-methylimidazole (4MI). Crystallographic studies have identified two 4MI binding sites, yet site specific mutations intended to disrupt 4MI binding have demonstrated these sites to be non-productive. In the present work MS-EVB simulations show that binding of 4MI near Thr199 in the H64A HCA II mutant, a binding site determined by NMR spectroscopy, results in a viable chemical rescue pathway. Additional viable rescue pathways are also identified where 4MI acts as a proton transport intermediary from the active site to ionizable residues on the rim of the active site, revealing a probable mode of action for the chemical rescue pathway PMID:21452838

  9. Identifying stereoisomers by ab-initio calculation of secondary isotope shifts on NMR chemical shieldings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Karl-Heinz; Banert, Klaus; Auer, Alexander A

    2014-04-23

    We present ab-initio calculations of secondary isotope effects on NMR chemical shieldings. The change of the NMR chemical shift of a certain nucleus that is observed if another nucleus is replaced by a different isotope can be calculated by computing vibrational corrections on the NMR parameters using electronic structure methods. We demonstrate that the accuracy of the computational results is sufficient to even distinguish different conformers. For this purpose, benchmark calculations for fluoro(2-2H)ethane in gauche and antiperiplanar conformation are carried out at the HF, MP2 and CCSD(T) level of theory using basis sets ranging from double- to quadruple-zeta quality. The methodology is applied to the secondary isotope shifts for 2-fluoronorbornane in order to resolve an ambiguity in the literature on the assignment of endo- and exo-2-fluoronorbornanes with deuterium substituents in endo-3 and exo-3 positions, also yielding insight into mechanistic details of the corresponding synthesis.

  10. Identifying Stereoisomers by ab-initio Calculation of Secondary Isotope Shifts on NMR Chemical Shieldings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-Heinz Böhm

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We present ab-initio calculations of secondary isotope effects on NMR chemical shieldings. The change of the NMR chemical shift of a certain nucleus that is observed if another nucleus is replaced by a different isotope can be calculated by computing vibrational corrections on the NMR parameters using electronic structure methods. We demonstrate that the accuracy of the computational results is sufficient to even distinguish different conformers. For this purpose, benchmark calculations for fluoro(2-2Hethane in gauche and antiperiplanar conformation are carried out at the HF, MP2 and CCSD(T level of theory using basis sets ranging from double- to quadruple-zeta quality. The methodology is applied to the secondary isotope shifts for 2-fluoronorbornane in order to resolve an ambiguity in the literature on the assignment of endo- and exo-2-fluoronorbornanes with deuterium substituents in endo-3 and exo-3 positions, also yielding insight into mechanistic details of the corresponding synthesis.

  11. 1H NMR spectra part 31: 1H chemical shifts of amides in DMSO solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Raymond J; Griffiths, Lee; Perez, Manuel

    2014-07-01

    The (1)H chemical shifts of 48 amides in DMSO solvent are assigned and presented. The solvent shifts Δδ (DMSO-CDCl3 ) are large (1-2 ppm) for the NH protons but smaller and negative (-0.1 to -0.2 ppm) for close range protons. A selection of the observed solvent shifts is compared with calculated shifts from the present model and from GIAO calculations. Those for the NH protons agree with both calculations, but other solvent shifts such as Δδ(CHO) are not well reproduced by the GIAO calculations. The (1)H chemical shifts of the amides in DMSO were analysed using a functional approach for near ( ≤ 3 bonds removed) protons and the electric field, magnetic anisotropy and steric effect of the amide group for more distant protons. The chemical shifts of the NH protons of acetanilide and benzamide vary linearly with the π density on the αN and βC atoms, respectively. The C=O anisotropy and steric effect are in general little changed from the values in CDCl3. The effects of substituents F, Cl, Me on the NH proton shifts are reproduced. The electric field coefficient for the protons in DMSO is 90% of that in CDCl3. There is no steric effect of the C=O oxygen on the NH proton in an NH…O=C hydrogen bond. The observed deshielding is due to the electric field effect. The calculated chemical shifts agree well with the observed shifts (RMS error of 0.106 ppm for the data set of 257 entries). Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Measurement of the relaxation rate of the magnetization in Mn12O12-acetate using proton NMR echo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang; Lascialfari; Borsa; Gatteschi

    2000-03-27

    We present a novel method to measure the relaxation rate W of the magnetization of Mn 12O (12)-acetate (Mn12) magnetic molecular cluster in its S = 10 ground state at low T. It is based on the observation of an exponential growth in time of the proton NMR signal during the thermal equilibration of the magnetization of the molecules. We can explain the novel effect with a simple model which relates the intensity of the proton echo signal to the microscopic reversal of the magnetization of each individual Mn12 molecule during the equilibration process. The method should find wide application in the study of magnetic molecular clusters in off-equilibrium conditions.

  13. Measurement of the Relaxation Rate of the Magnetization in Mn12O12 -Acetate Using Proton NMR Echo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Z. H.; Lascialfari, A.; Borsa, F.; Gatteschi, D.

    2000-01-01

    We present a novel method to measure the relaxation rate W of the magnetization of Mn 12 O 12 -acetate (Mn12) magnetic molecular cluster in its S=10 ground state at low T . It is based on the observation of an exponential growth in time of the proton NMR signal during the thermal equilibration of the magnetization of the molecules. We can explain the novel effect with a simple model which relates the intensity of the proton echo signal to the microscopic reversal of the magnetization of each individual Mn12 molecule during the equilibration process. The method should find wide application in the study of magnetic molecular clusters in off-equilibrium conditions. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  14. NMR water-proton spin-lattice relaxation time of human red blood cells and red blood cell suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, S.G.; Rosenthal, J.S.; Winston, A.; Stern, A.

    1988-01-01

    NMR water-proton spin-lattice relaxation times were studied as probes of water structure in human red blood cells and red blood cell suspensions. Normal saline had a relaxation time of about 3000 ms while packed red blood cells had a relaxation time of about 500 ms. The relaxation time of a red blood cell suspension at 50% hematocrit was about 750 ms showing that surface charges and polar groups of the red cell membrane effectively structure extracellular water. Incubation of red cells in hypotonic saline increases relaxation time whereas hypertonic saline decreases relaxation time. Relaxation times varied independently of mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration in a sample population. Studies with lysates and resealed membrane ghosts show that hemoglobin is very effective in lowering water-proton relaxation time whereas resealed membrane ghosts in the absence of hemoglobin are less effective than intact red cells. 9 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 table

  15. An analysis of the NMR-CT image by the measurement of proton-relaxation times in tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruse, Shoji; Horikawa, Yoshiharu; Tanaka, Chuzo; Hirakawa, Kimiyoshi; Nishikawa, Hiroyasu; Shimizu, Koji; Kiri, Motosada.

    1984-01-01

    NMR-CT images were analyzed by measuring the proton-relaxation times in tissues. The NMR-CT images were obtained in 10 normal volunteers and 16 patients with brain tumors with a prototype superconducting magnet (Shimadzu Corp., Japan) operating at 0.2 T and 0.375 T. A smooth T 1 relaxation curve was obtained in each part of the brain and the brain tumor by the use of the data of the NMR-CT image; consequently, the in vivo T 1 value was proved to be reliable. The in vivo T 1 value showed the specific value corresponding to each region of the normal brain in all cases. Cerebral gray matter normally had the longest T 1 value, followed by the medulla oblongata, the pons, and white matter. The T 1 value of each region of the brain varied to the same degree in proportion to the strength of the static magnetic field. The in vivo T 1 values of the brain tumor varied with the histological type. All were longer than any part of the brain parenchyma, being between 480 and 780 msec at 0.2 T. The prolongation of the T 1 value does not always correspond to the degree of the malignancy in a tumor. The in vitro T 1 and T 2 values were also prolonged in all tumors. Although the absolute value of T 1 did not coincide between the in vitro and in vivo data, the tendency of the prolongation was the same between them. This result indicated that the NMR-CT images could be analysed by the use of the data of the in vitro T 1 and T 2 values in the tumor tissues. It is important to analyse the NMR-CT image by both in vivo and in vitro examinations of the relaxation times. (J.P.N.)

  16. NMR determination of chemically related metals in solution as a new method of inorganic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    An NMR spectroscopic method for the determination of chemically related metals in solution is suggested. The metals are determined in complexes with specially selected polydentate ligands. Structural requirements to ligands, analytical properties and general limits of the application of the method are discussed. (orig.)

  17. Proton transfer in a short hydrogen bond caused by solvation shell fluctuations: an ab initio MD and NMR/UV study of an (OHO)(-) bonded system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylaeva, Svetlana; Allolio, Christoph; Koeppe, Benjamin; Denisov, Gleb S; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Sebastiani, Daniel; Tolstoy, Peter M

    2015-02-14

    We present a joint experimental and quantum chemical study on the influence of solvent dynamics on the protonation equilibrium in a strongly hydrogen bonded phenol-acetate complex in CD2Cl2. Particular attention is given to the correlation of the proton position distribution with the internal conformation of the complex itself and with fluctuations of the aprotic solvent. Specifically, we have focused on a complex formed by 4-nitrophenol and tetraalkylammonium-acetate in CD2Cl2. Experimentally we have used combined low-temperature (1)H and (13)C NMR and UV-vis spectroscopy and showed that a very strong OHO hydrogen bond is formed with proton tautomerism (PhOH···(-)OAc and PhO(-)···HOAc forms, both strongly hydrogen bonded). Computationally, we have employed ab initio molecular dynamics (70 and 71 solvent molecules, with and without the presence of a counter-cation, respectively). We demonstrate that the relative motion of the counter-cation and the "free" carbonyl group of the acid plays the major role in the OHO bond geometry and causes proton "jumps", i.e. interconversion of PhOH···(-)OAc and PhO(-)···HOAc tautomers. Weak H-bonds between CH(CD) groups of the solvent and the oxygen atom of carbonyl stabilize the PhOH···(-)OAc type of structures. Breaking of CH···O bonds shifts the equilibrium towards PhO(-)···HOAc form.

  18. NMR experiments for the measurement of proton-proton and carbon-carbon residual dipolar couplings in uniformly labelled oligosaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Pastor, Manuel [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Laboratorio Integral de Estructura de Biomoleculas Jose. R. Carracido, Unidade de Resonancia Magnetica, RIAIDT (Spain)], E-mail: mmartin@usc.es; Canales-Mayordomo, Angeles; Jimenez-Barbero, Jesus [Departamento de Estructura y funcion de proteinas, Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas, CSIC (Spain)], E-mail: jjbarbero@cib.csic.es

    2003-08-15

    A 2D-HSQC-carbon selective/proton selective-constant time COSY, 2D-HSQC-(sel C, sel H)-CT COSY experiment, which is applicable to uniformly {sup 13}C isotopically enriched samples (U-{sup 13}C) of oligosaccharides or oligonucleotides is proposed for the measurement of proton-proton RDC in crowded regions of 2D-spectra. In addition, a heteronuclear constant time-COSY experiment, {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C CT-COSY, is proposed for the measurement of one bond carbon-carbon RDC in these molecules. These two methods provide an extension, to U-{sup 13}C molecules, of the original homonuclear constant time-COSY experiment proposed by Tian et al. (1999) for saccharides. The combination of a number of these RDC with NOE data may provide the method of choice to study oligosaccharide conformation in the free and receptor-bound state.

  19. Communication: Proton NMR dipolar-correlation effect as a method for investigating segmental diffusion in polymer melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozovoi, A.; Mattea, C.; Stapf, S.; Herrmann, A.; Rössler, E. A.; Fatkullin, N.

    2016-01-01

    A simple and fast method for the investigation of segmental diffusion in high molar mass polymer melts is presented. The method is based on a special function, called proton dipolar-correlation build-up function, which is constructed from Hahn Echo signals measured at times t and t/2. The initial rise of this function contains additive contributions from both inter- and intramolecular magnetic dipole-dipole interactions. The intermolecular contribution depends on the relative mean squared displacements (MSDs) of polymer segments from different macromolecules, while the intramolecular part reflects segmental reorientations. Separation of both contributions via isotope dilution provides access to segmental displacements in polymer melts at millisecond range, which is hardly accessible by other methods. The feasibility of the method is illustrated by investigating protonated and deuterated polybutadiene melts with molecular mass 196 000 g/mol at different temperatures. The observed exponent of the power law of the segmental MSD is close to 0.32 ± 0.03 at times when the root MSD is in between 45 Å and 75 Å, and the intermolecular proton dipole-dipole contribution to the total proton Hahn Echo NMR signal is larger than 50% and increases with time.

  20. Suppression of Protonated Organic Solvents in NMR Spectroscopy Using a Perfect Echo Low-Pass Filtration Pulse Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Peter W A

    2018-04-03

    Proton NMR spectra are usually acquired using deuterated solvents, but in many cases it is necessary to obtain spectra on samples in protonated solvents. In these cases, the intense resonances of the protonated solvents need to be suppressed to maximize sensitivity and spectral quality. A wide range of highly effective solvent suppression methods have been developed, but additional measures are needed to suppress the 13 C satellites of the solvent. Because the satellites represent 1.1% of the original solvent signal, they remain problematic if unsuppressed. The recently proposed DISPEL pulse sequences suppress 13 C satellites extremely effectively, and this Technical Note demonstrates that combining DISPEL and presaturation results in exceptionally effective solvent suppression. An important element in the effectiveness is volume selection, which is inherent within the DISPEL sequence. Spectra acquired in protonated dimethlysulfoxide and tetrahydrofuran show that optimum results are obtained by modifying the phase cycle, cycling the pulse-field gradients, and using broadband 13 C inversion pulses to reduce the effects of radiofrequency offset and inhomogeneity.

  1. Automatic NMR-based identification of chemical reaction types in mixtures of co-occurring reactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo A R S Latino

    Full Text Available The combination of chemoinformatics approaches with NMR techniques and the increasing availability of data allow the resolution of problems far beyond the original application of NMR in structure elucidation/verification. The diversity of applications can range from process monitoring, metabolic profiling, authentication of products, to quality control. An application related to the automatic analysis of complex mixtures concerns mixtures of chemical reactions. We encoded mixtures of chemical reactions with the difference between the (1H NMR spectra of the products and the reactants. All the signals arising from all the reactants of the co-occurring reactions were taken together (a simulated spectrum of the mixture of reactants and the same was done for products. The difference spectrum is taken as the representation of the mixture of chemical reactions. A data set of 181 chemical reactions was used, each reaction manually assigned to one of 6 types. From this dataset, we simulated mixtures where two reactions of different types would occur simultaneously. Automatic learning methods were trained to classify the reactions occurring in a mixture from the (1H NMR-based descriptor of the mixture. Unsupervised learning methods (self-organizing maps produced a reasonable clustering of the mixtures by reaction type, and allowed the correct classification of 80% and 63% of the mixtures in two independent test sets of different similarity to the training set. With random forests (RF, the percentage of correct classifications was increased to 99% and 80% for the same test sets. The RF probability associated to the predictions yielded a robust indication of their reliability. This study demonstrates the possibility of applying machine learning methods to automatically identify types of co-occurring chemical reactions from NMR data. Using no explicit structural information about the reactions participants, reaction elucidation is performed without structure

  2. Automatic NMR-based identification of chemical reaction types in mixtures of co-occurring reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latino, Diogo A R S; Aires-de-Sousa, João

    2014-01-01

    The combination of chemoinformatics approaches with NMR techniques and the increasing availability of data allow the resolution of problems far beyond the original application of NMR in structure elucidation/verification. The diversity of applications can range from process monitoring, metabolic profiling, authentication of products, to quality control. An application related to the automatic analysis of complex mixtures concerns mixtures of chemical reactions. We encoded mixtures of chemical reactions with the difference between the (1)H NMR spectra of the products and the reactants. All the signals arising from all the reactants of the co-occurring reactions were taken together (a simulated spectrum of the mixture of reactants) and the same was done for products. The difference spectrum is taken as the representation of the mixture of chemical reactions. A data set of 181 chemical reactions was used, each reaction manually assigned to one of 6 types. From this dataset, we simulated mixtures where two reactions of different types would occur simultaneously. Automatic learning methods were trained to classify the reactions occurring in a mixture from the (1)H NMR-based descriptor of the mixture. Unsupervised learning methods (self-organizing maps) produced a reasonable clustering of the mixtures by reaction type, and allowed the correct classification of 80% and 63% of the mixtures in two independent test sets of different similarity to the training set. With random forests (RF), the percentage of correct classifications was increased to 99% and 80% for the same test sets. The RF probability associated to the predictions yielded a robust indication of their reliability. This study demonstrates the possibility of applying machine learning methods to automatically identify types of co-occurring chemical reactions from NMR data. Using no explicit structural information about the reactions participants, reaction elucidation is performed without structure elucidation of

  3. Two-dimensional NMR studies of squash family inhibitors. Sequence-specific proton assignments and secondary structure of reactive-site hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthi, R; Gong, Y X; Lin, C L; VanderVelde, D

    1992-01-28

    The solution structure of reactive-site hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III (CMTI-III*) was investigated by two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy. CMTI-III*, prepared by reacting CMTI-III with trypsin which cleaved the Arg5-Ile6 peptide bond, had the two fragments held together by a disulfide linkage. Sequence-specific 1H NMR resonance assignments were made for all the 29 amino acid residues of the protein. The secondary structure of CMTI-III*, as deduced from NOESY cross peaks and identification of slowly exchanging hydrogens, contains two turns (residues 8-12 and 24-27), a 3(10)-helix (residues 13-16), and a triple-stranded beta-sheet (residues 8-10, 29-27, and 21-25). This secondary structure is similar to that of CMTI-I [Holak, T. A., Gondol, D., Otlewski, J., & Wilusz, T. (1989) J. Mol. Biol. 210, 635-648], which has a Glu instead of a Lys at position 9. Sequential proton assignments were also made for the virgin inhibitor, CMTI-III, at pH 4.71, 30 degrees C. Comparison of backbone hydrogen chemical shifts of CMTI-III and CMTI-III* revealed significant changes for residues located far away from the reactive-site region as well as for those located near it, indicating tertiary structural changes that are transmitted through most of the 29 residues of the inhibitor protein. Many of these residues are functionally important in that they make contact with atoms of the enzyme in the trypsin-inhibitor complex, as revealed by X-ray crystallography [Bode, W., Greyling, H. J., Huber, R., Otlewski, J., & Wilusz, T. (1989) FEBS Lett. 242, 285-292].(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Magnetization transfer from macromolecules to water protons in murine dental tissues as revealed by 500 MHz 1H-NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Koji; Era, Seiichi; Nagai, Naoki; Sogami, Masaru; Takasaki, Akihiko; Kato, Kazuo.

    1997-01-01

    Although much is known about magnetization transfer phenomena in biological soft tissues, little is known about those in hard tissues. Using a 500 MHz 1 H-NMR spectrometer, we studied the spin-lattice relaxation time (T 1 (H 2 O)) and the intermolecular cross-relaxation times (T IS (H 2 O)) from irradiated macromolecular protons to observed water protons in murine lower incisors (hard tissue) and compared with those in murine lens tissue (soft tissue). Mean values for the water content (%) of murine lower incisors and lens tissue were 16.02±2.39 (n=14) and 67.20±4.60 (n=15), respectively. These findings were consistent with the large different in water content between soft tissues and hard tissues. T IS (H 2 O) values obtained by f 2 -irradiation at 7.13 or -4.00 ppm showed no significant difference between lower incisors and lens tissue. Plots of 1/T IS (H 2 O) values vs. tissue dry weight (W(%)) for lower incisor tissue approximated a straight line with slope approximately equal for that obtained for lens tissue. These results suggest that the state of water in hard tissue may be similar to that in soft tissues, in spite of the significant difference in water content. Thus, saturation transfer NMR techniques such as measurement of T IS (H 2 O) values may be applicable to the study of water-macromolecule interactions in both biological soft and hard tissues. (author)

  5. Characterizing source fingerprints and ageing processes in laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosols using proton-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) analysis and HPLC HULIS determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanca, Nicola; Lambe, Andrew T.; Massoli, Paola; Paglione, Marco; Croasdale, David R.; Parmar, Yatish; Tagliavini, Emilio; Gilardoni, Stefania; Decesari, Stefano

    2017-09-01

    The study of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in laboratory settings has greatly increased our knowledge of the diverse chemical processes and environmental conditions responsible for the formation of particulate matter starting from biogenic and anthropogenic volatile compounds. However, characteristics of the different experimental setups and the way they impact the composition and the timescale of formation of SOA are still subject to debate. In this study, SOA samples were generated using a potential aerosol mass (PAM) oxidation flow reactor using α-pinene, naphthalene and isoprene as precursors. The PAM reactor facilitated exploration of SOA composition over atmospherically relevant photochemical ageing timescales that are unattainable in environmental chambers. The SOA samples were analyzed using two state-of-the-art analytical techniques for SOA characterization - proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy and HPLC determination of humic-like substances (HULIS). Results were compared with previous Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements. The combined 1H-NMR, HPLC, and AMS datasets show that the composition of the studied SOA systems tend to converge to highly oxidized organic compounds upon prolonged OH exposures. Further, our 1H-NMR findings show that only α-pinene SOA acquires spectroscopic features comparable to those of ambient OA when exposed to at least 1 × 1012 molec OH cm-3 × s OH exposure, or multiple days of equivalent atmospheric OH oxidation. Over multiple days of equivalent OH exposure, the formation of HULIS is observed in both α-pinene SOA and in naphthalene SOA (maximum yields: 16 and 30 %, respectively, of total analyzed water-soluble organic carbon, WSOC), providing evidence of the formation of humic-like polycarboxylic acids in unseeded SOA.

  6. Characterizing source fingerprints and ageing processes in laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosols using proton-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR analysis and HPLC HULIS determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Zanca

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of secondary organic aerosol (SOA in laboratory settings has greatly increased our knowledge of the diverse chemical processes and environmental conditions responsible for the formation of particulate matter starting from biogenic and anthropogenic volatile compounds. However, characteristics of the different experimental setups and the way they impact the composition and the timescale of formation of SOA are still subject to debate. In this study, SOA samples were generated using a potential aerosol mass (PAM oxidation flow reactor using α-pinene, naphthalene and isoprene as precursors. The PAM reactor facilitated exploration of SOA composition over atmospherically relevant photochemical ageing timescales that are unattainable in environmental chambers. The SOA samples were analyzed using two state-of-the-art analytical techniques for SOA characterization – proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR spectroscopy and HPLC determination of humic-like substances (HULIS. Results were compared with previous Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS measurements. The combined 1H-NMR, HPLC, and AMS datasets show that the composition of the studied SOA systems tend to converge to highly oxidized organic compounds upon prolonged OH exposures. Further, our 1H-NMR findings show that only α-pinene SOA acquires spectroscopic features comparable to those of ambient OA when exposed to at least 1  ×  1012 molec OH cm−3  ×  s OH exposure, or multiple days of equivalent atmospheric OH oxidation. Over multiple days of equivalent OH exposure, the formation of HULIS is observed in both α-pinene SOA and in naphthalene SOA (maximum yields: 16 and 30 %, respectively, of total analyzed water-soluble organic carbon, WSOC, providing evidence of the formation of humic-like polycarboxylic acids in unseeded SOA.

  7. 1H and 13C NMR Chemical Shift Assignments and Conformational Analysis for the Two Diastereomers of the Vitamin K Epoxide Reductase Inhibitor Brodifacoum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cort, John R.; Cho, Herman M.

    2009-01-01

    Proton and 13C NMR chemical shift assignments and 1H-1H scalar couplings for the two diastereomers of the vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) inhibitor brodifacoum have been determined from acetone solutions containing both diastereomers. Data were obtained from homo- and heteronuclear correlation spectra acquired at 1H frequencies of 750 and 900 MHz over a 268-303 K temperature range. Conformations inferred from scalar coupling and 1-D NOE measurements exhibit large differences between the diastereomers. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  8. Benchmarking Hydrogen and Carbon NMR Chemical Shifts at HF, DFT, and MP2 Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaig, Denis; Maurer, Marina; Hanni, Matti; Braunger, Katharina; Kick, Leonhard; Thubauville, Matthias; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2014-02-11

    An extensive study of error distributions for calculating hydrogen and carbon NMR chemical shifts at Hartree-Fock (HF), density functional theory (DFT), and Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory (MP2) levels is presented. Our investigation employs accurate CCSD(T)/cc-pVQZ calculations for providing reference data for 48 hydrogen and 40 carbon nuclei within an extended set of chemical compounds covering a broad range of the NMR scale with high relevance to chemical applications, especially in organic chemistry. Besides the approximations of HF, a variety of DFT functionals, and conventional MP2, we also present results with respect to a spin component-scaled MP2 (GIAO-SCS-MP2) approach. For each method, the accuracy is analyzed in detail for various basis sets, allowing identification of efficient combinations of method and basis set approximations.

  9. FTIR, FT-Raman, FT-NMR, UV-visible and quantum chemical investigations of 2-amino-4-methylbenzothiazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Sakiladevi, S; Rani, T; Mythili, C V; Mohan, S

    2012-03-01

    The FT-IR (4000-400 cm(-1)) and FT-Raman (4000-100 cm(-1)) spectral measurements and complete assignments of the observed spectra of 2-amino-4-methylbenzothiazole (2A4MBT) have been proposed. Ab initio and DFT calculations have been performed and the structural parameters of the compound were determined from the optimised geometry with 6-31G(d,p), 6-311++G(d,p) and cc-pVDZ basis sets and giving energies, harmonic vibrational frequencies, depolarisation ratios, IR intensities and Raman activities. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra were recorded and (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. UV-visible spectrum of the compound was also recorded and the electronic properties, such as HOMO, LUMO and band gap energies were measured by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach. The geometric parameters, energies, harmonic vibrational frequencies, IR intensities, Raman activities chemical shifts and absorption wavelengths were compared with the available experimental data of the molecule. The influences of methyl and amino groups on the skeletal modes and on the proton chemical shifts have been investigated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. NMR studies of chemical structural variation of insoluble organic matter from different carbonaceous chondrite groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, George D.; Alexander, Conel M. O.'D.

    2005-02-01

    Solid-state 1H and 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopic experiments have been performed on isolated meteoritic Insoluble Organic Matter (IOM) spanning four different carbonaceous chondrite meteorite groups; a CR2 (EET92042), a CI1 (Orgueil), a CM2 (Murchison), and the unique C2 meteorite, Tagish Lake. These solid state NMR experiments reveal considerable variation in bulk organic composition across the different meteorite group's IOM. The fraction of aromatic carbon increases as CR2 meteorite groups. Single pulse (SP) 13C magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments reveal the presence of nanodiamonds with an apparent concentration ranking in the IOM of CR2 IOM of all four meteoritic IOM fractions are highly substituted. Fast spinning SP 1H MAS NMR spectral data combined with other NMR experimental data reveal that the average hydrogen content of sp 3 bonded carbon functional groups is low, requiring a high degree of aliphatic chain branching in each IOM fraction. The variation in chemistry across the meteorite groups is consistent with alteration by low temperature chemical oxidation. It is concluded that such chemistry principally affected the aliphatic moieties whereas the aromatic moieties and nanodiamonds may have been largely unaffected.

  11. Chemical shift-dependent apparent scalar couplings: An alternative concept of chemical shift monitoring in multi-dimensional NMR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatkowski, Witek; Riek, Roland

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents an alternative technique for chemical shift monitoring in a multi-dimensional NMR experiment. The monitored chemical shift is coded in the line-shape of a cross-peak through an apparent residual scalar coupling active during an established evolution period or acquisition. The size of the apparent scalar coupling is manipulated with an off-resonance radio-frequency pulse in order to correlate the size of the coupling with the position of the additional chemical shift. The strength of this concept is that chemical shift information is added without an additional evolution period and accompanying polarization transfer periods. This concept was incorporated into the three-dimensional triple-resonance experiment HNCA, adding the information of 1 H α chemical shifts. The experiment is called HNCA coded HA, since the chemical shift of 1 H α is coded in the line-shape of the cross-peak along the 13 C α dimension

  12. Modelling the acid/base 1H NMR chemical shift limits of metabolites in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tredwell, Gregory D; Bundy, Jacob G; De Iorio, Maria; Ebbels, Timothy M D

    2016-01-01

    Despite the use of buffering agents the 1 H NMR spectra of biofluid samples in metabolic profiling investigations typically suffer from extensive peak frequency shifting between spectra. These chemical shift changes are mainly due to differences in pH and divalent metal ion concentrations between the samples. This frequency shifting results in a correspondence problem: it can be hard to register the same peak as belonging to the same molecule across multiple samples. The problem is especially acute for urine, which can have a wide range of ionic concentrations between different samples. To investigate the acid, base and metal ion dependent 1 H NMR chemical shift variations and limits of the main metabolites in a complex biological mixture. Urine samples from five different individuals were collected and pooled, and pre-treated with Chelex-100 ion exchange resin. Urine samples were either treated with either HCl or NaOH, or were supplemented with various concentrations of CaCl 2 , MgCl 2 , NaCl or KCl, and their 1 H NMR spectra were acquired. Nonlinear fitting was used to derive acid dissociation constants and acid and base chemical shift limits for peaks from 33 identified metabolites. Peak pH titration curves for a further 65 unidentified peaks were also obtained for future reference. Furthermore, the peak variations induced by the main metal ions present in urine, Na + , K + , Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ , were also measured. These data will be a valuable resource for 1 H NMR metabolite profiling experiments and for the development of automated metabolite alignment and identification algorithms for 1 H NMR spectra.

  13. Comparison of PET and proton NMR imaging in the diagnosis of Alzheimer-type dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedland, R.P.; Budinger, T.F.; Jagust, W.J.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.

    1985-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), medical personnel remain unable to make the diagnosis noninvasively, except by exclusion. The more recently developed technique of positron emission tomography (PET) has been used with a labeled glucose analogue, ( 18 F)-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG), to noninvasively study glucose metabolism in dementia. Specific regional alterations, particularly in the temporal-parietal cortex, have been found. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging is another powerful new technology that is beginning to be applied to dementia. The authors have compared the findings in PET studies using FDG with NMR imaging in two subjects with Alzheimer-type dementia

  14. Role of post-sulfonation of poly(ether ether sulfone) in proton conductivity and chemical stability of its proton exchange membranes for fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unveren, Elif Erdal; Erdogan, Tuba; Inan, Tulay Y. [Chemistry Institute, TUBITAK Marmara Research Center, 41470, Gebze, Kocaeli (Turkey); Celebi, Serdar S. [Professor Emeritus, Chemical Engineering Department, Hacettepe University, 06800, Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-04-15

    Commercially available poly(ether ether sulfone), PEES, was directly sulfonated using concentrated sulfuric acid at low temperatures by minimizing degradation during sulfonation. The sulfonation reaction was performed in the temperature range of 5-25 C. Sulfonated polymers were characterized by FTIR, {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy and ion exchange capacity (IEC) measurements. Degradation during sulfonation was investigated by measuring intrinsic viscosity, glass transition temperature and thermal decomposition temperature of sulfonated polymers. Sulfonated PEES, SPEES, membranes were prepared by solvent casting method and characterized in terms of IEC, proton conductivity and water uptake. The effect of sulfonation conditions on chemical stability of membranes was also investigated via Fenton test. Optimum sulfonation condition was determined to be 10 C with conc. H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} based on the characteristics of sulfonated polymers and also the chemical stability of their membranes. SPEES membranes exhibited proton conductivity up to 185.8 mS cm{sup -1} which is higher than that of Nafion 117 (133.3 mS cm{sup -1}) measured at 80 C and relative humidity 100%. (author)

  15. Chemical profile of beans cultivars (Phaseolus vulgaris) by 1H NMR - high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS);Perfil quimico de cultivares de feijao (Phaseolus vulgaris) pela tecnica de high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Luciano Morais; Choze, Rafael; Cavalcante, Pedro Paulo Araujo; Santos, Suzana da Costa; Ferri, Pedro Henrique, E-mail: luciano@quimica.ufg.b [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Ferreira, Antonio Gilberto [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFScar), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2010-07-01

    The application of one-dimensional proton high-resolution magic angle spinning ({sup 1}H HR-MAS) NMR combined with a typical advantages of solid and liquid-state NMR techniques was used as input variables for the multivariate statistical analysis. In this paper, different cultivars of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) developed and in development by EMBRAPA - Arroz e Feijao were analyzed by {sup 1}H HR-MAS, which have been demonstrated to be a valuable tool in its differentiation according chemical composition and avoid the manipulation of the samples as used in other techniques. (author)

  16. Quantitative analysis of deuterium using the isotopic effect on quaternary {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darwish, Tamim A., E-mail: tamim.darwish@ansto.gov.au [National Deuteration Facility, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 21, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Yepuri, Nageshwar Rao; Holden, Peter J. [National Deuteration Facility, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 21, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); James, Michael [Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2016-07-13

    Quantitative analysis of specifically deuterated compounds can be achieved by a number of conventional methods, such as mass spectroscopy, or by quantifying the residual {sup 1}H NMR signals compared to signals from internal standards. However, site specific quantification using these methods becomes challenging when dealing with non-specifically or randomly deuterated compounds that are produced by metal catalyzed hydrothermal reactions in D{sub 2}O, one of the most convenient deuteration methods. In this study, deuterium-induced NMR isotope shifts of quaternary {sup 13}C resonances neighboring deuterated sites have been utilized to quantify the degree of isotope labeling of molecular sites in non-specifically deuterated molecules. By probing {sup 13}C NMR signals while decoupling both proton and deuterium nuclei, it is possible to resolve {sup 13}C resonances of the different isotopologues based on the isotopic shifts and the degree of deuteration of the carbon atoms. We demonstrate that in different isotopologues, the same quaternary carbon, neighboring partially deuterated carbon atoms, are affected to an equal extent by relaxation. Decoupling both nuclei ({sup 1}H, {sup 2}H) resolves closely separated quaternary {sup 13}C signals of the different isotopologues, and allows their accurate integration and quantification under short relaxation delays (D1 = 1 s) and hence fast accumulative spectral acquisition. We have performed a number of approaches to quantify the deuterium content at different specific sites to demonstrate a convenient and generic analysis method for use in randomly deuterated molecules, or in cases of specifically deuterated molecules where back-exchange processes may take place during work up. - Graphical abstract: The relative intensities of quaternary {sup 13}C {"1H,"2H} resonances are equal despite the different relaxation delays, allowing the relative abundance of the different deuterated isotopologues to be calculated using NMR fast

  17. Chemical Ligation of Folded Recombinant Proteins: Segmental Isotopic Labeling of Domains for NMR Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rong; Ayers, Brenda; Cowburn, David; Muir, Tom W.

    1999-01-01

    A convenient in vitro chemical ligation strategy has been developed that allows folded recombinant proteins to be joined together. This strategy permits segmental, selective isotopic labeling of the product. The src homology type 3 and 2 domains (SH3 and SH2) of Abelson protein tyrosine kinase, which constitute the regulatory apparatus of the protein, were individually prepared in reactive forms that can be ligated together under normal protein-folding conditions to form a normal peptide bond at the ligation junction. This strategy was used to prepare NMR sample quantities of the Abelson protein tyrosine kinase-SH(32) domain pair, in which only one of the domains was labeled with 15N Mass spectrometry and NMR analyses were used to confirm the structure of the ligated protein, which was also shown to have appropriate ligand-binding properties. The ability to prepare recombinant proteins with selectively labeled segments having a single-site mutation, by using a combination of expression of fusion proteins and chemical ligation in vitro, will increase the size limits for protein structural determination in solution with NMR methods. In vitro chemical ligation of expressed protein domains will also provide a combinatorial approach to the synthesis of linked protein domains.

  18. Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer in Chemical Reactions: A Mechanistic Tool for NMR Detection and Characterization of Transient Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokesh, N; Seegerer, Andreas; Hioe, Johnny; Gschwind, Ruth M

    2018-02-07

    The low sensitivity of NMR and transient key intermediates below detection limit are the central problems studying reaction mechanisms by NMR. Sensitivity can be enhanced by hyperpolarization techniques such as dynamic nuclear polarization or the incorporation/interaction of special hyperpolarized molecules. However, all of these techniques require special equipment, are restricted to selective reactions, or undesirably influence the reaction pathways. Here, we apply the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) technique for the first time to NMR detect and characterize previously unobserved transient reaction intermediates in organocatalysis. The higher sensitivity of CEST and chemical equilibria present in the reaction pathway are exploited to access population and kinetics information on low populated intermediates. The potential of the method is demonstrated on the proline-catalyzed enamine formation for unprecedented in situ detection of a DPU stabilized zwitterionic iminium species, the elusive key intermediate between enamine and oxazolidinones. The quantitative analysis of CEST data at 250 K revealed the population ratio of [Z-iminium]/[exo-oxazolidinone] 0.02, relative free energy +8.1 kJ/mol (calculated +7.3 kJ/mol), and free energy barrier of +45.9 kJ/mol (ΔG ⧧ calc. (268 K) = +42.2 kJ/mol) for Z-iminium → exo-oxazolidinone. The findings underpin the iminium ion participation in enamine formation pathway corroborating our earlier theoretical prediction and help in better understanding. The reliability of CEST is validated using 1D EXSY-build-up techniques at low temperature (213 K). The CEST method thus serves as a new tool for mechanistic investigations in organocatalysis to access key information, such as chemical shifts, populations, and reaction kinetics of intermediates below the standard NMR detection limit.

  19. A proton NMR study of the effect of Mucuna pruriens on seminal plasma metabolites of infertile males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ashish; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Ahmad, Mohammad Kaleem; Shukla, Kamla Kant; Bansal, Navneeta; Jaiswer, Shyam Pyari; Shankhwar, Satya Narain

    2011-07-15

    The objective of this study was to employ proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy to evaluate the impact of Mucuna pruriens seeds on the metabolic profile of seminal plasma of infertile patients. A total of 180 infertile patients were administered M. pruriens seed powder for a period of three months. Age-matched healthy men comprised the control (n=50) group in the study. Lactate, alanine, choline, citrate, glycerophosphocholine (GPC), glutamine, tyrosine, histidine, phenylalanine, and uridine were measured in seminal plasma by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. To evaluate the degree of infertility and extent of hormonal imbalance induced by this milieu, separate sperm concentration, motility, lipid peroxide in seminal plasma and LH, FSH, T, and PRL hormone concentration in serum were measured using standard laboratory methods and RIA, respectively, in the same subjects. M. pruriens therapy rectifies the perturbed alanine, citrate, GPC, histidine and phenylalanine content in seminal plasma and improves the semen quality of post-treated infertile men with compared to pre-treated. Concomitantly, clinical variables in seminal plasma and blood serum were also improved over post therapy in infertile men. On the basis of these observations, it may be proposed that M. pruriens seed powder not only reactivates the enzymatic activity of metabolic pathways and energy metabolism but also rejuvenates the harmonic balance of male reproductive hormones in infertile men. These findings open more opportunities for infertility treatment and management by improving semen quality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Interaction of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-factor with phospholipid vesicles as revealed by proton and phosphorus NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelicks, L.A.; Broido, M.S.; Becker, J.M.; Naider, F.R.

    1989-01-01

    Proton and phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H and 31 P NMR) studies of the interaction between a tridecapeptide pheromone, the α-factor of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and sonicated lipid vesicles are reported. 31 P NMR studies demonstrate that there is interaction of the peptide with the phosphorus headgroups, and quasielastic light scattering (QLS) studies indicate that lipid vesicles increase in size upon addition of peptide. Previous solution (aqueous and DMSO) studies from this laboratory indicate that α-factor is highly flexible with only one long-lived identifiable structural feature, a type II β-turn spanning the central portion of the peptide. Two-dimensional (2D) 1 H nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) studies demonstrate a marked ordering of the peptide upon interaction with lipid, suggesting a compact N-terminus, in addition to a stabilized β-turn. In contrast to these results in both solution and lipid environment, Wakamatsu et al. proposed a lipid environment conformation, on the basis of one-dimensional transferred NOE studies in D 2 O, which does not include the β-turn

  1. Investigating the Dissolution Performance of Amorphous Solid Dispersions Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Proton NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tres

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the dissolution performance of amorphous solid dispersions of poorly water-soluble bicalutamide in a Kollidon VA64 polymeric matrix as a function of the drug loading (5% vs. 30% bicalutamide. A combined suite of state-of-the-art analytical techniques were employed to obtain a clear picture of the drug release, including an integrated magnetic resonance imaging UV-Vis flow cell system and 1H-NMR. Off-line 1H-NMR was used for the first time to simultaneously measure the dissolution profiles and rates of both the drug and the polymer from a solid dispersion. MRI and 1H-NMR data showed that the 5% drug loading compact erodes linearly, and that bicalutamide and Kollidon VA64 are released at approximately the same rate from the molecular dispersion. For the 30% extrudate, data indicated a slower water ingress into the compact which corresponds to a slower dissolution rate of both bicalutamide and Kollidon VA64.

  2. Further conventions for NMR shielding and chemical shifts (IUPAC Recommendations 2008)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, R.K. [University of Durham, Durham (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry; Becker, E.D. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Menezes, S.M. Cabral de [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES); Granger, P. [University Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France). Inst. of Chemistry; Hoffman, R.E. [The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Safra Campus, Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Organic Chemistry; Zilm, K.W., E-mail: r.k.harris@durham.ac.uk [Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2008-07-01

    IUPAC has published a number of recommendations regarding the reporting of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data, especially chemical shifts. The most recent publication [Pure Appl. Chem. 73, 1795 (2001)] recommended that tetramethylsilane (TMS) serve as a universal reference for reporting the shifts of all nuclides, but it deferred recommendations for several aspects of this subject. This document first examines the extent to which the {sup 1}H shielding in TMS itself is subject to change by variation in temperature, concentration, and solvent. On the basis of recently published results, it has been established that the shielding of TMS in solution [along with that of sodium-3- (trimethylsilyl)propanesulfonate, DSS, often used as a reference for aqueous solutions] varies only slightly with temperature but is subject to solvent perturbations of a few tenths of a part per million (ppm). Recommendations are given for reporting chemical shifts under most routine experimental conditions and for quantifying effects of temperature and solvent variation, including the use of magnetic susceptibility corrections and of magic-angle spinning (MAS). This document provides the first IUPAC recommendations for referencing and reporting chemical shifts in solids, based on high-resolution MAS studies. Procedures are given for relating {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts in solids to the scales used for high resolution studies in the liquid phase. The notation and terminology used for describing chemical shift and shielding tensors in solids are reviewed in some detail, and recommendations are given for best practice. (author)

  3. Further conventions for NMR shielding and chemical shifts (IUPAC Recommendations 2008)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, R.K.; Menezes, S.M. Cabral de; Granger, P.; Hoffman, R.E.; Zilm, K.W.

    2008-01-01

    IUPAC has published a number of recommendations regarding the reporting of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data, especially chemical shifts. The most recent publication [Pure Appl. Chem. 73, 1795 (2001)] recommended that tetramethylsilane (TMS) serve as a universal reference for reporting the shifts of all nuclides, but it deferred recommendations for several aspects of this subject. This document first examines the extent to which the 1 H shielding in TMS itself is subject to change by variation in temperature, concentration, and solvent. On the basis of recently published results, it has been established that the shielding of TMS in solution [along with that of sodium-3- (trimethylsilyl)propanesulfonate, DSS, often used as a reference for aqueous solutions] varies only slightly with temperature but is subject to solvent perturbations of a few tenths of a part per million (ppm). Recommendations are given for reporting chemical shifts under most routine experimental conditions and for quantifying effects of temperature and solvent variation, including the use of magnetic susceptibility corrections and of magic-angle spinning (MAS). This document provides the first IUPAC recommendations for referencing and reporting chemical shifts in solids, based on high-resolution MAS studies. Procedures are given for relating 13 C NMR chemical shifts in solids to the scales used for high resolution studies in the liquid phase. The notation and terminology used for describing chemical shift and shielding tensors in solids are reviewed in some detail, and recommendations are given for best practice. (author)

  4. 1H NMR spectra. Part 30(+): 1H chemical shifts in amides and the magnetic anisotropy, electric field and steric effects of the amide group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Raymond J; Griffiths, Lee; Perez, Manuel

    2013-03-01

    The (1)H spectra of 37 amides in CDCl(3) solvent were analysed and the chemical shifts obtained. The molecular geometries and conformational analysis of these amides were considered in detail. The NMR spectral assignments are of interest, e.g. the assignments of the formamide NH(2) protons reverse in going from CDCl(3) to more polar solvents. The substituent chemical shifts of the amide group in both aliphatic and aromatic amides were analysed using an approach based on neural network data for near (≤3 bonds removed) protons and the electric field, magnetic anisotropy, steric and for aromatic systems π effects of the amide group for more distant protons. The electric field is calculated from the partial atomic charges on the N.C═O atoms of the amide group. The magnetic anisotropy of the carbonyl group was reproduced with the asymmetric magnetic anisotropy acting at the midpoint of the carbonyl bond. The values of the anisotropies Δχ(parl) and Δχ(perp) were for the aliphatic amides 10.53 and -23.67 (×10(-6) Å(3)/molecule) and for the aromatic amides 2.12 and -10.43 (×10(-6) Å(3)/molecule). The nitrogen anisotropy was 7.62 (×10(-6) Å(3)/molecule). These values are compared with previous literature values. The (1)H chemical shifts were calculated from the semi-empirical approach and also by gauge-independent atomic orbital calculations with the density functional theory method and B3LYP/6-31G(++) (d,p) basis set. The semi-empirical approach gave good agreement with root mean square error of 0.081 ppm for the data set of 280 entries. The gauge-independent atomic orbital approach was generally acceptable, but significant errors (ca. 1 ppm) were found for the NH and CHO protons and also for some other protons. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Ring-Substituted Benzohydroxamic Acids: 1H, 13C and 15N NMR Spectra and NHOH Proton Exchange

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schraml, Jan; Tkadlecová, M.; Pataridis, S.; Soukupová, Ludmila; Blechta, Vratislav; Roithová, Jana; Exner, Otto

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 7 (2005), s. 535-542 ISSN 0749-1581 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/03/1566; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4072605; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4072005; GA MŠk(CZ) LB98233 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : proton exchange * substituent effects * chemical shifts Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.553, year: 2005

  6. Simulations of NMR pulse sequences during equilibrium and non-equilibrium chemical exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helgstrand, Magnus; Haerd, Torleif; Allard, Peter

    2000-01-01

    The McConnell equations combine the differential equations for a simple two-state chemical exchange process with the Bloch differential equations for a classical description of the behavior of nuclear spins in a magnetic field. This equation system provides a useful starting point for the analysis of slow, intermediate and fast chemical exchange studied using a variety of NMR experiments. The McConnell equations are in the mathematical form of an inhomogeneous system of first-order differential equations. Here we rewrite the McConnell equations in a homogeneous form in order to facilitate fast and simple numerical calculation of the solution to the equation system. The McConnell equations can only treat equilibrium chemical exchange. We therefore also present a homogeneous equation system that can handle both equilibrium and non-equilibrium chemical processes correctly, as long as the kinetics is of first-order. Finally, the same method of rewriting the inhomogeneous form of the McConnell equations into a homogeneous form is applied to a quantum mechanical treatment of a spin system in chemical exchange. In order to illustrate the homogeneous McConnell equations, we have simulated pulse sequences useful for measuring exchange rates in slow, intermediate and fast chemical exchange processes. A stopped-flow NMR experiment was simulated using the equations for non-equilibrium chemical exchange. The quantum mechanical treatment was tested by the simulation of a sensitivity enhanced 15 N-HSQC with pulsed field gradients during slow chemical exchange and by the simulation of the transfer efficiency of a two-dimensional heteronuclear cross-polarization based experiment as a function of both chemical shift difference and exchange rate constants

  7. The 40th anniversary of the discovery of NMR-chemical shift and nuclear spin-spin coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhenghe; Gou Qingquan

    1989-01-01

    After the discovery of NMR Phenomenon in the physics laboratories of E.M.Purcell at Harvard and F.Bloch at Stanford in 1946, W.G.Proctor and F.C.Yu made the successful discovery of NMR-chemical shift and nuclear spin-spin coupling at Stanford in 1950, Which brought NMR spectroscopy from the physics laboratory to the laboratories of many different fields. This is worth memorizing. Retrospecting the past 40 years, it is sure that chemical shift theory will be much more prosperous prospects

  8. Monitoring chemical reactions by low-field benchtop NMR at 45 MHz: pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Elipe, Maria Victoria; Milburn, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    Monitoring chemical reactions is the key to controlling chemical processes where NMR can provide support. High-field NMR gives detailed structural information on chemical compounds and reactions; however, it is expensive and complex to operate. Conversely, low-field NMR instruments are simple and relatively inexpensive alternatives. While low-field NMR does not provide the detailed information as the high-field instruments as a result of their smaller chemical shift dispersion and the complex secondary coupling, it remains of practical value as a process analytical technology (PAT) tool and is complimentary to other established methods, such as ReactIR and Raman spectroscopy. We have tested a picoSpin-45 (currently under ThermoFisher Scientific) benchtop NMR instrument to monitor three types of reactions by 1D (1) H NMR: a Fischer esterification, a Suzuki cross-coupling, and the formation of an oxime. The Fischer esterification is a relatively simple reaction run at high concentration and served as proof of concept. The Suzuki coupling is an example of a more complex, commonly used reaction involving overlapping signals. Finally, the oxime formation involved a reaction in two phases that cannot be monitored by other PAT tools. Here, we discuss the pros and cons of monitoring these reactions at a low-field of 45 MHz by 1D (1) H NMR. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Stereochemistry of C18 monounsaturated cork suberin acids determined by spectroscopic techniques including (1) H-NMR multiplet analysis of olefinic protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sara; Graça, José

    2014-01-01

    Suberin is a biopolyester responsible for the protection of secondary plant tissues, and yet its molecular structure remains unknown. The C18:1 ω-hydroxyacid and the C18:1 α,ω-diacid are major monomers in the suberin structure, but the configuration of the double bond remains to be elucidated. To unequivocally define the configuration of the C18:1 suberin acids. Pure C18:1 ω-hydroxyacid and C18:1 α,ω-diacid, isolated from cork suberin, and two structurally very close C18:1 model compounds of known stereochemistry, methyl oleate and methyl elaidate, were analysed by NMR spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy, and GC-MS. The GC-MS analysis showed that both acids were present in cork suberin as only one geometric isomer. The analysis of dimethyloxazoline (DMOX) and picolinyl derivatives proved the double bond position to be at C-9. The FTIR spectra were concordant with a cis-configuration for both suberin acids, but their unambiguous stereochemical assignment came from the NMR analysis: (i) the chemical shifts of the allylic (13) C carbons were shielded comparatively to the trans model compound, and (ii) the complex multiplets of the olefinic protons could be simulated only with (3) JHH and long-range (4) JHH coupling constants typical of a cis geometry. The two C18:1 suberin acids in cork are (Z)-18-hydroxyoctadec-9-enoic acid and (Z)-octadec-9-enedoic acid. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Theoretical Study of the NMR Chemical Shift of Xe in Supercritical Condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacerda Junior, Evanildo Gomes; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Mikkelsen, Kurt Valentin

    2018-01-01

    In this work we investigate the level of theory necessary for reproducing the non-linear variation of the 129Xe nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift with the density of Xe in supercritical conditions. In detail we study how the 129Xe chemical shift depends under these conditions...... on electron correlation, relativistic and many-body effects. The latter are included using a sequential-QM/MM methodology, in which a classical MD simulation is performed first and the chemical shift is then obtained as an average of quantum calculations of 250 MD snapshots conformations carried out for Xen...... this approach we obtain very good agreement with the experimental data, showing that the chemical shift of 129Xe in supercritical conditions is very well described by cluster calculations at the HF level, with small contributions from relativistic and electron correlation effects....

  11. Identification of helix capping and {beta}-turn motifs from NMR chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yang; Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2012-03-15

    We present an empirical method for identification of distinct structural motifs in proteins on the basis of experimentally determined backbone and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts. Elements identified include the N-terminal and C-terminal helix capping motifs and five types of {beta}-turns: I, II, I Prime , II Prime and VIII. Using a database of proteins of known structure, the NMR chemical shifts, together with the PDB-extracted amino acid preference of the helix capping and {beta}-turn motifs are used as input data for training an artificial neural network algorithm, which outputs the statistical probability of finding each motif at any given position in the protein. The trained neural networks, contained in the MICS (motif identification from chemical shifts) program, also provide a confidence level for each of their predictions, and values ranging from ca 0.7-0.9 for the Matthews correlation coefficient of its predictions far exceed those attainable by sequence analysis. MICS is anticipated to be useful both in the conventional NMR structure determination process and for enhancing on-going efforts to determine protein structures solely on the basis of chemical shift information, where it can aid in identifying protein database fragments suitable for use in building such structures.

  12. Identification of helix capping and β-turn motifs from NMR chemical shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yang; Bax, Ad

    2012-01-01

    We present an empirical method for identification of distinct structural motifs in proteins on the basis of experimentally determined backbone and 13 C β chemical shifts. Elements identified include the N-terminal and C-terminal helix capping motifs and five types of β-turns: I, II, I′, II′ and VIII. Using a database of proteins of known structure, the NMR chemical shifts, together with the PDB-extracted amino acid preference of the helix capping and β-turn motifs are used as input data for training an artificial neural network algorithm, which outputs the statistical probability of finding each motif at any given position in the protein. The trained neural networks, contained in the MICS (motif identification from chemical shifts) program, also provide a confidence level for each of their predictions, and values ranging from ca 0.7–0.9 for the Matthews correlation coefficient of its predictions far exceed those attainable by sequence analysis. MICS is anticipated to be useful both in the conventional NMR structure determination process and for enhancing on-going efforts to determine protein structures solely on the basis of chemical shift information, where it can aid in identifying protein database fragments suitable for use in building such structures.

  13. NMR characterization of simulated Hanford low-activity waste glasses and its use in understanding waste form chemical durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darab, J.G.; Linehan, J.C.; McGrail, B.P.

