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Sample records for proton irradiation-induced modifications

  1. Carbon ion irradiation induced surface modification of polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, A.; Chakraborty, V.; Dutta, R.K.; Chintalapudi, S.N.

    2001-01-01

    Polypropylene was irradiated with 12 C ions of 3.6 and 5.4 MeV energies in the fluence range of 5x10 13 -5x10 14 ions/cm 2 using 3 MV tandem accelerator. Ion penetration was limited to a few microns and surface modifications were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. At the lowest ion fluence only blister formation of various sizes (1-6 μm) were observed, but at higher fluence (1x10 14 ions/cm 2 ) a three-dimensional network structure was found to form. A gradual degradation in the network structure was observed with further increase in the ion fluence. The dose dependence of the changes on surface morphology of polypropylene is discussed

  2. Carbon ion irradiation induced surface modification of polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, A. E-mail: abhijit@alpha.iuc.res.in; Chakraborty, V.; Dutta, R.K.; Chintalapudi, S.N

    2001-12-01

    Polypropylene was irradiated with {sup 12}C ions of 3.6 and 5.4 MeV energies in the fluence range of 5x10{sup 13}-5x10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} using 3 MV tandem accelerator. Ion penetration was limited to a few microns and surface modifications were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. At the lowest ion fluence only blister formation of various sizes (1-6 {mu}m) were observed, but at higher fluence (1x10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}) a three-dimensional network structure was found to form. A gradual degradation in the network structure was observed with further increase in the ion fluence. The dose dependence of the changes on surface morphology of polypropylene is discussed.

  3. Proton irradiation induced defects in Cd and Zn doped InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybicki, G.C.; Williams, W.S.

    1993-01-01

    Proton irradiation induced defects in Zn and Cd doped InP have been studied by deep level transient spectroscopy, (DLTS). After 2 MeV proton irradiation the defects H4 and H5 were observed in lightly Zn doped InP, while the defects H3 and H5 were observed in more heavily Zn and Cd doped InP. The defect properties were not affected by the substitution of Cd for Zn, but the introduction rate of H5 was lower in Cd doped InP. The annealing rate of defects was also higher in Cd doped InP. The use of Cd doped InP may thus result in an InP solar cell with even greater radiation resistance

  4. Preparation of the proton exchange membranes for fuel cell under pre-irradiation induced grafting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jingye; Muto, F.; Matsuura, A.; Kakiji, T.; Miura, T.; Oshima, A.; Washio, M.; Katsumura, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Proton exchange membranes (PEMs) were prepared via pre-irradiation induced grafting of styrene or styrene/divinylbenzene (S/DVB) into the crosslinked polytetrafluoroethylene (RX-PTFE) films with thickness around 10 m and then sulfonated by chlorosulfonic acid. The membrane electrode assembles (MEAs) based on these PEMs with ion exchange capacity (IEC) values around 2meq/g were prepared by hot-press with Nafion dispersion coated on the surfaces of the membranes and electrodes. And the MEA based on the Nafion 112 membrane was also prepared under same procedure as a comparison. The performances of the MEAs in single fuel cell were tested under different working temperatures and humidification conditions. The performance of the synthesized PEMs showed better results than that of Nafion 112 membrane under low humidification at 80 degree C. The electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) were taken with the direct current density of 0.5A/cm 2 and the resulted curves in Nyqvist representation obeyed the half circle pattern. (authors)

  5. On the modeling of irradiation-induced homogeneous precipitation in proton-bombarded Ni-Si solid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Nghi Q.; Janghorban, K.; Ardell, A. J.

    1981-10-01

    Irradiation-induced solute redistribution leading to precipitation of coherent γ' particles in undersaturated Ni-based solid solutions containing 6 and 8 at.% Si during 400-keV proton bombardment was modeled, based on the concept of solute segregation in concentrated alloys under spatially-dependent defect production conditions. The combined effects of (i) an extremely large difference between the defect production rates in the peak-damage and mid-range regions during irradiation and (ii) a preferential coupling between the interstitial and solute fluxes generate a net transient flux of Si atoms into the mid-range region, which is much larger than the solute flux out of this location. As a result, the Si concentration exceeds the solubility limit and homogeneous precipitation of the γ' phase occurs in this particular region of the irradiated samples. The spatial, compositional and temperature dependences of irradiation-induced homogeneous precipitation derived from the present theoretical calculations are in good qualitative agreement with experimental observations

  6. Correlation of proton irradiation induced threshold voltage shifts to deep level traps in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z.; Cardwell, D.; Sasikumar, A.; Arehart, A. R.; Ringel, S. A., E-mail: ringel.5@osu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Kyle, E. C. H.; Speck, J. S. [Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States); Chen, J.; Zhang, E. X.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Schrimpf, R. D. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States)

    2016-04-28

    The impact of proton irradiation on the threshold voltage (V{sub T}) of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures is systematically investigated to enhance the understanding of a primary component of the degradation of irradiated high electron mobility transistors. The value of V{sub T} was found to increase monotonically as a function of 1.8 MeV proton fluence in a sub-linear manner reaching 0.63 V at a fluence of 1 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −2}. Silvaco Atlas simulations of V{sub T} shifts caused by GaN buffer traps using experimentally measured introduction rates, and energy levels closely match the experimental results. Different buffer designs lead to different V{sub T} dependences on proton irradiation, confirming that deep, acceptor-like defects in the GaN buffer are primarily responsible for the observed V{sub T} shifts. The proton irradiation induced V{sub T} shifts are found to depend on the barrier thickness in a linear fashion; thus, scaling the barrier thickness could be an effective way to reduce such degradation.

  7. Correlation of proton irradiation induced threshold voltage shifts to deep level traps in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Cardwell, D.; Sasikumar, A.; Kyle, E. C. H.; Chen, J.; Zhang, E. X.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Schrimpf, R. D.; Speck, J. S.; Arehart, A. R.; Ringel, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    The impact of proton irradiation on the threshold voltage (VT) of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures is systematically investigated to enhance the understanding of a primary component of the degradation of irradiated high electron mobility transistors. The value of VT was found to increase monotonically as a function of 1.8 MeV proton fluence in a sub-linear manner reaching 0.63 V at a fluence of 1 × 1014 cm-2. Silvaco Atlas simulations of VT shifts caused by GaN buffer traps using experimentally measured introduction rates, and energy levels closely match the experimental results. Different buffer designs lead to different VT dependences on proton irradiation, confirming that deep, acceptor-like defects in the GaN buffer are primarily responsible for the observed VT shifts. The proton irradiation induced VT shifts are found to depend on the barrier thickness in a linear fashion; thus, scaling the barrier thickness could be an effective way to reduce such degradation.

  8. Correlation of proton irradiation induced threshold voltage shifts to deep level traps in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.; Cardwell, D.; Sasikumar, A.; Arehart, A. R.; Ringel, S. A.; Kyle, E. C. H.; Speck, J. S.; Chen, J.; Zhang, E. X.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Schrimpf, R. D.

    2016-01-01

    The impact of proton irradiation on the threshold voltage (V T ) of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures is systematically investigated to enhance the understanding of a primary component of the degradation of irradiated high electron mobility transistors. The value of V T was found to increase monotonically as a function of 1.8 MeV proton fluence in a sub-linear manner reaching 0.63 V at a fluence of 1 × 10 14  cm −2 . Silvaco Atlas simulations of V T shifts caused by GaN buffer traps using experimentally measured introduction rates, and energy levels closely match the experimental results. Different buffer designs lead to different V T dependences on proton irradiation, confirming that deep, acceptor-like defects in the GaN buffer are primarily responsible for the observed V T shifts. The proton irradiation induced V T shifts are found to depend on the barrier thickness in a linear fashion; thus, scaling the barrier thickness could be an effective way to reduce such degradation.

  9. Irradiation-induced modification of the material parameters in magnesium-doped lithium niobate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jentjens, Lena

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of this thesis the material properties of lithium niobate are directedly influenced by the irradiation with 3 He ions with an energy of 40 MeV. In the first part the irradiation-induced material changes are intensively studied. Long-time stable changes of the refractive index are measured in the range of up to 6.10 -3 , which depend on the radiation dose and exhibit until now no saturation behaviour. Accompanied is this change by an also dose-dependent deformation as well as a brownish change of color of the crystals. Furthermore a by several orders of magnitude increased electrical dark- and photoconductivity, which depends on the ion dose and exhibits until now also no saturation behaviour. An effect independent on the ion dose is the reduction of the coercive field strength by about 10%. Furthermore it was stated the quantity of the effects not only depends on the absolute dose, but also on the irradiation direction in view of the crystallographic c-axis. The second part of this thesis deals with the generation of microscopic structures in lithium niobate. By an ion microbeam respectively a shiftable slit aperture the fabrication of refractive-index gratings is pursued. Grating with periodicity lengths in the range of 12-160 μm could until now be detected and promise in comparison with photorefractive gratings the advance of larger stability.

  10. Characterization of the proton irradiation induced luminescence of materials and application in radiation oncology dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darafsheh, Arash; Zhang, Rongxiao; Kassaee, Alireza; Finlay, Jarod C.

    2018-03-01

    Visible light generated as the result of interaction of ionizing radiation with matter can be used for radiation therapy quality assurance. In this work, we characterized the visible light observed during proton irradiation of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and silica glass fiber materials by performing luminescence spectroscopy. The spectra of the luminescence signal from PMMA and silica glass fibers during proton irradiation showed continuous spectra whose shape were different from that expected from Čerenkov radiation, indicating that Čerenkov radiation cannot be the responsible radioluminescence signal. The luminescence signal from each material showed a Bragg peak pattern and their corresponding proton ranges are in agreement with measurements performed by a standard ion chamber. The spectrum of the silica showed two peaks at 460 and 650 nm stem from the point defects of the silica: oxygen deficiency centers (ODC) and non-bridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHC), respectively. The spectrum of the PMMA fiber showed a continuous spectrum with a peak at 410 nm whose origin is connected with the fluorescence of the PMMA material. Our results are of interest for various applications based on imaging radioluminescent signal in proton therapy and will inform on the design of high-resolution fiber probes for proton therapy dosimetry.

  11. Fundamental Studies of Irradiation-Induced Modifications in Microstructural Evolution and Mechanical Properties of Advanced Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbins, James; Heuser, Brent; Hosemann, Peter; Liu, Xiang

    2018-04-24

    This final technical report summarizes the research performed during October 2014 and December 2017, with a focus on investigating the radiation-induced microstructural and mechanical property modifications in optimized advanced alloys for sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) structural applications. To accomplish these objectives, the radiation responses of several different advanced alloys, including austenitic steel Alloy 709 (A709) and 316H, and ferritic/ martensitic Fe–9Cr steels T91 and G92, were investigated using a combination of microstructure characterizations and nanoindentation measurements. Different types of irradiation, including ex situ bulk ion irradiation and in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) ion irradiation, were employed in this study. Radiation-induced dislocations, precipitates, and voids were characterized by TEM. Scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) and/or atom probe tomography (APT) were used to study radiation-induced segregation and precipitation. Nanoindentation was used for hardness measurements to study irradiation hardening. Austenitic A709 and 316H was bulk-irradiated by 3.5 MeV Fe++ ions to up to 150 peak dpa at 400, 500, and 600°. Compared to neutron-irradiated stainless steel (SS) 316, the Frank loop density of ion-irradiated A709 shows similar dose dependence at 400°, but very different temperature dependence. Due to the noticeable difference in the initial microstructure of A709 and 316H, no systematic comparison on the Frank loops in A709 vs 316H was made. It would be helpful that future ion irradiation study on 316 stainless steel could be conducted to directly compare the temperature dependence of Frank loop density in ion-irradiated 316 SS with that in neutron-irradiated 316 SS. In addition, future neutron irradiation on A709 at 400–600° at relative high dose (>10 dpa) can be carried out to compare with ion-irradiated A709. The radiation

  12. Swift heavy ion irradiation induced modifications in the optical band gap and Urbach's tail in polyaniline nanofibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Somik; Kumar, A.

    2011-01-01

    Optical band gap and Urbach tail width of HCl and CSA doped polyaniline (PAni) nanofibers and the ion beam induced modifications in the band gap and Urbach's tail of the samples have been studied employing UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. All the major bands appearing in the FTIR spectra exhibit a decrease in intensity and broadening in their band widths upon interaction with the highly energetic ion beams. This suggests that SHI irradiation induces chain-scissioning events in the PAni nanofibers. An interesting result that comes out from the FTIR analysis is a transition from the benzenoid to quinoid states in the PAni chains, which reveals that there is a decrease in the degree of conjugation in the polymer upon irradiation. Optical absorption studies indicate three direct allowed transitions at ∼2.64, 3.61 and 4.08 eV for HCl doped PAni nanofibers and at ∼2.62, 3.49 and 4.02 eV for the CSA doped PAni nanofibers. The optical band gap is found to increase with increasing ion fluence which may be attributed to the reduction in the fiber diameters upon irradiation, which is corroborated by TEM analysis. Increase in the optical band gap also points out to a decrease in the conjugation length due to the larger torsion angles between the adjacent phenyl rings of the polymer with respect to the plane of the nitrogen atoms, which is also supported by FTIR results. The Urbach tail width decreases with increasing ion fluence indicating that structural disorders are annealed out of the PAni nanofibers which is also observed from the plots of (αhν) 2 against photon energy (hν) for HCl doped PAni nanofibers. The quantum confinement effect is confirmed by fact that a band gap exhibits a linear dependence on the inverse of the square of the radius of the PAni nanofibers. Infact, the increase in the optical band gap may be a combined effect of the decrease in the Urbach band width and the quantum confinement effect.

  13. Measurement and investigation of proton irradiation-induced charge transfer inefficiency in PPD CIS at different integration times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuanyuan; Wang, Zujun; Zhang, Fengqi; Bian, Jingying; Yao, Zhibin; He, Baoping; Liu, Minbo; Sheng, Jiangkun; Ma, Wuying; Dong, Guantao; Jin, Junshan

    2018-04-01

    Charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) is an important parameter for photodiode (PPD) CMOS image sensors (CISs). A test system was built and used to measure the CTI of PPD CIS devices at different integration times. The radiation effects of 3 MeV and 10 MeV protons on the CTI were investigated. The experiments were carried out at the EN Tandem Van de Graaff accelerator at proton fluences in the range 1010 to 1011 p/cm2. The CTI was measured within the 2 h following proton radiations. The dependence of CTI on integration time, proton energy and fluence were investigated. The CTI was observed to increase after proton irradiation: with the effect of irradiation with 3 MeV proton being more severe than that with 10 MeV protons. The CTI was also observed to decrease with increasing integration time, which is thought to be related to the charge density in the space charge region (SCR) of the CIS devices. This work has provided a simple method to measure the CTI and helped us to understand proton radiation effects on the CTI of PPD CISs.

  14. Proton beam modification of lead white pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, L.; Gutiérrez, P.C.; Miserque, F.; Thomé, L.

    2013-01-01

    Pigments and paint materials are known to be sensitive to particle irradiation. Occasionally, the analysis of paintings by PIXE can induce a slight or dark stain depending on the experimental conditions (beam current, dose, particle energy). In order to understand this discoloration, we have irradiated various types of art white pigments – lead white (hydrocerussite and basic lead sulfate), gypsum, calcite, zinc oxide and titanium oxide – with an external 3 MeV proton micro-beam commonly used for PIXE experiments. We have observed various sensitivities depending on the pigment. No visible change occurs for calcite and titanium oxide, whereas lead white pigments are very sensitive. For the majority of the studied compounds, the discoloration is proportional to the beam current and charge. The damage induced by proton beam irradiation in lead white pigments was studied by micro-Raman and XPS spectroscopies. Structural modifications and dehydration were detected. Damage recovery was investigated by thermal treatment and UV-light irradiation. The discoloration disappeared after one week of UV illumination, showing that PIXE experiments could be safely undertaken for pigments and paintings

  15. Modification of semiconductors with proton beams. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlovskii, V.V.; Lomasov, V.N.; Kozlov, V.A.

    2000-01-01

    Analysis is given of the progress in the modification of semiconductors by proton beams in fields such as proton-enhanced diffusion, ion-beam mixing, and formation of porous layers. This method of modification (doping) is shown to have high potential in monitoring the properties of semiconductor materials and designing devices of micro and nano electronics as compared to the conventional doping techniques such as thermal diffusion, epitaxy, and ion implantation

  16. Gamma irradiation-induced modifications of resins found in nuclear waste embedding processes; Modifications induites par irradiation gamma dans les differentes resines rencontrees dans le traitement des dechets nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allali, H [Faculte des Science et Techniques, Settat (Morocco); Debre, O; Lambert, M; Nsouli, B; Thomas, J P [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Collaboration: IPN-Lyon, Laboratoire d` Etude des Materiaux Plastiques et des Biomateriaux, URA 507, UCBL, Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radiactifs

    1999-12-31

    The various resins involved in nuclear waste disposal are subject to gamma irradiation-induced modifications. From Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry of Secondary ions emitted under High Energy Projectiles bombardment (HSF-SIMS) of such materials the following results are obtained: the embedding epoxy resin DGEBA-DDM does not exhibit significant bulk changes in chemical structure, whatever the dose rate and irradiation medium (air or water), at least up to 2 MGy. However, oxidation processes are well observed at the very surface. Under the same conditions Ion exchange resins to be embedded are subjected to scissions of their functional sites, leading to fixed ion release. Dehydration under irradiation is observed pointing out the crucial role of water in ion transport outside of the material. (authors)

  17. Modification of polycrystalline copper by proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia S, F.; Cabral P, A.; Saniger B, J.M.; Banuelos, J.G.; Barragan V, A.

    1997-01-01

    Polished copper samples were irradiated with proton beams of 300 and 700 keV at room temperature and at -150 Centigrade. In this work the obtained results are reported when such copper irradiated samples are analysed with Sem, Tem, AFM. The Sem micrographs showed evident changes in surface of these copper samples, therefore an EDAX microanalysis was done for its characterization. additionally, the Tem micrographs showed heaps formation until 200 nm. Its electron diffraction spectra indicated that these heaps consist of a copper compound. Finally with AFM were observed changes in coloration of the irradiated sample surface, as well as changes in texture and rugosity of them. These results show in general that irradiation process with protons which is known as an innocuo process produces changes in the copper properties. (Author)

  18. Irradiation-induced modification of the material parameters in magnesium-doped lithium niobate; Bestrahlungsinduzierte Modifikation der Materialparameter in Magnesiumdotiertem Lithiumniobat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jentjens, Lena

    2010-07-01

    In the framework of this thesis the material properties of lithium niobate are directedly influenced by the irradiation with {sup 3}He ions with an energy of 40 MeV. In the first part the irradiation-induced material changes are intensively studied. Long-time stable changes of the refractive index are measured in the range of up to 6.10{sup -3}, which depend on the radiation dose and exhibit until now no saturation behaviour. Accompanied is this change by an also dose-dependent deformation as well as a brownish change of color of the crystals. Furthermore a by several orders of magnitude increased electrical dark- and photoconductivity, which depends on the ion dose and exhibits until now also no saturation behaviour. An effect independent on the ion dose is the reduction of the coercive field strength by about 10%. Furthermore it was stated the quantity of the effects not only depends on the absolute dose, but also on the irradiation direction in view of the crystallographic c-axis. The second part of this thesis deals with the generation of microscopic structures in lithium niobate. By an ion microbeam respectively a shiftable slit aperture the fabrication of refractive-index gratings is pursued. Grating with periodicity lengths in the range of 12-160 {mu}m could until now be detected and promise in comparison with photorefractive gratings the advance of larger stability.

  19. Irradiation-Induced Nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birtcher, R.C.; Ewing, R.C.; Matzke, Hj.; Meldrum, A.; Newcomer, P.P.; Wang, L.M.; Wang, S.X.; Weber, W.J.

    1999-08-09

    This paper summarizes the results of the studies of the irradiation-induced formation of nanostructures, where the injected interstitials from the source of irradiation are not major components of the nanophase. This phenomena has been observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in a number of intermetallic compounds and ceramics during high-energy electron or ion irradiations when the ions completely penetrate through the specimen. Beginning with single crystals, electron or ion irradiation in a certain temperature range may result in nanostructures composed of amorphous domains and nanocrystals with either the original composition and crystal structure or new nanophases formed by decomposition of the target material. The phenomenon has also been observed in natural materials which have suffered irradiation from the decay of constituent radioactive elements and in nuclear reactor fuels which have been irradiated by fission neutrons and other fission products. The mechanisms involved in the process of this nanophase formation are discussed in terms of the evolution of displacement cascades, radiation-induced defect accumulation, radiation-induced segregation and phase decomposition, as well as the competition between irradiation-induced amorphization and recrystallization.

  20. Proton and gamma -Rays Irradiation-Induced Dark Current Random Telegraph Signal in a 0.18-mu{{m}} CMOS Image Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E.; Nuns, T.; Virmontois, C.; David, J.-P.; Gilard, O.

    2013-08-01

    The dark current random telegraph signal (RTS) behavior has been studied in a five-transistor-per-pixel (5T) pinned photodiode 0.18-μm COTS active pixel sensor (APS). Several devices, irradiated using protons and gamma rays, have been studied in order to assess the ionizing and displacement damage effects. The influence of the proton energy, fluence, ionizing dose and applied bias during irradiation on the number of RTS pixels, the number of discrete levels, maximum transition amplitude, and mean switching time constants is investigated.

  1. A comparison of 4 MeV Proton and Co-60 gamma irradiation induced degradation in the electrical characteristics of N-channel MOSFETs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anjum, Arshiya; Vinayakprasanna, N.H.; Pradeep, T.M. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570006 (India); Pushpa, N. [Department of PG Studies in Physics, JSS College, Ooty Road, Mysore 570025 (India); Krishna, J.B.M. [IUC-DAE CSR, Kolkota 700098 (India); Gnana Prakash, A.P., E-mail: gnanaprakash@physics.uni-mysore.ac.in [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570006 (India)

    2016-07-15

    N-channel depletion MOSFETs were irradiated with 4 MeV Proton and Co-60 gamma radiation in the dose range of 100 krad(Si) to 100 Mrad(Si). The electrical characteristics of MOSFET such as threshold voltage (V{sub th}), density of interface trapped charges (ΔN{sub it}), density of oxide trapped charges (ΔN{sub ot}), transconductance (g{sub m}), mobility (μ), leakage current (I{sub L}) and drain saturation current (I{sub D} {sub Sat}) were studied as a function of dose. A considerable increase in ΔN{sub it} and ΔN{sub ot} and decrease in V{sub th,}g{sub m}, μ, and I{sub D} {sub Sat} was observed after irradiation. The results of 4 MeV Proton irradiation were compared with that of Co-60 gamma radiation and it is found that the degradation is more for the devices irradiated with 4 MeV Protons when compared with the Co-60 gamma radiation. This indicates that Protons induce more trapped charges in the field oxide region when compared to the gamma radiation.

  2. Microwave irradiation induced modifications on the interfaces in SAN/EVA/PVC and PVAc/BPA/PVP ternary polymer blends: Positron lifetime study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinesh, Meghala; Chikkakuntappa, Ranganathaiah

    2013-01-01

    Ternary polymer blends of poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile)/poly(ethylene-co-vinylacetate)/poly(vinyl chloride) (SAN/EVA/PVC) and poly(vinyl acetate)/bisphenol A/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVAc/BPA/PVP) with different compositions have been prepared by solvent casting method and characterized by positron lifetime spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry DSC. Phase modifications have been induced by irradiating the blends with microwave radiation. These changes have been monitored by measuring the free-volume content in the blends. The results clearly show improved interactions between the constituent polymers of the blends upon microwave irradiation. However, the free-volume data and DSC measurements are found to be inadequate to reveal the changes at the interfaces and the interfaces determine the final properties of the blend. For this we have used hydrodynamic interaction (α ij ) approach developed by us to measure strength of hydrodynamic interaction at the interfaces. These results show that microwave irradiation stabilizes the interfaces if the blend contains strong polar groups. SAN/EVA/PVC blend shows an increased effective hydrodynamic interaction from −3.18 to −4.85 at composition 50/35/15 upon microwave irradiation and PVAc/BPA/PVP blend shows an increased effective hydrodynamic interaction from −3.81 to −7.57 at composition 20/50/30 after irradiation

  3. Microwave irradiation induced modifications on the interfaces in SAN/EVA/PVC and PVAc/BPA/PVP ternary polymer blends: Positron lifetime study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinesh, Meghala; Chikkakuntappa, Ranganathaiah, E-mail: crang1@rediffmail.com

    2013-09-01

    Ternary polymer blends of poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile)/poly(ethylene-co-vinylacetate)/poly(vinyl chloride) (SAN/EVA/PVC) and poly(vinyl acetate)/bisphenol A/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVAc/BPA/PVP) with different compositions have been prepared by solvent casting method and characterized by positron lifetime spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry DSC. Phase modifications have been induced by irradiating the blends with microwave radiation. These changes have been monitored by measuring the free-volume content in the blends. The results clearly show improved interactions between the constituent polymers of the blends upon microwave irradiation. However, the free-volume data and DSC measurements are found to be inadequate to reveal the changes at the interfaces and the interfaces determine the final properties of the blend. For this we have used hydrodynamic interaction (α{sub ij}) approach developed by us to measure strength of hydrodynamic interaction at the interfaces. These results show that microwave irradiation stabilizes the interfaces if the blend contains strong polar groups. SAN/EVA/PVC blend shows an increased effective hydrodynamic interaction from −3.18 to −4.85 at composition 50/35/15 upon microwave irradiation and PVAc/BPA/PVP blend shows an increased effective hydrodynamic interaction from −3.81 to −7.57 at composition 20/50/30 after irradiation.

  4. Induction of surface modification of polytetrafluoroethylene with proton ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, I S; Kim, H R; Choi, Y J; Park, H S [Seoul National Univ. of Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of the death in the USA and developed countries. More than 570,000 artery bypass graft surgeries per USA are performed each year, though percutaneous devices have abounded in extreme cases. Based on the surgery follow-ups, large diameter expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) (>5 mm) are clinically employed with good results but its clinical applications in smaller vessels is still problematic due to thrombosis and neointima formation. Achievement of high patency grafts has been to some extent achieved by numerous methods of surface modification techniques, but its results are less than its initial hopes. As examples, endothelial cells coated on the luminal surface of ePTFE has demonstrated limited success after recirculation. Surface modifications of PTFE film with either argon ion beam or UV light from Xe-excimer lamp were reported to increase its interaction with vascular endothelial cell. Surface modification of poly(lactide-co-glycolide)[PLGA] is also very important in tissue engineering, in where induction of its initial high cellular adhesion and spreading is a critical step for development of tissue engineering medical products. We previously reported tissue engineering of the hybrid ePTFE scaffold by seeding smooth muscle cells and subsequently evaluation of its tissue regeneration behaviors and stabilities with circulation of pulsatile flow. To improve its tissue engineering more quickly, we here performed surface modification of ePTFE and porous PLGA scaffold and evaluated its subsequent chemical and biological properties after treating its surface with low energy ion beams. The porous ePTFE was prepared in a round shape (diameter = 1 cm) and dried after organic solvent extraction for ion beam treatment. Another porous PLGA layers (d = 1 cm, t = 1 cm with approximately 92% porosity) were fabricated and treated its surface by irradiating low energy either nitrogen or argon ion beams (1 keV, 1x1015 ions

  5. Induction of surface modification of polytetrafluoroethylene with proton ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, I. S.; Kim, H. R.; Choi, Y. J.; Park, H. S.

    2007-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of the death in the USA and developed countries. More than 570,000 artery bypass graft surgeries per USA are performed each year, though percutaneous devices have abounded in extreme cases. Based on the surgery follow-ups, large diameter expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) (>5 mm) are clinically employed with good results but its clinical applications in smaller vessels is still problematic due to thrombosis and neointima formation. Achievement of high patency grafts has been to some extent achieved by numerous methods of surface modification techniques, but its results are less than its initial hopes. As examples, endothelial cells coated on the luminal surface of ePTFE has demonstrated limited success after recirculation. Surface modifications of PTFE film with either argon ion beam or UV light from Xe-excimer lamp were reported to increase its interaction with vascular endothelial cell. Surface modification of poly(lactide-co-glycolide)[PLGA] is also very important in tissue engineering, in where induction of its initial high cellular adhesion and spreading is a critical step for development of tissue engineering medical products. We previously reported tissue engineering of the hybrid ePTFE scaffold by seeding smooth muscle cells and subsequently evaluation of its tissue regeneration behaviors and stabilities with circulation of pulsatile flow. To improve its tissue engineering more quickly, we here performed surface modification of ePTFE and porous PLGA scaffold and evaluated its subsequent chemical and biological properties after treating its surface with low energy ion beams. The porous ePTFE was prepared in a round shape (diameter = 1 cm) and dried after organic solvent extraction for ion beam treatment. Another porous PLGA layers (d = 1 cm, t = 1 cm with approximately 92% porosity) were fabricated and treated its surface by irradiating low energy either nitrogen or argon ion beams (1 keV, 1x1015 ions

  6. Modification of polycrystalline copper by proton irradiation; Modificacion de cobre policristalino por irradiacion con protones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia S, F.; Cabral P, A. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Hipodromo Condesa, 06100 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Saniger B, J.M.; Banuelos, J.G. [UNAM Centro de Instrumentos, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Barragan V, A. [UNAM Instituto de Fisica, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    Polished copper samples were irradiated with proton beams of 300 and 700 keV at room temperature and at -150 Centigrade. In this work the obtained results are reported when such copper irradiated samples are analysed with Sem, Tem, AFM. The Sem micrographs showed evident changes in surface of these copper samples, therefore an EDAX microanalysis was done for its characterization. additionally, the Tem micrographs showed heaps formation until 200 nm. Its electron diffraction spectra indicated that these heaps consist of a copper compound. Finally with AFM were observed changes in coloration of the irradiated sample surface, as well as changes in texture and rugosity of them. These results show in general that irradiation process with protons which is known as an innocuo process produces changes in the copper properties. (Author)

  7. Modifications in track registration response of PADC detector by energetic protons

    CERN Document Server

    Dwivedi, K K; Fink, D; Mishra, R; Tripathy, S P; Kulshreshtha, A; Khathing, D T

    1999-01-01

    It has been well established that different ionising radiations modify the track registration properties of dielectric solids. In an effort to study the response of Polyallyl diglycol carbonate (PADC Homalite) detector towards fission fragment, PADC detectors were exposed to 10 sup 4 Gy dose of 62 MeV protons and then one set of samples were exposed to fission fragments from a sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf source. Two of these detectors were containing a thin layer of Buckminsterfullerene (C sub 6 sub 0). The study of the etched tracks by Leitz Optical Microscope reveals that the track diameters are enhanced by more than 70% in the proton irradiated zone as compared to that in the unirradiated zone. Scanning Electron Microscopy was performed after etching the sample in 6 N NaOH at 55 deg. C for different etching times, to study the details of the surface modifications due to proton irradiation of PADC detectors with and without C sub 6 sub 0 layer. Our observations revealed that the diameters and density of proton tra...

  8. On the modification to the SNS extracted proton beam to allow for a transmission target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reading, D.H.

    1979-07-01

    The present SNS proton beam line consists of a series of triplets of quadrupoles with an achromatic bend such that the protons are taken from the accelerator ring into Hall 3, down its centre line onto the target. The modification described here has been prompted by the demands of a proposed negative pion bio-medical beam line, and the adaption replaces the last three triplets QT12, QT13 and QT14 (Quadrupoles Q41 to Q49 incl.). It begins at an achromatic waist in the original design, and by the use of three triplets of greater aperture produces a further small waist for a target station before focussing the 'object' produced by this transmission target onto the SNS target. (UK)

  9. Irradiation induced effects in zirconium (A review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, P.K.

    1975-06-01

    Irradiation creep in zirconium and its alloys is comprehensively discussed. The main theories are outlined and the gaps between them and the observed creep behaviour, indicated. Although irradiation induced point defects play an important role, effects due to irradiation induced dislocation loops seem insignificant. The experimental results suggest that microstructural variations due to prior cold-working or hydrogen injection perturb the irradiation growth and the irradiation creep of zircaloy. Further investigations into these areas are required. One disadvantage of creep experiments lies in their duration. The possibility of accelerated experiments using ion implantation or electron irradiation is examined in the final section, and its possible advantages and disadvantages are outlined. (author)

  10. Swift heavy ion irradiation induced modification of structure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AFM analysis indicated that the pristine film consists of agglomerated grains with diffuse grain boundary. Irradiation led to reduced agglomeration of the grains with the formation of sharper grain boundaries. The rms roughness (rms) estimated from AFM analysis increased from 6.2 in pristine film to 12.7 nm when the film ...

  11. Swift heavy ion irradiation induced modification of structure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Department of Physics, Salipur College, Salipur 754 103, India. 2Department of ... Ion irradiation; nanoparticles; atomic force microscopy; BiFeO3. 1. Introduction .... and to understand their possible origin, a study on power spectral density ...

  12. Electron-irradiation-induced phase transformation in alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.L.; Arakawa, K.; Lee, J.-G.; Mori, H.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, electron-irradiation-induced phase transformations between alumina polymorphs were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the electron-irradiation-induced α → κ' phase transformation occurred in the alumina under 100 keV electron irradiation. It is likely that the knock-on collision between incident electrons and Al 3+ cations is responsible for the occurrence of electron-irradiation-induced phase transformation from α-alumina to κ'-alumina.

  13. Irradiation-induced precipitation and solute segregation in alloys. Fourth annual progress report, February 1, 1981-March 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardell, A.J.

    1982-04-01

    The studies of irradiation-induced solute segregation (IISS) and irradiation-induced precipitation (IIP) in Ni-Si and Pd-Fe alloys have been completed. Progress is reported for several other projects: irradiation damage in binary Pd-Cr, -Mn and -V alloys (15 at. %); IIP in Pd-Mo and Pd-W alloys; IIP in Pd-25 at. % Cr alloy; and irradiation damage effects in proton-bombarded metallic glasses (Ni-65 Zr, 40 Fe 40 Ni 14 P6B). 27 figures

  14. Characterization and Modification of Electrospun Fiber Mats for Use in Composite Proton Exchange Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannarino, Matthew Marchand

    Electrostatic fiber formation, or electrospinning, offers a particularly simple and robust method to create polymeric nanofibers of various sizes and morphologies. In electrospinning, a viscoelastic fluid is charged so that a liquid jet is ejected from the surface of the fluid (typically in the form of a drop supplied by a needle or spinneret) and collected on a grounded plate, creating a nonwoven fiber mat. Modification of the diameter of the fibers as well as the porosity, specific surface area, and mechanical properties of the mat allows one to tailor electrospun mats for specific applications. Despite the widespread and rapidly growing use of electrospinning in the fabrication of novel nanomaterials, there are no simple, universal methods of predicting, a priori, the properties of electrospun fibers from knowledge of the polymer solution properties and electrospinning operating conditions alone. Changing a single fluid or processing parameter can affect the jet and fiber formation through several mechanisms. For example, using a different solvent can change several properties of the electrospinning fluid, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, surface tension, and solute-solvent interaction. The work in this thesis seeks to develop a simple relation for predicting terminal jet diameter during electrospinning, which accounts for solution viscoelasticity as well as solution conductivity and operating parameters that can be easily measured and controlled. The mechanical and tribological properties of electrospun fiber mats are of paramount importance to their utility as components in a variety of applications. Although some mechanical properties of these mats have been investigated previously, reports of their tribological properties are essentially nonexistent. In this thesis, electrospun nanofiber mats of poly(trimethyl hexamethylene terephthalamide) (PA 6(3)T) and poly(hexamethylene adipamide) (PA 6,6) are characterized mechanically and tribologically

  15. Surface modification of a proton exchange membrane and hydrogen storage in a metal hydride for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Lisa

    Interest in fuel cell technology is rising as a result of the need for more affordable and available fuel sources. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells involve the catalysis of a fuel to release protons and electrons. It requires the use of a polymer electrolyte membrane to transfer protons through the cell, while the electrons pass through an external circuit, producing electricity. The surface modification of the polymer, NafionRTM, commonly researched as a proton exchange membrane, may improve efficiency of a fuel cell. Surface modification can change the chemistry of the surface of a polymer while maintaining bulk properties. Plasma modification techniques such as microwave discharge of an argon and oxygen gas mixture as well as vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photolysis may cause favorable chemical and physical changes on the surface of Nafion for improved fuel cell function. A possible increase in hydrophilicity as a result of microwave discharge experiments may increase proton conductivity. Grafting of acrylic acid from the surface of modified Nafion may decrease the permeation of methanol in a direct methanol fuel cell, a process which can decrease efficiency. Modification of the surface of Nafion samples were carried out using: 1) An indirect Ar/O2 gas mixture plasma investigating the reaction of oxygen radicals with the surface, 2) A direct Ar/O2 gas mixture plasma investigating the reaction of oxygen radicals and VUV radiation with the surface and, 3) VUV photolysis investigating exclusively the interaction of VUV radiation with the surface and any possible oxidation upon exposure to air. Acrylic acid was grafted from the VUV photolysed Nafion samples. All treated surfaces were analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to analyze the grafted Nafion samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and contact angle measurements were used to analyze experiments 2 and 3. Using hydrogen as fuel is a

  16. Pre-irradiation induced emulsion graft polymerization of acrylonitrile onto polyethylene nonwoven fabric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hanzhou; Yu Ming; Deng Bo; Li Linfan; Jiang Haiqing; Li Jingye

    2012-01-01

    Acrylonitrile has been widely used in the modification of polymers by graft polymerization. In the present work, pre-irradiation induced emulsion graft polymerization method is used to introduce acrylonitrile onto PE nonwoven fabric instead of the traditional reaction in organic solvents system. The degree of grafting (DG) is measured by gravimetric method and the kinetics of the graft polymerization is studied. The existence of the graft chains is proven by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis. Thermal stability of the grafted polymer is measured by Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). - Highlights: → Acrylonitrile is grafted onto pre-irradiated polyethylene (PE) nonwoven fabrics. → Emulsion system is applied, for the graft polymerization avoids organic solvent. → Kinetic of the pre-irradiation induced graft polymerization is studied. → Optimal condition is determined at the temperature below the b.p. of acrylonitrile.

  17. Gamma Irradiation Induced Degradation of Orange Peels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Saucedo Luna

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, gamma irradiation induced degradation of orange peels (OP was investigated. The lignocellulosic biomass degradation was carried out at doses of 0 (control, 600, 1800 and 3500 kGy using a Co-60 gamma radiation source. The samples were tested for total and reducing sugars. The concentrations of total sugars ranged from 0.530 g∙g−1 in control sample to 0.382 g∙g−1 of dry weight in the sample which received the highest radiation dose. The reducing sugars content varying from 0.018 to 0.184 g∙g−1 of dry weight with the largest rise occurring in the sample irradiated at 3500 kGy. The concentrations of sucrose, glucose and fructose were determined. The changes generated in physico-chemical properties were determined by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR and termogravimetric analysis (TG-DTG. The results show that OP was affected, but not significantly, which suggests that lignocellulose and sugars profiles were partially degraded after gamma irradiation.

  18. Irradiation-induced amorphization process in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Hiroaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1996-04-01

    Effects of the element process of irradiation damage on irradiation-induced amorphization processes of graphite was studied. High orientation thermal decomposed graphite was cut about 100 nm width and used as samples. The irradiation experiments are carried out under the conditions of electronic energy of 100-400 KeV, ion energy of 200-600 KeV, ionic species Xe, Ar, Ne, C and He and the irradiation temperature at from room temperature to 900 K. The critical dose ({phi}a) increases exponentially with increasing irradiation temperature. The displacement threshold energy of graphite on c-axis direction was 27 eV and {phi}a{sup e} = 0.5 dpa. dpa is the average number of displacement to atom. The critical dose of ion irradiation ({phi}a{sup i}) was 0.2 dpa at room temperature, and amorphous graphite was produced by less than half of dose of electronic irradiation. Amorphization of graphite depending upon temperature is discussed. (S.Y.)

  19. Structure modification and medical application of the natural products by proton beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D. W.; Park, J. K.; Kang, J. E.; Shin, S. C.; Ahn, J. H.; Lee, E. S. [Dongguk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    This study was performed for the investigation of changes of constituent contents of Korean ginseng (Panax genseng C.A. Meyer) after proton beam irradiation (Beam energy from MC-50 cyclotron : 36.5MeV) with beam range of 500 - 10000Gy

  20. Structure modification and medical application of the natural products by proton beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D. W.; Park, J. K.; Kang, J. E.; Shin, S. C.; Ahn, J. H.; Lee, E. S.

    2008-04-01

    This study was performed for the investigation of changes of constituent contents of Korean ginseng (Panax genseng C.A. Meyer) after proton beam irradiation (Beam energy from MC-50 cyclotron : 36.5MeV) with beam range of 500 - 10000Gy

  1. Radiation modification and interaction mechanism of polypropylene and polyethylene by protons and electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guanghou

    1988-10-01

    A systematic investigation of radiation effects on isotactic polypropylene (PP) and low-density polyethylene (PE) films by protons and electrons is reported. Electrons can make polyethylene cross-linked and polypropylene crached while protons can improve the PP mechanical properties and deteriorate polyethylene with increasing the irradiation dose. The structural analysis shows that conversion between α and β phases occurs and the crystallinity remains constant in the electron-irradiated polypropylene whereas the network structure is formed by allyl-type radicals in the e - -irradiated polyethylene. The infrared spectra indicate that conformational changes have taken place in the polypropylene under proton bombardment, such as the transition from an ordered to a disordered state in the crystalline region, the formation of double bonds as well as trans-conformations. This leads to the cross-linking between macromolecules of polypropylene at the proper irradiation doses, thus enhancing its mechanical properties. The cross-linking of polypropylene by proton bombardment observed and its properties may have some potential applications

  2. Proton-Conducting Sulfonated and Phosphonated Polymers and Fuel Cell Membranes by Chemical Modification of Polysulfones

    OpenAIRE

    Lafitte, Benoit

    2007-01-01

    The proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is currently emerging as an efficient and environmentally friendly power source. The technology is very complex and relies ultimately on materials and components which need further development. One of the major hurdles for advancing the PEMFC technology is currently the demand for new durable low-cost polymeric membranes that will allow fuel cell operation at high temperatures without extensive humidification requirements. Thus, the design and pr...

  3. Proton-Conducting Sulfonated Ionomers by Chemical Modification and Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Møller

    The cornerstone in this dissertation is made up by three individual assessments of the diversity in the macromolecular landscape that can be obtained by applying relatively few efficient chemical tools. The intention is to gain deeper knowledge on the chemical tuning of proton exchange membranes...... of hydrocarbon macromolecular architectures, PSU with postsulfonated polystyrene (PS) grafts are investigated. Here, IEC is controlled through the degree of substitution, the graft length and DS. The grafting is performed with atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The third assessment is dedicated...... of control by ATRP and click chemistry enables a wide selection of polymer structures with the handles: degree of substitution (DS), polymerization and sulfonation, and blending....

  4. Physico-chemical modification of polyethersulphone induced by high energy proton, C+ and Ne6+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinodh Kumar, S.; Biswavarathi, V.; Jal, P.; Dey, K.; Krishna, J.B.M.; Saha, A.

    2004-01-01

    Polyehersulphone (PES) was irradiated with 4 MeV proton, 3.6 MeV C + and 145 MeV Ne 6+ ions at different ion fluences. The ion induced spectral changes were analyzed by UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy. The increase in optical absorption, which shifts gradually from near UV to the visible region with increase in fluence for the three different types of bombarding ions was observed. A significant loss in fluorescence intensity with increase in fluence for three different ions was observed. (author)

  5. Electron irradiation-induced defects in {beta}-SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshima, Ryuichiro [Osaka Prefectural Univ., Sakai (Japan). Reseach Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology

    1996-04-01

    To add information of point defects in cubic crystal SiC, polycrystal {beta}-SiC on the market was used as sample and irradiated by neutron and electron. In situ observation of neutron and electron irradiation-induced defects in {beta}-SiC were carried out by ultra high-voltage electronic microscope (UHVEM) and ordinary electronic microscope. The obtained results show that the electron irradiation-induced secondary defects are micro defects less than 20 nm at about 1273K, the density of defects is from 2x10{sup 17} to 1x10{sup 18}/cc, the secondary defects may be hole type at high temperature and the preexistant defects control nuclear formation of irradiation-induced defects, effective sink. (S.Y.)