    1999-01-01

    Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopy has been used to characterize the structural and chemical environments of B, Al, and Si in model Hanford low-activity waste glasses. The average 29 Si NMR peak position was found to systematically change with changing glass composition and structure. From an understanding of the structural roles of Al and B obtained from MAS-NMR experiments, the authors first developed a model that reliably predicts the distribution of structural units and the average 29 Si chemical shift value, δ, based purely on glass composition. A product consistency test (PCT) was used to determine the normalized elemental release (NL) from the prepared glasses. Comparison of the NMR and PCT data obtained from sodium boro-aluminosilicate glasses indicates that a rudimentary exponential relationship exists between the 29 Si chemical shift value, and the boron NL value

  14. Comparison of the computational NMR chemical shifts of choline with the experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcorn, C; Cuperlovic-Culf, M; Ghandi, K

    2012-01-01

    One of the main biological markers of the presence of cancer in living patients is an over-expression of total choline (tCho), which is the sum of free choline and its derivatives. 1 H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, or H-MRS, enables the quantification of tCho via its proton spectra, and thus has the potential to be a diagnostic tool for the presence of cancer and an accurate early indicator of the response of cancer to treatment. However, it remains difficult to quantify individual choline derivatives, since they share a large structural similarity ((CH 3 ) 3 -N + -CH 2 -CH 2 -O-), of which the strongest signal detectable by MRS is that of the choline h ead group : the three methyl groups bonded to the nitrogen. This work used ACENet, a high performance computing system, to attempt to model the NMR parameters of choline derivatives, with the focus of this report being free choline. Optimized structures were determined using Density Functional Theory and the B3LYP electron correlation functional. The Polarizable Continuum Model was used to evaluate solvent effects. The Gauge-Invariant Atomic Orbital method was found to be the superior method for calculating the NMR parameters of cholines.

  15. Sensitivity of ab Initio vs Empirical Methods in Computing Structural Effects on NMR Chemical Shifts for the Example of Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumowski, Chris Vanessa; Hanni, Matti; Schweizer, Sabine; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2014-01-14

    The structural sensitivity of NMR chemical shifts as computed by quantum chemical methods is compared to a variety of empirical approaches for the example of a prototypical peptide, the 38-residue kaliotoxin KTX comprising 573 atoms. Despite the simplicity of empirical chemical shift prediction programs, the agreement with experimental results is rather good, underlining their usefulness. However, we show in our present work that they are highly insensitive to structural changes, which renders their use for validating predicted structures questionable. In contrast, quantum chemical methods show the expected high sensitivity to structural and electronic changes. This appears to be independent of the quantum chemical approach or the inclusion of solvent effects. For the latter, explicit solvent simulations with increasing number of snapshots were performed for two conformers of an eight amino acid sequence. In conclusion, the empirical approaches neither provide the expected magnitude nor the patterns of NMR chemical shifts determined by the clearly more costly ab initio methods upon structural changes. This restricts the use of empirical prediction programs in studies where peptide and protein structures are utilized for the NMR chemical shift evaluation such as in NMR refinement processes, structural model verifications, or calculations of NMR nuclear spin relaxation rates.

  16. Synthesis, vibrational, NMR, quantum chemical and structure-activity relation studies of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Devi, L; Subbalakshmi, R; Rani, T; Mohan, S

    2014-09-15

    The stable geometry of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone is optimised by DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G(∗∗) and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The structural parameters, thermodynamic properties and vibrational frequencies of the optimised geometry have been determined. The effects of substituents (hydroxyl, methoxy and acetyl groups) on the benzene ring vibrational frequencies are analysed. The vibrational frequencies of the fundamental modes of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone have been precisely assigned and analysed and the theoretical results are compared with the experimental vibrations. 1H and 13C NMR isotropic chemical shifts are calculated and assignments made are compared with the experimental values. The energies of important MO's, the total electron density and electrostatic potential of the compound are determined. Various reactivity and selectivity descriptors such as chemical hardness, chemical potential, softness, electrophilicity, nucleophilicity and the appropriate local quantities are calculated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Isotope-edited proton NMR study on the structure of a pepsin/inhibitor complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesik, S.W.; Luly, J.R.; Erickson, J.W.; Abad-Zapatero, C.

    1988-01-01

    A general approach is illustrated for providing detailed structural information on large enzyme/inhibitor complexes using NMR spectroscopy. The method involves the use of isotopically labeled ligands to simplify two-dimensional NOE spectra of large molecular complexes by isotope-editing techniques. With this approach, the backbone and side-chain conformations (at the P 2 and P 3 sites) of a tightly bound inhibitor of porcine pepsin have bene determined. In addition, structural information on the active site of pepsin has been obtained. Due to the sequence homology between porcine pepsin and human renin, this structural information may prove useful for modeling renin/inhibitor complexes with the ultimate goal of designing more effective renin inhibitors. Moreover, this general approach can be applied to study other biological systems of interest such as other enzyme/inhibitor complexes, ligands bound to soluble receptors, and enzyme/substrate interactions

  18. Molecular Structure of Phenytoin: NMR, UV-Vis and Quantum Chemical Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca Luchian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the presence of the carbonyl and imide groups in the structure of 5,5-diphenylhydantoin (DPH, the possibility for this compound to be involved in hydrogen bonding intermolecular interactions is obvious. Even though such interactions are presumably responsible for the mechanism of action of this drug, however, to the best of our knowledge, the self-hydrogen bonding interactions between the DPH monomers have not been addressed till now. Furthermore, studies reporting on the spectroscopic characteristics of this molecule are scarcely reported in the literature. Here we report on the possible dimers of DPH, investigated by quantum chemical calculations at B3LYP/6-31+G(2d,2p level of theory. Twelve unique DPH dimers were structurally optimized in gas-phase, as well as in ethanol and DMSO and then were used to compute the population-averaged UV-Vis and NMR spectra using Boltzmann statistics. UV-Vis and NMR techniques were employed to assess experimentally the spectroscopical response of this compound. DFT calculations are also used to investigate the structural transformations between the solid and liquid phase, as well as for describing the electronic transitions and for the assignment of NMR spectra of DPH.

  19. Measuring 13Cβ chemical shifts of invisible excited states in proteins by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundstroem, Patrik; Lin Hong; Kay, Lewis E.

    2009-01-01

    A labeling scheme is introduced that facilitates the measurement of accurate 13 C β chemical shifts of invisible, excited states of proteins by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy. The approach makes use of protein over-expression in a strain of E. coli in which the TCA cycle enzyme succinate dehydrogenase is knocked out, leading to the production of samples with high levels of 13 C enrichment (30-40%) at C β side-chain carbon positions for 15 of the amino acids with little 13 C label at positions one bond removed (∼5%). A pair of samples are produced using [1- 13 C]-glucose/NaH 12 CO 3 or [2- 13 C]-glucose as carbon sources with isolated and enriched (>30%) 13 C β positions for 11 and 4 residues, respectively. The efficacy of the labeling procedure is established by NMR spectroscopy. The utility of such samples for measurement of 13 C β chemical shifts of invisible, excited states in exchange with visible, ground conformations is confirmed by relaxation dispersion studies of a protein-ligand binding exchange reaction in which the extracted chemical shift differences from dispersion profiles compare favorably with those obtained directly from measurements on ligand free and fully bound protein samples

  20. TALOS+: a hybrid method for predicting protein backbone torsion angles from NMR chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yang; Delaglio, Frank [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Cornilescu, Gabriel [National Magnetic Resonance Facility (United States); Bax, Ad [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)], E-mail: bax@nih.gov

    2009-08-15

    NMR chemical shifts in proteins depend strongly on local structure. The program TALOS establishes an empirical relation between {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N and {sup 1}H chemical shifts and backbone torsion angles {phi} and {psi} (Cornilescu et al. J Biomol NMR 13 289-302, 1999). Extension of the original 20-protein database to 200 proteins increased the fraction of residues for which backbone angles could be predicted from 65 to 74%, while reducing the error rate from 3 to 2.5%. Addition of a two-layer neural network filter to the database fragment selection process forms the basis for a new program, TALOS+, which further enhances the prediction rate to 88.5%, without increasing the error rate. Excluding the 2.5% of residues for which TALOS+ makes predictions that strongly differ from those observed in the crystalline state, the accuracy of predicted {phi} and {psi} angles, equals {+-}13{sup o}. Large discrepancies between predictions and crystal structures are primarily limited to loop regions, and for the few cases where multiple X-ray structures are available such residues are often found in different states in the different structures. The TALOS+ output includes predictions for individual residues with missing chemical shifts, and the neural network component of the program also predicts secondary structure with good accuracy.

  1. Correlations between the 1H NMR chemical shieldings and the pKa values of organic acids and amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Juanfeng; Lu, Tingting; Zhao, Xinyun; Chen, Xi; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2018-06-01

    The acid dissociation constants and 1 H NMR chemical shieldings of organic compounds are important properties that have attracted much research interest. However, few studies have explored the relationship between these two properties. In this work, we theoretically studied the NMR chemical shifts of a series of carboxylic acids and amines in the gas phase and in aqueous solution. It was found that the negative logarithms of the experimental acid dissociation constants (i.e., the pK a values) of the organic acids and amines in aqueous solution correlate almost linearly with the corresponding calculated NMR chemical shieldings. Key factors that affect the theoretically predicted pK a values are discussed in this paper. The present work provides a new way to predict the pK a values of organic/biochemical compounds. Graphical abstract The chemical shielding values of organic acids and amines correlate near linearly with their corresponding pK a values.

  2. Proton NMR for Measuring Quantum Level Crossing in the Magnetic Molecular Ring Fe10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julien, M.; Jang, Z.H.; Borsa, F.; Julien, M.; Lascialfari, A.; Borsa, F.; Horvatic, M.; Caneschi, A.; Gatteschi, D.

    1999-01-01

    The proton nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T 1 has been measured as a function of temperature and magnetic field (up to 15thinspthinspT) in the molecular magnetic ring Fe 10 ( OCH 3 ) 20 (O 2 CCH 2 Cl) 10 (Fe10). Striking enhancement of 1/T 1 is observed around magnetic field values corresponding to a crossing between the ground state and the excited states of the molecule. We propose that this is due to a cross-relaxation effect between the nuclear Zeeman reservoir and the reservoir of the Zeeman levels of the molecule. This effect provides a powerful tool to investigate quantum dynamical phenomena at level crossing. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  3. Comparison of experimental and DFT-calculated NMR chemical shifts of 2-amino and 2-hydroxyl substituted phenyl benzimidazoles, benzoxazoles and benzothiazoles in four solvents using the IEF-PCM solvation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierens, Gregory K; Venkatachalam, T K; Reutens, David C

    2016-04-01

    A comparative study of experimental and calculated NMR chemical shifts of six compounds comprising 2-amino and 2-hydroxy phenyl benzoxazoles/benzothiazoles/benzimidazoles in four solvents is reported. The benzimidazoles showed interesting spectral characteristics, which are discussed. The proton and carbon chemical shifts were similar for all solvents. The largest chemical shift deviations were observed in benzene. The chemical shifts were calculated with density functional theory using a suite of four functionals and basis set combinations. The calculated chemical shifts revealed a good match to the experimentally observed values in most of the solvents. The mean absolute error was used as the primary metric. The use of an additional metric is suggested, which is based on the order of chemical shifts. The DP4 probability measures were also used to compare the experimental and calculated chemical shifts for each compound in the four solvents. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. NMR imaging and pharmaceutical sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beall, P.T.; Good, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    Described is the technique of NMR-imaging in diagnostic medicine. Proton and phosphorus NMR in diagnosis of abnormal tissue pathology. Discussed is the value of NMR to the pharmaceutical sciences. NMR may play an important role in monitoring the response of tissues to drugs, determining the localization of drugs, performing real time pharmacokinetics and testing the use of NMR contrast pharmaceuticals

  5. Protein backbone and sidechain torsion angles predicted from NMR chemical shifts using artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yang; Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2013-07-15

    A new program, TALOS-N, is introduced for predicting protein backbone torsion angles from NMR chemical shifts. The program relies far more extensively on the use of trained artificial neural networks than its predecessor, TALOS+. Validation on an independent set of proteins indicates that backbone torsion angles can be predicted for a larger, {>=}90 % fraction of the residues, with an error rate smaller than ca 3.5 %, using an acceptance criterion that is nearly two-fold tighter than that used previously, and a root mean square difference between predicted and crystallographically observed ({phi}, {psi}) torsion angles of ca 12 Masculine-Ordinal-Indicator . TALOS-N also reports sidechain {chi}{sup 1} rotameric states for about 50 % of the residues, and a consistency with reference structures of 89 %. The program includes a neural network trained to identify secondary structure from residue sequence and chemical shifts.

  6. Proton NMR Studies of a Large Protein. pH, Substrate Titrations, and NOESY Experiments with Perdeuterated Yeast Phosphoglycerate Kinase Containing [ 1H]Histidine Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappu, K. M.; Serpersu, E. H.

    Fully deuterated yeast phosphoglycerate kinase ([ 2H]PGK) was prepared biosynthetically with only histidine side chains of normal ( 1H) isotopic composition. The 1H NMR spectrum of this enzyme([ 1H]His[ 2H]PGK) showed that the histidine side chains are clearly visible as sharp signals. Thus detailed structural studies by 1H NMR became feasible with isotope-hybrid phosphoglycerate kinase which is otherwise too large ( Mr ˜ 46,000) for conventional 1H NMR studies. Proton signals of bound substrates were visible in the 1H NMR spectrum even with a substrate-to-enzyme ratio of less than 1/2 (mol/mol). The 2D NOESY spectrum of enzyme-MgdATP-glycerol 3-phosphate complex showed that, although protein concentration was very high (1.5 m M), no intraprotein cross peaks were observed other than those of intraresidue histidine NOE cross peaks. In addition, intrasubstrate NOEs and intermolecular NOEs between histidine and substrate protons were visible at a 1.5/1 substrate/enzyme (mol/mol) ratio. Paramagnetic effects of a substrate analog, Cr(III)ATP, on some of the histidine side chains indicated that the formation of the ternary enzyme-substrate complex causes large conformational changes in the enzyme.

  7. The effects of bone on proton NMR relaxation times of surrounding liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, C. A.; Genant, H. K.; Dunham, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary attempts by our group at UCSF to assess fat content of vertebral marrow in the lumbar spine using relaxation time information demonstrated that the presence of trabecular bone affects relaxation times. The objective of this work was a thorough study of the effects of bone on NMR relaxation characteristics of surrounding liquids. Trabecular bone from autopsy specimens was ground up and sifted into a series of powders with graded densities ranging from 0.3 gm/cc to 0.8 gm/cc. Each powder was placed first in n-saline and then in cottonseed oil. With spectroscopy, spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) and effective spin-spin relaxation times (T2*) were measured for each liquid in each bone powder. As bone density and surface to volume ratio increased, T1 decreased faster for saline than for oil. T2* decreased significantly for both water and oil as the surface to volume ratio increased. It was concluded that effects of water on T1 could be explained by a surface interaction at the bone/liquid interface, which restricted rotational and translational motion of nearby molecules. The T1s of oil were not affected since oil molecules are nonpolar, do not participate in significant intermolecular hydrogen bonding, and therefore would not be expected to interact strongly with the bone surface. Effects on T2* could be explained by local magnetic field inhomogeneities created by discontinuous magnetic susceptibility near the bone surface. These preliminary results suggest that water in contact with trabecular bone in vivo will exhibit shortened relaxation times.

  8. Changes in mouse brain metabolism following a convulsive dose of soman: A proton HRMAS NMR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fauvelle, F. [Unite de Biophysique Cellulaire et Moleculaire, Institut de Recherche Biomedicale des Armees, Centre de Recherches du Service Sante des Armees, BP87, 38 702 La Tronche Cedex (France); Dorandeu, F.; Carpentier, P.; Foquin, A. [Departement de Toxicologie, Institut de Recherche Biomedicale des Armees, Centre de Recherches du Service Sante des Armees, 24 avenue des Maquis du Gresivaudan, BP87, 38 702 La Tronche Cedex (France); Rabeson, H.; Graveron-Demilly, D. [Universite Lyon 1, Laboratoire Creatis-LRMN, CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U630, INSA de Lyon (France); Arvers, P. [Unite de Biophysique Cellulaire et Moleculaire, Institut de Recherche Biomedicale des Armees, Centre de Recherches du Service Sante des Armees, BP87, 38 702 La Tronche Cedex (France); Testylier, G., E-mail: guytestylier@crssa.net [Departement de Toxicologie, Institut de Recherche Biomedicale des Armees, Centre de Recherches du Service Sante des Armees, 24 avenue des Maquis du Gresivaudan, BP87, 38 702 La Tronche Cedex (France)

    2010-01-12

    Soman, an irreversible organophosphorus cholinesterase inhibitor, induces status epilepticus and, in sensitive brain areas, seizure-related brain damage (e.g. brain edema and neuronal loss). The brain metabolic disturbances associated with these events are ill known. In the present study, we thus evaluated these changes in a murine model of soman-induced status epilepticus up to 7 days after intoxication. Mice, protected by HI-6 and atropine methyl nitrate, were poisoned with soman (172 μg/kg) and then sacrificed at set time points, from 1 h to 7 days. Brain biopsies from the piriform cortex (Pir) and cerebellum (Cer) were analyzed by {sup 1}H HRMAS NMR spectroscopy. Spectra were then analyzed using both a supervised multivariate analysis and the QUEST procedure of jMRUI for the quantification of 17 metabolites. The multivariate analysis clearly showed the metabolic differences between a damaged structure (Pir) and a structure with less prominent changes (cerebellum) and helped to globally assess the time course of metabolic changes. Analysis of the individual metabolites showed that the major changes took place in the piriform cortex but that cerebellum was not change-free. The most prominent changes in the former were an early (1-4 h) increase in alanine and acetate, a delayed increase in lactate, glycerophosphocholine and glutamine as well as a delayed decrease in myo-inositol and N-acetylaspartate. A week after poisoning, some metabolic disturbances were still present. Further research will be necessary to clarify what could be the involvement of these metabolites in physiological processes and how they might become useful surrogate markers of brain damage and repair.

  9. Changes in mouse brain metabolism following a convulsive dose of soman: A proton HRMAS NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauvelle, F.; Dorandeu, F.; Carpentier, P.; Foquin, A.; Rabeson, H.; Graveron-Demilly, D.; Arvers, P.; Testylier, G.

    2010-01-01

    Soman, an irreversible organophosphorus cholinesterase inhibitor, induces status epilepticus and, in sensitive brain areas, seizure-related brain damage (e.g. brain edema and neuronal loss). The brain metabolic disturbances associated with these events are ill known. In the present study, we thus evaluated these changes in a murine model of soman-induced status epilepticus up to 7 days after intoxication. Mice, protected by HI-6 and atropine methyl nitrate, were poisoned with soman (172 μg/kg) and then sacrificed at set time points, from 1 h to 7 days. Brain biopsies from the piriform cortex (Pir) and cerebellum (Cer) were analyzed by 1 H HRMAS NMR spectroscopy. Spectra were then analyzed using both a supervised multivariate analysis and the QUEST procedure of jMRUI for the quantification of 17 metabolites. The multivariate analysis clearly showed the metabolic differences between a damaged structure (Pir) and a structure with less prominent changes (cerebellum) and helped to globally assess the time course of metabolic changes. Analysis of the individual metabolites showed that the major changes took place in the piriform cortex but that cerebellum was not change-free. The most prominent changes in the former were an early (1-4 h) increase in alanine and acetate, a delayed increase in lactate, glycerophosphocholine and glutamine as well as a delayed decrease in myo-inositol and N-acetylaspartate. A week after poisoning, some metabolic disturbances were still present. Further research will be necessary to clarify what could be the involvement of these metabolites in physiological processes and how they might become useful surrogate markers of brain damage and repair.

  10. Creatinine and creatininium cation in water solution. Tautomerism and quantitative interpretation of the solution acidity effect on 1H, 13C and 1:4N NMR chemical shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotsyubynskyy, D.; Molchanov, S.; Gryff-Keller, A.

    2004-01-01

    1 H, 13 C and 1 :4N NMR chemical shifts for creatinine in water solution of various acidity have been measured. Analysis of these data enabled determination of the acidity constant of creatininium cation and the chemical shifts of the neutral and protonated forms of creatinine. Molecular energies and carbon and nitrogen magnetic shielding constants for various tautomeric structures of the investigated species have been calculated using the quantum chemistry method GIAO DFT B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p). Compilation of the available experimental and theoretical results has provided additional information on the problem of tautomerism of this important biological molecule. (author)

  11. Benchmarking quantum mechanical calculations with experimental NMR chemical shifts of 2-HADNT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuemin; Junk, Thomas; Liu, Yucheng; Tzeng, Nianfeng; Perkins, Richard

    2015-04-01

    In this study, both GIAO-DFT and GIAO-MP2 calculations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were benchmarked with experimental chemical shifts. The experimental chemical shifts were determined experimentally for carbon-13 (C-13) of seven carbon atoms for the TNT degradation product 2-hydroxylamino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (2-HADNT). Quantum mechanics GIAO calculations were implemented using Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) and other six hybrid DFT methods (Becke-1-Lee-Yang-Parr (B1LYP), Becke-half-and-half-Lee-Yang-Parr (BH and HLYP), Cohen-Handy-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (O3LYP), Coulomb-attenuating-B3LYP (CAM-B3LYP), modified-Perdew-Wang-91-Lee-Yang-Parr (mPW1LYP), and Xu-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (X3LYP)) which use the same correlation functional LYP. Calculation results showed that the GIAO-MP2 method gives the most accurate chemical shift values, and O3LYP method provides the best prediction of chemical shifts among the B3LYP and other five DFT methods. Three types of atomic partial charges, Mulliken (MK), electrostatic potential (ESP), and natural bond orbital (NBO), were also calculated using MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ method. A reasonable correlation was discovered between NBO partial charges and experimental chemical shifts of carbon-13 (C-13).

  12. 29Si NMR Chemical Shift Calculation for Silicate Species by Gaussian Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, S. N.; Rostami, A. A.; Godarzian, A.

    2005-05-01

    Hartree-Fock self-consistent-field (HF-SCF) theory and the Gauge-including atomic orbital (GIAO) methods are used in the calculation of 29Si NMR chemical shifts for ABOUT 90 units of 19 compounds of various silicate species of precursors for zeolites. Calculations have been performed at geometries optimized at the AM1 semi-empirical method. The GIAO-HF-SCF calculations were carried out with using three different basis sets: 6-31G*, 6-31+G** and 6-311+G(2d,p). To demonstrate the quality of the calculations the calculated chemical shifts, δ, were compared with the corresponding experimental values for the compounds in study. The results, especially with 6-31+g** are in excellent agreement with experimental values. The calculated chemical shifts, in practical point of view, appear to be accurate enough to aid in experimental peak assignments. The difference between the experimental and calculated 29Si chemical shift values not only depends on the Qn units but also it seems that basis set effects and the level of theory is more important. For the series of molecules studied here, the standard deviations and mean absolute errors for 29Si chemical shifts relative to TMS determined using Hartree--Fock 6-31+G** basis is nearly in all cases smaller than the errors for shifts determined using HF/6-311+G(2d,p).

  13. Equilibrium simulations of proteins using molecular fragment replacement and NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomsma, Wouter; Tian, Pengfei; Frellsen, Jes; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Hamelryck, Thomas; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2014-09-23

    Methods of protein structure determination based on NMR chemical shifts are becoming increasingly common. The most widely used approaches adopt the molecular fragment replacement strategy, in which structural fragments are repeatedly reassembled into different complete conformations in molecular simulations. Although these approaches are effective in generating individual structures consistent with the chemical shift data, they do not enable the sampling of the conformational space of proteins with correct statistical weights. Here, we present a method of molecular fragment replacement that makes it possible to perform equilibrium simulations of proteins, and hence to determine their free energy landscapes. This strategy is based on the encoding of the chemical shift information in a probabilistic model in Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations. First, we demonstrate that with this approach it is possible to fold proteins to their native states starting from extended structures. Second, we show that the method satisfies the detailed balance condition and hence it can be used to carry out an equilibrium sampling from the Boltzmann distribution corresponding to the force field used in the simulations. Third, by comparing the results of simulations carried out with and without chemical shift restraints we describe quantitatively the effects that these restraints have on the free energy landscapes of proteins. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the molecular fragment replacement strategy can be used in combination with chemical shift information to characterize not only the native structures of proteins but also their conformational fluctuations.

  14. chemical shift tensors in helical peptides by dipolar-modulated chemical shift recoupling NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Xiaolan; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Hong Mei

    2002-01-01

    The Cα chemical shift tensors of proteins contain information on the backbone conformation. We have determined the magnitude and orientation of the Cα chemical shift tensors of two peptides with α-helical torsion angles: the Ala residue in G*AL (φ=-65.7 deg., ψ=-40 deg.), and the Val residue in GG*V (φ=-81.5 deg., ψ=-50.7 deg.). The magnitude of the tensors was determined from quasi-static powder patterns recoupled under magic-angle spinning, while the orientation of the tensors was extracted from Cα-Hα and Cα-N dipolar modulated powder patterns. The helical Ala Cα chemical shift tensor has a span of 36 ppm and an asymmetry parameter of 0.89. Its σ 11 axis is 116 deg. ± 5 deg. from the Cα-Hα bond while the σ 22 axis is 40 deg. ± 5 deg. from the Cα-N bond. The Val tensor has an anisotropic span of 25 ppm and an asymmetry parameter of 0.33, both much smaller than the values for β-sheet Val found recently (Yao and Hong, 2002). The Val σ 33 axis is tilted by 115 deg. ± 5 deg. from the Cα-Hα bond and 98 deg. ± 5 deg. from the Cα-N bond. These represent the first completely experimentally determined Cα chemical shift tensors of helical peptides. Using an icosahedral representation, we compared the experimental chemical shift tensors with quantum chemical calculations and found overall good agreement. These solid-state chemical shift tensors confirm the observation from cross-correlated relaxation experiments that the projection of the Cα chemical shift tensor onto the Cα-Hα bond is much smaller in α-helices than in β-sheets

  15. Cool-Climate Red Wines—Chemical Composition and Comparison of Two Protocols for 1H–NMR Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violetta Aru

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the metabolome of 26 experimental cool-climate wines made from 22 grape varieties using two different protocols for wine analysis by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H–NMR spectroscopy. The wine samples were analyzed as-is (wet and as dried samples. The NMR datasets were preprocessed by alignment and mean centering. No normalization or scaling was performed. The “wet” method preserved the inherent properties of the samples and provided a fast and effective overview of the molecular composition of the wines. The “dried” method yielded a slightly better sensitivity towards a broader range of the compounds present in wines. A total of 27 metabolites including amino acids, organic acids, sugars, and alkaloids were identified in the 1H–NMR spectra of the wine samples. Principal component analysis was performed on both NMR datasets evidencing well-defined molecular fingerprints for ‘Baco Noir’, ‘Bolero’, ‘Cabernet Cantor’, ‘Cabernet Cortis’, ‘Don Muscat’, ‘Eszter’, ‘Golubok’, ‘New York Muscat’, ‘Regent’, ‘Rondo’, ‘Triomphe d’Alsace’, ‘Précose Noir’, and ‘Vinoslivy’ wines. Amongst the identified metabolites, lactic acid, succinic acid, acetic acid, gallic acid, glycerol, and methanol were found to drive sample groupings. The 1H–NMR data was compared to the absolute concentration values obtained from a reference Fourier transform infrared method, evidencing a high correlation.

  16. NMR-based approach to the analysis of radiopharmaceuticals: radiochemical purity, specific activity, and radioactive concentration values by proton and tritium NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, David J; Dormer, Peter G; Hesk, David; Pollack, Scott R; Lavey, Carolee Flader

    2015-06-15

    Compounds containing tritium are widely used across the drug discovery and development landscape. These materials are widely utilized because they can be efficiently synthesized and produced at high specific activity. Results from internally calibrated (3)H and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy suggests that at least in some cases, this calibrated approach could supplement or potentially replace radio-high-performance liquid chromatography for radiochemical purity, dilution and scintillation counting for the measurement of radioactivity per volume, and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis for the determination of specific activity. In summary, the NMR-derived values agreed with those from the standard approaches to within 1% to 9% for solution count and specific activity. Additionally, the NMR-derived values for radiochemical purity deviated by less than 5%. A benefit of this method is that these values may be calculated at the same time that (3)H NMR analysis provides the location and distribution of tritium atoms within the molecule. Presented and discussed here is the application of this method, advantages and disadvantages of the approach, and a rationale for utilizing internally calibrated (1)H and (3)H NMR spectroscopy for specific activity, radioactive concentration, and radiochemical purity whenever acquiring (3)H NMR for tritium location. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. NMR analysis of male fathead minnow urinary metabolites: A potential approach for studying impacts of chemical exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekman, D.R. [Ecosystems Research Division, U.S. EPA, 960 College Station Road, Athens, GA 30605 (United States)], E-mail: ekman.drew@epa.gov; Teng, Q. [Ecosystems Research Division, U.S. EPA, 960 College Station Road, Athens, GA 30605 (United States); Jensen, K.M.; Martinovic, D.; Villeneuve, D.L.; Ankley, G.T. [Mid-Continent Ecology Division, U.S. EPA, 6201 Congdon Boulevard, Duluth, MN 55804 (United States); Collette, T.W. [Ecosystems Research Division, U.S. EPA, 960 College Station Road, Athens, GA 30605 (United States)

    2007-11-30

    The potential for profiling metabolites in urine from male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to assess chemical exposures was explored using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Both one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy was used for the assignment of metabolites in urine from unexposed fish. Because fathead minnow urine is dilute, we lyophilized these samples prior to analysis. Furthermore, 1D {sup 1}H NMR spectra of unlyophilized urine from unexposed male fathead minnow and Sprague-Dawley rat were acquired to qualitatively compare rat and fish metabolite profiles and to provide an estimate of the total urinary metabolite pool concentration difference. As a small proof-of-concept study, lyophilized urine samples from male fathead minnows exposed to three different concentrations of the antiandrogen vinclozolin were analyzed by 1D {sup 1}H NMR to assess exposure-induced changes. Through a combination of principal components analysis (PCA) and measurements of {sup 1}H NMR peak intensities, several metabolites were identified as changing with statistical significance in response to exposure. Among those changes occurring in response to exposure to the highest concentration (450 {mu}g/L) of vinclozolin were large increases in taurine, lactate, acetate, and formate. These increases coincided with a marked decrease in hippurate, a combination potentially indicative of hepatotoxicity. The results of these investigations clearly demonstrate the potential utility of an NMR-based approach for assessing chemical exposures in male fathead minnow, using urine collected from individual fish.

  18. NMR analysis of male fathead minnow urinary metabolites: A potential approach for studying impacts of chemical exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekman, D.R.; Teng, Q.; Jensen, K.M.; Martinovic, D.; Villeneuve, D.L.; Ankley, G.T.; Collette, T.W.

    2007-01-01

    The potential for profiling metabolites in urine from male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to assess chemical exposures was explored using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Both one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy was used for the assignment of metabolites in urine from unexposed fish. Because fathead minnow urine is dilute, we lyophilized these samples prior to analysis. Furthermore, 1D 1 H NMR spectra of unlyophilized urine from unexposed male fathead minnow and Sprague-Dawley rat were acquired to qualitatively compare rat and fish metabolite profiles and to provide an estimate of the total urinary metabolite pool concentration difference. As a small proof-of-concept study, lyophilized urine samples from male fathead minnows exposed to three different concentrations of the antiandrogen vinclozolin were analyzed by 1D 1 H NMR to assess exposure-induced changes. Through a combination of principal components analysis (PCA) and measurements of 1 H NMR peak intensities, several metabolites were identified as changing with statistical significance in response to exposure. Among those changes occurring in response to exposure to the highest concentration (450 μg/L) of vinclozolin were large increases in taurine, lactate, acetate, and formate. These increases coincided with a marked decrease in hippurate, a combination potentially indicative of hepatotoxicity. The results of these investigations clearly demonstrate the potential utility of an NMR-based approach for assessing chemical exposures in male fathead minnow, using urine collected from individual fish

  19. Spin-locking vs. chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI for investigating chemical exchange process between water and labile metabolite protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Autio, Joonas; Obata, Takayuki; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2010-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and spin-locking (SL) experiments were both able to probe the exchange process between protons of non-equivalent chemical environments. To compare the characteristics of the CEST and SL approaches in the study of chemical exchange effects, we performed CEST and SL experiments at varied pH and concentrated metabolites with exchangeable amide, amine, and hydroxyl protons at 9.4 T. Our results show that: i) On-resonance SL is most sensitive to chemical exchanges in the intermediate exchange regime and is able to detect hydroxyl and amine protons on a millimolar concentration scale. Off-resonance SL and CEST approaches are sensitive to slow-exchanging protons when an optimal SL or saturation pulse power matches the exchanging rate, respectively. ii) Offset frequency-dependent SL and CEST spectra are very similar, and can be explained well with an SL model recently developed by Trott and Palmer. iii) The exchange rate and population of metabolite protons can be determined from offset-dependent SL or CEST spectra or from on-resonance SL relaxation dispersion measurements. iv) The asymmetry of the magnetization transfer ratio (MTRasym) is highly dependent on the choice of saturation pulse power. In the intermediate exchange regime, MTRasym becomes complicated and should be interpreted with care. PMID:21500270

  20. Spin-locking versus chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI for investigating chemical exchange process between water and labile metabolite protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Autio, Joonas; Obata, Takayuki; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2011-05-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and spin-locking (SL) experiments were both able to probe the exchange process between protons of nonequivalent chemical environments. To compare the characteristics of the CEST and SL approaches in the study of chemical exchange effects, we performed CEST and SL experiments at varied pH and concentrated metabolite phantoms with exchangeable amide, amine, and hydroxyl protons at 9.4 T. Our results show that: (i) on-resonance SL is most sensitive to chemical exchanges in the intermediate-exchange regime and is able to detect hydroxyl and amine protons on a millimolar concentration scale. Off-resonance SL and CEST approaches are sensitive to slow-exchanging protons when an optimal SL or saturation pulse power matches the exchanging rate, respectively. (ii) Offset frequency-dependent SL and CEST spectra are very similar and can be explained well with an SL model recently developed by Trott and Palmer (J Magn Reson 2002;154:157-160). (iii) The exchange rate and population of metabolite protons can be determined from offset-dependent SL or CEST spectra or from on-resonance SL relaxation dispersion measurements. (iv) The asymmetry of the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR(asym)) is highly dependent on the choice of saturation pulse power. In the intermediate-exchange regime, MTR(asym) becomes complicated and should be interpreted with care. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Relativistic Spin-Orbit Heavy Atom on the Light Atom NMR Chemical Shifts: General Trends Across the Periodic Table Explained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vícha, Jan; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Marek, Radek; Straka, Michal

    2018-05-10

    The importance of relativistic effects on the NMR parameters in heavy-atom (HA) compounds, particularly the SO-HALA (Spin-Orbit Heavy Atom on the Light Atom) effect on NMR chemical shifts, has been known for about 40 years. Yet, a general correlation between the electronic structure and SO-HALA effect has been missing. By analyzing 1 H NMR chemical shifts of the sixth-period hydrides (Cs-At), we discovered general electronic-structure principles and mechanisms that dictate the size and sign of the SO-HALA NMR chemical shifts. In brief, partially occupied HA valence shells induce relativistic shielding at the light atom (LA) nuclei, while empty HA valence shells induce relativistic deshielding. In particular, the LA nucleus is relativistically shielded in 5d 2 -5d 8 and 6p 4 HA hydrides and deshielded in 4f 0 , 5d 0 , 6s 0 , and 6p 0 HA hydrides. This general and intuitive concept explains periodic trends in the 1 H NMR chemical shifts along the sixth-period hydrides (Cs-At) studied in this work. We present substantial evidence that the introduced principles have a general validity across the periodic table and can be extended to nonhydride LAs. The decades-old question of why compounds with occupied frontier π molecular orbitals (MOs) cause SO-HALA shielding at the LA nuclei, while the frontier σ MOs cause deshielding is answered. We further derive connection between the SO-HALA NMR chemical shifts and Spin-Orbit-induced Electron Deformation Density (SO-EDD), a property that can be obtained easily from differential electron densities and can be represented graphically. SO-EDD provides an intuitive understanding of the SO-HALA effect in terms of the depletion/concentration of the electron density at LA nuclei caused by spin-orbit coupling due to HA in the presence of a magnetic field. Using an analogy between the SO-EDD concept and arguments from classic NMR theory, the complex question of the SO-HALA NMR chemical shifts becomes easily understandable for a wide

  2. Proton NMR study of extra Virgin Olive Oil with temperature: Freezing and melting kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallamace, Domenico; Longo, Sveva; Corsaro, Carmelo

    2018-06-01

    The thermal properties of an extra Virgin Olive Oil (eVOO) depend on its composition and indeed characterize its quality. Many studies have shown that the freezing and melting behaviors of eVOOs can serve for geographical or chemical discrimination. We use Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy to study the evolution of the fatty acids bands as a function of temperature during freezing and melting processes. In such a way we can follow separately the variations in the thermal properties of the different molecular groups during these thermodynamic phase transitions. The data indicate that the methyl group which is at the end of every fatty chain displays the major changes during both freezing and melting processes.

  3. Identification of heparin samples that contain impurities or contaminants by chemometric pattern recognition analysis of proton NMR spectral data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zang, Qingda [University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Department of Pharmacology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Snowdon, Inc., Monmouth Junction, NJ (United States); University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Department of Health Informatics, School of Health Related Professions, Newark, NJ (United States); Keire, David A.; Buhse, Lucinda F.; Trehy, Michael L. [Food and Drug Administration, CDER, Division of Pharmaceutical Analysis, St. Louis, MO (United States); Wood, Richard D. [Snowdon, Inc., Monmouth Junction, NJ (United States); Mital, Dinesh P.; Haque, Syed; Srinivasan, Shankar [University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Department of Health Informatics, School of Health Related Professions, Newark, NJ (United States); Moore, Christine M.V.; Nasr, Moheb; Al-Hakim, Ali [Food and Drug Administration, CDER, Office of New Drug Quality Assessment, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Welsh, William J. [University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Department of Pharmacology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Chemometric analysis of a set of one-dimensional (1D) {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral data for heparin sodium active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) samples was employed to distinguish USP-grade heparin samples from those containing oversulfated chondroitin sulfate (OSCS) contaminant and/or unacceptable levels of dermatan sulfate (DS) impurity. Three chemometric pattern recognition approaches were implemented: classification and regression tree (CART), artificial neural network (ANN), and support vector machine (SVM). Heparin sodium samples from various manufacturers were analyzed in 2008 and 2009 by 1D {sup 1}H NMR, strong anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography, and percent galactosamine in total hexosamine tests. Based on these data, the samples were divided into three groups: Heparin, DS {<=} 1.0% and OSCS = 0%; DS, DS > 1.0% and OSCS = 0%; and OSCS, OSCS > 0% with any content of DS. Three data sets corresponding to different chemical shift regions (1.95-2.20, 3.10-5.70, and 1.95-5.70 ppm) were evaluated. While all three chemometric approaches were able to effectively model the data in the 1.95-2.20 ppm region, SVM was found to substantially outperform CART and ANN for data in the 3.10-5.70 ppm region in terms of classification success rate. A 100% prediction rate was frequently achieved for discrimination between heparin and OSCS samples. The majority of classification errors between heparin and DS involved cases where the DS content was close to the 1.0% DS borderline between the two classes. When these borderline samples were removed, nearly perfect classification results were attained. Satisfactory results were achieved when the resulting models were challenged by test samples containing blends of heparin APIs spiked with non-, partially, or fully oversulfated chondroitin sulfate A, heparan sulfate, or DS at the 1.0%, 5.0%, and 10.0% (w/w) levels. This study demonstrated that the combination of 1D {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy

  4. Quantitative NMR Approach to Optimize the Formation of Chemical Building Blocks from Abundant Carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Samuel G; Tolborg, Søren; Sádaba, Irantzu; Taarning, Esben; Meier, Sebastian

    2017-07-21

    The future role of biomass-derived chemicals relies on the formation of diverse functional monomers in high yields from carbohydrates. Recently, it has become clear that a series of α-hydroxy acids, esters, and lactones can be formed from carbohydrates in alcohol and water solvents using tin-containing catalysts such as Sn-Beta. These compounds are potential building blocks for polyesters bearing additional olefin and alcohol functionalities. An NMR approach was used to identify, quantify, and optimize the formation of these building blocks in the Sn-Beta-catalyzed transformation of abundant carbohydrates. Record yields of the target molecules can be achieved by obstructing competing reactions through solvent selection. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Spectroscopic (vibrational, NMR and UV-vis.) and quantum chemical investigations on 4-hexyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ashgar; Gökce, Halil; Bahçeli, Semiha

    2016-01-05

    In this study, the 4-hexyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde compound as one of the derivatives of vanillin which is a well known flavoring agent, C14H20O3, has been investigated by experimentally and extensively utilizing density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. In this context, the optimized geometry, vibrational frequencies, (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts, UV-vis. (in gas phase and in methanol solvent) spectra, HOMO-LUMO analysis, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), thermodynamic parameters and atomic charges of 4-hexyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde have been calculated. In addition, theoretically predicted IR, Raman and UV-vis. (in gas phase and in methanol solvent) spectra of the mentioned molecule have been constructed. The results calculated were compared with the experimental data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Proton NMR metabolic profiling of CSF reveals distinct differentiation of meningitis from negative controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterji, Tanushri; Singh, Suruchi; Sen, Manodeep; Singh, Ajai Kumar; Agarwal, Gaurav Raj; Singh, Deepak Kumar; Srivastava, Janmejai Kumar; Singh, Alka; Srivastava, Rajeshwar Nath; Roy, Raja

    2017-06-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is an essential bio-fluid of the central nervous system (CNS), playing a vital role in the protection of CNS and performing neuronal function regulation. The chemical composition of CSF varies during onset of meningitis, neurodegenerative disorders (positive controls) and in traumatic cases (negative controls). The study design was broadly categorized into meningitis cases, negative controls and positive controls. Further differentiation among the three groups was carried out using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) followed by supervised Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA). The statistical analysis of meningitis vs. negative controls using PLS-DA model resulted in R 2 of 0.97 and Q 2 of 0.85. There was elevation in the levels of ketone bodies, total free amino acids, glutamine, creatine, citrate and choline containing compounds (choline and GPC) in meningitis cases. Similarly, meningitis vs. positive controls resulted in R 2 of 0.80 and Q 2 of 0.60 and showed elevation in the levels of total free amino acids, glutamine, creatine/creatinine and citrate in the meningitis group. Four cases of HIV were identified by PLS-DA model as well as by clinical investigations. On the basis of metabolic profile it was found that negative control CSF samples are more appropriate for differentiation of meningitis than positive control CSF samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Tautomeric transformation of temozolomide, their proton affinities and chemical reactivities: A theoretical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang-Aroon, Wichien; Ruangpornvisuti, Vithaya; Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya

    2016-05-01

    The gas-phase geometry optimizations of bare, mono- and dihydrated complexes of temozolomide isomers were carried out using density functional calculation at the M06-2X/6-31+G(d,p) level of the theory. The structures and protonation energies of protonated species of temozolomide are reported. Chemical indices of all isomers and protonated species are also reported. Energies, thermodynamic quantities, rate constants and equilibrium constants of tautomeric and rotameric transformations of all isomers I1↔TZM↔HIa↔HIb↔I2↔I3 in bare and hydrated systems were obtained. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 13C NMR Chemical Shifts of the Triclinic and Monoclinic Crystal forms of Valinomycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameda, Tsunenori; McGeorge, Gary; Orendt, Anita M.; Grant, David M.

    2004-01-01

    Two different crystalline polymorphs of valinomycin, the triclinic and monoclinic forms, have been studied by high resolution, solid state 13 C CP-MAS NMR spectroscopy. Although the two polymorphs of the crystal are remarkably similar, there are distinct differences in the isotropic chemical shifts between the two spectra. For the triclinic form, the carbon chemical shift tensor components for the alpha carbons adjacent to oxygen in the lactic acid and hydroxyisovaleric acid residues and the ester carbonyls of the valine residue were obtained using the FIREMAT experiment. From the measured components, it was found that the behavior of the isotropic chemical shift, δ iso , for valine residue ester carbonyl carbons is predominately influenced by the intermediate component, δ 22 . Additionally it was found that the smallest shift component, δ 33 , for the L-lactic acid (L-Lac) and D-α-hydroxyisovaleric acid (D-Hyi) C α -O carbon was significantly displaced depending upon the nature of individual amino acid residues, and it is the δ 33 component that governs the behavior of δ iso in these alpha carbons

  9. NMR of lignins

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Ralph; Larry L. Landucci

    2010-01-01

    This chapter will consider the basic aspects and findings of several forms of NMR spectroscopy, including separate discussions of proton, carbon, heteronuclear, and multidimensional NMR. Enhanced focus will be on 13C NMR, because of its qualitative and quantitative importance, followed by NMR’s contributions to our understanding of lignin...

  10. Calculation of the NMR chemical shift for a 4d1 system in a strong crystal field environment of trigonal symmetry with a threefold axis of quantization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sang Woon; Oh, Se Woung; Ro, Seung Woo

    1986-01-01

    The NMR chemical shift arising from 4d electron angular momentum and 4d electron angular momentum and 4d electron spin dipolar-nuclear spin angular momentum interactions for a 4d 1 system in a strong crystal field environment of trigonal symmetry, where the threefold axis is chosen to be the axis of quantization axis, has been examined. A general expression using the nonmultipole expansion method (exact method) is derived for the NMR chemical shift. From this expression all the multipolar terms are determined. we observe that along the (100), (010), (110), and (111) axes the NMR chemical shifts are positive while along the (001) axis, it is negative. We observe that the dipolar term (1/R 3 ) is the dominant contribution to the NMR chemical shift except for along the (111) axis. A comparison of the multipolar terms with the exact values shows also that the multipolar results are exactly in agreement with the exact values around R≥0.2 nm. The temperature dependence analysis on the NMR chemical shifts may imply that along the (111) axis the contribution to the NMR chemical shift is dominantly pseudo contact interaction. Separation of the contributions of the Fermi and the pseudo contact interactions would correctly imply that the dipolar interaction is the dominant contribution to the NMR chemical shifts along the (100), (010), (001), and (110) axes, but along the (111) axis the Fermi contact interaction is incorrectly the dominant contribution to the NMR chemical shift. (Author)

  11. Chemical behavior of methylpyranomalvidin-3-O-glucoside in aqueous solution studied by NMR and UV-visible spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Joana; Petrov, Vesselin; Parola, A Jorge; Pina, Fernando; Azevedo, Joana; Teixeira, Natércia; Brás, Natércia F; Fernandes, Pedro A; Mateus, Nuno; Ramos, Maria João; de Freitas, Victor

    2011-02-17

    In the present work, the proton-transfer reactions of the methylpyranomalvidin-3-O-glucoside pigment in water with different pH values was studied by NMR and UV-visible spectroscopies. The results showed four equilibrium forms: the methylpyranomalvidin-3-O-glucoside cation, the neutral quinoidal base, the respective anionic quinoidal base, and a dianionic base unprotonated at the methyl group. According to the NMR data, it seems that for methylpyranomalvidin-3-O-glucoside besides the acid-base equilibrium between the pyranoflavylium cation and the neutral quinoidal base, a new species is formed at pD 4.88-6.10. This is corroborated by the appearance of a new set of signals in the NMR spectrum that may be assigned to the formation of hemiketal/cis-chalcone species to a small extent. The two ionization constants (pK(a1) and pK(a2)) obtained by both methods (NMR and UV-visible) for methylpyranomalvidin-3-O-glucoside are in agreement (pK(a1) = 5.17 ± 0.03; pK(a2) = 8.85 ± 0.08; and pK(a1) = 4.57 ± 0.07; pK(a2) = 8.23 ± 0.04 obtained by NMR and UV-visible spectroscopies, respectively). Moreover, the fully dianionic unprotonated form (at the methyl group) of the methylpyranomalvidin-3-O-glucoside is converted slowly into a new structure that displays a yellow color at basic pH. On the basis of the results obtained through LC-MS and NMR, the proposed structure was found to correspond to the flavonol syringetin-3-glucoside.

  12. From proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra to pH. Assessment of {sup 1}H NMR pH indicator compound set for deuterium oxide solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tynkkynen, Tuulia, E-mail: tuulia.tynkkynen@uku.fi [Laboratory of Chemistry, Department of Biosciences, University of Kuopio, PO Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Tiainen, Mika; Soininen, Pasi; Laatikainen, Reino [Laboratory of Chemistry, Department of Biosciences, University of Kuopio, PO Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2009-08-19

    In this study, a protocol for pH determination from D{sub 2}O samples using {sup 1}H NMR pH indicator compounds was developed and assessed by exploring the pH-dependency of 13 compounds giving pH-dependent {sup 1}H NMR signals. The indicators cover the pH range from pH* 0 to 7.2. Equations to transform the indicator chemical shifts to pH estimates are given here for acetic acid, formic acid, chloroacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid, creatine, creatinine, glycine, histidine, 1,2,4-triazole, and TSP (2,2,3,3-tetradeutero-3-(trimethylsilyl)-propionic acid). To characterize the method in presence of typical solutes, the effects of common metabolites, albumin and ionic strength were also evaluated. For the ionic strengths, the effects were also modelled. The experiments showed that the use of pH sensitive {sup 1}H NMR chemical shifts allows the pH determination of typical metabolite solutions with accuracy of 0.01-0.05 pH units. Also, when the ionic strength is known with accuracy better than 0.1 mol dm{sup -3} and the solute concentrations are low, pH{sub nmr}{sup *} (the NMR estimate of pH) can be assumed to be within 0.05 pH units from potentiometrically determined pH.

  13. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and metabolism. Applications of proton and sup 13 C NMR to the study of glutamate metabolism in cultured glial cells and human brain in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portais, J.C.; Pianet, I.; Merle, M.; Raffard, G.; Biran, M.; Labouesse, J.; Canioni, P. (Bordeaux-2 Univ., 33 (FR)); Allard, M.; Kien, P.; Caille, J.M. (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 33 Bordeaux (FR))

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the metabolism of cells from the central nervous system both in vitro on perchloric acid extracts obtained either from cultured tumoral cells (C6 rat glioma) or rat astrocytes in primary culture, and in vivo within the human brain. Analysis of carbon 13 NMR spectra of perchloric acid extracts prepared from cultured cells in the presence of NMR (1-{sup 13}C) glucose as substrate allowed determination of the glutamate and glutamine enrichments in both normal and tumoral cells. Preliminary results indicated large changes in the metabolism of these amino acids (and also of aspartate and alanine) in the C6 cell as compared to its normal counterpart. Localized proton NMR spectra of the human brain in vivo were obtained at 1.5 T, in order to evaluate the content of various metabolites, including glutamate, in peritumoral edema from a selected volume of 2 x 2 x 2 cm{sup 3}. N-acetyl aspartate, glutamate, phosphocreatine, creatine, choline and inositol derivative resonances were observed in 15 min spectra. N-acetyl-aspartate was found to be at a lower level in contrast to glutamate which was detected at a higher level in the injured area as compared to the controlateral unaffected side.

  14. Detection of the sulfhydryl groups in proteins with slow hydrogen exchange rates and determination of their proton/deuteron fractionation factors using the deuterium-induced effects on the 13C(beta) NMR signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Jee, JunGoo; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2010-05-05

    A method for identifying cysteine (Cys) residues with sulfhydryl (SH) groups exhibiting slow hydrogen exchange rates has been developed for proteins in aqueous media. The method utilizes the isotope shifts of the C(beta) chemical shifts induced by the deuteration of the SH groups. The 18.2 kDa E. coli peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase b (EPPIb), which was selectively labeled with [3-(13)C;3,3-(2)H(2)]Cys, showed much narrower line widths for the (13)C(beta) NMR signals, as compared to those of the proteins labeled with either [3-(13)C]Cys or (3R)-[3-(13)C;3-(2)H]Cys. The (13)C(beta) signals of the two Cys residues of EPPIb, i.e. Cys-31 and Cys-121, labeled with [3-(13)C;3,3-(2)H(2)]Cys, split into four signals in H(2)O/D(2)O (1:1) at 40 degrees C and pH 7.5, indicating that the exchange rates of the side-chain SH's and the backbone amides are too slow to average the chemical shift differences of the (13)C(beta) signals, due to the two- and three-bond isotope shifts. By virtue of the well-separated signals, the proton/deuteron fractional factors for both the SH and amide groups of the two Cys residues in EPPIb could be directly determined, as approximately 0.4-0.5 for [SD]/[SH] and 0.9-1.0 for [ND]/[NH], by the relative intensities of the NMR signals for the isotopomers. The proton NOE's of the two slowly exchanging SH's were clearly identified in the NOESY spectra and were useful for the determining the local structure of EPPIb around the Cys residues.

  15. Application of 13C NMR spectroscopy to characterize organic chemical components of decomposing coarse woody debris from different climatic regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Hishinuma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy was applied to coarse woody debris (CWD in different stages of decomposition and collected from forest floor of a subtropical, a cool temperate, and a subalpine forest in Japan. The purpose was to test its applicability to characterize organic chemical composition of CWD of broad-leaved and coniferous trees from different climatic conditions. O-alkyl-C, mainly representing carbohydrates, was the predominant component of CWD at the three sites, accounting for 43.5-58.1% of the NMR spectra. Generally, the relative area under the signals for aromatic-C and phenolic-C, mainly representing lignin, increased, whereas the relative area for O-alkyl-C decreased, as the decay class advanced. The relative area under NMR chemical shift regions was significantly correlated with the chemical properties examined with proximate analyses. That is, O-alkyl-C and di-O-alkyl-C NMR signal areas were positively correlated with the volumetric density of CWD and the content of total carbohydrates. Methoxyl-C, aromatic-C, phenolic-C, carboxyl-C, and carbonyl-C were positively correlated with the contents of acid-unhydrolyzable residues (lignin, tannins, and cutin and nitrogen. Lignin-C calculated from NMR signals increased, and polysaccharide-C decreased, with the decay class of CWD at the three study sites. A review of previous studies on 13C NMR spectroscopy for decomposing CWD suggested further needs of its application to broad-leaved trees from tropical and subtropical regions.