  6. X-irradiation-induced emesis in Suncus murinus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torii, Yoshifumi; Saito, Hiroshi; Matsuki, Norio; Shikita, Mikio.

    1993-01-01

    X-irradiation-induced emesis was investigated in Suncus murinus, a house musk shrew. Whole body X-irradiation caused emesis, and the calculated ED 50 value that induced emesis in 50% of animals was 429 cGy. At the irradiation dose of 800 cGy all the animals vomited 10.0±2.4 times with a latency of 20.0±2.9 min. The emetogenic effect of X-irradiation was dependent on the part of the body exposed. Abdominal X-irradiation at 1000 cGy caused emesis in all animals studied, whereas the same dose to the head had no emetogenic effect. We investigated several prophylactic methods against X-irradiation-induced emesis. Surgical vagotomy completely inhibited the emesis induced by 800 cGy X-irradiation. Emesis was also prevented by the subcutaneous administration of tropisetron (ICS 205-930, a selective serotonergic 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist) with an ID 50 value of 29 μg/kg. These results suggest that (1) suncus is a useful experimental animal for the study of radiation-induced emesis and the development of prophylactic drugs, (2) serotonin plays an important role in X-irradiation-induced emesis, and (3) X-irradiation-induced emesis is very similar to that caused by cancer chemotherapeutic agents. (author)

  7. Irradiation-induced stress relaxation of Eurofer97 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzginova, N.V.; Jong, M.; Rensman, J.W.; Hegeman, J.B.J.; Laan, J.G. van der

    2011-01-01

    The irradiation-induced stress relaxation behavior of Eurofer97 at 300 deg. C up to 3.4 dpa and under pre-stress loads typical for the ITER applications is investigated. The bolt specimens are pre-loaded from 30% to 90% of the yield strength. To verify the results obtained with the pre-stressed bolts, bent strips were investigated as well. The strips are bent into a pre-defined radius in order to achieve similar pre-stress levels. The irradiation-induced stress relaxation is found to be independent of the pre-stress level. 10-12% of the stress relaxation in Eurofer97 may be reached after a dose of 0.1 dpa, and after an irradiation dose of 2.7 dpa 42-47% of the original pre-stress is retained.

  8. Irradiation-induced tumours of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aanesen, J P; Olofsson, J [Linkoepings Hoegskola (Sweden)

    1979-09-01

    Though irradiation-induced tumours are uncommon, they represent a well defined entity. At this Hospital, 14 irradiation-induced head and neck tumours were encountered in 11 patients over a 10-year period. The irradiation had been given for tuberculous lymphadenitis in 6 of the patients, for lupus vulgaris in one, and thyrotoxicosis in another; the other 3 patients had received radiotherapy for malignant tumours. The interval between the treatment and the diagnosis of the tumour disease ranged from 9 to 48 years (mean 32). Three of the patients had multiple tumours. In view of the risk of cancer-albeit a small one-associated with radiological diagnosis and radiotherapy, these should be performed only on strict indications, expecially in young patients.

  9. Towards an automated tool to evaluate the impact of the nuclear modification of the gluon density on quarkonium, D and B meson production in proton-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Lansberg, Jean-Philippe

    2016-12-27

    We propose a simple and model-independent procedure to account for the impact of the nuclear modification of the gluon density as encoded in nuclear collinear PDF sets on two-to-two partonic hard processes in proton-nucleus collisions. This applies to a good approximation to quarkonium, D and B meson production, generically referred to H. Our procedure consists in parametrising the square of the parton scattering amplitude, A_{gg -> H X} and constraining it from the proton-proton data. Doing so, we have been able to compute the corresponding nuclear modification factors for J/psi, Upsilon and D^0 as a function of y and P_T at sqrt(s_NN)=5 and 8 TeV in the kinematics of the various LHC experiments in a model independent way. It is of course justified since the most important ingredient in such evaluations is the probability of each kinematical configuration. Our computations for D mesons can also be extended to B meson production. To further illustrate the potentiality of the tool, we provide --for the first t...

  10. Proton irradiation impacts age-driven modulations of cancer progression influenced by immune system transcriptome modifications from splenic tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wage, Justin; Ma, Lili; Peluso, Michael; Lamont, Clare; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn; Beheshti, Afshin; Evens, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Age plays a crucial role in the interplay between tumor and host, with additional impact due to irradiation. Proton irradiation of tumors induces biological modulations including inhibition of angiogenic and immune factors critical to 'hallmark' processes impacting tumor development. Proton irradiation has also provided promising results for proton therapy in cancer due to targeting advantages. Additionally, protons may contribute to the carcinogenesis risk from space travel (due to the high proportion of high-energy protons in space radiation). Through a systems biology approach, we investigated how host tissue (i.e. splenic tissue) of tumor-bearing mice was altered with age, with or without whole-body proton exposure. Transcriptome analysis was performed on splenic tissue from adolescent (68-day) versus old (736-day) C57BL/6 male mice injected with Lewis lung carcinoma cells with or without three fractionations of 0.5 Gy (1-GeV) proton irradiation. Global transcriptome analysis indicated that proton irradiation of adolescent hosts caused significant signaling changes within splenic tissues that support carcinogenesis within the mice, as compared with older subjects. Increases in cell cycling and immunosuppression in irradiated adolescent hosts with CDK2, MCM7, CD74 and RUVBL2 indicated these were the key genes involved in the regulatory changes in the host environment response (i.e. the spleen). Collectively, these results suggest that a significant biological component of proton irradiation is modulated by host age through promotion of carcinogenesis in adolescence and resistance to immunosuppression, carcinogenesis and genetic perturbation associated with advancing age. (author)

  11. Proton Irradiation Impacts Age Driven Modulations of Cancer Progression Influenced by Immune System Transcriptome Modifications from Splenic Tissue

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Age plays a crucial role in the interplay between tumor and host; with further perturbations induced by irradiation. Proton irradiation on tumors induces biological...

  12. Irradiation induced surface segregation in concentrated alloys: a contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandjean, Y.

    1996-01-01

    A new computer modelization of irradiation induced surface segregation is presented together with some experimental determinations in binary and ternary alloys. The model we propose handles the alloy thermodynamics and kinetics at the same level of sophistication. Diffusion is described at the atomistic level and proceeds vis the jumps of point defects (vacancies, dumb-bell interstitials): the various jump frequencies depend on the local composition in a manner consistent with the thermodynamics of the alloy. For application to specific alloys, we have chosen the simplest statistical approximation: pair interactions in the Bragg Williams approximation. For a system which exhibits the thermodynamics and kinetics features of Ni-Cu alloys, the model generates the behaviour parameters (flux and temperature) and of alloy composition. Quantitative agreement with the published experimental results (two compositions, three temperatures) is obtained with a single set of parameters. Modelling austenitic steels used in nuclear industry requires taking into account the contribution of dumbbells to mass transport. The effects of this latter contribution are studied on a model of Ni-Fe. Interstitial trapping on dilute impurities is shown to delay or even suppress the irradiation induced segregation. Such an effect is indeed observed in the experiments we report on Fe 50 Ni 50 and Fe 49 Ni 50 Hf 1 alloys. (author)

  13. Proton magnetic resonance study of the influence of chemical modification, mutation, quaternary state, and ligation state on dynamic stability of the heme pocket in hemoglobin as reflected in the exchange of the proximal histidyl ring labile proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K.H.; La Mar, G.N.; Nagai, K.

    1989-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been utilized to investigate the rates of exchange with deuterium of the proximal histidyl ring protons in a series of chemically modified and mutated forms of Hb A. Differences in rates of exchange are related to differences in the stability of the deformed or partially unfolded intermediates from which exchange with bulk solvent takes place. Each modified/mutated Hb exhibited kinetic subunit heterogeneity in the reduced ferrous state, with the alpha subunit exhibiting faster exchange than the beta subunit. Modification or mutation resulted in significant increases in the His F8 ring NH exchange rates primarily for the affected subunit and only if the modification/mutation occurs at the allosterically important alpha 1 beta 2 subunit interface. Moreover, this enhancement in exchange rate is observed primarily in that quaternary state of the modified/mutated Hb in which the modified/substituted residue makes the intersubunit contact. This confirms the importance of allosteric constraints in determining the dynamic properties of the heme pocket. Using modified or mutated Hbs that can switch between the alternate quaternary states within a given ligation state or ligate within a given quaternary state, we show that the major portion of the enhanced exchange rate in R-state oxy Hb relative to T-state deoxy Hb originates from the quaternary switch rather than from ligation. However, solely ligation effects are not negligible. The exchange rates of the His F8 ring labile protons increase dramatically upon oxidizing the iron to the ferric state, and both the subunit kinetic heterogeneity and the allosteric sensitivity to the quaternary state are essentially abolished

  14. Single-Amino Acid Modifications Reveal Additional Controls on the Proton Pathway of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornish, Adam J.; Ginovska, Bojana; Thelen, Adam; da Silva, Julio C. S.; Soares, Thereza A.; Raugei, Simone; Dupuis, Michel; Shaw, Wendy J.; Hegg, Eric L.

    2016-06-07

    The proton pathway of [FeFe]-hydrogenase is essential for enzymatic H2 production and oxidation and is composed of four residues and a modeled water molecule. Recently, a computational analysis of this pathway revealed that the solvent-exposed residue of the pathway (Glu282) could form hydrogen bonds to two residues outside of the pathway (Arg286 and Ser320), implicating that these residues could function in regulating proton transfer. Substituting Arg286 with leucine eliminates hydrogen bonding with Glu282 and results in a 2.5-fold enhancement in H2 production activity, suggesting that Arg286 serves an important role in controlling the rate of proton delivery. In contrast, substitution of Ser320 with alanine reduces the rate approximately 5-fold, implying that it either acts as a member of the pathway or influences Glu282 to enable proton transfer. Interestingly, QM/MM and molecular dynamics calculations indicate that Ser320 does not play an electronic or structural role. QM calculations also estimate that including Ser320 in the pathway does not significantly change the barrier to proton movement, providing further support for its role as a member of the proton pathway. While further studies are needed to quantify the role of Ser320, collectively, these data provide evidence that the enzyme scaffold plays a significant role in modulating the activity of the enzyme, demonstrating that the rate of intraprotein proton transfer can be accelerated, particularly in a non-biological context. This work was supported by the DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (DOE BER Office of Science, DE-FC02-07ER64494). In addition, support from the DOE Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (WJS, BGP, SR) is gratefully acknowledged. Computational resources were provided at W. R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy’s Office of

  15. On the analogy between thermally and irradiation induced creep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzarelli, F.A.; Huang, S.

    1977-01-01

    Employing an analogy between thermally induced and irradiation induced creep, physical arguments are used first to deduce a one-dimensional constitutive relation for metals under stress in a high temperature and high neutron flux field. This constitutive relation contains modified superposition integrals in which the temperature and flux dependence of the material parameters is included via the use of two reduced time scales; linear elastic, thermal expansion and swelling terms are also included. A systematic development based on thermodynamics, with the stress, temperature increment and defect density increment as independent variables in the Gibbs free energy, is then employed to obtain general three-dimensional memory integrals for strain; the entropy and coupled energy equation are also obtained. Modified superposition integrals similar to those previously obtained by physical argument are then obtained by substituting special functions into the results of the thermodynamic analysis, and the special case of an isotropic stress power law is examined in detail. (Auth.)

  16. Irradiation-induced segregation in multi-component alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, I.W.

    1983-01-01

    A unified analysis of irradiation-induced segregation in multi-component alloys is developed using the formulation of irreversible thermodynamics. Three distinct mechanisms for segregation, namely the inverse Kirkendall effect, the vacancy-wind effect, and the solute drag of interstitials, are identified. In particular, the inverse Kirkendall effect due to interstitials arises only if a solute-interstitial interaction or a mutual conversion among interstitials via lattice atom intermediaries operates simultaneously. In the limit of fast conversion a para-equilibrium state may be reached between interstitials and lattice atoms, and the interstitial mechanism becomes formally analogous to the vacancy mechanism. Although the past treatment of rate phenomena in this field was apparently limited to the latter case, the importance of the consideration of separate chemical potentials for interstitials of different species, in segregation and other irradiation effects, is emphasized. (orig.)

  17. Irradiation-induced creep in graphite: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.J.

    1981-08-01

    Data on irradiation-induced creep in graphite published since 1972 are reviewed. Sources include restrained shrinkage tests conducted at Petten, the Netherlands, tensile creep experiments with continuous strain registration at Petten and Grenoble, France, and controlled load tests with out-of-reactor strain measurement performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Petten, and in the United Kingdom. The data provide reasonable confirmation of the linear viscoelastic creep model with a recoverable transient strain component followed by a steady-state strain component, except that the steady-state creep coefficient must be treated as a function of neutron fluence and is higher for tensile loading than for compressive loading. The total transient creep strain is approximately equal to the preceding elastic strain. No temperature dependence of the transient creep parameters has been demonstrated. The initial steady-state creep coefficient is inversely proportional to the unirradiated Young modulus

  18. Electron irradiation induced nanocrystal formation in Cu-borosilicate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabri, Mohammed Mohammed; Möbus, Günter, E-mail: g.moebus@sheffield.ac.uk [University of Sheffield, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    Nanoscale writing of Cu nanoparticles in glasses is introduced using focused electron irradiation by transmission electron microscopy. Two types of copper borosilicate glasses, one with high and another with low Cu loading, have been tested at energies of 200–300 keV, and formation of Cu nanoparticles in a variety of shapes and sizes using different irradiation conditions is achieved. Electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis, combined with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging, confirmed the irradiation-induced precipitated nanoparticles as metallic, while furnace annealing of the glass triggered dendrite-shaped particles of copper oxide. Unusual patterns of nanoparticle rings and chains under focused electron beam irradiation are also presented. Conclusively, electron beam patterning of Cu-loaded glasses is a promising alternative route to well-established femtosecond laser photoreduction of Cu ions in glass.

  19. Effect of irradiation-induced defects on fusion reactor ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Structural, thermal, and electrical properties critical to performance of ceramics in a fusion environment can be profoundly altered by irradiation effects. Neutron damage may cause swelling, reduction of thermal conductivity, increase in dielectric loss, and either reduction or enhancement of strength depending on the crystal structure and defect content of the material. Absorption of ionizing energy inevitably leads to degradation of insulating properties, but these changes can be reduced by alterations in structural or compositional makeup. Assessment of the irradiation response of candidate ceramics Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , SiC and Si 3 N 4 shows that each may find use in advanced fusion devices. The present understanding of irradiation-induced defects in ceramics, while far from complete, nevertheless points the way to methods for developing improved materials for fusion applications

  20. Characterization of ion irradiation effects on the microstructure, hardness, deformation and crack initiation behavior of austenitic stainless steel:Heavy ions vs protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, J.; Hure, J.; Tanguy, B.; Laffont, L.; Lafont, M.-C.; Andrieu, E.

    2018-04-01

    Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) is a complex phenomenon of degradation which can have a significant influence on maintenance time and cost of core internals of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Hence, it is an issue of concern, especially in the context of lifetime extension of PWRs. Proton irradiation is generally used as a representative alternative of neutron irradiation to improve the current understanding of the mechanisms involved in IASCC. This study assesses the possibility of using heavy ions irradiation to evaluate IASCC mechanisms by comparing the irradiation induced modifications (in microstructure and mechanical properties) and cracking susceptibility of SA 304 L after both type of irradiations: Fe irradiation at 450 °C and proton irradiation at 350 °C. Irradiation-induced defects are characterized and quantified along with nano-hardness measurements, showing a correlation between irradiation hardening and density of Frank loops that is well captured by Orowan's formula. Both irradiations (iron and proton) increase the susceptibility of SA 304 L to intergranular cracking on subjection to Constant Extension Rate Tensile tests (CERT) in simulated nominal PWR primary water environment at 340 °C. For these conditions, cracking susceptibility is found to be quantitatively similar for both irradiations, despite significant differences in hardening and degree of localization.

  1. SPEEK-MO{sub 2} (M = Zr, Sn) composite membranes for direct ethanol fuel cell: an inorganic modification of proton conductive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguti, Carla A.; Gomes, Ailton S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas Eloisa Mano], e-mail: kawagutica@gmail.com

    2007-07-01

    Organic-inorganic composite membranes based on sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) for application in the direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) were synthesized. Particle of sulfated zirconia/tin oxide (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}/ZrO{sub 2}, SnO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}-/SnO{sub 2}) was synthesized by sol-gel method, and composite membranes with different oxide and different oxide contents were prepared from a mixture of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}/ZrO{sub 2} or SnO{sub 2} or SO{sub 3}-/SnO{sub 2} powder and SPEEK solution. The physico-chemical properties of the membranes were studied by water or ethanol solution uptake measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the membrane's water and ethanol permeabilities were evaluated in pervaporation experiments and the conductivity determined by impedance spectroscopy. The ethanol permeabilities were decreased by inorganic modification. At several temperatures analysed, all SPEEK-MO{sub 2} composite exhibited better ethanol solution uptake than water uptake and this sorption is decreased when inorganic particles are add. A reduction of the proton conductivity by the inorganic modification was observed. (author)

  2. Irradiation-induced dimensional changes of poorly crystalline carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullock, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    Data are presented on irradiation-induced changes of poorly crystalline carbons at high temperatures(>900 0 C). The materials surveyed include: (1) carbon fibers, (2) glassy carbons, (3) carbonaceous matrix materials for HTGR fuel rods and (4) pyrocarbons. The materials are listed in order of increasing stability, with maximum strains ranging from more than 50% for fibers to less than 10% for pyrocarbons. Dimensional changes of highly anisotropic carbon fibers appear to be sensitive to irradiation temperature, as slightly anisotropic pyrocarbons are, whereas temperature seems to have little influence on the behavior of isotropic glassy carbons over the range from 600 to 1350 0 C. Dimensional changes for graphite-filled matrix materials were roughly isotropic on the average and did not seem to be strongly temperature dependent for the lower fluences investigated. Increased graphite filler lowered volumetric dimensional changes of the matrix in agreement with a rule-of-mixtures relationship between change components for the filler and the less-stable binder phases. Instabilities of all of the poorly crystalline materials were generally greater than those for more crystalline carbons under the same conditions, including highly orientated graphites that approximate single-crystal behavior. (author)

  3. Irradiation induced precipitation in tungsten based, W-Re alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. K.; Wiffen, F. W.; Bentley, J.; Stiegler, J. O.

    1983-03-01

    Tungsten-base alloys containing 5, 11, and 25 pct Re were irradiated in the EBR-II reactor. Irradiation temperatures ranged from 600 to 1500 °C. All compositions were irradiated to fluences in the range 4.3 to 6.1 X 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV), and three 25 pct Re samples were also irradiated to 3.7 X 1026 n/m2 at temperatures 700 to 900 °C. Postirradiation examination included measurement of electrical resistivity at room temperature and lower temperatures, X-ray diffraction, optical metallography, microprobe analysis, and transmission electron microscopy. Irradiation induced resistivity decreases observed in most of the samples suggested second-phase precipitation. Complete results confirmed the precipitate formation in all samples, in disagreement with existing phase diagrams for the W-Re system. Electron diffraction showed the precipitates to be consistent with the cubic, Re-rich X-phase and inconsistent with the σ-phase. Large variations in precipitate morphology and distribution were observed between the different compositions and irradiation conditions. For the 5 and 11 pct Re-alloys, spherically symmetric strain fields surrounded the equiaxed precipitate particles, and were observed even where no particles were visible. These strain fields are believed to arise from local Re enrichment. Thermoelectric data show that the precipitation can lead to decalibration of W/Re thermocouples.

  4. The influence of lateral beam profile modifications in scanned proton and carbon ion therapy: a Monte Carlo study

    CERN Document Server

    Parodi, K; Kraemer, M; Sommerer, F; Naumann, J; Mairani, A; Brons, S

    2010-01-01

    Scanned ion beam delivery promises superior flexibility and accuracy for highly conformal tumour therapy in comparison to the usage of passive beam shaping systems. The attainable precision demands correct overlapping of the pencil-like beams which build up the entire dose distribution in the treatment field. In particular, improper dose application due to deviations of the lateral beam profiles from the nominal planning conditions must be prevented via appropriate beam monitoring in the beamline, prior to the entrance in the patient. To assess the necessary tolerance thresholds of the beam monitoring system at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center, Germany, this study has investigated several worst-case scenarios for a sensitive treatment plan, namely scanned proton and carbon ion delivery to a small target volume at a shallow depth. Deviations from the nominal lateral beam profiles were simulated, which may occur because of misaligned elements or changes of the beam optic in the beamline. Data have been an...

  5. Investigation of the effects of high-energy proton-beam irradiation on metal-oxide surfaces by using methane adsorption isotherms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Euikwoun; Lee, Junggil; Kim, Jaeyong; Kim, Kyeryung

    2012-01-01

    The creation of possible local defects on metal-oxide surfaces due to irradiation with a high-energy proton beam was investigated by using a series of gas adsorption isotherms for methane (CH 4 ) on a MgO powder surface. After a MgO powder surface having only a (100) surface had been irradiated with a 35-MeV proton beam, the second atomic layer of methane had completely disappeared while two distinct atomic layers were found in a layer-by-layer fashion on the surfaces of unirradiated samples. This subtle modification of the surface is evidenced by a change of the contrasts in the morphologies measured a using a transmission electron microscopy. Combined results obtained from an electron microscopy and methane adsorption isotherms strongly suggest that the high-energy proton-beam irradiation induced a local surface modification by imparting kinetic energy to the sample. The calculation of the 2-dimensional compressibility values, which are responsible for the formation of the atomic layers, confirmed the surface modification after irradiating surface-clean MgO powders with a proton beam.

  6. Boron ion irradiation induced structural and surface modification of glassy carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalijadis, Ana; Jovanović, Zoran; Cvijović-Alagić, Ivana; Laušević, Zoran

    2013-01-01

    The incorporation of boron into glassy carbon was achieved by irradiating two different types of targets: glassy carbon polymer precursor and carbonized glassy carbon. Targets were irradiated with a 45 keV B 3+ ion beam in the fluence range of 5 × 10 15 –5 × 10 16 ions cm −2 . For both types of targets, the implanted boron was located in a narrow region under the surface. Following irradiation, the polymer was carbonized under the same condition as the glassy carbon samples (at 1273 K) and examined by Raman spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption, hardness and cyclic voltammetry measurements. Structural analysis showed that during the carbonization process of the irradiated polymers, boron is substitutionally incorporated into the glassy carbon structure, while for irradiated carbonized glassy carbon samples, boron irradiation caused an increase of the sp 3 carbon fraction, which is most pronounced for the highest fluence irradiation. Further analyses showed that different nature of boron incorporation, and thus changed structural parameters, are crucial for obtaining glassy carbon samples with modified mechanical, chemical and electrochemical properties over a wide range

  7. Detection of irradiation induced modifications in foodstuff DNA using 32p post-labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoey, B.M.; Swallow, A.J.; Margison, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    DNA post-labelling has been used successfully to detect damage to DNA caused by a range of damaging agents. The assay results in a fingerprint of changes induced in DNA which might, in principle, be useful as a test for the detection of the irradiation of foods. The authors present their DNA extraction and 32 p post-labelling methods from chicken or cooked prawn samples and their analysis method (High Performance liquid chromatography). It's hoped that these results could form the basis of a test to detect if foods have been irradiated

  8. Ion-irradiation-induced microstructural modifications in ferritic/martensitic steel T91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiang; Miao, Yinbin; Li, Meimei; Kirk, Marquis A.; Maloy, Stuart A.; Stubbins, James F.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, in situ transmission electron microscopy investigations were carried out to study the microstructural evolution of ferritic/martensitic steel T91 under 1 MeV Krypton ion irradiation up to 4.2 x 10(15) ions/cm(2) at 573 K, 673 K, and 773 K. At 573 K, grown-in defects are strongly modified by black dot loops, and dislocation networks together with black-dot loops were observed after irradiation. At 673 K and 773 K, grown-in defects are only partially modified by dislocation loops; isolated loops and dislocation segments were commonly found after irradiation. Post irradiation examination indicates that at 4.2 x 1015 ions/cm(2), about 51% of the loops were a(0)/2 < 111 > type for the 673 K irradiation, and the dominant loop type was a(0)< 100 > for the 773 K irradiation. Finally, a dispersed barrier hardening model was employed to estimate the change in yield strength, and the calculated ion data were found to follow the similar trend as the existing neutron data with an offset of 100-150 MPa. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Preliminary study of the irradiation-induced modification of skin permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, R.; Istin, M.

    1978-01-01

    Irradiation of the skin of an animal leads immediately to a strong increase in vascular permeability. If a dye is at once injected intraveinously it diffuses very rapidly in the irradiated zone, this becomes highly coloured and the colour intensity measurement gives a clue to the severity of the lesions produced. This phenomenon has been used in the past as a pharmacological test to study vascular permeability and is employed in this work to observe the effect of diosmine-titrated flavonoids on vascular permeability in inflammatory diseases. The capillary permeability increase due to local γ irradiation of rabbit skin has been accurately determined by measurement of the colouration observed after injection of Geigy Blue. Diosmine, injected intraperitoneally, protects the vascular system against increased permeability due to ionising radiations [fr

  10. Ion irradiation-induced precipitation of Cr23C6 at dislocation loops in austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Shuoxue; Guo, Liping; Luo, Fengfeng; Yao, Zhongwen; Ma, Shuli; Tang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    The irradiation-induced precipitates in argon ion-irradiated austenitic stainless steel at 550 °C were examined via transmission electron microscopy. The selected-area electron diffraction patterns of precipitates indicated unambiguously that the precipitates were Cr 23 C 6 carbides. It was observed directly for the first time that irradiation-induced Cr 23 C 6 precipitates formed at dislocation loops in austenitic stainless steel, and coarsened with increasing irradiation dose.

  11. The impact of irradiation induced specimen charging on microanalysis in a scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens-Kalceff, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    which reproducibly evolve as a function of electron beam irradiation exposure. Complementary KPM and CL studies directly link the micro-segregation of defects with the highly localised irradiation induced electric field. It is important to consider the possibility of irradiation induced micro-modification of poorly conducting specimens when using charged beam micro-analytical techniques. Localised positive/ negative charging may increase/ reduce the effective energy of electrons incident on the specimen. The volume of specimen probed may also change as a result of charging induced effects. Both the radial diameter of the interaction volume and maximum penetration depth of the incident are influenced by the accumulation of charge in the subsurface interaction volume of specimen during electron irradiation. This research is funded by the Australian Research Council. Technical support from the Electron Microscope Unit at the University of New South Wales, Australia and W. Kalceff is also gratefully acknowledged. Copyright (2003) Australian Microbeam Analysis Society

  12. Proton Irradiation-Induced Metal Voids in Gallium Nitride High Electron Mobility Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    ABBREVIATIONS 2DEG two-dimensional electron gas AlGaN aluminum gallium nitride AlOx aluminum oxide CCD charged coupled device CTE coefficient of...frequency of FETs. Such a device may also be known as a heterojunction field-effect transistor (HFET), modulation-doped field-effect transistor (MODFET...electrons. This charge attracts electrons to the interface, forming the 2DEG channel. The HEMT includes a heterojunction of two semiconducting

  13. Radiation Effects in Nanostructures: Comparison of Proton Irradiation Induced Changes on Quantum Dots and Quantum Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, R.; Swift, G.; Magness, B.; Taylor, W.; Tang, Y.; Wang, K.; Dowd, P.; Zhang, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Successful implementation of technology using self-forming semiconductor Quantum Dots (QDs) has already demonstrated that temperature independent Dirac-delta density of states can be exploited in low current threshold QD lasers and QD infrared photodetectors.

  14. Ion irradiation-induced swelling and hardening effect of Hastelloy N alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S.J. [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro-and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Li, D.H.; Chen, H.C.; Lei, G.H.; Huang, H.F.; Zhang, W.; Wang, C.B. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Yan, L., E-mail: yanlong@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Fu, D.J. [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro-and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Tang, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2017-06-15

    The volumetric swelling and hardening effect of irradiated Hastelloy N alloy were investigated in this paper. 7 MeV and 1 MeV Xe ions irradiations were performed at room temperature (RT) with irradiation dose ranging from 0.5 to 27 dpa. The volumetric swelling increases with increasing irradiation dose, and reaches up to 3.2% at 27 dpa. And the irradiation induced lattice expansion is also observed. The irradiation induced hardening initiates at low ion dose (≤1dpa) then saturates with higher ion dose. The irradiation induced volumetric swelling may be ascribed to excess atomic volume of defects. The irradiation induced hardening may be explained by the pinning effect where the defects can act as obstacles for the free movement of dislocation lines. And the evolution of the defects' size and number density could be responsible for the saturation of hardness. - Highlights: •Irradiation Swelling: The irradiation induced volumetric swelling increases with ion dose. •Irradiation Hardening: The irradiation hardening initiates below 1 dpa, then saturates with higher ion dose (1–10 dpa). •Irradiation Mechanism: The irradiation phenomena are ascribed to the microstructural evolution of the irradiation defects.

  15. Proton Conductivity of Nafion/Ex-Situ Sulfonic Acid-Modified Stöber Silica Nanocomposite Membranes As a Function of Temperature, Silica Particles Size and Surface Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muriithi, Beatrice; Loy, Douglas A.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of sulfonic acid modified silica in Nafion nanocomposite membranes is a good method of improving the Nafion performance at high temperature and low relative humidity. Sulfonic acid-modified silica is bifunctional, with silica phase expected to offer an improvement in membranes hydration while sulfonic groups enhance proton conductivity. However, as discussed in this paper, this may not always be the case. Proton conductivity enhancement of Nafion nanocomposite membranes is very dependent on silica particle size, sometimes depending on experimental conditions, and by surface modification. In this study, Sulfonated Preconcentrated Nafion Stober Silica composites (SPNSS) were prepared by modification of Stober silica particles with mercaptopropyltriethoxysilane, dispersing the particles into a preconcentrated solution of Nafion, then casting the membranes. The mercapto groups were oxidized to sulfonic acids by heating the membranes in 10 wt % hydrogen peroxide for 1 h. At 80 °C and 100% relative humidity, a 20%–30% enhancement of proton conductivity was only observed when sulfonic acid modified particle less than 50 nm in diameter were used. At 120 °C, and 100% humidity, proton conductivity increased by 22%–42% with sulfonated particles with small particles showing the greatest enhancement. At 120 °C and 50% humidity, the sulfonated particles are less efficient at keeping the membranes hydrated, and the composites underperform Nafion and silica-Nafion nanocomposite membranes. PMID:26828525

  16. A small angle neutron study of irradiation induced microstructures in Cr-Mo-V WWER steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levit, Vladimir I.; Santos, Ari S.; Louzada, Ana R.R.; Silveira, Cristina M.; Vaniel, Ana Paula H.; Odette, George R.; Mader, Eric

    2000-01-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) has proven to be a very effective technique for characterizing the ultrafine (∼1 nm) irradiation induced microstructures which are responsible for hardening and the concomitant embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels. SANS measurement were carried out on three irradiated and unirradiated weld materials of WWER- type on 8 m instrument at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Washington, USA. Small (r m < 1 nm) irradiation induced features were found for all three materials. Were found volume fractions, number densities and ratios of magnetic to nuclear scattering. Some analyses of the irradiation induced precipitation nature and possible chemical composition were made by comparison of the results with other reactor materials SANS and Atom Probe Field Ion Microscopy data. (author)

  17. Origins of ion irradiation-induced Ga nanoparticle motion on GaAs surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, M.; Wu, J. H.; Chen, H. Y.; Thornton, K.; Goldman, R. S.; Sofferman, D. L.; Beskin, I.

    2013-01-01

    We have examined the origins of ion irradiation-induced nanoparticle (NP) motion. Focused-ion-beam irradiation of GaAs surfaces induces random walks of Ga NPs, which are biased in the direction opposite to that of ion beam scanning. Although the instantaneous NP velocities are constant, the NP drift velocities are dependent on the off-normal irradiation angle, likely due to a difference in surface non-stoichiometry induced by the irradiation angle dependence of the sputtering yield. It is hypothesized that the random walks are initiated by ion irradiation-induced thermal fluctuations, with biasing driven by anisotropic mass transport

  18. Edaravone protects human peripheral blood lymphocytes from γ-irradiation-induced apoptosis and DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liming; Liu, Yinghui; Dong, Liangliang; Chu, Xiaoxia

    2015-03-01

    Radiation-induced cellular injury is attributed primarily to the harmful effects of free radicals, which play a key role in irradiation-induced apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the radioprotective efficacy of edaravone, a licensed clinical drug and a powerful free radical scavenger that has been tested against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damage in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes in studies of various diseases. Edaravone was pre-incubated with lymphocytes for 2 h prior to γ-irradiation. It was found that pretreatment with edaravone increased cell viability and inhibited generation of γ-radiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) in lymphocytes exposed to 3 Gy γ-radiation. In addition, γ-radiation decreased antioxidant enzymatic activity, such as superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, as well as the level of reduced glutathione. Conversely, treatment with 100 μM edaravone prior to irradiation improved antioxidant enzyme activity and increased reduced glutathione levels in irradiated lymphocytes. Importantly, we also report that edaravone reduced γ-irradiation-induced apoptosis through downregulation of Bax, upregulation of Bcl-2, and consequent reduction of the Bax:Bcl-2 ratio. The current study shows edaravone to be an effective radioprotector against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damage in lymphocytes in vitro. Finally, edaravone pretreatment significantly reduced DNA damage in γ-irradiated lymphocytes, as measured by comet assay (% tail DNA, tail length, tail moment, and olive tail moment) (p edaravone offers protection from radiation-induced cytogenetic alterations.

  19. The irradiation induced creep of graphite under accelerated damage produced by boron doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocklehurst, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    The presence of boron enhances fast neutron irradiation damage in graphite by providing nucleation sites for interstitial loop formation. Doping with 11 B casues an increase in the irradiation induced macroscopic dimensional changes, which have been shown to result from an acceleration in the differential crystal growth rate for a given carbon atom displacement rate. Models of irradiation induced creep in graphite have centred around those in which creep is induced by internal stresses due to the anisotopic crystal growth, and those in which creep is activated by atomic displacements. A creep test on boron doped graphite has been performed in an attempt to establish which of these mechanisms is the determining factor. An isotropic nuclear graphite was doped to a 11 B concentration of 0.27 wt.%. The irradiation induced volume shrinkage rate at 750 0 C increased by a factor of 3 over that of the virgin graphite, in agreement with predictions from the earlier work, but the total creep strains were comparable in both doped and virgin samples. This observation supports the view that irradiation induced creep is dependent only on the carbon atom displacement rate and not on the internal stress level determined by the differential crystal growth rate. The implications of this result on the irradiation behaviour of graphite containing significant concentrations of boron are briefly discussed. (author)

  20. A case of irradiation-induced malignant fibrous histiocytoma after an operation for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahara, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Yoshinori; Kuranishi, Fumito; Toyota, Kazuhiro; Nakahara Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    We recently observed a case of presumed irradiation-induced malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH), which developed 11 years after postoperative chemoradiotherapy for residual rectal cancer. A 65-year-old female underwent chemoradiotherapy for the residual tumor on the sacrum after abdominoperineal resection for rectal cancer in 1991. She showed no evidence of local recurrence or distant metastasis. Biopsy and MRI in 2002 suggested a retroperitoneal malignant tumor associated with invasion of the uterus and the sacrum, and the patient subsequently underwent surgery. Histopathologically the tumor was MFH. This case was considered to be an irradiation-induced secondary malignant tumor, according to the criteria developed by Arlen et al. In elderly patients and cases that underwent chemoradiotherapy, the latency period of irradiation-induced secondary malignant tumor tends to be shorter. If the progress of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy increases the number of long-term surviving cases in the future, the incidence of irradiation-induced secondary malignant tumor will increase. It is therefore necessary to survey these cases over a longer period of time after surgery. (author)

  1. γIrradiation induced formation of PCB-solvent adducts in aliphatic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepine, F.; Milot, S.; Gagne, N.

    1990-01-01

    γIrradiation induced formation of PCB-solvent adducts was investigated as a model for PCB residues in irradiated food. Formation of cyclohexyl adducts of PCBs was found to be significant when pure PCB congeners and Aroclor mixture were irradiated in cyclohexane and cyclohexene. Reaction pathways were investigated, and the effects of oxygen and electron scavenger were studied

  2. Field- and irradiation-induced phenomena in memristive nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhaylov, A.N.; Gryaznov, E.G.; Belov, A.I.; Korolev, D.S.; Sharapov, A.N.; Guseinov, D.V.; Tetelbaum, D.I.; Tikhov, S.V.; Malekhonova, N.V.; Bobrov, A.I.; Pavlov, D.A.; Gerasimova, S.A.; Kazantsev, V.B.; Agudov, N.V.; Dubkov, A.A. [Lobachevsky University, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Rosario, C.M.M.; Sobolev, N.A. [Departamento de Fisica and I3N, Universidade de Aveiro (Portugal); Spagnolo, B. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Universita di Palermo, Group of Interdisciplinary Theoretical Physics (Italy); CNISM, Unita di Palermo (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    The breakthrough in electronics and information technology is anticipated by the development of emerging memory and logic devices, artificial neural networks and brain-inspired systems on the basis of memristive nanomaterials represented, in a particular case, by a simple 'metal-insulator-metal' (MIM) thin-film structure. The present article is focused on the comparative analysis of MIM devices based on oxides with dominating ionic (ZrO{sub x}, HfO{sub x}) and covalent (SiO{sub x}, GeO{sub x}) bonding of various composition and geometry deposited by magnetron sputtering. The studied memristive devices demonstrate reproducible change in their resistance (resistive switching - RS) originated from the formation and rupture of conductive pathways (filaments) in oxide films due to the electric-field-driven migration of oxygen vacancies and / or mobile oxygen ions. It is shown that, for both ionic and covalent oxides under study, the RS behaviour depends only weakly on the oxide film composition and thickness, device geometry (down to a device size of about 20 x 20 μm{sup 2}). The devices under study are found to be tolerant to ion irradiation that reproduces the effect of extreme fluences of high-energy protons and fast neutrons. This common behaviour of RS is explained by the localized nature of the redox processes in a nanoscale switching oxide volume. Adaptive (synaptic) change of resistive states of memristive devices is demonstrated under the action of single or repeated electrical pulses, as well as in a simple model of coupled (synchronized) neuron-like generators. It is concluded that the noise-induced phenomena cannot be neglected in the consideration of a memristive device as a nonlinear system. The dynamic response of a memristive device to periodic signals of complex waveform can be predicted and tailored from the viewpoint of stochastic resonance concept. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Field- and irradiation-induced phenomena in memristive nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhaylov, A.N.; Gryaznov, E.G.; Belov, A.I.; Korolev, D.S.; Sharapov, A.N.; Guseinov, D.V.; Tetelbaum, D.I.; Tikhov, S.V.; Malekhonova, N.V.; Bobrov, A.I.; Pavlov, D.A.; Gerasimova, S.A.; Kazantsev, V.B.; Agudov, N.V.; Dubkov, A.A.; Rosario, C.M.M.; Sobolev, N.A.; Spagnolo, B.

    2016-01-01

    The breakthrough in electronics and information technology is anticipated by the development of emerging memory and logic devices, artificial neural networks and brain-inspired systems on the basis of memristive nanomaterials represented, in a particular case, by a simple 'metal-insulator-metal' (MIM) thin-film structure. The present article is focused on the comparative analysis of MIM devices based on oxides with dominating ionic (ZrO_x, HfO_x) and covalent (SiO_x, GeO_x) bonding of various composition and geometry deposited by magnetron sputtering. The studied memristive devices demonstrate reproducible change in their resistance (resistive switching - RS) originated from the formation and rupture of conductive pathways (filaments) in oxide films due to the electric-field-driven migration of oxygen vacancies and / or mobile oxygen ions. It is shown that, for both ionic and covalent oxides under study, the RS behaviour depends only weakly on the oxide film composition and thickness, device geometry (down to a device size of about 20 x 20 μm"2). The devices under study are found to be tolerant to ion irradiation that reproduces the effect of extreme fluences of high-energy protons and fast neutrons. This common behaviour of RS is explained by the localized nature of the redox processes in a nanoscale switching oxide volume. Adaptive (synaptic) change of resistive states of memristive devices is demonstrated under the action of single or repeated electrical pulses, as well as in a simple model of coupled (synchronized) neuron-like generators. It is concluded that the noise-induced phenomena cannot be neglected in the consideration of a memristive device as a nonlinear system. The dynamic response of a memristive device to periodic signals of complex waveform can be predicted and tailored from the viewpoint of stochastic resonance concept. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Modifications on the hydrogen bond network by mutations of Escherichia coli copper efflux oxidase affect the process of proton transfer to dioxygen leading to alterations of enzymatic activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajikawa, Takao; Kataoka, Kunishige [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Sakurai, Takeshi, E-mail: tsakurai@se.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan)

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton transfer pathway to dioxygen in CueO was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glu506 is the key amino acid to transport proton. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ala mutation at Glu506 formed a compensatory proton transfer pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ile mutation at Glu506 shut down the hydrogen bond network. -- Abstract: CueO has a branched hydrogen bond network leading from the exterior of the protein molecule to the trinuclear copper center. This network transports protons in the four-electron reduction of dioxygen. We replaced the acidic Glu506 and Asp507 residues with the charged and uncharged amino acid residues. Peculiar changes in the enzyme activity of the mutants relative to the native enzyme indicate that an acidic amino acid residue at position 506 is essential for effective proton transport. The Ala mutation resulted in the formation of a compensatory hydrogen bond network with one or two extra water molecules. On the other hand, the Ile mutation resulted in the complete shutdown of the hydrogen bond network leading to loss of enzymatic activities of CueO. In contrast, the hydrogen bond network without the proton transport function was constructed by the Gln mutation. These results exerted on the hydrogen bond network in CueO are discussed in comparison with proton transfers in cytochrome oxidase.

  5. In situ transmission electron microscope studies of ion irradiation-induced and irradiation-enhanced phase changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    Motivated at least initially by materials needs for nuclear reactor development, extensive irradiation effects studies employing transmission electron microscopes (TEM) have been performed for several decades, involving irradiation-induced and irradiation-enhanced microstructural changes, including phase transformations such as precipitation, dissolution, crystallization, amorphization, and order-disorder phenomena. From the introduction of commercial high voltage electron microscopes (HVEM) in the mid-1960s, studies of electron irradiation effects have constituted a major aspect of HVEM application in materials science. For irradiation effects studies two additional developments have had particularly significant impact; the development of TEM specimen holder sin which specimen temperature can be controlled in the range 10-2200 K and the interfacing of ion accelerators which allows in situ TEM studies of irradiation effects and the ion beam modification of materials within this broad temperature range. This paper treats several aspects of in situ studies of electron and ion beam-induced and enhanced phase changes and presents two case studies involving in situ experiments performed in an HVEM to illustrate the strategies of such an approach of the materials research of irradiation effects

  6. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearing, H.W.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize some of the information about the nucleon-nucleon force which has been obtained by comparing recent calculations of proton-proton bremsstrahlung with cross section and analyzing power data from the new TRIUMF bremsstrahlung experiment. Some comments are made as to how these results can be extended to neutron-proton bremsstrahlung. (Author) 17 refs., 6 figs

  7. Schisandrin B protects against solar irradiation-induced oxidative injury in BJ human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Po Yee; Lam, Philip Y; Yan, Chung Wai; Ko, Kam Ming

    2011-06-01

    The effects of schisandrin B (Sch B) and its analogs on solar irradiation-induced oxidative injury were examined in BJ human fibroblasts. Sch B and schisandrin C (Sch C) increased cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) level and protected against solar irradiation-induced oxidative injury. The photoprotection was paralleled by decreases in the elastases-type protease activity and matrix-metalloproteinases-1 expression in solar-irradiated fibroblasts. The cytochrome P-450-mediated metabolism of Sch B or Sch C caused ROS production. The results suggest that by virtue of its pro-oxidant action and the subsequent glutathione antioxidant response, Sch B or Sch C may offer the prospect of preventing skin photo-aging. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Irradiation-induced creep in fuel compacts for high-temperature reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veringa, H; Blackstone, R [Stichting Energieonderzoek Centrum Nederland, Petten; Loelgen, R

    1977-01-01

    Restrained shrinkage experiments at neutron fluences up to 3 x 10/sup 21/ n cm/sup -2/ DNE in the temperature range 600 to 1200/sup 0/C were performed on three different dummy coated-particle fuel compacts in the high-flux reactor at Petten. The data were evaluated to obtain the steady-state radiation creep coefficient of the compacts. It was found that, for the materials investigated, the creep coefficient is temperature dependent, but no clear relationship with Young's modulus could be established. Under certain conditions this irradiation-induced plasticity influences the elastic properties, with the concomitant increase of the creep coefficient. This effect coincides with the formation and further opening up of cracks due to stresses caused by irradiation-induced shrinkage of matrix material.

  9. Irradiation-induced creep in fuel compacts for high-temperature reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veringa, H.; Blackstone, R.; Loelgen, R.

    1977-01-01

    Restrained shrinkage experiments at neutron fluences up to 3 x 10 21 n cm -2 DNE in the temperature range 600 to 1200 0 C were performed on three different dummy coated-particle fuel compacts in the high-flux reactor at Petten. The data were evaluated to obtain the steady-state radiation creep coefficient of the compacts. It was found that, for the materials investigated, the creep coefficient is temperature dependent, but no clear relationship with Young's modulus could be established. Under certain conditions this irradiation-induced plasticity influences the elastic properties, with the concomitant increase of the creep coefficient. This effect coincides with the formation and further opening up of cracks due to stresses caused by irradiation-induced shrinkage of matrix material. (author)

  10. Protective effects of nelumbo nucifera against {gamma}-irradiation-induced lipid peroxidation in mice urine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Il Yun; Park, Yong Dae; Jin, Caang Hyun; Choi, Dae Seong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyo Jung [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    The radioprotective effect of isoquercitrin-abundant fraction (IAF) of N. nucifera Gaertn. Ieaf extract against {gamma}-irradiation-induced oxidative stress was evaluated by the lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes (LPDAs) as a marker for oxidative risk in mice urine, and the DNA damage using comet assay in RAW 264.7 cells. Mice that were treated with IAF (50 mg/kg) and {gamma}-irradiation showed considerably decreased LPDA levels relative to those that had received {gamma}-irradiation alone. Furthermore, pretreatment with IAF resulted in a significant decrease in the amount of DNA damage in cells. It is demonstrated that pretreatment with IAF of N. nucifera Gaertn. gives protection against irradiation-induced cellular damage.

  11. Finite element analysis of irradiation-induced dilation of the fuel subassembly duct in LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Fuhai; Fu Hao; Li Nan; Yang Kongli; Wang Mingzhen

    2013-01-01

    Background: The calculation of irradiation-induced dilation of the fuel subassembly duct in LMFBR is important for fast reactor core design.. Purpose: To investigate how to calculate the dilation by using finite element method (FEM). Methods: First, irradiation-induced creep and swelling material models are introduced. Then, a theoretical solution based on a simplified bending plate model is briefly given. Finally, a stress update scheme for the adopted material models is presented and furthermore embedded into ABAQUS user interface UMAT to conduct finite element analysis. Both solutions are compared and discussed. Results: FEM successfully predicts the duct dilation and its solution agrees well with theoretical one in small deformation. Conclusions: The proposed stress update scheme is effective, The accuracy of the theory solution declines when dilation becomes larger. The maximum stress occurs at the duct corner point, and the location has stress relaxation effect. (authors)

  12. Irradiation-induced creep in metallic nanolaminates characterized by In situ TEM pillar nanocompression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, Shen J., E-mail: sdillon@illinois.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champagin, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Bufford, Daniel C. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Jawaharram, Gowtham S.; Liu, Xuying; Lear, Calvin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champagin, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hattar, Khalid [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Averback, Robert S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champagin, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2017-07-15

    This work reports on irradiation-induced creep (IIC) measured on nanolaminate (Cu-W and Ni-Ag) and nanocrystalline alloys (Cu-W) at room temperature using a combination of heavy ion irradiation and nanopillar compression performed concurrently in situ in a transmission electron microscope. Appreciable IIC is observed in multilayers with 50 nm layer thicknesses at high stress, ≈½ the yield strength, but not in multilayers with only 5 nm layer thicknesses.

  13. Relationship between equivalent chromium content and irradiation-induced swelling in 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.F.; Guthrie, G.L.

    1974-12-01

    A correlation is noted between equivalent chromium content and resistance to irradiation induced swelling in various 316 stainless steel specimens which have slightly different chemical compositions. Several examples are cited where an increased concentration of an α-stabilizing minor constituent results in decreased swelling. It is shown that the relative swelling resistance of alloys having the same carbon and equivalent nickel contents is higher for those alloys with the higher equivalent chromium content

  14. A review of irradiation induced re-solution in oxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    The paper reviews the existing experimental evidence for irradiation induced re-solution and also possible explanations for the mechanism. The importance of re-solution is considered with regard to intragranular bubbles and the accumulation of gas on grain boundaries. It is concluded that re-solution is most effective at low temperatures and could account for the present concern over gas release in high burn-up water reactor fuel assemblies. (author)

  15. Calculation of diffraction patterns associated with electron irradiation induced amorphization of CuTi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devanathan, R.; Meshii, M.; Sabochik, M.J.

    1990-11-01

    A new approach that uses the multislice method in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations to study electron irradiation induced amorphisation is presented. Diffraction patterns were calculated for CuTi and found to be more sensitive than the pair correlation function to the structural changes preceding amorphisation. The results from this approach and from a study of long range order are presented. 16 refs., 8 figs

  16. Fatigue behavior of Type 316 stainless steel following neutron irradiation inducing helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Liu, K.C.

    1980-01-01

    Since a tokamak reactor operates in a cyclic mode, thermal stresses will result in fatigue in structural components, especially in the first wall and blanket. There has been limited work on fatigue in irradiated alloys but none on irradiated materials containing significant amounts of irradiation-induced helium. To provide scoping data and to study the effects of irradiation on fatigue behavior, 20%-cold-worked type 316 stainless steel from the MFE reference heat was studied

  17. Apoptosis-promoted tumorigenesis: γ-irradiation-induced thymic lymphomagenesis requires Puma-driven leukocyte death

    OpenAIRE

    Michalak, Ewa M.; Vandenberg, Cassandra J.; Delbridge, Alex R.D.; Wu, Li; Scott, Clare L.; Adams, Jerry M.; Strasser, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Although tumor development requires impaired apoptosis, we describe a novel paradigm of apoptosis-dependent tumorigenesis. Because DNA damage triggers apoptosis through p53-mediated induction of BH3-only proteins Puma and Noxa, we explored their roles in γ-radiation-induced thymic lymphomagenesis. Surprisingly, whereas Noxa loss accelerated it, Puma loss ablated tumorigenesis. Tumor suppression by Puma deficiency reflected its protection of leukocytes from γ-irradiation-induced death, because...

  18. Proton concentrations can be a major contributor to the modification of osteoclast and osteoblast differentiation, working independently of extracellular bicarbonate ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kohtaro; Matsushita, Misao

    2014-01-01

    We established a system to separately analyze the role of protons and bicarbonate ions in vitro in which the pH of the medium was controlled by HEPES at various concentrations of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) in the absence of carbon dioxide (CO2). Using this system, we demonstrated that acidosis promoted osteoclast formation independently of extracellular NaHCO3 in a short-term culture. Protons and bicarbonate ions acted on osteoclast differentiation with opposite effects, the former positively and the latter negatively. The HEPES-based system maintained pH in the absence of extracellular NaHCO3 without CO2. Therefore, we could demonstrate that osteoblast differentiation was promoted at higher pH in a long-term culture system without NaHCO3 in which ALP activity and nodule mineralization were enhanced. This finding indicates that protons negatively control osteoblast differentiation independently of extracellular bicarbonate ions. However, the difference in the concentration of NaHCO3 did not have any influence on nodule mineralization. The opposite effects of protons, the promotion of osteoclast formation and the inhibition of osteoblast differentiation, were suppressed in the presence of 5 mM N-acetyl cysteine, a reagent activating the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS), implying that ROS act on both systems, the promotion of large osteoclast formation and the deterioration of osteoblast formation under acidosis.

  19. Preparation and electrical-property characterization of poly(vinyl chloride)-derived carbon nanosheet by ion beam irradiation-induced carbon clustering and carbonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chan-Hee; Sohn, Joon-Yong; Kim, Hyo-Sub; Hwang, In-Tae; Lee, Hong-Joon; Shin, Junhwa; Choi, Jae-Hak

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we demonstrated that carbon nanosheet (CNS) can easily be produced by a room-temperature, solid-state proton irradiation-induced clustering of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) films followed by carbonization. The results of the optical, chemical, and structural analyses revealed that oxidized and sp2-hybridized carbon clusters were effectively created in the PVC thin film by combined dehydrochlorination and inter-coupling reactions during proton irradiation. This was further converted to pseudo-hexagonally-structured nano-crystalline CNS with 2-D symmetry and metallic transporting character by high-temperature treatment. As a result, the CNS exhibited a very high electrical conductivity (587 S/cm) without a significant change in their thickness, a low surface roughness (0.36 nm), and a high work function (5.11 eV). These findings demonstrate that the radiation-based approach opens new avenues for the design and development of 2-D CNS as a graphene allotrope for the application of electronic devices, including field-effect transistors, electric heating devices, biosensors, supercapacitors, and fuel cells.

  20. Irradiation induced improvement in crystallinity of epitaxially grown Ag thin films on Si substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahiro, Katsumi; Nagata, Shinji; Yamaguchi, Sadae [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Materials Research

    1997-03-01

    We report the improvement in crystallinity of epitaxially grown Ag films on Si(100) substrates with ion irradiation. The irradiation of 0.5 MeV Si ions to 2x10{sup 16}/cm{sup 2} at 200degC, for example, reduces the channeling minimum yield from 60% to 6% at Ag surface. The improvement originates from the decrease of mosaic spread in the Ag thin film. In our experiments, ion energy, ion species and irradiation temperature have been varied. The better crystallinity is obtained as the higher concentration of defect is generated. The mechanism involved in the irradiation induced improvement is discussed. (author)

  1. What can we learn from Raman Spectroscopy on irradiation-induced defects in UO2?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desgranges, L.; Martin, Ph.; Simon, P.; Guimbretiere, G.; Baldinozzi, G.

    2014-01-01

    Recent results on irradiated UO 2 by Raman spectroscopy evidenced Raman lines that are characteristic of irradiation-induced defects. Three main mechanisms are identified to explain their origin: resonant Raman, formation of new molecular entities, or breakdown in symmetry. Arguments are given to consider breakdown in symmetry as the predominant mechanism. A tentative description of the defects at the origin of this symmetry breakdown is proposed in terms of coordination polyhedrons of uranium. This discussion led us to consider that the Raman defect modes could be related to area with different stoichiometry. (authors)

  2. Centrality dependence of the nuclear modification factor of charged pions, kaons, and protons in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, Jaroslav; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahn, Sang Un; Aimo, Ilaria; Aiola, Salvatore; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Millan Almaraz, Jesus Roberto; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto Perez, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blanco, Fernando; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Bossu, Francesco; Botta, Elena; Boettger, Stefan; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calero Diaz, Liliet; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Cerkala, Jakub; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Zhang, Chunhui; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Denes, Ervin Sandor; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Drozhzhova, Tatiana; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Engel, Heiko; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erdemir, Irem; Erhardt, Filip; Eschweiler, Dominic; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabbietti, Laura; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Fleck, Martin Gabriel; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Gao, Chaosong; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Germain, Marie; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grynyov, Borys; Grion, Nevio; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gulkanyan, Hrant; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hansen, Alexander; Harris, John William; Hartmann, Helvi; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hilden, Timo Eero; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hippolyte, Boris; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadlovska, Slavka; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyungtaik; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kamin, Jason Adrian; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karayan, Lilit; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Khan, Kamal; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Boesing, Christian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobayashi, Taiyo; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Kopcik, Michal; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Jitendra; Lokesh, Kumar; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Seongjoo; Legrand, Iosif; Lehas, Fatiha; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leoncino, Marco; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-Ivar; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martin Blanco, Javier; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-Garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Masui, Hiroshi; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Mcdonald, Daniel; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Minervini, Lazzaro Manlio; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Montes Prado, Esther; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Nattrass, Christine; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nellen, Lukas; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okatan, Ali; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Pajares Vales, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Pant, Divyash; Papcun, Peter; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pospisil, Jan; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-Lucian; Rivetti, Angelo; Rocco, Elena; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Ronflette, Lucile; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salgado Lopez, Carlos Alberto; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Sarkar, Debojit; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schulc, Martin; Schuster, Tim Robin; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Sekihata, Daiki; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Seo, Jeewon; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shadura, Oksana; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Mona; Sharma, Monika; Sharma, Natasha; Shigaki, Kenta; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Soegaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Song, Zixuan; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Spacek, Michal; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Steinpreis, Matthew Donald; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Symons, Timothy; Szabo, Alexander; Szanto De Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Takahashi, Jun; Tambave, Ganesh Jagannath; Tanaka, Naoto; Tangaro, Marco-Antonio; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tarantola Peloni, Attilio; Tarhini, Mohamad; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-Gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thaeder, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Trogolo, Stefano; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Veldhoen, Misha; Velure, Arild; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Yifei; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaborowska, Anna; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correia Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zyzak, Maksym

    2016-03-25

    Transverse momentum ($p_{\\rm{T}}$) spectra of pions, kaons, and protons up to $p_{\\rm{T}} = 20$ GeV/$c$ have been measured in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 2.76$ TeV using the ALICE detector for six different centrality classes covering 0-80%. The proton-to-pion and the kaon-to-pion ratios both show a distinct peak at $p_{\\rm{T}} \\approx 3$ GeV/$c$ in central Pb-Pb collisions that decreases towards more peripheral collisions. For $p_{\\rm{T}} > 10$ GeV/$c$, the nuclear modification factor is found to be the same for all three particle species in each centrality interval within systematic uncertainties of 10-20%. This suggests there is no direct interplay between the energy loss in the medium and the particle species composition in the hard core of the quenched jet. For $p_{\\rm{T}} < 10$ GeV/$c$, the data provide important constraints for models aimed at describing the transition from soft to hard physics.

  3. Sea Quarks in the Proton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reimer Paul E

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The proton is a composite particle in which the binding force is responsible for the majority of its mass. To understand this structure, the distributions and origins of the quark-antiquark pairs produced by the strong force must be measured. The SeaQuest collaboration is using the Drell-Yan process to elucidate antiquark distributions in the proton and to study their modification when the proton is held within a nucleus.

  4. Estimation of irradiation-induced material damage measure of FCM fuel in LWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Lee, Chungchan; Park, Sang-Yoon; Cho, Jin-Young; Chang, Jonghwa; Lee, Won Jae

    2014-01-01

    An irradiation-induced material damage measure on tri-isotropic (TRISO) multi-coating layers of fully ceramic micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel to replace conventional uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) fuel for existing light water reactors (LWRs) has been estimated using a displacement per atom (DPA) cross section for a FCM fuel performance analysis. The DPA cross sections in 47 and 190 energy groups for both silicon carbide (SiC) and graphite are generated based on the molecular dynamics simulation by SRIM/TRIM. For the selected FCM fuel assembly design with FeCrAl cladding, a core depletion analysis was carried out using the DeCART2D/MASTER code system with the prepared DPA cross sections to evaluate the irradiation effect in the Korean OPR-1000. The DPA of the SiC and IPyC coating layers is estimated by comparing the discharge burnup obtained from the MASTER calculation with the burnup-dependent DPA for each coating layer calculated using DeCART2D. The results show that low uranium loading and hardened neutron spectrum compared to that of high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) result in high discharge burnup and high fast neutron fluence. In conclusion, it can be seen that the irradiation-induced material damage measure is noticeably increased under LWR operating conditions compared to HTGRs. (author)

  5. Characterisation of irradiation-induced defects in ZnO single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prochazka, I; Cizek, J; Lukac, F; Melikhova, O; Valenta, J; Havranek, V; Anwand, W; Skuratov, V A; Strukova, T S

    2016-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) combined with optical methods was employed for characterisation of defects in the hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystals irradiated by 167 MeV Xe 26+ ions to fluences ranged from 3×10 12 to 1×10 14 cm -2 . The positron lifetime (LT), Doppler broadening as well as slow-positron implantation spectroscopy (SPIS) techniques were involved. The ab-initio theoretical calculations were utilised for interpretation of LT results. The optical transmission and photoluminescence measurements were conducted, too. The virgin ZnO crystal exhibited a single component LT spectrum with a lifetime of 182 ps which is attributed to saturated positron trapping in Zn vacancies associated with hydrogen atoms unintentionally introduced into the crystal during the crystal growth. The Xe ion irradiated ZnO crystals have shown an additional component with a longer lifetime of ≈ 360 ps which comes from irradiation-induced larger defects equivalent in size to clusters of ≈10 to 12 vacancies. The concentrations of these clusters were estimated on the basis of combined LT and SPIS data. The PAS data were correlated with irradiation induced changes seen in the optical spectroscopy experiments. (paper)

  6. Characterisation of irradiation-induced defects in ZnO single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochazka, I.; Cizek, J.; Lukac, F.; Melikhova, O.; Valenta, J.; Havranek, V.; Anwand, W.; Skuratov, V. A.; Strukova, T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) combined with optical methods was employed for characterisation of defects in the hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystals irradiated by 167 MeV Xe26+ ions to fluences ranged from 3×1012 to 1×1014 cm-2. The positron lifetime (LT), Doppler broadening as well as slow-positron implantation spectroscopy (SPIS) techniques were involved. The ab-initio theoretical calculations were utilised for interpretation of LT results. The optical transmission and photoluminescence measurements were conducted, too. The virgin ZnO crystal exhibited a single component LT spectrum with a lifetime of 182 ps which is attributed to saturated positron trapping in Zn vacancies associated with hydrogen atoms unintentionally introduced into the crystal during the crystal growth. The Xe ion irradiated ZnO crystals have shown an additional component with a longer lifetime of ≈ 360 ps which comes from irradiation-induced larger defects equivalent in size to clusters of ≈10 to 12 vacancies. The concentrations of these clusters were estimated on the basis of combined LT and SPIS data. The PAS data were correlated with irradiation induced changes seen in the optical spectroscopy experiments.

  7. Analysis of nano-sized irradiation-induced defects in Fe-base materials by means of small angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, G.

    2008-12-01

    Thermonuclear fusion of light atoms is considered since decades as an unlimited, safe and reliable source of energy that could eventually replace classical sources based on fossil fuel or nuclear fuel. Fusion reactor technology and materials studies are important parts of the fusion energy development program. For the time being, the most promising materials for structural applications in the future fusion power reactors are the Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steels for which the greatest technology maturity has been achieved, i.e., qualified fabrication routes, welding technology and a general industrial experience are almost available. The most important issues concerning the future use of RAFM steels in fusion power reactors are derived from their irradiation by 14 MeV neutrons that are the product, together with 3.5 MeV helium ions, of the envisaged fusion reactions between deuterium and tritium nuclei. Indeed, exposure of metallic materials to intense fluxes of 14 MeV neutrons will result in the formation of severe displacement damage (about 20-30 dpa per year) and high amounts of helium, which are at the origin of significant changes in the physical and mechanical properties of materials, such as hardening and embrittlement effects. This PhD Thesis work was aimed at investigating how far the Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) technique could be used for detecting and characterizing nano-sized irradiation-induced defects in RAFM steels. Indeed, the resolution limit of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is about 1 nm in weak beam TEM imaging, and it is usually thought that a large number of irradiation-induced effects have a size below 1 nm in RAFM steels and that these very small defects actually contribute to the irradiation-induced hardening and embrittlement of RAFM steels occurring at irradiation temperatures below about 400 °C. The aim of this work was achieved by combining SANS experiments on unirradiated and irradiated specimens

  8. Effect of 200 keV proton irradiation on the properties of methyl silicone rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lixin; Xu Zhou; Wei Qiang; He Shiyu

    2006-01-01

    The effects of 200 keV proton irradiation on methyl silicone rubber were studied. The changes in surface morphology, mechanical properties, cross-linking density, glass transition temperature, infrared attenuated total reflection spectrum and mass spectrum indicated that, at lower fluence, the proton irradiation induced cross-linking, resulting in an increase in tensile strength and hardness of the methyl silicone rubber. However, at higher proton fluence, radiation-induced degradation, which decreased the tensile strength and hardness, became dominant. A macromolecular-network destruction model for silicone rubber irradiated with protons was proposed

  9. Studies on γ-irradiation-induced-degradation of chloramphenicol in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Fang; Ha Yiming; Wang Feng; Zhou Hongjie

    2008-01-01

    The irradiation-induced degradation of chloramphenicol by γ-rays in aqueous solution was studied and the radiolytical products were determined. The relationship among degradation rate, absorbed dose and initial concentration have been explored by comparing the position of maximum absorption peaks of chloramphenicol be- fore and after irradiation using high performance liquid chromatography. The identification of radiolytical products has been conducted using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. It has been found that the relationship among C/C 0 , absorbed dose and initial concentration can be fit with index curve. After irradiation, more than 30 radiolytical products with stable absorption below 278nm could be determined. 8 major radiolytical products with [M-H] - 353, 337, 335(A), 335(B), 319, 289, 127, 166, which are detected in several different conditions, have been picked up. Their possible structures are deducted. (authors)

  10. Irradiation induced aerosol formation in flue gas: experiments on low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekelae, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory experiments on irradiation induced aerosol formation from gaseous sulphur dioxide in humid air are presented. This work is connected to the aerosol particle formation process in the electron beam technique for cleaning flue gas. As a partial process of this method primary products of the radiolysis of water vapour convert sulphur dioxide into gaseous sulphuric acid which then nucleates with water vapour forming small acid droplets. This experimental work has been performed on relatively low absorbed doses. Aerosol particle formation is strongly dependent on dose. In the experiments, the first aerosol particles were detected already on absorbed doses of 0.1-10 mGy. The particle size in these cases is in the so-called ultrafine size range (1-20 nm). In this article three experimental set-ups with some characteristic results are presented. (Author)

  11. Energy and orientation dependence of electron-irradiation-induced defects in InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibille, A.; Suski, J.; LeRoux, G.

    1984-01-01

    The concentration of several electron-irradiation-induced deep defect levels in InP has been measured by deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) as a function of electron energy. The dominant centers exhibit a threshold at about 100 keV, which clearly points to a primary production event by electron--phosphorus-atom collision. This unambiguous determination allowed a test of the recently proposed orientation dependence technique to find the nature of the sublattice involved in the collision process for III-V compounds. A good quantitative agreement is obtained with a hard-sphere model for secondary collisions if disorientation of the beam in the sample is taken into account. Other traps exhibit higher thresholds which correspond either to indium-atom displacements or to the involvement of secondary collisions in the production event

  12. A physically-based correlation of irradiation-induced transition temperature shifts for RPV steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eason, E.D.; Odette, G.R.; Nanstad, R.K.; Yamamoto, T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a physically-based, empirically calibrated model for estimating irradiation-induced transition temperature shifts in reactor pressure vessel steels, based on a broader database and more complete understanding of embrittlement mechanisms than was available for earlier models. Brief descriptions of the underlying radiation damage mechanisms and the database are included, but the emphasis is on the model and the quality of its fit to U.S. power reactor surveillance data. The model is compared to a random sample of surveillance data that were set aside and not used in fitting and to selected independent data from test reactor irradiations, in both cases showing good ability to predict data that were not used for calibration. The model is a good fit to the surveillance data, with no significant residual error trends for variables included in the model or additional variables that could be included

  13. Transmission electron microscope study of neutron irradiation-induced defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Ryuichiro; Kawano, Tetsuya; Fujimoto, Ryoji

    1994-01-01

    Commercial Czochralski-grown silicon (Cz-Si) and float-zone silicon (Fz-Si) wafers were irradiated with fission neutrons at various fluences from 10 19 to 10 22 n/cm 2 at temperatures ranging from 473 K to 1043 K. The irradiation induced defect structures were examined by transmission electron microscopy and ultra high voltage electron microscopy, which were compared with Marlowe code computer simulation results. It was concluded that the vacancy-type damage structure formed at 473 K were initiated from collapse of vacancy-rich regions of cascades, while interstitial type defect clusters formed by irradiation above 673 K were associated with interstitial oxygen atoms and free interstitials which diffused out of the cascades. Complex defect structures were identified to consist of {113} and {111} planar faults by the parallel beam illumination diffraction analysis. (author)

  14. Ion irradiation-induced diffusion in bixbyite-fluorite related oxides: Dislocations and phase transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolly, Gaboriaud, E-mail: Rolly.gaboriaud@univ-poitiers.fr [Institut Pprime, CNRS-University of Poitiers, SP2MI-BP 30179, 86962 Chasseneuil-Futuroscope (France); Fabien, Paumier [Institut Pprime, CNRS-University of Poitiers, SP2MI-BP 30179, 86962 Chasseneuil-Futuroscope (France); Bertrand, Lacroix [CSIC – University of Sevilla, Avenida Américo Vespucio, 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2014-05-01

    Ion-irradiation induced diffusion and the phase transformation of a bixbyite-fluorite related rare earth oxide thin films are studied. This work is focused on yttrium sesquioxide, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, thin films deposited on Si (1 0 0) substrates using the ion beam sputtering technique (IBS). As-deposited samples were annealed ant then irradiated at cryogenic temperature (80 K) with 260 keV Xe{sup 2+} at different fluences. The irradiated thin oxide films are characterized by X-ray diffraction. A cubic to monoclinic phase transformation was observed. Analysis of this phenomenon is done in terms of residual stresses. Stress measurements as a function of irradiation fluences were realised using the XRD-sin{sup 2}ψ method. Stress evolution and kinetic of the phase transformation are compared and leads to the role-played by the nucleation of point and extended defects.

  15. Irradiation-induced mutation experiments with eiploid and tetraploid tomato plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boda, J.

    1979-01-01

    Tomato mutation experiments are described. The tomatoes used in the experiment were the diploid Reziszta and its autotetraploid variety. The experimental plants were exposed to an irradiation of 5000 rsd for 1-2 days, and after transplantation into the gamma field, to chronic irradiation during the whole growing season. The chronic treatment heavily reduced fertility in the generations of tetraploid tomato plants. Recurrent treatment of tetraploid led to further deterioration in fertility. Several berries were formed with few seeds or with no seeds at all. After three irradiations, the chlorophyll mutation frequency increased in the diploid and tetraploid tomato plants. For diploids, treatment applied at the seedling stage gave a lower chlorophyll mutation frequency. With tetraploids the same treatment induced similar chlorophyll mutation frequency. As regards to phenotypic variability of quantitative characteristics in diploid and tetraploid tomatoes, the single and repeated chronic irradiation induced no increase in the variability of properties like flowering time, weight, height etc. (author)

  16. Heavy ion irradiation induces autophagy in irradiated C2C12 myoblasts and their bystander cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Mizuki; Tajika, Yuki; Hamada, Nobuyuki

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy is one of the major processes involved in the degradation of intracellular materials. Here, we examined the potential impact of heavy ion irradiation on the induction of autophagy in irradiated C2C12 mouse myoblasts and their non-targeted bystander cells. In irradiated cells, ultrastructural analysis revealed the accumulation of autophagic structures at various stages of autophagy (id est (i.e.) phagophores, autophagosomes and autolysosomes) within 20 min after irradiation. Multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and autolysosomes containing MVBs (amphisomes) were also observed. Heavy ion irradiation increased the staining of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 and LysoTracker Red (LTR). Such enhanced staining was suppressed by an autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. In addition to irradiated cells, bystander cells were also positive with LTR staining. Altogether, these results suggest that heavy ion irradiation induces autophagy not only in irradiated myoblasts but also in their bystander cells. (author)

  17. Magnetic circular dichroism study of electron-irradiation induced defects in InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gislason, H.P.

    1989-01-01

    A strong magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) absorption band centered at 1.07 eV in electron irradiated InP is reported. Temperature and magnetic field dependence of the signal reveal that the centre giving rise to this band is a spin triplet. By simulating neutral and reverse bias conditions of junction measurements through a careful choice of irradiation dose and starting material, the MCD band is shown to have an annealing behaviour closely resembling that of the majority carrier traps which control the Fermi level position in n- and p-type InP. The 1.07 eV MCD band represents the first magneto-optical signal connected with this family of complex irradiation-induced defects in InP. (author) 19 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  18. Electron-beam-irradiation-induced crystallization of amorphous solid phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dong; Wu, Liangcai; Wen, Lin; Ma, Liya; Zhang, Xingyao; Li, Yudong; Guo, Qi; Song, Zhitang

    2018-04-01

    The electron-beam-irradiation-induced crystallization of phase change materials in a nano sized area was studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. Amorphous phase change materials changed to a polycrystalline state after being irradiated with a 200 kV electron beam for a long time. The results indicate that the crystallization temperature strongly depends on the difference in the heteronuclear bond enthalpy of the phase change materials. The selected area electron diffraction patterns reveal that Ge2Sb2Te5 is a nucleation-dominated material, when Si2Sb2Te3 and Ti0.5Sb2Te3 are growth-dominated materials.

  19. Modelling irradiation-induced softening in BCC iron by crystal plasticity approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Xiazi; Terentyev, Dmitry; Yu, Long; Song, Dingkun; Bakaev, A.; Duan, Huiling

    2015-01-01

    Crystal plasticity model (CPM) for BCC iron to account for radiation-induced strain softening is proposed. CPM is based on the plastically-driven and thermally-activated removal of dislocation loops. Atomistic simulations are applied to parameterize dislocation-defect interactions. Combining experimental microstructures, defect-hardening/absorption rules from atomistic simulations, and CPM fitted to properties of non-irradiated iron, the model achieves a good agreement with experimental data regarding radiation-induced strain softening and flow stress increase under neutron irradiation. - Highlights: • A stress- and thermal-activated defect absorption model is proposed for the dislocation-loop interaction. • A temperature-dependent plasticity theory is proposed for the irradiation-induced strain softening of irradiated BCC metals. • The numerical results of the model match with the corresponding experimental data.

  20. The irradiation induced creep in fuel compact materials for H.T.R. applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veringa, H.; Blackstone, R.; Loelgen, R.

    1976-01-01

    Restrained shrinkage experiments up to 3 x 10 21 ncm -2 (DNE) in the temperature range of 600-1,200 0 C on three different dummy coated particle fuel compact materials were performed in the High Flux Reactor at Petten, the Netherlands. The data were evaluated to obtain the steady state irradiation creep coefficient of the compacts. It was found that for the materials investigated, the creep coefficient is temperature-dependent, but no clear relationship to the Young's modulus could be established. Under certain conditions, this irradiation-induced plasticity influences the elastic properties, while also the creep coefficient increases. This effect coincides with the formation and further opening of cracks due to stresses caused by irradiation shrinkage of the matrix material. (orig.) [de

  1. Irradiation-induced dimensional changes of fuel compacts and graphite sleeves of OGL-1 fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kimio; Minato, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Fumiaki; Tobita, Tsutomu; Kikuchi, Teruo; Kurobane, Shiro; Adachi, Mamoru; Fukuda, Kousaku

    1988-06-01

    Experimental data are summarized on irradiation-induced dimensional changes of fuel compacts and graphite sleeves of the first to ninth OGL-1 fuel assemblies. The range of fast-neutron fluence is up to 4 x 10 24 n/m 2 (E > 0.18 MeV); and that of irradiation temperature is 900 - 1400 deg C for fuel compacts and 800 - 1050 deg C for graphite sleeves. The dimensional change of the fuel compacts was shrinkage under these test conditions, and the shrinkage fraction increased almost linearly with fast-neutron fluence. The shrinkage fraction of the fuel compacts was larger by 20 % in the axial direction than in the radial direction. Influence of the irradiation temperature on the dimensional-change behavior of the fuel compacts was not observed clearly; presumably the influence was hidden by scatter of the data because of low level of the fast-neutron fluence and the resultant small dimensional changes. (author)

  2. Protection of a protein against irradiation-induced degradation by additives in the solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalaev, E.; Reddy, R.; Kimball, R.N.; Weinschenk, M.F.; Guinn, M.; Margulis, L.

    2003-01-01

    The impact of ionizing radiation on a globular protein (porcine somatotropin, pST) in the solid state was studied using rate of dissolution, high-performance liquid chromatography, and Electron spin resonance (ESR) in the presence of different additives. o-Vanillin stabilized pST against irradiation-induced degradation whereas effects of trolox and isopropyl alcohol were less significant. Stabilization effect of o-vanillin has been related to the energy transfer from pST molecules to the additive which was facilitated by formation of covalent bonds between o-vanillin and pST molecules. Anticorrelation between the level of free radicals and chemical degradation (i.e. degradation increased with decrease in a free radical level) was observed in the presence of o-vanillin

  3. Modelling irradiation-induced softening in BCC iron by crystal plasticity approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xiazi [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex System, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); CAPT, HEDPS and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center of MoE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Terentyev, Dmitry, E-mail: dterenty@SCKCEN.BE [Structural Material Group, Institute of Nuclear Materials Science, SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Yu, Long; Song, Dingkun [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex System, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Bakaev, A. [Structural Material Group, Institute of Nuclear Materials Science, SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Duan, Huiling, E-mail: hlduan@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex System, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); CAPT, HEDPS and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center of MoE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Crystal plasticity model (CPM) for BCC iron to account for radiation-induced strain softening is proposed. CPM is based on the plastically-driven and thermally-activated removal of dislocation loops. Atomistic simulations are applied to parameterize dislocation-defect interactions. Combining experimental microstructures, defect-hardening/absorption rules from atomistic simulations, and CPM fitted to properties of non-irradiated iron, the model achieves a good agreement with experimental data regarding radiation-induced strain softening and flow stress increase under neutron irradiation. - Highlights: • A stress- and thermal-activated defect absorption model is proposed for the dislocation-loop interaction. • A temperature-dependent plasticity theory is proposed for the irradiation-induced strain softening of irradiated BCC metals. • The numerical results of the model match with the corresponding experimental data.

  4. Irradiation-induced permeability in pyrocarbon coatings. Final report of work conducted under PWS FD-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, M.J.; Thiele, B.A.; Homan, F.J.

    1982-10-01

    Two US irradiation experiments were planned to provide information to supplement data from the German program on irradiation-induced permeability in pyrocarbon coatings. Hopefully, the data from both programs could be combined to define the onset of neutron-induced permeability in a variety of Biso coatings produced with different process variables (coating temperature, coating gases, and coating rates). The effort was not successful. None of the preirradiation characterization procedures were able to adequately predict irradiation performance. A large amount of within-batch scatter was observed in the fission gas and cesium release data along with significant within-batch variation in coating properties. Additional preirradiation characterization might result in a procedure that could successfully predict irradiation performance, but little can be done about the within-batch variation in coating properties. This variation is probably the result of random movement of particles within the coating furnace during pyrocarbon deposition. 19 figures, 4 tables

  5. A reevaluation of X-irradiation-induced phocomelia and proximodistal limb patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Jenna L; Delgado, Irene; Ros, Maria A; Tabin, Clifford J

    2009-07-16

    Phocomelia is a devastating, rare congenital limb malformation in which the long bones are shorter than normal, with the upper portion of the limb being most severely affected. In extreme cases, the hands or fingers are attached directly to the shoulder and the most proximal elements (those closest to the shoulder) are entirely missing. This disorder, previously known in both autosomal recessive and sporadic forms, showed a marked increase in incidence in the early 1960s due to the tragic toxicological effects of the drug thalidomide, which had been prescribed as a mild sedative. This human birth defect is mimicked in developing chick limb buds exposed to X-irradiation. Both X-irradiation and thalidomide-induced phocomelia have been interpreted as patterning defects in the context of the progress zone model, which states that a cell's proximodistal identity is determined by the length of time spent in a distal limb region termed the 'progress zone'. Indeed, studies of X-irradiation-induced phocomelia have served as one of the two major experimental lines of evidence supporting the validity of the progress zone model. Here, using a combination of molecular analysis and lineage tracing in chick, we show that X-irradiation-induced phocomelia is fundamentally not a patterning defect, but rather results from a time-dependent loss of skeletal progenitors. Because skeletal condensation proceeds from the shoulder to fingers (in a proximal to distal direction), the proximal elements are differentially affected in limb buds exposed to radiation at early stages. This conclusion changes the framework for considering the effect of thalidomide and other forms of phocomelia, suggesting the possibility that the aetiology lies not in a defect in the patterning process, but rather in progenitor cell survival and differentiation. Moreover, molecular evidence that proximodistal patterning is unaffected after X-irradiation does not support the predictions of the progress zone model.

  6. A Reevaluation of X-Irradiation Induced Phocomelia and Proximodistal Limb Patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Jenna L.; Delgado, Irene; Ros, Maria A.; Tabin, Clifford J.

    2009-01-01

    Phocomelia is a devastating, rare congenital limb malformation in which the long bones are shorter than normal, with the upper portion of the limb being most severely affected. In extreme cases, the hands or fingers are attached directly to the shoulder and the most proximal elements (those closest to the shoulder) are entirely missing. This disorder, previously known in both autosomal recessive and sporadic forms, showed a dramatic increase in incidence in the early 1960’s due to the tragic toxicological effects of the drug thalidomide, which had been prescribed as a mild sedative1, 2. This human birth defect is mimicked in developing chick limb buds exposed to X-irradiation3-5. Both X-irradiation5 and thalidomide-induced phocomelia5, 6 have been interpreted as patterning defects in the context of the Progress Zone Model, which states that a cell’s proximodistal (PD) identity is determined by the length of time spent in a distal limb region termed the “Progress Zone” 7. Indeed, studies of X-irradiation induced phocomelia have served as one of the two major experimental lines of evidence supporting the validity of the Progress Zone Model. Here, using a combination of molecular analysis and lineage tracing, we show that X-irradiation-induced phocomelia is fundamentally not a patterning defect, but rather results from a time-dependent loss of skeletal progenitors. As skeletal condensation proceeds from the shoulder to fingers (in a proximal to distal direction), the proximal elements are differentially affected in limb buds exposed to radiation at early stages. This conclusion changes the framework for considering the effect of thalidomide and other forms of phocomelia, suggesting the possibility that the etiology lies not in a defect in the patterning process, but rather in progenitor cell survival and differentiation. Moreover, molecular evidence that PD patterning is unaffected following X-irradiation does not support the predictions of the Progress Zone

  7. Irradiation induced tensile property change of SA 508 Cl.3 reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se-Hwan; Hong, Jun-Hwa; Kuk, Il-Hiun

    1998-01-01

    Irradiation induced tensile property change of four kinds of reactor pressure vessel steels manufactured by different steel refining process was compared based on the differences in the unirradiated and irradiated microstructure. Microvickers hardness, indentation, and miniature tensile specimen tests were conducted for mechanical property measurement and optical microscope (OM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were used for microstructural characterization. Specimens were 2 irradiated to a neutron fluence of 2.7x10 19 n/cm 2 (E ≥ 1 MeV) at 288 deg. C. Investigation on the unirradiated microstructures showed largely a same microstructure in that tempered acicular bainite and ferrite with bainitic phase prevailing in the unirradiated condition. Band-shaped segregations were also clearly observed except a kind of materials. A large difference in the unirradiated microstructure appeared in the grain size and carbide microstructure. Of carbide microstructures, noticeable differences were observed in the size and distribution of cementite, and bainitic lath microstructures. No noticeable changes were observed in the optical and thin film TEM microstructures after irradiation. Complicated microstructural. state of heat treated bainitic low alloy microstructure prevents easy quantification of microstructural changes due to irradiation. Apparent differences, however, were observed in the results of mechanical testing. Results of tensile testing and hardness measurement show that a steel refined by vacuum carbon deoxidation(VCD) method exhibits the highest radiation hardening behavior. Some of mechanical testing results on irradiated materials were possible to understand based on the initial microstructure, but further investigations using a wide array of sophisticated tools (for example, SANS, APFIM) are required to understand and characterize irradiation induced defects that are responsible for irradiation hardening behavior but are not revealed by

  8. Validation of software components for the prediction of irradiation-induced damage of RPV steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergner, Frank; Birkenheuer, Uwe; Ulbricht, Andreas

    2010-04-01

    The modelling of irradiation-induced damage of RPV steels from primary cascades up to the change of mechanical properties bridging length scales from the atomic level up to the macro-scale and time scales up to years contributes essentially to an improved understanding of the phenomenon of neutron embrittlement. In future modelling may become a constituent of the procedure to evaluate RPV safety. The selected two-step approach is based upon the coupling of a rate-theory module aimed at simulating the evolution of the size distribution of defect-solute clusters with a hardening module aimed at predicting the yield stress increase. The scope of the investigation consists in the development and validation of corresponding numerical tools. In order to validate these tools, the output of representative simulations is compared with results from small-angle neutron scattering experiments and tensile tests performed for neutron-irradiated RPV steels. Using the developed rate-theory module it is possible to simulate the evolution of size, concentration and composition of mixed Cu-vacancy clusters over the relevant ranges of size up to 10.000 atoms and time up to tens of years. The connection between the rate-theory model and hardening is based upon both the mean spacing and the strength of obstacles for dislocation glide. As a result of the validation procedure of the numerical tools, we have found that essential trends of the irradiation-induced yield stress increase of Cu-bearing and low-Cu RPV steels are displayed correctly. First ideas on how to take into account the effect of Ni on both cluster evolution and hardening are worked out.

  9. Irradiation induced tensile property change of SA 508 Cl. 3 reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Hong, Jun Hwa; Kuk, Il Hiun

    1998-01-01

    Irradiation induced tensile property change of four kinds of reactor pressure vessel steels manufactured by different steel refining process was compared based on the differences in the miniature tensile specimen tests were conducted for mechanical property measurement and optical microscope (OM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were used for microstructural characterization. Specimens were irradiated to a neutron fluence of 2.7 x 10 19 n/cm 2 (E ≥ 1 MeV) at 288 deg C. Investigation on the unirradiated microstructures showed largely a same microstructure in that tempered acicular bainite and ferrite with bainitic phase prevailing in the unirradiated condition. Ban-shaped segregations were also clearly observed except a kind of materials. A large difference in the unirradiated microstructure appeared in the grain size and carbide microstructure. Of carbide microstructures, noticeable differences were observed in the size and distribution of cementite, and bainitic lath microstructures. No noticeable changes were observed in the optical and thin film TEM microstructures after irradiation. Complicated microstructural state of heat treated bainitic low alloy microstructure prevents easy quantification of microstructural changes due to irradiation. Apparent differences, however, were observed in the results of mechanical testing. Results of tensile testing and hardness measurement show that a steel refined by vacuum carbon deoxidation (VCD) method exhibits the highest radiation hardening behavior. Some of mechanical testing results on irradiated materials were possible to understand based on the initial microstructure, but further investigations using a wide array of sophisticated tools (for example, SANS, APFIM) are required to understand and characterize irradiation induced defects that are responsible for irradiation hardening behavior but are not revealed by conventional TEM. (author)

  10. Blue light irradiation-induced oxidative stress in vivo via ROS generation in rat gingival tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ayaka; Shiotsu-Ogura, Yukako; Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Takahashi, Shun-suke; Toyama, Toshizo; Yoshino, Fumihiko

    2015-10-01

    It has been reported that oxidative stress with reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is induced by blue light irradiation to a living body. Only limited research has been reported in dental field on the dangers of blue light, mostly focusing on cytotoxicity associated with heat injury of dental pulp. We thus performed an in vivo study on oral tissue exposed to blue light. ROS generated upon blue light irradiation of flavin adenine dinucleotide were measured by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. After blue light irradiation, the palatal gingiva of Wistar rats were isolated. Collected samples were subjected to biochemical analysis of lipid peroxidation and glutathione. Singlet oxygen was generated by blue light irradiation, but was significantly quenched in an N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) concentration-dependent manner. Blue light significantly accelerated oxidative stress and increased the oxidized glutathione levels in gingival tissue. These effects were also inhibited by NAC pre-administration. The results suggest that blue light irradiation at clinical levels of tooth bleaching treatment may enhance lipid peroxidation by the induction of oxidative stress and the consumption of a significant amount of intracellular glutathione. In addition, NAC might be an effective supplement for the protection of oral tissues against blue light irradiation-induced oxidative damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Irreversible thermodynamics models and constitutive equations of the irradiation induced deformation and damage accumulating processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wassilew, C.