  16. Animal manure phosphorus characterization by sequential chemical fractionation, release kinetics and 31P-NMR analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tales Tiecher

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Phosphate release kinetics from manures are of global interest because sustainable plant nutrition with phosphate will be a major concern in the future. Although information on the bioavailability and chemical composition of P present in manure used as fertilizer are important to understand its dynamics in the soil, such studies are still scarce. Therefore, P extraction was evaluated in this study by sequential chemical fractionation, desorption with anion-cation exchange resin and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR spectroscopy to assess the P forms in three different dry manure types (i.e. poultry, cattle and swine manure. All three methods showed that the P forms in poultry, cattle and swine dry manures are mostly inorganic and highly bioavailable. The estimated P pools showed that organic and recalcitrant P forms were negligible and highly dependent on the Ca:P ratio in manures. The results obtained here showed that the extraction of P with these three different methods allows a better understanding and complete characterization of the P pools present in the manures.

  17. 1H NMR study of the solvent THF concerning their structural and dynamical properties in chemically Li-intercalated SWNT

    KAUST Repository

    Schmid, Marc R.

    2011-09-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of the THF solvent in single-walled carbon nanotubes intercalated with lithium are investigated by NMR. 1H NMR experiments reveal the existence of two types of inequivalent THF solvent molecules with different chemical environments and dynamical behavior. At low temperatures THF molecules perpendicularly arranged in between adjacent SWNT presumably exhibit a restricted rotation around their dipolar axis. At higher temperatures THF molecules are isotropically rotating and diffusing along the interstitial channels of the SWNT bundles. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. 1H NMR study of the solvent THF concerning their structural and dynamical properties in chemically Li-intercalated SWNT

    KAUST Repository

    Schmid, Marc R.; Goze-Bac, Christophe; Bouhrara, Mohamed; Saih, Youssef; Mehring, Michael; Abou-Hamad, Edy

    2011-01-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of the THF solvent in single-walled carbon nanotubes intercalated with lithium are investigated by NMR. 1H NMR experiments reveal the existence of two types of inequivalent THF solvent molecules with different chemical environments and dynamical behavior. At low temperatures THF molecules perpendicularly arranged in between adjacent SWNT presumably exhibit a restricted rotation around their dipolar axis. At higher temperatures THF molecules are isotropically rotating and diffusing along the interstitial channels of the SWNT bundles. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Absolute quantitative proton NMR spectroscopy based on the amplitude of the local water suppression pulse. Quantification of brain water and metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E R; Henriksen, O

    1994-01-01

    Quantification in localized proton NMR spectroscopy has been achieved by various methods in recent years. A new method for absolute quantification is described in this paper. The method simultaneously rules out problems with B1 field inhomogeneity and coil loading, utilizing a relation between th......M and [NAA] = 9.15 +/- 0.74 nM. It is concluded that the quantification method is easily applied in vivo, and that the absolute concentrations obtained are similar to results in other studies except those relying on assumptions of the concentration of an internal reference. The advantage...

  20. Studies of protonic self-diffusion and conductivity in 12-tungstophophoric acid hydrates by pulsed field gradient 1H NMR and ac Conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slade, R.C.; Pressman, H.A.; Barker, J.; Strange, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    Temperature dependent protonic conductivities σ and 1/H self-diffusion coefficients, D, are reported for polycrystalline hydrates of 12-tungstophosphoric acid (TPA). Conductivities were measured using ac admittane spectrometry and diffusion coefficients by the pulsed field gradient NMR technique. Conductivities for the hydrates TPA.nH 2 O (n=6, 14, 21) increase with n. Examination of σ and D values and of activation techniques shows self-diffusion and conduction to occur by different mechanisms in the higher hydrates. 25 refs.; 14 figs.; 1 table

  1. Measurement of the Relaxation Rate of the Magnetization in Mn{sub 12}O{sub 12} -Acetate Using Proton NMR Echo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Z. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Lascialfari, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' A. Volta' ' e Unita' , INFM di Pavia, Via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia, (Italy); Borsa, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' A. Volta' ' e Unita' , INFM di Pavia, Via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia, (Italy); Gatteschi, D. [Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Via Maragliano 77, 50144 Firenze, (Italy)

    2000-03-27

    We present a novel method to measure the relaxation rate W of the magnetization of Mn{sub 12}O {sub 12} -acetate (Mn12) magnetic molecular cluster in its S=10 ground state at low T . It is based on the observation of an exponential growth in time of the proton NMR signal during the thermal equilibration of the magnetization of the molecules. We can explain the novel effect with a simple model which relates the intensity of the proton echo signal to the microscopic reversal of the magnetization of each individual Mn12 molecule during the equilibration process. The method should find wide application in the study of magnetic molecular clusters in off-equilibrium conditions. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  2. Physical basis of the effect of hemoglobin on the 31P NMR chemical shifts of various phosphoryl compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, K.; Kuchel, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    The marked difference between the intra- and extracellular 31 P NMR chemical shifts of various phosphoryl compounds when added to a red cell suspension may be largely understood in terms of the effects of hemoglobin on the 31 P NMR chemical shifts. The presence of [oxy- or (carbonmonoxy)-] hemoglobin inside the red cell causes the bulk magnetic susceptibility of the cell cytoplasm to be significantly less than that of the external solution. This difference is sufficient to account for the difference in the intra- and extracellular chemical shifts of the two phosphate esters trimethyl phosphate and triethyl phosphate. However, in the case of the compounds dimethyl methylphosphonate, diethyl methylphosphonate, and trimethylphosphine oxide as well as the hypophosphite, phenylphosphinate, and diphenylphosphinate ions, hemoglobin exerts an additional, much larger, effect, causing the 31 P NMR resonances to shift to lower frequency in a manner that cannot be accounted for in terms of magnetic susceptibility. Lysozyme is a protein structurally unrelated to hemoglobin and was shown to cause similar shifts to lower frequency of the resonances of these six compounds; this suggests that the mechanism may involve a property of proteins in general and not a specific property of hemoglobin. The effect of different solvents on the chemical shifts of the eight phosphoryl compounds provided an insight into the possible physical basis of the effect. It is proposed that, in addition to magnetic susceptibility effects, hemoglobin exerts its influence on phosphoryl chemical shifts by disrupting the hydrogen bonding of the phosphoryl group to solvent water

  3. Estimating side-chain order in methyl-protonated, perdeuterated proteins via multiple-quantum relaxation violated coherence transfer NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Hechao; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Tugarinov, Vitali

    2012-01-01

    Relaxation violated coherence transfer NMR spectroscopy (Tugarinov et al. in J Am Chem Soc 129:1743–1750, 2007) is an established experimental tool for quantitative estimation of the amplitudes of side-chain motions in methyl-protonated, highly deuterated proteins. Relaxation violated coherence transfer experiments monitor the build-up of methyl proton multiple-quantum coherences that can be created in magnetically equivalent spin-systems as long as their transverse magnetization components relax with substantially different rates. The rate of this build-up is a reporter of the methyl-bearing side-chain mobility. Although the build-up of multiple-quantum 1 H coherences is monitored in these experiments, the decay of the methyl signal during relaxation delays occurs when methyl proton magnetization is in a single-quantum state. We describe a relaxation violated coherence transfer approach where the relaxation of multiple-quantum 1 H– 13 C methyl coherences during the relaxation delay period is quantified. The NMR experiment and the associated fitting procedure that models the time-dependence of the signal build-up, are applicable to the characterization of side-chain order in [ 13 CH 3 ]-methyl-labeled, highly deuterated protein systems up to ∼100 kDa in molecular weight. The feasibility of extracting reliable measures of side-chain order is experimentally verified on methyl-protonated, perdeuterated samples of an 8.5-kDa ubiquitin at 10°C and an 82-kDa Malate Synthase G at 37°C.

  4. NMR Characterization of Flavanone Naringenin 7-O-Glycoside Diastereomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUN Li-juan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available To discriminate R and S flavanone glycoside using NMR, the mixture of R and S naringenin 7-O-glycoside was first isolated from Gleditsia sinensis. 1H and 13C NMR data of the mixture were recorded with 1H NMR, 13C NMR, 1H-1H COSY, 1H-13C HSQC and 1H-13C HMBC in DMSO-d6 solution. The two diastereomers were then separated with chiral chromatographic isolation, with their absolute configurations determined by circular dichroism. To avoid the disturbance of protons from glucose residues to dihydroflavonoid, 1H NMR spectra were acquired for pure R and S naringenin 7-O-glycoside and their mixture in CD3CN. The two diastereomers showed the largest proton chemical shift differences at the end group of glucose residue (H-1" with a chemical shift difference of 9.4 Hz. The OH-5 proton showed a chemical shift difference of 5.8 Hz. The chemical shift of the three protons on ring C were all influenced by configuration.

  5. Vanadium NMR Chemical Shifts of (Imido)vanadium(V) Dichloride Complexes with Imidazolin-2-iminato and Imidazolidin-2-iminato Ligands: Cooperation with Quantum-Chemical Calculations and Multiple Linear Regression Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jun; Yang, Wenhong; Sun, Wen-Hua; Nomura, Kotohiro; Hada, Masahiko

    2017-11-30

    The NMR chemical shifts of vanadium ( 51 V) in (imido)vanadium(V) dichloride complexes with imidazolin-2-iminato and imidazolidin-2-iminato ligands were calculated by the density functional theory (DFT) method with GIAO. The calculated 51 V NMR chemical shifts were analyzed by the multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis (MLRA) method with a series of calculated molecular properties. Some of calculated NMR chemical shifts were incorrect using the optimized molecular geometries of the X-ray structures. After the global minimum geometries of all of the molecules were determined, the trend of the observed chemical shifts was well reproduced by the present DFT method. The MLRA method was performed to investigate the correlation between the 51 V NMR chemical shift and the natural charge, band energy gap, and Wiberg bond index of the V═N bond. The 51 V NMR chemical shifts obtained with the present MLR model were well reproduced with a correlation coefficient of 0.97.

  6. Chemical shift-based identification of monosaccharide spin-systems with NMR spectroscopy to complement untargeted glycomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klukowski, Piotr; Schubert, Mario

    2018-06-15

    A better understanding of oligosaccharides and their wide-ranging functions in almost every aspect of biology and medicine promises to uncover hidden layers of biology and will support the development of better therapies. Elucidating the chemical structure of an unknown oligosaccharide is still a challenge. Efficient tools are required for non-targeted glycomics. Chemical shifts are a rich source of information about the topology and configuration of biomolecules, whose potential is however not fully explored for oligosaccharides. We hypothesize that the chemical shifts of each monosaccharide are unique for each saccharide type with a certain linkage pattern, so that correlated data measured by NMR spectroscopy can be used to identify the chemical nature of a carbohydrate. We present here an efficient search algorithm, GlycoNMRSearch, that matches either a subset or the entire set of chemical shifts of an unidentified monosaccharide spin system to all spin systems in an NMR database. The search output is much more precise than earlier search functions and highly similar matches suggest the chemical structure of the spin system within the oligosaccharide. Thus searching for connected chemical shift correlations within all electronically available NMR data of oligosaccharides is a very efficient way of identifying the chemical structure of unknown oligosaccharides. With an improved database in the future, GlycoNMRSearch will be even more efficient deducing chemical structures of oligosaccharides and there is a high chance that it becomes an indispensable technique for glycomics. The search algorithm presented here, together with a graphical user interface, is available at http://glyconmrsearch.santos.pwr.edu.pl. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  7. O-17 NMR measurement of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukazawa, Nobuyuki

    1990-01-01

    Recently, attention has been paid to the various treatment of water and the utilization of water by magnetic treatment, electric field treatment and so on. It has been said that by these treatments, the change in the properties of water arises. The state of this treated water cannot be explained by the properties of water from conventional physical and chemical standpoints. In addition, the method of measurement of whether the change arose or not is not yet determined. It is necessary to establish the method of measurement for the basic state of water. In this study, O-17 NMR which observes the state of water directly at molecular or atomic level was investigated as the method of measuring water. The measurement of O-17 NMR was carried out with a JNR 90Q FT NMR of Fourier transformation type of JEOL Ltd. The experimental method and the results are reported. The result of measurement of the O-17 NMR spectrum for distilled ion exchange water is shown. It is know that it has very wide line width as compared with the NMR spectra of protons and C-13. The relative sensitivity of O-17 observation is about 1/100,000 of that of protons. As to the information on the state of water obtained by O-17 NMR, there are chemical shift and line width. As temperature rose, the line width showed decrease, which seemed to be related to the decrease of hydrogen combination. (K.I.)

  8. Protein structure validation and refinement using amide proton chemical shifts derived from quantum mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Steen; Linnet, Troels Emtekær; Borg, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    We present the ProCS method for the rapid and accurate prediction of protein backbone amide proton chemical shifts - sensitive probes of the geometry of key hydrogen bonds that determine protein structure. ProCS is parameterized against quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and reproduces high level...

  9. Chemical changes in PMMA as a function of depth due to proton beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilasi, S.Z.; Huszank, R.; Szikra, D.; Vaczi, T.; Rajta, I.; Nagy, I.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Chemical changes were investigated as a function of depth in proton irradiated PMMA → The depth profile of numerous functional groups was determined along the depth → The degree of chemical modification strongly depends on the LET of protons → At low-fluences the zone of maximal modification is restricted to the Bragg peak → At higher fluences the zone of max. modification extends towards the sample surface. - Abstract: In this work we determined depth profiles of the chemical change in PMMA irradiated with 2 MeV protons by infrared spectroscopic and micro-Raman measurements. The measurements were carried out on 10 μm thin stacked foil samples using an infrared spectrometer in universal attenuated total reflectance (UATR) and transmission modes; while the thick samples were analyzed with a confocal micro-Raman spectrometer. The depth profiles of the changes formed due to the various delivered fluences were compared to each other. The measurements show the strong dependence of the degree of modification on the energy transfer from the decelerating protons. Depth profiles reveal that at the fluences applied in this work the entire irradiated volume suffered some chemical modifications. In case of low-fluence samples the zone of maximal modification is restricted only to the Bragg peak, but with increasing fluences the region of maximal modification extends towards the sample surface.

  10. Mixed micelles of polyethylene glycol (23) lauryl ether with ionic surfactants studied by proton 1D and 2D NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong-Chang; Zhao, Sui; Mao, Shi-Zhen; Yuan, Han-Zhen; Yu, Jia-Yong; Shen, Lian-Fang; Du, You-Ru

    2002-05-01

    (1)H NMR chemical shift, spin-lattice relaxation time, spin-spin relaxation time, self-diffusion coefficient, and two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement (2D NOESY) measurements have been used to study the nonionic-ionic surfactant mixed micelles. Cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were used as the ionic surfactants and polyethylene glycol (23) lauryl ether (Brij-35) as the nonionic surfactant. The two systems are both with varying molar ratios of CTAB/Brij-35 (C/B) and SDS/Brij-35 (S/B) ranging from 0.5 to 2, respectively, at a constant concentration of 6 mM for Brij-35 in aqueous solutions. Results give information about the relative arrangement of the surfactant molecules in the mixed micelles. In the former system, the trimethyl groups attached to the polar heads of the CTAB molecules are located between the first oxy-ethylene groups next to the hydrophobic chains of Brij-35 molecules. These oxy-ethylene groups gradually move outward from the hydrophobic core of the mixed micelle with an increase in C/B in the mixed solution. In contrast to the case of the CTAB/Triton X-100 system, the long flexible hydrophilic poly oxy-ethylene chains, which are in the exterior part of the mixed micelles, remain coiled, but looser, surrounding the hydrophobic core. There is almost no variation in conformation of the hydrophilic chains of Brij-35 molecules in the mixed micelles of the SDS/Brij-35 system as the S/B increases. The hydrophobic chains of both CTAB and SDS are co-aggregated with Brij-35, respectively, in their mixed micellar cores.

  11. Interactions of ionic liquids and acetone: thermodynamic properties, quantum-chemical calculations, and NMR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Elia; Ferro, Victor R; Palomar, Jose; Ortega, Juan; Rodriguez, Juan Jose

    2013-06-20

    The interactions between ionic liquids (ILs) and acetone have been studied to obtain a further understanding of the behavior of their mixtures, which generally give place to an exothermic process, mutual miscibility, and negative deviation of Raoult's law. COSMO-RS was used as a suitable computational method to systematically analyze the excess enthalpy of IL-acetone systems (>300), in terms of the intermolecular interactions contributing to the mixture behavior. Spectroscopic and COSMO-RS results indicated that acetone, as a polar compound with strong hydrogen bond acceptor character, in most cases, establishes favorable hydrogen bonding with ILs. This interaction is strengthened by the presence of an acidic cation and an anion with dispersed charge and non-HB acceptor character in the IL. COSMO-RS predictions indicated that gas-liquid and vapor-liquid equilibrium data for IL-acetone systems can be finely tuned by the IL selection, that is, acting on the intermolecular interactions between the molecular and ionic species in the liquid phase. NMR measurements for IL-acetone mixtures at different concentrations were also carried out. Quantum-chemical calculations by using molecular clusters of acetone and IL species were finally performed. These results provided additional evidence of the main role played by hydrogen bonding in the behavior of systems containing ILs and HB acceptor compounds, such as acetone.

  12. Reversible solid oxide fuel cells (R-SOFCs) with chemically stable proton-conducting oxides

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei

    2015-07-01

    Proton-conducting oxides offer a promising way of lowering the working temperature of solid oxide cells to the intermediate temperate range (500 to 700. °C) due to their better ionic conductivity. In addition, the application of proton-conducting oxides in both solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and sold oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) provides unique advantages compared with the use of conventional oxygen-ion conducting conductors, including the formation of water at the air electrode site. Since the discovery of proton conduction in some oxides about 30. years ago, the development of proton-conducting oxides in SOFCs and SOECs (the reverse mode of SOFCs) has gained increased attention. This paper briefly summarizes the development in the recent years of R-SOFCs with proton-conducting electrolytes, focusing on discussing the importance of adopting chemically stable materials in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes. The development of electrode materials for proton-conducting R-SOFCs is also discussed. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Proton exchange between oxymethyl radical and acids and bases: semiempirical quantum-chemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Pustolaikina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The reactions with proton participation are widely represented in the analytical, technological and biological chemistry. Quantum-chemical study of the exchange processes in hydrogen bonding complexes will allow us to achieve progress in the understanding of the elementary act mechanism of proton transfer in hydrogen bonding chain as well as the essence of the acid-base interactions. Oxymethyl radical •CH2ОН is small in size and comfortable as a model particle that well transmits protolytic properties of paramagnetic acids having more complex structure. Quantum-chemical modeling of proton exchange reaction oxymethyl radical ∙CH2OH and its diamagnetic analog CH3OH with amines, carboxylic acids and water was carried out using UAM1 method with the help of Gaussian-2009 program. QST2 method was used for the search of transition state, IRC procedure was applied for the calculation of descents along the reaction coordinate. The difference in the structure of transition states of ∙CH2OH/ CH3OH with bases and acids has been shown. It has been confirmed that in the case of bases, consecutive proton exchange mechanism was fixed, and in the case of complexes with carboxylic acids parallel proton exchange mechanism was fixed. The similarity in the reaction behavior of paramagnetic and diamagnetic systems in the proton exchange has been found. It was suggested that the mechanism of proton exchange reaction is determined by the structure of the hydrogen bonding cyclic complex, which is, in turn, depends from the nature of the acid-base interactions partners.

  14. NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    Since hydrogen is the most abundant element in all living organisms, proton NMR lends itself well as a method of investigation in biology and medicine. NMR imaging has some special advantages as a diagnostic tool: no ionizing radiation is used, it is noninvasive; it provides a safer means of imaging than the use of x-rays, gamma rays, positrons, or heavy ions. In contrast with ultrasound, the radiation penetrates the bony structures without attenuation. In additional to morphological information, NMR imaging provides additional diagnostic insights through relaxation parameters, which are not available from other imaging methods. In the decade since the first primitive NMR images were obtained, the quality of images now obtained approaches those from CT x-ray scanners. Prototype instruments are being constructed for clinical evaluation and the first whole-body scanners are beginning to appear on the market at costs comparable to CT scanners. Primary differences in equipment for conventional NMR and NMR imaging are the much larger aperture magnets that are required for the examination of human subjects and the addition of coils to generate field gradients and facilities for manipulating the gradients. Early results from clinical trials in many parts of the world are encouraging, and in a few years, the usefuleness of this modality of medical imaging to the medical profession in diagnosis and treatment of disease will be defined. 10 figures

  15. An NMR and ab initio quantum chemical study of acid-base equilibria for conformationally constrained acidic alpha-amino acids in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Aadal; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W.; Norrby, Per-Ola

    2001-01-01

    The protonation states of a series of piperidinedicarboxylic acids (PDAs), which are conformationally constrained acidic alpha -amino acids, have been studied by C-13 NMR titration in water. The resulting data have been correlated with theoretical results obtained by HF/6-31+G* calculations using...

  16. Lanthanide paramagnetic probes for NMR spectroscopic studies of fast molecular conformational dynamics and temperature control. Effective six-site proton exchange in 18-crown-6 by exchange spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babailov, Sergey P

    2012-02-06

    (1)H and (13)C NMR measurements are reported for the CDCl(3) and CD(2)Cl(2) solutions of [La(18-crown-6)(NO(3))(3)] (I), [Pr(18-crown-6) (NO(3))(3)] (II), [Ce(18-crown-6)(NO(3))(3)] (III), and [Nd(18-crown-6)(NO(3))(3)] (IV) complexes. Temperature dependencies of the (1)H NMR spectra of paramagnetic II-IV have been analyzed using the dynamic NMR (DNMR) methods for six-site exchange. Two types of conformational dynamic processes were identified (the first one is conditioned by interconversion of complex enantiomeric forms and pseudorotation of a macrocycle molecule upon the C(2) symmetry axis; the second one is conditioned by macrocycle molecule inversion). Application of exchange spectroscopy (2D-EXSY) of DNMR for investigation of this dynamic system (II-IV) simplifies the assignment of the NMR signals and represents the first experimental study of multisite exchange. In the present work, the methodology of paramagnetic 4f (Ce, Pr, and Nd) probe applications for the study of free-energy, enthalpy, and entropy changes in chemical exchange processes, as well as the advantages of this method in a comparison with DNMR studies of diamagnetic substances, is discussed. In particular, as a result of paramagnetic chemical shifts in 4f complexes, the range of measurable rate constants expands considerably compared to the analogous range in diamagnetic compounds. Coordination compounds investigated in the paper represent new types of thermometric NMR sensors and lanthanide paramagnetic probes for in situ temperature control in solution.

  17. Predicting Heats of Explosion of Nitroaromatic Compounds through NBO Charges and 15N NMR Chemical Shifts of Nitro Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Infante-Castillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new quantitative model to predict the heat of explosion of nitroaromatic compounds using the natural bond orbital (NBO charge and 15N NMR chemical shifts of the nitro groups (15NNitro as structural parameters. The values of the heat of explosion predicted for 21 nitroaromatic compounds using the model described here were compared with experimental data. The prediction ability of the model was assessed by the leave-one-out cross-validation method. The cross-validation results show that the model is significant and stable and that the predicted accuracy is within 0.146 MJ kg−1, with an overall root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP below 0.183 MJ kg−1. Strong correlations were observed between the heat of explosion and the charges (R2 = 0.9533 and 15N NMR chemical shifts (R2 = 0.9531 of the studied compounds. In addition, the dependence of the heat of explosion on the presence of activating or deactivating groups of nitroaromatic explosives was analyzed. All calculations, including optimizations, NBO charges, and 15NNitro NMR chemical shifts analyses, were performed using density functional theory (DFT and a 6-311+G(2d,p basis set. Based on these results, this practical quantitative model can be used as a tool in the design and development of highly energetic materials (HEM based on nitroaromatic compounds.

  18. Complete 1H NMR spectral analysis of ten chemical markers of Ginkgo biloba

    OpenAIRE

    Napolitano, José G.; Lankin, David C.; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F.

    2012-01-01

    The complete and unambiguous 1H NMR assignments of ten marker constituents of Ginkgo biloba are described. The comprehensive 1H NMR profiles (fingerprints) of ginkgolide A, ginkgolide B, ginkgolide C, ginkgolide J, bilobalide, quercetin, kaempferol, isorhamnetin, isoquercetin, and rutin in DMSO-d6 were obtained through the examination of 1D 1H NMR and 2D 1H,1H-COSY data, in combination with 1H iterative Full Spin Analysis (HiFSA). The computational analysis of discrete spin systems allowed a ...

  19. Characterization of the conformational equilibrium between the two major substates of RNase A using NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilloni, Carlo; Robustelli, Paul; De Simone, Alfonso; Cavalli, Andrea; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2012-03-07

    Following the recognition that NMR chemical shifts can be used for protein structure determination, rapid advances have recently been made in methods for extending this strategy for proteins and protein complexes of increasing size and complexity. A remaining major challenge is to develop approaches to exploit the information contained in the chemical shifts about conformational fluctuations in native states of proteins. In this work we show that it is possible to determine an ensemble of conformations representing the free energy surface of RNase A using chemical shifts as replica-averaged restraints in molecular dynamics simulations. Analysis of this surface indicates that chemical shifts can be used to characterize the conformational equilibrium between the two major substates of this protein. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  20. Proton detection for signal enhancement in solid-state NMR experiments on mobile species in membrane proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Meaghan E.; Ritz, Emily [University of Guelph, Department of Physics (Canada); Ahmed, Mumdooh A. M. [Suez University, The Department of Physics, Faculty of Science (Egypt); Bamm, Vladimir V.; Harauz, George [University of Guelph, Biophysics Interdepartmental Group (Canada); Brown, Leonid S.; Ladizhansky, Vladimir, E-mail: vladizha@uoguelph.ca [University of Guelph, Department of Physics (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Direct proton detection is becoming an increasingly popular method for enhancing sensitivity in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Generally, these experiments require extensive deuteration of the protein, fast magic angle spinning (MAS), or a combination of both. Here, we implement direct proton detection to selectively observe the mobile entities in fully-protonated membrane proteins at moderate MAS frequencies. We demonstrate this method on two proteins that exhibit different motional regimes. Myelin basic protein is an intrinsically-disordered, peripherally membrane-associated protein that is highly flexible, whereas Anabaena sensory rhodopsin is composed of seven rigid transmembrane α-helices connected by mobile loop regions. In both cases, we observe narrow proton linewidths and, on average, a 10× increase in sensitivity in 2D insensitive nuclear enhancement of polarization transfer-based HSQC experiments when proton detection is compared to carbon detection. We further show that our proton-detected experiments can be easily extended to three dimensions and used to build complete amino acid systems, including sidechain protons, and obtain inter-residue correlations. Additionally, we detect signals which do not correspond to amino acids, but rather to lipids and/or carbohydrates which interact strongly with membrane proteins.

  1. Synthesis, three-dimensional structure, conformation and correct chemical shift assignment determination of pharmaceutical molecules by NMR and molecular modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azeredo, Sirlene O.F. de; Sales, Edijane M.; Figueroa-Villar, José D., E-mail: jdfv2009@gmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Grupo de Ressonância Magnética Nuclear e Química Medicinal

    2017-07-01

    This work includes the synthesis of phenanthrenequinone guanylhydrazone and phenanthro[9,10-e][1,2,4]triazin-3-amine to be tested as intercalate with DNA for treatment of cancer. The other synthesized product, 2-[(4-chlorophenylamino)methylene]malononitrile, was designed for future determination of its activity against leishmaniasis. A common problem about some articles on the literature is that some previously published compounds display error of their molecular structures. In this article it is shown the application of several procedures of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to determine the complete molecular structure and the non questionable chemical shift assignment of the synthesized compounds, and also their analysis by molecular modeling to confirm the NMR results. To determine the capacity of pharmacological compounds to interact with biological targets is determined by docking. This work is to motivate the application of NMR and molecular modeling on organic synthesis, being a process that is very important for the study of the prepared compounds as interactions with biological targets by NMR. (author)

  2. Synthesis, three-dimensional structure, conformation and correct chemical shift assignment determination of pharmaceutical molecules by NMR and molecular modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azeredo, Sirlene O.F. de; Sales, Edijane M.; Figueroa-Villar, José D.

    2017-01-01

    This work includes the synthesis of phenanthrenequinone guanylhydrazone and phenanthro[9,10-e][1,2,4]triazin-3-amine to be tested as intercalate with DNA for treatment of cancer. The other synthesized product, 2-[(4-chlorophenylamino)methylene]malononitrile, was designed for future determination of its activity against leishmaniasis. A common problem about some articles on the literature is that some previously published compounds display error of their molecular structures. In this article it is shown the application of several procedures of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to determine the complete molecular structure and the non questionable chemical shift assignment of the synthesized compounds, and also their analysis by molecular modeling to confirm the NMR results. To determine the capacity of pharmacological compounds to interact with biological targets is determined by docking. This work is to motivate the application of NMR and molecular modeling on organic synthesis, being a process that is very important for the study of the prepared compounds as interactions with biological targets by NMR. (author)

  3. A comparison of chemical shift sensitivity of trifluoromethyl tags: optimizing resolution in {sup 19}F NMR studies of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Libin; Larda, Sacha Thierry; Frank Li, Yi Feng [University of Toronto, UTM, Department of Chemistry (Canada); Manglik, Aashish [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology (United States); Prosser, R. Scott, E-mail: scott.prosser@utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, UTM, Department of Chemistry (Canada)

    2015-05-15

    The elucidation of distinct protein conformers or states by fluorine ({sup 19}F) NMR requires fluorinated moieties whose chemical shifts are most sensitive to subtle changes in the local dielectric and magnetic shielding environment. In this study we evaluate the effective chemical shift dispersion of a number of thiol-reactive trifluoromethyl probes [i.e. 2-bromo-N-(4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)acetamide (BTFMA), N-(4-bromo-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)acetamide (3-BTFMA), 3-bromo-1,1,1-trifluoropropan-2-ol (BTFP), 1-bromo-3,3,4,4,4-pentafluorobutan-2-one (BPFB), 3-bromo-1,1,1-trifluoropropan-2-one (BTFA), and 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl-1-thiol (TFET)] under conditions of varying polarity. In considering the sensitivity of the {sup 19}F NMR chemical shift to the local environment, a series of methanol/water mixtures were prepared, ranging from relatively non-polar (MeOH:H{sub 2}O = 4) to polar (MeOH:H{sub 2}O = 0.25). {sup 19}F NMR spectra of the tripeptide, glutathione ((2S)-2-amino-4-{[(1R)-1-[(carboxymethyl)carbamoyl] -2-sulfanylethyl]carbamoyl}butanoic acid), conjugated to each of the above trifluoromethyl probes, revealed that the BTFMA tag exhibited a significantly greater range of chemical shift as a function of solvent polarity than did either BTFA or TFET. DFT calculations using the B3LYP hybrid functional and the 6-31G(d,p) basis set, confirmed the observed trend in chemical shift dispersion with solvent polarity.

  4. Criteria to average out the chemical shift anisotropy in solid-state NMR when irradiated with BABA I, BABA II, and C7 radiofrequency pulse sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephane Mananga, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Floquet-Magnus expansion is used to study the effect of chemical shift anisotropy in solid-state NMR of rotating solids. The chemical shift interaction is irradiated with two types of radiofrequency pulse sequences: BABA and C7. The criteria for the chemical shift anisotropy to be averaged out in each rotor period are obtained. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Computational Protocols for Prediction of Solute NMR Relative Chemical Shifts. A Case Study of L-Tryptophan in Aqueous Solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Janus J.; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus H.; Aidas, Kestutis

    2011-01-01

    to the results stemming from the conformations extracted from the MM conformational search in terms of replicating an experimental reference as well as in achieving the correct sequence of the NMR relative chemical shifts of L-tryptophan in aqueous solution. We find this to be due to missing conformations......In this study, we have applied two different spanning protocols for obtaining the molecular conformations of L-tryptophan in aqueous solution, namely a molecular dynamics simulation and a molecular mechanics conformational search with subsequent geometry re-optimization of the stable conformers...... using a quantum mechanically based method. These spanning protocols represent standard ways of obtaining a set of conformations on which NMR calculations may be performed. The results stemming from the solute–solvent configurations extracted from the MD simulation at 300 K are found to be inferior...

  6. The use of IRMS, (1)H NMR and chemical analysis to characterise Italian and imported Tunisian olive oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camin, Federica; Pavone, Anita; Bontempo, Luana; Wehrens, Ron; Paolini, Mauro; Faberi, Angelo; Marianella, Rosa Maria; Capitani, Donatella; Vista, Silvia; Mannina, Luisa

    2016-04-01

    Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS), (1)H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1)H NMR), conventional chemical analysis and chemometric elaboration were used to assess quality and to define and confirm the geographical origin of 177 Italian PDO (Protected Denomination of Origin) olive oils and 86 samples imported from Tunisia. Italian olive oils were richer in squalene and unsaturated fatty acids, whereas Tunisian olive oils showed higher δ(18)O, δ(2)H, linoleic acid, saturated fatty acids β-sitosterol, sn-1 and 3 diglyceride values. Furthermore, all the Tunisian samples imported were of poor quality, with a K232 and/or acidity values above the limits established for extra virgin olive oils. By combining isotopic composition with (1)H NMR data using a multivariate statistical approach, a statistical model able to discriminate olive oil from Italy and those imported from Tunisia was obtained, with an optimal differentiation ability arriving at around 98%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Structural analysis of flavonoids in solution through DFT 1H NMR chemical shift calculations: Epigallocatechin, Kaempferol and Quercetin

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, Leonardo A.; Tavares, Wagner M. G.; Lopes, Ana Paula M.; Soeiro, Malucia M.; De Almeida, Wagner B.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we showed that comparison between experimental and theoretical 1H NMR chemical shift patterns, calculated using Density Functional Theory (DFT), can be used for the prediction of molecular structure of flavonoids in solution, what is experimentally accessible for gas phase (electron diffraction methods) and solid samples (X-ray diffraction). The best match between B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)-PCM 1H NMR calculations for B ring rotated structures and experimental spectra can provide information on the conformation adopted by polyphenols in solution (usually DMSO-d6, acetone-d6 as solvents), which may differ from solid state and gas phase observed structures, and also DFT optimized geometry in the vacuum.

  8. 1H NMR visibility of mammalian glycogen in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang, L.H.; Rothman, D.L.; Shulman, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    High-resolution 1 H NMR spectra of rabbit liver glycogen in 2 H 2 O were obtained at 500 MHz, and several resonances were assigned by comparison with the chemical shifts of α-linked diglucose molecules. The NMR relaxation times T 1 and T 2 of glycogen in 2 H 2 O were determined to be 1.1 and 0.029 s, respectively. The measured natural linewidth of the carbon-1 proton is in excellent agreement with that calculated from T 2 . The visibility measurements made by digesting glycogen and comparing glucose and glycogen signal intensities demonstrate that in spite of the very high molecular weight, all of the proton nuclei in glycogen contribute to the NMR spectrum. The result is not unexpected, since 100% NMR visibility was previously observed from the carbon nuclei of glycogen, due to the rapid intramolecular motions

  9. Performance test of multicomponent quantum mechanical calculation with polarizable continuum model for proton chemical shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanematsu, Yusuke; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2015-05-21

    Multicomponent quantum mechanical (MC_QM) calculations with polarizable continuum model (PCM) have been tested against liquid (1)H NMR chemical shifts for a test set of 80 molecules. Improvement from conventional quantum mechanical calculations was achieved for MC_QM calculations. The advantage of the multicomponent scheme could be attributed to the geometrical change from the equilibrium geometry by the incorporation of the hydrogen nuclear quantum effect, while that of PCM can be attributed to the change of the electronic structure according to the polarization by solvent effects.

  10. Complex methyl groups dynamics in [(CH3)4P]3Sb2Br9 (PBA) from low to high temperatures by proton spin-lattice relaxation and narrowing of proton NMR spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latanowicz, L; Medycki, W; Jakubas, R

    2009-11-01

    Molecular dynamics of a polycrystalline sample of [(CH(3))(4)P](3)Sb(2)Br(9) (PBA) has been studied on the basis of the T(1) (24.7 MHz) relaxation time measurement, the proton second moment of NMR and the earlier published T(1) (90 MHz) relaxation times. The study was performed in a wide range of temperatures (30-337 K). The tunnel splitting omega(T) of the methyl groups was estimated as of low frequency (from kHz to few MHz). The proton spin pairs of the methyl group are known to perform a complex internal motion being a resultant of four components. Three of them involve mass transportation over and through the potential barrier and are characterized by the correlation times tau(3) and tau(T)of the jumps over the barrier and tunnel jumps in the threefold potential of the methyl group and tau(iso) the correlation time of isotropic rotation of the whole TMP cation. For tau(3) and tau(iso) the Arrhenius temperature dependence was assumed, while for tau(T)--the Schrödinger one. The fourth motion causes fluctuations of the tunnel splitting frequency, omega(T), and it is related to the lifetime of the methyl spin at the energy level. The correlation function for this fourth motion (tau(omega) correlation time) has been proposed by Müller-Warmuth et al. In this paper a formula for the correlation function and spectral density of the complex motion made of the above-mentioned four components was derived and used in interpretation of the T(1) relaxation time. The second moment of proton NMR line at temperatures below 50K is four times lower than its value for the rigid structure. The three components of the internal motion characterized by tau(T), tau(H), and tau(iso) were proved to reduce the second moment of the NMR line. The tunnel jumps of the methyl group reduce M(2) at almost 0K, the classical jumps over the barrier reduce M(2) in the vicinity of 50K, while the isotropic motion near 150K. Results of the study on the dynamics of CH(3) groups of TMP cation based on

  11. Proton-Conducting Sulfonated Ionomers by Chemical Modification and Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Møller

    The cornerstone in this dissertation is made up by three individual assessments of the diversity in the macromolecular landscape that can be obtained by applying relatively few efficient chemical tools. The intention is to gain deeper knowledge on the chemical tuning of proton exchange membranes...... of hydrocarbon macromolecular architectures, PSU with postsulfonated polystyrene (PS) grafts are investigated. Here, IEC is controlled through the degree of substitution, the graft length and DS. The grafting is performed with atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The third assessment is dedicated...... of control by ATRP and click chemistry enables a wide selection of polymer structures with the handles: degree of substitution (DS), polymerization and sulfonation, and blending....

  12. Spin-echo based diagonal peak suppression in solid-state MAS NMR homonuclear chemical shift correlation spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaiyu; Zhang, Zhiyong; Ding, Xiaoyan; Tian, Fang; Huang, Yuqing; Chen, Zhong; Fu, Riqiang

    2018-02-01

    The feasibility of using the spin-echo based diagonal peak suppression method in solid-state MAS NMR homonuclear chemical shift correlation experiments is demonstrated. A complete phase cycling is designed in such a way that in the indirect dimension only the spin diffused signals are evolved, while all signals not involved in polarization transfer are refocused for cancellation. A data processing procedure is further introduced to reconstruct this acquired spectrum into a conventional two-dimensional homonuclear chemical shift correlation spectrum. A uniformly 13C, 15N labeled Fmoc-valine sample and the transmembrane domain of a human protein, LR11 (sorLA), in native Escherichia coli membranes have been used to illustrate the capability of the proposed method in comparison with standard 13C-13C chemical shift correlation experiments.

  13. Chemical and nanometer-scale structure of kerogen and its change during thermal maturation investigated by advanced solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, J.; Fang, X.; Lan, Y.; Schimmelmann, A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Xu, L.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2010-01-01

    We have used advanced and quantitative solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to investigate structural changes in a series of type II kerogen samples from the New Albany Shale across a range of maturity (vitrinite reflectance R0 from 0.29% to 1.27%). Specific functional groups such as CH3, CH2, alkyl CH, aromatic CH, aromatic C-O, and other nonprotonated aromatics, as well as "oil prone" and "gas prone" carbons, have been quantified by 13C NMR; atomic H/C and O/C ratios calculated from the NMR data agree with elemental analysis. Relationships between NMR structural parameters and vitrinite reflectance, a proxy for thermal maturity, were evaluated. The aromatic cluster size is probed in terms of the fraction of aromatic carbons that are protonated (???30%) and the average distance of aromatic C from the nearest protons in long-range H-C dephasing, both of which do not increase much with maturation, in spite of a great increase in aromaticity. The aromatic clusters in the most mature sample consist of ???30 carbons, and of ???20 carbons in the least mature samples. Proof of many links between alkyl chains and aromatic rings is provided by short-range and long-range 1H-13C correlation NMR. The alkyl segments provide most H in the samples; even at a carbon aromaticity of 83%, the fraction of aromatic H is only 38%. While aromaticity increases with thermal maturity, most other NMR structural parameters, including the aromatic C-O fractions, decrease. Aromaticity is confirmed as an excellent NMR structural parameter for assessing thermal maturity. In this series of samples, thermal maturation mostly increases aromaticity by reducing the length of the alkyl chains attached to the aromatic cores, not by pronounced growth of the size of the fused aromatic ring clusters. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Predicting Pt-195 NMR chemical shift using new relativistic all-electron basis set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paschoal, D.; Fonseca Guerra, C.; de Oliveira, M.A.L.; Ramalho, T.C.; Dos Santos, H.F.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting NMR properties is a valuable tool to assist the experimentalists in the characterization of molecular structure. For heavy metals, such as Pt-195, only a few computational protocols are available. In the present contribution, all-electron Gaussian basis sets, suitable to calculate the

  15. DFT study of zigzag (n, 0) single-walled carbon nanotubes: C-13 NMR chemical shifts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kupka, T.; Stachów, M.; Stobinski, L.; Kaminský, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 67, Jun (2016), s. 14-19 ISSN 1093-3263 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03564S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : zigzag SWCNT * cyclacenes * theoretical modeling * DFT * NMR Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.754, year: 2016

  16. Conformational Sampling by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations Improves NMR Chemical Shift Predictions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dračínský, Martin; Möller, H. M.; Exner, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 8 (2013), s. 3806-3815 ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-24880S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ab initio molecular dynamics * NMR spectroscopy * DFT calculations * hydration Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.310, year: 2013

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Chemically Modified Starches by 1H-NMR Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, R.A. de; Lammers, G.; Janssen, L.P.B.M.; Beenackers, A.A.C.M.

    1995-01-01

    A quantitative 1H-NMR method for the determination of the Molar Substitution (MS) of acetylated and hydroxypropylated starches was developed and tested for MS ranging from 0.09 to 0.5. Results were checked using the Johnson method and a titration method for hydroxypropylated and acetylated starch,

  18. Quantitative analysis of chemically modified starches by H-1-NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, R.A.; Lammers, G; Janssen, L.P.B.M.; Beenackers, A.A C M

    1995-01-01

    A quantitative H-1-NMR method for the determination of the Molar Substitution (MS) of acetylated and hydroxypropylated starches was developed and tested for MS ranging from 0.09 to 0.5. Results were checked using the Johnson method and a titration method for hydroxypropylated and acetylated starch,

  19. Quantitative NMR Approach to Optimize the Formation of Chemical Building Blocks from Abundant Carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elliot, Samuel Gilbert; Tolborg, Søren; Sádaba, Irantzu

    2017-01-01

    -containing catalysts such as Sn-Beta. These compounds are potential building blocks for polyesters with additional olefin and alcohol functionalities. We employ an NMR approach to identify, quantify and optimize the formation these building blocks in the chemocatalytic transformation of abundant carbohydrates by Sn...

  20. Temperature dependence of (+)-catechin pyran ring proton coupling constants as measured by NMR and modeled using GMMX search methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fred L. Tobiason; Stephen S. Kelley; M. Mark Midland; Richard W. Hemingway

    1997-01-01

    The pyran ring proton coupling constants for (+)-catechin have been experimentally determined in deuterated methanol over a temperature range of 213 K to 313 K. The experimental coupling constants were simulated to 0.04 Hz on the average at a 90 percent confidence limit using a LAOCOON method. The temperature dependence of the coupling constants was reproduced from the...

  1. 31P NMR Chemical Shifts of Phosphorus Probes as Reliable and Practical Acidity Scales for Solid and Liquid Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Anmin; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2017-10-11

    Acid-base catalytic reaction, either in heterogeneous or homogeneous systems, is one of the most important chemical reactions that has provoked a wide variety of industrial catalytic processes for production of chemicals and petrochemicals over the past few decades. In view of the fact that the catalytic performances (e.g., activity, selectivity, and reaction mechanism) of acid-catalyzed reactions over acidic catalysts are mostly dictated by detailed acidic features, viz. type (Brønsted vs Lewis acidity), amount (concentration), strength, and local environments (location) of acid sites, information on and manipulation of their structure-activity correlation are crucial for optimization of catalytic performances as well as innovative design of novel effective catalysts. This review aims to summarize recent developments on acidity characterization of solid and liquid catalysts by means of experimental 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy using phosphorus probe molecules such as trialkylphosphine (TMP) and trialkylphosphine oxides (R 3 PO). In particular, correlations between the observed 31 P chemical shifts (δ 31 P) of phosphorus (P)-containing probes and acidic strengths have been established in conjuction with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, rendering practical and reliable acidity scales for Brønsted and Lewis acidities at the atomic level. As illustrated for a variety of different solid and liquid acid systems, such as microporous zeolites, mesoporous molecular sieves, and metal oxides, the 31 P NMR probe approaches were shown to provide important acid features of various catalysts, surpassing most conventional methods such as titration, pH measurement, Hammett acidity function, and some other commonly used physicochemical techniques, such as calorimetry, temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia (NH 3 -TPD), Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR), and 1 H NMR spectroscopies.

  2. Protein energetic conformational analysis from NMR chemical shifts (PECAN) and its use in determining secondary structural elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eghbalnia, Hamid R.; Wang Liya; Bahrami, Arash [National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison, Biochemistry Department (United States); Assadi, Amir [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Mathematics Department (United States); Markley, John L. [National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison, Biochemistry Department (United States)], E-mail: eghbalni@nmrfam.wisc.edu

    2005-05-15

    We present an energy model that combines information from the amino acid sequence of a protein and available NMR chemical shifts for the purposes of identifying low energy conformations and determining elements of secondary structure. The model ('PECAN', Protein Energetic Conformational Analysis from NMR chemical shifts) optimizes a combination of sequence information and residue-specific statistical energy function to yield energetic descriptions most favorable to predicting secondary structure. Compared to prior methods for secondary structure determination, PECAN provides increased accuracy and range, particularly in regions of extended structure. Moreover, PECAN uses the energetics to identify residues located at the boundaries between regions of predicted secondary structure that may not fit the stringent secondary structure class definitions. The energy model offers insights into the local energetic patterns that underlie conformational preferences. For example, it shows that the information content for defining secondary structure is localized about a residue and reaches a maximum when two residues on either side are considered. The current release of the PECAN software determines the well-defined regions of secondary structure in novel proteins with assigned chemical shifts with an overall accuracy of 90%, which is close to the practical limit of achievable accuracy in classifying the states.

  3. Protein energetic conformational analysis from NMR chemical shifts (PECAN) and its use in determining secondary structural elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eghbalnia, Hamid R.; Wang Liya; Bahrami, Arash; Assadi, Amir; Markley, John L.

    2005-01-01

    We present an energy model that combines information from the amino acid sequence of a protein and available NMR chemical shifts for the purposes of identifying low energy conformations and determining elements of secondary structure. The model ('PECAN', Protein Energetic Conformational Analysis from NMR chemical shifts) optimizes a combination of sequence information and residue-specific statistical energy function to yield energetic descriptions most favorable to predicting secondary structure. Compared to prior methods for secondary structure determination, PECAN provides increased accuracy and range, particularly in regions of extended structure. Moreover, PECAN uses the energetics to identify residues located at the boundaries between regions of predicted secondary structure that may not fit the stringent secondary structure class definitions. The energy model offers insights into the local energetic patterns that underlie conformational preferences. For example, it shows that the information content for defining secondary structure is localized about a residue and reaches a maximum when two residues on either side are considered. The current release of the PECAN software determines the well-defined regions of secondary structure in novel proteins with assigned chemical shifts with an overall accuracy of 90%, which is close to the practical limit of achievable accuracy in classifying the states

  4. Experimental and DFT evaluation of the 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts for calix[4]arenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzo, Rodrigo N.; Rezende, Michelle Jakeline Cunha; Kartnaller, Vinicius; Carneiro, José Walkimar de M.; Stoyanov, Stanislav R.; Costa, Leonardo Moreira da

    2018-04-01

    The density functional theory is employed to determine the efficiency of 11 exchange-correlation (XC) functionals to compute the 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of p-tert-butylcalix[4]arene (ptcx4, R1 = C(CH3)3) and congeners using the 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The statistical analysis shows that B3LYP, B3PW91 and PBE1PBE are the best XC functionals for the calculation of 1H chemical shifts. Moreover, the best results for the 13C chemical shifts are obtained using the LC-WPBE, M06-2X and wB97X-D functionals. The performance of these XC functionals is tested for three other calix[4]arenes: p-sulfonic acid calix[4]arene (sfxcx4 - R1 = SO3H), p-nitro-calix[4]arene (ncx4, R1 = NO2) and calix[4]arene (cx4 - R1 = H). For 1H chemical shifts B3LYP, B3PW91 and PBE1PBE yield similar results, although B3PW91 shows more consistency in the calculated error for the different structures. For 13C NMR chemical shifts, the XC functional that stood out as best is LC-WPBE. Indeed, the three functionals selected for each of 1H and 13C show good accuracy and can be used in future studies involving the prediction of 1H and 13C chemical shifts for this type of compounds.

  5. Chemically stable Dy–Y double substituted barium zirconate with high proton conductivity and improved sinterability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paydar, M.H., E-mail: paaydar@shirazu.ac.ir [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nishimura, Ch. [Hydrogen Materials Unit, Environment and Energy Materials Division, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kobayashi, K. [Advanced Ceramics Group, Materials Processing Unit, Advanced Key Technologies Division, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • BaZr{sub (0.8−x)}Dy{sub x}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3−δ} (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.2) powders were synthesized by a wet chemical route. • The ability of the synthesized powders in uptaking water was determined. • Chemical stability of the synthesized powders was evaluated under in wet and CO{sub 2} atmosphere. • The conductivity of the sintered pellets was measured by AC impedance spectroscopy. • It was shown that Dy-doped BZY20 ceramic has excellent proton conductivity. • It was proved that Dy-doped BZY20 ceramic has good chemical stability. • It was concluded that Dy-doped BZY20 electrolyte can be considered as a promising electrolyte for solid oxide fuel cell applications. - Abstract: Novel proton conductors BaZr{sub (0.8−x)}Dy{sub x}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3−δ} (BZ{sub 0.8−x}D{sub x}Y20, 0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.2) with high proton conductivity, chemical stability and improved sinterability are developed by partially substituting the Zr site of the 20 mol% Y-doped barium zirconate (BZY20) with Dy. A modified Pechini method was applied to synthesize the BZ{sub 0.8−x}D{sub x}Y20 powders. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the well-calcined powders indicated that the specimens with 0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.2 possessed a single-phase of cubic perovskite-type oxides. Stability tests under both CO{sub 2} and moist air atmospheres demonstrated that the excellent chemical stability of the base BZY20 material was not influenced by the introduction of Dy. High density pellets with larger grain sizes were obtained at temperatures lower than those commonly employed for the base Y-doped barium zirconate compound. The proton conductivities, measured in different oxidizing and reducing, dry and humidified atmospheres by impedance spectroscopy, were significantly influenced by the Dy amount. In overall, BaZr{sub (0.8−x)}Dy{sub x}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3−δ} solid solutions having Dy ∼ 5–10% showed excellent chemical stability and high conductivity (above 10{sup −2} S cm{sup −1} at

  6. Functional group analysis by H NMR/chemical derivatization for the characterization of organic aerosol from the SMOCC field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tagliavini

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Water soluble organic compounds (WSOC in aerosol samples collected in the Amazon Basin in a period encompassing the middle/late dry season and the beginning of the wet season, were investigated by H NMR spectroscopy. HiVol filter samples (PM2.5 and PM>2.5 and size-segregated samples from multistage impactor were subjected to H NMR characterization. The H NMR methodology, recently developed for the analysis of organic aerosol samples, has been improved by exploiting chemical methylation of carboxylic groups with diazomethane, which allows the direct determination of the carboxylic acid content of WSOC. The content of carboxylic carbons for the different periods and sizes ranged from 12% to 20% of total measured carbon depending on the season and aerosol size, with higher contents for the fine particles in the transition and wet periods with respect to the dry period. A comprehensive picture is presented of WSOC functional groups in aerosol samples representative of the biomass burning period, as well as of transition and semi-clean atmospheric conditions. A difference in composition between fine (PM2.5 and coarse (PM>2.5 size fractions emerged from the NMR data, the former showing higher alkylic content, the latter being largely dominated by R-O-H (or R-O-R' functional groups. Very small particles (<0.14 μm, however, present higher alkyl-chain content and less oxygenated carbons than larger fine particles (0.42–1.2 μm. More limited variations were found between the average compositions in the different periods of the campaign.

  7. An easily sintered, chemically stable, barium zirconate-based proton conductor for high-performance proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Wenping; Shi, Zhen; Liu, Mingfei; Bi, Lei; Liu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Yttrium and indium co-doped barium zirconate is investigated to develop a chemically stable and sintering active proton conductor for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). BaZr0.8Y0.2-xInxO3- δ possesses a pure cubic perovskite structure. The sintering

  8. SPARTA+: a modest improvement in empirical NMR chemical shift prediction by means of an artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yang; Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.go [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2010-09-15

    NMR chemical shifts provide important local structural information for proteins and are key in recently described protein structure generation protocols. We describe a new chemical shift prediction program, SPARTA+, which is based on artificial neural networking. The neural network is trained on a large carefully pruned database, containing 580 proteins for which high-resolution X-ray structures and nearly complete backbone and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts are available. The neural network is trained to establish quantitative relations between chemical shifts and protein structures, including backbone and side-chain conformation, H-bonding, electric fields and ring-current effects. The trained neural network yields rapid chemical shift prediction for backbone and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} atoms, with standard deviations of 2.45, 1.09, 0.94, 1.14, 0.25 and 0.49 ppm for {delta}{sup 15}N, {delta}{sup 13}C', {delta}{sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}, {delta}{sup 13}C{sup {beta}}, {delta}{sup 1}H{sup {alpha}} and {delta}{sup 1}H{sup N}, respectively, between the SPARTA+ predicted and experimental shifts for a set of eleven validation proteins. These results represent a modest but consistent improvement (2-10%) over the best programs available to date, and appear to be approaching the limit at which empirical approaches can predict chemical shifts.