    1989-11-01

    This report gives an overall evaluation of several in-reactor deformation and creep-rupture experiments performed in BR-2, FFTF, and Rapsodie on pressurised tubes of the stabilized austenitic stainless steels 1.4970, 1.4981, 1.4988, and the nickel base alloy Hastelloy-X. The irradiation induced deformation processes observed in the components operating in a neutron environment can be divided into two main groups: 1. volume conserving creep and 2. volumetric swelling. Since the observed deformation as well as damage accumulating phenomena are caused by the same constrained generated and free disposable point defects and helium atoms, it is obvious and advisable to analyze, and to model simultaneously the ensemble of the elementary mechanisms and processes effective at the same time. Phenomenological models based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes have been developed, with the aim of: 1. grasping the partial relationships between the external variables and the response functions (creep, swelling, creep driven swelling, and time to rupture), 2. fathoming the rate-controlling mechanisms, 3. providing insight into the structural details and changes occurring during the deformation and the damage accumulating processes, 4. integrating the damage accumulating processes comprehensively, and 5. formulating the constitutive equations required to describe the elementary processes that generate plastic deformations as well as damage accumulation. (orig./MM)

  12. γ-irradiation-induced mortality: protective effect of protease inhibitors in chickens and mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palladino, M.A.; Galton, J.E.; Troll, W.; Thorbecke, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    Chickens (Gallus domesticus) were protected from the acute γ-irradiation-induced mortality (within 24 hours) by the proteolytic enzyme inhibitors, soy-bean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI), lima bean inhibitor (LBTI), antipain, α-N-benzoyl-L-arginine ethyl ester HCl (BAEE), trasylol, and leupeptin. Several other enzyme inhibitors, p-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester HCl (TAME), α-tosyl-lysyl-chloromethyl ketone HCl (TLCK) and epsilon-amino caproic acid (EACA), did not protect. EACA even increased the mortality caused by γ-irradiation. The pattern of protective enzyme inhibitors suggests involvement of a kallikrein-like enzyme. SBTI and antipain also protected against low range lethal γ-irradiation exposures, 690 R in BALB/c and 880 R in SJL/J mice. It is suggested that enhanced vascular permeability, which in chickens is known to be the cause of the irradiation mortality during the first 24 hours, may also contribute to the mortality in mice during the first week after irradiation. (author)

  13. Measurements of near-ultimate strength for multiwalled carbon nanotubes and irradiation-induced crosslinking improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bei; Locascio, Mark; Zapol, Peter; Li, Shuyou; Mielke, Steven L; Schatz, George C; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2008-10-01

    The excellent mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes are being exploited in a growing number of applications from ballistic armour to nanoelectronics. However, measurements of these properties have not achieved the values predicted by theory due to a combination of artifacts introduced during sample preparation and inadequate measurements. Here we report multiwalled carbon nanotubes with a mean fracture strength >100 GPa, which exceeds earlier observations by a factor of approximately three. These results are in excellent agreement with quantum-mechanical estimates for nanotubes containing only an occasional vacancy defect, and are approximately 80% of the values expected for defect-free tubes. This performance is made possible by omitting chemical treatments from the sample preparation process, thus avoiding the formation of defects. High-resolution imaging was used to directly determine the number of fractured shells and the chirality of the outer shell. Electron irradiation at 200 keV for 10, 100 and 1,800 s led to improvements in the maximum sustainable loads by factors of 2.4, 7.9 and 11.6 compared with non-irradiated samples of similar diameter. This effect is attributed to crosslinking between the shells. Computer simulations also illustrate the effects of various irradiation-induced crosslinking defects on load sharing between the shells.

  14. Solar ultraviolet irradiation induces decorin degradation in human skin likely via neutrophil elastase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Xia, Wei; Liu, Ying; Remmer, Henriette A; Voorhees, John; Fisher, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of human skin to solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induces matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) activity, which degrades type I collagen fibrils. Type I collagen is the most abundant protein in skin and constitutes the majority of skin connective tissue (dermis). Degradation of collagen fibrils impairs the structure and function of skin that characterize skin aging. Decorin is the predominant proteoglycan in human dermis. In model systems, decorin binds to and protects type I collagen fibrils from proteolytic degradation by enzymes such as MMP-1. Little is known regarding alterations of decorin in response to UV irradiation. We found that solar-simulated UV irradiation of human skin in vivo stimulated substantial decorin degradation, with kinetics similar to infiltration of polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells. Proteases that were released from isolated PMN cells degraded decorin in vitro. A highly selective inhibitor of neutrophil elastase blocked decorin breakdown by proteases released from PMN cells. Furthermore, purified neutrophil elastase cleaved decorin in vitro and generated fragments with similar molecular weights as those resulting from protease activity released from PMN cells, and as observed in UV-irradiated human skin. Cleavage of decorin by neutrophil elastase significantly augmented fragmentation of type I collagen fibrils by MMP-1. Taken together, these data indicate that PMN cell proteases, especially neutrophil elastase, degrade decorin, and this degradation renders collagen fibrils more susceptible to MMP-1 cleavage. These data identify decorin degradation and neutrophil elastase as potential therapeutic targets for mitigating sun exposure-induced collagen fibril degradation in human skin.

  15. Irradiation induced defects containing oxygen atoms in germanium crystal as studied by deep level transient spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuoka, Noboru; Kambe, Yoshiyuki; Saito, Haruo; Matsuda, Koji.

    1984-05-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy was applied to the electron trapping levels which are associated with the irradiation induced lattice defects in germanium crystals. The germanium crystals used in the study were doped with oxygen, antimony or arsenic and the defects were formed by electron irradiation of 1.5MeV or 10MeV. The nature of so called ''thermal defect'' formed by heat treatment at about 670K was also studied. The trapping levels at Esub(c)-0.13eV, Esub(c)-0.25eV and Esub(c)-0.29eV were found to be associated with defects containing oxygen atoms. From the experimental results the Esub(c)-0.25eV level was attributed to the germanium A-center (interstitial oxygen atom-vacancy pair). Another defect associated with the 715cm -1 infrared absorption band was found to have a trapping level at the same position at Esub(c)-0.25eV. The Esub(c)-0.23eV and Esub(c)-0.1eV levels were revealed to be associated with thermal donors formed by heat treatment at about 670K. Additional two peaks (levels) were observed in the DLTS spectrum. The annealing behavior of the levels suggests that the thermal donors originate from not a single type but several types of defects. (author)

  16. Irradiation-induced structure and property changes in tokamak plasma-facing, carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.

    1994-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma-facing components because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce large neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from two irradiation experiments are reported and discussed here. Carbon-carbon composite materials were irradiated in target capsules in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 4.7 displacements per atom (dpa) at 600 degree C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included uni-directional, two-directional, and three-directional carbon-carbon composites. Dimensional changes are reported for the composite materials and are related to single crystal dimensional changes through fiber and composite structural models. Moreover, the irradiation-induced dimensional changes are reported and discussed in terms of their architecture, fiber type, and graphitization temperature. The effect of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of two three-directional, carbon-carbon composites is reported and the recovery of thermal conductivity due to thermal annealing is discussed

  17. Measurements of near-ultimate strength for multiwalled carbon nanotubes and irradiation-induced crosslinking improvements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, B.; Locascio, M.; Zapol, P.; Li, S.; Mielke, S. L.; Schatz, G. C.; Espinosa, H. D.; Northwestern Univ.

    2008-01-01

    The excellent mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes are being exploited in a growing number of applications from ballistic armour to nanoelectronics. However, measurements of these properties have not achieved the values predicted by theory due to a combination of artifacts introduced during sample preparation and inadequate measurements. Here we report multiwalled carbon nanotubes with a mean fracture strength >100 GPa, which exceeds earlier observations by a factor of approximately three. These results are in excellent agreement with quantum-mechanical estimates for nanotubes containing only an occasional vacancy defect, and are {approx}80% of the values expected for defect-free tubes. This performance is made possible by omitting chemical treatments from the sample preparation process, thus avoiding the formation of defects. High-resolution imaging was used to directly determine the number of fractured shells and the chirality of the outer shell. Electron irradiation at 200 keV for 10, 100 and 1,800 s led to improvements in the maximum sustainable loads by factors of 2.4, 7.9 and 11.6 compared with non-irradiated samples of similar diameter. This effect is attributed to crosslinking between the shells. Computer simulations also illustrate the effects of various irradiation-induced crosslinking defects on load sharing between the shells.

  18. Measurements of near-ultimate strength for multiwalled carbon nanotubes and irradiation-induced crosslinking improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, B.; Locascio, M.; Zapol, P.; Li, S.; Mielke, S.L.; Schatz, G.C.; Espinosa, H.D.

    2008-01-01

    The excellent mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes are being exploited in a growing number of applications from ballistic armour to nanoelectronics. However, measurements of these properties have not achieved the values predicted by theory due to a combination of artifacts introduced during sample preparation and inadequate measurements. Here we report multiwalled carbon nanotubes with a mean fracture strength >100 GPa, which exceeds earlier observations by a factor of approximately three. These results are in excellent agreement with quantum-mechanical estimates for nanotubes containing only an occasional vacancy defect, and are ∼80% of the values expected for defect-free tubes. This performance is made possible by omitting chemical treatments from the sample preparation process, thus avoiding the formation of defects. High-resolution imaging was used to directly determine the number of fractured shells and the chirality of the outer shell. Electron irradiation at 200 keV for 10, 100 and 1,800 s led to improvements in the maximum sustainable loads by factors of 2.4, 7.9 and 11.6 compared with non-irradiated samples of similar diameter. This effect is attributed to crosslinking between the shells. Computer simulations also illustrate the effects of various irradiation-induced crosslinking defects on load sharing between the shells.

  19. Continuous in-situ measurements of fission fragment irradiation induced void swelling in Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefakis, H.

    1980-01-01

    A novel simulation technique has been developed to study the early stages of irradiation induced void formation in metals. The technique makes use of fission fragment irradiation produced by doping with 235 U and irradiating in a thermal neutron flux under highly controlled irradiation-environmental conditions. Employment of a computer and a high temperature radiation resistant LVDT resulted in a high volumetric sensitivity and the production of continuous, in-situ void swelling data for bulk specimens. Results for Ni, used as a test-metal served to corroborate the technique in a number of ways including comparisons with (a) reactor data, (b) direct post-irradiation specimen length measurements and (c) TEM examinations of irradiated samples. The technique has several unique advantages and, in conjunction with other conventional methods, it offers the possibility of detailed evaluation of void nucleation and growth theories. In view of the present results no definitive answer may be given on the issue of the incubation period while checks with two theoretical models have yielded an order-of-magnitude agreement

  20. Irradiation-induced defects in graphite and glassy carbon studied by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, M.; Kajino, M.; Kuwahara, H.; Yamaguchi, S.; Kuramoto, E.; Takenaka, M.

    1992-01-01

    ACAR and positron lifetime measurements have been made on, HOPG, isotropic fine-grained graphites, glassy carbons and C 60 /C 70 . HOPG showed a marked bimodal ACAR distribution along the c-axis. By irradiation of 1.0 X 10 19 fast neutrons/cm 2 remarkable narrowing in the ACAR curves and disappearance of the bimodal distribution were observed. Lifetime in HOPG increased from 225 psec to 289 psec (positron-lifetime in vacancies and their small clusters) by the irradiation. The irradiation on isotropic graphites and glassy carbons, however, gave slight narrowing in ACAR curves and decrease in lifetimes (360 psec → 300psec). This suggests irradiation-induced vacancy trapping in crystallites. In C 60 /C 70 powder two lifetime components were detected: τ 1 =177psec, τ 2 =403psec (I 2 =58%). The former is less than the bulk lifetime of HOPG, while the latter being very close to lifetimes in the isotropic graphites and glassy carbons. This and recent 2D-ACAR study of HOPG surface [15] strongly suggest free and defect surface states around ''soccer ball'' cages

  1. Low energy helium ion irradiation induced nanostructure formation on tungsten surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ajlony, A.; Tripathi, J.K.; Hassanein, A.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the low energy helium ion irradiation induced surface morphology changes on tungsten (W) surfaces under extreme conditions. Surface morphology changes on W surfaces were monitored as a function of helium ion energy (140–300 eV), fluence (2.3 × 10 24 –1.6 × 10 25 ions m −2 ), and flux (2.0 × 10 20 –5.5 × 10 20 ion m −2 s −1 ). All the experiments were performed at 900° C. Our study shows significant effect of all the three ion irradiation parameters (ion flux, fluence, and energy) on the surface morphology. However, the effect of ion flux is more pronounced. Variation of helium ion fluence allows to capture the very early stages of fuzz growth. The observed fuzz growth and morphology changes were understood in the realm of various possible phenomena. The study has relevance and important impact in the current and future nuclear fusion applications. - Highlights: •Reporting formation of W nanostructure (fuzz) due to low energy He ion beam irradiation. •Observing the very early stages for the W-Fuzz formation. •Tracking the surface morphological evolution during the He irradiation. •Discussing in depth our observation and drawing a possible scenario that explain this phenomenon. •Studying various ions irradiation parameters such as flux, fluence, and ions energy.

  2. Low energy helium ion irradiation induced nanostructure formation on tungsten surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ajlony, A., E-mail: montaserajlony@yahoo.com; Tripathi, J.K.; Hassanein, A.

    2017-05-15

    We report on the low energy helium ion irradiation induced surface morphology changes on tungsten (W) surfaces under extreme conditions. Surface morphology changes on W surfaces were monitored as a function of helium ion energy (140–300 eV), fluence (2.3 × 10{sup 24}–1.6 × 10{sup 25} ions m{sup −2}), and flux (2.0 × 10{sup 20}–5.5 × 10{sup 20} ion m{sup −2} s{sup −1}). All the experiments were performed at 900° C. Our study shows significant effect of all the three ion irradiation parameters (ion flux, fluence, and energy) on the surface morphology. However, the effect of ion flux is more pronounced. Variation of helium ion fluence allows to capture the very early stages of fuzz growth. The observed fuzz growth and morphology changes were understood in the realm of various possible phenomena. The study has relevance and important impact in the current and future nuclear fusion applications. - Highlights: •Reporting formation of W nanostructure (fuzz) due to low energy He ion beam irradiation. •Observing the very early stages for the W-Fuzz formation. •Tracking the surface morphological evolution during the He irradiation. •Discussing in depth our observation and drawing a possible scenario that explain this phenomenon. •Studying various ions irradiation parameters such as flux, fluence, and ions energy.

  3. Effect of melatonin and time of administration on irradiation-induced damage to rat testes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Take

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ionizing irradiation on testes and the protective effects of melatonin were investigated by immunohistochemical and electron microscopic methods. Eighty-two adult male Wistar rats were divided into 10 groups. The rats in the irradiated groups were exposed to a sublethal irradiation dose of 8 Gy, either to the total body or abdominopelvic region using a 60Co source at a focus of 80 cm away from the skin in the morning or evening together with vehicle (20% ethanol or melatonin administered 24 h before (10 mg/kg, immediately before (20 mg/kg and 24 h after irradiation (10 mg/kg, all ip. Caspace-3 immunoreactivity was increased in the irradiated group compared to control (P < 0.05. Melatonin-treated groups showed less apoptosis as indicated by a considerable decrease in caspace-3 immunoreactivity (P < 0.05. Electron microscopic examination showed that all spermatogenic cells, especially primary spermatocytes, displayed prominent degeneration in the groups submitted to total body and abdominopelvic irradiation. However, melatonin administration considerably inhibited these degenerative changes, especially in rats who received abdominopelvic irradiation. Total body and abdominopelvic irradiation induced identical apoptosis and testicular damage. Chronobiological assessment revealed that biologic rhythm does not alter the inductive effect of irradiation. These data indicate that melatonin protects against total body and abdominopelvic irradiation. Melatonin was more effective in the evening abdominopelvic irradiation and melatonin-treated group than in the total body irradiation and melatonin-treated group.

  4. X-ray irradiation induced reversible resistance change in Pt/TiO2/Pt cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Seo Hyoung; Kim, Jungho; Phatak, Charudatta; D'Aquila, Kenneth; Kim, Seong Keun; Kim, Jiyoon; Song, Seul Ji; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Eastman, Jeffrey A; Freeland, John W; Hong, Seungbum

    2014-02-25

    The interaction between X-rays and matter is an intriguing topic for both fundamental science and possible applications. In particular, synchrotron-based brilliant X-ray beams have been used as a powerful diagnostic tool to unveil nanoscale phenomena in functional materials. However, it has not been widely investigated how functional materials respond to the brilliant X-rays. Here, we report the X-ray-induced reversible resistance change in 40-nm-thick TiO2 films sandwiched by Pt top and bottom electrodes, and propose the physical mechanism behind the emergent phenomenon. Our findings indicate that there exists a photovoltaic-like effect, which modulates the resistance reversibly by a few orders of magnitude, depending on the intensity of impinging X-rays. We found that this effect, combined with the X-ray irradiation induced phase transition confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, triggers a nonvolatile reversible resistance change. Understanding X-ray-controlled reversible resistance changes can provide possibilities to control initial resistance states of functional materials, which could be useful for future information and energy storage devices.

  5. Fe+ ion irradiation induced changes in structural and magnetic properties of iron films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Papamihail

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available 490keV Fe+ ion irradiation of 200nm thick Fe films was found to induce both structural and magnetic changes. Both, the lattice constant and the grain size increase as a function of dose and both properties follow the same power law. Irradiation induces a depth dependent magnetic profile consisting of two sublayers. The top Fe sublayer has a magnetic moment higher than that of the Fe before the irradiation whereas the bottom sublayer lower. The two sublayers are connected with the effects of Fe+ irradiation, i.e. the top sublayer with the depth in which mainly radiation damage occurs whereas the bottom one with the implantation of impinging Fe+ ions. The magnetic moments of the two sublayers have a non-monotonous variation with irradiation dose depicting a maximum for the top sublayer and a minimum for the bottom one at 96.2 dpa (‘displacements per atom’. The magnetic moment enhancement/reduction is discussed in relation with the atomic volume variation in the case of atom displacements and/or implantation effects.

  6. Effects of high-energy proton irradiation on the superconducting properties of Fe(Se,Te) thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylva, G.; Bellingeri, E.; Ferdeghini, C.; Martinelli, A.; Pallecchi, I.; Pellegrino, L.; Putti, M.; Ghigo, G.; Gozzelino, L.; Torsello, D.; Grimaldi, G.; Leo, A.; Nigro, A.; Braccini, V.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper we explore the effects of 3.5 MeV proton irradiation on Fe(Se,Te) thin films grown on CaF2. In particular, we carry out an experimental investigation with different irradiation fluences up to 7.30 · 1016 cm‑2 and different proton implantation depths, in order to clarify whether and to what extent the critical current is enhanced or suppressed, what are the effects of irradiation on the critical temperature, resistivity, and critical magnetic fields, and finally what is the role played by the substrate in this context. We find that the effect of irradiation on superconducting properties is generally small compared to the case of other iron-based superconductors. The irradiation effect is more evident on the critical current density Jc, while it is minor on the transition temperature Tc, normal state resistivity ρ, and on the upper critical field Hc2 up to the highest fluences explored in this work. In more detail, our analysis shows that when protons implant in the substrate far from the superconducting film, the critical current can be enhanced up to 50% of the pristine value at 7 T and 12 K; meanwhile, there is no appreciable effect on critical temperature and critical fields together with a slight decrease in resistivity. On the contrary, when the implantation layer is closer to the film–substrate interface, both critical current and temperature show a decrease accompanied by an enhancement of the resistivity and lattice strain. This result evidences that possible modifications induced by irradiation in the substrate may affect the superconducting properties of the film via lattice strain. The robustness of the Fe(Se,Te) system to irradiation-induced damage makes it a promising compound for the fabrication of magnets in high-energy accelerators.

  7. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alfred R

    2006-01-01

    Proton therapy has become a subject of considerable interest in the radiation oncology community and it is expected that there will be a substantial growth in proton treatment facilities during the next decade. I was asked to write a historical review of proton therapy based on my personal experiences, which have all occurred in the United States, so therefore I have a somewhat parochial point of view. Space requirements did not permit me to mention all of the existing proton therapy facilities or the names of all of those who have contributed to proton therapy. (review)

  8. On the diffusion process of irradiation-induced point defects in the stress field of a moving dislocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbach, E.

    1987-01-01

    The cellular model of a dislocation is used for an investigation of the time-dependent diffusion process of irradiation-induced point defects interacting with the stress field of a moving dislocation. An analytic solution is given taking into account the elastic interaction due to the first-order size effect and the stress-induced interaction, the kinematic interaction due to the dislocation motion as well as the presence of secondary neutral sinks. The results for the space and time-dependent point defect concentration, represented in terms of Mathieu-Bessel and Mathieu-Hankel functions, emphasize the influence of the parameters which have been taken into consideration. Proceeding from these solutions, formulae for the diffusion flux reaching unit length of the dislocation, which plays an important role with regard to void swelling and irradiation-induced creep, are derived

  9. Identification of irradiation treatment in processed food. Pt. 2. Evaluation of a SPE-method for analyzing irradiation induced hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, M.; Ammon, J.; Berg, H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with a solid phase extraction (SPE) method for the isolation of irradiation induced hydrocarbons which can replace the column chromatography described in the paragraph 35 LMBG (German Food Law) procedure L06.00-37. Using this new method, only a tenth of solvents and column material is necessary. The SPE method was a good as LC-LC-GC/FID or LC-LC-GC/MS in analyzing new or complex matrices like paprika or salmon. Additionally, it is fast, cheap and easy to perform. As far as we know, the detection of irradiation traetment in paprika powder by analyzing irradiation induced hydrocarbons has not been described before. The new method is a good alternative for the commonly used thermoluminescence procedure. (orig.) [de

  10. Irradiation-induced doping of Bismuth Telluride Bi2Te3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rischau, Carl Willem

    2014-01-01

    around the point of optimal compensation. This coexistence is explained by the formation of charge puddles due to spatial inhomogeneities in the distribution of defects and the associated charges. Moreover, it was shown that at both temperatures, the irradiation-induced defects lead to a strong decrease of the hole carrier concentration and the electron mobility so that a metal-insulator transition in terms of the Ioffe-Regel criterion can be achieved. However, the irradiation-induced changes of the carrier concentration are not sufficient to induce a Mott metal-insulator transition. The magnetoresistance measured in-situ during low temperature irradiation shows the presence of weak anti-localization, which might be a signature of the topologically protected surface states. (author)

  11. Irradiation-induced amorphization of Cd2Nb2O7 pyrochlore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meldrum, A.; White, C. W.; Keppens, V.; Boatner, L. A.; Ewing, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    Several investigations have recently been undertaken in order to achieve a more complete understanding of the radiation-damage mechanisms in A 2 B 2 O 7 pyrochlore-structure compounds. The present work represents the first systematic study of the irradiation-induced amorphization of a pyrochlore with A- and B-site cation valences of +2 and +5, respectively. Relatively large single crystals of Cd 2 Nb 2 O 7 were grown for these experiments. In situ ion-irradiation experiments were carried out in a transmission electron microscope in conjunction with ex situ Rutherford backscattering measurements of ion-irradiated Cd 2 Nb 2 O 7 single crystals. Cd 2 Nb 2 O 7 can be amorphized in situ by Ne or Xe ions at temperatures up to 480 and 620 K, respectively. At room temperature, the amorphization fluence was 36 times higher for 280 keV Ne + than for 1200 keV Xe 2+ , corresponding to a displacement dose that was higher by a factor of 3. Disordering of Cd and Nb over the available cation sites occurs at intermediate ion doses prior to amorphization. The temperature dependence of the amorphization dose is modeled, and the results are compared to those of a previous model. The bulk-sample Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) results were generally consistent with the in situ TEM measurements. Effects of crystallographic orientation and ion charge state had relatively little effect on the damage accumulation in bulk crystals. The RBS data are consistent with a defect-accumulation, cascade-overlap model of amorphization of Cd 2 Nb 2 O 7 , as are the in situ TEM observations

  12. Evaluation of radio-protective effect of melatonin on whole body irradiation induced liver tissue damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Alireza; Mihandoost, Ehsan; Ghobadi, Ghazale; Mohseni, Mehran; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Ionizing radiation interacts with biological systems to induce excessive fluxes of free radicals that attack various cellular components. Melatonin has been shown to be a direct free radical scavenger and indirect antioxidant via its stimulatory actions on the antioxidant system.The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant role of melatonin against radiation-induced oxidative injury to the rat liver after whole body irradiation. In this experimental study,thirty-two rats were divided into four groups. Group 1 was the control group, group 2 only received melatonin (30 mg/kg on the first day and 30 mg/kg on the following days), group 3 only received whole body gamma irradiation of 10 Gy, and group 4 received 30 mg/kg melatonin 30 minutes prior to radiation plus whole body irradiation of 10 Gy plus 30 mg/kg melatonin daily through intraperitoneal (IP) injection for three days after irradiation. Three days after irradiation, all rats were sacrificed and their livers were excised to measure the biochemical parameters malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH). Each data point represents mean ± standard error on the mean (SEM) of at least eight animals per group. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to compare different groups, followed by Tukey's multiple comparison tests (p<0.05). The results demonstrated that whole body irradiation induced liver tissue damage by increasing MDA levels and decreasing GSH levels. Hepatic MDA levels in irradiated rats that were treated with melatonin (30 mg/kg) were significantly decreased, while GSH levels were significantly increased, when compared to either of the control groups or the melatonin only group. The data suggest that administration of melatonin before and after irradiation may reduce liver damage caused by gamma irradiation.

  13. High-dose irradiation induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and developmental defects during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Jin Shim

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation (IR treatment induces a DNA damage response, including cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and apoptosis in metazoan somatic cells. Because little has been reported in germline cells, we performed a temporal analysis of the DNA damage response utilizing Drosophila oogenesis as a model system. Oogenesis in the adult Drosophila female begins with the generation of 16-cell cyst by four mitotic divisions of a cystoblast derived from the germline stem cells. We found that high-dose irradiation induced S and G2 arrests in these mitotically dividing germline cells in a grp/Chk1- and mnk/Chk2-dependent manner. However, the upstream kinase mei-41, Drosophila ATR ortholog, was required for the S-phase checkpoint but not for the G2 arrest. As in somatic cells, mnk/Chk2 and dp53 were required for the major cell death observed in early oogenesis when oocyte selection and meiotic recombination occurs. Similar to the unscheduled DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs generated from defective repair during meiotic recombination, IR-induced DSBs produced developmental defects affecting the spherical morphology of meiotic chromosomes and dorsal-ventral patterning. Moreover, various morphological abnormalities in the ovary were detected after irradiation. Most of the IR-induced defects observed in oogenesis were reversible and were restored between 24 and 96 h after irradiation. These defects in oogenesis severely reduced daily egg production and the hatch rate of the embryos of irradiated female. In summary, irradiated germline cells induced DSBs, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and developmental defects resulting in reduction of egg production and defective embryogenesis.

  14. Protective effect of Hippophae rhamnoides leaf extract on gamma irradiation induced clastogenecity in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, Anuradha; Prasad, Jagdish; Bala, Madhu

    2012-01-01

    Hippophae rhamnoides (sea buckthorn) is a plant belonging to Elaeagnaceae family and is distributed worldwide. It has variety of uses from nutritional food to pharmacological application. The study was aimed to analyse the extract from Hippophae rhamnoides leaves for their possible protective effects against the whole body 60 Co-a-irradiation. The study was performed on six groups of male mice i.e. untreated group, H. rhamnoides extract group, irradiated (2Gy), irradiated (3Gy), H. rhamnoides and irradiated (2Gy) and H. rhamnoides and irradiated (3Gy). In each group micronucleus test was performed utilising bone marrow and peripheral blood. The mice were sacrificed 30 hrs after treatment and analysed for the presence of micronuclei. In the present study, there was no significant increase in the frequency of either micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCEs) or normochromatic erythrocytes (NCE) in H. rhamnoides extract treated group over the negative control group of animals, indicating its non-clastogenic and non-toxic activity in the erythropoietic system. H. rhamnoides extract showed good anti-clastogenic activity against the a-irradiation induced clastogenecity in both the tissues i.e. bone marrow and peripheral blood by reducing the frequency of micronuclei. Also the administration of H. rhamnoides extract along with irradiation was slightly able to increase the frequency of PCE in bone marrow as well as in peripheral blood in comparison to the irradiated group (2Gy and 3Gy) indicating its ability to reduce the toxicity caused by irradiation in the erythropoietic system. Thus the results indicate the non-clastogenic effect of H. rhamnoides leaf extract and significant protective activity against 60 Co-a-irradiation suggesting its pharmacological significance for development of radioprotector. (author)

  15. Positron and positronium studies of irradiation-induced defects and microvoids in vitreous metamict silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, M.; Saneyasu, M.; Tabata, M.; Tang, Z.; Nagai, Y.; Chiba, T.; Ito, Y.

    2000-01-01

    To study irradiation-induced defects and structural microvoids in vitreous silica (v-SiO 2 ), positron lifetime, angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (ACAR), and electron spin resonance (ESR) were measured on v-SiO 2 and quartz (c-SiO 2 ) samples irradiated with fast neutrons up to a dose of 4.1x10 20 n/cm 2 . Two kinds of positron-trapping defects have been found to form in v-SiO 2 by fast neutron irradiation: type-I and type-II defects. Similar defects also appear in the irradiated c-SiO 2 , indicating that both the defects are common in v-SiO 2 and c-SiO 2 . The detailed annealing and photo-illumination studies of positron annihilation and ESR for these two defects suggest that the type-I defects are non-bridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHC), while the type-II defects are oxygen molecules which cannot be detected by ESR. Higher dose irradiation than 1.0x10 20 n/cm 2 causes c-SiO 2 to change to metamict (amorphous) phase (m-SiO 2 ). Positronium (Ps) atoms are found to form in microvoids with an average radius of about 0.3 nm in the v-SiO 2 and m-SiO 2 . This suggests that microvoids proved by Ps are structurally intrinsic open spaces and reflect the topologically disordered structure of these phases in the subnanometer scale

  16. The effect of mesenchymal stem cells on the p53 methylation in irradiation-induced thymoma in C57BL/6 mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai B Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: MSCs decrease the incidence of irradiation-induced thymoma, which may be mediated by improving thymus microenvironment and changing the methylation of p53 promoter, and subsequently maintaining genome′s stability.

  17. Irradiation induces a biphasic expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruebe, C.E.; Wilfert, F.; Palm, J.; Burdak-Rothkamm, S.; Ruebe, C.; Koenig, J.; Liu Li; Schuck, A.; Willich, N.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: the precise pathophysiological mechanisms of radiation-induced lung injury are poorly understood, but have been shown to correlate with dysregulation of different cytokines. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the time course of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-(TNF-)α, interleukin-(IL)-1α and IL-6 after whole-lung irradiation. Material and methods: the thoraces of C57BL/6J mice were irradiated with 12 Gy. Treated and control mice were sacrificed at 0.5, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 h, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 24 weeks post irradiation (p.i.). Real-time multiplex RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase polmyerase chain reaction) was established to evaluate the expression of TNF-α, IL-1α and IL-6 in the lung tissue of the mice. For histological analysis, lung tissue sections were stained by hematoxylin and eosin. Results: multiplex RT-PCR analysis revealed a biphasic expression of these pro-inflammatory cytokines in the lung tissue after irradiation. After an initial increase at 1 h p.i. for TNF-α and at 6 h p.i. for IL-1α and IL-6, the mRNA expression of these pro-inflammatory cytokines returned to basal levels (48 h, 72 h, 1 week, 2 weeks p.i.). During the pneumonic phase, TNF-α, IL-1α and IL-6 were significantly elevated and revealed their maximum at 8 weeks p.i. Histopathologic evaluation of the lung sections obtained within 4 weeks p.i. revealed only minor lung damage in 5-30% of the lung tissue. By contrast, at 8, 16, and 24 weeks p.i., 70-90% of the lung tissue revealed histopathologically detectable organizing alveolitis. Conclusion: irradiation induces a biphasic expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the lung. The initial transitory cytokine response occurred within the first hours after lung irradiation with no detectable histopathologic alterations. The second, more persistent cytokine elevation coincided with the onset of histologically discernible organizing acute pneumonitis. (orig.)

  18. Irradiation induces a biphasic expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruebe, C.E.; Wilfert, F.; Palm, J.; Burdak-Rothkamm, S.; Ruebe, C. [Dept. of Radiotherapy - Radiooncology, Saarland Univ., Homburg/Saar (Germany); Koenig, J. [Inst. of Medical Biometrics, Epidemiology and Medical Informatics, Saarland Univ., Homburg/Saar (Germany); Liu Li [Dept. of Radiotherapy - Radiooncology, Saarland Univ., Homburg/Saar (Germany); Cancer Center, Union Hospital Tongji Medical Coll., Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Schuck, A.; Willich, N. [Dept. of Radiotherapy - Radiooncology, Univ. of Muenster (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Background and purpose: the precise pathophysiological mechanisms of radiation-induced lung injury are poorly understood, but have been shown to correlate with dysregulation of different cytokines. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the time course of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-(TNF-){alpha}, interleukin-(IL)-1{alpha} and IL-6 after whole-lung irradiation. Material and methods: the thoraces of C57BL/6J mice were irradiated with 12 Gy. Treated and control mice were sacrificed at 0.5, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 h, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 24 weeks post irradiation (p.i.). Real-time multiplex RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase polmyerase chain reaction) was established to evaluate the expression of TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{alpha} and IL-6 in the lung tissue of the mice. For histological analysis, lung tissue sections were stained by hematoxylin and eosin. Results: multiplex RT-PCR analysis revealed a biphasic expression of these pro-inflammatory cytokines in the lung tissue after irradiation. After an initial increase at 1 h p.i. for TNF-{alpha} and at 6 h p.i. for IL-1{alpha} and IL-6, the mRNA expression of these pro-inflammatory cytokines returned to basal levels (48 h, 72 h, 1 week, 2 weeks p.i.). During the pneumonic phase, TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{alpha} and IL-6 were significantly elevated and revealed their maximum at 8 weeks p.i. Histopathologic evaluation of the lung sections obtained within 4 weeks p.i. revealed only minor lung damage in 5-30% of the lung tissue. By contrast, at 8, 16, and 24 weeks p.i., 70-90% of the lung tissue revealed histopathologically detectable organizing alveolitis. Conclusion: irradiation induces a biphasic expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the lung. The initial transitory cytokine response occurred within the first hours after lung irradiation with no detectable histopathologic alterations. The second, more persistent cytokine elevation coincided with the onset of histologically discernible organizing acute

  19. Polarized protons at the AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krisch, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    Various aspects of the project of modifying the Brookhaven AGS for the production of polarized proton beams are discussed. It is observed that pure spin state cross sections are of great importance in many investigations since differences between spin states are frequently significant. Financial and technical aspects of the modification of the Brookhaven accelerator are also discussed

  20. Melatonin may play a role in modulation of bax and bcl-2 expression levels to protect rat peripheral blood lymphocytes from gamma irradiation-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohseni, Mehran; Mihandoost, Ehsan; Shirazi, Alireza; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham; Bazzaz, Javad Tavakkoly; Ghazi-khansari, Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    The close relationship between free radicals effects and apoptosis process has been proved. Melatonin has been reported as a direct free radical scavenger. We investigated the capability of melatonin in the modification of radiation-induced apoptosis and apoptosis-associated upstream regulators expression in rat peripheral blood lymphocytes. Rats were irradiated with a single whole body Cobalt 60-gamma radiation dose of 8 Gy at a dose rate of 101 cGy/min with or without melatonin pretreatments at different concentrations of 10 and 100 mg/kg body weight. The rats were divided into eight groups of control, irradiation-only, vehicle-only, vehicle plus irradiation, 10 mg/kg melatonin alone, 10 mg/kg melatonin plus irradiation, 100 mg/kg melatonin alone and 100 mg/kg melatonin plus irradiation. Rats were given an intraperitoneal (IP) injection of melatonin or the same volume of vehicle alone 1 h prior to irradiation. Blood samples were taken 4, 24, 48 and 72 h after irradiation for evaluation of flow cytometric analysis of apoptotic lymphocytes using Annexin V/PI assay and measurement of bax and bcl-2 expression using quantitative real-time PCR (RT 2 qPCR). Irradiation-only and vehicle plus irradiation showed an increase in the percentage of apoptotic lymphocytes significantly different from control group (P < 0.01), while melatonin pretreatments in a dose-dependent manner reduced it as compared with the irradiation-only and vehicle plus irradiation groups (P < 0.01) in all time points. This reduced apoptosis by melatonin was related to the downregulation of bax, upregulation of bcl-2, and therefore reduction of bax/bcl-2 ratio. Our results suggest that melatonin in these doses may provide modulation of bax and bcl-2 expression as well as bax/bcl-2 ratio to protect rat peripheral blood lymphocytes from gamma irradiation-induced apoptosis.

  1. Mono and sequential ion irradiation induced damage formation and damage recovery in oxide glasses: Stopping power dependence of the mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mir, A.H.; Monnet, I.; Toulemonde, M.; Bouffard, S.; Jegou, C.; Peuget, S.

    2016-01-01

    Simple and complex borosilicate glasses were irradiated with single and double ion beams of light and heavy ions over a broad fluence and stopping power range. As a result of the heavy ion irradiation (U, Kr, Au), the hardness was observed to diminish and saturate after a decrease by 35 ± 1%. Unlike slow and swift heavy ion irradiation, irradiation with light ions (He,O) induced a saturation hardness decrease of 18 ± 1% only. During double ion beam irradiation; where glasses were first irradiated with a heavy ion (gold) and then by a light ion (helium), the light ion irradiation induced partial damage recovery. As a consequence of the recovery effect, the hardness of the pre-irradiated glasses increased by 10–15% depending on the chemical composition. These results highlight that the nuclear energy loss and high electronic energy loss (≥4 keV/nm) result in significant and similar modifications whereas light ions with low electronic energy loss (≤1 keV/nm) result in only mild damage formation in virgin glasses and recovery in highly pre-damaged glasses. These results are important to understand the damage formation and recovery in actinide bearing minerals and in glasses subjected to self-irradiation by alpha decays. - Highlights: • Behavior of glasses strongly depends on the electronic energy loss (Se) of the ions. • High Se (≥4 keV/nm) induces large changes in comparison to lower Se values. • Apart from mild damage formation, low Se causes recovery of pre-existing damage. • Alpha induced partial recovery of the damage would occur in nuclear waste glasses.

  2. Melatonin may play a role in modulation of bax and bcl-2 expression levels to protect rat peripheral blood lymphocytes from gamma irradiation-induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohseni, Mehran [Department of Radiology and Medical Physics, Faculty of Paramedicine, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mihandoost, Ehsan, E-mail: mihandoost.e@gmail.com [Department of Medical Radiation Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shirazi, Alireza [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sepehrizadeh, Zargham [Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bazzaz, Javad Tavakkoly [Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghazi-khansari, Mahmoud [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The close relationship between free radicals effects and apoptosis process has been proved. Melatonin has been reported as a direct free radical scavenger. We investigated the capability of melatonin in the modification of radiation-induced apoptosis and apoptosis-associated upstream regulators expression in rat peripheral blood lymphocytes. Rats were irradiated with a single whole body Cobalt 60-gamma radiation dose of 8 Gy at a dose rate of 101 cGy/min with or without melatonin pretreatments at different concentrations of 10 and 100 mg/kg body weight. The rats were divided into eight groups of control, irradiation-only, vehicle-only, vehicle plus irradiation, 10 mg/kg melatonin alone, 10 mg/kg melatonin plus irradiation, 100 mg/kg melatonin alone and 100 mg/kg melatonin plus irradiation. Rats were given an intraperitoneal (IP) injection of melatonin or the same volume of vehicle alone 1 h prior to irradiation. Blood samples were taken 4, 24, 48 and 72 h after irradiation for evaluation of flow cytometric analysis of apoptotic lymphocytes using Annexin V/PI assay and measurement of bax and bcl-2 expression using quantitative real-time PCR (RT{sup 2}qPCR). Irradiation-only and vehicle plus irradiation showed an increase in the percentage of apoptotic lymphocytes significantly different from control group (P < 0.01), while melatonin pretreatments in a dose-dependent manner reduced it as compared with the irradiation-only and vehicle plus irradiation groups (P < 0.01) in all time points. This reduced apoptosis by melatonin was related to the downregulation of bax, upregulation of bcl-2, and therefore reduction of bax/bcl-2 ratio. Our results suggest that melatonin in these doses may provide modulation of bax and bcl-2 expression as well as bax/bcl-2 ratio to protect rat peripheral blood lymphocytes from gamma irradiation-induced apoptosis.

  3. Ionizing irradiation induces apoptotic damage of salivary gland acinar cells via NADPH oxidase 1-dependent superoxide generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tateishi, Yoshihisa; Sasabe, Eri; Ueta, Eisaku; Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2008-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have important roles in various physiological processes. Recently, several novel homologues of the phagocytic NADPH oxidase have been discovered and this protein family is now designated as the Nox family. We investigated the involvement of Nox family proteins in ionizing irradiation-induced ROS generation and impairment in immortalized salivary gland acinar cells (NS-SV-AC), which are radiosensitive, and immortalized ductal cells (NS-SV-DC), which are radioresistant. Nox1-mRNA was upregulated by γ-ray irradiation in NS-SV-AC, and the ROS level in NS-SV-AC was increased to approximately threefold of the control level after 10 Gy irradiation. The increase of ROS level in NS-SV-AC was suppressed by Nox1-siRNA-transfection. In parallel with the suppression of ROS generation and Nox1-mRNA expression by Nox1-siRNA, ionizing irradiation-induced apoptosis was strongly decreased in Nox1-siRNA-transfected NS-SV-AC. There were no large differences in total SOD or catalase activities between NS-SV-AC and NS-SV-DC although the post-irradiation ROS level in NS-SV-AC was higher than that in NS-SV-DC. In conclusion, these results indicate that Nox1 plays a crucial role in irradiation-induced ROS generation and ROS-associated impairment of salivary gland cells and that Nox1 gene may be targeted for preservation of the salivary gland function from radiation-induced impairment

  4. Radiation stability of proton irradiated zirconium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yong; Dickerson, Clayton A.; Allen, Todd R.

    2009-01-01

    The use of zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for the deep burn (DB)-TRISO fuel as a replacement for the silicon carbide coating. The radiation stability of ZrC was studied using 2.6 MeV protons, across the irradiation temperature range from 600 to 900degC and to doses up to 1.75 dpa. The microstructural characterization shows that the irradiated microstructure is comprised of a high density of nanometer-sized dislocation loops, while no irradiation induced amorphization or voids are observed. The lattice expansion induced by point defects is found to increase as the dose increases for the samples irradiated at 600 and 800degC, while for the 900degC irradiation, a slight lattice contraction is observed. The radiation hardening is also quantified using a micro indentation technique for the temperature and doses studies. (author)

  5. Flux pinning by heavy-ion-irradiation induced linear defects in YBa2Cu3O7 epitaxial films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budhani, R.C.; Zhu, Y.; Suenaga, M.

    1992-01-01

    We report some transport measurements carried out to study flux pinning by heavy-ion-irradiation induced linear defects in Y 1 Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7 films. Our results show that in these in situ deposited films containing a large concentration of defects frozen-in at the time of film growth, a marginal enhancement in critical current density occurs when the density of linear defects 10 /cm 2 , and their diameter of the order of coherence length. This criterion is satisfied by Ag +21 ions. The damage due to Au +24 ions is much too severe to improve the J c

  6. Irradiation-induced changes in the subclavian and axillary arteries after radiotherapy for carcinoma of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kretschmer, G.; Niederle, B.; Polterauer, P.; Waneck, R.

    1986-01-01

    Three case reports are reviewed to illustrate the possibility of treating irradiation-induced lesions of the subclavian-brachial vascular segment (aneurysm and segmental occlusions) 14, 20, and 26 years after radical mastectomy and subsequent radiotherapy. All patients had an extraanatomic vein bypass graft from the carotid to the brachial artery crossing the shoulder near the acromioclavicular joint, with the advantage that the tissue changed by radiotherapy or infected by ulceration could be circumvented. There were no postoperative complications, with adequate function of the grafts (follow-up, 17, 24, and 20 months, respectively)

  7. protective effect of combined administration of isoflavones genistein and daidzein against irradiation -induced damage in female rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashry, O.M.

    2009-01-01

    The renewed interests in the search for plant-derived drugs in the field of alternative medicine necessitate further studies. the present work aimed to evaluate the efficacy of diet phyto estrogens such as diadzein and genistein on repairing oxidative damage and protecting calcium homeostatic system against radiation induced disorders in female rats. soybean isoflavones were orally administered in a dose of 9 mg/kg body wt/day for 21 and 26 days. irradiated animals received diadzein and genistein for 11 consecutive days before exposing female rats to 6 Gy gamma irradiation and continued to receive soybean isoflavones until sacrificed 10 and 15 days post irradiation . Irradiation induced significant decrease in white blood cells(WBCs), red blood cells (RBCs), haemoglobin (HB), haematocrit (Ht %), glutathione (GSH), calcium (CA) and estradiol, while it induced significant elevation in serum malondialdehyde(MDA), inorganic phosphorus, thyroxine 3 (T 3 ) and thyroxine 4 (T 4 ), 10 and 15 days post -irradiation . diadzein and genistein treatment before and through irradiation accelerated the recovery of circulating WBCs and RBCs, elevated HB, Hct % GSH meanwhile hindered the depression in CA. Soy isoflavones depressed MDA and ameliorated the increase in T 3 , T 4 and elevated estradiol and phosphorus levels 10 and 15 days post irradiation. the results recommend combined treatment with genistein and daidzein to mitigate irradiation-induced damage and bon loss and suggest clinical application of these isoflavones in radiotherapy

  8. Effect of Artocarpus communis Extract on UVB Irradiation-Induced Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Hairless Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Lin Yen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Administration of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents is an effective strategy for preventing ultraviolet (UV irradiation-induced skin damage. Artocarpus communis possesses several pharmacological activities, such as antioxidant, anticancer and anti-inflammation. However, the photoprotective activity of methanol extract of A. communis heartwood (ACM in ultraviolet irradiation-induced skin damage has not yet been investigated. The present study was performed using ultraviolet absorption, histopathological observation, antioxidant and anti-inflammation assays to elucidate the mechanism of the photoprotective activity of ACM. Our results indicated that ACM displayed a UVA and UVB absorption effect and then effectively decreased scaly skin, epidermis thickness and sunburn cells during ultraviolet irradiation in hairless mice. ACM not only decreased ultraviolet irradiation-mediated oxidative stress, including lowering the overproduction of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation (p < 0.05, but also reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin 1β. Additionally, ACM can decrease the synthesis of cytosolic phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenase, inducible nitric oxide synthase and vascular cell adhesion molecular-1 via inhibiting TNF-α-independent pathways (p < 0.05 in UVB-mediated inflammation and formation of sunburn cells. Consequently, we concluded that ACM extract has a photoprotective effect against UVB-induced oxidative stress and inflammation due to its sunscreen property, and its topical formulations may be developed as therapeutic and/or cosmetic products in further studies.

  9. Irradiation-induced precipitates in a neutron irradiated 304 stainless steel studied by three-dimensional atom probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyama, T., E-mail: ttoyama@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Narita-cho 2145-2, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nozawa, Y. [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Narita-cho 2145-2, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Van Renterghem, W. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Matsukawa, Y.; Hatakeyama, M.; Nagai, Y. [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Narita-cho 2145-2, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Al Mazouzi, A. [EDF R and D, Avenue des Renardieres Ecuelles, 77818 Moret sur Loing Cedex (France); Van Dyck, S. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > Irradiation-induced precipitates in a 304 stainless steel were investigated by three-dimensional atom probe. > The precipitates were found to be {gamma}' precipitates (Ni{sub 3}Si). > Post-irradiation annealing was performed to discuss the contribution of the precipitates to irradiation-hardening. - Abstract: Irradiation-induced precipitates in a 304 stainless steel, neutron-irradiated to a dose of 24 dpa at 300 deg. C in the fuel wrapper plates of a commercial pressurized water reactor, were investigated by laser-assisted three-dimensional atom probe. A high number density of 4 x 10{sup 23} m{sup -3} of Ni-Si rich precipitates was observed, which is one order of magnitude higher than that of Frank loops. The average diameter was {approx}10 nm and the average chemical composition was 40% Ni, 14% Si, 11% Cr and 32% Fe in atomic percent. Over a range of Si concentrations, the ratio of Ni to Si was {approx}3, close to that of {gamma}' precipitate (Ni{sub 3}Si). In some precipitates, Mn enrichment inside the precipitate and P segregation at the interface were observed. Post-irradiation annealing was performed to discuss the contribution of the precipitates to irradiation-hardening.

  10. Effectiveness of trimethylopropane trimethacrylate for the electron-beam-irradiation-induced cross-linking of polylactic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Hon-Meng [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Genting Kelang, 53300 Setapak, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Bee, Soo-Tueen, E-mail: beest@utar.edu.my [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Genting Kelang, 53300 Setapak, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ratnam, C.T. [Radiation Processing Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Sin, Lee Tin; Phang, Yee-Yao; Tee, Tiam-Ting [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Genting Kelang, 53300 Setapak, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Rahmat, A.R. [Department of Polymer Engineering, Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Investigation of trimethylopropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) on electron beam irradiated PLA. • Irradiated PLA blends were weakened by incorporation of high amount of TMPTMA. • TMPTMA interacts with polymer free radicals to build crosslinking network. -- Abstract: The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of various loading levels of trimethylopropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) on the properties of polylactic acid (PLA) cross-linked via electron-beam irradiation. PLA was compounded with 3–5 wt.% of TMPTMA to induce cross-linking upon subjection to electron-beam irradiation doses of 25–250 kGy. The physical properties of the PLA samples were characterised by means of X-ray diffraction, gel fraction and scanning electron microscopy analyses on fractured surfaces after tensile tests. The presence of TMPTMA in PLA was found to effectively increase the crystallite size and gel fraction. However, higher loading levels of TMPTMA could compromise the properties of the PLA/TMPTMA samples, indicating that a larger amount of monomer free radicals might promote degradation within the substantially cross-linked amorphous phase. Irradiation-induced cross-linking in the samples could improve the cross-linking density while decreasing the elongation and interfering with the crystallisation. These effects are caused by the intensive irradiation-induced chain scission that is responsible for the deterioration of the mechanical and crystalline properties of the samples.

  11. Protective effect of gelatin and gelatin hydrolysate from salmon skin on UV irradiation-induced photoaging of mice skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tiejun; Hou, Hu; Lu, Jiaohan; Zhang, Kai; Li, Bafang

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of gelatin (SG) isolated from salmon skin and its hydrolysate (SGH) on photoaging skin, and the mechanism responsible for anti-photoaging. The average molecular weights of SG and SGH were 65 kDa and 873 Da, respectively. The amino acid compositions of SG and SGH were similar. Both of them were abundant in hydrophobic amino acids. Twenty-five peptides were identified from SGH. SG and SGH could improve UV irradiation-induced pathological changes of macroscopical tissue texture and skin morphology. Hydroxyproline content is an indicator of matrix collagen content, SG and SGH could inhibit the decrease of hydroxyproline content in photoaging skin in a dose dependent manner. In addition, SG and SGH could alleviate UV irradiation-induced oxidative damages to skin by increasing the activities of total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT), increasing the content of glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the content of malonaldehyde (MDA). Moreover, SG and SGH could enhance immune regulation system by increasing the thymus index. Thus, the anti-photoaging mechanisms of SG and SGH were by inhibiting the depletion of antioxidant defense components, involving in the synthesis of collagen and enhancing the function of immune system. Besides, SGH showed a better result in protecting skin from photoaging than SG.

  12. Electron-irradiation induced changes in structural and magnetic properties of Fe and Co based metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, S.N., E-mail: kane_sn@yahoo.com [School of Physics, D.A. University, Khandwa Road Campus, Indore 452001 (India); Satalkar, M., E-mail: satalkar.manvi@gmail.com [School of Physics, D.A. University, Khandwa Road Campus, Indore 452001 (India); Ghosh, A.; Shah, M. [School of Physics, D.A. University, Khandwa Road Campus, Indore 452001 (India); Ghodke, N. [UGC-DAE CSR, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452001 (India); Pramod, R.; Sinha, A.K.; Singh, M.N.; Dwivedi, J. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, P.O. CAT, Indore 452013 (India); Coisson, M.; Celegato, F.; Vinai, F.; Tiberto, P. [INRIM, Electromagnetism Division, Strada Delle Cacce 91, I-10135 TO (Italy); Varga, L.K. [RISSPO, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Enhancement of Ms by low electron irradiation dose in Fe-based alloy. • Variation of magnetic properties by electron irradiation induced ordered phase. • Electron irradiation alters TM-TM distance and, magnetic properties. - Abstract: Electron-irradiation induced changes in structural and, magnetic properties of Co{sub 57.6}Fe{sub 14.4}Si{sub 4.8}B{sub 19.2}Nb{sub 4}, Fe{sub 72}Si{sub 4.8}B{sub 19.2}Nb{sub 4} and, Co{sub 72}Si{sub 4.8}B{sub 19.2}Nb{sub 4} metallic glasses were studied using magnetic hysteresis and, synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements. Results reveal composition dependent changes of magnetic properties in electron irradiated metallic glasses. A low electron irradiation dose (15 kGy) enhances saturation magnetization (up to 62%) in Fe-based alloy (Fe{sub 72}Si{sub 4.8}B{sub 19.2}Nb{sub 4}). Synchrotron XRD measurements reveal that electron irradiation transforms the amorphous matrix to a more ordered phase, accountable for changes in magnetic properties.

  13. Effectiveness of trimethylopropane trimethacrylate for the electron-beam-irradiation-induced cross-linking of polylactic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Hon-Meng; Bee, Soo-Tueen; Ratnam, C.T.; Sin, Lee Tin; Phang, Yee-Yao; Tee, Tiam-Ting; Rahmat, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Investigation of trimethylopropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) on electron beam irradiated PLA. • Irradiated PLA blends were weakened by incorporation of high amount of TMPTMA. • TMPTMA interacts with polymer free radicals to build crosslinking network. -- Abstract: The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of various loading levels of trimethylopropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) on the properties of polylactic acid (PLA) cross-linked via electron-beam irradiation. PLA was compounded with 3–5 wt.% of TMPTMA to induce cross-linking upon subjection to electron-beam irradiation doses of 25–250 kGy. The physical properties of the PLA samples were characterised by means of X-ray diffraction, gel fraction and scanning electron microscopy analyses on fractured surfaces after tensile tests. The presence of TMPTMA in PLA was found to effectively increase the crystallite size and gel fraction. However, higher loading levels of TMPTMA could compromise the properties of the PLA/TMPTMA samples, indicating that a larger amount of monomer free radicals might promote degradation within the substantially cross-linked amorphous phase. Irradiation-induced cross-linking in the samples could improve the cross-linking density while decreasing the elongation and interfering with the crystallisation. These effects are caused by the intensive irradiation-induced chain scission that is responsible for the deterioration of the mechanical and crystalline properties of the samples

  14. Proton implantation effect on (SUS-316) stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, A.K.; Ishigami, R.; Kamal, I.

    2015-01-01

    Microstructural damage and nano hardness of the industrial grade stainless steel (SUS-316) have been studied under proton (H + ) implanted condition applying different doses at room temperature. The implantation scheme such as proton energy, fluence, irradiation time, and penetration depth in the target materials were estimated by Monte Carlo Simulation Code SRIM-2008. In the simulation, the parameters were chosen in such a way that the damage density (displacement per atom or dpa) would be uniform up to certain depth from the surface. X-ray diffraction study of the annealed samples prior to the proton implantation showed the austenitic fcc structure and no significant change was observed after proton implantation in it. Microstructural observation made by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) revealed that 1 dpa of proton-irradiation induced the structural damage extended up to 1 μm depth from the surface. The nano hardness study showed that the hardness level of the irradiated samples increased monotonically with the irradiation doses. Proton dose of 1 dpa caused 65% increment of hardness level on average in case of uniformly irradiated samples. It was realized that the increment of hardness was a consequence of microstructural damages caused by the formation of interstitial dislocation loops in the sample matrix keeping the lattice structure unaffected

  15. Proton minibeam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girst, Stefanie

    2016-03-08

    in the skin tissue, but with significantly increased doses (up to 5000 Gy) compared to the average dose of 2 Gy, which was applied homogeneously in further skin samples for comparison. Gaussian-shaped minibeams of even larger sizes (σ=260 μm and 520 μm, inter-beam distance 1.8 mm) were analyzed in further experiments to evaluate the effect of increasing beam sizes as in deeper-lying tissues. Acute side effects were quantified via the MTT tissue viability test and the release of inflammatory proteins into the culture medium and showed improved results for minibeam compared to homogeneous irradiation. Genetic damage, an indicator for secondary tumor induction, was analyzed via the micronucleus test in the epidermal keratinocytes and was less than half for minibeams up to 180 μm size compared to homogeneous fields. Increasing minibeam sizes, i.e. increasing fractions of irradiated skin (receiving a dose higher than the average dose of 2 Gy) increased the number of micronuclei per divided cell, but never exceeded the genetic damage induced by a homogeneous dose distribution. A more authentic and representative in-vivo skin model, accounting for higher complexity with blood vessels, further cell types, follicles, glands and especially a working immune system, was used in the next step to further examine the side effects of minibeam radiotherapy compared to homogeneous irradiation. The central part of the ear of adult BALB/c mice was irradiated with 20 MeV protons, using an average dose of 60 Gy in a field of 7.2 x 7.2 mm{sup 2}. The 4 x 4 minibeams of nominal 6000 Gy had a size of 180 x 180 μm{sup 2} and inter-beam distances of 1.8 mm, as in previous in-vitro skin experiments. Minibeam irradiation induced no ear swelling or other visible skin reaction at any time, while significant ear swelling (up to 4-fold), skin reddening (erythema) and desquamation developed in homogeneously irradiated ears 3-4 weeks after irradiation. Loss of hair and sebaceous glands only

  16. Low energy electron irradiation induced carbon etching: Triggering carbon film reacting with oxygen from SiO{sub 2} substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Cheng [Institute of Nanosurface Science and Engineering (INSE), Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education and Guangdong Province, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Wang, Chao, E-mail: cwang367@szu.edu.cn, E-mail: dfdiao@szu.edu.cn; Diao, Dongfeng, E-mail: cwang367@szu.edu.cn, E-mail: dfdiao@szu.edu.cn [Institute of Nanosurface Science and Engineering (INSE), Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China)

    2016-08-01

    We report low-energy (50–200 eV) electron irradiation induced etching of thin carbon films on a SiO{sub 2} substrate. The etching mechanism was interpreted that electron irradiation stimulated the dissociation of the carbon film and SiO{sub 2}, and then triggered the carbon film reacting with oxygen from the SiO{sub 2} substrate. A requirement for triggering the etching of the carbon film is that the incident electron penetrates through the whole carbon film, which is related to both irradiation energy and film thickness. This study provides a convenient electron-assisted etching with the precursor substrate, which sheds light on an efficient pathway to the fabrication of nanodevices and nanosurfaces.

  17. A 3D-RBS study of irradiation-induced deformation and masking properties of ordered colloidal nanoparticulate masks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolnai, Z.; Deak, A.; Nagy, N.; Toth, A.L.; Kotai, E.; Battistig, G.

    2010-01-01

    The 500 keV Xe 2+ irradiation-induced anisotropic deformation of ordered colloidal silica nanoparticulate masks is followed using 2 MeV 4 He + Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) with different measurement geometries and the improved data analysis capabilities of the RBS-MAST spectrum simulation code. The three-dimensional (3D) geometrical transformation from spherical to oblate ellipsoidal and polygonal shape and the decrease of the mask's hole size is described. The masking properties of the silica monolayer and the depth distribution of Xe in the underlying Si substrate vs. the irradiated Xe 2+ fluence are discussed. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) is applied as complementary characterization tool. Our results give contribution to clarify the impact of ion-nanoparticle interactions on the potentials and limits of nanosphere lithography. We also show the capability of the conventional RBS technique to characterize laterally ordered submicron-sized three-dimensional structures.

  18. Proton decay theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Topics include minimal SU(5) predictions, gauge boson mediated proton decay, uncertainties in tau/sub p/, Higgs scalar effects, proton decay via Higgs scalars, supersymmetric SU(5), dimension 5 operators and proton decay, and Higgs scalars and proton decay

  19. The evolution of interaction between grain boundary and irradiation-induced point defects: Symmetric tilt GB in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Qin, Yuan; Yang, Yingying; Yao, Man; Wang, Xudong; Xu, Haixuan; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2018-03-01

    Molecular dynamics method is used and scheme of calculational tests is designed. The atomic evolution view of the interaction between grain boundary (GB) and irradiation-induced point defects is given in six symmetric tilt GB structures of bcc tungsten with the energy of the primary knock-on atom (PKA) EPKA of 3 and 5 keV and the simulated temperature of 300 K. During the collision cascade with GB structure there are synergistic mechanisms to reduce the number of point defects: one is vacancies recombine with interstitials, and another is interstitials diffuse towards the GB with vacancies almost not move. The larger the ratio of the peak defect zone of the cascades overlaps with the GB region, the statistically relative smaller the number of surviving point defects in the grain interior (GI); and when the two almost do not overlap, vacancy-intensive area generally exists nearby GBs, and has a tendency to move toward GB with the increase of EPKA. In contrast, the distribution of interstitials is relatively uniform nearby GBs and is affected by the EPKA far less than the vacancy. The GB has a bias-absorption effect on the interstitials compared with vacancies. It shows that the number of surviving vacancies statistically has increasing trend with the increase of the distance between PKA and GB. While the number of surviving interstitials does not change much, and is less than the number of interstitials in the single crystal at the same conditions. The number of surviving vacancies in the GI is always larger than that of interstitials. The GB local extension after irradiation is observed for which the interstitials absorbed by the GB may be responsible. The designed scheme of calculational tests in the paper is completely applicable to the investigation of the interaction between other types of GBs and irradiation-induced point defects.

  20. Temper embrittlement, irradiation induced phosphorus segregation and implications for post-irradiation annealing of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, R.J.; English, C.A.; Foreman, A.J.; Gage, G.; Hyde, J.M.; Ray, P.H.N.; Vatter, I.A.

    1999-01-01

    Three steels designated JPB, JPC and JPG from the IAEA Phase 3 Programme containing two copper and phosphorus levels were pre- and post-irradiation Charpy and hardness tested in the as-received (AR), 1200 C/0.5h heat treated (HT) and heat treated and 450 C/2000h aged (HTA) conditions. The HT condition was designed to simulate coarse grained heat-affected zones (HAZ's) and showed a marked sensitivity to thermal ageing in all three alloys. Embrittlement after thermal ageing was greater in the higher phosphorus alloys JPB and JPG. Charpy shifts due to thermal ageing of between 118 and 209 C were observed and accompanied by pronounced intergranular fracture, due to phosphorus segregation. The irradiation embrittlement response was complex. The low copper alloys, JPC and JPB, in the HT and HTA condition exhibited significant irradiation induced Charpy shift but very low or even negative hardness changes indicating non-hardening embrittlement. The higher copper alloy, JPG, also exhibited irradiation hardening in line with its copper content. Fractographic and microchemical studies indicated irradiation induced phosphorus segregation and a transition from cleavage to intergranular failure at grain boundary phosphorus concentrations above a critical level. The enhanced grain boundary phosphorus level increased with dose in agreement with a kinetic segregation model developed at Harwell. The relevance of the thermal ageing studies to RPV Annealing for Plant-Life Extension was identified early in the program. It is of concern that annealing of RPV's has been performed, or is proposed, at temperatures in the range 425--475 C for periods of about 1 week (168h). Much attention has been given to the use of in-situ hardness measurements and machining miniature Charpy and tensile specimens from belt-line plate and weld materials. However, HAZ's, often containing higher phosphorus levels than the present materials, have largely been ignored. A post-irradiation annealing (PIA

  1. EFFICIENCY OF BORAGE SEEDS OIL AGAINST GAMMA IRRADIATION-INDUCED HEPATOTOXICITY IN MALE RATS: POSSIBLE ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattab, Hala A H; Abdallah, Inas Z A; Yousef, Fatimah M; Huwait, Etimad A

    2017-01-01

    Borage ( Borago officinal L.) is an annual herbaceous plant of great interest because its oil contains a high percentage of γ-linolenic acid (GLA). The present work was carried out to detect fatty acids composition of the oil extracted from borage seeds (BO) and its potential effectiveness against γ-irradiation- induced hepatotoxicity in male rats. GC-MS analysis of fatty acids methyl esters of BO was performed to identify fatty acids composition. Sixty rats were divided into five groups (12 rats each): Control, irradiated; rats were exposed to (6.5 Gy) of whole body γ-radiation, BO (50 mg/kg b.wt), irradiated BO post-treated and irradiated BO prepost-treated. Six rats from each group were sacrificed at two time intervals 7 and 15 days post-irradiation. Serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) levels, lipids profile, as well as serum and hepatic reduced glutathione (GSH) and lipid peroxide (malondialdehyde) (MDA) levels were assessed. Histopathological examination of liver sections were also carried out. The results showed that the high contents of BO extracted by cold pressing, were linoleic acid (34.23%) and GLA (24.79%). Also, oral administration of BO significantly improved serum levels of liver enzymes, lipids profile, as well as serum and hepatic GSH and MDA levels (p<0.001) as compared with irradiated rats after 15 days post irradiation. Moreover, it exerted marked amelioration against irradiation-induced histopathological changes in liver tissues. The improvement was more pronounced in irradiated BO prepost-treated group than irradiated BO post-treated. BO has a beneficial role in reducing hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by radiation exposure. Therefore, BO may be used as a beneficial supplement for patients during radiotherapy treatment.

  2. Electron beam irradiation induces abnormal development and the stabilization of p53 protein of American serpentine leafminer, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Hyun-Na; Yun, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Changmann [Department of Plant Medicine, College of Agriculture, Life and Environment Sciences, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gil-Hah, E-mail: khkim@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Plant Medicine, College of Agriculture, Life and Environment Sciences, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    The American serpentine leafminer fly, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), is one of the most destructive polyphagous pests worldwide. In this study, we determined electron beam doses for inhibition of normal development of the leaf miner and investigated the effect of electron beam irradiation on DNA damage and p53 stability. Eggs (0-24 h old), larvae (2nd instar), puparia (0-24 h old after pupariation) and adults (24 h after emergence) were irradiated with increasing doses of electron beam irradiation (six levels between 30 and 200 Gy). At 150 Gy, the number of adults that developed from irradiated eggs, larvae and puparia was lower than in the untreated control. Fecundity and egg hatchability decreased depending on the doses applied. Reciprocal crosses between irradiated and unirradiated flies demonstrated that males were more radiotolerant than females. Adult longevity was not affected in all stages. The levels of DNA damage in L. trifolii adults were evaluated using the alkaline comet assay. Our results indicate that electron beam irradiation increased levels of DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, low doses of electron beam irradiation led to the rapid appearance of p53 protein within 6 h; however, it decreased after exposure to high doses (150 Gy and 200 Gy). These results suggest that electron beam irradiation induced not only abnormal development and reproduction but also p53 stability caused by DNA damage in L. trifolii. We conclude that a minimum dose of 150 Gy should be sufficient for female sterilization of L. trifolii. - Highlights: > Electron beam irradiation inhibited normal development of the leaf miner. > Electron beam irradiation inhibited normal reproduction of the leaf miner. > Electron beam irradiation increased levels of DNA damage. > Electron beam irradiation induced p53 stability.

  3. Heavy ion irradiation induced effects in Ni3N/Al bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhar, S.; Rissanen, L.; Engel, K.; Wenderoth, M.; Lieb, K.P.

    2001-01-01

    The article reports on the Xe ion beam irradiation studies of Ni 3 N/Al bilayers at 80 K. The ion-induced modifications were monitored by Rutherford backscattering (RBS), resonant nuclear reaction analysis (RNRA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We found preferential loss of nitrogen from the surface region of the Ni 3 N top layers. The surface roughness Δσ S and the interface broadening variance Δσ int 2 increase linearly with the Xe ion fluence PHI. The experimental mixing rate of Δσ 2 /PHI=1.8 nm 4 is explained by considering an enhancement of ballistic mixing due to chemical reactions at the interface

  4. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jongen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Ideal radiotherapy deposits a large amount of energy in the tumour volume, and none in the surrounding healthy tissues. Proton therapy comes closer to this goal because of a greater concentration of dose, well defined proton ranges and points of energy release which are precisely known - the Bragg peak1. In the past, the development of clinical proton therapy has been hampered by complexity, size, and cost. To be clinically effective, energies of several hundred MeV are required; these were previously unavailable for hospital installations, and pioneering institutions had to work with complex, inadequate equipment originally intended for nuclear physics research. Recently a number of specialist organizations and commercial companies have been working on dedicated systems for proton therapy. One, IBA of Belgium, has equipment for inhouse hospital operation which encompasses a complete therapy centre, delivered as a turnkey package and incorporating a compact, automated, higher energy cyclotron with isocentric gantries. Their system will be installed at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. The proton therapy system comprises: - a 235 MeV isochronous cyclotron to deliver beams of up to 1.5 microamps, but with a hardware limitation to restrict the maximum possible dose; - variable energy beam (235 to 70 MeV ) with energy spread and emittance verification; - a beam transport and switching system to connect the exit of the energy selection system to the entrances of a number of gantries and fixed beamlines. Along the beam transport system, the beam characteristics are monitored with non-interceptive multiwire ionization chambers for automatic tuning; - gantries fitted with nozzles and beamline elements for beam control; both beam scattering and beam wobbling techniques are available for shaping the beam;

  5. Target irradiation induced bystander effects between stem-like and non stem-like cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yu [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kobayashi, Alisa [Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Maeda, Takeshi [Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Fu, Qibin [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Oikawa, Masakazu [Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yang, Gen, E-mail: gen.yang@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Konishi, Teruaki, E-mail: tkonishi@nirs.go.jp [Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Uchihori, Yukio [Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); and others

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Existence of radiation induced bystander effects (RIBE) between cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and non stem-like cancer cells (NSCCs) in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. • Existence of significant difference in generation and response of bystander signals between CSCs and NSCCs. • CSCs are significantly less sensitive to NO scavenger than that of NSCCs in terms of DNA double strand breaks induced by RIBE. - Abstract: Tumors are heterogeneous in nature and consist of multiple cell types. Among them, cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are suggested to be the principal cause of tumor metastasis, resistance and recurrence. Therefore, understanding the behavior of CSCs in direct and indirect irradiations is crucial for clinical radiotherapy. Here, the CSCs and their counterpart non stem-like cancer cells (NSCCs) in human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell line were sorted and labeled, then the two cell subtypes were mixed together and chosen separately to be irradiated via a proton microbeam. The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) between the CSCs and NSCCs was measured by imaging 53BP1 foci, a widely used indicator for DNA double strand break (DSB). CSCs were found to be less active than NSCCs in both the generation and the response of bystander signals. Moreover, the nitric oxide (NO) scavenger c-PTIO can effectively alleviate the bystander effect in bystander NSCCs but not in bystander CSCs, indicating a difference of the two cell subtypes in NO signal response. To our knowledge, this is the first report shedding light on the RIBE between CSCs and NSCCs, which might contribute to a further understanding of the out-of-field effect in cancer radiotherapy.

  6. Target irradiation induced bystander effects between stem-like and non stem-like cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yu; Kobayashi, Alisa; Maeda, Takeshi; Fu, Qibin; Oikawa, Masakazu; Yang, Gen; Konishi, Teruaki; Uchihori, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Existence of radiation induced bystander effects (RIBE) between cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and non stem-like cancer cells (NSCCs) in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. • Existence of significant difference in generation and response of bystander signals between CSCs and NSCCs. • CSCs are significantly less sensitive to NO scavenger than that of NSCCs in terms of DNA double strand breaks induced by RIBE. - Abstract: Tumors are heterogeneous in nature and consist of multiple cell types. Among them, cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are suggested to be the principal cause of tumor metastasis, resistance and recurrence. Therefore, understanding the behavior of CSCs in direct and indirect irradiations is crucial for clinical radiotherapy. Here, the CSCs and their counterpart non stem-like cancer cells (NSCCs) in human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell line were sorted and labeled, then the two cell subtypes were mixed together and chosen separately to be irradiated via a proton microbeam. The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) between the CSCs and NSCCs was measured by imaging 53BP1 foci, a widely used indicator for DNA double strand break (DSB). CSCs were found to be less active than NSCCs in both the generation and the response of bystander signals. Moreover, the nitric oxide (NO) scavenger c-PTIO can effectively alleviate the bystander effect in bystander NSCCs but not in bystander CSCs, indicating a difference of the two cell subtypes in NO signal response. To our knowledge, this is the first report shedding light on the RIBE between CSCs and NSCCs, which might contribute to a further understanding of the out-of-field effect in cancer radiotherapy

  7. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, Jan; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT)

  8. An Investigation on Irradiation-induced Grid Width Growth in Advanced Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Young Ki; Jeon, Kyeong Lak; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kim, Jae Ik; Hwang, Sun Tack; Kim, Man Su; Lee, Tae Hyoung; Yoo, Myeong Jong; Yoon, Yong Bae; Kim, Tae Wan

    2011-01-01

    The spacer grids for fuel assembly are fabricated from preformed Zircaloy or Inconel strips interlocked in an egg crate fashion and welded or brazed together. The spacer grid is the important component to maintain the fuel rod array by providing positive lateral restraint to the fuel rods but only frictional restraint to axial fuel rod motion. To improve economy and safety aspects, advanced nuclear fuels of PLUS7, 16ACE7 and 17ACE7 were developed. The former is for Optimized Power Reactor of 1000 MWe (OPR1000) and Advanced Power Reactor of 1400 MWe (APR1400) and the latter two are for 16x16 and 17x17 Westinghouse type reactors, respectively. The material for top and bottom spacer grids on these advanced fuels are Inconel and the mid grids are Zirlo patented by Westinghouse. For neutron economy, the fuel assemblies are arranged very closely and the gaps between assemblies are kept to around 1 mm based on the worst case. The Zirconium-based alloys grow during irradiation in reactor. The large growth may cause some difficulties in loading and unloading fuel assemblies during refueling outage in reactor. The severe growth may cause some problems that fuel assemblies may be stuck within the core shroud and a modification of loading pattern is required. In addition, the grid growth with grid spring relaxation may cause different rod vibration behavior and results in the different wear mechanism. The grid width growth on the advanced fuels were predicted by using the growth models before the irradiation in reactor and were examined using lead test assemblies (LTAs) after each cycle in Ulchin unit 3 and Kori units 2 and 3, respectively. To reconfirm irradiation performance results using LTAs, the additional examinations are being performed through the surveillance programs on the commercially supplied fuels in Yonggwang unit 5 and Kori units 2 and 4. It is investigated on this study whether the grid widths on the advanced fuels meet their criteria and the predicted models

  9. Anomalous effects in silicon solar cell irradiated by 1-MeV protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachare, R.; Anspaugh, B. E.

    1989-01-01

    Several silicon solar cells having thicknesses of approximately 63 microns, with and without back-surface fields (BSF), were irradiated with 1-MeV protons having fluences between 10 to the 10th and 10 to the 12th sq cm. The irradiations were performed using both normal and isotropic incidence on the rear surfaces of the cells. It was observed that after irradiation with fluences greater than 10 to the 11th protons/sq cm, all BSF cells degraded at a faster rate than cells without BSF. The irradiation results are analyzed using a model in which irradiation-induced defects in the BSF region are taken into account. Tentatively, it is concluded that an increase in defect density due to the formation of aluminum and proton complexes in BSF cells is responsible for the higher-power loss in the BSF cells compared to the non-BSF cells.

  10. Proton diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Besten, J.L.; Jamieson, D.N.; Allen, L.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Lindhard theory on ion channeling in crystals has been widely accepted throughout ion beam analysis for use in simulating such experiments. The simulations use a Monte Carlo method developed by Barret, which utilises the classical 'billiard ball' theory of ions 'bouncing' between planes or tubes of atoms in the crystal. This theory is not valid for 'thin' crystals where the planes or strings of atoms can no longer be assumed to be of infinite proportions. We propose that a theory similar to that used for high energy electron diffraction can be applied to MeV ions, especially protons, in thin crystals to simulate the intensities of transmission channeling and of RBS spectra. The diffraction theory is based on a Bloch wave solution of the Schroedinger equation for an ion passing through the periodic crystal potential. The widely used universal potential for proton-nucleus scattering is used to construct the crystal potential. Absorption due to thermal diffuse scattering is included. Experimental parameters such as convergence angle, beam tilt and scanning directions are considered in our calculations. Comparison between theory and experiment is encouraging and suggests that further work is justified. (authors)

  11. The dose, temperature, and projectile-mass dependence for irradiation-induced amorphization of CuTi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, J.; Okamoto, P.R.; Rehn, L.E.; Meshii, M.

    1989-01-01

    CuTi was irradiated with 1-MeV Ne + , Kr + , and Xe + in the temperature range from 150 to 563 K. The volume fraction of the amorphous phase produced during room temperature irradiation with Ne + and Kr + ions was determined as a function of ion dose from measurements of the integrated intensity of the diffuse ring in electron diffraction patterns. The results, analyzed by Gibbons' model, indicate that direct amorphization occurs along a single ion track with Kr + , but the overlapping of three ion tracks is necessary for amorphization with Ne + . The critical temperature for amorphization increases with increasing projectile mass from electron to Ne + to Kr + . However, the critical temperatures for Kr + and Xe + irradiations were found to be identical, and very close to the thermal crystallization temperature of an amorphous zone embedded in the crystalline matrix. Using the present observations, relationships between the amorphization kinetics and the displacement density along the ion track, and between the critical temperature and the stability of the irradiation-induced damage, are discussed

  12. Report on fundamental modeling of irradiation-induced swelling and creep in FeCrAl alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohnert, Aaron A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dasgupta, Dwaipayan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Linton, Kory D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-23

    In order to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactor (LWR) fuel, alternative cladding materials have been proposed to replace zirconium (Zr)-based alloys. Of these materials, there is a particular focus on iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys due to much slower oxidation kinetics in high-temperature steam than Zr-alloys. This should decrease the energy release due to oxidation and allow the cladding to remain integral longer in the presence of high temperature steam, making accident mitigation more likely. As a continuation of the development for these alloys, the material response must be demonstrated to provide suitable radiation stability, in order to ensure that there will not be significant dimensional changes (e.g., swelling), as well as quantifying the radiation hardening and radiation creep behavior. In this report, we describe the use of cluster dynamics modeling to evaluate the defect physics and damage accumulation behavior of FeCrAl alloys subjected to neutron irradiation, with a particular focus on irradiation-induced swelling and defect fluxes to dislocations that are required to model irradiation creep behavior.

  13. Role of L-carnitine in Ameliorating the Cadmium Chloride and/or Irradiation-Induced Testicular Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan, L.A.

    2003-01-01

    The role of oxidative stress in chronic administration of CdCl2 and/or irradiation toxicity and its prevention by pretreatment with L-carnitine was investigated. Adult male rats were administered with CdCl2 (3 mg/kg S.C. three times a week for three weeks) and /or irradiated at (2 Gy) dose level of gamma radiation. CdCl2 administration and/or irradiation induced cellular damage was indicated by significant decrease in lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme (LDH-X), glutathione level (GSH) and glutathione peroxidase enzyme activity (GSH-PX) as well as significant increase in malonaldehyde (MDA) in testicular tissues. Administration of L-carnitine (200 mg/kg I.P.) 1 hr before CdCl2 and/or irradiation, ameliorated the decrease in LDH-X, GSH and GSH-PX and the increase in MDA induced by CdCl2 and/or irradiation indicating the prophylactic action of L-carnitine on CdCl2 and /or irradiation toxicity. Various studies have indicated that cadmium is a potent heavy metal carcinogen in experimental animals (Poirier et al., 1983 and Waalkes et al..,1988) and is possibly carcinogenic in human populations exposed either occupationally or environmentally (Bako et al., 1982). Target sites for cadmium carcinogenesis in rodents have been shown to include testes after parenteral exposure (Poirier et al., 1983 and Waalkes et al., 1988) and lung after chronic inhalation (Takenaka et al., 1983)

  14. Primary and aggregate color centers in proton irradiated LiF crystals and thin films for luminescent solid state detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccinini, M; Ambrosini, F; Ampollini, A; Bonfigli, F; Libera, S; Picardi, L; Ronsivalle, C; Vincenti, M A; Montereali, R M

    2015-01-01

    Proton beams of 3 MeV energy, produced by the injector of a linear accelerator for proton therapy, were used to irradiate at room temperature lithium fluoride crystals and polycrystalline thin films grown by thermal evaporation. The irradiation fluence range was 10 11 -10 15 protons/cm 2 . The proton irradiation induced the stable formation of primary and aggregate color centers. Their formation was investigated by optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The F 2 and F 3 + photoluminescence intensities, carefully measured in LiF crystals and thin films, show linear behaviours up to different maximum values of the irradiation fluence, after which a quenching is observed, depending on the nature of the samples (crystals and films). The Principal Component Analysis, applied to the absorption spectra of colored crystals, allowed to clearly identify the formation of more complex aggregate defects in samples irradiated at highest fluences. (paper)

  15. Primary and aggregate color centers in proton irradiated LiF crystals and thin films for luminescent solid state detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinini, M.; Ambrosini, F.; Ampollini, A.; Bonfigli, F.; Libera, S.; Picardi, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; Vincenti, M. A.; Montereali, R. M.

    2015-04-01

    Proton beams of 3 MeV energy, produced by the injector of a linear accelerator for proton therapy, were used to irradiate at room temperature lithium fluoride crystals and polycrystalline thin films grown by thermal evaporation. The irradiation fluence range was 1011-1015 protons/cm2. The proton irradiation induced the stable formation of primary and aggregate color centers. Their formation was investigated by optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The F2 and F3+ photoluminescence intensities, carefully measured in LiF crystals and thin films, show linear behaviours up to different maximum values of the irradiation fluence, after which a quenching is observed, depending on the nature of the samples (crystals and films). The Principal Component Analysis, applied to the absorption spectra of colored crystals, allowed to clearly identify the formation of more complex aggregate defects in samples irradiated at highest fluences.

  16. Structural changes and tribological performance of thermosetting polyimide induced by proton and electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv, Mei; Wang, Yanming; Wang, Qihua; Wang, Tingmei; Liang, Yongmin

    2015-01-01

    The structural changes and tribological performance of thermosetting polyimide were investigated by electron, proton or both combined irradiations at 25 keV in a ground-based simulation facility. Three forms of irradiations could lead to the formation of the carbonized layer on the polymer surface that could increase the hardness and adhesive force of the material. Proton irradiation induced more extensive changes in structure and friction behavior than electron irradiation by reason of the higher linear energy transfer value, and combined irradiation resulted in the largest impact, but which was less than the sum of the radiation effects of electron and proton. Moreover, the experimental results indicated that the changes in friction behavior are closely related with the carbonized layer, which was easily worn out in friction process and could introduce a shift from adhesion wear to three-body abrasive wear that reduced the wear rate and the friction coefficient. The friction process of irradiated samples could be divided into the initial stage and the steady stage. Three forms of irradiations all induced the high friction coefficient in the initial stage and the low friction coefficient in the steady stage, and the wear rate of the irradiated samples decreased in the order: electron irradiation>proton irradiation>combined irradiation. - Highlights: • Proton irradiation induced more extensive changes in structure and friction behavior than electron irradiation. • The effect of combined irradiation was less than that of the sum of electron and proton irradiation. • Three forms of irradiations all induced the high initial friction coefficient and the low steady-stage friction coefficient. • The initial friction stage means a fast-wearing adhesive process while the steady-state of the system is a three-body abrasion

  17. Inhibition of Cartilage Acidic Protein 1 Reduces Ultraviolet B Irradiation Induced-Apoptosis through P38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase and Jun Amino-Terminal Kinase Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Yinghong Ji; Xianfang Rong; Dan Li; Lei Cai; Jun Rao; Yi Lu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation can easily induce apoptosis in human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) and further lead to various eye diseases including cataract. Here for the first time, we investigated the role of cartilage acidic protein 1 (CRTAC1) gene in UVB irradiation induced-apoptosis in HLECs. Methods: Three groups of HLECs were employed including model group, empty vector group, and CRTAC1 interference group. Results: After UVB irradiation, the percentage of primary ap...

  18. Effect of interaction between irradiation-induced defects and intrinsic defects in the pinning improvement of neutron irradiated YBaCuO sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topal, Ugur; Sozeri, Huseyin; Yavuz, Hasbi

    2004-01-01

    Interaction between the intrinsic (native) defects and the irradiation-induced defects created by neutron irradiation was examined for the YBCO sample. For this purpose, non-superconducting Y-211 phase was included to the Y-123 samples at different contents as a source of large pinning center. The critical current density enhancement with the irradiation for these samples were analysed and then the role of defects on pinning improvement was discussed

  19. Effect of interaction between irradiation-induced defects and intrinsic defects in the pinning improvement of neutron irradiated YBaCuO sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topal, Ugur; Sozeri, Huseyin; Yavuz, Hasbi

    2004-08-01

    Interaction between the intrinsic (native) defects and the irradiation-induced defects created by neutron irradiation was examined for the YBCO sample. For this purpose, non-superconducting Y-211 phase was included to the Y-123 samples at different contents as a source of large pinning center. The critical current density enhancement with the irradiation for these samples were analysed and then the role of defects on pinning improvement was discussed.

  20. Proton imaging apparatus for proton therapy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sipala, V.; Lo Presti, D.; Brianzi, M.; Civinini, C.; Bruzzi, M.; Scaringella, M.; Talamonti, C.; Bucciolini, M.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G.; Randazzo, N.; Stancampiano, C.; Tesi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy with protons, due to the physical properties of these particles, offers several advantages for cancer therapy as compared to the traditional radiotherapy and photons. In the clinical use of proton beams, a p CT (Proton Computer Tomography) apparatus can contribute to improve the accuracy of the patient positioning and dose distribution calculation. In this paper a p CT apparatus built by the Prima (Proton Imaging) Italian Collaboration will be presented and the preliminary results will be discussed.

  1. Proton radioactivity from proton-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman, F.; Goncalves, M.; Tavares, O.A.P.; Duarte, S.B.; Garcia, F.; Rodriguez, O.