  9. SPARTA+: a modest improvement in empirical NMR chemical shift prediction by means of an artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yang; Bax, Ad

    2010-01-01

    NMR chemical shifts provide important local structural information for proteins and are key in recently described protein structure generation protocols. We describe a new chemical shift prediction program, SPARTA+, which is based on artificial neural networking. The neural network is trained on a large carefully pruned database, containing 580 proteins for which high-resolution X-ray structures and nearly complete backbone and 13 C β chemical shifts are available. The neural network is trained to establish quantitative relations between chemical shifts and protein structures, including backbone and side-chain conformation, H-bonding, electric fields and ring-current effects. The trained neural network yields rapid chemical shift prediction for backbone and 13 C β atoms, with standard deviations of 2.45, 1.09, 0.94, 1.14, 0.25 and 0.49 ppm for δ 15 N, δ 13 C', δ 13 C α , δ 13 C β , δ 1 H α and δ 1 H N , respectively, between the SPARTA+ predicted and experimental shifts for a set of eleven validation proteins. These results represent a modest but consistent improvement (2-10%) over the best programs available to date, and appear to be approaching the limit at which empirical approaches can predict chemical shifts.

  10. Changes in chemical composition of litter during decomposition: a review of published 13C NMR spectra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cepáková, Šárka; Frouz, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 3 (2015), s. 805-815 ISSN 0718-9516 Grant - others:GAJU(CZ) GAJU/04-146/2013P; GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/12/1288 Program:GA Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : 13C CPMAS NMR * litter decomposition * litter quality * soil organic matter Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science Impact factor: 1.600, year: 2015

  11. 71Ga Chemical Shielding and Quadrupole Coupling Tensors of the Garnet Y(3)Ga(5)O(12) from Single-Crystal (71)Ga NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vosegaard, Thomas; Massiot, Dominique; Gautier, Nathalie

    1997-01-01

    A single-crystal (71)Ga NMR study of the garnet Y(3)Ga(5)O(12) (YGG) has resulted in the determination of the first chemical shielding tensors reported for the (71)Ga quadrupole. The single-crystal spectra are analyzed in terms of the combined effect of quadrupole coupling and chemical shielding ...

  12. Chemical tagging of chlorinated phenols for their facile detection and analysis by NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdez, Carlos A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Leif, Roald N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-03-22

    A derivatization method that employs diethyl (bromodifluoromethyl) phosphonate (DBDFP) to efficiently tag the endocrine disruptor pentachlorophenol (PCP) and other chlorinated phenols (CPs) along with their reliable detection and analysis by NMR is presented. The method accomplishes the efficient alkylation of the hydroxyl group in CPs with the difluoromethyl (CF2H) moiety in extremely rapid fashion (5 min), at room temperature and in an environmentally benign manner. The approach proved successful in difluoromethylating a panel of 18 chlorinated phenols, yielding derivatives that displayed unique 1H, 19F NMR spectra allowing for the clear discrimination between isomerically related CPs. Due to its biphasic nature, the derivatization can be applied to both aqueous and organic mixtures where the analysis of CPs is required. Furthermore, the methodology demonstrates that PCP along with other CPs can be selectively derivatized in the presence of other various aliphatic alcohols, underscoring the superiority of the approach over other general derivatization methods that indiscriminately modify all analytes in a given sample. The present work demonstrates the first application of NMR on the qualitative analysis of these highly toxic and environmentally persistent species.

  13. Comparison of Chemical Compositions in Pseudostellariae Radix from Different Cultivated Fields and Germplasms by NMR-Based Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujiao Hua

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pseudostellariae Radix (PR is an important traditional Chinese medicine (TCM, which is consumed commonly for its positive health effects. However, the chemical differences of PR from different cultivated fields and germplasms are still unknown. In order to comprehensively compare the chemical compositions of PR from different cultivated fields, in this study, 1H-NMR-based metabolomics coupled with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC were used to investigate the different metabolites in PR from five germplasms (jr, zs1, zs2, sb, and xc cultivated in traditional fields (Jurong, Jiangsu, JSJR and cultivated fields (Zherong, Fujian, FJZR. A total of 34 metabolites were identified based on 1H-NMR data, and fourteen of them were found to be different in PR from JSJR and FJZR. The relative contents of alanine, lactate, lysine, taurine, sucrose, tyrosine, linolenic acid, γ-aminobutyrate, and hyperoside in PR from JSJR were higher than that in PR from FJZR, while PR from FJZR contained higher levels of glutamine, raffinose, xylose, unsaturated fatty acid, and formic acid. The contents of Heterophyllin A and Heterophyllin B were higher in PR from FJZR. This study will provide the basic information for exploring the influence law of ecological environment and germplasm genetic variation on metabolite biosynthesis of PR and its quality formation mechanism.

  14. Chemical effects in the stopping cross sections of protons in rare earth fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, J.; Pineda, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Stopping cross sections were measured for 0.5-0.7 MeV protons impinging on selected rare earth fluorides using energy differences of ions backscattered by thin films. The surface approximation was employed to determine the stopping cross sections. Consideration of chemical effects through the enthalpy of formation of the target compounds, as suggested by Bauer and Semrad (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 182 (2001) 62), allows a much better agreement with the electronic stopping predictions of the SRIM code, the Montenegro et al. universal formula and the tables by Janni

  15. Stereospecific assignment of the asparagine and glutamine sidechain amide protons in proteins from chemical shift analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harsch, Tobias; Schneider, Philipp; Kieninger, Bärbel; Donaubauer, Harald; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert, E-mail: hans-robert.kalbitzer@biologie.uni-regensburg.de [University of Regensburg, Institute of Biophysics and Physical Biochemistry and Centre of Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry and Biomedicine (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Side chain amide protons of asparagine and glutamine residues in random-coil peptides are characterized by large chemical shift differences and can be stereospecifically assigned on the basis of their chemical shift values only. The bimodal chemical shift distributions stored in the biological magnetic resonance data bank (BMRB) do not allow such an assignment. However, an analysis of the BMRB shows, that a substantial part of all stored stereospecific assignments is not correct. We show here that in most cases stereospecific assignment can also be done for folded proteins using an unbiased artificial chemical shift data base (UACSB). For a separation of the chemical shifts of the two amide resonance lines with differences ≥0.40 ppm for asparagine and differences ≥0.42 ppm for glutamine, the downfield shifted resonance lines can be assigned to H{sup δ21} and H{sup ε21}, respectively, at a confidence level >95%. A classifier derived from UASCB can also be used to correct the BMRB data. The program tool AssignmentChecker implemented in AUREMOL calculates the Bayesian probability for a given stereospecific assignment and automatically corrects the assignments for a given list of chemical shifts.

  16. Effect of solvent on proton location and dynamic behavior in short intramolecular hydrogen bonds studied by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Yukie, E-mail: mori.yukie@ocha.ac.jp; Masuda, Yuichi

    2015-09-08

    Highlights: • MD simulations were performed to study dynamics of strong hydrogen bonds. • Nuclear magnetic relaxation times of proton were measured in solution. • The hydrogen bond of dibenzoylmethane enol is asymmetric in methanol solution. • Formation or breakage of intermolecular hydrogen bonds can trigger proton transfer. • Dimethylsulfoxide may form a bifurcated hydrogen bond with a hydrogen-bonded system. - Abstract: Hydrogen phthalate anion has a short strong O–H–O hydrogen bond (H-bond). According to previous experimental studies, the H-bond is asymmetric and two tautomers are interconverted in aqueous solutions. In the present study, the effects of polar solvents on the H-bond in a zwitterionic hydrogen phthalate derivative 1 were investigated by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The analyses of the trajectories for the methanol solution showed that the H-bonding proton tends to be located closer to the carboxylate group that forms fewer intermolecular H-bonds, than to the other carboxylate group and that the intramolecular proton transfer in 1 is triggered by the breakage and/or formation of an intermolecular H-bond. The enol form of dibenzoylmethane (2) also has a short H-bond, and the OH bond is reported to be rather long (>1.1 Å) in the crystal. In the present study, the effects of the solvent on the H-bond in 2 were investigated by molecular orbital (MO) calculations, MD simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations for 2 in vacuum indicated that the barrier height for the intramolecular proton transfer is almost the same as the zero-point energy of the vibrational ground state, resulting in broad distribution of the proton density along the H-bond, owing to the nuclear quantum effect. The OH distances were determined in CCl{sub 4}, acetonitrile, and dimethylsulfoxide solutions from the magnetic dipolar interactions between the {sup 17

  17. Effect of solvent on proton location and dynamic behavior in short intramolecular hydrogen bonds studied by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Yukie; Masuda, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • MD simulations were performed to study dynamics of strong hydrogen bonds. • Nuclear magnetic relaxation times of proton were measured in solution. • The hydrogen bond of dibenzoylmethane enol is asymmetric in methanol solution. • Formation or breakage of intermolecular hydrogen bonds can trigger proton transfer. • Dimethylsulfoxide may form a bifurcated hydrogen bond with a hydrogen-bonded system. - Abstract: Hydrogen phthalate anion has a short strong O–H–O hydrogen bond (H-bond). According to previous experimental studies, the H-bond is asymmetric and two tautomers are interconverted in aqueous solutions. In the present study, the effects of polar solvents on the H-bond in a zwitterionic hydrogen phthalate derivative 1 were investigated by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The analyses of the trajectories for the methanol solution showed that the H-bonding proton tends to be located closer to the carboxylate group that forms fewer intermolecular H-bonds, than to the other carboxylate group and that the intramolecular proton transfer in 1 is triggered by the breakage and/or formation of an intermolecular H-bond. The enol form of dibenzoylmethane (2) also has a short H-bond, and the OH bond is reported to be rather long (>1.1 Å) in the crystal. In the present study, the effects of the solvent on the H-bond in 2 were investigated by molecular orbital (MO) calculations, MD simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations for 2 in vacuum indicated that the barrier height for the intramolecular proton transfer is almost the same as the zero-point energy of the vibrational ground state, resulting in broad distribution of the proton density along the H-bond, owing to the nuclear quantum effect. The OH distances were determined in CCl 4 , acetonitrile, and dimethylsulfoxide solutions from the magnetic dipolar interactions between the 17 O and 1

  18. Proton NMR study of the influence of heme vinyl groups on the formation of the isomeric forms of sulfmyoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatfield, M.J.; La Mar, G.N.; Balch, A.L.; Smith, K.M.; Parish, D.W.; LePage, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    The formation of sulfmyoglobin has been investigated for myoglobin reconstituted with hemins having vinyls replaced by hydrogens to determine the participation of the vinyl groups in the reaction processes. Green complexes are produced in all cases, proving that vinyls are not obligatory for the formation of sulfproteins. In the presence of the 4-vinyl group, the 1 H NMR spectra of the met-cyano derivatives indicate the formation of three green species; however, the most stable of these products is not formed in the absence of this group, confirming reaction of the 4-vinyl in this species. Two new red extractable sulfmyoglobin derivatives are formed in the absence of the 4-vinyl group. (Auth.)

  19. Intermolecular Interactions in Crystalline Theobromine as Reflected in Electron Deformation Density and (13)C NMR Chemical Shift Tensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzková, Kateřina; Babinský, Martin; Novosadová, Lucie; Marek, Radek

    2013-06-11

    An understanding of the role of intermolecular interactions in crystal formation is essential to control the generation of diverse crystalline forms which is an important concern for pharmaceutical industry. Very recently, we reported a new approach to interpret the relationships between intermolecular hydrogen bonding, redistribution of electron density in the system, and NMR chemical shifts (Babinský et al. J. Phys. Chem. A, 2013, 117, 497). Here, we employ this approach to characterize a full set of crystal interactions in a sample of anhydrous theobromine as reflected in (13)C NMR chemical shift tensors (CSTs). The important intermolecular contacts are identified by comparing the DFT-calculated NMR CSTs for an isolated theobromine molecule and for clusters composed of several molecules as selected from the available X-ray diffraction data. Furthermore, electron deformation density (EDD) and shielding deformation density (SDD) in the proximity of the nuclei involved in the proposed interactions are calculated and visualized. In addition to the recently reported observations for hydrogen bonding, we focus here particularly on the stacking interactions. Although the principal relations between the EDD and CST for hydrogen bonding (HB) and stacking interactions are similar, the real-space consequences are rather different. Whereas the C-H···X hydrogen bonding influences predominantly and significantly the in-plane principal component of the (13)C CST perpendicular to the HB path and the C═O···H hydrogen bonding modulates both in-plane components of the carbonyl (13)C CST, the stacking modulates the out-of-plane electron density resulting in weak deshielding (2-8 ppm) of both in-plane principal components of the CST and weak shielding (∼ 5 ppm) of the out-of-plane component. The hydrogen-bonding and stacking interactions may add to or subtract from one another to produce total values observed experimentally. On the example of theobromine, we demonstrate

  20. Progress in proton-detected solid-state NMR (SSNMR): Super-fast 2D SSNMR collection for nano-mole-scale proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Yoshitaka; Wickramasinghe, Ayesha; Matsuda, Isamu; Endo, Yuki; Ishii, Yuji; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Nemoto, Takahiro; Kamihara, Takayuki

    2018-01-01

    Proton-detected solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy has attracted much attention due to its excellent sensitivity and effectiveness in the analysis of trace amounts of amyloid proteins and other important biological systems. In this perspective article, we present the recent sensitivity limit of 1H-detected SSNMR using "ultra-fast" magic-angle spinning (MAS) at a spinning rate (νR) of 80-100 kHz. It was demonstrated that the high sensitivity of 1H-detected SSNMR at νR of 100 kHz and fast recycling using the paramagnetic-assisted condensed data collection (PACC) approach permitted "super-fast" collection of 1H-detected 2D protein SSNMR. A 1H-detected 2D 1H-15N correlation SSNMR spectrum for ∼27 nmol of a uniformly 13C- and 15N-labeled GB1 protein sample in microcrystalline form was acquired in only 9 s with 50% non-uniform sampling and short recycle delays of 100 ms. Additional data suggests that it is now feasible to detect as little as 1 nmol of the protein in 5.9 h by 1H-detected 2D 1H-15N SSNMR at a nominal signal-to-noise ratio of five. The demonstrated sensitivity is comparable to that of modern solution protein NMR. Moreover, this article summarizes the influence of ultra-fast MAS and 1H-detection on the spectral resolution and sensitivity of protein SSNMR. Recent progress in signal assignment and structural elucidation by 1H-detected protein SSNMR is outlined with both theoretical and experimental aspects.

  1. Evidence for an anisotropic contact shift. Proton NMR study of line shapes in uranocene and (C5H5)3UCl powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGarvey, B.R.; Nagy, S.

    1987-01-01

    The proton NMR spectra of solid powders of uranocene and (C 5 H 5 ) 3 UCl were measured from 90 to 298 K. The line shapes of both systems became increasingly anisotropic as the temperature was lowered. The cyclooctatetraene rings in uranocene were found to be rotating at a frequency greater than 100 kHz down to 90 K. The (C 5 H 5 ) 3 UCl molecules were found to be reorienting rapidly above 220 K, but below 140 K the NMR spectra were characteristic of a rigid lattice with no rotation of the cyclopentadienyl rings. The spectra of both compounds could be simulated by assuming an axial paramagnetic shift tensor and an orientation-dependent line width. Comparison of the experimental shift tensor with that calculated for a point dipolar interaction revealed a large and very anisotropic paramagnetic shift for uranocene due to unpaired spin transferred into the ligand orbitals. The shift was large when the magnetic field was along the 8-fold symmetry axis of the molecule and nearly zero perpendicular to the axis. It appears conclusive that the contact shift in uranocene is not isotropic at all. A similar anisotropy in the contact shift associated with the cyclopentadienyl rings is evident also in the results for (C 5 H 5 )UCl. The average solid-state shift of uranocene agreed with the solution shift, within experimental error, but the solid state shift of (C 5 H 5 ) 3 UCl was 42 ppm greater than the solution shift at 298 K, indicating a difference in molecular geometry between the crystalline state and solution. 32 references, 8 figures, 3 tables

  2. Quantum-chemical investigation of the 1,2-proton shift in protonated five-membered aromatic heterocycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abronin, I.A.; Gorb, L.G.; Litvinov, V.P.

    1985-01-01

    Calculations of the energetics of the 1,2-proton shift in protonated five-membered aromatic heterocycles - pyrrole, furan, and thiophene - have been carried out by the SCF MO LCAO method in the MINDO/3 approximation and nonempirically on the OST-3GF (OST-3GF) basis. The general features of this process, and also the influence of solvation and of taking into account the vacant d-AOs of the sulfur atom in the protonated form of thiophene on the results of the calculation are considered. The results obtained have been used for a discussion of the activity and selectivity of the heterocycles considered in aromatic electrophilic substitution reactions

  3. Elucidation of the substitution pattern of 9,10-anthraquinones through the chemical shifts of peri-hydroxyl protons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schripsema, Jan; Danigno, Denise

    1996-01-01

    In 9,10-anthraquinones the chemical shift of a peri-hydroxyl proton is affected by the substituents in the other benzenoid ring. These effects are additive. They are useful for the determination of substitution patterns and have been used to revise the structures of six previously reported...... anthraquinones containing methoxyl, hydroxyl, methylenedioxy and beta-methyl substituents. Because the chemical shifts of the other protons are hardly affected by substitutions in the other ring, the characteristic chemical shifts for a wide variety of substitution patterns could be derived....

  4. Chemical Composition and Seasonality of Aromatic Mediterranean Plant Species by NMR-Based Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Scognamiglio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An NMR-based metabolomic approach has been applied to analyse seven aromatic Mediterranean plant species used in traditional cuisine. Based on the ethnobotanical use of these plants, the approach has been employed in order to study the metabolic changes during different seasons. Primary and secondary metabolites have been detected and quantified. Flavonoids (apigenin, quercetin, and kaempferol derivatives and phenylpropanoid derivatives (e.g., chlorogenic and rosmarinic acid are the main identified polyphenols. The richness in these metabolites could explain the biological properties ascribed to these plant species.

  5. Chemical Composition and Seasonality of Aromatic Mediterranean Plant Species by NMR-Based Metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scognamiglio, Monica; D'Abrosca, Brigida; Esposito, Assunta; Fiorentino, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    An NMR-based metabolomic approach has been applied to analyse seven aromatic Mediterranean plant species used in traditional cuisine. Based on the ethnobotanical use of these plants, the approach has been employed in order to study the metabolic changes during different seasons. Primary and secondary metabolites have been detected and quantified. Flavonoids (apigenin, quercetin, and kaempferol derivatives) and phenylpropanoid derivatives (e.g., chlorogenic and rosmarinic acid) are the main identified polyphenols. The richness in these metabolites could explain the biological properties ascribed to these plant species.

  6. Pulse NMR-spectroscopy of structural changes of chemically modified polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gafarov, A.M.; Galibeev, S.S.; Kochnev, A.M.; Sukhanov, P.P.; Arkhireev, V.P.

    2004-01-01

    The structure of polypropylene compositions is studied by the method of pulse NMR-spectroscopy. The polypropylene compositions are derived by means of the modification by multicomponent systems. The analysis of relaxation times in a wide temperature range is carried out. Character of changes going on at a level of supermolecular structures is described. It is shown that the amplifications that manifest themselves under the polypropylene modification by the mixtures based on 2,4-tolyilendiisocyanate and e-caprolactam, are related to the change in the intermolecular interaction and formation of a more ordered polymer structure. (authors)

  7. 1H, 13C and 13N chemical shifts and 1H-15N and 13C-15N heteronuclear spin-spin coupling constants n the NMR spectra of 5-substituted furfural oximes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popelis, Yu.Yu.; Liepin'sh, E.E.; Lukevits, E.Ya.

    1986-01-01

    The 1 H, 13 C, and 15 N NMR spectra of 15 N-enriched 5-substituted furfural oximes were investigated. It was shown that the chemical shifts of the ring atoms and the oxime group correlate satisfactorily with the F and R substituent constants, whereas their sensitivity to the effect of the substituents is lower than in monosubstituted furan derivatives. The constants of spin-spin coupling between the ring protons and the oxime group were determined. An analysis of the 1 H- 1 H spin-spin coupling constants (SSCC) on the basis of their stereospecificity indicates that the E isomers have primarily an s-trans conformation in polar dimethyl sulfoxide, whereas the Z isomers, on the other hand, have an s-cis conformation. The signs of the direct and geminal 13 C- 15 N SSCC were determined for 5-trimethylsilylfurfural oxime

  8. A quantum chemical study of the mechanism for proton-coupled electron transfer leading to proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.; Siegbahn, Per E. M.

    2010-10-01

    The proton pumping mechanism in cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme in the respiratory chain, has been investigated using hybrid DFT with large chemical models. In previous studies, a gating mechanism was suggested based on electrostatic interpretations of kinetic experiments. The predictions from that analysis are tested here. The main result is that the suggestion of a positively charged transition state for proton transfer is confirmed, while some other suggestions for the gating are not supported. It is shown that a few critical relative energy values from the earlier studies are reproduced with quite high accuracy using the present model calculations. Examples are the forward barrier for proton transfer from the N-side of the membrane to the pump-loading site when the heme a cofactor is reduced, and the corresponding back leakage barrier when heme a is oxidised. An interesting new finding is an unexpected double-well potential for proton transfer from the N-side to the pump-loading site. In the intermediate between the two transition states found, the proton is bound to PropD on heme a. A possible purpose of this type of potential surface is suggested here. The accuracy of the present values are discussed in terms of their sensitivity to the choice of dielectric constant. Only one energy value, which is not critical for the present mechanism, varies significantly with this choice and is therefore less certain.

  9. Physical characteristics of chemically modified starch from potatoes, evaluated by X-ray diffraction, SEM and NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivolil; Perez, E.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the physical characteristics of chemically modified starch by cross-linking and methylation in order to observe the changes occurred in the molecule which could give it a positive and specific application. The physical characteristics were evaluated by morphometric analysis using analytical methods as scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and nuclear magnetic resonance in solid state. The results point for all the evaluated characteristics that the cross-linked starch from potato maintains a granular size and shape similar to native starch, through some granules were affected since they presented cracks and outlet of internal material; the introduction of phosphate groups in the molecule is evident in the NMR spectra: the methylated starch from potato changed in a drastic way the structure of granules since the size increased from 9 to 53 μm of the native starch to 44 to 181 μm for the methylated, the X-ray spectra shows a formation of crystals, banishing the characteristic standard type B, likewise with NMR a modification of starch was observed due to the presence of methyl groups. (Author)

  10. Temperature dependence of 1H NMR chemical shifts and its influence on estimated metabolite concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermter, Felizitas C; Mitschke, Nico; Bock, Christian; Dreher, Wolfgang

    2017-12-01

    Temperature dependent chemical shifts of important brain metabolites measured by localised 1 H MRS were investigated to test how the use of incorrect prior knowledge on chemical shifts impairs the quantification of metabolite concentrations. Phantom measurements on solutions containing 11 metabolites were performed on a 7 T scanner between 1 and 43 °C. The temperature dependence of the chemical shift differences was fitted by a linear model. Spectra were simulated for different temperatures and analysed by the AQSES program (jMRUI 5.2) using model functions with chemical shift values for 37 °C. Large differences in the temperature dependence of the chemical shift differences were determined with a maximum slope of about ±7.5 × 10 -4  ppm/K. For 32-40 °C, only minor quantification errors resulted from using incorrect chemical shifts, with the exception of Cr and PCr. For 1-10 °C considerable quantification errors occurred if the temperature dependence of the chemical shifts was neglected. If 1 H MRS measurements are not performed at 37 °C, for which the published chemical shift values have been determined, the temperature dependence of chemical shifts should be considered to avoid systematic quantification errors, particularly for measurements on animal models at lower temperatures.

  11. Chiral diamine-silver(I)-alkene complexes: a quantum chemical and NMR study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kieken, Elsa; Wiest, Olaf; Helquist, Paul

    2005-01-01

    explored by DFT methods. By successive substitution of the computational model complexes, it has been possible to elucidate the role of each amine substituent in achieving successful discrimination of alkenes. The conformational space has been fully explored using small model systems, allowing an unbiased......The ability of chiral diamine silver complexes to bind chiral and prochiral alkenes has been analyzed in detail. The stereoselectivity in binding of alkenes to a chiral ethanediamine silver complex has been investigated by NMR. The low-energy conformations of several small model complexes have been...... calculation of stereoselectivities that match well the experimental results. For a chiral allylic alcohol substrate, the correct stereoselectivity was obtained only when the structures were optimized with a continuum representation of the solvent. The discrepancy between gas phase and solution data is found...

  12. FTIR, FT-Raman, FT-NMR and quantum chemical investigations of 3-acetylcoumarin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V.; Sakiladevi, S.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.

    2013-05-01

    3-Acetylcoumarin (3AC) was synthesised by a Knoevenagel reaction. Conformational analysis using the B3LYP method was also carried out to determine the most stable conformation of the compound. FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of 3AC have been recorded in the range 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. 1H and 13C NMR spectra have also been recorded. The complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound were carried out using the experimental FTIR and FT-Raman data and quantum mechanical studies. The experimental vibrational frequencies were compared with the wavenumbers obtained theoretically from the DFT-B3LYP/B3PW91 gradient calculations employing the standard 6-31G**, high level 6-311++G** and cc-pVTZ basis sets for optimised geometry of the compound. The frontier molecular orbital energies of the compound are determined by DFT method.

  13. 1H and 13C NMR studies of palladium(2) and platinium(2) complexes with S-Methyl-L-Cysteine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allain, A.; Jezowska-Trzebiatowska, B.; Kozlowski, H.

    1979-01-01

    Our recent 1 H NMR studies on Pd(2)-S-Methyl-L-Cysteine(SMC) complexes have shown that the use of a conformational analysis to establish the complexed species existing in solution may provide clearer results than considering the proton chemical shift only. However, the use of the vicinal coupling constant of ABC spectrum of αCH-βCH 2 proton unit to estimate the rotational isomer fractions, may contain some ambiguity, especially on the proton assignment of the methylene group. For this reason 13 C NMR method has been applied to study these systems. (author)

  14. Single-Crystalline cooperite (PtS): Crystal-Chemical characterization, ESR spectroscopy, and {sup 195}Pt NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozhdestvina, V. I., E-mail: veronika@ascnet.ru; Ivanov, A. V.; Zaremba, M. A. [Far East Division, Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Geology and Nature Management (Russian Federation); Antsutkin, O. N.; Forsling, W. [Lulea University of Technology (Sweden)

    2008-05-15

    Single-crystalline cooperite (PtS) with a nearly stoichiometric composition was characterized in detail by X-ray diffraction, electron-probe X-ray microanalysis, and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. For the first time it was demonstrated that {sup 195}Pt static and MAS NMR spectroscopy can be used for studying natural platinum minerals. The {sup 195}Pt chemical-shift tensor of cooperite was found to be consistent with the axial symmetry and is characterized by the following principal values: {delta}{sub xx} = -5920 ppm, {delta}{sub yy} = -3734 ppm, {delta}{sub zz} = +4023 ppm, and {delta}{sub iso} = -1850 ppm. According to the ESR data, the samples of cooperite contain copper(II), which is adsorbed on the surface during the layer-by-layer crystal growth and is not involved in the crystal lattice.

  15. Synthesis of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) copolymers and its chemical characterization by NMR and FTIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erbetta, Cynthia D.C.; Viegas, Carla C.B.; Freitas, Roberto F.S.; Sousa, Ricardo G.

    2011-01-01

    Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) copolymer is of great interest for medical applications. This interest is justified by the fact that it is bioreabsorbable, biocompatible and non-toxic, while its degradation kinetics can be modified by the copolymerization ratio of the monomers. In this study, copolymers were synthesized at 175 deg C by opening the rings of the cyclic dimers of the D,L-lactide and glycolide monomers in the presence of stannous octoate initiator and lauryl alcohol co-initiator. The efficient application of a vacuum to the reaction medium, coupled with adequate stirring, is fundamental for the success of the synthesis. The following analysis techniques were used to characterize the synthesized copolymers: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (NMR) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The chemical composition and the ratio of the monomers in the synthesized copolymer were determined. (author)

  16. Indirectly detected chemical shift correlation NMR spectroscopy in solids under fast magic angle spinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Kanmi [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The development of fast magic angle spinning (MAS) opened up an opportunity for the indirect detection of insensitive low-γ nuclei (e.g., 13C and 15N) via the sensitive high-{gamma} nuclei (e.g., 1H and 19F) in solid-state NMR, with advanced sensitivity and resolution. In this thesis, new methodology utilizing fast MAS is presented, including through-bond indirectly detected heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectroscopy, which is assisted by multiple RF pulse sequences for 1H-1H homonuclear decoupling. Also presented is a simple new strategy for optimization of 1H-1H homonuclear decoupling. As applications, various classes of materials, such as catalytic nanoscale materials, biomolecules, and organic complexes, are studied by combining indirect detection and other one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR techniques. Indirectly detected through-bond HETCOR spectroscopy utilizing refocused INEPT (INEPTR) mixing was developed under fast MAS (Chapter 2). The time performance of this approach in 1H detected 2D 1H{l_brace}13C{r_brace} spectra was significantly improved, by a factor of almost 10, compared to the traditional 13C detected experiments, as demonstrated by measuring naturally abundant organic-inorganic mesoporous hybrid materials. The through-bond scheme was demonstrated as a new analytical tool, which provides complementary structural information in solid-state systems in addition to through-space correlation. To further benefit the sensitivity of the INEPT transfer in rigid solids, the combined rotation and multiple-pulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS) was implemented for homonuclear 1H decoupling under fast MAS (Chapter 3). Several decoupling schemes (PMLG5m$\\bar{x}$, PMLG5mm$\\bar{x}$x and SAM3) were analyzed to maximize the performance of through-bond transfer based

  17. An easily sintered, chemically stable, barium zirconate-based proton conductor for high-performance proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Wenping

    2014-07-25

    Yttrium and indium co-doped barium zirconate is investigated to develop a chemically stable and sintering active proton conductor for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). BaZr0.8Y0.2-xInxO3- δ possesses a pure cubic perovskite structure. The sintering activity of BaZr0.8Y0.2-xInxO3- δ increases significantly with In concentration. BaZr0.8Y0.15In0.05O3- δ (BZYI5) exhibits the highest total electrical conductivity among the sintered oxides. BZYI5 also retains high chemical stability against CO2, vapor, and reduction of H2. The good sintering activity, high conductivity, and chemical stability of BZYI5 facilitate the fabrication of durable SOFCs based on a highly conductive BZYI5 electrolyte film by cost-effective ceramic processes. Fully dense BZYI5 electrolyte film is successfully prepared on the anode substrate by a facile drop-coating technique followed by co-firing at 1400 °C for 5 h in air. The BZYI5 film exhibits one of the highest conductivity among the BaZrO3-based electrolyte films with various sintering aids. BZYI5-based single cells output very encouraging and by far the highest peak power density for BaZrO3-based proton-conducting SOFCs, reaching as high as 379 mW cm-2 at 700 °C. The results demonstrate that Y and In co-doping is an effective strategy for exploring sintering active and chemically stable BaZrO3-based proton conductors for high performance proton-conducting SOFCs. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Characterizing Slow Chemical Exchange in Nucleic Acids by Carbon CEST and Low Spin-Lock Field R1ρ NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Hansen, Alexandar L.; Zhang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative characterization of dynamic exchange between various conformational states provides essential insights into the molecular basis of many regulatory RNA functions. Here, we present an application of nucleic-acid-optimized carbon chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and low spin-lock field R1ρ relaxation dispersion (RD) NMR experiments in characterizing slow chemical exchange in nucleic acids that is otherwise difficult if not impossible to be quantified by the ZZ-exchange NMR experiment. We demonstrated the application on a 47-nucleotide fluoride riboswitch in the ligand-free state, for which CEST and R1ρ RD profiles of base and sugar carbons revealed slow exchange dynamics involving a sparsely populated (p ~ 10%) and shortly lived (τ ~ 10 ms) NMR “invisible” state. The utility of CEST and low spin-lock field R1ρ RD experiments in studying slow exchange was further validated in characterizing an exchange as slow as ~60 s−1. PMID:24299272

  19. Characterizing slow chemical exchange in nucleic acids by carbon CEST and low spin-lock field R(1ρ) NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Hansen, Alexandar L; Zhang, Qi

    2014-01-08

    Quantitative characterization of dynamic exchange between various conformational states provides essential insights into the molecular basis of many regulatory RNA functions. Here, we present an application of nucleic-acid-optimized carbon chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and low spin-lock field R(1ρ) relaxation dispersion (RD) NMR experiments in characterizing slow chemical exchange in nucleic acids that is otherwise difficult if not impossible to be quantified by the ZZ-exchange NMR experiment. We demonstrated the application on a 47-nucleotide fluoride riboswitch in the ligand-free state, for which CEST and R(1ρ) RD profiles of base and sugar carbons revealed slow exchange dynamics involving a sparsely populated (p ~ 10%) and shortly lived (τ ~ 10 ms) NMR "invisible" state. The utility of CEST and low spin-lock field R(1ρ) RD experiments in studying slow exchange was further validated in characterizing an exchange as slow as ~60 s(-1).

  20. Nano-scale chemical evolution in a proton-and neutron-irradiated Zr alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harte, Allan, E-mail: allan.harte@manchester.ac.uk [The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Topping, M.; Frankel, P. [The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Jädernäs, D. [Studsvik Nuclear AB, SE 611 82, Nyköping (Sweden); Romero, J. [Westinghouse Electric Company, Columbia, SC (United States); Hallstadius, L. [Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, SE 72163 Västerås (Sweden); Darby, E.C. [Rolls Royce Plc., Nuclear Materials, Derby (United Kingdom); Preuss, M. [The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    Proton-and neutron-irradiated Zircaloy-2 are compared in terms of the nano-scale chemical evolution within second phase particles (SPPs) Zr(Fe,Cr){sub 2} and Zr{sub 2}(Fe,Ni). This is accomplished through ultra-high spatial resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and the use of energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic methods. Fe-depletion is observed from both SPP types after irradiation with both irradiative species, but is heterogeneous in the case of Zr(Fe,Cr){sub 2}, predominantly from the edge region, and homogeneously in the case of Zr{sub 2}(Fe,Ni). Further, there is evidence of a delay in the dissolution of the Zr{sub 2}(Fe,Ni) SPP with respect to the Zr(Fe,Cr){sub 2}. As such, SPP dissolution results in matrix supersaturation with solute under both irradiative species and proton irradiation is considered well suited to emulate the effects of neutron irradiation in this context. The mechanisms of solute redistribution processes from SPPs and the consequences for irradiation-induced growth phenomena are discussed. - Highlights: •Protons emulate the effects of neutron irradiation in the evolution of chemistry and morphology of second phase particles. •Detailed energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy reveals heterogeneity in Zr-Fe-Cr SPPs both before and after irradiation. •Zr-Fe-Ni SPPs are delayed in irradiation-induced dissolution due to their better self-solubility with respect to Zr-Fe-Cr.

  1. Chemical characterization of materials relevant to nuclear technology using neutron and proton based nuclear analytical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, R.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear analytical techniques (NATs), utilizing neutron and proton based nuclear reactions and subsequent measurement of gamma rays, are capable of chemical characterization of various materials at major to trace concentration levels. The present article deals with the recent developments and applications of conventional and k0-based internal monostandard (i) neutron activation analysis (NAA) and (ii) prompt gamma ray NAA (PGNAA) methods as well as (iii) in situ current normalized particle induced gamma ray emission (PIGE). The materials that have been analyzed by NAA and PGNAA include (i) nuclear reactor structural materials like zircaloys, stainless steels, Ni alloys, high purity aluminium and graphite and (ii) uranium oxide, U-Th mixed oxides, uranium ores and minerals. Internal monostandard NAA (IM-NAA) method with in situ detection efficiency was used to analyze large and non-standard geometry samples and standard-less compositional characterization was carried out for zircaloys and stainless steels. PIGE methods using proton beams were standardized for quantification of low Z elements (Li to Ti) and applied for compositional analysis of borosilicate glass and lithium titanate (Li 2 TiO 3 ) samples and quantification of total B and its isotopic composition of B ( 10 B/ 11 B) in boron based neutron absorbers like B 4 C. (author)

  2. Humidity independent mass spectrometry for gas phase chemical analysis via ambient proton transfer reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; Huang, Guangming

    2015-03-31

    In this work, a humidity independent mass spectrometric method was developed for rapid analysis of gas phase chemicals. This method is based upon ambient proton transfer reaction between gas phase chemicals and charged water droplets, in a reaction chamber with nearly saturate humidity under atmospheric pressure. The humidity independent nature enables direct and rapid analysis of raw gas phase samples, avoiding time- and sample-consuming sample pretreatments in conventional mass spectrometry methods to control sample humidity. Acetone, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene were used to evaluate the analytical performance of present method. The limits of detection for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene are in the range of ∼0.1 to ∼0.3 ppbV; that of benzene is well below the present European Union permissible exposure limit for benzene vapor (5 μg m(-3), ∼1.44 ppbV), with linear ranges of approximately two orders of magnitude. The majority of the homemade device contains a stainless steel tube as reaction chamber and an ultrasonic humidifier as the source of charged water droplets, which makes this cheap device easy to assemble and facile to operate. In addition, potential application of this method was illustrated by the real time identification of raw gas phase chemicals released from plants at different physiological stages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. High-Frequency C-13 and Si-29 NMR Chemical Shifts in Diamagnetic Low-Valence Compounds of TII and Pb-II: Decisive Role of Relativistic Effects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vícha, J.; Marek, R.; Straka, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2016), s. 1770-1781 ISSN 0020-1669 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03564S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : high-frequency NMR chemical shifts * HALA effect * relativistic DFT calculations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.857, year: 2016

  4. Influence of stacking interactions on NMR chemical shielding tensors in benzene and formamide homodimers as studied by HF, DFT and MP2 calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Czernek, Jiří

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 19 (2003), s. 3952-3959 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB4050311 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : NMR * chemical shielding tensor * ab initio Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.792, year: 2003

  5. Exploring the Structure of a DNA Hairpin with the Help of NMR Spin-Spin Coupling Constants: An Experimental and Quantum Chemical Investigation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sychrovský, Vladimír; Vacek, Jaroslav; Hobza, Pavel; Žídek, L.; Sklenář, V.; Cremer, D.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 106, - (2002), s. 10242-10250 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : DNA * help of NMR spin-spin coupling constants * quantum chemical investigation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.765, year: 2002

  6. Chemical structure changes in coals after low-temperature oxidation and demineralization by acid treatment as revealed by high resolution solid state 13C NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tekely, P.; Nicole, D.; Delpuech, J.-J.; Totino, E.; Muller, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    13 C CP/MAS NMR has been used for characterization of chemical structure changes in coals after low-temperature oxidation and prolonged demineralization by acid treatment. In both cases the changes take place mainly in the aliphatic part of coal molecules. 21 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  7. A complete set of NMR chemical shifts and spin-spin coupling constants for L-Alanyl-L-Alanine zwitterion and analysis of its conformational behavior

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bouř, Petr; Buděšínský, Miloš; Špirko, Vladimír; Kapitán, Josef; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Sychrovský, Vladimír

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 127, - (2005), 17079-17089 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4055104; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0388 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : NMR * chemical shifts * coupling constants Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 7.419, year: 2005

  8. [Monitoring of chemical components with different color traits of Tussilago farfara using NMR-based metabolomics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Xi; Li, Zhen-yu; Qin, Xue-mei; Zhang, Li-zeng

    2013-11-01

    The quality and grade of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs were assessed by their characteristics traditionally. According to traditional experience, the quality of the purple Flos Farfarae is better than that of yellow buds. NMR-based metabolomic approach combined with significant analysis of microarray (SAM) and Spearman rank correlation analysis were used to investigate the different metabolites of the Flos Farfarae with different color feature. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed clear distinction between the purple and yellow flower buds of Tussilago farfara. The S-plot of orthogonal PLS-DA (OPLS-DA) and t test revealed that the levels of threonine, proline, phosphatidylcholine, creatinine, 4, 5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, rutin, caffeic acid, kaempferol analogues, and tussilagone were higher in the purple flower buds than that in the yellow buds, in agreement with the results of SAM and Spearman rank correlation analysis. The results confirmed the traditional medication experience that "purple flower bud is better than the yellow ones", and provide a scientific basis for assessing the quality of Flos Farfarae by the color features.

  9. FTIR, FT-Raman, FT-NMR and quantum chemical investigations of 3-acetylcoumarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Sakiladevi, S; Marchewka, M K; Mohan, S

    2013-05-15

    3-Acetylcoumarin (3AC) was synthesised by a Knoevenagel reaction. Conformational analysis using the B3LYP method was also carried out to determine the most stable conformation of the compound. FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of 3AC have been recorded in the range 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm(-1), respectively. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra have also been recorded. The complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound were carried out using the experimental FTIR and FT-Raman data and quantum mechanical studies. The experimental vibrational frequencies were compared with the wavenumbers obtained theoretically from the DFT-B3LYP/B3PW91 gradient calculations employing the standard 6-31G(**), high level 6-311++G(**) and cc-pVTZ basis sets for optimised geometry of the compound. The frontier molecular orbital energies of the compound are determined by DFT method. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Proton-sensing transistor systems for detecting ion leakage from plasma membranes under chemical stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Yuki; Goda, Tatsuro; Schaffhauser, Daniel F; Okada, Jun-Ichi; Matsumoto, Akira; Miyahara, Yuji

    2017-03-01

    The membrane integrity of live cells is routinely evaluated for cytotoxicity induced by chemical or physical stimuli. Recent progress in bioengineering means that high-quality toxicity validation is required. Here, we report a pH-sensitive transistor system developed for the continuous monitoring of ion leakage from cell membranes upon challenge by toxic compounds. Temporal changes in pH were generated with high reproducibility via periodic flushing of HepG2 cells on a gate insulator of a proton-sensitive field-effect transistor with isotonic buffer solutions with/without NH 4 Cl. The pH transients at the point of NH 4 Cl addition/withdrawal originated from the free permeation of NH 3 across the semi-permeable plasma membranes, and the proton sponge effect produced by the ammonia equilibrium. Irreversible attenuation of the pH transient was observed when the cells were subjected to a membrane-toxic reagent. Experiments and simulations proved that the decrease in the pH transient was proportional to the area of the ion-permeable pores on the damaged plasma membranes. The pH signal was correlated with the degree of hemolysis produced by the model reagents. The pH assay was sensitive to the formation of molecularly sized pores that were otherwise not measurable via detection of the leakage of hemoglobin, because the hydrodynamic radius of hemoglobin was greater than 3.1nm in the hemolysis assay. The pH transient was not disturbed by inherent ion-transporter activity. The ISFET assay was applied to a wide variety of cell types. The system presented here is fast, sensitive, practical and scalable, and will be useful for validating cytotoxins and nanomaterials. The plasma membrane toxicity and hemolysis are widely and routinely evaluated in biomaterials science and biomedical engineering. Despite the recent development of a variety of methods/materials for efficient gene/drug delivery systems to the cytosol, the methodologies for safety validation remain unchanged in

  11. Resolution of NMR chemical shift images into real and imaginary components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, E.; Kohno, H.

    1986-01-01

    Fast chemical shift imaging of two-line materials is described using a modified spin-echo sequence. The method resolves the two chemical shift images into real and imaginary components representing the reconstructed image. The measuring time is reduced to half of that for the conventional method proposed by Dixon et al, and quantitative evaluation of the images becomes possible. Reference material with a single resonant line is used to eliminate the phase error caused by static field inhomogeneity and the inherent apparatus offset phase. Experiments are conducted using acetone and benzene with a medium-bore superconductive magnet operating at 0.5T. From these experiments, two chemical shift images are obtained. These images are then superimposed to produce a conventional density image. (author)

  12. Determination of trace amounts of chemical warfare agent degradation products in decontamination solutions with NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, Harri; Rapinoja, Marja-Leena; Kuitunen, Marja-Leena; Vanninen, Paula

    2007-12-01

    Decontamination solutions are used for an efficient detoxification of chemical warfare agents (CWAs). As these solutions can be composed of strong alkaline chemicals with hydrolyzing and oxidizing properties, the analysis of CWA degradation products in trace levels from these solutions imposes a challenge for any analytical technique. Here, we present results of application of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for analysis of trace amounts of CWA degradation products in several untreated decontamination solutions. Degradation products of the nerve agents sarin, soman, and VX were selectively monitored with substantially reduced interference of background signals by 1D 1H-31P heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) spectrometry. The detection limit of the chemicals was at the low part-per-million level (2-10 microg/mL) in all studied solutions. In addition, the concentration of the degradation products was obtained with sufficient confidence with external standards.

  13. NMR structure calculation for all small molecule ligands and non-standard residues from the PDB Chemical Component Dictionary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Emel Maden; Güntert, Peter, E-mail: guentert@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    An algorithm, CYLIB, is presented for converting molecular topology descriptions from the PDB Chemical Component Dictionary into CYANA residue library entries. The CYANA structure calculation algorithm uses torsion angle molecular dynamics for the efficient computation of three-dimensional structures from NMR-derived restraints. For this, the molecules have to be represented in torsion angle space with rotations around covalent single bonds as the only degrees of freedom. The molecule must be given a tree structure of torsion angles connecting rigid units composed of one or several atoms with fixed relative positions. Setting up CYANA residue library entries therefore involves, besides straightforward format conversion, the non-trivial step of defining a suitable tree structure of torsion angles, and to re-order the atoms in a way that is compatible with this tree structure. This can be done manually for small numbers of ligands but the process is time-consuming and error-prone. An automated method is necessary in order to handle the large number of different potential ligand molecules to be studied in drug design projects. Here, we present an algorithm for this purpose, and show that CYANA structure calculations can be performed with almost all small molecule ligands and non-standard amino acid residues in the PDB Chemical Component Dictionary.

  14. Ab Initio Calculations of 31P NMR Chemical Shielding Anisotropy Tensors in Phosphates: Variations Due to Ring Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd M. Alam

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Ring formation in phosphate systems is expected to influence both the magnitude and orientation of the phosphorus (31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR chemical shielding anisotropy (CSA tensor. Ab initio calculations of the 31P CSA tensor in both cyclic and acyclic phosphate clusters were performed as a function of the number of phosphate tetrahedral in the system. The calculation of the 31P CSA tensors employed the GAUSSIAN 98 implementation of the gauge-including atomic orbital (GIAO method at the Hartree-Fock (HF level. It is shown that both the 31P CSA tensor anisotropy, and the isotropic chemical shielding can be used for the identification of cyclic phosphates. The differences between the 31P CSA tensor in acyclic and cyclic phosphate systems become less pronounced with increasing number of phosphate groups within the ring. The orientation of the principal components for the 31P CSA tensor shows some variation due to cyclization, most notably with the smaller, highly strained ring systems.

  15. Other compounds isolated from Simira glaziovii and the {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift assignments of new 1-epi-castanopsol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Marcelo F. de; Vieira, Ivo J. Curcino [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, Seropedica, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Braz-Filho, Raimundo [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacases, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas. Lab. de Ciencias Quimicas; Carvalho, Mario G. de, E-mail: mgeraldo@ufrrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (NPPN/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias da Saude. Nucleo de Pesquisa em Produtos Naturais

    2012-07-01

    A new triterpene, 1-epi-castanopsol, besides eleven known compounds: sitosterol, stigmasterol, campesterol, lupeol, lupenone, simirane B, syringaresinol, scopoletin, isofraxidin, 6,7,8-trimethoxycoumarin and harman, were isolated from the wood of Simira glaziovii. The structures of the known compounds were defined by 1D, 2D {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C NMR spectra data analyses and comparison with literature data. The detailed spectral data analyses allowed the definition of the structure of the new 1-epi isomer of castanopsol and performance of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift assignments. (author)

  16. Other compounds isolated from Simira glaziovii and the 1H and 13C NMR chemical shift assignments of new 1-epi-castanopsol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Marcelo F. de; Vieira, Ivo J. Curcino; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; Carvalho, Mario G. de

    2012-01-01

    A new triterpene, 1-epi-castanopsol, besides eleven known compounds: sitosterol, stigmasterol, campesterol, lupeol, lupenone, simirane B, syringaresinol, scopoletin, isofraxidin, 6,7,8-trimethoxycoumarin and harman, were isolated from the wood of Simira glaziovii. The structures of the known compounds were defined by 1D, 2D 1 H, 13 C NMR spectra data analyses and comparison with literature data. The detailed spectral data analyses allowed the definition of the structure of the new 1-epi isomer of castanopsol and performance of 1 H and 13 C NMR chemical shift assignments. (author)

  17. Skeletal and chlorine effects on 13C-NMR chemical shifts of chlorinated polycyclic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa V.E.U.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to establish a comparative analysis of chemical shifts caused by ring compression effects or by the presence of a chlorine atom on strained chlorinated carbons, a series of the chlorinated and dechlorinated polycyclic structures derived from "aldrin" (5 and "isodrin" (14 was studied. Compounds were classified in four different groups, according to their conformation and number of ring such as: endo-exo and endo-endo tetracyclics, pentacyclics and hexacyclics. The 13C chemical shift comparison between the chlorinated and dechlorinated compounds showed that when C-9 and C-10 are olefinic carbons, it occurs a shielding of 0.5-2.4 ppm for endo-endo tetracyclics and of 4.7-7.6 ppm for endo-exo tetracyclic. The chemical shift variation for C-11 reaches 49-53 ppm for endo-exo and endo-endo tetracyclics, 54 ppm for pentacyclic and 56-59 ppm for hexacyclic compounds. From these data, it was possible to observe the influence of ring compression on the chemical shifts.

  18. A chemically stable electrolyte with a novel sandwiched structure for proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs)

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei; Traversa, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    A chemically stable electrolyte structure was developed for proton-conducting SOFCs by using two layers of stable BaZr0.7Pr 0.1Y0.2O3 -δ to sandwich a highly-conductive but unstable BaCe0.8Y0.2O 3 -δ electrolyte layer. The sandwiched electrolyte

  19. Reversible solid oxide fuel cells (R-SOFCs) with chemically stable proton-conducting oxides

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei; Boulfrad, Samir; Traversa, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Proton-conducting oxides offer a promising way of lowering the working temperature of solid oxide cells to the intermediate temperate range (500 to 700. °C) due to their better ionic conductivity. In addition, the application of proton

  20. NMR mechanisms in gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, L J

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance was critical to the development of gel dosimetry, as it established the potential for three dimensional dosimetry with chemical dosimeter systems through magnetic resonance imaging [1]. In the last two decades MRI has served as the gold standard for imaging, while NMR relaxometry has played an important role in the development and understanding of the behaviour of new gel dosimetry systems. Therefore, an appreciation of the relaxation mechanisms determining the NMR behaviour of irradiated gel dosimeters is important for a full comprehension of a considerable component of the literature on gel dosimetry. A number of excellent papers have presented this important theory, this brief review will highlight some of the salient points made previously [1-5]. The spin relaxation of gel dosimeters (which determines the dose dependence in most conventional MR imaging) is determined principally by the protons on water molecules in the system. These water protons exist in different environments, or groups (see Figure 1): on bulk water, on water hydrating the chemical species that are being modified under irradiation, and on water hydrating the gel matrix used to spatially stabilize the dosimeter (e.g., gelatin, agarose, etc). The spin relaxation depends on the inherent relaxation rate of each spin group, that is, on the relaxation rate which would be observed for the specific group if it were isolated. Also, the different water environments are not isolated from each other, and the observed relaxation rate also depends on the rate of exchange of magnetization between the groups, and on the fraction of protons in each group. In fact, the water exchanges quickly between the environments, so that relaxation is in what is usually termed the fast exchange regime. In the limit of fast exchange, the relaxation of the water protons is well characterized by a single exponential and hence by a single apparent relaxation rate. In irradiated gel dosimeters this

  1. Chemical Shifts of the Carbohydrate Binding Domain of Galectin-3 from Magic Angle Spinning NMR and Hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Jodi; Gupta, Rupal; Yehl, Jenna; Lu, Manman; Case, David A; Gronenborn, Angela M; Akke, Mikael; Polenova, Tatyana

    2018-03-22

    Magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy is uniquely suited to probe the structure and dynamics of insoluble proteins and protein assemblies at atomic resolution, with NMR chemical shifts containing rich information about biomolecular structure. Access to this information, however, is problematic, since accurate quantum mechanical calculation of chemical shifts in proteins remains challenging, particularly for 15 N H . Here we report on isotropic chemical shift predictions for the carbohydrate recognition domain of microcrystalline galectin-3, obtained from using hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations, implemented using an automated fragmentation approach, and using very high resolution (0.86 Å lactose-bound and 1.25 Å apo form) X-ray crystal structures. The resolution of the X-ray crystal structure used as an input into the AF-NMR program did not affect the accuracy of the chemical shift calculations to any significant extent. Excellent agreement between experimental and computed shifts is obtained for 13 C α , while larger scatter is observed for 15 N H chemical shifts, which are influenced to a greater extent by electrostatic interactions, hydrogen bonding, and solvation.

  2. Proton magnetic resonance chemical shift imaging (1H CSI)-directed stereotactic biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, B.-C.; Kim, B.-C.; Kang, J.-K.; Choi, B.-G.; Kim, E.-N.; Baik, H.-M.; Choe, B.-Y.; Naruse, S.