    1999-03-01

    Half-lives for proton emission from proton-rich nuclei have been calculated by using the effective liquid drop model of heavy-particle decay of nuclei. It is shown that this model is able to offer results or spontaneous proton-emission half-life-values in excellent agreement with the existing experimental data. Predictions of half-life-values for other possible proton-emission cases are present for null orbital angular momentum. (author)

  2. Effects of wearing bio-active material coated fabric against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damaged in Sprague-Dawley rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jung Ae; Kim, Hye Rim; Yoon, Sun Hye; Nam, Sang Hyun; Park, Sang Hyun; Jang, Beom Su; Go, Kyung Chan; Yang, Gwang Wung; Rho, Young Hwan; Park, Hyo Suk

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes cellular damage and death through the direct damage and/or indirectly the production of ROS, which induces oxidative stress. This study was designed to evaluate the in vivo radioprotective effects of a bio-active material coated fabric (BMCF) against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damage in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Healthy male SD rats wore bio-active material coated (concentrations in 10% and 30%) fabric for 7 days after 3 Gy of γ-irradiation. Radioprotective effects were evaluated by performing various biochemical assays including spleen and thymus index, WBC count, hepatic damage marker enzymes [aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT)] in plasma, liver antioxidant enzymes, and mitochondrial activity in muscle. Exposure to γ-irradiation resulted in hepatocellular and immune systemic damage. Gamma-irradiation induced decreases in antioxidant enzymes. However, wearing the BMCF-30% decreased significantly AST and ALT activities in plasma. Furthermore, wearing the BMCF-30% increased SOD (superoxide dismutase) and mitochondrial activity. These results suggest that wearing BMCF offers effective radioprotection against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damage in SD rats

  3. RhNRG-1β Protects the Myocardium against Irradiation-Induced Damage via the ErbB2-ERK-SIRT1 Signaling Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anxin Gu

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD, which is a serious side effect of the radiotherapy applied for various tumors due to the inevitable irradiation of the heart, cannot be treated effectively using current clinical therapies. Here, we demonstrated that rhNRG-1β, an epidermal growth factor (EGF-like protein, protects myocardium tissue against irradiation-induced damage and preserves cardiac function. rhNRG-1β effectively ameliorated irradiation-induced myocardial nuclear damage in both cultured adult rat-derived cardiomyocytes and rat myocardium tissue via NRG/ErbB2 signaling. By activating ErbB2, rhNRG-1β maintained mitochondrial integrity, ATP production, respiratory chain function and the Krebs cycle status in irradiated cardiomyocytes. Moreover, the protection of irradiated cardiomyocytes and myocardium tissue by rhNRG-1β was at least partly mediated by the activation of the ErbB2-ERK-SIRT1 signaling pathway. Long-term observations further showed that rhNRG-1β administered in the peri-irradiation period exerts continuous protective effects on cardiac pump function, the myocardial energy metabolism, cardiomyocyte volume and interstitial fibrosis in the rats receiving radiation via NRG/ErbB2 signaling. Our findings indicate that rhNRG-1β can protect the myocardium against irradiation-induced damage and preserve cardiac function via the ErbB2-ERK-SIRT1 signaling pathway.

  4. Effects of wearing bio-active material coated fabric against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damaged in Sprague-Dawley rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jung Ae; Kim, Hye Rim; Yoon, Sun Hye; Nam, Sang Hyun; Park, Sang Hyun; Jang, Beom Su [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Go, Kyung Chan; Yang, Gwang Wung; Rho, Young Hwan; Park, Hyo Suk [Research and Development Center, VENTEX Co. Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Ionizing radiation causes cellular damage and death through the direct damage and/or indirectly the production of ROS, which induces oxidative stress. This study was designed to evaluate the in vivo radioprotective effects of a bio-active material coated fabric (BMCF) against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damage in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Healthy male SD rats wore bio-active material coated (concentrations in 10% and 30%) fabric for 7 days after 3 Gy of γ-irradiation. Radioprotective effects were evaluated by performing various biochemical assays including spleen and thymus index, WBC count, hepatic damage marker enzymes [aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT)] in plasma, liver antioxidant enzymes, and mitochondrial activity in muscle. Exposure to γ-irradiation resulted in hepatocellular and immune systemic damage. Gamma-irradiation induced decreases in antioxidant enzymes. However, wearing the BMCF-30% decreased significantly AST and ALT activities in plasma. Furthermore, wearing the BMCF-30% increased SOD (superoxide dismutase) and mitochondrial activity. These results suggest that wearing BMCF offers effective radioprotection against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damage in SD rats.

  5. Influence of ion beam irradiation induced defects on the structural, optical and electrical properties of tellurium nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Narinder [Department of Physics, Chaudhary Devi Lal University, Sirsa, 125055 (India); Department of Physics, Haryana College of Technology & Management, Kaithal, 136027 (India); Kumar, Rajesh [Department of Physics, RN College of Engineering & Technology, Madlauda, 132104 (India); Kumar, Sushil, E-mail: sushil_phys@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Chaudhary Devi Lal University, Sirsa, 125055 (India); Chakarvarti, S.K. [Research and Development, Manav Rachana International University, Faridabad, 121001 (India)

    2016-11-01

    In this study, tellurium nanowires were electrodeposited into the polymer membranes from aqueous acidic bath containing HTeO{sub 2}{sup +} ions. The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images confirmed the formation of uniform and straight nanowires. The influence of 110 MeV Ni{sup 8+} ion irradiation induced defects on the structural, optical and electrical properties of as–deposited tellurium nanowires were examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–visible absorption spectroscopy and current–voltage (I–V) measurements. The XRD data depicted the hexagonal phase of tellurium nanowires and further revealed a variation in the intensity of diffraction peaks of ion irradiated nanowires. Williamson–Hall (WH) analysis is used for convoluting the size and microstrain contributions to the width of diffraction peaks. Tellurium nanowires exhibited a distinct absorbance band in the visible region at 686 nm, while this was absent in bulk tellurium. Electrical properties of nanowires are explored on the basis of I–V curves, which revealed a significant increase in the electrical conductivity of irradiated nanowires. A possible mechanism for the enhanced electrical conductivity is the increase in carrier concentration due to thermally excited defects. The defects produced by ion irradiation play a vital role in modifying the properties of semiconducting nanowires. - Highlights: • 110 MeV Ni{sup 8+} ion beam induced changes in tellurium nanowires have been examined. • Nanowires were prepared using template electrodeposition method. • Irradiation improved the electrical conductivity of tellurium nanowires. • Mechanism for enhanced electrical conductivity of irradiated nanowires was discussed.

  6. Swift heavy ion irradiation induced phase transformation in undoped and niobium doped titanium dioxide composite thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautam, Subodh K., E-mail: subodhkgtm@gmail.com [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Chettah, Abdelhak [LGMM Laboratory, Université 20 Août 1955-Skikda, BP 26, 21000 Skikda (Algeria); Singh, R.G. [Department of Physics, Bhagini Nivedita College, Delhi University, Delhi 110043 (India); Ojha, Sunil; Singh, Fouran [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India)

    2016-07-15

    Study reports the effect of swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation induced phase transformation in undoped and Niobium doped anatase TiO{sub 2} composite thin films. Investigations were carried out at different densities of electronic excitations (EEs) using 120 MeV Ag and 130 MeV Ni ions irradiations. Films were initially annealed at 900 °C and results revealed that undoped films were highly stable in anatase phase, while the Nb doped films showed the composite nature with the weak presence of Niobium penta-oxide (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}) phase. The effect at low density of EEs in undoped film show partial anatase to rutile phase transformation; however doped film shows only further growth of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} phase beside the anatase to rutile phase transformation. At higher density of EEs induced by Ag ions, registered continuous ion track of ∼3 nm in lattice which leads to nano-crystallization followed by decomposition/amorphization of rutile TiO{sub 2} and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} phases in undoped and doped films, respectively. However, Ni ions are only induced discontinuous sequence of ion tracks with creation of damage and disorder and do not show amorphization in the lattice. The in-elastic thermal spike calculations were carried out for anatase TiO{sub 2} phase to understand the effect of EEs on anatase to rutile phase transformation followed by amorphization in NTO films in terms of continuous and discontinuous track formation by SHI irradiation.

  7. Alpha-particle irradiation induced defects in SiO2 films of Si-SiO2 structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koman, B.P.; Gal'chynskyy, O.V.; Kovalyuk, R.O.; Shkol'nyy, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the work was to investigate alpha-particle irradiation induced defects in Si-SiO 2 structures by means of the thermostimulated discharge currents (TSDC) analysis. The object of investigation were (p-Si)-SiO 2 structures formed by a combined oxidation of the industrial p-Si wafers in dry and wet oxygen at temperature of 1150 C. The TSD currents were investigated in the temperature range between 90 and 500 K under linear heating rate. Pu 238 isotopes were the source of alpha-particles with an energy of 4-5 MeV and a density of 5.10 7 s -1 cm -2 . The TSD current curves show two peculiar maxima at about 370 and 480 K. Alpha-particle irradiation doesn't affect the general shape of the TSDC curves but leads to a shift of the maximum at 370 K and reduces the total electret charge which is accumulated in the Si-SiO 2 structures during polarization. The energy distribution function of the defects which are involved in SiO 2 polarization has been calculated. It showes that defects with activation energies of about 0.8 and 1.0 eV take part in forming the electret state, and these activation energies have certain energy distributions. It has been found that the TSDC maximum at 370 K has space charge nature and is caused by migration of hydrogen ions. In irradiated samples hydrogen and natrium ions localize on deeper trapping centres induced by alpha-particle irradiation. (orig.)

  8. Human amnion-derived mesenchymal stem cells protect against UVA irradiation-induced human dermal fibroblast senescence, in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunli; Yuchi, Haishen; Sun, Lu; Zhou, Xiaoli; Lin, Jinde

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine if human amnion-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HAMSCs) exert a protective effect on ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation-induced human dermal fibroblast (HDF) senescence. A senescence model was constructed as follows: HDFs (104–106 cells/well) were cultured in a six-well plate in vitro and then exposed to UVA irradiation at 9 J/cm2 for 30 min. Following the irradiation period, HDFs were co-cultured with HAMSCs, which were seeded on transwells. A total of 72 h following the co-culturing, senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining was performed and reactive oxygen species (ROS) content and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) were detected in the HDFs via flow cytometric analysis. The results demonstrated that the percentage of HDFs, detected via staining with X-gal, were markedly decreased when co-cultured with human HAMSCs, compared with the group that were not co-cultured. The ROS content was decreased and the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) recovered in cells treated with UVA and HAMSCs, compared with that of cells treated with UVA alone. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed the significant effects of HAMSCs on the HDF senescence marker genes p53 and matrix metalloproteinase-1 mRNA expression. In addition to this, western blot analysis verified the effects of HAMSCs on UVA induced senescence, providing a foundation for novel regenerative therapeutic methods. Furthermore, the results suggested that activation of the extracellular-signal regulated kinase 1/2 mitogen activated protein kinase signal transduction pathway, is essential for the HAMSC-mediated UVA protective effects. The decrease in ROS content additionally indicated that HAMSCs may exhibit the potential to treat oxidative stress-mediated UVA skin senescence in the future. PMID:28627622

  9. Effect of He+ fluence on surface morphology and ion-irradiation induced defect evolution in 7075 aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Kai; Ma, Qian; Wan, Hao; Yang, Bin; Ge, Junjie; Zhang, Lingyu; Si, Naichao

    2018-02-01

    The evolution of microstructure for 7075 aluminum alloys with 50 Kev helium ions irradiation were studied by using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fluences of 1 × 1015, 1 × 1016 and 1 × 1017 ions cm-2 were selected, and irradiation experiments were conducted at room temperatures. The transmission process of He+ ions was simulated by using SRIM software, including distribution of ion ranges, energy losses and atomic displacements. Experimental results show that irradiated pits and micro-cracks were observed on irradiation sample surface, and the size of constituent particles (not including Mg2Si) decreased with the increasing dose. The x-ray diffraction results of the pair of peaks is better resolved in irradiated samples might indicate that the stressed structure consequence due to crystal defects (vacancies and interstitials) after He+ implantation. TEM observation indicated that the density of MgZn2 phase was significantly reduced after helium ion irradiation which is harmful to strength. Besides, the development of compressive stress produced a large amount of dislocation defects in the 1015 ions cm-2 sample. Moreover, higher fluence irradiation produced more dislocations in sample. At fluence of 1016 ions cm-2, dislocation wall formed by dislocation slip and aggregation in the interior of grains, leading to the refinement of these grains. As fluence increased to 1017 ions cm-2, dislocation loops were observed in pinned dislocation. Moreover, dislocation as effective defect sink, irradiation-induced vacancy defects aggregated to these sinks, and resulted in the formation of helium bubbles in dislocation.

  10. The effect of boron additions on irradiation-induced order changes in Ni3Al intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Njah, N.; Gilbon, D.; Dimitrov, O.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of boron additions (0.1 wt%) on the kinetics of atomic order changes in a Ni 76 Al 24 intermetallic compound, under 1 MeV electron irradiation, were investigated at temperatures of 293 K and 410 K and displacement rates of 0.09 x 10 -3 to 4.7 x 10 -3 dpa.s -1 . In these irradiation conditions, a state of residual order was obtained for long irradiation times, characterized by a steady state order parameter S∞; it corresponds to a competition between two opposite features: irradiation disordering and thermal reordering enhanced by irradiation. Boron additions did not affect the efficiency of irradiation-induced disordering: the disordering cross-section (or, equivalently, the number of replacements per displacement var-epsilon) were comparable with and without a boron addition. By contrast, the S∞ values at 293 K were much lower in the alloy containing boron. Since boron does not change the disordering rate, the large difference between the values obtained in undoped and in boron-doped alloys shows that the reordering rate is strongly reduced by the presence of boron. Thus, boron modifies the mobility of the defects responsible for the irradiation-enhanced diffusion. The data on dislocation-loop size and the reordering kinetics suggest that vacancies are trapped by boron at low temperatures and immobilized, probably by the formation of a boron-vacancy complex. The effect becomes weaker at higher displacement rates and higher temperatures, probably due to the boron-vacancy complexes becoming unstable. It is proposed that two different reordering mechanisms may be operative at 293 K, according to the presence of boron: reordering is promoted by vacancy migration in the Ni 76 Al 24 alloy, whereas in the Ni 76 Al 24 (0.1 wt%B) alloy, it is promoted by the migration of split-interstitials or/and of low-mobility vacancy-boron complexes

  11. Proton irradiation effects on beryllium – A macroscopic assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simos, Nikolaos, E-mail: simos@bnl.gov [Nuclear Sciences & Technology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States); Elbakhshwan, Mohamed [Nuclear Sciences & Technology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States); Zhong, Zhong [Photon Sciences, NSLS II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States); Camino, Fernando [Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Beryllium, due to its excellent neutron multiplication and moderation properties, in conjunction with its good thermal properties, is under consideration for use as plasma facing material in fusion reactors and as a very effective neutron reflector in fission reactors. While it is characterized by unique combination of structural, chemical, atomic number, and neutron absorption cross section it suffers, however, from irradiation generated transmutation gases such as helium and tritium which exhibit low solubility leading to supersaturation of the Be matrix and tend to precipitate into bubbles that coalesce and induce swelling and embrittlement thus degrading the metal and limiting its lifetime. Utilization of beryllium as a pion production low-Z target in high power proton accelerators has been sought both for its low Z and good thermal properties in an effort to mitigate thermos-mechanical shock that is expected to be induced under the multi-MW power demand. To assess irradiation-induced changes in the thermal and mechanical properties of Beryllium, a study focusing on proton irradiation damage effects has been undertaken using 200 MeV protons from the Brookhaven National Laboratory Linac and followed by a multi-faceted post-irradiation analysis that included the thermal and volumetric stability of irradiated beryllium, the stress-strain behavior and its ductility loss as a function of proton fluence and the effects of proton irradiation on the microstructure using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The mimicking of high temperature irradiation of Beryllium via high temperature annealing schemes has been conducted as part of the post-irradiation study. This paper focuses on the thermal stability and mechanical property changes of the proton irradiated beryllium and presents results of the macroscopic property changes of Beryllium deduced from thermal and mechanical tests.

  12. Proton movies

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    A humorous short film made by three secondary school students received an award at a Geneva film festival. Even without millions of dollars or Hollywood stars at your disposal, it is still possible to make a good science fiction film about CERN. That is what three students from the Collège Madame de Staël in Carouge, near Geneva, demonstrated. For their amateur short film on the LHC, they were commended by the jury of the video and multimedia festival for schools organised by the "Media in education" service of the Canton of Geneva’s Public Education Department. The film is a spoof of a television news report on the LHC start-up. In sequences full of humour and imagination, the reporter conducts interviews with a very serious "Professor Sairne", some protons preparing for their voyage and even the neutrons that were rejected by the LHC. "We got the idea of making a film about CERN at the end of the summer," explains Lucinda Päsche, one of the three students. "We did o...

  13. Ion beam modification and analysis of thin YBa2Cu3O7 films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, O.

    1989-04-01

    The application of ion beams for the analysis and modification of high Tc superconductors is reviewed. Ion backscattering and channeling spectroscopy is used to optimize the film composition and the epitaxial growth performance on various single crystalline substrates. The influence of radiation damage on the transport properties and on the structure of polycrystalline as well as of single crystalline thin films is presented. The irradiation induced metal to insulator phase transition is discussed in detail. Some applications including the use of ion implantation for structuring are summarized. (orig.) [de

  14. Photoluminescence study of high energy proton irradiation on Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Bonhyeong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, June Hyuk [Neutron Science Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Donghyeop [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Ahn, Byung Tae, E-mail: btahn@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Byungha, E-mail: byungha@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-31

    We have studied the effect of proton irradiation on Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) thin films using photoluminescence (PL). We used a 10 MeV proton beam with varying doses from 10{sup 9} to 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}. Intensity-dependent low temperature PL measurements suggest that the proton irradiation does not create a new defect level but instead changes the number of preexisting defects in the detection range of the PL system. By comparing PL spectra after the proton irradiation with those obtained after thermal annealing under inert gas as well as under hydrogen gas ambient, we find that the irradiation-induced change in the defect structure does not originate from the incorporation of hydrogen but from energetics of the irradiating particles. Electrical resistivity of the proton irradiated CIGS thin films is shown to decrease after the proton irradiation, and this is explained by the reduction of the concentration of compensating donor-like defects, specifically selenium vacancies, based on the PL results. - Highlights: • Photoluminescence study of 10 MeV proton irradiation on CIGS at 10 K. • Irradiation modified population of existing defects without introducing new levels. • Changes in CIGS by 10 MeV irradiation are due to energetics of irradiating protons.

  15. Modeling investigation of the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of nanoscale precipitates in advanced structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Materials used in extremely hostile environment such as nuclear reactors are subject to a high flux of neutron irradiation, and thus vast concentrations of vacancy and interstitial point defects are produced because of collisions of energetic neutrons with host lattice atoms. The fate of these defects depends on various reaction mechanisms which occur immediately following the displacement cascade evolution and during the longer-time kinetically dominated evolution such as annihilation, recombination, clustering or trapping at sinks of vacancies, interstitials and their clusters. The long-range diffusional transport and evolution of point defects and self-defect clusters drive a microstructural and microchemical evolution that are known to produce degradation of mechanical properties including the creep rate, yield strength, ductility, or fracture toughness, and correspondingly affect material serviceability and lifetimes in nuclear applications. Therefore, a detailed understanding of microstructural evolution in materials at different time and length scales is of significant importance. The primary objective of this work is to utilize a hierarchical computational modeling approach i) to evaluate the potential for nanoscale precipitates to enhance point defect recombination rates and thereby the self-healing ability of advanced structural materials, and ii) to evaluate the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of such nanoscale precipitates resulting from enhanced point defect transport to and annihilation at precipitate interfaces. This project will utilize, and as necessary develop, computational materials modeling techniques within a hierarchical computational modeling approach, principally including molecular dynamics, kinetic Monte Carlo and spatially-dependent cluster dynamics modeling, to identify and understand the most important physical processes relevant to promoting the ''selfhealing'' or radiation resistance in advanced

  16. Irradiation-Induced Cardiac Connexin-43 and miR-21 Responses Are Hampered by Treatment with Atorvastatin and Aspirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csilla Viczenczova

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Radiation of the chest during cancer therapy is deleterious to the heart, mostly due to oxidative stress and inflammation related injury. A single sub-lethal dose of irradiation has been shown to result in compensatory up-regulation of the myocardial connexin-43 (Cx43, activation of the protein kinase C (PKC signaling along with the decline of microRNA (miR-1 and an increase of miR-21 levels in the left ventricle (LV. We investigated whether drugs with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory or vasodilating properties, such as aspirin, atorvastatin, and sildenafil, may affect myocardial response in the LV and right ventricle (RV following chest irradiation. Adult, male Wistar rats were subjected to a single sub-lethal dose of chest radiation at 25 Gy and treated with aspirin (3 mg/day, atorvastatin (0.25 mg/day, and sildenafil (0.3 mg/day for six weeks. Cx43, PKCε and PKCδ proteins expression and levels of miR-1 as well as miR-21 were determined in the LV and RV. Results showed that the suppression of miR-1 was associated with an increase of total and phosphorylated forms of Cx43 as well as PKCε expression in the LV while having no effect in the RV post-irradiation as compared to the non-irradiated rats. Treatment with aspirin and atorvastatin prevented an increase in the expression of Cx43 and PKCε without change in the miR-1 levels. Furthermore, treatment with aspirin, atorvastatin, and sildenafil completely prevented an increase of miR-21 in the LV while having partial effect in the RV post irradiation. The increase in pro-apoptotic PKCδ was not affected by any of the used treatment. In conclusion, irradiation and drug-induced changes were less pronounced in the RV as compared to the LV. Treatment with aspirin and atorvastatin interfered with irradiation-induced compensatory changes in myocardial Cx43 protein and miR-21 by preventing their elevation, possibly via amelioration of oxidative stress and inflammation.

  17. Modeling investigation of the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of nanoscale precipitates in advanced structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-04-08

    Materials used in extremely hostile environment such as nuclear reactors are subject to a high flux of neutron irradiation, and thus vast concentrations of vacancy and interstitial point defects are produced because of collisions of energetic neutrons with host lattice atoms. The fate of these defects depends on various reaction mechanisms which occur immediately following the displacement cascade evolution and during the longer-time kinetically dominated evolution such as annihilation, recombination, clustering or trapping at sinks of vacancies, interstitials and their clusters. The long-range diffusional transport and evolution of point defects and self-defect clusters drive a microstructural and microchemical evolution that are known to produce degradation of mechanical properties including the creep rate, yield strength, ductility, or fracture toughness, and correspondingly affect material serviceability and lifetimes in nuclear applications. Therefore, a detailed understanding of microstructural evolution in materials at different time and length scales is of significant importance. The primary objective of this work is to utilize a hierarchical computational modeling approach i) to evaluate the potential for nanoscale precipitates to enhance point defect recombination rates and thereby the self-healing ability of advanced structural materials, and ii) to evaluate the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of such nanoscale precipitates resulting from enhanced point defect transport to and annihilation at precipitate interfaces. This project will utilize, and as necessary develop, computational materials modeling techniques within a hierarchical computational modeling approach, principally including molecular dynamics, kinetic Monte Carlo and spatially-dependent cluster dynamics modeling, to identify and understand the most important physical processes relevant to promoting the “selfhealing” or radiation resistance in advanced materials containing

  18. Proton-air and proton-proton cross sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Different attempts to measure hadronic cross sections with cosmic ray data are reviewed. The major results are compared to each other and the differences in the corresponding analyses are discussed. Besides some important differences, it is crucial to see that all analyses are based on the same fundamental relation of longitudinal air shower development to the observed fluctuation of experimental observables. Furthermore, the relation of the measured proton-air to the more fundamental proton-proton cross section is discussed. The current global picture combines hadronic proton-proton cross section data from accelerator and cosmic ray measurements and indicates a good consistency with predictions of models up to the highest energies.

  19. Histidine in Continuum Electrostatics Protonation State Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Vernon; Stuchebruckhov, Alexei

    2014-01-01

    A modification to the standard continuum electrostatics approach to calculate protein pKas which allows for the decoupling of histidine tautomers within a two state model is presented. Histidine with four intrinsically coupled protonation states cannot be easily incorporated into a two state formalism because the interaction between the two protonatable sites of the imidazole ring is not purely electrostatic. The presented treatment, based on a single approximation of the interrelation between histidine’s charge states, allows for a natural separation of the two protonatable sites associated with the imidazole ring as well as the inclusion of all protonation states within the calculation. PMID:22072521

  20. Intratracheal injection of adenovirus containing the human MNSOD transgene protects athymic nude mice from irradiation-induced organizing alveolitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epperly, Michael W.; Bray, Jenifer A.; Krager, Stephen; Berry, Luann M.; Gooding, William; Engelhardt, John F.; Zwacka, Ralf; Travis, Elizabeth L.; Greenberger, Joel S.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: A dose and volume limiting factor in radiation treatment of thoracic cancer is the development of fibrosis in normal lung. The goal of the present study was to determine whether expression prior to irradiation of a transgene for human manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) or human copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD) protects against irradiation-induced lung damage in mice. Methods and Materials: Athymic Nude (Nu/J) mice were intratracheally injected with 10 9 plaque-forming units (PFU) of a replication-incompetent mutant adenovirus construct containing the gene for either human MnSOD, human copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD) or LacZ. Four days later the mice were irradiated to the pulmonary cavity to doses of 850, 900, or 950 cGy. To demonstrate adenoviral infection, nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was carried out with primers specific for either human MnSOD or Cu/ZnSOD transgene on freshly explanted lung, trachea, or alveolar type II cells, and immunohistochemistry was used to measure LacZ expression. RNA was extracted on day 0, 1, 4, or 7 after 850 cGy of irradiation from lungs of mice that had previously received adenovirus or had no treatment. Slot blot analysis was performed to quantitate RNA expression for IL-1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, TGF-β, MnSOD, or Cu/ZnSOD. Lung tissue was explanted and tested for biochemical activity of MnSOD or Cu/ZnSOD after adenovirus injection. Other mice were sacrificed 132 days after irradiation, lungs excised, frozen in OCT, (polyvinyl alcohol, polyethylene glycol mixture) sectioned, H and E stained, and evaluated for percent of the lung demonstrating organizing alveolitis. Results: Mice injected intratracheally with adenovirus containing the gene for human MnSOD had significantly reduced chronic lung irradiation damage following 950 cGy, compared to control mice or mice injected with adenovirus containing the gene for human Cu/ZnSOD or LacZ. Immunohistochemistry

  1. Proton therapy device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronc, D.

    1994-01-01

    The invention concerns a proton therapy device using a proton linear accelerator which produces a proton beam with high energies and intensities. The invention lies in actual fact that the proton beam which is produced by the linear accelerator is deflected from 270 deg in its plan by a deflecting magnetic device towards a patient support including a bed the longitudinal axis of which is parallel to the proton beam leaving the linear accelerator. The patient support and the deflecting device turn together around the proton beam axis while the bed stays in an horizontal position. The invention applies to radiotherapy. 6 refs., 5 figs

  2. Color centers of a borosilicate glass induced by 10 MeV proton, 1.85 MeV electron and 60Co-γ ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Jishi; Wu, Jiehua; Zhao, Lili; Song, Lixin

    2013-01-01

    Optical absorption spectra, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, Raman spectra of a borosilicate glass after irradiation by 10 MeV proton, 1.85 MeV electron and 60 Co-γ ray were studied. The process of irradiation inducing color centers in the glass was discussed. The band gap of the glass before and after 60 Co-γ ray irradiation was studied using Mott and Davis's theory, and it was found that calculated change of the band gap introduced a paradox, because Mott and Davis's theory on the band gap cannot be adopted in the study on the irradiated glass. - Highlights: ► All the three types of irradiation induce the same types of color centers. ► Calculated change of the band gap introduced a paradox. ► Mott and Davis's theory on band gap cannot be adopted in the irradiated glass

  3. Elastic proton-proton scattering at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, K.

    2011-09-03

    Here we describe elastic proton+proton (p+p) scattering measurements at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run. We present preliminary results of single and double spin asymmetries.

  4. Baryon production in proton-proton collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, F.M.; Werner, K.

    2002-01-01

    Motivated by the recent rapidity spectra of baryons and antibaryons in pp collisions at 158 GeV and the Ω-bar/Ω ratio discussion, we reviewed string formation mechanism and some string models. This investigation told us how color strings are formed in ultrarelativistic proton-proton collisions

  5. Proton: the particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All

  6. Proton: The Particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10{sup 80}. Protons were created at 10{sup −6} –1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10{sup 10} years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10{sup 34} years; that is, the age of the universe is 10{sup −24}th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W{sup +}, W{sup −}, Z{sup 0}, and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  7. Irradiation induced effects in the FE-I4 front-end chip of the ATLAS IBL detector

    CERN Document Server

    La Rosa, Alessandro; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) detector was installed into the ATLAS experiment in 2014 and has been in operation since 2015. During the first year of IBL data taking an increase of the low voltage currents produced by the FE-I4 front-end chip was observed and this increase was traced back to the radiation damage in the chip. The dependence of the current on the total-ionising dose and temperature has been tested with Xray and proton irradiations and will be presented in this paper together with the detector operation guidelines.

  8. Ultraviolet B irradiation induces changes in the distribution and release of arachidonic acid, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid in human keratinocytes in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punnonen, K.; Puustinen, T.; Jansen, C.T.

    1987-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that derivatives of 20-carbon polyunsaturated fatty acids, the eicosanoids, play an important role in the inflammatory responses of the human skin. To better understand the metabolic fate of fatty acids in the skin, the effect of ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation (280-320 nm) on the distribution and release of 14 C-labeled arachidonic acid, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid in human keratinocytes in culture was investigated. Ultraviolet B irradiation induced the release of all three 14 C-labeled fatty acids from the phospholipids, especially from phosphatidylethanolamine, and this was accompanied by increased labeling of the nonphosphorus lipids. This finding suggests that UVB induces a significant liberation of eicosanoid precursor fatty acids from cellular phospholipids, but the liberated fatty acids are largely reincorporated into the nonphosphorus lipids. In conclusion, the present study suggests that not only arachidonic acid but also dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid might be involved in the UVB irradiation-induced inflammatory reactions of human skin

  9. Irradiation induced surface segregation in concentrated alloys: a contribution; Contribution a l`etude de la segregation de surface induite par irradiation dans les alliages concentres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandjean, Y.

    1996-12-31

    A new computer modelization of irradiation induced surface segregation is presented together with some experimental determinations in binary and ternary alloys. The model we propose handles the alloy thermodynamics and kinetics at the same level of sophistication. Diffusion is described at the atomistic level and proceeds vis the jumps of point defects (vacancies, dumb-bell interstitials): the various jump frequencies depend on the local composition in a manner consistent with the thermodynamics of the alloy. For application to specific alloys, we have chosen the simplest statistical approximation: pair interactions in the Bragg Williams approximation. For a system which exhibits the thermodynamics and kinetics features of Ni-Cu alloys, the model generates the behaviour parameters (flux and temperature) and of alloy composition. Quantitative agreement with the published experimental results (two compositions, three temperatures) is obtained with a single set of parameters. Modelling austenitic steels used in nuclear industry requires taking into account the contribution of dumbbells to mass transport. The effects of this latter contribution are studied on a model of Ni-Fe. Interstitial trapping on dilute impurities is shown to delay or even suppress the irradiation induced segregation. Such an effect is indeed observed in the experiments we report on Fe{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} and Fe{sub 49}Ni{sub 50}Hf{sub 1} alloys. (author). 190 refs.

  10. Tranexamic acid suppresses ultraviolet B eye irradiation-induced melanocyte activation by decreasing the levels of prohormone convertase 2 and alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramoto, Keiichi; Yamate, Yurika; Sugiyama, Daijiro; Takahashi, Yumi; Mafune, Eiichi

    2014-12-01

    Tranexamic acid (trans-4-aminomethylcyclohexanecarboxylic acid) is a medicinal amino acid used in skin whitening care. This study examined the effects of tranexamic acid on the melanocyte activation of the skin induced by an ultraviolet (UV) B eye irradiation. The eye or ear was locally exposed to UVB at a dose of 1.0 kJ/m(2) using a 20SE sunlamp after covering the remaining body surface with aluminum foil. UVB eye irradiation induced melanocyte activation of the skin, similar to that observed following UVB ear irradiation, which was suppressed by the administration of tranexamic acid treatment. The plasma α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) content was increased by UVB irradiation of the eye; however, the increase in α-MSH was suppressed by tranexamic acid treatment. In addition, UVB eye irradiation induced the up-regulation of prohormone convertase (PC) 2 in the pituitary gland. Meanwhile, the increase in PC2 induced by UVB eye irradiation was suppressed by tranexamic acid treatment. These results clearly indicate that tranexamic acid decreases the expression of PC2, which cleavages from proopiomelanocortin to α-MSH in the pituitary gland, thereby suppressing melanocyte activation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Analysis of irradiation-induced stresses in coating layers of coated fuel particles for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kimio; Kikuchi, Teruo; Fukuda, Kousaku; Sato, Sadao; Toyota, Junji; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Kashimura, Satoru.

    1991-07-01

    Irradiation-induced stresses in coating layers of coated fuel particles were analyzed by the MICROS-2 code for the fuels of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) under its operating conditions. The analyses were made on the standard core fuel (A-type) and the test fuels comprising the advanced SiC-coated particle fuel (B-1 type) and the ZrC-coated particle fuel (B-2 type). For the B-1 type fuel, the stresses were relieved due to the thicker buffer and SiC layers than for the A type fuel. The slightly decreased thickness of the fourth layer for the B-1 type than for the A type fuel had no significant effect on the stresses. As for the B-2 type fuel, almost the same results as for the B-1 type were obtained under an assumption that the ZrC layer as well as the SiC layer undergoes negligible dimension change within the analysis conditions. The obtained results indicated that the B-1 and B-2 type fuels are better than the A type fuel in terms of integrity against the irradiation-induced stresses. Finally, research subjects for development of the analysis code on the fuel behavior are discussed. (author)

  12. Protective effect of S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) on irradiation-induced inhibition of intestinal transport function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T.S.; Ando, M.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effect of S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) on whole-body irradiation-induced inhibition of intestinal transport function. The jejunal transport of fluid and sugars was studied in male Swiss-Webster mice before and 3 days after whole-body irradiation (1000 rads). The rates of glucose and water transport were decreased by 86 and 70%, respectively, in irradiated animals. However, the rate of transport of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose (3MG) was not affected. In mice receiving WR-2721 (500 mg/kg, ip) 15 to 30 min prior to whole-body irradiation, net water flux was unaffected and the rate of D-glucose transport was decreased only 8%. WR-2721 administered alone (500 mg/kg, ip) had no effect on either D-glucose transport or net water flux across the jejunal mucosa. The results suggest that WR-2721 protects against irradiation-induced inhibition of some intestinal transport functions

  13. Spherical proton emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, S.; Semmes, P.B.; Nazarewicz, W.

    1997-01-01

    Various theoretical approaches to proton emission from spherical nuclei are investigated, and it is found that all the methods employed give very similar results. The calculated decay widths are found to be qualitatively insensitive to the parameters of the proton-nucleus potential, i.e., changing the potential parameters over a fairly large range typically changes the decay width by no more than a factor of ∼3. Proton half-lives of observed heavy proton emitters are, in general, well reproduced by spherical calculations with the spectroscopic factors calculated in the independent quasiparticle approximation. The quantitative agreement with experimental data obtained in our study requires that the parameters of the proton-nucleus potential be chosen carefully. It also suggests that deformed proton emitters will provide invaluable spectroscopic information on the angular momentum decomposition of single-proton orbitals in deformed nuclei. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  14. Proton therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Proton Therapy Physics goes beyond current books on proton therapy to provide an in-depth overview of the physics aspects of this radiation therapy modality, eliminating the need to dig through information scattered in the medical physics literature. After tracing the history of proton therapy, the book summarizes the atomic and nuclear physics background necessary for understanding proton interactions with tissue. It describes the physics of proton accelerators, the parameters of clinical proton beams, and the mechanisms to generate a conformal dose distribution in a patient. The text then covers detector systems and measuring techniques for reference dosimetry, outlines basic quality assurance and commissioning guidelines, and gives examples of Monte Carlo simulations in proton therapy. The book moves on to discussions of treatment planning for single- and multiple-field uniform doses, dose calculation concepts and algorithms, and precision and uncertainties for nonmoving and moving targets. It also exami...

  15. Proton solvation and proton transfer in chemical and electrochemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengyel, S.; Conway, B.E.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter examines the proton solvation and characterization of the H 3 O + ion, proton transfer in chemical ionization processes in solution, continuous proton transfer in conductance processes, and proton transfer in electrode processes. Topics considered include the condition of the proton in solution, the molecular structure of the H 3 O + ion, thermodynamics of proton solvation, overall hydration energy of the proton, hydration of H 3 O + , deuteron solvation, partial molal entropy and volume and the entropy of proton hydration, proton solvation in alcoholic solutions, analogies to electrons in semiconductors, continuous proton transfer in conductance, definition and phenomenology of the unusual mobility of the proton in solution, solvent structure changes in relation to anomalous proton mobility, the kinetics of the proton-transfer event, theories of abnormal proton conductance, and the general theory of the contribution of transfer reactions to overall transport processes

  16. Study of proton radioactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  17. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2014-01-01

    In the last five decades, proton–proton and proton–antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion–ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  18. Medium effects on spin observables of proton knockout reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krein, G.; Maris, T.A.J.; Rodrigues, B.B.; Veit, E.A.

    1994-07-01

    Medium modifications of the properties of bound nucleons and mesons are investigated by means of medium energy quasi free proton knockout reactions with polarized incident protons. The sensitivity of the spin observables of these reactions to modifications of the nucleon and meson properties is studied using the Bonn one-boson exchange model of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. A method proposed to extract the pp analysing power in medium from the (p, 2 p) asymmetries indicates a reduction of this quantity compared to its free space value. This reduction is linked to modifications of masses and coupling constants of the nucleons and mesons in the nucleus. The implications of these modifications for another spin observable to be measured in the future are discussed. (author). 39 refs, 9 figs

  19. Medium effects on spin observables of proton knockout reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krein, G [Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Maris, T A.J.; Rodrigues, B B; Veit, E A [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1994-07-01

    Medium modifications of the properties of bound nucleons and mesons are investigated by means of medium energy quasi free proton knockout reactions with polarized incident protons. The sensitivity of the spin observables of these reactions to modifications of the nucleon and meson properties is studied using the Bonn one-boson exchange model of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. A method proposed to extract the pp analysing power in medium from the (p, 2 p) asymmetries indicates a reduction of this quantity compared to its free space value. This reduction is linked to modifications of masses and coupling constants of the nucleons and mesons in the nucleus. The implications of these modifications for another spin observable to be measured in the future are discussed. (author). 39 refs, 9 figs.

  20. Nano-scale chemical evolution in a proton-and neutron-irradiated Zr alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harte, Allan, E-mail: allan.harte@manchester.ac.uk [The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Topping, M.; Frankel, P. [The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Jädernäs, D. [Studsvik Nuclear AB, SE 611 82, Nyköping (Sweden); Romero, J. [Westinghouse Electric Company, Columbia, SC (United States); Hallstadius, L. [Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, SE 72163 Västerås (Sweden); Darby, E.C. [Rolls Royce Plc., Nuclear Materials, Derby (United Kingdom); Preuss, M. [The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    Proton-and neutron-irradiated Zircaloy-2 are compared in terms of the nano-scale chemical evolution within second phase particles (SPPs) Zr(Fe,Cr){sub 2} and Zr{sub 2}(Fe,Ni). This is accomplished through ultra-high spatial resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and the use of energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic methods. Fe-depletion is observed from both SPP types after irradiation with both irradiative species, but is heterogeneous in the case of Zr(Fe,Cr){sub 2}, predominantly from the edge region, and homogeneously in the case of Zr{sub 2}(Fe,Ni). Further, there is evidence of a delay in the dissolution of the Zr{sub 2}(Fe,Ni) SPP with respect to the Zr(Fe,Cr){sub 2}. As such, SPP dissolution results in matrix supersaturation with solute under both irradiative species and proton irradiation is considered well suited to emulate the effects of neutron irradiation in this context. The mechanisms of solute redistribution processes from SPPs and the consequences for irradiation-induced growth phenomena are discussed. - Highlights: •Protons emulate the effects of neutron irradiation in the evolution of chemistry and morphology of second phase particles. •Detailed energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy reveals heterogeneity in Zr-Fe-Cr SPPs both before and after irradiation. •Zr-Fe-Ni SPPs are delayed in irradiation-induced dissolution due to their better self-solubility with respect to Zr-Fe-Cr.

  1. Irradiation-induced regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor in six human squamous cell carcinoma lines of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artman, Meri Tuuli

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy is frequently used to treat squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN), although, it can be unsuccessful due to radiation resistance of the tumor. Currently, there are no established predictive markers for radiation resistance in SCCHN. The aim of this work was to investigate PAI-1 and VEGF secretion as markers for radiation resistance in six human SCCHN cell lines. The cell lines differed in their basal secretion levels and in their in vitro radiation sensitivity. PAI-1 and VEGF levels increased after irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. A significant correlation was detected between radiation-induced PAI-1 and VEGF secretion, which suggests that irradiation-induced secretion of PAI-1 and VEGF are partially regulated by related mechanisms. However, neither basal levels nor radiation-induced PAI-1 and VEGF secretion correlated with radiation resistance. Therefore, PAI-1 and VEGF are most likely not predictive markers for radiation resistance in SCCHN.

  2. Study of irradiation induced defects and phase instability in β phase of Zr Excel alloy with in-situ heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, H.; Yao, Z.; Kirk, M.A.; Daymond, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    In situ heavy ion irradiation with 1 MeV Kr"2"+ was carried out to study irradiation induced phase change and atomic lattice defects in theβ phase of Zr Excel alloy. No decomposition of β-Zr was observed under irradiation at either 200 "oC or 450 "oC. However, ω-Zr particles experienced shape change and shrinkage associated enrichment of Fe in the β/ω interface at 200 "oC irradiation but not at 450 "oC. The defect evolution in the β-phase was examined with single phase Zr-20Nb alloy. It was found that dislocation loops with Burgers vector 1/2 and both present in β-Zr under room temperature irradiation. (author)

  3. Study of irradiation induced defects and phase instability in β phase of Zr Excel alloy with in-situ heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, H.; Yao, Z., E-mail: 12hy1@queensu.ca [Queen' s University, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Kingston, ON (Canada); Kirk, M.A. [Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Argonne, IL (United States); Daymond, M.R. [Queen' s University, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    In situ heavy ion irradiation with 1 MeV Kr{sup 2+} was carried out to study irradiation induced phase change and atomic lattice defects in theβ phase of Zr Excel alloy. No decomposition of β-Zr was observed under irradiation at either 200 {sup o}C or 450 {sup o}C. However, ω-Zr particles experienced shape change and shrinkage associated enrichment of Fe in the β/ω interface at 200 {sup o}C irradiation but not at 450 {sup o}C. The defect evolution in the β-phase was examined with single phase Zr-20Nb alloy. It was found that dislocation loops with Burgers vector 1/2<111> and <001> both present in β-Zr under room temperature irradiation. (author)

  4. Chronic low-dose UVA irradiation induces local suppression of contact hypersensitivity, Langerhans cell depletion and suppressor cell activation in C3H/HeJ mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bestak, Rosa; Halliday, G.M.