    2001-01-01

    Introduction. To add metabolic information during stereotactic biopsy target selection, the authors adopted proton chemical shift imaging ( 1 H CSI)-directed stereotactic biopsy. Currently, proton single voxel spectroscopy (SVS) technique has been reported in stereotactic biopsy. We performed 1 H CSI in combination with a stereotactic headframe and selected targets according to local metabolic information, and evaluated the pathological results. Patients and Method. The 1 H CSI-directed stereotactic biopsy was performed in four patients. 1 H CSI and conventional Gd-enhancement stereotactic MRI were performed simultaneously after the fitting of a stereotactic frame. After reconstructing the metabolic maps of N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/phosphocreatine (Cr), phosphocholine (Cho)/Cr, and Lactate/Cr ratios, focal areas of increased Cho/Cr ratio and Lac/Cr ratios were selected as target sites in the stereotactic MR images. Result. 1 H CSI is possible with the stereotactic headframe in place. No difficulty was experienced performing 1 H CSI or making a diagnosis. Pathological samples taken from areas of increased Cho/Cr ratios and decreased NAA/Cr ratios provided information upon increased cellularity, mitoses and cellular atypism, and facilitated diagnosis. Pathological samples taken from areas of increased Lac/ Cr ratio snowed predominant feature of necrosis. Conclusion. 1 H CSI was feasible with the stereotactic headframe in place. The final pathological results obtained were concordant with the local metabolic information from 1 H CSI. We believe that 1 H CSI-directed stereotactic biopsy has the potential to significantly improve the accuracy of stereotactic biopsy targeting. (author)

  3. Protolytic properties of polyamine wasp toxin analogues studied by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Piazzi, Lorna; Olsen, Christian A

    2006-01-01

    Acid-base properties of the natural polyamine wasp toxin PhTX-433 (1) and seven synthetic analogues [PhTX-343 (2), PhTX-334 (3), PhTX-443 (4), PhTX-434 (5), PhTX-344 (6), PhTX-444 (7), and PhTX-333 (8)], each having four protolytic sites, were characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy. Nonlinear......, multiparameter, simultaneous fit of all chemical shift data obtained from the NMR titration curves yielded macroscopic pKa values as well as intrinsic chemical shift data of all differently protonated macrospecies. Analyses of the chemical shift data demonstrated strong interactions between all four sites...

  4. Multivariate analysis of fingerprinting of majority secondary metabolites of propolis of Costa Rica using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umana Rojas, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Propolis is produced by Apis mellifera bees from resins of plants that are found around the apiary. The chemical composition is highly variable and Costa Rica has reported without studies of characterization to define the types of propolis in the country. 119 samples were collected from beekeeping areas of the country. The spectrum of 1 H-NMR and its antioxidant activity against DPPH radical were measured. The spectra have been divided into 243 blocks of 0,04 ppm and processed with the Minitab software for multivariate analysis. 99 of the samples collected were used for construction of models for the valuation of the predictive ability of the model have been used coefficients of determination (R 2 ) of prediction by the software and the remaining 20 samples. The existence of three types of propolis with chemically different metabolomes were determined by principal component analysis (PCA). A prediction model was constructed by analysis of partial least squares (PLS). The prediction model has allowed to classify a propolis according to the level of anti-oxidant activity (AAO), high (type I and II) or low (type III) from the spectrum of 1 H-NMR. The R 2 has been 0.88 and R 2 prediction of 0, 718 for new samples. The n-coniferyl benzoate of group I and nemorosone of the group II as two discriminated antioxidants among the groups I and II were isolated and high concentration levels of these compounds have been differentiated with respect to type III. This has allowed the construction of a linear discriminant model with a success rate of 100% for the samples used for formulation and 92,9 for the prediction of different samples. The classification systems could be applied to the standardization of the quality of propolis from Costa Rica for future medicinal or cosmetic applications that take advantage of its antioxidant properties. Also, the methylated derivative has isolated and identified of the n-coniferyl benzoate thereof propolis than was obtained his counterpart

  5. Calculation of NMR chemical shifts. 7. Gauge-invariant INDO method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, H.; Miura, K.; Hirai, A.

    A gauge-invariant INDO method based on the coupled Hartree-Fuck perturbation theory is presented and applied to the calculation of 1H and 13C chemical shifts of hydrocarbons including ring compounds. Invariance of the diamagnetic and paramagnetic shieldings with respect to displacement of the coordinate origin is discussed. Comparison between calculated and experimental results exhibits fairly good agreement, provided that the INDO parameters of Ellis et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc.94, 4069 (1972)) are used with the inclusion of all multicenter one-electron integrals.

  6. Proton and deuterium NMR experiments in zero field. [Perdeuterated p-demethoxybenzene, perdeuterated malonic acid, diethyl terephthalate-d4, nonadecane-2,2'-D2, sodium propionate-D2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millar, J.M.

    1986-02-01

    High field solid-state NMR lineshapes suffer from inhomogeneous broadening since resonance frequencies are a function of molecular orientation. Time domain zero field NMR is a two-dimensional field-cycling technique which removes this broadening by probing the evolution of the spin system under zero applied field. The simplest version, the sudden transition experiment, induces zero field evolution by the sudden removal of the applied magnetic field. Theory and experimental results of this experiment and several variations using pulsed dc magnetic fuelds to initiate zero field evolution are presented. In particular, the pulsed indirect detection method allows detection of the zero field spectrum of one nuclear spin species via another (usually protons) by utilizing the level crossings which occur upon adiabatic demagnetization to zero field. Experimental examples of proton/deuteron systems are presented which demonstrate the method results in enhanced sensitivity relative to that obtained in sudden transition experiments performed directly on deuterium. High resolution /sup 2/H NQR spectra of a series of benzoic acid derivatives are obtained using the sudden transition and indirect detection methods. Librational oscillations in the water molecules of barium chlorate monohydrate are studied using proton and deuterium ZF experiments. 177 refs., 88 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Correlations of the chemical shift on fasly rotating biological solids by means of NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The basic aim of the thesis was the development and improvement of homo- and heteronuclear feedback sequences for the generation of correlation spectra of the chemical shift. In a first step the possibility of the acquisition of 13 C- 13 correlation spectra of the chemical shift by means of inversion pulses with low RF power factor was studied. Furthermore it was shown that broad-band phase-modulated inversion and universal rotational pulses can be constructed by means of global optimization procedures like the genetic algorithms under regardment of the available RF field strength. By inversion, universal rotational, and 360 pulses as starting values of the optimization efficient homonuclear CN n ν and RN n ν mixing sequences as well as heteronuclear RN n ν s ,ν k feedback sequences were generated. The satisfactory power of the numerically optimized sequences was shown by means of the simulation as well by means of correlation experiments of the chemical shift of L-histidine, L-arginine, and the (CUG) 97 -RNA. This thesis deals furthermore with the possibility to acquire simultaneously different signals with several receivers. By means of numerically optimized RN n ν s ,ν k pulse sequences both 15 N- 13 C and 13 C- 15 N correlation spectra were simultaneously generated. Furthermore it could be shown that the simultaneous acquisition of 3D- 15 N- 13 C- 13 C and 13 C- 15 N-( 1 H)- 1 H correlation spectra is possible. By this in only one measurement process resonance assignments can be met and studies of the global folding performed. A further application of several receivers is the simultaneous acquisition of CHHC, NHHN, NHHC, as well as CHHN spectra. By such experiments it is possible to characterize the hydrogen-bonding pattern and the glycosidic torsion angle χ in RNA. This was demonstrated by means of the (CUG) 97 -RNA. The simultaneous acquisition of all relevant crossing signals of the correlation spectra leads not only to an essential time saving, but

  8. Benchmarking of density functionals for a soft but accurate prediction and assignment of (1) H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts in organic and biological molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benassi, Enrico

    2017-01-15

    A number of programs and tools that simulate 1 H and 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts using empirical approaches are available. These tools are user-friendly, but they provide a very rough (and sometimes misleading) estimation of the NMR properties, especially for complex systems. Rigorous and reliable ways to predict and interpret NMR properties of simple and complex systems are available in many popular computational program packages. Nevertheless, experimentalists keep relying on these "unreliable" tools in their daily work because, to have a sufficiently high accuracy, these rigorous quantum mechanical methods need high levels of theory. An alternative, efficient, semi-empirical approach has been proposed by Bally, Rablen, Tantillo, and coworkers. This idea consists of creating linear calibrations models, on the basis of the application of different combinations of functionals and basis sets. Following this approach, the predictive capability of a wider range of popular functionals was systematically investigated and tested. The NMR chemical shifts were computed in solvated phase at density functional theory level, using 30 different functionals coupled with three different triple-ζ basis sets. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Molecular and Silica-Supported Molybdenum Alkyne Metathesis Catalysts: Influence of Electronics and Dynamics on Activity Revealed by Kinetics, Solid-State NMR, and Chemical Shift Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Deven P; Gordon, Christopher P; Fedorov, Alexey; Liao, Wei-Chih; Ehrhorn, Henrike; Bittner, Celine; Zier, Manuel Luca; Bockfeld, Dirk; Chan, Ka Wing; Eisenstein, Odile; Raynaud, Christophe; Tamm, Matthias; Copéret, Christophe

    2017-12-06

    Molybdenum-based molecular alkylidyne complexes of the type [MesC≡Mo{OC(CH 3 ) 3-x (CF 3 ) x } 3 ] (MoF 0 , x = 0; MoF 3 , x = 1; MoF 6 , x = 2; MoF 9 , x = 3; Mes = 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl) and their silica-supported analogues are prepared and characterized at the molecular level, in particular by solid-state NMR, and their alkyne metathesis catalytic activity is evaluated. The 13 C NMR chemical shift of the alkylidyne carbon increases with increasing number of fluorine atoms on the alkoxide ligands for both molecular and supported catalysts but with more shielded values for the supported complexes. The activity of these catalysts increases in the order MoF 0 molecular and supported species. Detailed solid-state NMR analysis of molecular and silica-supported metal alkylidyne catalysts coupled with DFT/ZORA calculations rationalize the NMR spectroscopic signatures and discernible activity trends at the frontier orbital level: (1) increasing the number of fluorine atoms lowers the energy of the π*(M≡C) orbital, explaining the more deshielded chemical shift values; it also leads to an increased electrophilicity and higher reactivity for catalysts up to MoF 6 , prior to a sharp decrease in reactivity for MoF 9 due to the formation of stable metallacyclobutadiene intermediates; (2) the silica-supported catalysts are less active than their molecular analogues because they are less electrophilic and dynamic, as revealed by their 13 C NMR chemical shift tensors.

  10. CSI 3.0: a web server for identifying secondary and super-secondary structure in proteins using NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsa, Noor E; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2015-07-01

    The Chemical Shift Index or CSI 3.0 (http://csi3.wishartlab.com) is a web server designed to accurately identify the location of secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains using only nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) backbone chemical shifts and their corresponding protein sequence data. Unlike earlier versions of CSI, which only identified three types of secondary structure (helix, β-strand and coil), CSI 3.0 now identifies total of 11 types of secondary and super-secondary structures, including helices, β-strands, coil regions, five common β-turns (type I, II, I', II' and VIII), β hairpins as well as interior and edge β-strands. CSI 3.0 accepts experimental NMR chemical shift data in multiple formats (NMR Star 2.1, NMR Star 3.1 and SHIFTY) and generates colorful CSI plots (bar graphs) and secondary/super-secondary structure assignments. The output can be readily used as constraints for structure determination and refinement or the images may be used for presentations and publications. CSI 3.0 uses a pipeline of several well-tested, previously published programs to identify the secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains. Comparisons with secondary and super-secondary structure assignments made via standard coordinate analysis programs such as DSSP, STRIDE and VADAR on high-resolution protein structures solved by X-ray and NMR show >90% agreement between those made with CSI 3.0. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Measurements of relative chemical shift tensor orientations in solid-state NMR: new slow magic angle spinning dipolar recoupling experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurd, Andrew P S; Titman, Jeremy J

    2009-08-28

    Solid-state NMR experiments can be used to determine conformational parameters, such as interatomic distances and torsion angles. The latter can be obtained from measurements of the relative orientation of two chemical shift tensors, if the orientation of these with respect to the surrounding bonds is known. In this paper, a new rotor-synchronized magic angle spinning (MAS) dipolar correlation experiment is described which can be used in this way. Because the experiment requires slow MAS rates, a novel recoupling sequence, designed using symmetry principles, is incorporated into the mixing period. This recoupling sequence is based in turn on a new composite cyclic pulse referred to as COAST (for combined offset and anisotropy stabilization). The new COAST-C7(2)(1) sequence is shown to give good theoretical and experimental recoupling efficiency, even when the CSA far exceeds the MAS rate. In this regime, previous recoupling sequences, such as POST-C7(2)(1), exhibit poor recoupling performance. The effectiveness of the new method has been explored by a study of the dipeptide L-phenylalanyl-L-phenylalanine.

  12. NMR Chemical Shift of a Helium Atom as a Probe for Electronic Structure of FH, F-, (FHF)-, and FH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupikina, E Yu; Efimova, A A; Denisov, G S; Tolstoy, P M

    2017-12-21

    In this work, we present the first results of outer electronic shell visualization by using a 3 He atom as a probe particle. As model objects we have chosen F - , FH, and FH 2 + species, as well as the hydrogen-bonded complex FH···F - at various H···F - distances (3.0, 2.5, 2.0, and 1.5 Å and equilibrium at ca. 1.14 Å). The interaction energy of investigated objects with helium atom (CCSD/aug-cc-pVTZ) and helium atom chemical shift (B3LYP/pcS-2) surfaces were calculated, and their topological analysis was performed. For comparison, the results of standard quantum mechanical approaches to electronic shell visualization were presented (ESP, ELF, ED, ∇ 2 ED). We show that the Laplacian of helium chemical shift, ∇ 2 δ He , is sensitive to fluorine atom lone pair localization regions, and it can be used for the visualization of the outer electronic shell, which could be used to evaluate the proton accepting ability. The sensitivity of ∇ 2 δ He to lone pairs is preserved at distances as large as 2.0-2.5 Å from the fluorine nucleus (in comparison with the distance to ESP minima, located at 1.0-1.5 Å or maxima of ELF, which are as close as 0.6 Å to the fluorine nucleus).

  13. Chemical vs. electrochemical extraction of lithium from the Li-excess Li(1.10)Mn(1.90)O4 spinel followed by NMR and DRX techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, S; Sobrados, I; Tonti, D; Amarilla, J M; Sanz, J

    2014-02-21

    Lithium extraction from the Li-excess Li1.10Mn1.90O4 spinel has been performed by chemical and electrochemical methods in aqueous and in organic media, respectively. De-lithiated samples have been investigated by XRD, SEM, TG, (7)Li and (1)H MAS-NMR techniques. The comparative study has allowed demonstrating that the intermediate de-intercalated samples prepared during the chemical extraction by acid titration are similar to those prepared by the electrochemical way in a non-aqueous electrolyte. LiMn2O4 based spinel with a tailored de-lithiation degree can be prepared as a single phase by controlling the pH used in chemical extraction. (7)Li MAS-NMR spectroscopy has been used to follow the influence of the manganese oxidation state on tetra and octahedral Li-signals detected in Li-extracted samples. The oxidation of Mn(III) ions goes parallel to the partial dissolution of the spinel, following Hunter's mechanism. Based on this mechanism, a generalized chemical reaction has been proposed to explain the formation of intermediate Li(+) de-intercalated samples during acid treatment in aqueous media. By the (1)H MAS NMR study, no evidence of Li-H topotactic exchange in the bulk of the acid treated material was found.

  14. Heteronuclear three-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. Natural abundance 13C chemical shift editing of 1H-1H COSY spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesik, S.W.; Gampe, R.T. Jr.; Zuiderweg, E.R.P.

    1989-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that heteronuclear 3D NMR spectroscopy can be effectively applied to small molecules with 13 C at natural abundance. A 78mM solution of the aminoglycoside, kanamycin A was used for this experiment. The heteronuclear 3D NMR spectroscopy is shown to be a useful method for resolving spectral overlap in all frequency domains. 10 refs., 2 figs

  15. Energetics and chemical bonding of the 1,3,5-tridehydrobenzene triradical and its protonated form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hue Minh Thi Nguyen; Hoeltzl, Tibor; Gopakumar, G.; Veszpremi, Tamas; Peeters, Jozef; Minh Tho Nguyen

    2005-01-01

    Quantum chemical calculations were applied to investigate the electronic structure of the parent 1,3,5-tridehydrobenzene triradical (C 6 H 3 , TDB) and its anion (C 6 H 3 - ), cation (C 6 H 3 + ) and protonated form (C 6 H 4 + ). Our results obtained using the state-averaged complete active space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) followed by second-order multi-state multi-configuration perturbation theory, MS-CASPT2, and MRMP2 in conjunction with the large ANO-L and 6-311++G(3df,2p) basis set, confirm and reveal the followings: (i) TDB has a doublet 2 A 1 ground state with a 4 B 2 - 2 A 1 energy gap of 29kcal/mol, (ii) the ground state of the C 6 H 3 - anion in the triplet 3 B 2 being 4kcal/mol below the 1 A 1 state. (iii) the electron affinity (EA), ionization energy (IE) and proton affinity (PA) are computed to be: EA=1.6eV, IE=7.2eV, PA=227kcal/mol using UB3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p)+ZPE; standard heat of formation ΔH f(298K,1atm) (TDB)=179+/-2kcal/mol was calculated with CBS-QB3 method. An atoms-in-molecules (AIM) analysis of the structure reveals that the topology of the electron density is similar in all compounds: hydrogens connect to a six-membered ring, except for the case of the 2 A 2 state of C 6 H 4 + (MBZ + ) which is bicyclic with fused five- and three-membered rings. Properties of the chemical bonds were characterized with Electron Localization Function (ELF) analysis, as well as Wiberg indices, Laplacian and spin density maps. We found that the radicals form separate monosynaptic basins on the ELF space, however its pair character remains high. In the 2 A 1 state of TDB, the radical center is mainly localized on the C1 atom, while in the 2 B 2 state it is equally distributed between the C3 and C5 atoms and, due to the symmetry, in the 4 B 2 state the C1, C2 and C3 atoms have the same radical character. There is no C3-C5 bond in the 2 A 1 state of TDB, but the interaction between these atoms is strong. The ground state of cation C 6 H 3 + (DHP), 1 A 1 , is

  16. Energetics and chemical bonding of the 1,3,5-tridehydrobenzene triradical and its protonated form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hue Minh Thi Nguyen [Department of Chemistry, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200F, B-3001 Heverlee, Leuven (Belgium); Faculty of Chemistry, University of Education, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Hoeltzl, Tibor [Department of Chemistry, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200F, B-3001 Heverlee, Leuven (Belgium); Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Technology and Economics Gellert ter 4, H-1521-Budapest (Hungary); Gopakumar, G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200F, B-3001 Heverlee, Leuven (Belgium); Veszpremi, Tamas [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Technology and Economics Gellert ter 4, H-1521-Budapest (Hungary); Peeters, Jozef [Department of Chemistry, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200F, B-3001 Heverlee, Leuven (Belgium); Minh Tho Nguyen [Department of Chemistry, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200F, B-3001 Heverlee, Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: minh.nguyen@chem.kuleuven.be

    2005-09-19

    Quantum chemical calculations were applied to investigate the electronic structure of the parent 1,3,5-tridehydrobenzene triradical (C{sub 6}H{sub 3}, TDB) and its anion (C{sub 6}H{sub 3}{sup -}), cation (C{sub 6}H{sub 3}{sup +}) and protonated form (C{sub 6}H{sub 4}{sup +}). Our results obtained using the state-averaged complete active space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) followed by second-order multi-state multi-configuration perturbation theory, MS-CASPT2, and MRMP2 in conjunction with the large ANO-L and 6-311++G(3df,2p) basis set, confirm and reveal the followings: (i) TDB has a doublet {sup 2}A{sub 1} ground state with a {sup 4}B{sub 2}-{sup 2}A{sub 1} energy gap of 29kcal/mol, (ii) the ground state of the C{sub 6}H{sub 3}{sup -} anion in the triplet {sup 3}B{sub 2} being 4kcal/mol below the {sup 1}A{sub 1} state. (iii) the electron affinity (EA), ionization energy (IE) and proton affinity (PA) are computed to be: EA=1.6eV, IE=7.2eV, PA=227kcal/mol using UB3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p)+ZPE; standard heat of formation {delta}H{sub f(298K,1atm)}(TDB)=179+/-2kcal/mol was calculated with CBS-QB3 method. An atoms-in-molecules (AIM) analysis of the structure reveals that the topology of the electron density is similar in all compounds: hydrogens connect to a six-membered ring, except for the case of the {sup 2}A{sub 2} state of C{sub 6}H{sub 4}{sup +} (MBZ{sup +}) which is bicyclic with fused five- and three-membered rings. Properties of the chemical bonds were characterized with Electron Localization Function (ELF) analysis, as well as Wiberg indices, Laplacian and spin density maps. We found that the radicals form separate monosynaptic basins on the ELF space, however its pair character remains high. In the {sup 2}A{sub 1} state of TDB, the radical center is mainly localized on the C1 atom, while in the {sup 2}B{sub 2} state it is equally distributed between the C3 and C5 atoms and, due to the symmetry, in the {sup 4}B{sub 2} state the C1, C2 and C3 atoms have the same

  17. Positional enrichment by proton analysis (PEPA). A one-dimensional "1H-NMR approach for "1"3C stable isotope tracer studies in metabolomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinaixa, Maria; Yanes, Oscar; Rodriguez, Miguel A.; Capellades, Jordi; Aivio, Suvi; Stracker, Travis H.; Gomez, Josep; Canyellas, Nicolau

    2017-01-01

    A novel metabolomics approach for NMR-based stable isotope tracer studies called PEPA is presented, and its performance validated using human cancer cells. PEPA detects the position of carbon label in isotopically enriched metabolites and quantifies fractional enrichment by indirect determination of "1"3C-satellite peaks using 1D-"1H-NMR spectra. In comparison with "1"3C-NMR, TOCSY and HSQC, PEPA improves sensitivity, accelerates the elucidation of "1"3C positions in labeled metabolites and the quantification of the percentage of stable isotope enrichment. Altogether, PEPA provides a novel framework for extending the high-throughput of "1H-NMR metabolic profiling to stable isotope tracing in metabolomics, facilitating and complementing the information derived from 2D-NMR experiments and expanding the range of isotopically enriched metabolites detected in cellular extracts. (copyright 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA.)

  18. Positional enrichment by proton analysis (PEPA). A one-dimensional {sup 1}H-NMR approach for {sup 13}C stable isotope tracer studies in metabolomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinaixa, Maria; Yanes, Oscar [Department of Electronic Engineering-Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Spanish Biomedical Research Center in Diabetes and Associated Metabolic Disorders (CIBERDEM), Reus (Spain); Rodriguez, Miguel A.; Capellades, Jordi [Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Spanish Biomedical Research Center in Diabetes and Associated Metabolic Disorders (CIBERDEM), Reus (Spain); Aivio, Suvi; Stracker, Travis H. [Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (Spain); Gomez, Josep; Canyellas, Nicolau [Department of Electronic Engineering-, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain)

    2017-03-20

    A novel metabolomics approach for NMR-based stable isotope tracer studies called PEPA is presented, and its performance validated using human cancer cells. PEPA detects the position of carbon label in isotopically enriched metabolites and quantifies fractional enrichment by indirect determination of {sup 13}C-satellite peaks using 1D-{sup 1}H-NMR spectra. In comparison with {sup 13}C-NMR, TOCSY and HSQC, PEPA improves sensitivity, accelerates the elucidation of {sup 13}C positions in labeled metabolites and the quantification of the percentage of stable isotope enrichment. Altogether, PEPA provides a novel framework for extending the high-throughput of {sup 1}H-NMR metabolic profiling to stable isotope tracing in metabolomics, facilitating and complementing the information derived from 2D-NMR experiments and expanding the range of isotopically enriched metabolites detected in cellular extracts. (copyright 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA.)

  19. NMR spectroscopic studies of a TAT-derived model peptide in imidazolium-based ILs: influence on chemical shifts and the cis/trans equilibrium state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Christoph; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Mrestani-Klaus, Carmen; Bordusa, Frank

    2017-09-13

    NMR spectroscopy was used to study systematically the impact of imidazolium-based ionic liquid (IL) solutions on a TAT-derived model peptide containing Xaa-Pro peptide bonds. The selected IL anions cover a wide range of the Hofmeister series of ions. Based on highly resolved one- and two-dimensional NMR spectra individual 1 H and 13 C peptide chemical shift differences were analysed and a classification of IL anions according to the Hofmeister series was derived. The observed chemical shift changes indicate significant interactions between the peptide and the ILs. In addition, we examined the impact of different ILs towards the cis/trans equilibrium state of the Xaa-Pro peptide bonds. In this context, the IL cations appear to be of exceptional importance for inducing an alteration of the native cis/trans equilibrium state of Xaa-Pro bonds in favour of the trans-isomers.

  20. Structure, solvent, and relativistic effects on the NMR chemical shifts in square-planar transition-metal complexes: assessment of DFT approaches

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vícha, J.; Novotný, J.; Straka, Michal; Repisky, M.; Ruud, K.; Komorovsky, S.; Marek, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 38 (2015), s. 24944-24955 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03564S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : NMR chemical shifts * transition metal complexes * relativistic effects * method calibration Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.449, year: 2015 http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlepdf/2015/cp/c5cp04214c

  1. Vibrational, NMR and quantum chemical investigations of acetoacetanilde, 2-chloroacetoacetanilide and 2-methylacetoacetanilide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Kalaivani, M; Senthilkumari, S; Mohan, S

    2013-11-01

    The vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compounds acetoacetanilide (AAA), 2-chloroacetoacetanilide (2CAAA) and 2-methylacetoacetanilide (2MAAA) have been performed. Density functional theory studies have been carried out with B3LYP method utilising 6-311++G(**) and cc-pVTZ basis sets to determine structural, thermodynamic and vibrational characteristics of the compounds and also to understand the influence of chloro and methyl groups on the characteristic frequencies of amide (CONH) group. Intramolecular hydrogen bond exists in acetoacetanilide and o-substituted acetoacetanilide molecules and the N⋯O distance is found to be around 2.7Å. The (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecules were determined and the same have been calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The energies of the frontier molecular orbitals have been determined. In AAA, 2CAAA and 2MAAA molecules, the nN→πCO(∗) interaction between the nitrogen lone pair and the amide CO antibonding orbital gives strong stabilization of 64.75, 62.84 and 64.18kJmol(-1), respectively. The blue shift in amide-II band of 2MAAA is observed by 45-50cm(-1) than that of AAA. The steric effect of ortho methyl group significantly operating on the NH bond properties. The amide-III, the CN stretching mode of methyl and chloro substituted acetoacetanilide compounds are not affected by the substitution while the amide-V band, the NH out of plane bending mode of 2-chloroacetoacetanilide compound is shifted to a higher frequency than that of AAA. The substituent chlorine plays significantly and the blue shift in o-substituted compounds than the parent in the amide-V vibration is observed. The amide-VI, CO out of plane bending modes of 2MAAA and 2CAAA are significantly raised than that of AAA. A blue shift of amide-VI, CO out of plane bending modes of 2MAAA and 2CAAA than AAA is observed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  2. Quantum-Chemical Approach to NMR Chemical Shifts in Paramagnetic Solids Applied to LiFePO4 and LiCoPO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Arobendo; Kaupp, Martin

    2018-04-05

    A novel protocol to compute and analyze NMR chemical shifts for extended paramagnetic solids, accounting comprehensively for Fermi-contact (FC), pseudocontact (PC), and orbital shifts, is reported and applied to the important lithium ion battery cathode materials LiFePO 4 and LiCoPO 4 . Using an EPR-parameter-based ansatz, the approach combines periodic (hybrid) DFT computation of hyperfine and orbital-shielding tensors with an incremental cluster model for g- and zero-field-splitting (ZFS) D-tensors. The cluster model allows the use of advanced multireference wave function methods (such as CASSCF or NEVPT2). Application of this protocol shows that the 7 Li shifts in the high-voltage cathode material LiCoPO 4 are dominated by spin-orbit-induced PC contributions, in contrast with previous assumptions, fundamentally changing interpretations of the shifts in terms of covalency. PC contributions are smaller for the 7 Li shifts of the related LiFePO 4 , where FC and orbital shifts dominate. The 31 P shifts of both materials finally are almost pure FC shifts. Nevertheless, large ZFS contributions can give rise to non-Curie temperature dependences for both 7 Li and 31 P shifts.

  3. Molecular modeling of protonic acid doping of emeraldine base polyaniline for chemical sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.; Yuan, C.A.; Wong, C.K.Y.; Ye, H.; Leung, S.Y.Y.; Zhang, G.

    2012-01-01

    We proposed a molecular modeling methodology to study the protonic acid doping of emeraldine base polyaniline which can used in gas detection. The commercial forcefield COMPASS was used for the polymer and protonic acid molecules. The molecular model, which is capable of representing the polyaniline

  4. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Metabolomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhi Hu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a non-destructive, quantitative, reproducible, untargeted and unbiased method that requires no or minimal sample preparation, and is one of the leading analytical tools for metabonomics research [1-3]. The easy quantification and the no need of prior knowledge about compounds present in a sample associated with NMR are advantageous over other techniques [1,4]. 1H NMR is especially attractive because protons are present in virtually all metabolites and its NMR sensitivity is high, enabling the simultaneous identification and monitoring of a wide range of low molecular weight metabolites.

  5. Proton tunnelling in intermolecular hydrogen bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsewill, A J [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom); Johnson, M R [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Trommsdorff, H P [Grenoble-1 Univ., 38 (France)

    1997-04-01

    The wavefunctions of particles extend beyond the classically accessible regions of potential energy-surfaces (PES). A manifestation of this partial delocalization is the quantum-mechanical tunneling effect which enables a particle to escape from a metastable potential-well. Tunnelling is most important for the lightest atoms, so that the determination of its contribution to proton transfer, one of the most fundamental chemical reactions, is an important issue. QENS and NMR techniques have been employed to study the motion of protons in the hydrogen bond of benzoic-acid crystals, a system which has emerged as a particularly suitable model since proton transfer occurs in a near symmetric double-well potential. The influence of quantum tunnelling was revealed and investigated in these experiments. This work provides an experimental benchmark for theoretical descriptions of translational proton-tunnelling. (author). 7 refs.

  6. Optimization of 7-T Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer Parameters for Validation of Glycosaminoglycan and Amide Proton Transfer of Fibroglandular Breast Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dula, Adrienne N.; Dewey, Blake E.; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Williams, Jason M.; Klomp, DWJ; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Smith, Seth

    Purpose: To (a) implement simulation-optimized chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) measurements sensitive to amide proton transfer (APT) and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) hydroxyl proton transfer effects in the human breast at 7 T and (b) determine the reliability of these techniques for

  7. NbF5 and TaF5: Assignment of 19F NMR resonances and chemical bond analysis from GIPAW calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswal, Mamata; Body, Monique; Legein, Christophe; Sadoc, Aymeric; Boucher, Florent

    2013-01-01

    The 19 F isotropic chemical shifts (δ iso ) of two isomorphic compounds, NbF 5 and TaF 5 , which involve six nonequivalent fluorine sites, have been experimentally determined from the reconstruction of 1D 19 F MAS NMR spectra. In parallel, the corresponding 19 F chemical shielding tensors have been calculated using the GIPAW method for both experimental and DFT-optimized structures. Furthermore, the [M 4 F 20 ] units of NbF 5 and TaF 5 being held together by van der Waals interactions, the relevance of Grimme corrections to the DFT optimization processes has been evaluated. However, the semi-empirical dispersion correction term introduced by such a method does not show any significant improvement. Nonetheless, a complete and convincing assignment of the 19 F NMR lines of NbF 5 and TaF 5 is obtained, ensured by the linearity between experimental 19 F δ iso values and calculated 19 F isotropic chemical shielding σ iso values. The effects of the geometry optimizations have been carefully analyzed, confirming among other matters, the inaccuracy of the experimental structure of NbF 5 . The relationships between the fluorine chemical shifts, the nature of the fluorine atoms (bridging or terminal), the position of the terminal ones (opposite or perpendicular to the bridging ones), the fluorine charges, the ionicity and the length of the M–F bonds have been established. Additionally, for three of the 19 F NMR lines of NbF 5 , distorted multiplets, arising from 1 J-coupling and residual dipolar coupling between the 19 F and 93 Nb nuclei, were simulated yielding to values of 93 Nb– 19 F 1 J-coupling for the corresponding fluorine sites. - Graphical abstract: The complete assignment of the 19 F NMR lines of NbF 5 and TaF 5 allow establishing relationships between the 19 F δ iso values, the nature of the fluorine atoms (bridging or terminal), the position of the terminal ones (opposite or perpendicular to the bridging ones), the fluorine charges, the ionicity and the

  8. Prototropic tautomerism of 5-nitrobenzimidazole derivatives in {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N NMR spectra; Tautomeria prototropowa pochodnych 5-nitrobenzimidazolu w widmach {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiench, J W; Bocian, W; Stefaniak, L [Inst. Chemii Organicznej, Polska Akademia Nauk, Warsaw (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    NMR spectra of 5-nitrobenzimidazole derivatives in DMSO solution show the fast exchange of protons. The line broadening in {sup 1}H,{sup 13}C and {sup 15}N spectra have been observed. The interpretation of the spectra has been done basing on chemical shifts values and couplings between nuclei in the investigated derivatives. 3 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs.

  9. Combining NMR ensembles and molecular dynamics simulations provides more realistic models of protein structures in solution and leads to better chemical shift prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehtivarjo, Juuso; Tuppurainen, Kari; Hassinen, Tommi; Laatikainen, Reino; Peräkylä, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    While chemical shifts are invaluable for obtaining structural information from proteins, they also offer one of the rare ways to obtain information about protein dynamics. A necessary tool in transforming chemical shifts into structural and dynamic information is chemical shift prediction. In our previous work we developed a method for 4D prediction of protein 1 H chemical shifts in which molecular motions, the 4th dimension, were modeled using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Although the approach clearly improved the prediction, the X-ray structures and single NMR conformers used in the model cannot be considered fully realistic models of protein in solution. In this work, NMR ensembles (NMRE) were used to expand the conformational space of proteins (e.g. side chains, flexible loops, termini), followed by MD simulations for each conformer to map the local fluctuations. Compared with the non-dynamic model, the NMRE+MD model gave 6–17% lower root-mean-square (RMS) errors for different backbone nuclei. The improved prediction indicates that NMR ensembles with MD simulations can be used to obtain a more realistic picture of protein structures in solutions and moreover underlines the importance of short and long time-scale dynamics for the prediction. The RMS errors of the NMRE+MD model were 0.24, 0.43, 0.98, 1.03, 1.16 and 2.39 ppm for 1 Hα, 1 HN, 13 Cα, 13 Cβ, 13 CO and backbone 15 N chemical shifts, respectively. The model is implemented in the prediction program 4DSPOT, available at http://www.uef.fi/4dspothttp://www.uef.fi/4dspot.

  10. Combining NMR ensembles and molecular dynamics simulations provides more realistic models of protein structures in solution and leads to better chemical shift prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtivarjo, Juuso, E-mail: juuso.lehtivarjo@uef.fi; Tuppurainen, Kari; Hassinen, Tommi; Laatikainen, Reino [University of Eastern Finland, School of Pharmacy (Finland); Peraekylae, Mikael [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Biomedicine (Finland)

    2012-03-15

    While chemical shifts are invaluable for obtaining structural information from proteins, they also offer one of the rare ways to obtain information about protein dynamics. A necessary tool in transforming chemical shifts into structural and dynamic information is chemical shift prediction. In our previous work we developed a method for 4D prediction of protein {sup 1}H chemical shifts in which molecular motions, the 4th dimension, were modeled using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Although the approach clearly improved the prediction, the X-ray structures and single NMR conformers used in the model cannot be considered fully realistic models of protein in solution. In this work, NMR ensembles (NMRE) were used to expand the conformational space of proteins (e.g. side chains, flexible loops, termini), followed by MD simulations for each conformer to map the local fluctuations. Compared with the non-dynamic model, the NMRE+MD model gave 6-17% lower root-mean-square (RMS) errors for different backbone nuclei. The improved prediction indicates that NMR ensembles with MD simulations can be used to obtain a more realistic picture of protein structures in solutions and moreover underlines the importance of short and long time-scale dynamics for the prediction. The RMS errors of the NMRE+MD model were 0.24, 0.43, 0.98, 1.03, 1.16 and 2.39 ppm for {sup 1}H{alpha}, {sup 1}HN, {sup 13}C{alpha}, {sup 13}C{beta}, {sup 13}CO and backbone {sup 15}N chemical shifts, respectively. The model is implemented in the prediction program 4DSPOT, available at http://www.uef.fi/4dspothttp://www.uef.fi/4dspot.

  11. Electrochemical/chemical oxidation of bisphenol A in a four-electron/two-proton process in aprotic organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Ya Yun; Yue, Yanni; Li, Yongxin; Webster, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Bisphenol A undergoes a chemically irreversible voltammetric oxidation process. • Chemical oxidation was performed to overcome adsorption effects that cause electrode fouling. • A new product was isolated from chemical oxidation with 4 mol equiv. of the one-electron oxidant, NO + . • The oxidative mechanism was proposed to be a four-electron/two-proton process. - Abstract: The electrochemical behavior of bisphenol A (BPA) was examined using cyclic voltammetry, bulk electrolysis and chemical oxidation in aprotic organic solvents. It was found that BPA undergoes a chemically irreversible voltammetric oxidation process to form compounds that cannot be electrochemically converted back to the starting materials on the voltammetric timescale. To overcome the effects of electrode fouling during controlled potential electrolysis experiments, NO + was used as a one-electron chemical oxidant. A new product, hydroxylated bisdienone was isolated from the chemical oxidation of BPA with 4 mol equiv of NO + SbF 6 − in low water content CH 3 CN. The structure of the cation intermediate species was deduced and it was proposed that BPA is oxidized in a four-electron/two-proton process to form a relatively unstable dication which reacts quickly in the presence of water in acetonitrile (in a mechanism that is similar to phenols in general). However, as the water content of the solvent increased it was found that the chemical oxidation mechanism produced a nitration product in high yield. The findings from this study provide useful insights into the reactions that can occur during oxidative metabolism of BPA and highlight the possibility of the role of a bisdienone cation as a reactive metabolite in biological systems

  12. Stereochemistry of Complex Marine Natural Products by Quantum Mechanical Calculations of NMR Chemical Shifts: Solvent and Conformational Effects on Okadaic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto J. Domínguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine organisms are an increasingly important source of novel metabolites, some of which have already inspired or become new drugs. In addition, many of these molecules show a high degree of novelty from a structural and/or pharmacological point of view. Structure determination is generally achieved by the use of a variety of spectroscopic methods, among which NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance plays a major role and determination of the stereochemical relationships within every new molecule is generally the most challenging part in structural determination. In this communication, we have chosen okadaic acid as a model compound to perform a computational chemistry study to predict 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts. The effect of two different solvents and conformation on the ability of DFT (density functional theory calculations to predict the correct stereoisomer has been studied.

  13. NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenert, J.

    1989-01-01

    The book reviews the applications of NMR-spectroscopy in medicine and biology. The first chapter of about 40 pages summarizes the history of development and explains the chemical and physical fundamentals of this new and non-invasive method in an easily comprehensible manner. The other chapters summarize diagnostic results obtained with this method in organs and tissues, so that the reader will find a systematic overview of the available findings obtained in the various organ systems. It must be noted, however, that ongoing research work and new insight quite naturally will necessitate corrections to be done, as is the case here with some biochemical interpretations which would need adjustment to latest research results. NMR-spectroscopy is able to measure very fine energy differences on the molecular level, and thus offers insight into metabolic processes, with the advantage that there is no need of applying ionizing radiation in order to qualitatively or quantitatively analyse the metabolic processes in the various organ systems. (orig./DG) With 40 figs., 4 tabs [de

  14. Using 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts to determine cyclic peptide conformations: a combined molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Q Nhu N; Schwochert, Joshua; Tantillo, Dean J; Lokey, R Scott

    2018-05-10

    Solving conformations of cyclic peptides can provide insight into structure-activity and structure-property relationships, which can help in the design of compounds with improved bioactivity and/or ADME characteristics. The most common approaches for determining the structures of cyclic peptides are based on NMR-derived distance restraints obtained from NOESY or ROESY cross-peak intensities, and 3J-based dihedral restraints using the Karplus relationship. Unfortunately, these observables are often too weak, sparse, or degenerate to provide unequivocal, high-confidence solution structures, prompting us to investigate an alternative approach that relies only on 1H and 13C chemical shifts as experimental observables. This method, which we call conformational analysis from NMR and density-functional prediction of low-energy ensembles (CANDLE), uses molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to generate conformer families and density functional theory (DFT) calculations to predict their 1H and 13C chemical shifts. Iterative conformer searches and DFT energy calculations on a cyclic peptide-peptoid hybrid yielded Boltzmann ensembles whose predicted chemical shifts matched the experimental values better than any single conformer. For these compounds, CANDLE outperformed the classic NOE- and 3J-coupling-based approach by disambiguating similar β-turn types and also enabled the structural elucidation of the minor conformer. Through the use of chemical shifts, in conjunction with DFT and MD calculations, CANDLE can help illuminate conformational ensembles of cyclic peptides in solution.

  15. Proton Environments in Biomimetic Calcium Phosphates Formed from Mesoporous Bioactive CaO-SiO2-P2O5 Glasses in Vitro: Insights from Solid-State NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Renny; Turdean-Ionescu, Claudia; Yu, Yang; Stevensson, Baltzar; Izquierdo-Barba, Isabel; García, Ana; Arcos, Daniel; Vallet-Regí, María; Edén, Mattias

    2017-06-22

    When exposed to body fluids, mesoporous bioactive glasses (MBGs) of the CaO-SiO 2 -P 2 O 5 system develop a bone-bonding surface layer that initially consists of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), which transforms into hydroxy-carbonate apatite (HCA) with a very similar composition as bone/dentin mineral. Information from various 1 H-based solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments was combined to elucidate the evolution of the proton speciations both at the MBG surface and within each ACP/HCA constituent of the biomimetic phosphate layer formed when each of three MBGs with distinct Ca, Si, and P contents was immersed in a simulated body fluid (SBF) for variable periods between 15 min and 30 days. Directly excited magic-angle-spinning (MAS) 1 H NMR spectra mainly reflect the MBG component, whose surface is rich in water and silanol (SiOH) moieties. Double-quantum-single-quantum correlation 1 H NMR experimentation at fast MAS revealed their interatomic proximities. The comparatively minor H species of each ACP and HCA component were probed selectively by heteronuclear 1 H- 31 P NMR experimentation. The initially prevailing ACP phase comprises H 2 O and "nonapatitic" HPO 4 2- /PO 4 3- groups, whereas for prolonged MBG soaking over days, a well-progressed ACP → HCA transformation was evidenced by a dominating O 1 H resonance from HCA. We show that 1 H-detected 1 H → 31 P cross-polarization NMR is markedly more sensitive than utilizing powder X-ray diffraction or 31 P NMR for detecting the onset of HCA formation, notably so for P-bearing (M)BGs. In relation to the long-standing controversy as to whether bone mineral comprises ACP and/or forms via an ACP precursor, we discuss a recently accepted structural core-shell picture of both synthetic and biological HCA, highlighting the close relationship between the disordered surface layer and ACP.

  16. An automated system designed for large scale NMR data deposition and annotation: application to over 600 assigned chemical shift data entries to the BioMagResBank from the Riken Structural Genomics/Proteomics Initiative internal database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Naohiro; Harano, Yoko; Tochio, Naoya; Nakatani, Eiichi; Kigawa, Takanori; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Mading, Steve; Ulrich, Eldon L.; Markley, John L.; Akutsu, Hideo; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2012-01-01

    Biomolecular NMR chemical shift data are key information for the functional analysis of biomolecules and the development of new techniques for NMR studies utilizing chemical shift statistical information. Structural genomics projects are major contributors to the accumulation of protein chemical shift information. The management of the large quantities of NMR data generated by each project in a local database and the transfer of the data to the public databases are still formidable tasks because of the complicated nature of NMR data. Here we report an automated and efficient system developed for the deposition and annotation of a large number of data sets including 1 H, 13 C and 15 N resonance assignments used for the structure determination of proteins. We have demonstrated the feasibility of our system by applying it to over 600 entries from the internal database generated by the RIKEN Structural Genomics/Proteomics Initiative (RSGI) to the public database, BioMagResBank (BMRB). We have assessed the quality of the deposited chemical shifts by comparing them with those predicted from the PDB coordinate entry for the corresponding protein. The same comparison for other matched BMRB/PDB entries deposited from 2001–2011 has been carried out and the results suggest that the RSGI entries greatly improved the quality of the BMRB database. Since the entries include chemical shifts acquired under strikingly similar experimental conditions, these NMR data can be expected to be a promising resource to improve current technologies as well as to develop new NMR methods for protein studies.

  17. Advantages of chemical exchange-sensitive spin-lock (CESL) over chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) for hydroxyl- and amine-water proton exchange studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2014-11-01

    The chemical exchange (CE) rate of endogenous hydroxyl and amine protons with water is often comparable to the difference in their chemical shifts. These intermediate exchange processes have been imaged by the CE saturation transfer (CEST) approach with low-power and long-duration irradiation. However, the sensitivity is not optimal and, more importantly, the signal is contaminated by slow magnetization transfer processes. Here, the properties of CEST signals are compared with those of a CE-sensitive spin-lock (CESL) technique irradiating at the labile proton frequency. First, using a higher power and shorter irradiation in CE-MRI, we obtain: (i) an increased selectivity to faster CE rates via a higher sensitivity to faster CEs and a lower sensitivity to slower CEs and magnetization transfer processes; and (ii) a decreased in vivo asymmetric magnetization transfer contrast measured at ±15 ppm. The sensitivity gain of CESL over CEST is higher for a higher power and shorter irradiation. Unlike CESL, CEST signals oscillate at a very high power and short irradiation. Second, time-dependent CEST and CESL signals are well modeled by analytical solutions of CE-MRI with an asymmetric population approximation, which can be used for quantitative CE-MRI and validated by simulations of Bloch-McConnell equations and phantom experiments. Finally, the in vivo amine-water proton exchange contrast measured at 2.5 ppm with ω1 = 500 Hz is 18% higher in sensitivity for CESL than CEST at 9.4 T. Overall, CESL provides better exchange rate selectivity and sensitivity than CEST; therefore, CESL is more suitable for CE-MRI of intermediate exchange protons. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Chemically Methylated and Reduced Pectins: Preparation and Characterisation by 1H-NMR Spectroscopy, Enzymatic Degradation and Gelling Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbohm, Christoph; Lundt, Inge; Christensen, T.M.I.E.

    2003-01-01

    with lower DM. A simple method for determination of DM by 1H-NMR spectroscopy is presented. New modified pectins have been prepared by treatment of pectins having different DM’s with NaBH4 to reduce selectively the methyl esters to primary alcohols in the presence of free acids. The degree of reduction (DR......) and the DM of the remaining carboxylic acids could likewise be determined by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The new reduced pectins can be tolerated by the pectin degrading enzymes polygalacturonase PGI and PGII as well as by pectin lyase, all from Aspergillus niger, but the enzymes exhibit lower specific activities...

  19. Detailed {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectral data assignment for two dihydrobenzofuran neolignans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Talita C.T.; Dias, Herbert J.; Crotti, Antônio E.M., E-mail: millercrotti@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras. Departamento de Química

    2016-07-01

    In this work we present a complete proton ({sup 1}H) and carbon 13 ({sup 13}C) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral analysis of two synthetic dihydrofuran neolignans (±)-trans-dehydrodicoumarate dimethyl ester and (±)-trans-dehydrodiferulate dimethyl ester. Unequivocal assignments were achieved by 1 H NMR, proton decoupled {sup 13}C ({sup 13}C{"1H}) NMR spectra, gradient-selected correlation spectroscopy (gCOSY), J-resolved, gradient-selected heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (gHMQC), gradient-selected heteronuclear multiple bond coherence (gHMBC) and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments. All hydrogen coupling constants were measured, clarifying all the hydrogen signals multiplicities. Computational methods were also used to simulate the {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C chemical shifts and showed good agreement with the trans configuration of the substituents at C{sub 7} and C{sub 8}. (author)

  20. Detailed 1H and 13C NMR spectral data assignment for two dihydrobenzofuran neolignans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros, Talita C.T.; Dias, Herbert J.; Crotti, Antônio E.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we present a complete proton ( 1 H) and carbon 13 ( 13 C) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral analysis of two synthetic dihydrofuran neolignans (±)-trans-dehydrodicoumarate dimethyl ester and (±)-trans-dehydrodiferulate dimethyl ester. Unequivocal assignments were achieved by 1 H NMR, proton decoupled 13 C ( 13 C{ 1 H}) NMR spectra, gradient-selected correlation spectroscopy (gCOSY), J-resolved, gradient-selected heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (gHMQC), gradient-selected heteronuclear multiple bond coherence (gHMBC) and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments. All hydrogen coupling constants were measured, clarifying all the hydrogen signals multiplicities. Computational methods were also used to simulate the 1 H and 13 C chemical shifts and showed good agreement with the trans configuration of the substituents at C 7 and C 8 . (author)

  1. Identifying inter-residue resonances in crowded 2D {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C chemical shift correlation spectra of membrane proteins by solid-state MAS NMR difference spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao Yimin; Cross, Timothy A. [Florida State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Fu Riqiang, E-mail: rfu@magnet.fsu.edu [National High Magnet Field Lab (United States)

    2013-07-15

    The feasibility of using difference spectroscopy, i.e. subtraction of two correlation spectra at different mixing times, for substantially enhanced resolution in crowded two-dimensional {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C chemical shift correlation spectra is presented. With the analyses of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C spin diffusion in simple spin systems, difference spectroscopy is proposed to partially separate the spin diffusion resonances of relatively short intra-residue distances from the longer inter-residue distances, leading to a better identification of the inter-residue resonances. Here solid-state magic-angle-spinning NMR spectra of the full length M2 protein embedded in synthetic lipid bilayers have been used to illustrate the resolution enhancement in the difference spectra. The integral membrane M2 protein of Influenza A virus assembles as a tetrameric bundle to form a proton-conducting channel that is activated by low pH and is essential for the viral lifecycle. Based on known amino acid resonance assignments from amino acid specific labeled samples of truncated M2 sequences or from time-consuming 3D experiments of uniformly labeled samples, some inter-residue resonances of the full length M2 protein can be identified in the difference spectra of uniformly {sup 13}C labeled protein that are consistent with the high resolution structure of the M2 (22-62) protein (Sharma et al., Science 330(6003):509-512, 2010)

  2. {sup 1}H NMR investigation of self-association of vanillin in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdan, Mircea; Floare, Calin G; PIrnau, Adrian, E-mail: mircea.bogdan@itim-cj.r [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2009-08-01

    A self-association of vanillin have been studied by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy using the analysis of proton chemical shifts changes in aqueous solution as a function of concentration. The experimental results have been analysed using indefinite non-cooperative and cooperative models of molecular self-association, enabling the determination of equilibrium constants, parameters of cooperativity and the limiting values of vanillin proton chemical shifts in the complex. It was found that the dimer formation creates energetically favourable conditions for subsequent molecular association.

  3. 1H NMR investigation of self-association of vanillin in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdan, Mircea; Floare, Calin G; PIrnau, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    A self-association of vanillin have been studied by 1 H NMR spectroscopy using the analysis of proton chemical shifts changes in aqueous solution as a function of concentration. The experimental results have been analysed using indefinite non-cooperative and cooperative models of molecular self-association, enabling the determination of equilibrium constants, parameters of cooperativity and the limiting values of vanillin proton chemical shifts in the complex. It was found that the dimer formation creates energetically favourable conditions for subsequent molecular association.

  4. 13C solid state NMR investigation of natural resins components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, Maria I.B.; Bathista, Andre L.B.S.; Silva, Emerson O.; Priante Filho, Nicolau; Nogueira, Jose S.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this work is to establish and analytical methodology as a routine using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to investigate the mainly chemical components presented in natural resins in bulk. And also to evaluate the molecular behaviour of these resins. The routine solid state techniques allow us to assign the main compounds presented in the resins. Therefore, applying specialised techniques, like variable contact time, delayed contact time, dephasing time and proton spin lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame (T 1 H ρ), more information about chemical structure and molecular dynamic is available

  5. Effect of counterions on properties of micelles formed by alkylpyridinium surfactants .1. Conductometry and H-1-NMR chemical shifts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijma, K; Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    1997-01-01

    This paper delineates the influence of counterions on the aggregation behavior of 1-methyl-4-n-dodecylpyridinium surfactants, using conductometry and H-1-NMR spectroscopy. Three types of counterions have been studied: (i) halides, (ii) alkanesulfonates, and (iii) aromatic counterions. The critical.

  6. Chemical and physical properties of the normal and aging lens: spectroscopic (UV, fluorescence, phosphorescence, and NMR) analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerman, S.

    1987-01-01

    In vitro [UV absorption, fluorescence, phosphorescence, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)] spectroscopic studies on the normal human lens demonstrate age-related changes which can be correlated with biochemical and photobiologic mechanisms occurring during our lifetime. Chronic cumulative UV exposure results in an age-related increase of photochemically induced chromophores and in color of the lens nucleus. This enables the lens to filter the incident UV radiation, thereby protecting the underlying aging retina from UV photodamage. We have measured the age-related increase in lens fluorescence in vivo on more than 300 normal subjects (1st to 9th decade) by UV slitlamp densitography. These data show a good correlation with the in vitro lens fluorescence studies reported previously and demonstrate that molecular photodamage can be monitored in the lens. In vitro NMR (human and animal lenses) and in vivo experiments currently in progress are rapidly elucidating the physicochemical basis for transparency and the development of light scattering areas. Surface scanning NMR can monitor organophosphate metabolism in the ocular lens in vivo as well as in vitro. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using biophysical methods (optical spectroscopy and NMR analyses) to delineate age-related parameters in the lens, in vivo as well as in vitro. 46 references

  7. Non-targeted detection of chemical contamination in carbonated soft drinks using NMR spectroscopy, variable selection and chemometrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlton, Adrian J. [Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Central Science Laboratory, Sand Hutton, York YO41 1LZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: adrian.charlton@csl.gov.uk; Robb, Paul; Donarski, James A.; Godward, John [Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Central Science Laboratory, Sand Hutton, York YO41 1LZ (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-23

    An efficient method for detecting malicious and accidental contamination of foods has been developed using a combined {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and chemometrics approach. The method has been demonstrated using a commercially available carbonated soft drink, as being capable of identifying atypical products and to identify contaminant resonances. Soft-independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA) was used to compare {sup 1}H NMR profiles of genuine products (obtained from the manufacturer) against retail products spiked in the laboratory with impurities. The benefits of using feature selection for extracting contaminant NMR frequencies were also assessed. Using example impurities (paraquat, p-cresol and glyphosate) NMR spectra were analysed using multivariate methods resulting in detection limits of approximately 0.075, 0.2, and 0.06 mM for p-cresol, paraquat and glyphosate, respectively. These detection limits are shown to be approximately 100-fold lower than the minimum lethal dose for paraquat. The methodology presented here is used to assess the composition of complex matrices for the presence of contaminating molecules without a priori knowledge of the nature of potential contaminants. The ability to detect if a sample does not fit into the expected profile without recourse to multiple targeted analyses is a valuable tool for incident detection and forensic applications.

  8. Non-targeted detection of chemical contamination in carbonated soft drinks using NMR spectroscopy, variable selection and chemometrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, Adrian J.; Robb, Paul; Donarski, James A.; Godward, John

    2008-01-01

    An efficient method for detecting malicious and accidental contamination of foods has been developed using a combined 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and chemometrics approach. The method has been demonstrated using a commercially available carbonated soft drink, as being capable of identifying atypical products and to identify contaminant resonances. Soft-independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA) was used to compare 1 H NMR profiles of genuine products (obtained from the manufacturer) against retail products spiked in the laboratory with impurities. The benefits of using feature selection for extracting contaminant NMR frequencies were also assessed. Using example impurities (paraquat, p-cresol and glyphosate) NMR spectra were analysed using multivariate methods resulting in detection limits of approximately 0.075, 0.2, and 0.06 mM for p-cresol, paraquat and glyphosate, respectively. These detection limits are shown to be approximately 100-fold lower than the minimum lethal dose for paraquat. The methodology presented here is used to assess the composition of complex matrices for the presence of contaminating molecules without a priori knowledge of the nature of potential contaminants. The ability to detect if a sample does not fit into the expected profile without recourse to multiple targeted analyses is a valuable tool for incident detection and forensic applications

  9. NMR, water and plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As, H. van.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis describes the application of a non-destructive pulsed proton NMR method mainly to measure water transport in the xylem vessels of plant stems and in some model systems. The results are equally well applicable to liquid flow in other biological objects than plants, e.g. flow of blood and other body fluids in human and animals. The method is based on a pulse sequence of equidistant π pulses in combination with a linear magnetic field gradient. (Auth.)

  10. Correlations of the chemical shift on fasly rotating biological solids by means of NMR spectroscopy; Korrelationen der chemischen Verschiebung an schnell rotierenden biologischen Festkoerpern mittels NMR-Spektroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, Christian

    2010-04-27

    The basic aim of the thesis was the development and improvement of homo- and heteronuclear feedback sequences for the generation of correlation spectra of the chemical shift. In a first step the possibility of the acquisition of {sup 13}C-{sup 13} correlation spectra of the chemical shift by means of inversion pulses with low RF power factor was studied. Furthermore it was shown that broad-band phase-modulated inversion and universal rotational pulses can be constructed by means of global optimization procedures like the genetic algorithms under regardment of the available RF field strength. By inversion, universal rotational, and 360 pulses as starting values of the optimization efficient homonuclear CN{sub n}{sup {nu}} and RN{sub n}{sup {nu}} mixing sequences as well as heteronuclear RN{sub n}{sup {nu}{sub s},{nu}{sub k}} feedback sequences were generated. The satisfactory power of the numerically optimized sequences was shown by means of the simulation as well by means of correlation experiments of the chemical shift of L-histidine, L-arginine, and the (CUG){sub 97}-RNA. This thesis deals furthermore with the possibility to acquire simultaneously different signals with several receivers. By means of numerically optimized RN{sub n}{sup {nu}{sub s},{nu}{sub k}} pulse sequences both {sup 15}N-{sup 13}C and {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N correlation spectra were simultaneously generated. Furthermore it could be shown that the simultaneous acquisition of 3D-{sup 15}N-{sup 13}C-{sup 13}C and {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N-({sup 1}H)-{sup 1}H correlation spectra is possible. By this in only one measurement process resonance assignments can be met and studies of the global folding performed. A further application of several receivers is the simultaneous acquisition of CHHC, NHHN, NHHC, as well as CHHN spectra. By such experiments it is possible to characterize the hydrogen-bonding pattern and the glycosidic torsion angle {sup {chi}} in RNA. This was demonstrated by means of the (CUG){sub 97

  11. NMR of insensitive nuclei enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miéville, Pascal; Jannin, Sami; Helm, Lothar; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2011-01-01

    Despite the powerful spectroscopic information it provides, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy suffers from a lack of sensitivity, especially when dealing with nuclei other than protons. Even though NMR can be applied in a straightforward manner when dealing with abundant protons of organic molecules, it is very challenging to address biomolecules in low concentration and/or many other nuclei of the periodic table that do not provide as intense signals as protons. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) is an important technique that provides a way to dramatically increase signal intensities in NMR. It consists in transferring the very high electron spin polarization of paramagnetic centers (usually at low temperature) to the surrounding nuclear spins with appropriate microwave irradiation. DNP can lead to an enhancement of the nuclear spin polarization by up to four orders of magnitude. We present in this article some basic concepts of DNP, describe the DNP apparatus at EPFL, and illustrate the interest of the technique for chemical applications by reporting recent measurements of the kinetics of complexation of 89Y by the DOTAM ligand.

  12. NMR imaging and spectroscopy of the mammalian central nervous system after heavy ion radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, T.

    1984-09-01

    NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopic, and histopathologic techniques were used to study the proton relaxation time and related biochemical changes in the central nervous system after helium beam in vivo irradiation of the rodent brain. The spectroscopic observations reported in this dissertation were made possible by development of methods for measuring the NMR parameters of the rodent brain in vivo and in vitro. The methods include (1) depth selective spectroscopy using an optimization of rf pulse energy based on a priori knowledge of N-acetyl aspartate and lipid spectra of the normal brain, (2) phase-encoded proton spectroscopy of the living rodent using a surface coil, and (3) dual aqueous and organic tissue extraction technique for spectroscopy. Radiation induced increases were observed in lipid and p-choline peaks of the proton spectrum, in vivo. Proton NMR spectroscopy measurements on brain extracts (aqueous and organic solvents) were made to observe chemical changes that could not be seen in vivo. Radiation-induced changes were observed in lactate, GABA, glutamate, and p-choline peak areas of the aqueous fraction spectra. In the organic fraction, decreases were observed in peak area ratios of the terminal-methyl peaks, the N-methyl groups of choline, and at a peak at 2.84 ppM (phosphatidyl ethanolamine and phosphatidyl serine resonances) relative to TMS. With histology and Evans blue injections, blood-brain barrier alternations were seen as early as 4 days after irradiation. 83 references, 53 figures

  13. NMR imaging and spectroscopy of the mammalian central nervous system after heavy ion radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, T.

    1984-09-01

    NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopic, and histopathologic techniques were used to study the proton relaxation time and related biochemical changes in the central nervous system after helium beam in vivo irradiation of the rodent brain. The spectroscopic observations reported in this dissertation were made possible by development of methods for measuring the NMR parameters of the rodent brain in vivo and in vitro. The methods include (1) depth selective spectroscopy using an optimization of rf pulse energy based on a priori knowledge of N-acetyl aspartate and lipid spectra of the normal brain, (2) phase-encoded proton spectroscopy of the living rodent using a surface coil, and (3) dual aqueous and organic tissue extraction technique for spectroscopy. Radiation induced increases were observed in lipid and p-choline peaks of the proton spectrum, in vivo. Proton NMR spectroscopy measurements on brain extracts (aqueous and organic solvents) were made to observe chemical changes that could not be seen in vivo. Radiation-induced changes were observed in lactate, GABA, glutamate, and p-choline peak areas of the aqueous fraction spectra. In the organic fraction, decreases were observed in peak area ratios of the terminal-methyl peaks, the N-methyl groups of choline, and at a peak at 2.84 ppM (phosphatidyl ethanolamine and phosphatidyl serine resonances) relative to TMS. With histology and Evans blue injections, blood-brain barrier alternations were seen as early as 4 days after irradiation. 83 references, 53 figures.

  14. Proton Chemical Shift Imaging of the Brain in Pediatric and Adult Developmental Stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Joseph; Dong, Zhengchao; Bansal, Ravi; Ivanov, Iliyan; Hao, Xuejun; Desai, Jay; Pozzi, Elena; Peterson, Bradley S

    2017-01-01

    Developmental stuttering is a neuropsychiatric condition of incompletely understood brain origin. Our recent functional magnetic resonance imaging study indicates a possible partial basis of stuttering in circuits enacting self-regulation of motor activity, attention, and emotion. To further characterize the neurophysiology of stuttering through in vivo assay of neurometabolites in suspect brain regions. Proton chemical shift imaging of the brain was performed in a case-control study of children and adults with and without stuttering. Recruitment, assessment, and magnetic resonance imaging were performed in an academic research setting. Ratios of N-acetyl-aspartate plus N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAA) to creatine (Cr) and choline compounds (Cho) to Cr in widespread cerebral cortical, white matter, and subcortical regions were analyzed using region of interest and data-driven voxel-based approaches. Forty-seven children and adolescents aged 5 to 17 years (22 with stuttering and 25 without) and 47 adults aged 21 to 51 years (20 with stuttering and 27 without) were recruited between June 2008 and March 2013. The mean (SD) ages of those in the stuttering and control groups were 12.2 (4.2) years and 13.4 (3.2) years, respectively, for the pediatric cohort and 31.4 (7.5) years and 30.5 (9.9) years, respectively, for the adult cohort. Region of interest-based findings included lower group mean NAA:Cr ratio in stuttering than nonstuttering participants in the right inferior frontal cortex (-7.3%; P = .02), inferior frontal white matter (-11.4%; P < .001), and caudate (-10.6%; P = .04), while the Cho:Cr ratio was higher in the bilateral superior temporal cortex (left: +10.0%; P = .03 and right: +10.8%; P = .01), superior temporal white matter (left: +14.6%; P = .003 and right: +9.5%; P = .02), and thalamus (left: +11.6%; P = .002 and right: +11.1%; P = .001). False discovery rate-corrected voxel-based findings were highly consistent

  15. Effect of counterions on properties of micelles formed by alkylpyridinium surfactants .1. Conductometry and H-1-NMR chemical shifts

    OpenAIRE

    Bijma, K; Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    1997-01-01

    This paper delineates the influence of counterions on the aggregation behavior of 1-methyl-4-n-dodecylpyridinium surfactants, using conductometry and H-1-NMR spectroscopy. Three types of counterions have been studied: (i) halides, (ii) alkanesulfonates, and (iii) aromatic counterions. The critical. micelle concentration is found to decrease with increasing counterion size and increasing counterion hydrophobicity, whereas the degree of counterion binding increases. The aggregation behavior of ...

  16. Structure of the Alanine Hydration Shell as Probed by NMR Chemical Shifts and Indirect Spin-Spin Coupling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dračínský, Martin; Kaminský, Jakub; Bouř, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 44 (2009), s. 14698-14707 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/07/0732; GA AV ČR IAA400550702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : NMR spectroscopy * CPMD * molecular dynamics * solvent effects Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.471, year: 2009

  17. A chemically stable electrolyte with a novel sandwiched structure for proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs)

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei

    2013-11-01

    A chemically stable electrolyte structure was developed for proton-conducting SOFCs by using two layers of stable BaZr0.7Pr 0.1Y0.2O3 -δ to sandwich a highly-conductive but unstable BaCe0.8Y0.2O 3 -δ electrolyte layer. The sandwiched electrolyte structure showed good chemical stability in both CO2 and H2O atmosphere, indicating that the BZPY layers effectively protect the inner BCY electrolyte, while the BCY electrolyte alone decomposed completely under the same conditions. Fuel cell prototypes fabricated with the sandwiched electrolyte achieved a relatively high performance of 185 mW cm- 2 at 700 C, with a high electrolyte film conductivity of 4 × 10- 3 S cm- 1 at 600 C. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Quantum-chemical, NMR, FT IR, and ESI MS studies of complexes of colchicine with Zn(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Wojciech; Kurek, Joanna; Barczyński, Piotr; Hoffmann, Marcin

    2017-04-01

    Colchicine is a tropolone alkaloid from Colchicinum autumnale. It shows antifibrotic, antimitotic, and anti-inflammatory activities, and is used to treat gout and Mediterranean fever. In this work, complexes of colchicine with zinc(II) nitrate were synthesized and investigated using DFT, 1 H and 13 C NMR, FT IR, and ESI MS. The counterpoise-corrected and uncorrected interaction energies of these complexes were calculated. We also calculated their 1 H, 13 C NMR, and IR spectra and compared them with the corresponding experimentally obtained data. According to the ESI MS mass spectra, colchicine forms stable complexes with zinc(II) nitrate that have various stoichiometries: 2:1, 1:1:1, and 2:1:1 with respect to colchichine, Zn(II), and nitrate ion. All of the complexes were investigated using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). The calculated and the measured spectra showed differences before and after the complexation process. Calculated electron densities and bond critical points indicated the presence of bonds between the ligands and the central cation in the investigated complexes that satisfied the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. Graphical Abstract DFT, NMR, FT IR, ESI MS, QTAIM and puckering studies of complexes of colchicine with Zn(II).

  19. Tautomerism and the Protonation/Deprotonation of Isocytosine in Liquid- and Solid-States Studied by NMR Spectroscopy and Theoretical Calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dračínský, Martin; Jansa, Petr; Ahonen, K.; Buděšínský, Miloš

    -, č. 8 (2011), s. 1544-1551 ISSN 1434-193X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400550903; GA MŠk 1M0508 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M200380901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : NMR spectroscopy * tautomerism * nitrogen heterocycles * density functional calculations Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.329, year: 2011

  20. Ab initio/GIAO-CCSD(T) study of structures, energies, and 13C NMR chemical shifts of C4H7(+) and C5H9(+) ions: relative stability and dynamic aspects of the cyclopropylcarbinyl vs bicyclobutonium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olah, George A; Surya Prakash, G K; Rasul, Golam

    2008-07-16

    The structures and energies of the carbocations C 4H 7 (+) and C 5H 9 (+) were calculated using the ab initio method. The (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the carbocations were calculated using the GIAO-CCSD(T) method. The pisigma-delocalized bisected cyclopropylcarbinyl cation, 1 and nonclassical bicyclobutonium ion, 2 were found to be the minima for C 4H 7 (+) at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level. At the MP4(SDTQ)/cc-pVTZ//MP2/cc-pVTZ + ZPE level the structure 2 is 0.4 kcal/mol more stable than the structure 1. The (13)C NMR chemical shifts of 1 and 2 were calculated by the GIAO-CCSD(T) method. Based on relative energies and (13)C NMR chemical shift calculations, an equilibrium involving the 1 and 2 in superacid solutions is most likely responsible for the experimentally observed (13)C NMR chemical shifts, with the latter as the predominant equilibrating species. The alpha-methylcyclopropylcarbinyl cation, 4, and nonclassical bicyclobutonium ion, 5, were found to be the minima for C 5H 9 (+) at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level. At the MP4(SDTQ)/cc-pVTZ//MP2/cc-pVTZ + ZPE level ion 5 is 5.9 kcal/mol more stable than the structure 4. The calculated (13)C NMR chemical shifts of 5 agree rather well with the experimental values of C 5H 9 (+).

  1. Metal and proton toxicity to lake zooplankton: A chemical speciation based modelling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockdale, Anthony; Tipping, Edward; Lofts, Stephen; Fott, Jan; Garmo, Øyvind A.; Hruska, Jakub; Keller, Bill; Löfgren, Stefan; Maberly, Stephen C.; Majer, Vladimir; Nierzwicki-Bauer, Sandra A.; Persson, Gunnar; Schartau, Ann-Kristin; Thackeray, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    The WHAM-F TOX model quantifies the combined toxic effects of protons and metal cations towards aquatic organisms through the toxicity function (F TOX ), a linear combination of the products of organism-bound cation and a toxic potency coefficient for each cation. We describe the application of the model to predict an observable ecological field variable, species richness of pelagic lake crustacean zooplankton, studied with respect to either acidification or the impacts of metals from smelters. The fitted results give toxic potencies increasing in the order H + TOX to relate combined toxic effects of protons and metal cations towards lake crustacean zooplankton. • The fitted results give toxic potencies increasing in the order H + TOX model has been applied to field data for pelagic lake crustacean zooplankton. The fitted results give metal toxic potencies increasing in the order H + < Al < Cu < Zn < Ni

  2. Solid-state NMR chemical-shift perturbations indicate domain reorientation of the DnaG primase in the primosome of Helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardiennet, Carole [Université de Lorraine, CNRS, CRM2, UMR 7036 (France); Wiegand, Thomas [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Bazin, Alexandre [Université de Lyon 1, Molecular Microbiology and Structural Biochemistry, Labex Ecofect, UMR 5086 CNRS (France); Cadalbert, Riccardo [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Kunert, Britta; Lacabanne, Denis [Université de Lyon 1, Molecular Microbiology and Structural Biochemistry, Labex Ecofect, UMR 5086 CNRS (France); Gutsche, Irina [Université Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS), CNRS, IBS, CEA, IBS (France); Terradot, Laurent, E-mail: l.terradot@ibcp.fr [Université de Lyon 1, Molecular Microbiology and Structural Biochemistry, Labex Ecofect, UMR 5086 CNRS (France); Meier, Beat H., E-mail: beme@ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Böckmann, Anja, E-mail: a.bockmann@ibcp.fr [Université de Lyon 1, Molecular Microbiology and Structural Biochemistry, Labex Ecofect, UMR 5086 CNRS (France)

    2016-03-15

    We here investigate the interactions between the DnaB helicase and the C-terminal domain of the corresponding DnaG primase of Helicobacter pylori using solid-state NMR. The difficult crystallization of this 387 kDa complex, where the two proteins interact in a six to three ratio, is circumvented by simple co-sedimentation of the two proteins directly into the MAS-NMR rotor. While the amount of information that can be extracted from such a large protein is still limited, we can assign a number of amino-acid residues experiencing significant chemical-shift perturbations upon helicase-primase complex formation. The location of these residues is used as a guide to model the interaction interface between the two proteins in the complex. Chemical-shift perturbations also reveal changes at the interaction interfaces of the hexameric HpDnaB assembly on HpDnaG binding. A structural model of the complex that explains the experimental findings is obtained.

  3. Proton-Conducting Sulfonated and Phosphonated Polymers and Fuel Cell Membranes by Chemical Modification of Polysulfones

    OpenAIRE

    Lafitte, Benoit

    2007-01-01

    The proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is currently emerging as an efficient and environmentally friendly power source. The technology is very complex and relies ultimately on materials and components which need further development. One of the major hurdles for advancing the PEMFC technology is currently the demand for new durable low-cost polymeric membranes that will allow fuel cell operation at high temperatures without extensive humidification requirements. Thus, the design and pr...

  4. Out-and-back {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C scalar transfers in protein resonance assignment by proton-detected solid-state NMR under ultra-fast MAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Pell, Andrew J. [University of Lyon, CNRS/ENS Lyon/UCB Lyon 1, Centre de RMN a Tres Hauts Champs (France); Jaudzems, Kristaps [Latvian Institute of Organic Synthesis (Latvia); Franks, W. Trent; Retel, Joren S. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (Germany); Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Tars, Kaspars [Biomedical Research and Study Center (Latvia); Emsley, Lyndon [University of Lyon, CNRS/ENS Lyon/UCB Lyon 1, Centre de RMN a Tres Hauts Champs (France); Oschkinat, Hartmut [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (Germany); Lesage, Anne; Pintacuda, Guido, E-mail: guido.pintacuda@ens-lyon.fr [University of Lyon, CNRS/ENS Lyon/UCB Lyon 1, Centre de RMN a Tres Hauts Champs (France)

    2013-08-15

    We present here {sup 1}H-detected triple-resonance H/N/C experiments that incorporate CO-CA and CA-CB out-and-back scalar-transfer blocks optimized for robust resonance assignment in biosolids under ultra-fast magic-angle spinning (MAS). The first experiment, (H)(CO)CA(CO)NH, yields {sup 1}H-detected inter-residue correlations, in which we record the chemical shifts of the CA spins in the first indirect dimension while during the scalar-transfer delays the coherences are present only on the longer-lived CO spins. The second experiment, (H)(CA)CB(CA)NH, correlates the side-chain CB chemical shifts with the NH of the same residue. These high sensitivity experiments are demonstrated on both fully-protonated and 100 %-H{sup N} back-protonated perdeuterated microcrystalline samples of Acinetobacter phage 205 (AP205) capsids at 60 kHz MAS.

  5. NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5}: Assignment of {sup 19}F NMR resonances and chemical bond analysis from GIPAW calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswal, Mamata, E-mail: Mamata.Biswal-Susanta_Kumar_Nayak.Etu@univ-lemans.fr [LUNAM Université, Université du Maine, CNRS UMR 6283, Institut des Molécules et des Matériaux du Mans, Avenue Olivier Messiaen, 72085 Le Mans Cedex 9 (France); Body, Monique, E-mail: monique.body@univ-lemans.fr [LUNAM Université, Université du Maine, CNRS UMR 6283, Institut des Molécules et des Matériaux du Mans, Avenue Olivier Messiaen, 72085 Le Mans Cedex 9 (France); Legein, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.legein@univ-lemans.fr [LUNAM Université, Université du Maine, CNRS UMR 6283, Institut des Molécules et des Matériaux du Mans, Avenue Olivier Messiaen, 72085 Le Mans Cedex 9 (France); Sadoc, Aymeric, E-mail: Aymeric.Sadoc@cnrs-imn.fr [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), Université de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Boucher, Florent, E-mail: Florent.Boucher@cnrs-imn.fr [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), Université de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France)

    2013-11-15

    The {sup 19}F isotropic chemical shifts (δ{sub iso}) of two isomorphic compounds, NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5}, which involve six nonequivalent fluorine sites, have been experimentally determined from the reconstruction of 1D {sup 19}F MAS NMR spectra. In parallel, the corresponding {sup 19}F chemical shielding tensors have been calculated using the GIPAW method for both experimental and DFT-optimized structures. Furthermore, the [M{sub 4}F{sub 20}] units of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} being held together by van der Waals interactions, the relevance of Grimme corrections to the DFT optimization processes has been evaluated. However, the semi-empirical dispersion correction term introduced by such a method does not show any significant improvement. Nonetheless, a complete and convincing assignment of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} is obtained, ensured by the linearity between experimental {sup 19}F δ{sub iso} values and calculated {sup 19}F isotropic chemical shielding σ{sub iso} values. The effects of the geometry optimizations have been carefully analyzed, confirming among other matters, the inaccuracy of the experimental structure of NbF{sub 5}. The relationships between the fluorine chemical shifts, the nature of the fluorine atoms (bridging or terminal), the position of the terminal ones (opposite or perpendicular to the bridging ones), the fluorine charges, the ionicity and the length of the M–F bonds have been established. Additionally, for three of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5}, distorted multiplets, arising from {sup 1}J-coupling and residual dipolar coupling between the {sup 19}F and {sup 93}Nb nuclei, were simulated yielding to values of {sup 93}Nb–{sup 19}F {sup 1}J-coupling for the corresponding fluorine sites. - Graphical abstract: The complete assignment of the {sup 19}F NMR lines of NbF{sub 5} and TaF{sub 5} allow establishing relationships between the {sup 19}F δ{sub iso} values, the nature of the fluorine atoms

  6. A novel in situ electrochemical NMR cell with a palisade gold film electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Zu-Rong; Cui, Xiao-Hong; Cao, Shuo-Hui; Chen, Zhong

    2017-08-01

    In situ electrochemical nuclear magnetic resonance (EC-NMR) has attracted considerable attention because of its ability to directly observe real-time electrochemical processes. Therefore, minimizing the incompatibility between the electrochemical device and NMR detection has become an important challenge. A circular thin metal film deposited on the outer surface of a glass tube with a thickness considerably less than the metal skin depth is considered to be the ideal working electrode. In this study, we demonstrate that such a thin film electrode still has a great influence on the radio frequency field homogeneity in the detective zone of the NMR spectrometer probe and provide theoretical and experimental confirmation of its electromagnetic shielding. Furthermore, we propose a novel palisade gold film device to act as the working electrode. The NMR nutation behavior of protons shows that the uniformity of the radio frequency field is greatly improved, increasing the sensitivity in NMR detection. Another advantage of the proposed device is that an external reference standard adapted to the reaction compound can be inserted as a probe to determine the fluctuation of the physico-chemical environment and achieve high-accuracy quantitative NMR analysis. A three-chamber electrochemical device based on the palisade gold film design was successfully fabricated and the in situ electrochemical NMR performance was validated in a standard 5 mm NMR probe by acquiring voltammograms and high-resolution NMR spectra to characterize the electrochemically generated species. The evolution of in situ EC-NMR spectrum monitoring of the redox transformation between p-benzoquinone and hydroquinone demonstrates the ability of the EC-NMR device to simultaneously quantitatively determine the reactants and elucidate the reaction mechanism at the molecular level.

  7. A novel in situ electrochemical NMR cell with a palisade gold film electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zu-Rong Ni

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In situ electrochemical nuclear magnetic resonance (EC-NMR has attracted considerable attention because of its ability to directly observe real-time electrochemical processes. Therefore, minimizing the incompatibility between the electrochemical device and NMR detection has become an important challenge. A circular thin metal film deposited on the outer surface of a glass tube with a thickness considerably less than the metal skin depth is considered to be the ideal working electrode. In this study, we demonstrate that such a thin film electrode still has a great influence on the radio frequency field homogeneity in the detective zone of the NMR spectrometer probe and provide theoretical and experimental confirmation of its electromagnetic shielding. Furthermore, we propose a novel palisade gold film device to act as the working electrode. The NMR nutation behavior of protons shows that the uniformity of the radio frequency field is greatly improved, increasing the sensitivity in NMR detection. Another advantage of the proposed device is that an external reference standard adapted to the reaction compound can be inserted as a probe to determine the fluctuation of the physico-chemical environment and achieve high-accuracy quantitative NMR analysis. A three-chamber electrochemical device based on the palisade gold film design was successfully fabricated and the in situ electrochemical NMR performance was validated in a standard 5 mm NMR probe by acquiring voltammograms and high-resolution NMR spectra to characterize the electrochemically generated species. The evolution of in situ EC-NMR spectrum monitoring of the redox transformation between p-benzoquinone and hydroquinone demonstrates the ability of the EC-NMR device to simultaneously quantitatively determine the reactants and elucidate the reaction mechanism at the molecular level.

  8. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts of 10-Hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Kamounah, Fadhil S.; Gryko, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 13C-NMR chemical shifts are investigated in a series of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines (HBQ’s) The OH proton is deuteriated. The isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts in these hydrogen bonded systems are rather unusual. The formal four-bond effects are found to be nega...

  9. High resolution deuterium NMR studies of bacterial metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo, J.B.; Gamcsik, M.P.; Dick, J.D.

    1988-12-25

    High resolution deuterium NMR spectra were obtained from suspensions of five bacterial strains: Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Deuterium-labeled D-glucose at C-1, C-2, and C-6 was used to monitor dynamically anaerobic metabolism. The flux of glucose through the various bacterial metabolic pathways could be determined by following the disappearance of glucose and the appearance of the major end products in the 2H NMR spectrum. The presence of both labeled and unlabeled metabolites could be detected using 1H NMR spectroscopy since the proton resonances in the labeled species are shifted upfield due to an isotopic chemical shift effect. The 1H-1H scalar coupling observed in both the 2H and 1H NMR spectra was used to assign definitively the resonances of labeled species. An increase in the intensity of natural abundance deuterium signal of water can be used to monitor pathways in which a deuteron is lost from the labeled metabolite. The steps in which label loss can occur are outlined, and the influence these processes have on the ability of 2H NMR spectroscopy to monitor metabolism are assessed.

  10. High resolution deuterium NMR studies of bacterial metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguayo, J.B.; Gamcsik, M.P.; Dick, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    High resolution deuterium NMR spectra were obtained from suspensions of five bacterial strains: Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Deuterium-labeled D-glucose at C-1, C-2, and C-6 was used to monitor dynamically anaerobic metabolism. The flux of glucose through the various bacterial metabolic pathways could be determined by following the disappearance of glucose and the appearance of the major end products in the 2H NMR spectrum. The presence of both labeled and unlabeled metabolites could be detected using 1H NMR spectroscopy since the proton resonances in the labeled species are shifted upfield due to an isotopic chemical shift effect. The 1H-1H scalar coupling observed in both the 2H and 1H NMR spectra was used to assign definitively the resonances of labeled species. An increase in the intensity of natural abundance deuterium signal of water can be used to monitor pathways in which a deuteron is lost from the labeled metabolite. The steps in which label loss can occur are outlined, and the influence these processes have on the ability of 2H NMR spectroscopy to monitor metabolism are assessed

  11. Solid state NMR study of cumbaru flour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Jose S.; Bathista, Andre L.B.S.; Silva, Emerson O.; Priante Filho, Nicolau; Tavares, Maria I.B.

    2001-01-01

    The polysaccharide obtained by seed of Dipteryx alata Vog, has been characterised by 13 C solid state, using the basic routine techniques, like MAS and CPMAS and by the proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame parameter (T 1 H ρ). Knowing that the chemical structure and molecular dynamic are extremely necessary route to obtain information on the polysaccharides, this work contributes to the classification of the seed containing in the cumbaru fruit to get response on its application. To obtain the initial responses for our purposes some solid state NMR techniques were chosen. The CPMAS 13 C NMR spectrum of the polysaccharide was investigated to know if it has some crystallinity. The MAS 13 C NMR spectrum showed the presence of domains with distinct molecular mobility, because these domains will differ basically in the distribution size and chain packing. The variable contact time experiment was used to analyse the distribution form of 13 C decays, which give us more information about sample heterogeneity. The T 1 H ρHr values were obtained from the variable contact time and by delayed contact time experiment, because these parameter indicate the order of polysaccharides. From the values of this parameter, we found that this polysaccharide is completely non-ordered. (author)

  12. Chemical constituents from leaves of the Qualea grandiflora: attribution of the NMR data of two diastereoisomeric acylated flavonoid glycosides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, Mariane Cruz Costa; Escorcio, Samuel Portela; Costa, Danielly Albuquerque da; Chaves, Mariana H.; Gerardo, Magela Vieira Junior; Cavalheiro, Alberto J.

    2008-01-01

    Phytochemical investigation from leaves of the Qualea grandiflora (Vochysiaceae) resulted in the isolation and identification of kaempferol-3-O-alpha-L-(4 - E-p-coumaroyl)-rhamnoside, kaempferol-3-O-alpha-L-(4 - Z-p-coumaroyl)-rhamnoside, squalene, phytol, lupeol, alpha-amyrin, beta-amyrin, sitosterol, sitostenone, sitosterol-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, ursolic and oleanolic acids. The structures of the compounds were identified by 1D- and 2D-NMR experiments, mass and UV spectrometry and comparison with literature data. (author)

  13. Physico-chemical modification of polyethersulphone induced by high energy proton, C+ and Ne6+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinodh Kumar, S.; Biswavarathi, V.; Jal, P.; Dey, K.; Krishna, J.B.M.; Saha, A.

    2004-01-01

    Polyehersulphone (PES) was irradiated with 4 MeV proton, 3.6 MeV C + and 145 MeV Ne 6+ ions at different ion fluences. The ion induced spectral changes were analyzed by UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy. The increase in optical absorption, which shifts gradually from near UV to the visible region with increase in fluence for the three different types of bombarding ions was observed. A significant loss in fluorescence intensity with increase in fluence for three different ions was observed. (author)

  14. pH control and rapid mixing in spinning NMR samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesinowski, James P.; Sunberg, Richard J.; Benedict, James J.

    An apparatus is described which permits the acquisition of NMR spectra from spinning 20-mm sample tubes while: (1) constantly monitoring the pH; (2) adding reagents to maintain constant pH (pH-statting); (3) efficiently mixing the added reagent. The apparatus was built to study the spontaneous precipitation of calcium phosphates from supersaturated solutions using 31P NMR. Other applications include the rapid determination of NMR titration curves, and the minimization of temperature gradients in large sample tubes. The apparatus was used to measure the 31P chemical shift titration of dilute phosphoric acid, which yielded accurate shifts for the three species of protonated orthophosphate ion. The bulk magnetic susceptibility of 85% H 3PO 4 relative to a dilute aqueous sample was also measured, and is shown to contribute significantly to chemical shift measurements.

  15. Determination of the intracellular pH of intact erythrocytes by 1H NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabenstein, D.L.; Isab, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    A method is described for determining the intracellular pH of intact erythrocytes by 1 H NMR. The determination is based on the pH dependence of the chemical shifts of resonances for carbon-bounded protons of an indicator molecule (imidazole) in intact cells. The imidazole is introduced into the erythrocytes by incubation in an isotonic saline solution of the indicator. The pH dependence of the chemical shifts of the imidazole resonances is calibrated from 1 H NMR spectra of the imidazole-containing red cell lysates whose pH is varied by the addition of acid or base and measured directly with a pH electrode. To reduce in intensity or eliminate the much more intense envelope of resonances from the hemoglobin, the 1 H NMR measurements are made by either the spin-echo Fourier transform technique or by the transfer-or-saturation by cross-relaxation method

  16. Thermal Fluctuations in the Magnetic Ground State of the Molecular Cluster Mn12O12 Acetate from μSR and Proton NMR Relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lascialfari, A.; Borsa, F.; Carretta, P.; Jang, Z.H.; Borsa, F.; Gatteschi, D.

    1998-01-01

    Measurements of the spin-lattice relaxation rate are reported for muons and protons as a function of temperature for different values of the applied magnetic field in the Mn 12 O 12 molecular cluster. Strongly field dependent maxima in the relaxation rate versus temperature are observed below 50thinspthinspK. The results are explained in terms of thermal fluctuations of the total magnetization of the cluster among the different orientations with respect to the anisotropy axis. The lifetimes of the different m components of the total spin, S T =10 , of the molecule are obtained from the experiment and shown to be consistent with the ones expected from a spin-phonon coupling mechanism. No clear evidence for macroscopic quantum tunneling was observed in the field dependence of the proton relaxation rate at low T . copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  17. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT)was used to assign the electronic absorption bands observed experimentally. Pyridine derivative showed two bands at shorter λmax compared to the others, both experimentally and theoretically. The NMR chemical shifts were computed for protons and carbons using GIAO ...

  18. Chemical dynamics of the first proton-coupled electron transfer of water oxidation on TiO2 anatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Li, Ye-Fei; Sit, Patrick; Selloni, Annabella

    2013-12-18

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a prototype, water-splitting (photo)catalyst, but its performance is limited by the large overpotential for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). We report here a first-principles density functional theory study of the chemical dynamics of the first proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), which is considered responsible for the large OER overpotential on TiO2. We use a periodic model of the TiO2/water interface that includes a slab of anatase TiO2 and explicit water molecules, sample the solvent configurations by first principles molecular dynamics, and determine the energy profiles of the two electronic states involved in the electron transfer (ET) by hybrid functional calculations. Our results suggest that the first PCET is sequential, with the ET following the proton transfer. The ET occurs via an inner sphere process, which is facilitated by a state in which one electronic hole is shared by the two oxygen ions involved in the transfer.

  19. Some double resonance and multiple quantum NMR studies in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wemmer, D.E.

    1978-08-01

    The first section of this work presents the theory and experimental applications to analysis of molecular motion of chemical shielding lineshapes obtained with high resolution double resonance NMR techniques. Analysis of /sup 13/C powder lineshapes in hexamethylbenzene (HMB) and decamethylferrocene (DMFe) show that these molecules reorient in a jumping manner about the symmetry axis. Analysis of proton chemical shielding lineshapes of residual protons in heavy ice (D/sub 2/O) show that protons are exchanged among the tetrahedral positions of neighboring oxygen atoms, consistent with motion expected from defect migration. The second section describes the application of Fourier Transform Double Quantum NMR to measurement of chemical shielding of deuterium in powder samples. Studies of partially deuterated benzene and ferrocene give equal shielding anisotropies, ..delta..sigma = -6.5 ppM. Theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of dipolar couplings between deuterons using FTDQ NMR are presented. Crystals of BaClO/sub 3/.D/sub 2/O, ..cap alpha..,..beta.. d-2 HMB and ..cap alpha..,..beta..,..gamma.. d-3 HMB were studied, as were powders of d-2 HMB and anisic acid. The third section discusses general multiple quantum spectroscopy in dipolar coupled spin systems. Theoretical description is made for creation and detection of coherences between states without quantum number selection rules ..delta..m = +-1. Descriptions of techniques for partial selectivity of order in preparation and detection of multiple quantum coherences are made. The effects on selectivity and resolution of echo pulses during multiple quantum experiments are discussed. Experimental observation of coherences up to order 6 have been made in a sample of benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal. Experimental verifications of order selection and echo generation have been made.

  20. Some double resonance and multiple quantum NMR studies in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wemmer, D.E.

    1978-08-01

    The first section of this work presents the theory and experimental applications to analysis of molecular motion of chemical shielding lineshapes obtained with high resolution double resonance NMR techniques. Analysis of 13 C powder lineshapes in hexamethylbenzene (HMB) and decamethylferrocene (DMFe) show that these molecules reorient in a jumping manner about the symmetry axis. Analysis of proton chemical shielding lineshapes of residual protons in heavy ice (D 2 O) show that protons are exchanged among the tetrahedral positions of neighboring oxygen atoms, consistent with motion expected from defect migration. The second section describes the application of Fourier Transform Double Quantum NMR to measurement of chemical shielding of deuterium in powder samples. Studies of partially deuterated benzene and ferrocene give equal shielding anisotropies, Δsigma = -6.5 ppM. Theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of dipolar couplings between deuterons using FTDQ NMR are presented. Crystals of BaClO 3 .D 2 O, α,β d-2 HMB and α,β,γ d-3 HMB were studied, as were powders of d-2 HMB and anisic acid. The third section discusses general multiple quantum spectroscopy in dipolar coupled spin systems. Theoretical description is made for creation and detection of coherences between states without quantum number selection rules Δm = +-1. Descriptions of techniques for partial selectivity of order in preparation and detection of multiple quantum coherences are made. The effects on selectivity and resolution of echo pulses during multiple quantum experiments are discussed. Experimental observation of coherences up to order 6 have been made in a sample of benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal. Experimental verifications of order selection and echo generation have been made

  1. nmr spectroscopic study and dft calculations of giao nmr shieldings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    3Department of Physics, Arts and Science Faculty, Dumlupinar University, Kütahya, ... 1H, 13C NMR chemical shifts and 1JCH coupling constants of .... then estimated using the corresponding TMS shieldings calculated in advance at the same.

  2. Evaluation of chemical changes during Myrciaria cauliflora (jabuticaba fruit) fermentation by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy and chemometric analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortes, Gilmara A.C.; Naves, Sara S.; Ferri, Pedro H.; Santos, Suzana C., E-mail: suzana.quimica.ufg@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Lab. de Bioatividade Molecular

    2012-10-15

    Organic acids, sugars, alcohols, phenolic compounds, color properties, pH and titratable acidity were monitored during the commercial fermentation of jabuticaba (Myrciaria cauliflora) by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, spectrophotometric assays and standard methods of analysis. Data collected was analyzed by principal component (PCA), hierarchical cluster (HCA) and canonical correlation (CCA) analyses. Two sample groups were distinguished and the variables responsible for separation were sugars, anthocyanins, alcohols, hue and acetic and succinic acids. The canonical correlation analysis confirmed the influence of alcohols (ethanol, methanol and glycerol), organic acids (citric, succinic and acetic acids), pH and titratable acidity on the extraction and stability of anthocyanins and co pigments. As a result, color properties were also affected by phenolic variation throughout the fermentative process. (author)

  3. Organometallic derivatives of furan. LII. Synthesis of carbofunctional furylsilanes and their 1H, 13C, and 29Si NMR spectroscopic and quantum-chemical investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukevits, E.; Erchak, N.P.; Castro, I.; Popelis, Yu.Yu.; Kozyrev, A.K.; Anoshkin, V.I.; Kovalev, I.F.

    1986-01-01

    Under the standard conditions for the synthesis of furan compounds it is possible to obtain the carbofunctional derivatives of silylated furfural with retention of the trimethylsilyl group in the ring. By NMR and CNDO/2 LCAO MO methods and also as a result of the investigation of the chemical characteristics of silylated furfural and its carbofunctional derivatives it was established that the introduction of a trimethylsilyl group at position 5 of the furan ring does not change the reactivity of the carbofunctional substituents at position 2. The electronic effects of the substituents are hardly transmitted through the furan ring at all. The effect of substituents in the carbofunctional furylsilanes on the electronic structure of the ring is additive

  4. Primidone--an antiepileptic drug--characterisation by quantum chemical and spectroscopic (FTIR, FT-Raman, 1H, 13C NMR and UV-Visible) investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Santhanam, R; Subramanian, S; Mohan, S

    2013-05-15

    The solid phase FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of primidone were recorded in the regions 4000-400 cm(-1) and 4000-100 cm(-1), respectively. The vibrational spectra were analysed and the observed fundamentals were assigned and analysed. The experimental wavenumbers were compared with the theoretical scaled vibrational wavenumbers determined by DFT methods. The Raman intensities were also determined with B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) method. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surface of the molecule were constructed by using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method to display electrostatic potential (electron+nuclei) distribution. The HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. Natural bond orbital analysis of primidone has been performed to indicate the presence of intramolecular charge transfer. The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra were recorded and the chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. NMR Study on the Interaction of Trehalose with Lactose and Its Effect on the Hydrogen Bond Interaction in Lactose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Morssing Vilén

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose, a well-known stress-protector of biomolecules, has been investigated for its effect on the mobility, hydration and hydrogen bond interaction of lactose using diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy and NMR of hydroxy protons. In ternary mixtures of trehalose, lactose and water, the two sugars have the same rate of diffusion. The chemical shifts, temperature coefficients, vicinal coupling constants and ROE of the hydroxy protons in trehalose, lactose and sucrose were measured for the disaccharides alone in water/acetone-d6 solutions as well as in mixtures. The data indicated that addition of trehalose did not change significantly the strength of the hydrogen bond interaction between GlcOH3 and GalO5' in lactose. Small upfield shifts were however measured for all hydroxy protons when the sugar concentration was increased. The chemical shift of the GlcOH3 signal in lactose showed less change, attributed to the spatial proximity to GalO5'. Chemical exchange between hydroxy protons of lactose and trehalose was observed in the ROESY NMR spectra. Similar effects were observed with sucrose indicating no specific effect of trehalose at the concentrations investigated (73 to 763 mg/mL and suggesting that it is the concentration of hydroxy groups more than the type of sugars which is guiding intermolecular interactions.

  6. Proton NMR studies of Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitors: evidence for pH-dependent conformational change and His25-Tyr27 interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthi, R; Lin, C L; Gong, Y X; VanderVelde, D; Hahn, K

    1992-01-28

    A pH-dependent His25-Tyr27 interaction was demonstrated in the case of Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitors (CMTI-I and CMTI-III) by means of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. pH titration, line widths, peak shapes, deuterium exchange kinetics, and two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) were employed to characterize a conformational change involving Tyr27, which was shown to be triggered by deprotonation of His25 around pH 6. A hydrogen bond is proposed to be formed between N epsilon of His25 and OH of Tyr27, as a distance between the atoms, His25 N epsilon and Tyr27 OH, of 3.02 A is consistent with a model built with NOE-derived distance constraints. Both the X-ray [Bode, W., Greyling, J.H., Huber, R., Otlewski, J., & Wilusz, T. (1989) FEBS Lett. 242, 282-292] and NMR [Holak, T.A., Gondol, D., Otlewski, J., & Wilusz, T. (1989) J. Mol. Biol. 210, 635-648] structures of CMTI-I at low pH (4.7-5.3) rule out such an interaction between the two aromatic rings, as the ring planes are oriented about 10 A away from each other. The presently characterized relative orientations of His25 and Tyr27 are of functional significance, as these residues make contact with the enzyme in the enzyme-inhibitor complex. Furthermore, trypsin assay and inhibitor-binding studies showed that conformations of trypsin and the squash inhibitor were functionally relevant only in the pH range 6-8. The pKa of His25 was determined and found to be influenced by Glu9/Lys substitution and by the hydrolysis of the reactive-site peptide bond between Arg5 and Ile6.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Reassigning the Structures of Natural Products Using NMR Chemical Shifts Computed with Quantum Mechanics: A Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, Teresa A.; Truong, Tiana T.; Wong, Shirley M. T.; Mack, Emma T.; Lodewyk, Michael W.; Harrison, Jason G.; Gamage, R. Alan; Siegel, Justin B.; Kurth, Mark J.; Tantillo, Dean J.

    2015-01-01

    An applied computational chemistry laboratory exercise is described in which students use modern quantum chemical calculations of chemical shifts to assign the structure of a recently isolated natural product. A pre/post assessment was used to measure student learning gains and verify that students demonstrated proficiency of key learning…

  8. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rule, Gordon S

    2006-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful technique to study the structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy is a comprehensive textbook that guides the reader from a basic understanding of the phenomenological properties of magnetic resonance to the application and interpretation of modern multi-dimensional NMR experiments on 15N/13C-labeled proteins. Beginning with elementary quantum mechanics, a set of practical rules is presented and used to describe many commonly employed multi-dimensional, multi-nuclear NMR pulse sequences. A modular analysis of NMR pulse sequence building blocks also provides a basis for understanding and developing novel pulse programs. This text not only covers topics from chemical shift assignment to protein structure refinement, as well as the analysis of protein dynamics and chemical kinetics, but also provides a practical guide to many aspects of modern spectrometer hardware, sample preparation, experimental set-up, and data pr...

  9. Steam Electrolysis by Proton-Conducting Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOECs) with Chemically Stable BaZrO3-Based Electrolytes

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei

    2015-07-17

    BaZrO3-based material was applied as the electrolyte for proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOECs). Compared with the instability of BaCeO3-based proton-conductors, BaZrO3-based material could be a more promising candidate for proton-conducting SOECs due to its excellent chemical stability under H2O conditions, but few reports on this aspect has been made due to the processing difficulty for BaZrO3. Our recent pioneering work has demonstrated the feasibility of using BaZrO3-based electrolyte for SOECs and the fabricated cell achieves relatively high cell performance, which is comparable or even higher than that for BaCeO3-based SOECs and offers better chemical stability. Cell performance can be further improved by tailoring the electrolyte and electrode. © The Electrochemical Society.

  10. Trace level detection of compounds related to the chemical weapons convention by 1H-detected 13C NMR spectroscopy executed with a sensitivity-enhanced, cryogenic probehead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullinan, David B; Hondrogiannis, George; Henderson, Terry J

    2008-04-15

    Two-dimensional 1H-13C HSQC (heteronuclear single quantum correlation) and fast-HMQC (heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation) pulse sequences were implemented using a sensitivity-enhanced, cryogenic probehead for detecting compounds relevant to the Chemical Weapons Convention present in complex mixtures. The resulting methods demonstrated exceptional sensitivity for detecting the analytes at trace level concentrations. 1H-13C correlations of target analytes at chemical shift information could be derived quickly and simultaneously from the resulting spectra. The fast-HMQC pulse sequences generated magnitude mode spectra suitable for detailed analysis in approximately 4.5 h and can be used in experiments to efficiently screen a large number of samples. The HSQC pulse sequences, on the other hand, required roughly twice the data acquisition time to produce suitable spectra. These spectra, however, were phase-sensitive, contained considerably more resolution in both dimensions, and proved to be superior for detecting analyte 1H-13C correlations. Furthermore, a HSQC spectrum collected with a multiplicity-edited pulse sequence provided additional structural information valuable for identifying target analytes. The HSQC pulse sequences are ideal for collecting high-quality data sets with overnight acquisitions and logically follow the use of fast-HMQC pulse sequences to rapidly screen samples for potential target analytes. Use of the pulse sequences considerably improves the performance of NMR spectroscopy as a complimentary technique for the screening, identification, and validation of chemical warfare agents and other small-molecule analytes present in complex mixtures and environmental samples.

  11. Y-doped BaZrO3 as a chemically stable electrolyte for proton-conducting solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs)

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei

    2015-01-01

    A proton-conducting solid oxide electrolysis cell using an Y-doped BaZrO3 electrolyte film, which has been demonstrated to be chemically stable, was successfully fabricated for the first time and showed a promising electrolysis performance.

  12. NMR comparison of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cytochromes c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chau, Meihing; Cai, Meng Li; Timkovich, R.

    1990-01-01

    1 H NMR spectroscopy has been used to examine ferrocytochrome c-551 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 19429) over the pH range 3.5-10.6 and the temperature range 4-60 degree C. Resonance assignments are proposed for main-chain and side-chain protons. Comparison of results for cytochrome c-551 to recently assigned spectra for horse cytochrome c and mutants of yeast iso-1 cytochrome reveals some unique resonances with unusual chemical shifts in all cytochromes that may serve as markers for the heme region. Results for cytochrome c-551 indicate that in the smaller prokaryotic cytochrome, all benzoid side chains are rapidly flipping on the NMR time scale. In contrast, in eukaryotic cytochromes there are some rings flipping slowly on the NMR time scale. The ferrocytochrome c-551 undergoes a transition linked to pH with a pK around 7. The pH behavior of assigned resonances provides evidence that the site of protonation is the inner or buried 17-propionic acid heme substituent (IUPAC-IUB porphyrin nomenclature). Conformational heterogeneity has been observed for segments near the inner heme propionate substituent

  13. Metal alkyls programmed to generate metal alkylidenes by α-H abstraction: prognosis from NMR chemical shift† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental and computational details, NMR spectra, results of NMR calculations and NCS analysis, graphical representation of shielding tensors, molecular orbital diagrams of selected compounds, optimized structures for all calculated species. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc05039a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Christopher P.; Yamamoto, Keishi; Searles, Keith; Shirase, Satoru

    2018-01-01

    Metal alkylidenes, which are key organometallic intermediates in reactions such as olefination or alkene and alkane metathesis, are typically generated from metal dialkyl compounds [M](CH2R)2 that show distinctively deshielded chemical shifts for their α-carbons. Experimental solid-state NMR measurements combined with DFT/ZORA calculations and a chemical shift tensor analysis reveal that this remarkable deshielding originates from an empty metal d-orbital oriented in the M–Cα–Cα′ plane, interacting with the Cα p-orbital lying in the same plane. This π-type interaction inscribes some alkylidene character into Cα that favors alkylidene generation via α-H abstraction. The extent of the deshielding and the anisotropy of the alkyl chemical shift tensors distinguishes [M](CH2R)2 compounds that form alkylidenes from those that do not, relating the reactivity to molecular orbitals of the respective molecules. The α-carbon chemical shifts and tensor orientations thus predict the reactivity of metal alkyl compounds towards alkylidene generation. PMID:29675237

  14. Determination of accurate 1H positions of an alanine tripeptide with anti-parallel and parallel β-sheet structures by high resolution 1H solid state NMR and GIPAW chemical shift calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazawa, Koji; Suzuki, Furitsu; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Ohata, Takuya; Aoki, Akihiro; Nishimura, Katsuyuki; Kaji, Hironori; Shimizu, Tadashi; Asakura, Tetsuo

    2012-11-25

    The accurate (1)H positions of alanine tripeptide, A(3), with anti-parallel and parallel β-sheet structures could be determined by highly resolved (1)H DQMAS solid-state NMR spectra and (1)H chemical shift calculation with gauge-including projector augmented wave calculations.

  15. Use of chemical fractionation and proton nuclear magnetic resonance to probe the physical structure of the primary plant cell wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, I.E.P.; Wallace, J.C.; MacKay, A.L.; Volke, F.