    1996-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that chronic low-dose solar-simulated UV radiation could induce both local and systemic immunosuppression as well as tolerance to a topically applied hapten. In this study, we have used a chronic low-dose UV-irradiation protocol to investigate the effects of UVA on the skin immune system of C3H/HeJ mice. Irradiation with UVA+B significantly suppressed the local and systemic primary contact hypersensitivity (CHS) response to the hapten 2,4,6-trinitrochlorobenzene. Furthermore, UVA+B reduced Langerhans cell (LC) and dendritic epidermal T cell (DETC) densities in chronically UV-irradiated mice. Ultraviolet A irradiation induced local, but not systemic, immunosuppression and reduced LC (32%) but not DETC from the epidermis compared to the shaved control animals. Treatment of mice with both UVA+B and UVA radiation also induced an impaired secondary CHS response, and this tolerance was transferable with spleen cells. (Author)

  5. Behavior Modification in Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Annette Rutt; Stillman, Stephen M.

    1979-01-01

    An example of behavior modification used in athletic coaching is presented. The case study involves a member of a women's basketball team and details the use of behavior modification for both weight reduction and skill improvement. (JMF)

  6. Proton Fast Ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, M H; Freeman, R R; Hatchett, S P; MacKinnon, A J; Patel, P K; Snavely, R A; Stephens, R B

    2006-04-01

    Fast ignition (FI) by a laser generated ballistically focused proton beam is a more recently proposed alternative to the original concept of FI by a laser generated beam of relativistic electrons. It has potential advantages in less complex energy transport into dense plasma. Recent successful target heating experiments motivate further investigation of the feasibility of proton fast ignition. The concept, the physics and characteristics of the proton beams, the recent experimental work on focusing of the beams and heating of solid targets and the overall prospects for proton FI are discussed

  7. Inhibition of Cartilage Acidic Protein 1 Reduces Ultraviolet B Irradiation Induced-Apoptosis through P38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase and Jun Amino-Terminal Kinase Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghong Ji

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Ultraviolet B (UVB irradiation can easily induce apoptosis in human lens epithelial cells (HLECs and further lead to various eye diseases including cataract. Here for the first time, we investigated the role of cartilage acidic protein 1 (CRTAC1 gene in UVB irradiation induced-apoptosis in HLECs. Methods: Three groups of HLECs were employed including model group, empty vector group, and CRTAC1 interference group. Results: After UVB irradiation, the percentage of primary apoptotic cells was obviously fewer in CRTAC1 interference group. Meanwhile, inhibition of CRTAC1 also reduced both reactive oxygen species (ROS production and intracellular Ca2+ concentration, but the level of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm was increased in HLECs. Further studies indicated that superoxide dismutase (SOD activity and total antioxidative (T-AOC level were significantly increased in CRTAC1-inhibited cells, while the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH were significantly decreased. ELISA analysis of CRTAC1-inhibited cells showed that the concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin-6 (IL-6 were significantly decreased, but the concentration of interleukin-10 (IL-10 was significantly increased. Western blot analyses of eight apoptosis-associated proteins including Bax, Bcl-2, p38, phospho-p38 (p-p38, Jun amino-terminal kinases (JNK1/2, phospho-JNK1/2 (p-JNK1/2, calcium-sensing receptor (CasR, and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII indicated that the inhibition of CRTAC1 alleviated oxidative stress and inflammation response, inactivated calcium-signaling pathway, p38 and JNK1/2 signal pathways, and eventually reduced UVB irradiation induced-apoptosis in HLECs. Conclusion: These results provided new insights into the mechanism of cataract development, and demonstrated that CRTAC1 could be a potentially novel target for cataract treatment.

  8. Inhibition of Cartilage Acidic Protein 1 Reduces Ultraviolet B Irradiation Induced-Apoptosis through P38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase and Jun Amino-Terminal Kinase Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yinghong; Rong, Xianfang; Li, Dan; Cai, Lei; Rao, Jun; Lu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation can easily induce apoptosis in human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) and further lead to various eye diseases including cataract. Here for the first time, we investigated the role of cartilage acidic protein 1 (CRTAC1) gene in UVB irradiation induced-apoptosis in HLECs. Three groups of HLECs were employed including model group, empty vector group, and CRTAC1 interference group. After UVB irradiation, the percentage of primary apoptotic cells was obviously fewer in CRTAC1 interference group. Meanwhile, inhibition of CRTAC1 also reduced both reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and intracellular Ca2+ concentration, but the level of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) was increased in HLECs. Further studies indicated that superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and total antioxidative (T-AOC) level were significantly increased in CRTAC1-inhibited cells, while the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were significantly decreased. ELISA analysis of CRTAC1-inhibited cells showed that the concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were significantly decreased, but the concentration of interleukin-10 (IL-10) was significantly increased. Western blot analyses of eight apoptosis-associated proteins including Bax, Bcl-2, p38, phospho-p38 (p-p38), Jun amino-terminal kinases (JNK1/2), phospho-JNK1/2 (p-JNK1/2), calcium-sensing receptor (CasR), and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) indicated that the inhibition of CRTAC1 alleviated oxidative stress and inflammation response, inactivated calcium-signaling pathway, p38 and JNK1/2 signal pathways, and eventually reduced UVB irradiation induced-apoptosis in HLECs. These results provided new insights into the mechanism of cataract development, and demonstrated that CRTAC1 could be a potentially novel target for cataract treatment. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Proton decay: spectroscopic probe beyond the proton drip line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seweryniak, D; Davids, C N; Robinson, A; Woods, P J; Blank, B; Carpenter, M P; Davinson, T; Freeman, S J; Hammond, N; Hoteling, N; Janssens, R V F; Khoo, T L; Liu, Z; Mukherjee, G; Shergur, J; Sinha, S; Sonzogni, A A; Walters, W B; Woehr, A

    2005-01-01

    Proton decay has been transformed in recent years from an exotic phenomenon into a powerful spectroscopic tool. The frontiers of experimental and theoretical proton-decay studies will be reviewed. Different aspects of proton decay will be illustrated with recent results on the deformed proton emitter 135 Tb, the odd-odd deformed proton emitter 130 Eu, the complex fine structure in the odd-odd 146 Tm nucleus and on excited states in the transitional proton emitter 145 Tm

  10. Review of inelastic proton-proton reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Morrison, Douglas Robert Ogston

    1973-01-01

    The most important new results on inelastic proton-proton scattering obtained with the new machines, I.S.R. and N.A.L., are: (1) The inelastic cross-section increases monotonically with energy from threshold to 1500 GeV/c. Above 6 GeV/c the energy variation has a s /sup +0.04/ behaviour. (2) Scaling is observed at I.S.R. energies in pion production. Confirmation is obtained of the hypothesis of limiting fragmentation. (3) The results are in general, consistent with the two-component model-one class of events being produced by diffraction dissociation and the other by a short-range-order process (e.g. the multiperipheral model). (4) There are indications that the protons have a granular structure; this from observation of secondaries of large transverse momenta. (33 refs).

  11. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Pedersen, Morten Jeppe; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Nissen, Poul

    2008-01-01

    molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological...... proton pumps emerge. Most notably, the minimal pumping apparatus of all pumps consists of a central proton acceptor/donor, a positively charged residue to control pK (a) changes of the proton acceptor/donor, and bound water molecules to facilitate rapid proton transport along proton wires....

  12. Color centers of a borosilicate glass induced by 10 MeV proton, 1.85 MeV electron and 60Co-γ ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jishi; Wu, Jiehua; Zhao, Lili; Song, Lixin

    2013-05-01

    Optical absorption spectra, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, Raman spectra of a borosilicate glass after irradiation by 10 MeV proton, 1.85 MeV electron and 60Co-γ ray were studied. The process of irradiation inducing color centers in the glass was discussed. The band gap of the glass before and after 60Co-γ ray irradiation was studied using Mott and Davis's theory, and it was found that calculated change of the band gap introduced a paradox, because Mott and Davis's theory on the band gap cannot be adopted in the study on the irradiated glass.

  13. Giving Protons a Boost

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The first of LHC's superconducting radio-frequency cavity modules has passed its final test at full power in the test area of building SM18. These modules carry an oscillating electric field that will accelerate protons around the LHC ring and help maintain the stability of the proton beams.

  14. On the proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonda, L.; Ghirardi, G.C.; Weber, T.

    1983-07-01

    The problem of the proton decay is considered taking into account that in actual experiments there is an interaction of the proton with its environment which could imply an increase of its theoretical lifetime. It is seen that, by application of the time-energy uncertainty relation, no prolongation of the lifetime is obtained in this case. (author)

  15. PS proton source

    CERN Multimedia

    1959-01-01

    The first proton source used at CERN's Proton Synchrotron (PS) which started operation in 1959. This is CERN's oldest accelerator still functioning today (2018). It is part of the accelerator chain that supplies proton beams to the Large Hadron Collider. The source is a Thonemann type. In order to extract and accelerate the protons at high energy, a high frequency electrical field is used (140Mhz). The field is transmitted by a coil around a discharge tube in order to maintain the gas hydrogen in an ionised state. An electrical field pulse, in the order of 15kV, is then applied via an impulse transformer between anode and cathode of the discharge tube. The electrons and protons of the plasma formed in the ionised gas in the tube, are then separated. Currents in the order of 200mA during 100 microseconds have benn obtained with this type of source.

  16. Molecular mechanisms controlling proton pumping by bacteriorhodopsin. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouch, Rosalie K.; Ebrey, Thomas G.

    2000-02-10

    Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is the simplest biological system for the transduction of light energy. Light energy is directly converted to transmembrane proton gradient by a single, small membrane protein. The extraordinary stability of bR makes it an outstanding subject for bioenergetic studies. This project has focused on the role of interactions between key residues of the pigment involved in light-induced proton transfer. Methods to estimate the strength of these interactions and their correlation with the rate and efficiency of proton transfer have been developed. The concept of the coupling of the protonation states of key groups has been applied to individual steps of the proton transfer with the ultimate goal of understanding on the molecular level the driving forces for proton transport and the pathway of the transported proton in bT. The mechanism of light-induced proton release, uptake and the mechanism of recovery of initial state of bT has been examined. The experiments were performed with genetically engineered, site-specific mutants of bR. This has enabled us to characterize the role of individual amino acid residues in bR. Time resolved and low temperature absorption spectroscopy and light-induced photocurrent measurements were used in order to study the photochemical cycle and proton transfer in mutant pigments. Chemical modification and crosslinking of both the specific amino acids to the chromophore or to other amino acids were used to elucidate the role of light-induced conformational changes in the photocycle and the structure of the protein in the ground state. The results of this project provided new knowledge on the architecture of the proton transfer pathways inside the protein, on the mechanism of proton release in bR, and on the role of specific amino acid residues in the structure and function of bR.

  17. Proton-proton colliding beam facility ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper attempts to present the status of the ISABELLE construction project, which has the objective of building a 400 + 400 GeV proton colliding beam facility. The major technical features of the superconducting accelerators with their projected performance are described. Progress made so far, difficulties encountered, and the program until completion in 1986 is briefly reviewed

  18. J/ψ production in proton-lead collisions with the central barrel of ALICE at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winn, Michael [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: ALICE-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The description of J/ψ production in proton-proton and its nuclear modification in proton-nucleus collisions remains challenging for theory based on perturbative QCD and factorization. Furthermore, the investigation of J/ψ in pp and p-A collisions represents an important reference for heavy-ion collisions, where charmonium production is seen as a key observable for deconfinement. First results of the nuclear modification factor of inclusive J/ψ in proton-lead collisions with the central barrel of ALICE, both integral as well as differential in transverse momentum, are presented. Model comparisons are discussed.

  19. Study of energetic-particle-irradiation induced biological effect on Rhizopus oryzae through synchrotron-FTIR micro-spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinghua; Qi, Zeming; Huang, Qing; Wei, Xiaoli; Ke, Zhigang; Fang, Yusheng; Tian, Yangchao; Yu, Zengliang

    2013-01-01

    Energetic particles exist ubiquitously and cause varied biological effects such as DNA strand breaks, lipid peroxidation, protein modification, cell apoptosis or death. An emerging biotechnology based on ion-beam technique has been developed to serve as an effective tool for mutation breeding of crops and microbes. In order to improve the effectiveness of ion-beam biotechnology for mutation breeding, it is indispensible to gain a better understanding of the mechanism of the interactions between the energetic ions and biological systems which is still elusive. A new trend is to conduct more comprehensive research which is based on micro-scaled observation of the changes of the cellular structures and compositions under the interactions. For this purpose, advanced synchrotron FTIR (s-FTIR) microscopy was employed to monitor the cellular changes of single fungal hyphae under irradiation of α-particles from 241Am. Intracellular contents of ROS, MDA, GSSG/GSH and activities of CAT and SOD were measured via biochemical assay. Ion-irradiation on Rhizopus oryzae causes localized vacuolation, autolysis of cell wall and membrane, lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and conformational changes of proteins, which have been clearly revealed by the s-FTIR microspectroscopy. The different changes of cell viability, SOD and CAT activities can be explained by the ROS-involved chemical reactions. Evidently, the elevated level of ROS in hyphal cells upon irradiation plays the key role in the caused biological effect. This study demonstrates that s-FTIR microspectroscopy is an effective tool to study the damage of fungal hyphae caused by ionizing radiation and it facilitates the exploit of the mechanism for the interactions between the energetic ions and biological systems.

  20. Beam-induced magnetic property modifications: Basics, nanostructure fabrication and potential applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devolder, T.; Bernas, H.; Ravelosona, D.; Chappert, C.; Pizzini, S.; Vogel, J.; Ferre, J.; Jamet, J.-P.; Chen, Y.; Mathet, V.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed an irradiation technique that allows us to tune the magnetic properties of thin films without affecting their roughness. We discuss the mechanisms involved and the applications. He + ion irradiation of Co/Pt multilayers lowers their magnetic anisotropy in a controlled way, reducing the coercive force and then leading to in-plane magnetization. By X-ray reflectometry, we study how irradiation-induced structural modifications correlate with magnetic properties. We also report the L1 0 chemical ordering of FePt by irradiation at 280 deg. C, and the consequent increase of magnetic anisotropy. Planar magnetic patterning at the sub 50 nm scale can be achieved when the irradiation is performed through a mask. New magnetic behaviors result from the fabrication process. They appear to arise from collateral damage. We model these effects in the case of SiO 2 and W masks. The planarity of irradiation-induced patterning and its ability to independently control nanostructure size and coercivity make it very appealing for magnetic recording on nanostructured media. Finally, possible applications to the granular media used in current hard disk drive storage technology are discussed

  1. Proton storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, R.R.

    1978-04-01

    A discussion is given of proton storage ring beam dynamic characteristics. Topics considered include: (1) beam energy; (2) beam luminosity; (3) limits on beam current; (4) beam site; (5) crossing angle; (6) beam--beam interaction; (7) longitudinal instability; (8) effects of scattering processes; (9) beam production; and (10) high magnetic fields. Much of the discussion is related to the design parameters of ISABELLE, a 400 x 400 GeV proton---proton intersecting storage accelerator to be built at Brookhaven National Laboratory

  2. ATLAS Forward Proton Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Grieco, Chiara; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detector system is the measurement of protons scattered diffractively or electromagnetically at very small angles. The full two-arm setup was installed during the 2016/2017 EYETS. This allows measurements of processes with two forward protons: central diffraction, exclusive production, and two-photon processes. In 2017, AFP participated in the ATLAS high-luminosity data taking on the day-by-day basis. In addition, several special runs with reduced luminosity were taken. The poster will present the AFP detectors and the lessons learned from the last year operation and some performance from 2016 and 2017.

  3. UV irradiation-induced methionine oxidation in human skin keratins: Mass spectrometry-based non-invasive proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seon Hwa; Matsushima, Keita; Miyamoto, Kohei; Oe, Tomoyuki

    2016-02-05

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is the major environmental factor that causes oxidative skin damage. Keratins are the main constituents of human skin and have been identified as oxidative target proteins. We have recently developed a mass spectrometry (MS)-based non-invasive proteomic methodology to screen oxidative modifications in human skin keratins. Using this methodology, UV effects on methionine (Met) oxidation in human skin keratins were investigated. The initial screening revealed that Met(259), Met(262), and Met(296) in K1 keratin were the most susceptible oxidation sites upon UVA (or UVB) irradiation of human tape-stripped skin. Subsequent liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-MS and tandem MS analyses confirmed amino acid sequences and oxidation sites of tryptic peptides D(290)VDGAYMTK(298) (P1) and N(258)MQDMVEDYR(267) (P2). The relative oxidation levels of P1 and P2 increased in a time-dependent manner upon UVA irradiation. Butylated hydroxytoluene was the most effective antioxidant for artifactual oxidation of Met residues. The relative oxidation levels of P1 and P2 after UVA irradiation for 48 h corresponded to treatment with 100mM hydrogen peroxide for 15 min. In addition, Met(259) was oxidized by only UVA irradiation. The Met sites identified in conjunction with the current proteomic methodology can be used to evaluate skin damage under various conditions of oxidative stress. We demonstrated that the relative Met oxidation levels in keratins directly reflected UV-induced damages to human tape-stripped skin. Human skin proteins isolated by tape stripping were analyzed by MS-based non-invasive proteomic methodology. Met(259), Met(262), and Met(296) in K1 keratin were the most susceptible oxidation sites upon UV irradiation. Met(259) was oxidized by only UVA irradiation. Quantitative LC/ESI-SRM/MS analyses confirmed a time-dependent increase in the relative oxidation of target peptides (P1 and P2) containing these Met residues, upon UVA irradiation

  4. In medium modification of nucleon electromagnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, F.; Rakhimov, A.; Yakhsiev, U.

    1997-01-01

    Since nucleons are composite objects, their internal structure is expected to be changed by nuclear environment. A Skyrme like Lagrangian is proposed to consider such effects, namely the modification of electromagnetic (EM) properties of the nucleon. The static properties and EM form factors were obtained. It was shown that the charge radius of the nucleon increased in medium and the mass and axial coupling constant are reduced. The enhancement of magnetic moment of proton is smaller than that obtained in non-topological soliton model.Obtained results may be useful in electron nucleus scattering analysis.(A.A.D.)

  5. Proton computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, K.M.

    1978-01-01

    The use of protons or other heavy charged particles instead of x rays in computed tomography (CT) is explored. The results of an experimental implementation of proton CT are presented. High quality CT reconstructions are obtained at an average dose reduction factor compared with an EMI 5005 x-ray scanner of 10:1 for a 30-cm-diameter phantom and 3.5:1 for a 20-cm diameter. The spatial resolution is limited by multiple Coulomb scattering to about 3.7 mm FWHM. Further studies are planned in which proton and x-ray images of fresh human specimens will be compared. Design considerations indicate that a clinically useful proton CT scanner is eminently feasible

  6. Electron - proton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiik, B.H.

    1985-01-01

    Electron-proton storage rings allow us to study the interaction between the two basic constituents of matter, electrons and quarks at very short distances. Such machines were first discussed in connection with the ISR but the idea was abandoned because of the anticipated low counting rate. The interest in electron-proton storage rings was rekindeled by the discovery of large pointlike cross sections in lepton-hardon interactions and several/sup 2-15/ projects have been discussed during the past decade. However, despite a glorious past, which includes the discovery of quarks and neutral currents, and a multitude of proposals no electron-proton storage ring has ever been built. What we might learn by studying electron-proton collisions at high energies is discussed. After some brief comments on present proposals the proposed DESY ep project HERA is described as an example of how to realize such a machine

  7. Apparatus for proton radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus for effecting diagnostic proton radiography of patients in hospitals comprises a source of negative hydrogen ions, a synchrotron for accelerating the negative hydrogen ions to a predetermined energy, a plurality of stations for stripping extraction of a radiography beam of protons, means for sweeping the extracted beam to cover a target, and means for measuring the residual range, residual energy, or percentage transmission of protons that pass through the target. The combination of information identifying the position of the beam with information about particles traversing the subject and the back absorber is performed with the aid of a computer to provide a proton radiograph of the subject. In an alternate embodiment of the invention, a back absorber comprises a plurality of scintillators which are coupled to detectors. 10 claims, 7 drawing figures

  8. Plant proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaxiola, Roberto A.; Palmgren, Michael Gjedde; Schumacher, Karin

    2007-01-01

    Chemiosmotic circuits of plant cells are driven by proton (H+) gradients that mediate secondary active transport of compounds across plasma and endosomal membranes. Furthermore, regulation of endosomal acidification is critical for endocytic and secretory pathways. For plants to react...

  9. Inauguration of Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    On 5 February 1960, the Proton Synchrotron (PS) was formally inaugurated. The great Danish physicist, Niels Bohr, releases a bottle of champagne against a shielding block to launch the PS on its voyage in physics.

  10. Proton beam therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs

  11. Proton beam therapy facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  12. PROTON MICROSCOPY AT FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrill, F. E.; Mariam, F. G.; Golubev, A. A.; Turtikov, V. I.; Varentsov, D.

    2009-01-01

    Proton radiography was invented in the 1990's at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as a diagnostic to study dynamic material properties under extreme pressures, strain and strain rate. Since this time hundreds of dynamic proton radiography experiments have been performed at LANL and a facility has been commissioned at the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) in Russia for similar applications in dynamic material studies. Recently an international effort has investigated a new proton radiography capability for the study of dynamic material properties at the Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR) located in Darmstadt, Germany. This new Proton microscope for FAIR(PRIOR) will provide radiographic imaging of dynamic systems with unprecedented spatial, temporal and density resolution, resulting in a window for understanding dynamic material properties at new length scales. It is also proposed to install the PRIOR system at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung before installation at FAIR for dynamic experiments with different drivers including high explosives, pulsed power and lasers. The design of the proton microscope and expected radiographic performance is presented.

  13. Multicavity proton cyclotron accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Hirshfield

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available A mechanism for acceleration of protons is described, in which energy gain occurs near cyclotron resonance as protons drift through a sequence of rotating-mode TE_{111} cylindrical cavities in a strong nearly uniform axial magnetic field. Cavity resonance frequencies decrease in sequence from one another with a fixed frequency interval Δf between cavities, so that synchronism can be maintained between the rf fields and proton bunches injected at intervals of 1/Δf. An example is presented in which a 122 mA, 1 MeV proton beam is accelerated to 961 MeV using a cascade of eight cavities in an 8.1 T magnetic field, with the first cavity resonant at 120 MHz and with Δf=8 MHz. Average acceleration gradient exceeds 40 MV/m, average effective shunt impedance is 223 MΩ/m, but maximum surface field in the cavities does not exceed 7.2 MV/m. These features occur because protons make many orbital turns in each cavity and thus experience acceleration from each cavity field many times. Longitudinal and transverse stability appear to be intrinsic properties of the acceleration mechanism, and an example to illustrate this is presented. This acceleration concept could be developed into a proton accelerator for a high-power neutron spallation source, such as that required for transmutation of nuclear waste or driving a subcritical fission burner, provided a number of significant practical issues can be addressed.

  14. Permit application modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This document contains the Permit Application Modifications for the Y-12 Industrial Landfill V site on the Oak Ridge Reservation. These modifications include the assessment of stability of the proposed Landfill V under static and loading conditions. Analyses performed include the general slope stability, veneer stability of the bottom liner and cover system, and a liquefaction potential assessment of the foundation soils.

  15. The management of modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, C.

    1992-01-01

    Description of the management methods of modifications at EDF. To maintain safety standards of the nuclear power station the 'Direction de l'Equipment' and the 'Direction du Parc en Exploitation' have jointly fixed the modalities of management for all modifications and recorded them in a 'Practical Guide'

  16. Permit application modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    This document contains the Permit Application Modifications for the Y-12 Industrial Landfill V site on the Oak Ridge Reservation. These modifications include the assessment of stability of the proposed Landfill V under static and loading conditions. Analyses performed include the general slope stability, veneer stability of the bottom liner and cover system, and a liquefaction potential assessment of the foundation soils

  17. Radioprotection of whole-body γ-irradiation-induced alteration in some haematological parameters by cysteine, vitamin E and their combination in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaheen, A.A.; Hassan, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    Radioprotective effect of cysteine, vitamin E and their combination on γ-irradiation-induced alteration in some haematological parameters in male rats has been studied 24 and 48 hrs after whole-body γ-irradiation at a dose level of 7.5 Gy. The results of this study reveal that γ-irradiation caused a significant decrease in red blood cells (RBCs) count with insignificant change in hemoglobin level, 24 and 48 hrs postirradiation, γ-irradiated rats showed as well a progressive decrease in their blood ATP, and serum-SH levels with a significant increase in blood glutathione (GSH) level. Administration of cysteine or vitamin E preceeding γ-radiation exposure gave a significant radioprotection to the above haematological parameters. However, combination of both agents afforded a better protection, so that most of the measured parameters were restored to the pre-irradiated values. Finally, the data demonstrate that the radioprotection provided by combined adminsistration of vitamin E and cysteine is feasible and perhaps, even more efficient against radiation injury to RBCs. This will appreciate the usage of such combination in protecting the patient during radiotherapy. (orig.) [de

  18. First-principles investigation of neutron-irradiation-induced point defects in B4C, a neutron absorber for sodium-cooled fast nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yan; Yoshida, Katsumi; Yano, Toyohiko

    2018-05-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a leading candidate neutron absorber material for sodium-cooled fast nuclear reactors owing to its excellent neutron-capture capability. The formation and migration energies of the neutron-irradiation-induced defects, including vacancies, neutron-capture reaction products, and knocked-out atoms were studied by density functional theory calculations. The vacancy-type defects tend to migrate to the C–B–C chains of B4C, which indicates that the icosahedral cage structures of B4C have strong resistance to neutron irradiation. We found that lithium and helium atoms had significantly lower migration barriers along the rhombohedral (111) plane of B4C than perpendicular to this plane. This implies that the helium and lithium interstitials tended to follow a two-dimensional diffusion regime in B4C at low temperatures which explains the formation of flat disk like helium bubbles experimentally observed in B4C pellets after neutron irradiation. The knocked-out atoms are considered to be annihilated by the recombination of the close pairs of self-interstitials and vacancies.

  19. Investigation of irradiation induced inter-granular stress corrosion cracking susceptibility on austenitic stainless steels for PWR by simulated radiation induced segregation materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonezawa, Toshio; Fujimoto, Koji; Kanasaki, Hiroshi; Iwamura, Toshihiko [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Takasago R and D Center, Takasago, Hyogo (Japan); Nakada, Shizuo; Ajiki, Kazuhide [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Kobe Shipyard and Machinery Works, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Urata, Sigeru [General Office of Nuclear and Fossil Power Production, Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    An Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) has not been found in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). However, the authors have investigated on the possibility of IASCC so as to be able to estimate the degradation of PWR plants up to the end of their lifetime. In this study, the authors melted the test alloys whose bulk compositions simulated the grain boundary compositions of irradiated Type 304 and Type 316 CW stainless steels. Low chromium, high nickel and silicon (12%Cr-28%Ni-3%Si) steel showed high susceptibility to PWSCC (Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking) by SSRT (Slow Strain Rate Tensile) test in simulated PWR primary water. PWSCC susceptibility of the test steels increases with a decrease of chromium content and a increase of nickel and silicon contents. The aged test steel included coherent M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides with matrices at the grain boundaries showed low PWSCC susceptibility. This tendency is in very good agreement with that of the PWSCC susceptibility of nickel based alloys X-750 and 690. From these results, if there is the possibility of IASCC for austenitic stainless steels in PWRs, in the future, the IASCC shall be caused by the PWSCC as a result of irradiation induced grain boundary segregation. (author)

  20. High-resolution electron microscopy study of electron-irradiation-induced crystalline-to-amorphous transition in α-SiC single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inui, H.; Mori, H.; Sakata, T.

    1992-01-01

    An electron-irradiation-induced crystalline-to-amorphous (CA) transition in α-SiC has been studied by high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM). The irradiation-produced damage structure was examined as a function of dose of electrons by taking high-resolution maps extending from the unirradiated crystalline region to the completely amorphized region. In the intermediate region between those two regions, that is in the CA transition region, the damage structure was essentially a mixture of crystalline and amorphous phases. The volume fraction of the amorphous phase was found to increase with increasing dose of electrons and no discrete crystalline-amorphous interface was observed in the CA transition region. These facts indicate the heterogeneous and gradual nature of the CA transition. In the transition region close to the unirradiated crystalline region, a sort of fragmentation of the crystal lattice was observed to occur, crystallites with slightly different orientations with respect to the parent crystal were formed owing to the strain around the dispersed local amorphous regions. In the transition region close to the amorphized region, these crystallites were reduced in size and were embedded in an amorphous matrix. This damage structure is the result of the increased volume fraction of the amorphous phase. In the completely amorphized region, no lattice fringes were recognized in the HREM images. The atomistic process of the CA transition is discussed on the basis of the present results and those from previous studies. (Author)

  1. Recruitment of Gr1(+)CD11b (+)F4/80 (+) population in the bone marrow and spleen by irradiation-induced pulmonary damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanasegaran, Suganya; Ito, Sachiko; Nishio, Naomi; Uddin, Mohammad Nizam; Sun, Yang; Isobe, Ken-ichi

    2015-04-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury is a kind of sterile inflammation, which may lead to morbidity and mortality. The mechanism by which ionizing radiation activate the immune system is not well understood. In the present study, we have investigated the immunological responses induced by local irradiation-induced damage in mouse lung. The left lungs of C57BL/6 mice were irradiated at a high dose of 100 Gy. The histology of the lungs and spleen showed evidences of alveolar inflammation and congestion at 2 weeks after X-ray treatment. Also, prominent increase in cells expressing the cell surface markers, Gr(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) and Ly6C(+) Ly6G(+) were observed 2 weeks after X-ray treatment (100 Gy). Gr1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cell depletion by clodronate treatment reversed the histological effects and also failed to recruit Gr(+)CD11b(+) cells or F4/80(+) cells caused by irradiation. The origin of recruited Gr1(+)CD11b(+) cells was found to be a mixed resident and recruited phenotype.

  2. Ion irradiation induced order-to-disorder transformations in δ-phase Sc4-xZr3+xO12+x/2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J.; Wang, Y.Q.; Tang, M.; Valdez, J.A.; Sickafus, K.E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of stoichiometry on crystal structure transformations in derivative fluorite compounds known as delta (δ) phase. In this study, polycrystalline δ-phase ceramic pellets were prepared with stoichiometries given by Sc 4-x Zr 3+x O 12+x/2 (x = 0, 0.77 and 1.20) . The pressed and polished pellets were then irradiated under cryogenic conditions with 200 keV Ne + ions to fluences ranging from 1-5 x 10 14 Ne/cm 2 . An order-to-disorder (O-D) transformation was observed for all compositions, as determined using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD). However, the transformation threshold dose was found to systematically decrease with increasing ZrO 2 content: ∼0.2, ∼0.16, and ∼0.08 dpa for Sc 4-x Zr 3+x O 12+x/2 with x = 0, 0.77, and 1.20, respectively. These irradiation-induced phase transformation results are discussed in terms of the crystal structure of the δ-phase.

  3. Identification of equilibrium and irradiation-induced defects in nuclear ceramics: electronic structure calculations of defect properties and positron annihilation characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiktor, Julia

    2015-01-01

    During in-pile irradiation the fission of actinide nuclei causes the creation of large amounts of defects, which affect the physical and chemical properties of materials inside the reactor, in particular the fuel and structural materials. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) can be used to characterize irradiation induced defects, empty or containing fission products. This non-destructive experimental technique involves detecting the radiation generated during electron-positron annihilation in a sample and deducing the properties of the material studied. As positrons get trapped in open volume defects in solids, by measuring their lifetime and momentum distributions of the annihilation radiation, one can obtain information on the open and the chemical environments of the defects. In this work electronic structure calculations of positron annihilation characteristics were performed using two-component density functional theory (TCDFT). To calculate the momentum distributions of the annihilation radiation, we implemented the necessary methods in the open-source ABINIT program. The theoretical results have been used to contribute to the identification of the vacancy defects in two nuclear ceramics, silicon carbide (SiC) and uranium dioxide (UO 2 ). (author) [fr

  4. Study on expression of SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 and SHP-2 in γ-ray irradiation-induced thymus lymphoma in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Dingde; Chen Qi; Han Ling; Cai Jianming; Li Bailong; Huang Yuecheng; Gao Jianguo; Sun Suping

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of SH2 domain containing-protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 and SHP-2 in γ-ray irradiation-induced thymus lymphoma in mice. Methods: Altogether 338 BALB/c mice were randomly divided into irradiation groups and controls. Irradiation groups which were irradiated with γ-rays included canceration groups confirmed with histology and uncanceration groups. The controls were fed synchronistically with irradiation groups. The expression of SHP-1 and SHP-2 was detected with Western blot in thymus cells. Results: The expression of SHP-1 in canceration groups was much higher than that in uncanceration groups and controls significantly, while the expression of SHP-2 in canceration groups was higher than that in uncanceration groups and controls. When authors detected the expression of SHP-2 with Western blot, the authors found another protein with a molecular weight of 55x10 3 , which expression in canceration groups was higher than that in uncanceration groups and controls. Conclusion: The expression of SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 and SHP-2 is significantly increased in canceration groups, suggesting that SHP-1 and SHP-2 may be related with γ-ray induced thymus lymphoma in mice. Further research is expected on the relationship between development of cancer and SHP-1 and SHP-2

  5. The effect of the antipsoriatic drug metabolite etretin (Ro 10-1670) on UVB irradiation induced changes in the metabolism of arachidonic acid in human keratinocytes in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punnonen, Kari; Jansen, C.T.; Puustinen, Tapio

    1986-01-01

    [ 14 C]Arachidonic acid was avidly incorporated into human keratinocytes in culture and following exposure to UVB irradiation of 9 mJ/cm 2 (erythemally effective, EE) substantial amounts of 14 C-radiolabel were released from the cells. The release of radiolabel was accompanied by a decrease in the labelling of phosphatidylethanolamine whereas the labelling of triacylglycerols and cholesteryl esters was increased. Keratinocytes produced significant amounts of prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) and following UVB irradiation of 9 mJ/cm 2 (EE) the formation of prostaglandin E 2 was increased. Etretin (Ro 10-1670), the active metabolite of the antipsoriatic drug etretinate (Ro 10-9359), affected significantly neither the total release of radiolabel induced by UVB nor the formation of prostaglandin E 2 . However, in the presence of etretin the UVB irradiation induced transfer of [ 14 C]arachidonic acid into triacylglycerols and cholesteryl esters was not increased as much as in the corresponding experiments without etretin. On the basis of the present study it appears that etretin dose not interfere with the release of arachidonic acid in amounts which could be related to the therapeutic effects of the combination of retinoids with UVB irradiation (Re-UVB) in the treatment of psoriasis. (author)

  6. The effect of the initial microstructure in terms of sink strength on the ion-irradiation-induced hardening of ODS alloys studied by nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Binghuang; Heintze, Cornelia; Bergner, Frank; Ulbricht, Andreas; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Oñorbe, Elvira; de Carlan, Yann; Wang, Tieshan

    2017-11-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr alloys are promising candidates for structural components in nuclear energy production. The small grain size, high dislocation density and the presence of particle matrix interfaces may contribute to the improved irradiation resistance of this class of alloys by providing sinks and/or traps for irradiation-induced point defects. The extent to which these effects impede hardening is still a matter of debate. To address this problem, a set of alloys of different grain size, dislocation density and oxide particle distribution were selected. In this study, three-step Fe-ion irradiation at both 300 °C and 500 °C up to 10 dpa was used to introduce damage in five different materials including three 9Cr-ODS alloys, one 14Cr-ODS alloy and one 14Cr-non-ODS alloy. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small angle neutron scattering (SANS), and nanoindentation testing were applied, the latter before and after irradiation. Significant hardening occurred for all materials and temperatures, but it is distinctly lower in the 14Cr alloys and also tends to be lower at the higher temperature. The possible contribution of Cr-rich α‧-phase particles is addressed. The impact of grain size, dislocation density and particle distribution is demonstrated in terms of an empirical trend between total sink strength and hardening.

  7. Thymosin alpha 1 (Ta-1) induction of spleen cell proliferation and production of interleukin 2 (IL2) after irradiation-induced depression of systematic cellular immunity (SCI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, W.C.; Revie, D.R.; Oliver, J.H.; Hasslinger, B.J.; Suter, C.M.; Blanchard, C.L.; Goldstein, A.L.; Chretien, P.B.

    1986-01-01

    To assess the effects of Ta-1 on recovery from irradiation induced depression of SCI, C3H mice were given 400 rads (240kV) on each of 3 alternate days via head, chest and pelvic portals and assays performed 2 days after the last exposure. Compared with shams, total spleen cell counts and production of IL2, total peripheral blood lymphocyte and T-cell levels, and delayed type hypersensitivity to oxazolone (DTH-O) were all similarly depressed in the three portal groups (p < .0001). Following optimum doses of Ta-1, administered daily starting with the first day of irradiation, DTH-O in the head and chest groups was restored, but in the pelvic group was only partially corrected. Changes in total spleen cell counts and IL2 production paralleled and covaried with DTH-O (p < .0001). The results offer IL2 induced lymphocyte proliferation as a reparative mechanism after radiation-induced depression of SCI. The incomplete restoration of SCI in the pelvic group suggests that generation of IL2-producing spleen cells by Ta-1 requires pelvic and other bone marrow lymphocyte precursors

  8. Proton Radiography to Improve Proton Radiotherapy : Simulation Study at Different Proton Beam Energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegun, Aleksandra; Takatsu, Jun; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; van der Graaf, Emiel; van Beuzekom, Martin; Visser, Jan; Brandenburg, Sijtze

    To improve the quality of cancer treatment with protons, a translation of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images into a map of the proton stopping powers needs to be more accurate. Proton stopping powers determined from CT images have systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a

  9. Observations of defect structure evolution in proton and Ni ion irradiated Ni-Cr binary alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, Samuel A., E-mail: sabriggs2@wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Barr, Christopher M. [Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Pakarinen, Janne [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); SKC-CEN Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Mamivand, Mahmood [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Hattar, Khalid [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Morgan, Dane D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Taheri, Mitra [Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Two binary Ni-Cr model alloys with 5 wt% Cr and 18 wt% Cr were irradiated using 2 MeV protons at 400 and 500 °C and 20 MeV Ni{sup 4+} ions at 500 °C to investigate microstructural evolution as a function of composition, irradiation temperature, and irradiating ion species. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was applied to study irradiation-induced void and faulted Frank loops microstructures. Irradiations at 500 °C were shown to generate decreased densities of larger defects, likely due to increased barriers to defect nucleation as compared to 400 °C irradiations. Heavy ion irradiation resulted in a larger density of smaller voids when compared to proton irradiations, indicating in-cascade clustering of point defects. Cluster dynamics simulations were in good agreement with the experimental findings, suggesting that increases in Cr content lead to an increase in interstitial binding energy, leading to higher densities of smaller dislocation loops in the Ni-18Cr alloy as compared to the Ni-5Cr alloy. - Highlights: • Binary Ni-Cr alloys were irradiated with protons or Ni ions at 400 and 500 °C. • Higher irradiation temperatures yield increased size, decreased density of defects. • Hypothesize that varying Cr content affects interstitial binding energy. • Fitting CD models for loop nucleation to data supports this hypothesis.

  10. Chemical changes in PMMA as a function of depth due to proton beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilasi, S.Z.; Huszank, R.; Szikra, D.; Vaczi, T.; Rajta, I.; Nagy, I.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Chemical changes were investigated as a function of depth in proton irradiated PMMA → The depth profile of numerous functional groups was determined along the depth → The degree of chemical modification strongly depends on the LET of protons → At low-fluences the zone of maximal modification is restricted to the Bragg peak → At higher fluences the zone of max. modification extends towards the sample surface. - Abstract: In this work we determined depth profiles of the chemical change in PMMA irradiated with 2 MeV protons by infrared spectroscopic and micro-Raman measurements. The measurements were carried out on 10 μm thin stacked foil samples using an infrared spectrometer in universal attenuated total reflectance (UATR) and transmission modes; while the thick samples were analyzed with a confocal micro-Raman spectrometer. The depth profiles of the changes formed due to the various delivered fluences were compared to each other. The measurements show the strong dependence of the degree of modification on the energy transfer from the decelerating protons. Depth profiles reveal that at the fluences applied in this work the entire irradiated volume suffered some chemical modifications. In case of low-fluence samples the zone of maximal modification is restricted only to the Bragg peak, but with increasing fluences the region of maximal modification extends towards the sample surface.

  11. Mechanical properties of low temperature proton irradiated single crystal copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schildcrout, M.

    1975-01-01

    Single crystal copper samples, of varying degrees of cold work, were irradiated near either liquid helium or liquid nitrogen temperature by 10.1-MeV protons. The internal friction and dynamic Young's modulus were observed as a function of either temperature or integrated proton flux. The primary effect of irradiation was to produce dislocation pinning. The initial pinning rate was found to be very sensitive to cold work. During irradiation it was found that heavily cold worked samples (25 percent compression) exhibited, almost exclusively, exponential pinning given by Y = e/sup --lambda phi/. This is attributed to the immobilization, rather than shortening, of loop lengths and is characterized by the pinning constant lambda. Exponential pinning was also found, to a smaller degree, in less heavily cold worked samples. Cold work appears to reduce the ''effective volume'' within which the defect clusters produced by irradiation, can immobilize dislocation segments. The bulk effect was observed after dislocation pinning was completed. Expressed in terms of the fractional change in Young's modulus per unit concentration of irradiation induced defects, it was measured at liquid helium temperature to be --18.5 +- 3. An anelastic process occurring near 10 0 K for low kHz frequencies and due to stress-induced ordering of point defects produced by irradiation has also been studied. The peak height per unit fluence was found to decrease with increasing cold work. The peak was not observed in samples compressed 25 percent. For the most carefully handled sample the activation energy was (1.28 +- 0.05) x 10 -2 eV, the attempt frequency was 10/sup 11.6 +- .8/ s -1 , the shape factor was 0.20, and the half width of the peak was 11 percent larger than the theoretical value calculated from the Debye equation for a single relaxation process

  12. Modifications to POISSON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harwood, L.H.

    1981-01-01

    At MSU we have used the POISSON family of programs extensively for magnetic field calculations. In the presently super-saturated computer situation, reducing the run time for the program is imperative. Thus, a series of modifications have been made to POISSON to speed up convergence. Two of the modifications aim at having the first guess solution as close as possible to the final solution. The other two aim at increasing the convergence rate. In this discussion, a working knowledge of POISSON is assumed. The amount of new code and expected time saving for each modification is discussed

  13. Proton therapy in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Proton therapy has been in use since 1954 and over 25,000 patients have been treated worldwide. Until recently most patients were treated at physics research facilities but with the development of more compact and reliable accelerators it is now possible to realistically plan for proton therapy in an Australian hospital. The Australian National Proton Project has been formed to look at the feasibility of a facility which would be primarily for patient treatment but would also be suitable for research and commercial applications. A detailed report will be produced by the end of the year. The initial clinical experience was mainly with small tumours and other lesions close to critical organs. Large numbers of eye tumours have also been treated. Protons have a well-defined role in these situations and are now being used in the treatment of more common cancers. With the development of hospital-based facilities, over 2,500 patients with prostate cancer have been treated using a simple technique which gives results at least as good as radical surgery, external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy. Importantly, the incidence of severe complications is very low. There are encouraging results in many disease sites including lung, liver, soft tissue sarcomas and oesophagus. As proton therapy becomes more widely available, randomised trials comparing it with conventional radiotherapy or Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) will be possible. In most situations the use of protons will enable a higher dose to be given safely but in situations where local control rates are already satisfactory, protons are expected to produce less complications than conventional treatment. The initial costs of a proton facility are high but the recurrent costs are similar to other forms of high technology radiotherapy. . Simple treatment techniques with only a few fields are usually possible and proton therapy avoids the high integral doses associated with IMRT. This reduction in

  14. Proton dynamics in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Veronica; De Milito, Angelo; Harguindey, Salvador; Reshkin, Stephan J; Wahl, Miriam L; Rauch, Cyril; Chiesi, Antonio; Pouysségur, Jacques; Gatenby, Robert A; Rivoltini, Licia; Fais, Stefano

    2010-06-15

    Cancer remains a leading cause of death in the world today. Despite decades of research to identify novel therapeutic approaches, durable regressions of metastatic disease are still scanty and survival benefits often negligible. While the current strategy is mostly converging on target-therapies aimed at selectively affecting altered molecular pathways in tumor cells, evidences are in parallel pointing to cell metabolism as a potential Achilles' heel of cancer, to be disrupted for achieving therapeutic benefit. Critical differences in the metabolism of tumor versus normal cells, which include abnormal glycolysis, high lactic acid production, protons accumulation and reversed intra-extracellular pH gradients, make tumor site a hostile microenvironment where only cancer cells can proliferate and survive. Inhibiting these pathways by blocking proton pumps and transporters may deprive cancer cells of a key mechanism of detoxification and thus represent a novel strategy for a pleiotropic and multifaceted suppression of cancer cell growth.Research groups scattered all over the world have recently started to investigate various aspects of proton dynamics in cancer cells with quite encouraging preliminary results. The intent of unifying investigators involved in this research line led to the formation of the "International Society for Proton Dynamics in Cancer" (ISPDC) in January 2010. This is the manifesto of the newly formed society where both basic and clinical investigators are called to foster translational research and stimulate interdisciplinary collaboration for the development of more specific and less toxic therapeutic strategies based on proton dynamics in tumor cell biology.