    1990-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance has been used to monitor the microscopic physical properties of etiolated hypocotyl cell walls from Phaseolus vulgaris L. at all stages in a series of chemical fractionations with ammonium oxalate and potassium hydroxide. Solid echo measurements indicate that 75% of the polymers in the intact cell wall, including the cellulose and most of the hemicelluloses, are arranged such that there is almost complete restraint of molecular motion. The chemical fractionations generally altered the physical structures of the remaining cell wall components. Digestion with 0.25% ammonium oxalate/oxalic acid solubilized the pectin and increased the mobility of the hemicellulose I component. Extraction with 4% potassium hydroxide removed the hemicellulose I component and loosened the hemicellulose II. Further extraction with 24% potassium hydroxide removed the hemicellulose II and loosened some of the cellulose. The cellulose crystallinity, as monitored by Jeener echo measurements decreased from 83% to 63% during these fractionations. We conclude that, while hemicellulose I is firmly attached to hemicellulose II, it is not in a closely packed structure. Hemicellulose II is strongly bound to cellulose and has a much more closely packed structure

  16. Metal and proton toxicity to lake zooplankton: A chemical speciation based modelling approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stockdale, A.; Tipping, E.; Lofts, S.; Fott, J.; Garmo, Ø.; Hruška, Jakub; Keller, B.; Löfgren, S.; Maberlyh, S.; Majer, V.; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S. A.; Persson, G.; Schartau, A.; Thackeray, S. J.; Valois, A.; Vrba, Jaroslav; Walseng, B.; Yan, N.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 186, MAR (2014), s. 115-125 ISSN 0269-7491 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073; GA ČR GA206/07/1200 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : chemical speciation * bioavailability * recovery * crustacean zooplankton * lakes Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 4.143, year: 2014

  17. Moving protons with pendant amines: proton mobility in a nickel catalyst for oxidation of hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, Molly; Shaw, Wendy J; Raugei, Simone; Chen, Shentan; Yang, Jenny Y; Kilgore, Uriah J; DuBois, Daniel L; Bullock, R Morris

    2011-09-14

    Proton transport is ubiquitous in chemical and biological processes, including the reduction of dioxygen to water, the reduction of CO(2) to formate, and the production/oxidation of hydrogen. In this work we describe intramolecular proton transfer between Ni and positioned pendant amines for the hydrogen oxidation electrocatalyst [Ni(P(Cy)(2)N(Bn)(2)H)(2)](2+) (P(Cy)(2)N(Bn)(2) = 1,5-dibenzyl-3,7-dicyclohexyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane). Rate constants are determined by variable-temperature one-dimensional NMR techniques and two-dimensional EXSY experiments. Computational studies provide insight into the details of the proton movement and energetics of these complexes. Intramolecular proton exchange processes are observed for two of the three experimentally observable isomers of the doubly protonated Ni(0) complex, [Ni(P(Cy)(2)N(Bn)(2)H)(2)](2+), which have N-H bonds but no Ni-H bonds. For these two isomers, with pendant amines positioned endo to the Ni, the rate constants for proton exchange range from 10(4) to 10(5) s(-1) at 25 °C, depending on isomer and solvent. No exchange is observed for protons on pendant amines positioned exo to the Ni. Analysis of the exchange as a function of temperature provides a barrier for proton exchange of ΔG(‡) = 11-12 kcal/mol for both isomers, with little dependence on solvent. Density functional theory calculations and molecular dynamics simulations support the experimental observations, suggesting metal-mediated intramolecular proton transfers between nitrogen atoms, with chair-to-boat isomerizations as the rate-limiting steps. Because of the fast rate of proton movement, this catalyst may be considered a metal center surrounded by a cloud of exchanging protons. The high intramolecular proton mobility provides information directly pertinent to the ability of pendant amines to accelerate proton transfers during catalysis of hydrogen oxidation. These results may also have broader implications for proton movement in

  18. Distinguishing Vaccinium species by chemical fingerprinting based on NMR spectra, validated with spectra collected in different laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Michelle A; Ferrier, Jonathan; Luchsinger, Sarah M; Yuk, Jimmy; Cuerrier, Alain; Balick, Michael J; Hicks, Joshua M; Killday, K Brian; Kirby, Christopher W; Berrue, Fabrice; Kerr, Russell G; Knagge, Kevin; Gödecke, Tanja; Ramirez, Benjamin E; Lankin, David C; Pauli, Guido F; Burton, Ian; Karakach, Tobias K; Arnason, John T; Colson, Kimberly L

    2014-06-01

    A method was developed to distinguish Vaccinium species based on leaf extracts using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Reference spectra were measured on leaf extracts from several species, including lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium), oval leaf huckleberry (Vaccinium ovalifolium), and cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon). Using principal component analysis, these leaf extracts were resolved in the scores plot. Analysis of variance statistical tests demonstrated that the three groups differ significantly on PC2, establishing that the three species can be distinguished by nuclear magnetic resonance. Soft independent modeling of class analogies models for each species also showed discrimination between species. To demonstrate the robustness of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for botanical identification, spectra of a sample of lowbush blueberry leaf extract were measured at five different sites, with different field strengths (600 versus 700 MHz), different probe types (cryogenic versus room temperature probes), different sample diameters (1.7 mm versus 5 mm), and different consoles (Avance I versus Avance III). Each laboratory independently demonstrated the linearity of their NMR measurements by acquiring a standard curve for chlorogenic acid (R(2) = 0.9782 to 0.9998). Spectra acquired on different spectrometers at different sites classifed into the expected group for the Vaccinium spp., confirming the utility of the method to distinguish Vaccinium species and demonstrating nuclear magnetic resonance fingerprinting for material validation of a natural health product. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Prediction of physical-chemical properties of crude oils by 1H NMR analysis of neat samples and chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masili, Alice; Puligheddu, Sonia; Sassu, Lorenzo; Scano, Paola; Lai, Adolfo

    2012-11-01

    In this work, we report the feasibility study to predict the properties of neat crude oil samples from 300-MHz NMR spectral data and partial least squares (PLS) regression models. The study was carried out on 64 crude oil samples obtained from 28 different extraction fields and aims at developing a rapid and reliable method for characterizing the crude oil in a fast and cost-effective way. The main properties generally employed for evaluating crudes' quality and behavior during refining were measured and used for calibration and testing of the PLS models. Among these, the UOP characterization factor K (K(UOP)) used to classify crude oils in terms of composition, density (D), total acidity number (TAN), sulfur content (S), and true boiling point (TBP) distillation yields were investigated. Test set validation with an independent set of data was used to evaluate model performance on the basis of standard error of prediction (SEP) statistics. Model performances are particularly good for K(UOP) factor, TAN, and TPB distillation yields, whose standard error of calibration and SEP values match the analytical method precision, while the results obtained for D and S are less accurate but still useful for predictions. Furthermore, a strategy that reduces spectral data preprocessing and sample preparation procedures has been adopted. The models developed with such an ample crude oil set demonstrate that this methodology can be applied with success to modern refining process requirements. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Whitening Agents from Reseda luteola L. and Their Chemical Characterization Using Combination of CPC, UPLC-HRMS and NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Burger

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Skin whitening agents occupy an important part of the dermo-cosmetic market nowadays. They are used to treat various skin pigmentation disorders, or simply to obtain a lighter skin tone. The use of traditional skin bleachers (e.g., hydroquinone, corticoids is now strictly regulated due to their side effects. When considering this and the growing consumers’ interest for more natural ingredients, plant extracts can be seen as safe and natural alternatives. In this perspective, in vitro bioassays were undertaken to assess cosmetic potential of Reseda luteola, and particularly its promising whitening activities. A bioguided purification procedure employing centrifugal partition chromatography, Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (UPLC-HRMS and NMR was developed to isolate and identify the whitening agents (i.e., luteolin and apigenin from aerial parts of R. luteola. UPLC-HRMS also enabled the characterization of acetylated luteolin- and apigenin-O-glycosides, which occurrence is reported for the first time in R. luteola.

  1. Toxicity of proton-metal mixtures in the field: Linking stream macroinvertebrate species diversity to chemical speciation and bioavailability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockdale, Anthony [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Tipping, Edward, E-mail: et@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Lofts, Stephen [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Ormerod, Stephen J. [Catchment Research Group, Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3US (United Kingdom); Clements, William H. [Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Blust, Ronny [Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology Group, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2010-10-01

    Understanding metal and proton toxicity under field conditions requires consideration of the complex nature of chemicals in mixtures. Here, we demonstrate a novel method that relates streamwater concentrations of cationic metallic species and protons to a field ecological index of biodiversity. The model WHAM-F{sub TOX} postulates that cation binding sites of aquatic macroinvertebrates can be represented by the functional groups of natural organic matter (humic acid), as described by the Windermere Humic Aqueous Model (WHAM6), and supporting field evidence is presented. We define a toxicity function (F{sub TOX}) by summing the products: (amount of invertebrate-bound cation) x (cation-specific toxicity coefficient, {alpha}{sub i}). Species richness data for Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera (EPT), are then described with a lower threshold of F{sub TOX}, below which all organisms are present and toxic effects are absent, and an upper threshold above which organisms are absent. Between the thresholds the number of species declines linearly with F{sub TOX}. We parameterised the model with chemistry and EPT data for low-order streamwaters affected by acid deposition and/or abandoned mines, representing a total of 412 sites across three continents. The fitting made use of quantile regression, to take into account reduced species richness caused by (unknown) factors other than cation toxicity. Parameters were derived for the four most common or abundant cations, with values of {alpha}{sub i} following the sequence (increasing toxicity) H{sup +} < Al < Zn < Cu. For waters affected mainly by H{sup +} and Al, F{sub TOX} shows a steady decline with increasing pH, crossing the lower threshold near to pH 7. Competition effects among cations mean that toxicity due to Cu and Zn is rare at lower pH values, and occurs mostly between pH 6 and 8.

  2. Applications of Neutron Scattering in the Chemical Industry: Proton Dynamics of Highly Dispersed Materials, Characterization of Fuel Cell Catalysts, and Catalysts from Large-Scale Chemical Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Peter W.; Parker, Stewart F.

    The attractiveness of neutron scattering techniques for the detailed characterization of materials of high degrees of dispersity and structural complexity as encountered in the chemical industry is discussed. Neutron scattering picks up where other analytical methods leave off because of the physico-chemical properties of finely divided products and materials whose absorption behavior toward electromagnetic radiation and electrical conductivity causes serious problems. This is demonstrated by presenting typical applications from large-scale production technology and industrial catalysis. These include the determination of the proton-related surface chemistry of advanced materials that are used as reinforcing fillers in the manufacture of tires, where interrelations between surface chemistry, rheological properties, improved safety, and significant reduction of fuel consumption are the focus of recent developments. Neutron scattering allows surface science studies of the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen on nanodispersed, supported precious metal particles of fuel cell catalysts under in situ loading at realistic gas pressures of about 1 bar. Insight into the occupation of catalytically relevant surface sites provides valuable information about the catalyst in the working state and supplies essential scientific input for tailoring better catalysts by technologists. The impact of deactivation phenomena on industrial catalysts by coke deposition, chemical transformation of carbonaceous deposits, and other processes in catalytic hydrogenation processes that result in significant shortening of the time of useful operation in large-scale plants can often be traced back in detail to surface or bulk properties of catalysts or materials of catalytic relevance. A better understanding of avoidable or unavoidable aspects of catalyst deactivation phenomena under certain in-process conditions and the development of effective means for reducing deactivation leads to more energy

  3. Remeasuring HEWL pKa values by NMR spectroscopy 

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, Helen; Tynan-Connolly, Barbara Mary; Lee, Gregory M

    2011-01-01

    Site-specific pK(a) values measured by NMR spectroscopy provide essential information on protein electrostatics, the pH-dependence of protein structure, dynamics and function, and constitute an important benchmark for protein pK(a) calculation algorithms. Titration curves can be measured by track......Site-specific pK(a) values measured by NMR spectroscopy provide essential information on protein electrostatics, the pH-dependence of protein structure, dynamics and function, and constitute an important benchmark for protein pK(a) calculation algorithms. Titration curves can be measured...... by tracking the NMR chemical shifts of several reporter nuclei versus sample pH. However, careful analysis of these curves is needed to extract residue-specific pK(a) values since pH-dependent chemical shift changes can arise from many sources, including through-bond inductive effects, through-space electric...... protonated carbons and protons in this protein. We extracted pK(a) values from the resulting titration curves using standard fitting methods, and compared these values to each other, and with those measured previously by ¹H NMR (Bartik et al., Biophys J 1994;66:1180–1184). This analysis gives insights...

  4. Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (qCEST) MRI--RF spillover effect-corrected omega plot for simultaneous determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Dai, ZhuoZhi; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2014-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is sensitive to dilute proteins and peptides as well as microenvironmental properties. However, the complexity of the CEST MRI effect, which varies with the labile proton content, exchange rate and experimental conditions, underscores the need for developing quantitative CEST (qCEST) analysis. Towards this goal, it has been shown that omega plot is capable of quantifying paramagnetic CEST MRI. However, the use of the omega plot is somewhat limited for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) MRI because it is more susceptible to direct radio frequency (RF) saturation (spillover) owing to the relatively small chemical shift. Recently, it has been found that, for dilute DIACEST agents that undergo slow to intermediate chemical exchange, the spillover effect varies little with the labile proton ratio and exchange rate. Therefore, we postulated that the omega plot analysis can be improved if RF spillover effect could be estimated and taken into account. Specifically, simulation showed that both labile proton ratio and exchange rate derived using the spillover effect-corrected omega plot were in good agreement with simulated values. In addition, the modified omega plot was confirmed experimentally, and we showed that the derived labile proton ratio increased linearly with creatine concentration (p plot for quantitative analysis of DIACEST MRI. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. In Situ Solid-State Reactions Monitored by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy: Temperature-Induced Proton Transfer Leads to Chemical Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Joanna S; Walczak, Monika; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A

    2016-10-24

    The dramatic colour and phase alteration with the solid-state, temperature-dependent reaction between squaric acid and 4,4'-bipyridine has been probed in situ with X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The electronic and chemical sensitivity to the local atomic environment through chemical shifts in the near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) revealed proton transfer from the acid to the bipyridine base through the change in nitrogen protonation state in the high-temperature form. Direct detection of proton transfer coupled with structural analysis elucidates the nature of the solid-state process, with intermolecular proton transfer occurring along an acid-base chain followed by a domino effect to the subsequent acid-base chains, leading to the rapid migration along the length of the crystal. NEXAFS thereby conveys the ability to monitor the nature of solid-state chemical reactions in situ, without the need for a priori information or long-range order. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in tautomeric systems with double proton transfer. Citronin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, P.E.; Langgard, M.; Bolvig, S.

    1998-01-01

    Primary and secondary deuterium isotope effects on 1 H and 13 C chemical shifts are measured in citrinin, a tautomeric compound with an unusual doubly intramolecularly hydrogen bonded structure. The isotope effects are to a large extent dominated by equilibrium contributions and deuteration leads to more of the deuterated enol forms rather than the deuterated acid form. 1 H 13 C and 17 O nuclear shieldings are calculated using density functional ab initio methods. A very good correlation between calculated nuclear shieldings and experimental 1 H and 13 C chemical shifts is obtained. The tautomeric equilibrium can be analyzed based on the isotope effects on B-6 and C-8 carbons and shows an increase in the o-quinone form on lowering the temperature. Furthermore, upon deuteration the largest equilibrium shift is found for deuteration at OH-8 and the shift in the tautomeric equilibrium upon deuteration at OH-8 and the shift in the tautomeric equilibrium upon deuteration is increasing at lower temperature. (author)

  7. Proton NMR studies of Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitors: Evidence for pH-dependent conformational change and his25 - try27 interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamoorthi, R.; Chanlan Sun Lin; Yuxi Gong (Kansas State Univ., Manhattan (United States)); VanderVelde, D. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence (United States)); Hahn, K. (Univ. of Colorado, Denver (United States))

    1992-01-28

    A pH-dependent His25-Tyr27 interaction was demonstrated in the case of Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitors (CMTI-I and CMTI-III) by means of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. pH titration, line widths, peak shapes, deuterium exchange kinetics, and two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) were employed to characterize a conformational change involving Tyr27, which was shown to be triggered by deprotonation of His25 around pH 6. A hydrogen bond is proposed to be formed between N{sub {epsilon}} of His25 and OH of Tyr27, as a distance between the atoms, His25 N{epsilon} and Tyr25 OH, of 3.02 {angstrom} is consistent with a model built with NOE-derived distance constraints. The presently characterized relative orientations of His25 and Tyr27 are of functional significance, as these residues make contact with the enzyme in the enzyme-inhibitor complex. Furthermore, trypsin assay and inhibitor-binding studies showed that conformations of trypsin and the squash inhibitor complex. Furthermore, trypsin assay and inhibitor-binding studies showed that conformations of trypsin and the squash inhibitor were functionally relevant only in the pH range 6-8. The pK{sub a} of His25 was determined and found to be influenced by Glu9/Lys substitution and by the hydrolysis of the reactive-site peptide bond between Arg5 and Ile6. As these sites are located far (>10 {angstrom}) from His25, the results point out conformational changes that are propagated to a distant site in the protein molecule.

  8. Practical use of chemical shift databases for protein solid-state NMR: 2D chemical shift maps and amino-acid assignment with secondary-structure information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsching, K. J.; Yang, Y.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.; Hong Mei

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a Python-based program that utilizes the large database of 13 C and 15 N chemical shifts in the Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank to rapidly predict the amino acid type and secondary structure from correlated chemical shifts. The program, called PACSYlite Unified Query (PLUQ), is designed to help assign peaks obtained from 2D 13 C– 13 C, 15 N– 13 C, or 3D 15 N– 13 C– 13 C magic-angle-spinning correlation spectra. We show secondary-structure specific 2D 13 C– 13 C correlation maps of all twenty amino acids, constructed from a chemical shift database of 262,209 residues. The maps reveal interesting conformation-dependent chemical shift distributions and facilitate searching of correlation peaks during amino-acid type assignment. Based on these correlations, PLUQ outputs the most likely amino acid types and the associated secondary structures from inputs of experimental chemical shifts. We test the assignment accuracy using four high-quality protein structures. Based on only the Cα and Cβ chemical shifts, the highest-ranked PLUQ assignments were 40–60 % correct in both the amino-acid type and the secondary structure. For three input chemical shifts (CO–Cα–Cβ or N–Cα–Cβ), the first-ranked assignments were correct for 60 % of the residues, while within the top three predictions, the correct assignments were found for 80 % of the residues. PLUQ and the chemical shift maps are expected to be useful at the first stage of sequential assignment, for combination with automated sequential assignment programs, and for highly disordered proteins for which secondary structure analysis is the main goal of structure determination.

  9. Practical use of chemical shift databases for protein solid-state NMR: 2D chemical shift maps and amino-acid assignment with secondary-structure information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsching, K. J.; Yang, Y.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.; Hong Mei, E-mail: mhong@iastate.edu [Iowa State University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2013-06-15

    We introduce a Python-based program that utilizes the large database of {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N chemical shifts in the Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank to rapidly predict the amino acid type and secondary structure from correlated chemical shifts. The program, called PACSYlite Unified Query (PLUQ), is designed to help assign peaks obtained from 2D {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C, {sup 15}N-{sup 13}C, or 3D {sup 15}N-{sup 13}C-{sup 13}C magic-angle-spinning correlation spectra. We show secondary-structure specific 2D {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C correlation maps of all twenty amino acids, constructed from a chemical shift database of 262,209 residues. The maps reveal interesting conformation-dependent chemical shift distributions and facilitate searching of correlation peaks during amino-acid type assignment. Based on these correlations, PLUQ outputs the most likely amino acid types and the associated secondary structures from inputs of experimental chemical shifts. We test the assignment accuracy using four high-quality protein structures. Based on only the C{alpha} and C{beta} chemical shifts, the highest-ranked PLUQ assignments were 40-60 % correct in both the amino-acid type and the secondary structure. For three input chemical shifts (CO-C{alpha}-C{beta} or N-C{alpha}-C{beta}), the first-ranked assignments were correct for 60 % of the residues, while within the top three predictions, the correct assignments were found for 80 % of the residues. PLUQ and the chemical shift maps are expected to be useful at the first stage of sequential assignment, for combination with automated sequential assignment programs, and for highly disordered proteins for which secondary structure analysis is the main goal of structure determination.

  10. Proton conduction in biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Jin Jung [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Lee, Kyu Won; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Cheol Eui, E-mail: rscel@korea.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seunho [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology and UBITA, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Chanho [Naraebio Research Laboratories, 177 Dangha-ri, Bongdam-eup, Hawseong-si 445-892 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-07

    Protonic currents play a vital role in electrical signalling in living systems. It has been suggested that succinoglycan plays a specific role in alfalfa root nodule development, presumably acting as the signaling molecules. In this regard, charge transport and proton dynamics in the biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan have been studied by means of electrical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, a dielectric dispersion in the system has revealed that the electrical conduction is protonic rather electronic. Besides, our laboratory- and rotating-frame {sup 1}H NMR measurements have elucidated the nature of the protonic conduction, activation of the protonic motion being associated with a glass transition.

  11. Supra-molecular structure and chemical reactivity of cellulose I studied using CP/MAS (sup)13 C-NMR

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chunilall, Viren

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available There are a few traditional methods of analysing the chemical properties of cellulose I. Some of these methods include the Permanganate number determination, which is used to obtain the lignin content of the pulp [12]. The acid insoluble lignin content... – Fundamental Aspects 88 [10] Fengel D, Wegener G. Wood Chemistry, Ultrastructure, Reactions, Walter de Gruyter; 1984. [11] Uhlmann T. Ullmann's encyclopedia of industrial chemistry. Paper and Pulp. 1991; 18 (A). [12] Permanganate number of pulp, Tappi T...

  12. Performance of the WeNMR CS-Rosetta3 web server in CASD-NMR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Schot, Gijs; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    We present here the performance of the WeNMR CS-Rosetta3 web server in CASD-NMR, the critical assessment of automated structure determination by NMR. The CS-Rosetta server uses only chemical shifts for structure prediction, in combination, when available, with a post-scoring procedure based on

  13. Theoretical and experimental NMR studies on muscimol from fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupka, Teobald; Wieczorek, Piotr P.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report results of combined theoretical and experimental NMR studies on muscimol, the bioactive alkaloid from fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria). The assignment of 1H and 13C NMR spectra of muscimol in DMSO-d6 was supported by additional two-dimensional heteronuclear correlated spectra (2D NMR) and gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) NMR calculations using density functional theory (DFT). The effect of solvent in theoretical calculations was included via polarized continuum model (PCM) and the hybrid three-parameter B3LYP density functional in combination with 6-311++G(3df,2pd) basis set enabled calculation of reliable structures of non-ionized (neutral) molecule and its NH and zwitterionic forms in the gas phase, chloroform, DMSO and water. GIAO NMR calculations, using equilibrium and rovibrationally averaged geometry, at B3LYP/6-31G* and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ-J levels of theory provided muscimol nuclear magnetic shieldings. The theoretical proton and carbon chemical shifts were critically compared with experimental NMR spectra measured in DMSO. Our results provide useful information on its structure in solution. We believe that such data could improve the understanding of basic features of muscimol at atomistic level and provide another tool in studies related to GABA analogs.

  14. Calculation of 125Te NMR Chemical Shifts at the Full Four-Component Relativistic Level with Taking into Account Solvent and Vibrational Corrections: A Gateway to Better Agreement with Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusakova, Irina L; Rusakov, Yuriy Yu; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2017-06-29

    Four-component relativistic calculations of 125 Te NMR chemical shifts were performed in the series of 13 organotellurium compounds, potential precursors of the biologically active species, at the density functional theory level under the nonrelativistic and four-component fully relativistic conditions using locally dense basis set scheme derived from relativistic Dyall's basis sets. The relativistic effects in tellurium chemical shifts were found to be of as much as 20-25% of the total calculated values. The vibrational and solvent corrections to 125 Te NMR chemical shifts are about, accordingly, 6 and 8% of their total values. The PBE0 exchange-correlation functional turned out to give the best agreement of calculated tellurium shifts with their experimental values giving the mean absolute percentage error of 4% in the range of ∼1000 ppm, provided all corrections are taken into account.

  15. On Neglecting Chemical Exchange When Correcting in Vivo 31P MRS Data for Partial Saturation: Commentary on: ``Pitfalls in the Measurement of Metabolite Concentrations Using the One-Pulse Experiment in in Vivo NMR''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouwerkerk, Ronald; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2001-04-01

    This article replies to Spencer et al. (J. Magn. Reson.149, 251-257, 2001) concerning the degree to which chemical exchange affects partial saturation corrections using saturation factors. Considering the important case of in vivo31P NMR, we employ differential analysis to demonstrate a broad range of experimental conditions over which chemical exchange minimally affects saturation factors, and near-optimum signal-to-noise ratio is preserved. The analysis contradicts Spencer et al.'s broad claim that chemical exchange results in a strong dependence of saturation factors upon M0's and T1 and exchange parameters. For Spencer et al.'s example of a dynamic 31P NMR experiment in which phosphocreatine varies 20-fold, we show that our strategy of measuring saturation factors at the start and end of the study reduces errors in saturation corrections to 2% for the high-energy phosphates.

  16. Compact NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemich, Bernhard; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Zia, Wasif [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie (ITMC)

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the most popular method for chemists to analyze molecular structures, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for medical doctors that provides high-contrast images of biological tissue. In both applications, the sample (or patient) is positioned inside a large, superconducting magnet to magnetize the atomic nuclei. Interrogating radio-frequency pulses result in frequency spectra that provide the chemist with molecular information, the medical doctor with anatomic images, and materials scientist with NMR relaxation parameters. Recent advances in magnet technology have led to a variety of small permanent magnets to allow compact and low-cost instruments. The goal of this book is to provide an introduction to the practical use of compact NMR at a level nearly as basic as the operation of a smart phone.

  17. Coherent evolution of parahydrogen induced polarisation using laser pump, NMR probe spectroscopy: Theoretical framework and experimental observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halse, Meghan E; Procacci, Barbara; Henshaw, Sarah-Louise; Perutz, Robin N; Duckett, Simon B

    2017-05-01

    We recently reported a pump-probe method that uses a single laser pulse to introduce parahydrogen (p-H 2 ) into a metal dihydride complex and then follows the time-evolution of the p-H 2 -derived nuclear spin states by NMR. We present here a theoretical framework to describe the oscillatory behaviour of the resultant hyperpolarised NMR signals using a product operator formalism. We consider the cases where the p-H 2 -derived protons form part of an AX, AXY, AXYZ or AA'XX' spin system in the product molecule. We use this framework to predict the patterns for 2D pump-probe NMR spectra, where the indirect dimension represents the evolution during the pump-probe delay and the positions of the cross-peaks depend on the difference in chemical shift of the p-H 2 -derived protons and the difference in their couplings to other nuclei. The evolution of the NMR signals of the p-H 2 -derived protons, as well as the transfer of hyperpolarisation to other NMR-active nuclei in the product, is described. The theoretical framework is tested experimentally for a set of ruthenium dihydride complexes representing the different spin systems. Theoretical predictions and experimental results agree to within experimental error for all features of the hyperpolarised 1 H and 31 P pump-probe NMR spectra. Thus we establish the laser pump, NMR probe approach as a robust way to directly observe and quantitatively analyse the coherent evolution of p-H 2 -derived spin order over micro-to-millisecond timescales. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantitative NMR proton spectroscopy in vivo at 1,5 Tesla and possible applications to investigations of brain metabolism of depressive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzler, D.

    1997-12-01

    Using a clinical magnetic resonance imaging/spectroscopy system 22 patients suffering from bipolar disorders and 22 healthy volunteers were examined by localized in vivo proton spectroscopy. The measurements were performed on a 1.5 Tesla whole body scanner of Siemens AG, Magnetom SP 4000, using the standard head coil (CP). For localization a STEAM sequence was used with an echo times TE of 55 ms. A recovery time of 3500 ms was chosen. The number of acquisitions was 256. The spectra were acquired from voxel volumes of 20 x 30 x 20 mm 3 . Three Gaussian presaturation pulses (CHESS) with subsequent dephasing gradients were used for water suppression. After correction for eddy-current effects and Fast-Fourier transformation the intensities of myo-inositol, choline compounds, creatine together with phospho-creatine, and N-acetylaspartate were evaluated from the spectra. The spectra from the frontal brain of depressed patients and controls revealed mInos/Cr ratios of about 0,4 - 0,5. This lies within the range, which is presumed to be the mInos concentration in 1 H-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy studies in human brain in vivo. Concerning the total sample (N = 2 x 22) there were no intergroup differences in the present study. Concluding a subsample of subjects younger than 40 years (N = 2 x 10), depressives showed lower mInos levels than controls in the right frontal lobe. The patients showed a significant positive correlation between age and mInos/Cr in the right frontal lobe, while in the left frontal lobe this could be seen only as a trend. In contrast, NAA/Cr decreased with increasing age. There were neither significant differences between sex nor between hemispheres. (author)

  19. High resolution NMR spectroscopy of synthetic polymers in bulk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komorski, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Overview of high-resolution NMR of solid polymers; High-resolution NMR of glassy amorphous polymers; Carbon-13 solid-state NMR of semicrystalline polymers; Conformational analysis of polymers of solid-state NMR; High-resolution NMR studies of oriented polymers; High-resolution solid-state NMR of protons in polymers; and Deuterium NMR of solid polymers. This work brings together the various approaches for high-resolution NMR studies of bulk polymers into one volume. Heavy emphasis is, of course, given to 13C NMR studies both above and below Tg. Standard high-power pulse and wide-line techniques are not covered

  20. NMR studies of the structure of glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, P.J.; Gravina, S.J.; Stallworth, P.E.; Szu, S.P.; Jianhui Zhong

    1988-01-01

    Earlier continuous wave (CW) NMR studies of chemical bonding and structure in glasses are summarized. Examples are given of this use of the quadrupolar interaction and chemical shift to obtain structural information. New NMR data and analyses are presented for alkali borate and gallate glasses. Extensions to other elements (e.g. molybdenum, lanthanum) are suggested. 44 refs. (author)

  1. NMR in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, F.W.

    1987-01-01

    The development of NMR for clinical use has been complicated by a number of controversies, the largest of these being the question of what is the optimum field strength for proton imaging. Many workers believe that diagnostically useful images can only be produced at high field strength (i.e. 0.5 - 2.0 T), where in fact diagnostically useful images are made using field strengths of as low as 0.02 T. Because the method is more complex than X-ray CT, which relies on the measurement of only one parameter, tissue density, many new users have difficulty in selecting the correct imaging pulse sequence to provide the most useful image for diagnosis. NMR imaging pulse sequence may be selected to produce images of the proton density, T/sub 1/ or T/sub 2/ signals, or combinations of them. When this facility is used, images which are T/sub 1/ or T/sub 2/ weighted can be selected. Inversion-recovery sequences are more appropriate for imaging the abdomen where by selecting a short TR interval the signal from subcutaneous fat, which is the major cause of image artefact in abdominal imaging, is suppressed thereby improving image quality. The use of surface receiver coils, which are applied closely to the area of the body being examined is becoming more widespread and is of particular value when examining the orbits, facial structures, neck, breast, spine and limbs. The use of these coils together with a discussion of patient selection for NMR imaging, image interpretation and data storage follow

  2. NMR studies of the solution conformation and dynamics of the tyrocidine peptide antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, N.

    1985-01-01

    The tyrocidine B and tyrocidine C 1 H NMR spectra in DMSO-d 6 were assigned by using 2D 1 H- 1 H correlation spectroscopy and 1D double resonance experiments. Based on the proton chemical shifts, 3 J/sub NH-Nα/ coupling constants, the chemical shift temperature dependence, and 1D and 2D 1 H- 1 H NOE values, a backbone conformation consisting of an anti-parallel β-pleated sheet, a type I β-turn and a type II' β-turn was suggested for both tyrocidines B and C. Seven out of ten side chains were determined to exist predominantly in one classical Chi 1 rotamer; while the residues Val 1 and Leu 3 had two Chi 1 rotamers which were significantly populated. Chi 2 angles were determined for residues Phe 4 , Trp 6 , DPhe 7 (D Trp 7 ) and Asn 8 . The natural abundance 13 C spectra of tyrocidine B and tyrocidine C were assigned by using 1 H- 13 C correlation spectroscopy. A study of the effect of soluble paramagnetic nitroxide compounds on tyrocidine A proton T 1 values were performed which confirmed the proposed tyrocidine A conformation. It also proved that these nitroxide compounds are very useful in studying proton solvent exposure, and therefore in delineating hydrogen bonding. A proton NMR study of the opioid peptide dynorphin-(1-13) in aqueous solution was reported which was consistent with a non-ordered molecule in the solution

  3. Determination of scutellarin in breviscapine preparations using quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzuo Jiang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to develop the selection criteria of proton signals for the determination of scutellarin using quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR, which is the main bioactive compound in breviscapine preparations for the treatment of cerebrovascular disease. The methyl singlet signal of 3-(trimethylsilylpropionic-2,2,3,3-d4 acid sodium salt was selected as the internal standard for quantification. The molar concentration of scutellarin was determined by employing different proton signals. To obtain optimum proton signals for the quantification, different combinations of proton signals were investigated according to two selection criteria: the recovery rate of qNMR method and quantitative results compared with those obtained with ultra-performance liquid chromatography. As a result, the chemical shift of H-2′ and H-6′ at δ 7.88 was demonstrated as the most suitable signal with excellent linearity range, precision, and recovery for determining scutellarin in breviscapine preparations from different manufacturers, batch numbers, and dosage forms. Hierarchical cluster analysis was employed to evaluate the determination results. The results demonstrated that the selection criteria of proton signals established in this work were reliable for the qNMR study of scutellarin in breviscapine preparations.

  4. "1H and "1"3C NMR Data on Hydroxy/methoxy Flavonoids and the Effects of Substituents on Chemical Shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hyuk; Eom, Sung Lock; Hyun, Ji Ye; Jo, Geun Hyeong; Hwang, Do Seok; Lee, Sun Hee; Yong, Yeon Joong; Lee, Young Han; Lim, Yoong Ho; Park, Jun Cheol

    2011-01-01

    Polyphenols have recently been examined for such applications, and they are classified based on their carbon skeletons: phenolic acids with C6-C1 skeleton, hydrocinammates with C6-C_3 skeleton, stilbenes with C6-C2-C6 skeleton, and flavonoids with C6-C_3-C6 skeleton.2 Of these compounds, flavonoids are ubiquitously found in most plants. Since flavonoids belong to polyphenols, they have many hydroxy groups. From a bioavailability point of view, hydroxy groups prevent cell membrane transport, and hydroxyflavonoids can be metabolized by O-methyltransferases. However, methoxylated flavonoids may not have these problems. Hydroxylated or methoxylated flavonoids are found from natural sources. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used to identify different compounds including hydroxylated or methoxylated flavonoids. Because the position and the number of substituted hydroxy or/and methoxy groups will change the "1H and "1"3C chemical shifts, it is important to understand these changes so that the structures of newly isolated hydroxy/methoxy-flavonoids can be easily identified

  5. Early diagenesis of mangrove leaves in a tropical estuary: Bulk chemical characterization using solid-state 13C NMR and elemental analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Ronald; Hatcher, Patrick G.; Hedges, John I.

    1990-07-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of mangrove ( Rhizophora mangle) leaves during decomposition in tropical estuarine waters were characterized using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and elemental (CHNO) analysis. Carbohydrates were the most abundant components of the leaves accounting for about 50 wt% of senescent tissues. Tannins were estimated to account for about 20 wt% of leaf tissues, and lipid components, cutin, and possibly other aliphatic biopolymers in leaf cuticles accounted for about 15 wt%. Carbohydrates were generally less resistant to decomposition than the other constituents and decreased in relative concentration during decomposition. Tannins were of intermediate resistance to decomposition and remained in fairly constant proportion during decomposition. Paraffinic components were very resistant to decomposition and increased in relative concentration as decomposition progressed. Lignin was a minor component of all leaf tissues. Standard methods for the colorimetric determination of tannins (Folin-Dennis reagent) and the gravimetric determination of lignin (Klason lignin) were highly inaccurate when applied to mangrove leaves. The N content of the leaves was particularly dynamic with values ranging from 1.27 wt% in green leaves to 0.65 wt% in senescent yellow leaves attached to trees. During decomposition in the water the N content initially decreased to 0.51 wt% due to leaching, but values steadily increased thereafter to 1.07 wt% in the most degraded leaf samples. The absolute mass of N in the leaves increased during decomposition indicating that N immobilization was occurring as decomposition progressed.

  6. VITAL NMR: using chemical shift derived secondary structure information for a limited set of amino acids to assess homology model accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brothers, Michael C.; Nesbitt, Anna E.; Hallock, Michael J. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Chemistry (United States); Rupasinghe, Sanjeewa G. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology (United States); Tang Ming [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Chemistry (United States); Harris, Jason; Baudry, Jerome [University of Tennessee, Department of Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Biology (United States); Schuler, Mary A. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology (United States); Rienstra, Chad M., E-mail: rienstra@illinois.edu [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Homology modeling is a powerful tool for predicting protein structures, whose success depends on obtaining a reasonable alignment between a given structural template and the protein sequence being analyzed. In order to leverage greater predictive power for proteins with few structural templates, we have developed a method to rank homology models based upon their compliance to secondary structure derived from experimental solid-state NMR (SSNMR) data. Such data is obtainable in a rapid manner by simple SSNMR experiments (e.g., {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C 2D correlation spectra). To test our homology model scoring procedure for various amino acid labeling schemes, we generated a library of 7,474 homology models for 22 protein targets culled from the TALOS+/SPARTA+ training set of protein structures. Using subsets of amino acids that are plausibly assigned by SSNMR, we discovered that pairs of the residues Val, Ile, Thr, Ala and Leu (VITAL) emulate an ideal dataset where all residues are site specifically assigned. Scoring the models with a predicted VITAL site-specific dataset and calculating secondary structure with the Chemical Shift Index resulted in a Pearson correlation coefficient (-0.75) commensurate to the control (-0.77), where secondary structure was scored site specifically for all amino acids (ALL 20) using STRIDE. This method promises to accelerate structure procurement by SSNMR for proteins with unknown folds through guiding the selection of remotely homologous protein templates and assessing model quality.

  7. VITAL NMR: Using Chemical Shift Derived Secondary Structure Information for a Limited Set of Amino Acids to Assess Homology Model Accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brothers, Michael C [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Nesbitt, Anna E [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Hallock, Michael J [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Rupasinghe, Sanjeewa [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Tang, Ming [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Harris, Jason B [ORNL; Baudry, Jerome Y [ORNL; Schuler, Mary A [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Rienstra, Chad M [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

    2011-01-01

    Homology modeling is a powerful tool for predicting protein structures, whose success depends on obtaining a reasonable alignment between a given structural template and the protein sequence being analyzed. In order to leverage greater predictive power for proteins with few structural templates, we have developed a method to rank homology models based upon their compliance to secondary structure derived from experimental solid-state NMR (SSNMR) data. Such data is obtainable in a rapid manner by simple SSNMR experiments (e.g., (13)C-(13)C 2D correlation spectra). To test our homology model scoring procedure for various amino acid labeling schemes, we generated a library of 7,474 homology models for 22 protein targets culled from the TALOS+/SPARTA+ training set of protein structures. Using subsets of amino acids that are plausibly assigned by SSNMR, we discovered that pairs of the residues Val, Ile, Thr, Ala and Leu (VITAL) emulate an ideal dataset where all residues are site specifically assigned. Scoring the models with a predicted VITAL site-specific dataset and calculating secondary structure with the Chemical Shift Index resulted in a Pearson correlation coefficient (-0.75) commensurate to the control (-0.77), where secondary structure was scored site specifically for all amino acids (ALL 20) using STRIDE. This method promises to accelerate structure procurement by SSNMR for proteins with unknown folds through guiding the selection of remotely homologous protein templates and assessing model quality.

  8. Comprehensive quantum chemical and spectroscopic (FTIR, FT-Raman, 1H, 13C NMR) investigations of O-desmethyltramadol hydrochloride an active metabolite in tramadol - An analgesic drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V.; Santhanam, R.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.

    2014-03-01

    O-desmethyltramadol is one of the main metabolites of tramadol widely used clinically and has analgesic activity. The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of O-desmethyl tramadol hydrochloride are recorded in the solid phase in the regions 4000-400 cm-1 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. The observed fundamentals are assigned to different normal modes of vibration. Theoretical studies have been performed as its hydrochloride salt. The structure of the compound has been optimised with B3LYP method using 6-31G** and cc-pVDZ basis sets. The optimised bond length and bond angles are correlated with the X-ray data. The experimental wavenumbers were compared with the scaled vibrational frequencies determined by DFT methods. The IR and Raman intensities are determined with B3LYP method using cc-pVDZ and 6-31G(d,p) basic sets. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces of the molecule are constructed by using B3LYP/cc-pVDZ method to display electrostatic potential (electron + nuclei) distribution. The electronic properties HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. Natural bond orbital analysis of O-desmethyltramadol hydrochloride has been performed to indicate the presence of intramolecular charge transfer. The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule have been anlysed.

  9. NMR imaging of cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takusagawa, Yoshihiko; Yamaoka, Naoki; Doi, Kazuaki; Okada, Keisei

    1987-01-01

    One hundred and five patients with cerebral infarction were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) CT (resistive type of magnet with strength of 0.1 tesla) and X-ray CT. Pulse sequences used saturation recovery (Tr = 600 mSec), Inversion recovery (Tr = 500 mSec, Td = 300 mSec) and spin echo (Tr = 1500 mSec, Te = 40, 80, 120, 160 mSec). Fifteen cases were examined by NMR-CT within 24 hours from onset. Proton NMR imaging could not detect cerebral ischemia as early as 2 hours after onset, but except could detect the lesions in Se image the area of cerebral infarct 3 hours after onset. After 5 hours from onset image changes in SE were evident and corresponded to the area of cerebral infarct, but image changes in IR could not fully delineate the infarcted area. NMR images of 41 year-old woman with cerebral embolism by MCA trunck occlusion associated with mitral stenosis were presented, and NMR-CT was examined 10 hours, 9th and 43th days after episode of MCA occlusion. Sixty patents (64 times) with lacunar infarction were studied by NMR-CT and X-ray CT. The inversion recovery images were used mainly for detection of lesions and comparison with X-ray CT. In 160 lesions which were detected by NMR-CT or X-ray CT, could 156 lesions be detected by NMR-CT and 78 lesions by X-ray CT. Inversion recovery images were more useful for detection of lacunes than X-ray CT. Calculated T1 and T2 values prolonged with time course from onset. (author)

  10. NMR investigation of coal extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, I; Sebor, G [Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Prague. Hornicky Ustav; Sebor, G Jr; Hajek, M; Mostecky, J [Vysoka Skola Chemicko-Technologicka, Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1978-07-01

    Proton NMR spectroscopy was used for the evaluation of 10% coal extract solutions in deuterated pyridine. Four types of Czechoslovak coal were analyzed. Agreement was found between the aromaticity of coal extracts calculated from /sup 1/H NMR data using Brown's method and Ladner's and Williams' method and the characterization of an average molecule of the coal extract by the number of non-bridge carbon atoms of aromatic rings, by the overall number of aromatic ring carbon atoms and the number of aromatic rings, determined by the Williams and Ferris methods. The methods for calculating carbon distribution from /sup 1/H NMR data, however, contain some constants theoretically estimated or experimentally found using the method which still remain to be verified.

  11. Dynamics of Chemical and Charge Transfer Reactions of Molecular Dications: IV. Proton Transfer and Reactions of Dication Isomers in the CHCl2+ +D2 System

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roithová, Jana; Žabka, Ján; Hrušák, Jan; Thissen, R.; Herman, Zdeněk

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 107, - (2003), s. 7347-7354 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/00/0632; GA AV ČR KJB4040302 Grant - others:Barrande(FR) 2002-013-1 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : dynamics of chemical * molecular dications * proton transfer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.792, year: 2003

  12. Characterization of Silicon Nanocrystal Surfaces by Multidimensional Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanrahan, Michael P.; Fought, Ellie L.; Windus, Theresa L.; Wheeler, Lance M.; Anderson, Nicholas C.

    2017-01-01

    The chemical and photophysical properties of silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) are strongly dependent on the chemical composition and structure of their surfaces. Here we use fast magic angle spinning (MAS) and proton detection to enable the rapid acquisition of dipolar and scalar 2D 1 H– 29 Si heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) solid-state NMR spectra and reveal a molecular picture of hydride-terminated and alkyl-functionalized surfaces of Si NCs produced in a nonthermal plasma. 2D 1 H– 29 Si HETCOR and dipolar 2D 1 H– 1 H multiple-quantum correlation spectra illustrate that resonances from surface mono-, di-, and trihydride groups cannot be resolved, contrary to previous literature assignments. Instead the 2D NMR spectra illustrate that there is large distribution of 1 H and 29 Si chemical shifts for the surface hydride species in both the as-synthesized and functionalized Si NCs. However, proton-detected 1 H– 29 Si refocused INEPT experiments can be used to unambiguously differentiate NMR signals from the different surface hydrides. Varying the 29 Si evolution time in refocused INEPT experiments and fitting the oscillation of the NMR signals allows for the relative populations of the different surface hydrides to be estimated. This analysis confirms that monohydride species are the predominant surface species on the as-synthesized Si NCs. A reduction in the populations of the di- and trihydrides is observed upon functionalization with alkyl groups, consistent with our previous hypothesis that the trihydride, or silyl (*SiH 3 ), group is primarily responsible for initiating surface functionalization reactions. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to obtain quantum chemical structural models of the Si NC surface and reproduce the observed 1 H and 29 Si chemical shifts. Furthermore, the approaches outlined here will be useful to obtain a more detailed picture of surface structures for Si NCs and other hydride-passivated nanomaterials.

  13. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearing, H.W.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize some of the information about the nucleon-nucleon force which has been obtained by comparing recent calculations of proton-proton bremsstrahlung with cross section and analyzing power data from the new TRIUMF bremsstrahlung experiment. Some comments are made as to how these results can be extended to neutron-proton bremsstrahlung. (Author) 17 refs., 6 figs

  14. Solution structures of α-conotoxin G1 determined by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardi, A.; Galdes, A.; Florance, J.; Maniconte, D.

    1989-01-01

    Two-dimensional NMR data have been used to generate solution structures of α-conotoxin G1, a potent peptide antagonist of the acetylcholine receptor. Structural information was obtained in the form of proton-proton internuclear distance constraints, and initial structures were produced with a distance geometry algorithm. Energetically more favorable structures were generated by using the distance geometry structures as input for a constrained energy minimization program. The results of both of these calculations indicate that the overall backbone conformation of the molecule is well-defined by the NMR data whereas the side-chain conformations are generally less well-defined. The main structural features derived from the NMR data were the presence of tight turns centered on residues Pro 5 and Arg 9 . The solution structures are compared with previous proposed models of conotoxin G1, and the NMR data are interpreted in conjunction with chemical modification studies and structural properties of other antagonists of the acetylcholine receptor to gain insight into structure-activity relationships in these peptide toxins

  15. Chemical degradation of proton conducting perflurosulfonic acid ionomer membranes studied by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghassemzadeh, L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Marrony, M. [European Institute for Energy Research, Emmy-Noether-Strasse 11, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Barrera, R. [Edison, Via Giorgio La Pira, 2, I-10028 Trofarello (Italy); Kreuer, K.D.; Maier, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Mueller, K. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    The degradation of two different types of perfluorinated polymer membranes, Nafion and Hyflon Ion, has been examined by solid-state {sup 19}F and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. This spectroscopic technique is demonstrated to be a valuable tool for the study of the membrane structure and its alterations after in situ degradation in a fuel cell. The structural changes in different parts of the polymers are clearly distinguished, which provides unique insight into details of the degradation processes. The experimental NMR spectra prove that degradation mostly takes place within the polymer side chains, as reflected by the intensity losses of NMR signals associated with SO{sub 3}H, CF{sub 3}, OCF{sub 2} and CF groups. The integral degree of degradation is found to decrease with increasing membrane thickness while for a given thickness, Hyflon Ion appears to degrade less than Nafion. (author)

  16. NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouchi, Toshihiro; Steiner, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    Three epidermoid and two dermoid tumours, pathologically proven, were examined by NMR and CT scans. Although most brain tumours have a low signal with a long T 1 , a dermoid cyst and one of the two components of the other dermoid tumour had a high signal and therefore a short T 1 . All three epidermoid tumours had a low signal and a long T 1 . Because of the high level contrast between some of the tumours and cerebrospinal fluid, NMR is helpful to detect the lesion. Neither of the liquid fluid levels in the tumour cysts or floating fat in the subarachnoid space was recognized in one patients, but the fine leakage of the content from the epidermoid cyst into the lateral ventricle was detected on a saturation recovery 1000 image in one case. (author)

  17. Direct 13C NMR Detection in HPLC Hyphenation Mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wubshet, Sileshi Gizachew; Johansen, Kenneth; Nyberg, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Solid phase extraction (SPE) was introduced as a crucial step in the HPLC-SPE-NMR technique to enable online analyte enrichment from which proton-detected NMR experiments on submicrogram amounts from complex mixtures were possible. However, the significance of direct-detected (13)C NMR experiments...... application of HPLC-SPE-NMR analysis using direct-detected (13)C NMR spectra. HPLC column loading, accumulative SPE trappings, and the effect of different elution solvents were evaluated and optimized. A column loading of approximately 600 mug of a prefractionated triterpenoid mixture, six trappings...

  18. Advantages of Chemical Exchange-Sensitive Spin-Lock (CESL) Over Saturation Transfer (CEST) for Hydroxyl- and Amine-Water Proton Exchange Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2014-01-01

    The chemical exchange (CE) rate of endogenous hydroxyl and amine protons with water is often comparable to the difference in their chemical shifts. These intermediate exchange (IMEX) processes have been imaged by the CE saturation transfer (CEST) approach with low-power and long-duration irradiation. However, its sensitivity is not optimal, and more importantly, the signal is contaminated by slow magnetization transfer processes. Here, the property of CEST signals is compared to a CE-sensitive spin-locking (CESL) technique irradiating at the labile proton frequency. Firstly, using a higher power and shorter irradiation in CE-MRI yields i) increasing selectivity to faster chemical exchange rates by higher sensitivity to faster exchanges and less sensitivity to slower CE and magnetization transfer processes, and ii) decreasing in vivo asymmetric magnetization transfer contrast measured at ±15 ppm. The sensitivity gain of CESL over CEST is higher for a higher-power and shorter irradiation. Unlike CESL, CEST signals oscillate at a very high power and short irradiation. Secondly, time-dependent CEST and CESL signals are well modeled by analytical solutions of CE-MRI with asymmetric population approximation (CEAPA), which can be used for quantitative CE-MRI, and validated by simulations of Bloch-McConnell equations and phantom experiments. Lastly, in vivo amine-water proton exchange contrast measured at 2.5 ppm with ω1 of 500 Hz is 18% higher in sensitivity for CESL than CEST at 9.4 T. Overall, CESL provides better exchange rate selectivity and sensitivity than CEST; therefore, CESL is more suitable for CE-MRI of IMEX protons. PMID:25199631

  19. Two dimensional solid state NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kentgens, A.P.M.

    1987-01-01

    This thesis illustrates, by discussing some existing and newly developed 2D solid state experiments, that two-dimensional NMR of solids is a useful and important extension of NMR techniques. Chapter 1 gives an overview of spin interactions and averaging techniques important in solid state NMR. As 2D NMR is already an established technique in solutions, only the basics of two dimensional NMR are presented in chapter 2, with an emphasis on the aspects important for solid spectra. The following chapters discuss the theoretical background and applications of specific 2D solid state experiments. An application of 2D-J resolved NMR, analogous to J-resolved spectroscopy in solutions, to natural rubber is given in chapter 3. In chapter 4 the anisotropic chemical shift is mapped out against the heteronuclear dipolar interaction to obtain information about the orientation of the shielding tensor in poly-(oxymethylene). Chapter 5 concentrates on the study of super-slow molecular motions in polymers using a variant of the 2D exchange experiment developed by us. Finally chapter 6 discusses a new experiment, 2D nutation NMR, which makes it possible to study the quadrupole interaction of half-integer spins. 230 refs.; 48 figs.; 8 tabs

  20. Principal component analysis for verifying 1H NMR spectral assignments. The case of 3-aryl (1,2,4)-oxadiazole-5-carbohydrazide benzylidene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Joao Bosco P. da; Malvestiti, Ivani; Hallwass, Fernando; Ramos, Mozart N.; Leite, Lucia F.C. da Costa; Barreiro, Eliezer J.

    2005-01-01

    The 1 H NMR data set of a series of 3-aryl (1,2,4)-oxadiazole-5-carbohydrazide benzylidene derivatives synthesized in our group was analyzed using the chemometric technique of principal component analysis (PCA). Using the original 1H NMR data PCA allowed identifying some misassignments of the proton aromatic chemical shifts. As a consequence of this multivariate analysis, nuclear Overhauser difference experiments were performed to investigate the ambiguity of other assignments of the ortho and meta aromatic hydrogens for the compound with the bromine substituent. The effect of the 1,2,4-oxadiazole group as an electron acceptor, mainly for the hydrogens 12,13, has been highlighted. (author)

  1. Two-dimensional NMR investigations of the dynamic conformations of phospholipids and liquid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Mei [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Applied Science and Technology

    1996-05-01

    Two-dimensional 13C, 1H, and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are developed and used to study molecular structure and dynamics in liquid-crystalline systems, primarily phospholipids and nematic liquid crystals. NMR spectroscopy characterizes molecular conformation in terms of orientations and distances of molecular segments. In anisotropically mobile systems, this is achieved by measuring motionally-averaged nuclear dipolar couplings and chemical shift anisotropies. The short-range couplings yield useful bond order parameters, while the long-range interactions constrain the overall conformation. In this work, techniques for probing proton dipolar local fields are further developed to obtain highlyresolved dipolar couplings between protons and rare spins. By exploiting variable-angle sample spinning techniques, orientation-sensitive NMR spectra are resolved according to sitespecific isotropic chemical shifts. Moreover, the signs and magnitudes of various short-range dipolar couplings are obtained. They are used in novel theoretical analyses that provide information about segmental orientations and their distributions. Such information is obtained in a model-independent fashion or with physically reasonable assumptions. The structural investigation of phospholipids is focused on the dynam

  2. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping 129 Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the 131 Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen

  3. Electrokinetic transport of water and methanol in Nafion membranes as observed by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallberg, Fredrik; Vernersson, Thomas; Pettersson, Erik Thyboll; Dvinskikh, Sergey V.; Lindbergh, Goeran; Furo, Istvan

    2010-01-01

    Electrophoretic NMR (eNMR) and pulsed-field-gradient NMR (PFG-NMR) methods were used to study transport processes in situ and in a chemically resolved manner in the electrolyte of an experimental direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) setup, constituted of several layers of Nafion 117. The measurements were conducted at room temperature for membranes fully swollen by methanol-water mixtures over a wide concentration interval. The experimental setup and the experimental protocol for the eNMR experiments are discussed in detail. The magnitude of the water and methanol self-diffusion coefficients show a good agreement with previously published data while the ratio of the two self-diffusion coefficients may indicate an imperfect mixing of the two solvent molecules. On the molecular level, the drag of water and methanol molecules by protons is roughly of the same magnitude, with the drag of methanol molecules increasing with increasing methanol content. The electro-osmotic drag defined on mass-flow basis increased for methanol from a low level with increasing methanol concentration while that of water remained roughly constant.

  4. Dynamic NMR Study of Model CMP Slurry Containing Silica Particles as Abrasives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odeh, F.; Al-Bawab, A.; Li, Y.

    2018-02-01

    Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) should provide a good surface planarity with minimal surface defectivity. Since CMP slurries are multi-component systems, it is very important to understand the various processes and interactions taking place in such slurries. Several techniques have been employed for such task, however, most of them lack the molecular recognition to investigate molecular interactions without adding probes which in turn increase complexity and might alter the microenvironment of the slurry. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful technique that can be employed in such study. The longitudinal relaxation times (T1) of the different components of CMP slurries were measured using Spin Echo-NMR (SE-NMR) at a constant temperature. The fact that NMR is non-invasive and gives information on the molecular level gives more advantage to the technique. The model CMP slurry was prepared in D2O to enable monitoring of T1 for the various components' protons. SE-NMR provide a very powerful tool to study the various interactions and adsorption processes that take place in a model CMP silica based slurry which contains BTA and/or glycine and/or Cu+2 ions. It was found that BTA is very competitive towards complexation with Cu+2 ions and BTA-Cu complex adsorbs on silica surface.

  5. Studies of interactions of porphyrins with transfer RNA by high-resolution NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birdsall, W.J.; Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA; Anderson, W.R. Jr; Foster, N.

    1989-01-01

    The interactions of tetra-4N-methulpyridyl porphyrin and its zinc (II), copper (II) and manganese (III) complexes with brewer's yeast type V phenylalanine specific tRNA have been evaluated by high-resolution NMR. Differences in chemical shifts have been noted for thre proton resonances in response to the presence of small quantities of the fre base and the zinc and copper complexes. The protons giving rise to these signals are located on bases T54 and psi55, both of which are involved in the primary intraloop and interloop hydroen bonds that hold the D and TpsiC loops together in the tertiary structure. In addition, broadening of specific resonances due to hydrogen bonding protons in the D stem at low ratios of porphyrin to tRNA indicates that the association of porphyrins increases the rate of imino proton exchange. The titration of the tRNA with the manganese (III) complex did not eveal shifts or spcific broadening comparable to the other porpyrins at low ratios. The changes induced in the NMR spectrum of tNA by porphyrins define their site of interaction with the polynucleotide. This site, at the outside of the elbow-bend in the tRNA 'L', is different from the locus of binding in tRNA for other classical DNA intercalators. Furthermore, a new mode of binding may be involved that is neither intercalative nor simply electrostatic. (author). 36 refs.; 4 figs

  6. Characterization of natural bentonite by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Sidnei Q.M.; Dieguez, Lidia C.; Menezes, Sonia M.C.; San Gil, Rosane A.S.

    1993-01-01

    Solid state NMR as well as several other instrumental chemical analysis techniques were used in order to characterize two natural occurring bentonite. The methodology is described. The NMR spectra, together with the other used techniques suggest that the observed differences are due to iron inclusions in tetrahedral and octahedral sites

  7. Chemical modeling of acid-base properties of soluble biopolymers derived from municipal waste treatment materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabasso, Silvia; Berto, Silvia; Rosato, Roberta; Marinos, Janeth Alicia Tafur; Ginepro, Marco; Zelano, Vincenzo; Daniele, Pier Giuseppe; Montoneri, Enzo

    2015-02-04

    This work reports a study of the proton-binding capacity of biopolymers obtained from different materials supplied by a municipal biowaste treatment plant located in Northern Italy. One material was the anaerobic fermentation digestate of the urban wastes organic humid fraction. The others were the compost of home and public gardening residues and the compost of the mix of the above residues, digestate and sewage sludge. These materials were hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to yield the biopolymers by saponification. The biopolymers were characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and potentiometric titration. The titration data were elaborated to attain chemical models for interpretation of the proton-binding capacity of the biopolymers obtaining the acidic sites concentrations and their protonation constants. The results obtained with the models and by NMR spectroscopy were elaborated together in order to better characterize the nature of the macromolecules. The chemical nature of the biopolymers was found dependent upon the nature of the sourcing materials.

  8. Calculation of site affinity constants and cooperativity coefficients for binding of ligands and/or protons to macromolecules. II. Relationships between chemical model and partition function algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisicaro, E; Braibanti, A; Lamb, J D; Oscarson, J L

    1990-05-01

    The relationships between the chemical properties of a system and the partition function algorithm as applied to the description of multiple equilibria in solution are explained. The partition functions ZM, ZA, and ZH are obtained from powers of the binary generating functions Jj = (1 + kappa j gamma j,i[Y])i tau j, where i tau j = p tau j, q tau j, or r tau j represent the maximum number of sites in sites in class j, for Y = M, A, or H, respectively. Each term of the generating function can be considered an element (ij) of a vector Jj and each power of the cooperativity factor gamma ij,i can be considered an element of a diagonal cooperativity matrix gamma j. The vectors Jj are combined in tensor product matrices L tau = (J1) [J2]...[Jj]..., thus representing different receptor-ligand combinations. The partition functions are obtained by summing elements of the tensor matrices. The relationship of the partition functions with the total chemical amounts TM, TA, and TH has been found. The aim is to describe the total chemical amounts TM, TA, and TH as functions of the site affinity constants kappa j and cooperativity coefficients bj. The total amounts are calculated from the sum of elements of tensor matrices Ll. Each set of indices (pj..., qj..., rj...) represents one element of a tensor matrix L tau and defines each term of the summation. Each term corresponds to the concentration of a chemical microspecies. The distinction between microspecies MpjAqjHrj with ligands bound on specific sites and macrospecies MpAqHR corresponding to a chemical stoichiometric composition is shown. The translation of the properties of chemical model schemes into the algorithms for the generation of partition functions is illustrated with reference to a series of examples of gradually increasing complexity. The equilibria examined concern: (1) a unique class of sites; (2) the protonation of a base with two classes of sites; (3) the simultaneous binding of ligand A and proton H to a

  9. Evidence for excited-state intramolecular proton transfer in 4-chlorosalicylic acid from combined experimental and computational studies: Quantum chemical treatment of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Bijan Kumar [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Calcutta 700009 (India); Guchhait, Nikhil, E-mail: nikhil.guchhait@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Calcutta 700009 (India)

    2012-07-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental and computational studies on the photophysics of 4-chlorosalicylic acid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spectroscopically established ESIPT reaction substantiated by theoretical calculation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum chemical treatment of IMHB unveils strength, nature and directional nature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Superiority of quantum chemical treatment of H-bond over geometric criteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Role of H-bond as a modulator of aromaticity. -- Abstract: The photophysical study of a pharmaceutically important chlorine substituted derivative of salicylic acid viz., 4-chlorosalicylic acid (4ClSA) has been carried out by steady-state absorption, emission and time-resolved emission spectroscopy. A large Stokes shifted emission band with negligible solvent polarity dependence marks the spectroscopic signature of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction in 4ClSA. Theoretical calculation by ab initio and Density Functional Theory methods yields results consistent with experimental findings. Theoretical potential energy surfaces predict the occurrence of proton transfer in S{sub 1}-state. Geometrical and energetic criteria, Atoms-In-Molecule topological parameters, Natural Bond Orbital population analysis have been exploited to evaluate the intramolecular hydrogen bond (IMHB) interaction and to explore its directional nature. The inter-correlation between aromaticity and resonance assisted H-bond is also discussed in this context. Our results unveil that the quantum chemical treatment is a more accurate tool to assess hydrogen bonding interaction in comparison to geometrical criteria.

  10. Proton magnetic resonance study of the influence of chemical modification, mutation, quaternary state, and ligation state on dynamic stability of the heme pocket in hemoglobin as reflected in the exchange of the proximal histidyl ring labile proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K.H.; La Mar, G.N.; Nagai, K.

    1989-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been utilized to investigate the rates of exchange with deuterium of the proximal histidyl ring protons in a series of chemically modified and mutated forms of Hb A. Differences in rates of exchange are related to differences in the stability of the deformed or partially unfolded intermediates from which exchange with bulk solvent takes place. Each modified/mutated Hb exhibited kinetic subunit heterogeneity in the reduced ferrous state, with the alpha subunit exhibiting faster exchange than the beta subunit. Modification or mutation resulted in significant increases in the His F8 ring NH exchange rates primarily for the affected subunit and only if the modification/mutation occurs at the allosterically important alpha 1 beta 2 subunit interface. Moreover, this enhancement in exchange rate is observed primarily in that quaternary state of the modified/mutated Hb in which the modified/substituted residue makes the intersubunit contact. This confirms the importance of allosteric constraints in determining the dynamic properties of the heme pocket. Using modified or mutated Hbs that can switch between the alternate quaternary states within a given ligation state or ligate within a given quaternary state, we show that the major portion of the enhanced exchange rate in R-state oxy Hb relative to T-state deoxy Hb originates from the quaternary switch rather than from ligation. However, solely ligation effects are not negligible. The exchange rates of the His F8 ring labile protons increase dramatically upon oxidizing the iron to the ferric state, and both the subunit kinetic heterogeneity and the allosteric sensitivity to the quaternary state are essentially abolished

  11. Experimental and quantum chemical studies of a new organic proton transfer compound, 1H-imidazole-3-ium-3-hydroxy-2,4,6-trinitrophenolate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamodharan, P.; Sathya, K.; Dhandapani, M.

    2018-02-01

    A new proton transfer compound, 1H-imidazole-3-ium-3-hydroxy-2,4,6-trinitrophenolate (IMHTP), was crystallized by slow evaporation-solution growth technique. 1H and 13C NMR spectral studies confirm the molecular structure of the grown crystal. Single crystal X-ray diffraction study confirms that IMHTP crystallizes in monoclinic system with space group P21/c. Thermal curves (TG/DTA) show that the material is thermally stable up to 198 °C. The crystal emits fluorescence at 510 nm, proving its utility in making green light emitting materials in optical applications. The stable molecular structure was optimized by Gaussian 09 program with B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of basis set. The frontier molecular orbital study shows that the charge transfer interaction occurs within the complex. The calculated first-order hyperpolarizability value of IMHTP is 44 times higher than that the reference material, urea. The electrostatic potential map was used to probe into electrophilic and nucleophilic reactive sites present in the molecule.

  12. Thiol-thione tautomeric analysis, spectroscopic (FT-IR, Laser-Raman, NMR and UV-vis) properties and DFT computations of 5-(3-pyridyl)-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökce, Halil; Öztürk, Nuri; Ceylan, Ümit; Alpaslan, Yelda Bingöl; Alpaslan, Gökhan

    2016-06-15

    In this study, the 5-(3-pyridyl)-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol molecule (C7H6N4S) molecule has been characterized by using FT-IR, Laser-Raman, NMR and UV-vis spectroscopies. Quantum chemical calculations have been performed to investigate the molecular structure (thione-thiol tautomerism), vibrational wavenumbers, electronic transition absorption wavelengths in DMSO solvent and vacuum, proton and carbon-13 NMR chemical shifts and HOMOs-LUMOs energies at DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level for all five tautomers of the title molecule. The obtained results show that the calculated vibrational wavenumbers, NMR chemical shifts and UV-vis wavelengths are in a good agreement with experimental data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Prediction of hydrogen and carbon chemical shifts from RNA using database mining and support vector regression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Joshua D.; Summers, Michael F. [University of Maryland Baltimore County, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (United States); Johnson, Bruce A., E-mail: bruce.johnson@asrc.cuny.edu [University of Maryland Baltimore County, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank (BMRB) contains NMR chemical shift depositions for over 200 RNAs and RNA-containing complexes. We have analyzed the {sup 1}H NMR and {sup 13}C chemical shifts reported for non-exchangeable protons of 187 of these RNAs. Software was developed that downloads BMRB datasets and corresponding PDB structure files, and then generates residue-specific attributes based on the calculated secondary structure. Attributes represent properties present in each sequential stretch of five adjacent residues and include variables such as nucleotide type, base-pair presence and type, and tetraloop types. Attributes and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts of the central nucleotide are then used as input to train a predictive model using support vector regression. These models can then be used to predict shifts for new sequences. The new software tools, available as stand-alone scripts or integrated into the NMR visualization and analysis program NMRViewJ, should facilitate NMR assignment and/or validation of RNA {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C chemical shifts. In addition, our findings enabled the re-calibration a ring-current shift model using published NMR chemical shifts and high-resolution X-ray structural data as guides.

  14. pH Dependent Spin State Population and 19F NMR Chemical Shift via Remote Ligand Protonation in an Iron(II) Complex (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-11

    Kershaw Cook , F. Tuna and M. A. Halcrow, Dalton Trans., 2013, 42, 2254. 21 Z. Derikvand, M. M. Olmstead, B. Q. Mercado, A. Shokrollahi and M. Shahryari...L. E. Reuther, C. J. Herbst-Gervasoni, J. J. Paul, V. Mochalin, M. Zeller, C. M. Thomas , A. W. Addison and E. T. Papish, Inorg. Chem., 2013, 52...Educ., 1992, 69, 62. 30 O. Kahn, Molecular Magnetism, VCH Publishers, Inc., New York, NY, 1993. 31 L. J. Kershaw Cook , R. Kulmaczewski, R. Mohammed, S

  15. Determination of the Tautomeric Equilibria of Pyridoyl Benzoyl -Diketones in the Liquid and Solid State through the use of Deuterium Isotope Effects on 1H and 13C NMR Chemical Shifts and Spin Coupling Constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Borisov, Eugeny V.; Lindon, John C.

    2015-01-01

    The tautomeric equilibria for 2-pyridoyl-, 3-pyridoyl-, and 4-pyridoyl-benzoyl methane have been investigated using deuterium isotope effects on 1H and 13C chemical shifts both in the liquid and the solid state. Equilibria are established both in the liquid and the solid state. In addition......, in the solution state the 2-bond and 3-bond J(1H–13C) coupling constants have been used to confirm the equilibrium positions. The isotope effects due to deuteriation at the OH position are shown to be superior to chemical shift in determination of equilibrium positions of these almost symmetrical -pyridoyl......-benzoyl methanes. The assignments of the NMR spectra are supported by calculations of the chemical shifts at the DFT level. The equilibrium positions are shown to be different in the liquid and the solid state. In the liquid state the 4-pyridoyl derivative is at the B-form (C-1 is OH), whereas the 2-and 3-pyridoyl...

  16. Halogen effect on structure and 13C NMR chemical shift of 3,6-disubstituted-N-alkyl carbazoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radula-Janik, Klaudia; Kupka, Teobald; Ejsmont, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Structures of selected 3,6-dihalogeno-N-alkyl carbazole derivatives were calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2pd) level of theory and their 13C NMR isotropic nuclear shieldings were predicted using density functional theory (DFT). The model compounds contained 9H-, N-methyl and N-ethyl derivatives...

  17. The covariance of the differences between experimental and theoretical chemical shifts as an aid for assigning two-dimensional heteronuclear correlation solid-state NMR spectra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Czernek, Jiří; Brus, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 608, 21 July (2014), s. 334-339 ISSN 0009-2614 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03636S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : NMR * DFT * covariance Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.897, year: 2014

  18. Proton magnetic resonance studies in solutions of o- and p-hydroxy benzoic acids in dioxan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arulmozhi, V.; Srinivasa Rao, A.; Balasubramanian, V.

    1990-01-01

    High resolution proton(NMR) studies were carried out in solutions of o- and p-hydroxy benzoic acids(OHBA and PHBA) in dioxan (D) for several solute concentrations in the range of 0.01 to 0.10 mole fraction (mf). The spectra corresponding to OH and COOH protons could be distinguished in solutions of OHBA in D whereas solution of PHBA in D show only peak in the range of chemical shifts attributable to OH and COOH protons. In the solution of OHBA in dioxan the chemical shift of the proton of the hydroxyl group increases with increase of solute concentration and attains a maximum at a solute concentration of 0.04 mf and then decreases with further increase of solute concentration. For the carboxyl group, the chemical shift increase with increase of solute concentration and attians a maximum at 0.08 mf solute concentration. In solutions of PHBA in D the chemical shift of the single line observed increases with increase of solute concentration and attains a maximum at a solute concentration of 0.05 mf. The data are interpreted as due to formation of hydrogen bonds between the molecule of OHBA and PHBA and dioxan. The proton magnetic relaxation studies in the above solutions also confirm the above findings. (author). 6 refs., 5 figs

  19. 1H NMR studies of human lysozyme: Spectral assignment and comparison with hen lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redfield, C.; Dobson, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    Complete main-chain (NH and αCH) 1 H NMR assignments are reported for the 130 residues of human lysozyme, along with extensive assignments for side-chain protons. Analysis of 2-D NOESY experiments shows that the regions of secondary structure for human lysozyme in solution are essentially identical with those found previously in a similar study of hen lysozyme and are in close accord with the structure of the protein reported previously from x-ray diffraction studies in the crystalline state. Comparison of the chemical shifts, spin-spin coupling constants, and hydrogen exchange behavior are also consistent with closely similar structures for the two proteins in solution. In a number of cases specific differences in the NMR parameters between hen and human lysozymes can be correlated with specific differences observed in the crystal structures

  20. Study on the interactions PVC/plasticizers by NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, Maria I.B.; Monteiro, Elisabeth E.C. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas; Harris, Robin [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    1992-12-31

    The nature of the interactions between PVC and plasticizers as di-butyl phthalate and di-2-ethyl-hexyl phthalate can be investigated using proton/carbon-13 NMR techniques. The measurements of T{sub 1} for protons and carbon-13 and T{sub 1} P for protons can provide a good source of information about the complex behaviour for those two systems which were investigated. (author) 14 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. NMR investigations of the melting behaviour of mesogen compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limmer, S.; Grande, S.; Loesche, A.

    1977-01-01

    Proton NMR spectra of mesogen compounds in the solid phase are recorded. Between 20 and 40 K and 4 and 12 K below the melting point they exhibit a very narrow central line with a structure caused by the chemical shift, which is superimposed to the broad structureless line normally expected from polycrystalline solid phases. It is concluded that it originates from ''quasi-liquid'' molecules whose intensity grows drastically with increasing temperature and involves a maximum of about 2.5% of the whole intensity of the spectrum. In the region close to the melting point appears another lineshape, the so-called ''super-Lorentzian'' line, whose intensity increases still stronger than that of the narrow line. It can be shown that it is due to the existence of mesomorphic clusters the directors of which are statistically distributed in the sample. The impurity dependence of these effects is investigated and an attempt is made to explain them. (author)

  2. Study of xenon binding in cryptophane-A using laser-induced NMR polarization enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luhmer, M.; Goodson, B.M.; Song, Y.Q.; Laws, D.D.; Kaiser, L.; Pines, A.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA

    1999-01-01

    Xenon is chemically inert, yet exhibits NMR parameters that are highly sensitive to its chemical environment. Considerable work has therefore capitalized on the utility of 129 Xe (I = 1/2) as a magnetic resonance probe of molecules, materials, and biological systems. In solution, spin-polarization transfer between laser-polarized xenon and the hydrogen nuclei of nearby molecules leads to signal enhancements in the resolved 1 H NMR spectrum, offering new opportunities for probing the chemical environment of xenon atoms. Following binding of laser-polarized xenon to molecules of cryptophane-A, selective enhancements of the 1 H NMR signals were observed. A theoretical framework for the interpretation of such experimental results is provided, and the spin polarization-induced nuclear Overhauser effects are shown to yield information about the molecular environment of xenon. The observed selective 1 H enhancements allowed xenon-proton internuclear distances to be estimated. These distances reveal structural characteristics of the complex, including the preferred molecular conformations adopted by cryptophane-A upon binding of xenon

  3. NMR imaging of the cardiovascular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canby, R.C.; Evanochko, W.T.; Pohost, G.M.

    1986-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging permits high-resolution tomographic and three-dimensional images of the human body to be obtained without exposure to ionizing radiation. Such imaging not only yields anatomic resolution comparable to X-ray examinations but also provides a potential means to discriminate between healthy tissue and diseased tissue. This potential is based on certain NMR properties known as relaxation times, which determine, in part, the signal intensity in an image. These properties are related to such factors as the sizes and concentrations of proteins and mobile lipids and the compartmentalization of the protons of water. Although NMR imaging (also called magnetic resonance imaging, MRI) is becoming widely available for clinical use, application to the cardiovascular system, though promising, remains primarily a research tool. Gated proton NMR imaging can generate cardiac images with excellent morphologic detail and contrast; however, its ultimate importance as a cardiovascular diagnostic modality will depend on the development of several unique applications. These applications are discussed in this paper

  4. Study of solid chemical evolution in torrefaction of different biomasses through solid-state "1"3C cross-polarization/magic angle spinning NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) and TGA (thermogravimetric analysis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Alonso, Elvira; Dupont, Capucine; Heux, Laurent; Da Silva Perez, Denilson; Commandre, Jean-Michel; Gourdon, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work is to compare mass loss and chemical evolution of the solid phase, versus time, during dynamic torrefaction of different types of biomass. For this purpose, two experiments, ThermoGravimetric Analysis and solid-state "1"3C Cross-Polarization/Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, were run on four representative biomasses. Overall mass loss and chemical evolution of the solid phase were followed, respectively, as a function of temperature and time. Thanks to this coupled information, it was shown that the knowledge of both solid mass loss and chemical evolution is necessary to characterize torrefaction severity. Moreover, biomasses containing higher proportions of xylan lost mass faster than those containing lower proportions. Lignin showed a protecting role towards cellulose, which would lead to a faster degradation of non-woody biomasses in comparison with woody biomasses. Three parameters would have an influence on solid chemical evolution during torrefaction: xylan content in hemicellulose, lignin content in biomass, and cellulose crystallinity. - Highlights: • Torrefaction of four biomasses was studied with TGA and solid-state NMR. • Both solid mass loss and chemical evolution characterize torrefaction severity. • Biomasses containing a higher proportion of xylan lose mass faster. • Lignin shows a stronger protecting role in degradation of woody biomasses. • Xylan, lignin and crystalline cellulose values influence solid chemical evolution.

  5. Carbon-13 NMR of flavinoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    The present book has been written with the objective of introducing the organic chemists with the conceptual and experimental basis required for interpretation of 13 C NMR spectra of a flavonoid and to a discussion of general usefulness of the technique in solving flavonoid structural problem. After a brief general introduction to the essential aspects of flavonoids and 13 C NMR spectroscopy, considerable emphasis has been placed in chapter 2 on the various experimental methods and the interpretation of spectral details which enable individual resonance lines to be associated with the appropriate carbons in a molecule. The whole bulk of the literature, published on 13 C NMR of flavonoids in the major journals upto 1986 alongwith some recent references of 1987 has been classified in several categories such as: flavonoids, isflavonoids, other flavonoids, flavonoid glycosides, chalconoids and flavanoids. Each category constitutes a chapter. Finally the last chapter is devoted largely to a discussion for the differentiation of various categories and subcategories of flavonoids and for the establishment of aromatic substitution pattern in these compounds. It should be emphasized that the book is a data book and only concerned with the actual analysis of 13 C NMR spectra, thus a reasonable familiarity with basic instrumentation of 13 C NMR and general pattern of nuclear chemical shifts has been assumed. (author). refs.; figs.; tabs

  6. Generation of Gaussian 09 Input Files for the Computation of 1H and 13C NMR Chemical Shifts of Structures from a Spartan’14 Conformational Search

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Spencer Reisbick & Patrick Willoughby ### Abstract This protocol describes an approach to preparing a series of Gaussian 09 computational input files for an ensemble of conformers generated in Spartan’14. The resulting input files are necessary for computing optimum geometries, relative conformer energies, and NMR shielding tensors using Gaussian. Using the conformational search feature within Spartan’14, an ensemble of conformational isomers was obtained. To convert the str...

  7. The Solid Solution Sr(1-x)Ba(x)Ga2: Substitutional Disorder and Chemical Bonding Visited by NMR Spectroscopy and Quantum Mechanical Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecher, Oliver; Mausolf, Bernhard; Lamberts, Kevin; Oligschläger, Dirk; Niewieszol, Carina; Englert, Ulli; Haarmann, Frank

    2015-09-28

    Complete miscibility of the intermetallic phases (IPs) SrGa2 and BaGa2 forming the solid solution Sr(1-x)Ba(x)Ga2 is shown by means of X-ray diffraction, thermoanalytical and metallographic studies. Regarding the distances of Sr/Ba sites versus substitution degree, a model of isolated substitution centres (ISC) for up to 10% cation substitution is explored to study the influence on the Ga bonding situation. A combined application of NMR spectroscopy and quantum mechanical (QM) calculations proves the electric field gradient (EFG) to be a sensitive measure of different bonding situations. The experimental resolution is boosted by orientation-dependent NMR on magnetically aligned powder samples, revealing in first approximation two different Ga species in the ISC regimes. EFG calculations using superlattice structures within periodic boundary conditions are in fair agreement with the NMR spectroscopy data and are discussed in detail regarding their application on disordered IPs. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Plakilactones G and H from a marine sponge. Stereochemical determination of highly flexible systems by quantitative NMR-derived interproton distances combined with quantum mechanical calculations of 13C chemical shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Di Micco

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the stereostructural investigation of two new oxygenated polyketides, plakilactones G and H, isolated from the marine sponge Plakinastrella mamillaris collected at Fiji Islands, is reported. The stereostructural studies began on plakilactone H by applying an integrated approach of the NOE-based protocol and quantum mechanical calculations of 13C chemical shifts. In particular, plakilactone H was used as a template to extend the application of NMR-derived interproton distances to a highly flexible molecular system with simultaneous assignment of four non-contiguous stereocenters. Chemical derivatization and quantum mechanical calculations of 13C on plakilactone G along with a plausible biogenetic interconversion between plakilactone G and plakilactone H allowed us to determine the absolute configuration in this two new oxygenated polyketides.

  9. nmrML: A Community Supported Open Data Standard for the Description, Storage, and Exchange of NMR Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Daniel; Jacob, Daniel; Wilson, Michael; Cruz, Joseph A; Marcu, Ana; Grant, Jason R; Moing, Annick; Deborde, Catherine; de Figueiredo, Luis F; Haug, Kenneth; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Easton, John; Ebbels, Timothy M D; Hao, Jie; Ludwig, Christian; Günther, Ulrich L; Rosato, Antonio; Klein, Matthias S; Lewis, Ian A; Luchinat, Claudio; Jones, Andrew R; Grauslys, Arturas; Larralde, Martin; Yokochi, Masashi; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Porzel, Andrea; Griffin, Julian L; Viant, Mark R; Wishart, David S; Steinbeck, Christoph; Salek, Reza M; Neumann, Steffen

    2018-01-02

    NMR is a widely used analytical technique with a growing number of repositories available. As a result, demands for a vendor-agnostic, open data format for long-term archiving of NMR data have emerged with the aim to ease and encourage sharing, comparison, and reuse of NMR data. Here we present nmrML, an open XML-based exchange and storage format for NMR spectral data. The nmrML format is intended to be fully compatible with existing NMR data for chemical, biochemical, and metabolomics experiments. nmrML can capture raw NMR data, spectral data acquisition parameters, and where available spectral metadata, such as chemical structures associated with spectral assignments. The nmrML format is compatible with pure-compound NMR data for reference spectral libraries as well as NMR data from complex biomixtures, i.e., metabolomics experiments. To facilitate format conversions, we provide nmrML converters for Bruker, JEOL and Agilent/Varian vendor formats. In addition, easy-to-use Web-based spectral viewing, processing, and spectral assignment tools that read and write nmrML have been developed. Software libraries and Web services for data validation are available for tool developers and end-users. The nmrML format has already been adopted for capturing and disseminating NMR data for small molecules by several open source data processing tools and metabolomics reference spectral libraries, e.g., serving as storage format for the MetaboLights data repository. The nmrML open access data standard has been endorsed by the Metabolomics Standards Initiative (MSI), and we here encourage user participation and feedback to increase usability and make it a successful standard.

  10. Repeatability of two-dimensional chemical shift imaging multivoxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for measuring human cerebral choline-containing compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Basant K; Egan, Mary; Wallis, Fintan; Jakeman, Philip

    2018-03-22

    To investigate the repeatability of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the in vivo measurement of human cerebral levels of choline-containing compounds (Cho). Two consecutive scans were carried out in six healthy resting subjects at a magnetic field strength of 1.5 T. On each occasion, neurospectroscopy data were collected from 64 voxels using the same 2D chemical shift imaging (CSI) sequence. The data were analyzed in the same way, using the same software, to obtain the values for each voxel of the ratio of Cho to creatine. The Wilcoxon related-samples signed-rank test, coefficient of variation (CV), repeatability coefficient (RC), and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were used to assess the repeatability. The CV ranged from 2.75% to 33.99%, while the minimum RC was 5.68%. There was excellent reproducibility, as judged by significant ICC values, in 26 voxels. Just three voxels showed significant differences according to the Wilcoxon related-samples signed-rank test. It is therefore concluded that when CSI multivoxel proton neurospectroscopy is used to measure cerebral choline-containing compounds at 1.5 T, the reproducibility is highly acceptable.

  11. Recommendations of the wwPDB NMR Validation Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelione, Gaetano T.; Nilges, Michael; Bax, Ad; Güntert, Peter; Herrmann, Torsten; Richardson, Jane S.; Schwieters, Charles; Vranken, Wim F.; Vuister, Geerten W.; Wishart, David S.; Berman, Helen M.; Kleywegt, Gerard J.; Markley, John L.

    2013-01-01

    As methods for analysis of biomolecular structure and dynamics using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) continue to advance, the resulting 3D structures, chemical shifts, and other NMR data are broadly impacting biology, chemistry, and medicine. Structure model assessment is a critical area of NMR methods development, and is an essential component of the process of making these structures accessible and useful to the wider scientific community. For these reasons, the Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) has convened an NMR Validation Task Force (NMR-VTF) to work with the wwPDB partners in developing metrics and policies for biomolecular NMR data harvesting, structure representation, and structure quality assessment. This paper summarizes the recommendations of the NMR-VTF, and lays the groundwork for future work in developing standards and metrics for biomolecular NMR structure quality assessment. PMID:24010715

  12. Optimal voxel size for measuring global gray and white matter proton metabolite concentrations using chemical shift imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Lars Peter Grüner; Adalsteinsson, E; Pfefferbaum, A

    2000-01-01

    Quantification of gray and white matter levels of spectroscopically visible metabolites can provide important insights into brain development and pathological conditions. Chemical shift imaging offers a gain in efficiency for estimation of global gray and white matter metabolite concentrations co...

  13. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Pedersen, Morten Jeppe; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Veierskov, Bjarke

    2008-01-01

    The very high mobility of protons in aqueous solutions demands special features of membrane proton transporters to sustain efficient yet regulated proton transport across biological membranes. By the use of the chemical energy of ATP, plasma-membrane-embedded ATPases extrude protons from cells...... of plants and fungi to generate electrochemical proton gradients. The recently published crystal structure of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase contributes to our knowledge about the mechanism of these essential enzymes. Taking the biochemical and structural data together, we are now able to describe the basic...... molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological...

  14. Chemical effects of 13N produced by recoil protons and deuterons in pile-irradiated methanol and methanol-d4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensui, Y.; Tomura, K.; Matsuura, T.

    1982-01-01

    The stabilized chemical forms of 13 N resulting from the reactions 13 C(p,n) 13 N by a recoil proton and 12 C(d,n) 13 N by a recoil deuteron, were studied in pile-irradiated methanol and methanol-d 4 in the temperature range from 77 to 295 K. Contrary to the target of benzene, cyclohexane, acetone and diethyl ether previously studied, the relative yield of 13 N-compounds did not depend on the irradiation temperature in the present media. In the yield of 13 N-compounds no marked change was observed between methanol and methanol-d 4 , differing from the results between benzene and benzene-d 6 . A mechanism is proposed to explain the results. (author)

  15. Exergy analysis of the biogas sorption-enhanced chemical looping reforming process integrated with a high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasemanand, Sarunyou; Im-orb, Karittha; Tippawan, Phanicha; Wiyaratn, Wisitsree; Arpornwichanop, Amornchai

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A biogas reforming and fuel cell integrated process is considered. • Energy and exergy analyses of the integrated process are performed. • Increasing the nickel oxide-to-biogas ratio decreases the exergy efficiency. • The exergy destruction of the fuel cell increases with increasing cell temperature. • The exergy efficiency of the process is improved when heat integration is applied. - Abstract: A biogas sorption-enhanced chemical looping reforming process integrated with a high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell is analyzed. Modeling of such an integrated process is performed by using a flowsheet simulator (Aspen plus). The exergy analysis is performed to evaluate the energy utilization efficiency of each unit and that of the integrated process. The effect of steam and nickel oxide to biogas ratios on the exergetic performance of the stand-alone biogas sorption-enhanced chemical looping reforming process is investigated. The total exergy destruction increases as the steam or nickel oxide to biogas ratio increases. The main exergy destruction is found at the air reactor. For the high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell, the main exergy destruction is found at the cathode. The total exergy destruction increases when cell temperature increases, whereas the inverse effect is found when the current density is considered as a key parameter. Regarding the exergy efficiency, the results show opposite trend to the exergy destruction. The heat integration analysis is performed to improve the exergetic performance. It is found that the integrated process including the heat integration system can improve the exergy destruction and exergy efficiency of 48% and 60%, respectively.

  16. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of regionally ischemic canine hearts: effects of paramagnetic proton signal enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, T.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Pykett, I.L.; Buonanno, F.S.; Kistler, J.P.; Newhouse, J.H.; Burt, C.T.; Hinshaw, W.S.; Pohost, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    In a study to evaluate the potential of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging with and without manganese contrast enhancement for detecting acute myocardial infarction, 12 dogs underwent 90-minute occlusion of the left circumflex coronary artery. Transverse-section NMR images of the excised, nonbeating heart were obtained at 1-cm intervals using the steady-state-free-precession (SSFP) technique. All NMR images revealed detailed structure of the heart. The three hearts without manganese showed no difference in intensity between the normal and the ischemic posterior regions, whereas those with manganese demonstrated a clearly demarcated zone of reduced signal intensity consistent with the ischemic zone. It is concluded that high-resolution tomograms of the excised canine myocardium can be obtained using proton NMR imaging. With the SSFP imaging technique, proton signal enhancement with manganese infusion is necessary to differentiate between ischemic and nonischemic myocardium after 90 minutes of coronary occlusion

  17. EZ-ASSIGN, a program for exhaustive NMR chemical shift assignments of large proteins from complete or incomplete triple-resonance data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuiderweg, Erik R. P., E-mail: zuiderwe@umich.edu; Bagai, Ireena [The University of Michigan Medical School, Department of Biological Chemistry (United States); Rossi, Paolo [Rutgers University, Center for Integrative Proteomics Research (United States); Bertelsen, Eric B. [Arbor Communications, Inc. (United States)

    2013-10-15

    For several of the proteins in the BioMagResBank larger than 200 residues, 60 % or fewer of the backbone resonances were assigned. But how reliable are those assignments? In contrast to complete assignments, where it is possible to check whether every triple-resonance Generalized Spin System (GSS) is assigned once and only once, with incomplete data one should compare all possible assignments and pick the best one. But that is not feasible: For example, for 200 residues and an incomplete set of 100 GSS, there are 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 260} possible assignments. In 'EZ-ASSIGN', the protein sequence is divided in smaller unique fragments. Combined with intelligent search approaches, an exhaustive comparison of all possible assignments is now feasible using a laptop computer. The program was tested with experimental data of a 388-residue domain of the Hsp70 chaperone protein DnaK and for a 351-residue domain of a type III secretion ATPase. EZ-ASSIGN reproduced the hand assignments. It did slightly better than the computer program PINE (Bahrami et al. in PLoS Comput Biol 5(3):e1000307, 2009) and significantly outperformed SAGA (Crippen et al. in J Biomol NMR 46:281-298, 2010), AUTOASSIGN (Zimmerman et al. in J Mol Biol 269:592-610, 1997), and IBIS (Hyberts and Wagner in J Biomol NMR 26:335-344, 2003). Next, EZ-ASSIGN was used to investigate how well NMR data of decreasing completeness can be assigned. We found that the program could confidently assign fragments in very incomplete data. Here, EZ-ASSIGN dramatically outperformed all the other assignment programs tested.

  18. EZ-ASSIGN, a program for exhaustive NMR chemical shift assignments of large proteins from complete or incomplete triple-resonance data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuiderweg, Erik R. P.; Bagai, Ireena; Rossi, Paolo; Bertelsen, Eric B.

    2013-01-01

    For several of the proteins in the BioMagResBank larger than 200 residues, 60 % or fewer of the backbone resonances were assigned. But how reliable are those assignments? In contrast to complete assignments, where it is possible to check whether every triple-resonance Generalized Spin System (GSS) is assigned once and only once, with incomplete data one should compare all possible assignments and pick the best one. But that is not feasible: For example, for 200 residues and an incomplete set of 100 GSS, there are 1.6 × 10 260 possible assignments. In “EZ-ASSIGN”, the protein sequence is divided in smaller unique fragments. Combined with intelligent search approaches, an exhaustive comparison of all possible assignments is now feasible using a laptop computer. The program was tested with experimental data of a 388-residue domain of the Hsp70 chaperone protein DnaK and for a 351-residue domain of a type III secretion ATPase. EZ-ASSIGN reproduced the hand assignments. It did slightly better than the computer program PINE (Bahrami et al. in PLoS Comput Biol 5(3):e1000307, 2009) and significantly outperformed SAGA (Crippen et al. in J Biomol NMR 46:281–298, 2010), AUTOASSIGN (Zimmerman et al. in J Mol Biol 269:592–610, 1997), and IBIS (Hyberts and Wagner in J Biomol NMR 26:335–344, 2003). Next, EZ-ASSIGN was used to investigate how well NMR data of decreasing completeness can be assigned. We found that the program could confidently assign fragments in very incomplete data. Here, EZ-ASSIGN dramatically outperformed all the other assignment programs tested

  19. Phosphide oxides RE2AuP2O (RE = La, Ce, Pr, Nd): synthesis, structure, chemical bonding, magnetism, and 31P and 139La solid state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Timo; Wiegand, Thomas; Ren, Jinjun; Eckert, Hellmut; Johrendt, Dirk; Niehaus, Oliver; Eul, Matthias; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2013-02-18

    Polycrystalline samples of the phosphide oxides RE(2)AuP(2)O (RE = La, Ce, Pr, Nd) were obtained from mixtures of the rare earth elements, binary rare earth oxides, gold powder, and red phosphorus in sealed silica tubes. Small single crystals were grown in NaCl/KCl fluxes. The samples were studied by powder X-ray diffraction, and the structures were refined from single crystal diffractometer data: La(2)AuP(2)O type, space group C2/m, a = 1515.2(4), b = 424.63(8), c = 999.2(2) pm, β = 130.90(2)°, wR2 = 0.0410, 1050 F(2) values for Ce(2)AuP(2)O, and a = 1503.6(4), b = 422.77(8), c = 993.0(2) pm, β = 130.88(2)°, wR2 = 0.0401, 1037 F(2) values for Pr(2)AuP(2)O, and a = 1501.87(5), b = 420.85(5), c = 990.3(3) pm, β = 131.12(1)°, wR2 = 0.0944, 1143 F(2) values for Nd(2)AuP(2)O with 38 variables per refinement. The structures are composed of [RE(2)O](4+) polycationic chains of cis-edge-sharing ORE(4/2) tetrahedra and polyanionic strands [AuP(2)](4-), which contain gold in almost trigonal-planar phosphorus coordination by P(3-) and P(2)(4-) entities. The isolated phosphorus atoms and the P(2) pairs in La(2)AuP(2)O could clearly be distinguished by (31)P solid state NMR spectroscopy and assigned on the basis of a double quantum NMR technique. Also, the two crystallographically inequivalent La sites could be distinguished by static (139)La NMR in conjunction with theoretical electric field gradient calculations. Temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements show diamagnetic behavior for La(2)AuP(2)O. Ce(2)AuP(2)O and Pr(2)AuP(2)O are Curie-Weiss paramagnets with experimental magnetic moments of 2.35 and 3.48 μ(B) per rare earth atom, respectively. Their solid state (31)P MAS NMR spectra are strongly influenced by paramagnetic interactions. Ce(2)AuP(2)O orders antiferromagnetically at 13.1(5) K and shows a metamagnetic transition at 11.5 kOe. Pr(2)AuP(2)O orders ferromagnetically at 7.0 K.

  20. Hydrogen and deuterium NMR of solids by magic-angle spinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckman, R.R.

    1982-10-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance of solids has long been characterized by very large specral broadening which arises from internuclear dipole-dipole coupling or the nuclear electric quadrupole interaction. These couplings can obscure the smaller chemical shift interaction and make that information unavailable. Two important and difficult cases are that of hydrogen and deuterium. The development of cross polarization, heteronuclear radiofrequency decoupling, and coherent averaging of nuclear spin interactions has provided measurement of chemical shift tensors in solids. Recently, double quantum NMR and double quantum decoupling have led to measurement of deuterium and proton chemical shift tensors, respectively. A general problem of these experiments is the overlapping of the tensor powder pattern spectra of magnetically distinct sites which cannot be resolved. In this work, high resolution NMR of hydrogen and deuterium in solids is demonstrated. For both nuclei, the resonances are narrowed to obtain liquid-like isotropic spectra by high frequency rotation of the sample about an axis inclined at the magic angle, β/sub m/ = Arccos (3/sup -1/2/), with respect to the direction of the external magnetic field. For deuterium, the powder spectra were narrowed by over three orders of magnitude by magic angle rotation with precise control of β. A second approach was the observation of deuterium double quantum transitions under magic angle rotation. For hydrogen, magic angle rotation alone could be applied to obtain the isotropic spectrum when H/sub D/ was small. This often occurs naturally when the nuclei are semi-dilute or involved in internal motion. In the general case of large H/sub D/, isotropic spectra were obtained by dilution of 1 H with 2 H combined with magic angle rotation. The resolution obtained represents the practical limit for proton NMR of solids

  1. Quartz Crystal Temperature Sensor for MAS NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Gerald

    1997-10-01

    Quartz crystal temperature sensors (QCTS) were tested for the first time as wireless thermometers in NMR MAS rotors utilizing the NMR RF technique itself for exiting and receiving electro-mechanical quartz resonances. This new tool in MAS NMR has a high sensitivity, linearity, and precision. When compared to the frequently used calibration of the variable temperature in the NMR system by a solid state NMR chemical shift thermometer (CST), such as lead nitrate, QCTS shows a number of advantages. It is an inert thermometer in close contact with solid samples operating parallel to the NMR experiment. QCTS can be manufactured for any frequency to be near a NMR frequency of interest (typically 1 to 2 MHz below or above). Due to the strong response of the crystal, signal detection is possible without changing the tuning of the MAS probe. The NMR signal is not influenced due to the relative sharp crystal resonance, restricted excitation by finite pulses, high probeQvalues, and commonly used audio filters. The quadratic dependence of the temperature increase on spinning speed is the same for the QCTS and for the CST lead nitrate and is discussed in terms of frictional heat in accordance with the literature about lead nitrate and with the results of a simple rotor speed jump experiment with differently radial located lead nitrate in the rotor.

  2. Use of NMR as an online sensor in industrial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Fabiana Diuk de

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is one of the most versatile analytical techniques for chemical, biochemical and medical applications. Despite this great success, NMR is seldom used as a tool in industrial applications. The first application of NMR in flowing samples was published in 1951. However, only in the last ten years Flow NMR has gained momentum and new and potential applications have been proposed. In this review we present the historical evolution of flow or online NMR spectroscopy and imaging, and current developments for use in the automation of industrial processes. (author)

  3. Determination of herb authenticity by low-field NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preto, M S M; Tavares, M I B; Sebastião, P J O; Azeredo, R B V

    2013-02-15

    The safe use of herbal medicines requires prior authentication of the raw materials used to make them. This is an important step, since the ingestion of herbal preparations or extracts can cause serious health problems. Among the different analytical techniques, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has the advantage of being non-invasive and therefore suitable for the characterization of natural products such as medicinal plants. This work presents a characterisation study of the samples of the popular plant Maytenus ilicifolia, obtained from different commercial producers. This plant is used for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders, as it possesses antitumorigenic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. The differences in the chemical structure and molecular organisation detected by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) were also investigated by proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry, in particular by fast field cycling (FFC) relaxometry, and relaxometry in the rotating frame. All results confirmed the similarity between the control sample and only one of the plant investigated. The differences detected between the samples could be related to their non-authenticity, due to the non recognise the plant due to the leaves similarity among plants from the same family and/or contamination, due to addition of similar other plants parts to the commercial ones, as they are mixed together this difficulties the acceptation of the plant. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. High resolution NMR in zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Anix [INTEVEP, Filial de Petroleos de Venezuela, SA, Caracas (Venezuela). Dept. de Analisis y Evalucion

    1992-12-31

    In this work {sup 29} Si and {sup 27} Al NMR spectroscopy was used to study various types of zeolites. The corresponding spectra were used to measure the Si/Al ratios, to follow chemical modifications induced by acid and hydrothermal treatments, to determine non-equivalent crystallographic sites in highly dealuminated mordenites, and to detect modifications of faujasites due to the insertion of titanium atoms in the lattice. (author) 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. High resolution NMR in zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, Anix

    1991-01-01

    In this work 29 Si and 27 Al NMR spectroscopy was used to study various types of zeolites. The corresponding spectra were used to measure the Si/Al ratios, to follow chemical modifications induced by acid and hydrothermal treatments, to determine non-equivalent crystallographic sites in highly dealuminated mordenites, and to detect modifications of faujasites due to the insertion of titanium atoms in the lattice. (author)

  6. Chemical characterization of a chelator-treated soil humate by solution-state multinuclear two-dimensional NMR and FTIR and pyrolysis-GCMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, T.W.M.; Higashi, R.M.; Lane, A.N.

    2000-05-01

    A California forest soil used for contaminant bioavailability studies was extracted for humic substances (HS) and then treated with 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzene disulfonate (Tiron) to remove exchangeable metal ions. This yielded HS that was readily water-soluble at neutral pH without residual Tiron contamination, and the gel electrophoretic pattern was very similar to an international reference HS. The improved solubility facilitated analysis of HS by solution-state 1-D and 2-D {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 31}P, and {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H NMR. The amino acids Gly, Ala, Leu, lle, Val, Asp, Ser, Thr, Glu, and Pro were identified in intact HS as peptidic from scalar coupling in TOCSY and dipolar interactions in NOESY and then confirmed by acid digestion of HS with 2-D {sup 1}H NMR and GCMS analysis. The presence of peptides was also corroborated by FT-IR and pyrolysis-GCMS results. Carbohydrates containing {alpha}- and {beta}-pyranoses, methoxy-phenylpropanyl structures, phosphate mono/diesters, polyphosphates, plus phosphatidic acid esters were also evident. Furthermore, the {sup 1}H NOESY, TOCSY, and HSQC together indicated that the peptidic side chains were mobile, whereas aromatic groups were relatively rigid. Thus the peptidic moieties may be more readily accessible to aqueous contaminants than aromatic groups.

  7. Production of carrier-free 28Mg and 24Na by 50-180 MeV protons on Si, P, S, Cl, Ar and K. Excitation functions and chemical separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundqvist, H.; Malmborg, P.

    1976-01-01

    This work investigates the possible use of high energy proton bomardment of silicon, phosphorous, sulphur, chlorine, argon or potassium for production of carrier-free 28 Mg. A chemical separation is essential in this preparation in order to get rid of the bulk of target material and contaminating radionuclides. A simple and efficient method to get carrier-free 28 Mg with neglectible amounts of radio-chemical impurities has been established. (Auth.)

  8. Direct Comparison of 19F qNMR and 1H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR (1H qNMR and only a few fluorine qNMR (19F qNMR were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both 19F and 1H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that 19F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to 1H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from 19F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. 19F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes.

  9. Difference in the structures of alanine tri- and tetra-peptides with antiparallel β-sheet assessed by X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR and chemical shift calculations by GIPAW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Yazawa, Koji; Horiguchi, Kumiko; Suzuki, Furitsu; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Nishimura, Katsuyuki; Kaji, Hironori

    2014-01-01

    Alanine oligomers provide a key structure for silk fibers from spider and wild silkworms.We report on structural analysis of L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-alanine (Ala)4 with anti-parallel (AP) β-structures using X-ray and solid-state NMR. All of the Ala residues in the (Ala)4 are in equivalent positions, whereas for alanine trimer (Ala)3 there are two alternative locations in a unit cell as reported previously (Fawcett and Camerman, Acta Cryst., 1975, 31, 658-665). (Ala)4 with AP β-structure is more stable than AP-(Ala)3 due to formation of the stronger hydrogen bonds. The intermolecular structure of (Ala)4 is also different from polyalanine fiber structure, indicating that the interchain arrangement of AP β-structure changes with increasing alanine sequencelength. Furthermore the precise (1)H positions, which are usually inaccesible by X-ray diffraction method, are determined by high resolution (1)H solid state NMR combined with the chemical shift calculations by the gauge-including projector augmented wave method. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Flow-through lipid nanotube arrays for structure-function studies of membrane proteins by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Gor'kov, Peter L; Cross, Timothy A; Alaouie, Ali M; Smirnov, Alex I

    2006-10-15

    A novel method for studying membrane proteins in a native lipid bilayer environment by solid-state NMR spectroscopy is described and tested. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates with flow-through 175 nm wide and 60-mum-long nanopores were employed to form macroscopically aligned peptide-containing lipid bilayers that are fluid and highly hydrated. We demonstrate that the surfaces of both leaflets of such bilayers are fully accessible to aqueous solutes. Thus, high hydration levels as well as pH and desirable ion and/or drug concentrations could be easily maintained and modified as desired in a series of experiments with the same sample. The method allows for membrane protein NMR experiments in a broad pH range that could be extended to as low as 1 and as high as 12 units for a period of up to a few hours and temperatures as high as 70 degrees C without losing the lipid alignment or bilayers from the nanopores. We demonstrate the utility of this method by a solid-state 19.6 T (17)O NMR study of reversible binding effects of mono- and divalent ions on the chemical shift properties of the Leu(10) carbonyl oxygen of transmembrane pore-forming peptide gramicidin A (gA). We further compare the (17)O shifts induced by binding metal ions to the binding of protons in the pH range from 1 to 12 and find a significant difference. This unexpected result points to a difference in mechanisms for ion and proton conduction by the gA pore. We believe that a large number of solid-state NMR-based studies, including structure-function, drug screening, proton exchange, pH, and other titration experiments, will benefit significantly from the method described here.

  11. NMR dispersion measurement of dynamic nuclear polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, K.; Cox, S.F.J.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of monitoring dynamic nuclear polarization from the NMR dispersive susceptibility is examined. Two prototype instruments are tested in a polarized proton target using organic target material. The more promising employs a tunnel diode oscillator, inside the target cavity, and should provide a precise polarization measurement working at a frequency far enough from the main resonance for the disturbance of the measured polarization to be negligible. Other existing methods for measuring target polarization are briefly reviewed. (author)

  12. Steam Electrolysis by Proton-Conducting Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOECs) with Chemically Stable BaZrO3-Based Electrolytes

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei; Traversa, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    BaZrO3-based material was applied as the electrolyte for proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOECs). Compared with the instability of BaCeO3-based proton-conductors, BaZrO3-based material could be a more promising candidate for proton

  13. NMR chemical shift and J coupling parameterization and quantum mechanical reference spectrum simulation for selected nerve agent degradation products in aqueous conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, Harri; Anđelković, Boban

    2017-10-01

    The spectral parameters of selected nerve agent degradation products relevant to the Chemical Weapons Convention, namely, ethyl methylphosphonate, isopropyl methylphosphonate, pinacolyl methylphosphonate and methylphosphonic acid, were studied in wide range of pH conditions and selected temperatures. The pH and temperature dependence of chemical shifts and J couplings was parameterized using Henderson-Hasselbalch-based functions. The obtained parameters allowed calculation of precise chemical shifts and J coupling constants in arbitrary pH conditions and typical measurement temperatures, thus facilitating quantum mechanical simulation of reference spectra in the chosen magnetic field strength for chemical verification. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Some exercises in quantitative NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakker, C.J.G.

    1985-01-01

    The articles represented in this thesis result from a series of investigations that evaluate the potential of NMR imaging as a quantitative research tool. In the first article the possible use of proton spin-lattice relaxation time T 1 in tissue characterization, tumor recognition and monitoring tissue response to radiotherapy is explored. The next article addresses the question whether water proton spin-lattice relaxation curves of biological tissues are adequately described by a single time constant T 1 , and analyzes the implications of multi-exponentiality for quantitative NMR imaging. In the third article the use of NMR imaging as a quantitative research tool is discussed on the basis of phantom experiments. The fourth article describes a method which enables unambiguous retrieval of sign information in a set of magnetic resonance images of the inversion recovery type. The next article shows how this method can be adapted to allow accurate calculation of T 1 pictures on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The sixth article, finally, describes a simulation procedure which enables a straightforward determination of NMR imaging pulse sequence parameters for optimal tissue contrast. (orig.)

  15. Acceleration of natural-abundance solid-state MAS NMR measurements on bone by paramagnetic relaxation from gadolinium-DTPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-07-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA = Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the 1H T1 values were calculated from data collected by 1H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the 1H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10 mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the 13C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from 13C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using 1H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans.

  16. Xe-129 NMR chemical shift in Xe@C-60 calculated at experimental conditions: Essential role of the relativity, dynamics, and explicit solvent

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Standara, Stanislav; Kulhánek, P.; Marek, R.; Straka, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 22 (2013), s. 1890-1898 ISSN 0192-8651 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/2037; GA ČR GA13-03978S Grant - others:7th European Community Framework Program(XE) FP7-286154; CEITEC-Central European Institute of Technology (European Regional Development)(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0068; Operational Program Research and Development for Innovations(XE) CZ.1.05/3.2.00/08.0144 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Xe-129 NMR * Xe@C-60 * dynamical averaging * explicit solvent * relativistic effects Subject RI