  15. Proton dynamics in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouysségur Jacques

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer remains a leading cause of death in the world today. Despite decades of research to identify novel therapeutic approaches, durable regressions of metastatic disease are still scanty and survival benefits often negligible. While the current strategy is mostly converging on target-therapies aimed at selectively affecting altered molecular pathways in tumor cells, evidences are in parallel pointing to cell metabolism as a potential Achilles' heel of cancer, to be disrupted for achieving therapeutic benefit. Critical differences in the metabolism of tumor versus normal cells, which include abnormal glycolysis, high lactic acid production, protons accumulation and reversed intra-extracellular pH gradients, make tumor site a hostile microenvironment where only cancer cells can proliferate and survive. Inhibiting these pathways by blocking proton pumps and transporters may deprive cancer cells of a key mechanism of detoxification and thus represent a novel strategy for a pleiotropic and multifaceted suppression of cancer cell growth. Research groups scattered all over the world have recently started to investigate various aspects of proton dynamics in cancer cells with quite encouraging preliminary results. The intent of unifying investigators involved in this research line led to the formation of the "International Society for Proton Dynamics in Cancer" (ISPDC in January 2010. This is the manifesto of the newly formed society where both basic and clinical investigators are called to foster translational research and stimulate interdisciplinary collaboration for the development of more specific and less toxic therapeutic strategies based on proton dynamics in tumor cell biology.

  16. Polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized proton beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the presence of numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Careful and tedious minimization of polarization loss at each of these resonances allowed acceleration of polarized proton beams up to 22 GeV. It has been the hope that Siberian Snakes, which are local spin rotators inserted into ring accelerators, would eliminate these resonances and allow acceleration of polarized beams with the same ease and efficiency that is now routine for unpolarized beams. First tests at IUCF with a full Siberian Snake showed that the spin dynamics with a Snake can be understood in detail. The author now has results of the first tests of a partial Siberian Snake at the AGS, accelerating polarized protons to an energy of about 25 GeV. These successful tests of storage and acceleration of polarized proton beams open up new possibilities such as stored polarized beams for internal target experiments and high energy polarized proton colliders

  17. Journal of Proton Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Journal of Proton Therapy (JPT is an international open access, peer-reviewed journal, which publishes original research, technical reports, reviews, case reports, editorials, and other materials on proton therapy with focus on radiation oncology, medical physics, medical dosimetry, and radiation therapy.No article processing/submission feeNo publication feePeer-review completion within 3-6 weeksImmediate publication after the completion of final author proofreadDOI assignment for each published articleFree access to published articles for all readers without any access barriers or subscriptionThe views and opinions expressed in articles are those of the author/s and do not necessarily reflect the policies of the Journal of Proton Therapy.Authors are encouraged to submit articles for publication in the inaugural issue of the Journal of Proton Therapy by online or email to editor@protonjournal.comOfficial Website of Journal of Proton Therapy: http://www.protonjournal.org/

  18. Medical Proton Accelerator Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comsan, M.N.H.

    2008-01-01

    A project for a medical proton accelerator for cancer treatment is outlined. The project is motivated by the need for a precise modality for cancer curing especially in children. Proton therapy is known by its superior radiation and biological effectiveness as compared to photon or electron therapy. With 26 proton and 3 heavy-ion therapy complexes operating worldwide only one (p) exists in South Africa, and none in south Asia and the Middle East. The accelerator of choice should provide protons with energy 75 MeV for eye treatment and 250 MeV for body treatment. Four treatment rooms are suggested: two with isocentric gantries, one with fixed beams and one for development. Passive scanning is recommended. The project can serve Middle East and North Africa with ∼ 400 million populations. The annual capacity of the project is estimated as 1,100 to be compared with expected radiation cases eligible for proton cancer treatment of not less than 200,000

  19. Proton relativistic model; Modelo relativistico do proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Wilson Roberto Barbosa de

    1996-12-31

    In this dissertation, we present a model for the nucleon, which is composed by three relativistic quarks interacting through a contract force. The nucleon wave-function was obtained from the Faddeev equation in the null-plane. The covariance of the model under kinematical null-plane boots is discussed. The electric proton form-factor, calculated from the Faddeev wave-function, was in agreement with the data for low-momentum transfers and described qualitatively the asymptotic region for momentum transfers around 2 GeV. (author) 42 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Advanced Proton Conducting Polymer Electrolytes for Electrochemical Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Han

    Research on solid electrochemical energy storage devices aims to provide high performance, low cost, and safe operation solutions for emerging applications from flexible consumer electronics to microelectronics. Polymer electrolytes, minimizing device sealing and liquid electrolyte leakage, are key enablers for these next-generation technologies. In this thesis, a novel proton-conducing polymer electrolyte system has been developed using heteropolyacids (HPAs) and polyvinyl alcohol for electrochemical capacitors. A thorough understanding of proton conduction mechanisms of HPAs together with the interactions among HPAs, additives, and polymer framework has been developed. Structure and chemical bonding of the electrolytes have been studied extensively to identify and elucidate key attributes affecting the electrolyte properties. Numerical models describing the proton conduction mechanism have been applied to differentiate those attributes. The performance optimization of the polymer electrolytes through additives, polymer structural modifications, and synthesis of alternative HPAs has achieved several important milestones, including: (a) high proton mobility and proton density; (b) good ion accessibility at electrode/electrolyte interface; (c) wide electrochemical stability window; and (d) good environmental stability. Specifically, high proton mobility has been addressed by cross-linking the polymer framework to improve the water storage capability at normal-to-high humidity conditions (e.g. 50-80% RH) as well as by incorporating nano-fillers to enhance the water retention at normal humidity levels (e.g. 30-60% RH). High proton density has been reached by utilizing additional proton donors (i.e. acidic plasticizers) and by developing different HPAs. Good ion accessibility has been achieved through addition of plasticizers. Electrochemical stability window of the electrolyte system has also been investigated and expanded by utilizing HPAs with different heteroatoms

  1. Accommodating for plant modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weirich, P.H.

    1977-01-01

    Modification to a nuclear power plant may have different causes: 1) new instructions by the authorities; 2) changes of the marginal conditions on the construction site; 3) progress in the technological development. - Examples from different plants are supposed to demonstrate how such changes influence the planning or the construction and how they are integrated in the process of preparation. A distinction can be made between modifications before the completion of the submission of the order, during the phase of preparatory planning and during the construction phase. Of great importance are especially modifications made after the beginning of the construction works, since, in general, there is little scope for technical modifications and since consequences for the time schedule are to be expected. (orig.) [de

  2. Structural dynamic modification

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and stiffness matrices) andaor modal parameters, in order to acquire some ... For the above reasons, another modification approach is presented here ... The data necessary to solve the direct problem are dynamic behaviour of the original.

  3. Synchrotron radiation from protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutt, S.K.

    1992-12-01

    Synchrotron radiation from protons, though described by the same equations as the radiation from electrons, exhibits a number of interesting features on account of the parameters reached in praxis. In this presentation, we shall point out some of the features relating to (i) normal synchrotron radiation from dipoles in proton machines such as the High Energy Booster and the Superconducting Super Collider; (ii) synchrotron radiation from short dipoles, and its application to light monitors for proton machines, and (iii) synchrotron radiation from undulators in the limit when, the deflection parameter is much smaller than unity. The material for this presentation is taken largely from the work of Hofmann, Coisson, Bossart, and their collaborators, and from a paper by Kim. We shall emphasize the qualitative aspects of synchrotron radiation in the cases mentioned above, making, when possible, simple arguments for estimating the spectral and angular properties of the radiation. Detailed analyses can be found in the literature

  4. Polarized proton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    High energy polarized beam collisions will open up the unique physics opportunities of studying spin effects in hard processes. This will allow the study of the spin structure of the proton and also the verification of the many well documented expectations of spin effects in perturbative QCD and parity violation in W and Z production. Proposals for polarized proton acceleration for several high energy colliders have been developed. A partial Siberian Snake in the AGS has recently been successfully tested and full Siberian Snakes, spin rotators, and polarimeters for RHIC are being developed to make the acceleration of polarized beams to 250 GeV possible. This allows for the unique possibility of colliding two 250 GeV polarized proton beams at luminosities of up to 2 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1

  5. Effects of a low-energy proton irradiation on n+/p-AlInGaP solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.S.; Yamaguchi, M.; Ekins-Daukes, N.J.; Khan, A.; Takamoto, T.; Imaizumi, M.; Ohshima, T.; Itoh, H.

    2006-01-01

    For the first time, by deep-level transient spectroscopy, 30keV proton irradiation-induced defects in n + /p-AlInGaP solar cells have been observed. After the 30keV proton irradiation, new deep-level defects such as two majority-carrier (hole) traps HP1 (E V +0.98eV, N T =3.8x10 14 cm -3 ) and HP2, and two minority-carrier (electron) traps EP1 (E C -0.71eV, N T =2.0x10 15 cm -3 ) and EP2 have been observed in p-AlInGaP. The introduction rate of majority-carrier trap center (HP1) is 380cm -1 , which is lower than that (1500cm -1 ) in 100keV proton-irradiated p-InGaP. From the minority-carrier injection annealing for HP1 defect and carrier concentration in 30keV proton-irradiated p-AlInGaP, HP1 defect is likely to act as a recombination center as well as a compensator center

  6. Pragmatic Graph Rewriting Modifications

    OpenAIRE

    Rodgers, Peter; Vidal, Natalia

    1999-01-01

    We present new pragmatic constructs for easing programming in visual graph rewriting programming languages. The first is a modification to the rewriting process for nodes the host graph, where nodes specified as 'Once Only' in the LHS of a rewrite match at most once with a corresponding node in the host graph. This reduces the previously common use of tags to indicate the progress of matching in the graph. The second modification controls the application of LHS graphs, where those specified a...

  7. Current-current interaction picture for proton-proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, D.J.; Lo, S.Y.

    1979-01-01

    The authors propose that color current - color current interaction is reponsible for small angle elastic proton proton scattering at asymptotic energy. Excellent fits are obtained for all data above 12 GeV/c which covers twelve orders of magnitude

  8. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Pedersen, Morten Jeppe; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Veierskov, Bjarke

    2008-01-01

    The very high mobility of protons in aqueous solutions demands special features of membrane proton transporters to sustain efficient yet regulated proton transport across biological membranes. By the use of the chemical energy of ATP, plasma-membrane-embedded ATPases extrude protons from cells...... of plants and fungi to generate electrochemical proton gradients. The recently published crystal structure of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase contributes to our knowledge about the mechanism of these essential enzymes. Taking the biochemical and structural data together, we are now able to describe the basic...... molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological...

  9. Modification of JRR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyasaka, Yasuhiko

    1978-01-01

    This report gives an outline of some of the main modifications carried out around the Reactor Core on the Research Reactor JRR-2, at the Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI. The JRR-2 was shut down in December 1973, to improve it in heavy water leakage from the metal packing between core tank and support ring, corrosion of the lower shielding plug, and fault in the control-rod mechanism. Main modifications were a standing seal weld at the support ring to stop heavy water leakage, replacement of the reactor top shield and improvement of the helium system. The control-rod assemblies and the refueling devices were replaced by the newly designed ones also. In addition to the modification plan, the irradiated air exhaust system was improved to reduce radioactive argon gas release through the stack. Works were completed successfully in September 1975. But a light water leakage occurred at the stand pipe below the light water tank on November 11, 1975, which was repaired in about 4 months. When considering the operation of above 5,000 hours after the modification, however, the quality of the modification work may be said to be quite satisfactory. The present report in which works to the completion are described may be valuable as a record of reactor modification which is a new experience at JAERI. (auth.)

  10. Proton tunneling in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-10-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  11. Proton irradiation and endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.H.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Salmon, Y.L.; Eason, R.L.; Boster, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    It was found that female rhesus monkeys given single total-body exposures of protons of varying energies developed endometriosis at a frequency significantly higher than that of nonirradiated animals of the same age. The minimum latency period was determined to be 7 years after the proton exposure. The doses and energies of the radiation received by the experimental animals were within the range that could be received by an aircrew member in near-earth orbit during a random solar flare event. It is concluded that endometriosis should be a consideration in assessing the risk of delayed radiation effects in female crew members. 15 references

  12. Diagnosis by proton bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steward, V.W.; Koehler, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    Beams of monoenergetic protons or other charged ions are passed through the living human body to detect abnormalities and obstructions in body tissue, which abnormalities and obstructions are visualized as density variations in the particle image emerging from the body part under investigation. The particles used are preferably protons having an energy of 100 to 300 MeV, more especially 200 to 300 MeV. The method is of use in detecting inter alia tumors, blood clots, infarcts, soft tissue lesions and multiple sclerosis in patients without exposure to high radiation dosages. 6 claims, 2 drawing figures

  13. Do protons decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litchfield, P.J.

    1984-09-01

    The experimental status of proton decay is reviewed after the Leipzig International conference, July 1984. A brief comparative description of the currently active experiments is given. From the overall samples of contained events it can be concluded that the experiments are working well and broadly agree with each other. The candidates for proton decay from each experiment are examined. Although several experiments report candidates at a higher rate than expected from background calculations, the validity of these calculations is still open to doubt. (author)

  14. Proton tunneling in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-01-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  15. Proton Beam Writing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajta, I.; Szilasi, S.Z.; Csige, I.; Baradacs, E.

    2005-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Refractive index depth profile in PMMA due to proton irradiation Proton Beam Writing has been successfully used to create buried channel waveguides in PMMA, which suggested that proton irradiation increases the refractive index. To investigate this effect, PMMA samples were irradiated by 1.7-2.1 MeV proton beam. Spectroscopic Ellipsometry has been used to investigate the depth profile of the refractive index. An increase of the refractive index was observed in the order of 0.01, which is approximately one order of magnitude higher than the detection limit. The highest increase of the refractive index occurs at the end of range, i.e. we found a good correlation with the Bragg curve of the energy loss. Hardness changes in PMMA due to proton beam micromachining As protons penetrate a target material and lose their energy according to the Bragg curve, the energy loss is different at different depths. This causes depth-dependent changes of some physical properties in the target material (e.g. refractive index, hardness). In order to characterize the changes of hardness and other mechanical properties as a function of beam penetration depth, systematic investigations have been performed on PMMA, the most common resist material used in proton beam micromachining. Silicon check valve made by proton beam micromachining The possible application of Proton Beam Micromachining (PBM) has been demonstrated by a few authors for creating 3D Si microstructures. In this work we present alternative methods for the formation of a simple a non-return valve for microfluidic applications. Two different approaches have been applied, in both cases we exploited characteristic features of the PBM technique and the selective formation and dissolution of porous Si over the implantation damaged areas. In the first case we implanted 10 μm thick cantilever-type membrane of the valve normally to the crystal surface and at 30-60 degrees to the sidewalls of the

  16. Androgen-mediated development of irradiation-induced thyroid tumors in rats: dependence on animal age during interval of androgen replacement in castrated males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, C.; Oslapas, R.; Nayyar, R.; Paloyan, E.

    1986-01-01

    When male Long-Evans rats at age 8 weeks were radiation treated (40 microCi Na131I), thyroid follicular adenomas and carcinomas were observed at age 24 months with a high incidence of 94%. Castration of males prior to irradiation significantly reduced this tumor incidence to 60%. When testosterone (T) was replaced in castrated, irradiated male rats, differentially increased incidences of thyroid tumors occurred. Immediate (age 2-6 mo) or early (age 6-12 mo) T replacement at approximate physiologic levels led to thyroid follicular tumor incidences of 100 and 82%, respectively, whereas intermediate (12-18 mo) or late (18-24 mo) T treatment led to only 70 and 73% incidences, respectively. Continuous T replacement (2-24 mo) in castrated irradiated male rats raised thyroid tumor incidence to 100%. Since elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) is a reported requisite for development of radiation-associated thyroid tumors, the effects of T on serum TSH levels were examined. Mean serum TSH values in all irradiated animal groups were significantly elevated above age-matched nonirradiated animals at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Serum TSH levels were higher in continuous T-replaced irradiated castrates than in intact, irradiated males, whereas such intact male TSH levels were greater than those for irradiated castrates without T treatment. Interval T replacement in castrated male rats was associated with increased serum TSH levels during the treatment interval and with lowered TSH levels after discontinuation of T treatment, particularly in irradiated rats. However, when irradiated, castrated males received late T replacement (age 18-24 mo), there was no elevation of TSH at the end of the treatment interval. An indirect effect of T via early stimulation of TSH may be partly responsible for the high incidence of irradiation-induced thyroid tumors in rats

  17. Early life hormetic treatments decrease irradiation-induced oxidative damage, increase longevity, and enhance sexual performance during old age in the Caribbean fruit fly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López-Martínez, Giancarlo; Hahn, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Early life events can have dramatic consequences on performance later in life. Exposure to stressors at a young age affects development, the rate of aging, risk of disease, and overall lifespan. In spite of this, mild stress exposure early in life can have beneficial effects on performance later in life. These positive effects of mild stress are referred to as physiological conditioning hormesis. In our current study we used anoxia conditioning hormesis as a pretreatment to reduce oxidative stress and improve organismal performance, lifespan, and healthspan of Caribbean fruit flies. We used gamma irradiation to induce mild oxidative damage in a low-dose experiment, and massive oxidative damage in a separate high-dose experiment, in pharate adult fruit flies just prior to adult emergence. Irradiation-induced oxidative stress leads to reduced adult emergence, flight ability, mating performance, and lifespan. We used a hormetic approach, one hour of exposure to anoxia plus irradiation in anoxia, to lower post-irradiation oxidative damage. We have previously shown that this anoxic-conditioning treatment elevates total antioxidant capacity and lowers post-irradiation oxidative damage to lipids and proteins. In this study, conditioned flies had lower mortality rates and longer lifespan compared to those irradiated without hormetic conditioning. As a metric of healthspan, we tracked mating both at a young age (10 d) and old age (30 d). We found that anoxia-conditioned male flies were more competitive at young ages when compared to unconditioned irradiation stressed male flies, and that the positive effects of anoxic conditioning hormesis on mating success were even more pronounced in older males. Our data shows that physiological conditioning hormesis at a young age, not only improves immediate metrics of organismal performance (emergence, flight, mating), but the beneficial effects also carry into old age by reducing late life oxidative damage and improving lifespan and

  18. Systemic transplantation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells for the regeneration of irradiation-induced salivary gland damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Yol Lim

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Cell-based therapy has been reported to repair or restore damaged salivary gland (SG tissue after irradiation. This study was aimed at determining whether systemic administration of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAdMSCs can ameliorate radiation-induced SG damage. METHODS: hAdMSCs (1 × 10(6 were administered through a tail vein of C3H mice immediately after local irradiation, and then this infusion was repeated once a week for 3 consecutive weeks. At 12 weeks after irradiation, functional evaluations were conducted by measuring salivary flow rates (SFRs and salivation lag times, and histopathologic and immunofluorescence histochemistry studies were performed to assay microstructural changes, apoptosis, and proliferation indices. The engraftment and in vivo differentiation of infused hAdMSCs were also investigated, and the transdifferentiation of hAdMSCs into amylase-producing SG epithelial cells (SGCs was observed in vitro using a co-culture system. RESULTS: The systemic administration of hAdMSCs exhibited improved SFRs at 12 weeks after irradiation. hAdMSC-transplanted SGs showed fewer damaged and atrophied acinar cells and higher mucin and amylase production levels than untreated irradiated SGs. Immunofluorescence TUNEL assays revealed fewer apoptotic cells in the hAdMSC group than in the untreated group. Infused hAdMSCs were detected in transplanted SGs at 4 weeks after irradiation and some cells were found to have differentiated into SGCs. In vitro, a low number of co-cultured hAdMSCs (13%-18% were observed to transdifferentiate into SGCs. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study indicate that hAdMSCs have the potential to protect against irradiation-induced cell loss and to transdifferentiate into SGCs, and suggest that hAdMSC administration should be viewed as a candidate therapy for the treatment of radiation-induced SG damage.

  19. SSR marker analysis on genetic variation of M3 from maize inbred lines 48-2 and R08 after irradiation inducement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qi; Shi Haichun; Ke Yongpei; Yuan Jichao; Yu Xuejie

    2011-01-01

    Analyzing the biological effects and the genetic variations of maize mutagenic progenies is important to facilitate effective selections and utilization of the mutants. In this study, the genetic variation of 103 mutagenic progenies of M 3 lines of inbred lines 48-2 and R08 with 60 Co γ-rays inducement were evaluated with SSR molecular markers. The results indicated that, the amplitude of polymorphism information content (PIC) of the 48-2 and R08 M 3 lines ranged 0.307 ∼ 0.948 and 0.108 ∼ 0.955, with an average of 0.762 and 0.701, respectively. The amplitude of genetic diversity indexes (H') ranged 0.552 ∼ 2.830 and 0.254 ∼ 3.309, with an average of 1.830 and 1.777, respectively. The average value of genetic similarity coefficient of the 49 M 3 lines of 48-2 with its check (M673) was 0.8194. However, the average value of genetic similarity coefficient of the M 3 lines of R08 with its check (M487) was 0.8373. Based on the genetic similarity coefficient, inbred lines 48-2, R08 and their 101 M 3 lines were clustered in 7 and 5 populations respectively. This phenomenon indicated that massive genetic variation could appear in progenies due to irradiation. The strengthen of selection and utilization of mutants based on the breeding objectives and in accordance with the feature and regularity on genetic variations of main characteristics of mutant lines in various populations could be enhanced in breeding program, to some extent, which can increase the breeding efficiency of irradiation induced mutation in maize. (authors)

  20. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung in a relativistic covariant model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinus, Gerard Henk

    1998-01-01

    Proton-proton bremsstrahlung is one of the simplest processes involving the half off-shell NN interaction. Since protons are equally-charged particles with the same mass, electric-dipole radiation is suppressed and higher-order effects play an important role. Thus it is possible to get information

  1. Predictions of diffractive cross sections in proton-proton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goulianos, Konstantin [Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    We review our pre-LHC predictions of the total, elastic, total-inelastic, and diffractive components of proton-proton cross sections at high energies, expressed in the form of unitarized expressions based on a special parton-model approach to diffraction employing inclusive proton parton distribution functions and QCD color factors and compare with recent LHC results.

  2. Human Rights and Behavior Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Philip

    1974-01-01

    Criticisms of behavior modification, which charge that it violates ethical and legal principles, are discussed and reasons are presented to explain behavior modification's susceptibility to attack. (GW)

  3. Progresses in proton radioactivity studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, L. S., E-mail: flidia@ist.utl.pt [Center of Physics and Engineering of Advanced Materials, CeFEMA and Departamento de Física, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Avenida Rovisco Pais, P1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Maglione, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “G. Galilei”, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova, Italy and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova (Italy)

    2016-07-07

    In the present talk, we will discuss recent progresses in the theoretical study of proton radioactivity and their impact on the present understanding of nuclear structure at the extremes of proton stability.

  4. Proton Radiography (pRad)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The proton radiography project has used 800 MeV protons provided by the LANSCE accelerator facility at LANL, to diagnose more than 300 dynamic experiments in support...

  5. Violent collisions of spinning protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krisch, A.D. [Michigan Univ., Spin Physics Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2005-07-01

    The author draws the history of polarized proton beams that has relied on experiments that took place in different accelerators like ZGS (zero gradient synchrotron, Argonne), AGS (Brookhaven) and Fermilab from 1973 till today. The first studies of the behavior and spin-manipulation of polarized protons helped in developing polarized beams around the world: Brookhaven now has 200 GeV polarized protons in the RHIC collider, perhaps someday the 7 TeV LHC at CERN might have polarized protons.

  6. Neutron-proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, P.

    1990-02-01

    Neutron-proton scattering as fundamental interaction process below and above hundred MeV is discussed. Quark model inspired interactions and phenomenological potential models are described. The seminar also indicates the experimental improvements for achieving new precise scattering data. Concluding remarks indicate the relevance of nucleon-nucleon scattering results to finite nuclei. (orig.) [de

  7. Radiotherapy : proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The first phase of proton therapy at the National Accelerator Centre will be the development of a 200 MeV small-field horizontal beam radioneurosurgical facility in the south treatment vault. A progressive expansion of this facility is planned. The patient support and positioning system has been designed and developed by the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Surveying of the University of Cape Town to ensure the accurate positioning in the proton beam of the lesion to be treated. The basic components of the system are an adjustable chair, a series of video cameras and two computers. The specifications for the proton therapy interlock system require that the inputs to and the outputs from the system be similar to those of the neutron therapy system. Additional facilities such as a full diagnostic system which would assist the operators in the event of an error will also be provided. Dosimeters are required for beam monitoring, for monitor calibration and for determining dose distributions. Several designs of transmission ionization chambers for beam monitoring have been designed and tested, while several types of ionization chambers and diodes have been used for the dose distribution measurements. To facilitate the comparison of measured ranges and energy losses of proton beams in the various materials with tabled values, simple empirical approximations, which are sufficiently accurate for most applications, have been used. 10 refs., 10 fig., 4 tabs

  8. Proton Pulse Radiolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, H C; Nilsson, G; Reitberger, T; Thuomas, K A

    1973-03-15

    A 5 MeV proton accelerator (Van de Graaff) has been used for pulse radiolysis of a number of organic gases and the transient spectra obtained from the alkanes methane, ethane, propane, n-butane and neopentane have tentatively been assigned to alkyl radicals. Some methodological aspects of this new technique are discussed

  9. The Melbourne proton microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legge, G.J.F.; McKenzie, C.D.; Mazzolini, A.P.

    1979-01-01

    A scanning proton microprobe is described which operates in ultra-high vacuum with a resolution of ten microns. The operating principles and main features of the design are discussed and the ability of such an instrument to detect trace elements down to a few ppm by mass is illustrated

  10. Proton microanalysis in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrec, J.P.

    Micro-analyses by nuclear reactions and atomic excitation are used to determine the distribution of fluorine and calcium in the needles of Abies Alba. Fluorine is detected by the nuclear reaction 19 F(p,α) 16 O at the 1.35 MeV resonance. Calcium is measured by its characteristic X-rays due to proton excitation [fr

  11. Proton transfer events in GFP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Donato, M.; van Wilderen, L.J.G.W.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Cohen Stuart, T.A.; Kennis, J.T.M.; Hellingwerf, K.J.; van Grondelle, R.; Groot, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Proton transfer is one of the most important elementary processes in biology. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) serves as an important model system to elucidate the mechanistic details of this reaction, because in GFP proton transfer can be induced by light absorption. Illumination initiates proton

  12. Australian national proton facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Proton therapy has been in use since 1954 and over 25,000 patients have been treated worldwide. Until recently most patients were treated at physics research facilities and apart from the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory and some low energy machines for eye treatment, only small numbers of patients were treated in each centre and conditions were less than optimal. Limited beam time and lack of support facilities restricted the type of patient treated and conventional fractionation could not be used. The initial clinical experience was mainly with small tumours and other lesions close to critical organs. Large numbers of eye tumours have also been treated. Protons have a well-defined role in these situations and are now being used in the treatment of more common cancers. Since the development of hospital-based facilities, such as the one in Loma Linda in California, over 2,500 patients with prostate cancer have been treated using a simple technique which gives results at least as good as radical surgery, external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy. Importantly, the incidence of severe complications is very low. There are encouraging results in many disease sites including lung, liver, soft tissue sarcomas and oesophagus. As proton therapy becomes more widely available, randomised trials comparing it with conventional radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) will be possible. In most situations the use of protons will enable a higher dose to be given safely but in situations where local control rates are already satisfactory, protons are expected to produce less complications than conventional treatment. The initial costs of a proton facility are high but the recurrent costs are similar to other forms of high technology radiotherapy. Simple treatment techniques with only a few fields are usually possible and proton therapy avoids the high integral doses associated with IMRT. This reduction in the low dose volume is likely to be particularly

  13. Modified conductivity of polymer materials with proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Shinji; Seki, Miharu; Shima, Kunihiro; Ishihara, Toyoyuki

    2001-01-01

    Ionic conductivity of polymer materials is of increasing interest in many scientific fields. Industrial applications seem to be promising. In the present investigation, we used proton bombardment to modify the characteristic properties of polymers, especially for improvement in conductivity and hardening gel polymers. Particle beam bombardment is known to produce many scissions by particle passages and new bonds by bridge connection. These effects may modify various properties in many ways. We examined the modification of conductivity in solid polymers composed of polyethylene oxide and polyurethane and the surface appearance of gel polymers with bombardment by a proton beam using the accelerator facility of Tsukuba University. The results indicated proton bombardment induced conductivity changes in various ways according to particle range and polymer properties. (author)

  14. Protonation of pyridine. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahran, N F; Ghoniem, H; Helal, A I [Physics Dept., Nuclear Research Center, AEA., Cairo, (Egypt); Rasheed, N [Nuclear Material Authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Field ionization mass spectra of pyridine is measured using 10{mu}m activated wire. protonation of pyridine, is observed as an intense peak in the mass spectra. Charge distribution of pyridine molecule is calculated using the modified neglect of diatomic overlap (MNDO) technique, and consequently proton attachment is proposed to be on the nitrogen atom. Temperature dependence of (M+H){sup +} ion is investigated and discussed. MNDO calculations of the protonated species are done, and the proton affinity of pyridine molecule is estimated. Time dependence of the field ionization process of pyridine and protonated ions are observed and discussed. 5 figs.

  15. Ultrafast Melting of Carbon Induced by Intense Proton Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelka, A.; Guenther, M. M.; Harres, K.; Otten, A.; Roth, M.; Gregori, G.; Gericke, D. O.; Vorberger, J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Kritcher, A. L.; Heathcote, R.; Li, B.; Neely, D.; Kugland, N. L.; Niemann, C.; Makita, M.; Riley, D.; Mithen, J.; Schaumann, G.; Schollmeier, M.

    2010-01-01

    Laser-produced proton beams have been used to achieve ultrafast volumetric heating of carbon samples at solid density. The isochoric melting of carbon was probed by a scattering of x rays from a secondary laser-produced plasma. From the scattering signal, we have deduced the fraction of the material that was melted by the inhomogeneous heating. The results are compared to different theoretical approaches for the equation of state which suggests modifications from standard models.

  16. Proton transfer events in GFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Donato, Mariangela; van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Stuart, Thomas Cohen; Kennis, John T M; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; van Grondelle, Rienk; Groot, Marie Louise

    2011-09-28

    Proton transfer is one of the most important elementary processes in biology. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) serves as an important model system to elucidate the mechanistic details of this reaction, because in GFP proton transfer can be induced by light absorption. Illumination initiates proton transfer through a 'proton-wire', formed by the chromophore (the proton donor), water molecule W22, Ser205 and Glu222 (the acceptor), on a picosecond time scale. To obtain a more refined view of this process, we have used a combined approach of time resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy and visible pump-dump-probe spectroscopy to resolve with atomic resolution how and how fast protons move through this wire. Our results indicate that absorption of light by GFP induces in 3 ps (10 ps in D(2)O) a shift of the equilibrium positions of all protons in the H-bonded network, leading to a partial protonation of Glu222 and to a so-called low barrier hydrogen bond (LBHB) for the chromophore's proton, giving rise to dual emission at 475 and 508 nm. This state is followed by a repositioning of the protons on the wire in 10 ps (80 ps in D(2)O), ultimately forming the fully deprotonated chromophore and protonated Glu222.

  17. Solar proton fluxes since 1956

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reedy, R.C.

    1977-01-01

    The fluxes of protons emitted during solar flares since 1956 were evaluated. The depth-versus-activity profiles of 56 Co in several lunar rocks are consistent with the solar-proton fluxes detected by experiments on several satellites. Only about 20% of the solar-proton-induced activities of 22 Na and 55 Fe in lunar rocks from early Apollo missions were produced by protons emitted from the sun during solar cycle 20 (1965--1975). The depth-versus-activity data for these radionuclides in several lunar rocks were used to determine the fluxes of protons during solar cycle 19 (1954--1964). The average proton fluxes for cycle 19 are about five times those for both the last million years and for cycle 20. These solar-proton flux variations correlate with changes in sunspot activity

  18. Irradiation-induced up-regulation of HLA-E on macrovascular endothelial cells confers protection against killing by activated natural killer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Riederer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apart from the platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1, CD31, endoglin (CD105 and a positive factor VIII-related antigen staining, human primary and immortalized macro- and microvascular endothelial cells (ECs differ in their cell surface expression of activating and inhibitory ligands for natural killer (NK cells. Here we comparatively study the effects of irradiation on the phenotype of ECs and their interaction with resting and activated NK cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Primary macrovascular human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs only express UL16 binding protein 2 (ULBP2 and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I chain-related protein MIC-A (MIC-A as activating signals for NK cells, whereas the corresponding immortalized EA.hy926 EC cell line additionally present ULBP3, membrane heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70, intercellular adhesion molecule ICAM-1 (CD54 and HLA-E. Apart from MIC-B, the immortalized human microvascular endothelial cell line HMEC, resembles the phenotype of EA.hy926. Surprisingly, primary HUVECs are more sensitive to Hsp70 peptide (TKD plus IL-2 (TKD/IL-2-activated NK cells than their immortalized EC counterpatrs. This finding is most likely due to the absence of the inhibitory ligand HLA-E, since the activating ligands are shared among the ECs. The co-culture of HUVECs with activated NK cells induces ICAM-1 (CD54 and HLA-E expression on the former which drops to the initial low levels (below 5% when NK cells are removed. Sublethal irradiation of HUVECs induces similar but less pronounced effects on HUVECs. Along with these findings, irradiation also induces HLA-E expression on macrovascular ECs and this correlates with an increased resistance to killing by activated NK cells. Irradiation had no effect on HLA-E expression on microvascular ECs and the sensitivity of these cells to NK cells remained unaffected. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These data emphasize that an irradiation-induced

  19. Study of a High-Yield Cellulase System Created by Heavy-Ion Irradiation-Induced Mutagenesis of Aspergillus niger and Mixed Fermentation with Trichoderma reesei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji-Hong; Li, Wen-Jian; Liu, Jing; Hu, Wei; Xiao, Guo-Qing; Dong, Miao-Yin; Wang, Yu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and validate the efficiency of 12C6+ irradiation of Aspergillus niger (A. niger) or mutagenesis via mixed Trichoderma viride (T. viride) culturing as well as a liquid cultivation method for cellulase production via mixed Trichoderma reesei (T. reesei) and A. niger culture fermentation. The first mutagenesis approach was employed to optimize yield from a cellulase-producing strain via heavy-ion mutagenesis and high-throughput screening, and the second was to effectively achieve enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulase from a mixed culture of mutant T. viride and A. niger. We found that 12C6+-ion irradiation induced changes in cellulase biosynthesis in A. niger but had no effect on the time course of the synthesis. It is notable that the exoglucanases (CBH) activities of A. niger strains H11-1 and H differed (6.71 U/mL vs. 6.01 U/mL) and were significantly higher than that of A. niger mutant H3-1. Compared with strain H, the filter paper assay (FPA), endoglucanase (EG) and β-glucosidase (BGL) activities of mutant strain H11-1 were increased by 250.26%, 30.26% and 34.91%, respectively. A mixed culture system was successfully optimized, and the best ratio of T. reesei to A. niger was 5:1 for 96 h with simultaneous inoculation. The BGL activity of the mixed culture increased after 72 h. At 96 h, the FPA and BGL activities of the mixed culture were 689.00 and 797.15 U/mL, respectively, significantly higher than those of monocultures, which were 408.70 and 646.98 U/mL for T. reesei and 447.29 and 658.89 U/mL for A. niger, respectively. The EG activity of the mixed culture was 2342.81 U/mL, a value that was significantly higher than that of monocultures at 2206.57 U/mL for T. reesei and 1727.62 U/mL for A. niger. In summary, cellulose production and hydrolysis yields were significantly enhanced by the proposed combination scheme. PMID:26656155

  20. Study of a High-Yield Cellulase System Created by Heavy-Ion Irradiation-Induced Mutagenesis of Aspergillus niger and Mixed Fermentation with Trichoderma reesei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yang Wang

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate and validate the efficiency of 12C6+ irradiation of Aspergillus niger (A. niger or mutagenesis via mixed Trichoderma viride (T. viride culturing as well as a liquid cultivation method for cellulase production via mixed Trichoderma reesei (T. reesei and A. niger culture fermentation. The first mutagenesis approach was employed to optimize yield from a cellulase-producing strain via heavy-ion mutagenesis and high-throughput screening, and the second was to effectively achieve enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulase from a mixed culture of mutant T. viride and A. niger. We found that 12C6+-ion irradiation induced changes in cellulase biosynthesis in A. niger but had no effect on the time course of the synthesis. It is notable that the exoglucanases (CBH activities of A. niger strains H11-1 and H differed (6.71 U/mL vs. 6.01 U/mL and were significantly higher than that of A. niger mutant H3-1. Compared with strain H, the filter paper assay (FPA, endoglucanase (EG and β-glucosidase (BGL activities of mutant strain H11-1 were increased by 250.26%, 30.26% and 34.91%, respectively. A mixed culture system was successfully optimized, and the best ratio of T. reesei to A. niger was 5:1 for 96 h with simultaneous inoculation. The BGL activity of the mixed culture increased after 72 h. At 96 h, the FPA and BGL activities of the mixed culture were 689.00 and 797.15 U/mL, respectively, significantly higher than those of monocultures, which were 408.70 and 646.98 U/mL for T. reesei and 447.29 and 658.89 U/mL for A. niger, respectively. The EG activity of the mixed culture was 2342.81 U/mL, a value that was significantly higher than that of monocultures at 2206.57 U/mL for T. reesei and 1727.62 U/mL for A. niger. In summary, cellulose production and hydrolysis yields were significantly enhanced by the proposed combination scheme.

  1. Application of single- and dual-energy CT brain tissue segmentation to PET monitoring of proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Bianca; Landry, Guillaume; Schwarz, Florian; Tessonnier, Thomas; Kamp, Florian; Dedes, George; Thieke, Christian; Würl, Matthias; Kurz, Christopher; Ganswindt, Ute; Verhaegen, Frank; Debus, Jürgen; Belka, Claus; Sommer, Wieland; Reiser, Maximilian; Bauer, Julia; Parodi, Katia

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the ability of single and dual energy computed tomography (SECT, DECT) to estimate tissue composition and density for usage in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of irradiation induced β + activity distributions. This was done to assess the impact on positron emission tomography (PET) range verification in proton therapy. A DECT-based brain tissue segmentation method was developed for white matter (WM), grey matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The elemental composition of reference tissues was assigned to closest CT numbers in DECT space (DECTdist). The method was also applied to SECT data (SECTdist). In a validation experiment, the proton irradiation induced PET activity of three brain equivalent solutions (BES) was compared to simulations based on different tissue segmentations. Five patients scanned with a dual source DECT scanner were analyzed to compare the different segmentation methods. A single magnetic resonance (MR) scan was used for comparison with an established segmentation toolkit. Additionally, one patient with SECT and post-treatment PET scans was investigated. For BES, DECTdist and SECTdist reduced differences to the reference simulation by up to 62% when compared to the conventional stoichiometric segmentation (SECTSchneider). In comparison to MR brain segmentation, Dice similarity coefficients for WM, GM and CSF were 0.61, 0.67 and 0.66 for DECTdist and 0.54, 0.41 and 0.66 for SECTdist. MC simulations of PET treatment verification in patients showed important differences between DECTdist/SECTdist and SECTSchneider for patients with large CSF areas within the treatment field but not in WM and GM. Differences could be misinterpreted as PET derived range shifts of up to 4 mm. DECTdist and SECTdist yielded comparable activity distributions, and comparison of SECTdist to a measured patient PET scan showed improved agreement when compared to SECTSchneider. The agreement between predicted and measured PET

  2. Proton mass decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi-Bo; Chen, Ying; Draper, Terrence; Liang, Jian; Liu, Keh-Fei

    2018-03-01

    We report the results on the proton mass decomposition and also on the related quark and glue momentum fractions. The results are based on overlap valence fermions on four ensembles of Nf = 2 + 1 DWF configurations with three lattice spacings and volumes, and several pion masses including the physical pion mass. With 1-loop pertur-bative calculation and proper normalization of the glue operator, we find that the u, d, and s quark masses contribute 9(2)% to the proton mass. The quark energy and glue field energy contribute 31(5)% and 37(5)% respectively in the MS scheme at µ = 2 GeV. The trace anomaly gives the remaining 23(1)% contribution. The u, d, s and glue momentum fractions in the MS scheme are consistent with the global analysis at µ = 2 GeV.

  3. Proton solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaposhnikova, E.F.

    1979-01-01

    The observations of proton solar flares have been carried out in 1950-1958 using the extrablackout coronograph of the Crimea astrophysical observatory. The experiments permit to determine two characteristic features of flares: the directed motion of plasma injection flux from the solar depths and the appearance of a shock wave moving from the place of the injection along the solar surface. The appearance of the shock wave is accompanied by some phenomena occuring both in the sunspot zone and out of it. The consistent flash of proton flares in the other groups of spots, the disappearance of fibres and the appearance of eruptive prominences is accomplished in the sunspot zone. Beyond the sunspot zone the flares occur above spots, the fibres disintegrate partially or completely and the eruptive prominences appear in the regions close to the pole

  4. The Amsterdam proton microbeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bos, A.J.J.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of the work presented in this thesis is to develop a microbeam setup such that small beam spot sizes can be produced routinely, and to investigate the capabilities of the setup for micro-PIXE analysis. The development and performance of the Amsterdam proton microbeam setup are described. The capabilities of the setup for micro-PIXE are shown with an investigation into the presence of trace elements in human hair. (Auth.)

  5. The comparison of microstructure and nanocluster evolution in proton and neutron irradiated Fe–9%Cr ODS steel to 3 dpa at 500 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swenson, M.J., E-mail: matthewswenson1@u.boisestate.edu; Wharry, J.P.

    2015-12-15

    A model Fe–9%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel was irradiated with protons or neutrons to a dose of 3 displacements per atom (dpa) at a temperature of 500 °C, enabling a direct comparison of ion to neutron irradiation effects at otherwise fixed irradiation conditions. The irradiated microstructures were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography including cluster analysis. Both proton and neutron irradiations produced a comparable void and dislocation loop microstructure. However, the irradiation response of the Ti–Y–O oxide nanoclusters varied. Oxides remained stable under proton irradiation, but exhibited dissolution and an increase in Y:Ti composition ratio under neutron irradiation. Both proton and neutron irradiation also induced varying extents of Si, Ni, and Mn clustering at existing oxide nanoclusters. Protons are able to reproduce the void and loop microstructure of neutron irradiation carried out to the same dose and temperature. However, since nanocluster evolution is controlled by both diffusion and ballistic impacts, protons are rendered unable to reproduce the nanocluster evolution of neutron irradiation at the same dose and temperature. - Highlights: • Fe–9% Cr ODS was irradiated with protons and neutrons to 3 dpa at 500 °C. • Dislocation loop size and density were similar upon proton and neutron irradiation. • Oxide nanocluster size and density decreased more with neutron irradiation. • Oxide Y:Ti ratio increased from 0.54 to 0.97 upon neutron irradiation. • Irradiation induced enrichment of Si, Mn, and Ni at oxide locations.

  6. The proton radius puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonesini, Maurizio

    2017-12-01

    The FAMU (Fisica degli Atomi Muonici) experiment has the goal to measure precisely the proton Zemach radius, thus contributing to the solution of the so-called proton radius "puzzle". To this aim, it makes use of a high-intensity pulsed muon beam at RIKEN-RAL impinging on a cryogenic hydrogen target with an high-Z gas admixture and a tunable mid-IR high power laser, to measure the hyperfine (HFS) splitting of the 1S state of the muonic hydrogen. From the value of the exciting laser frequency, the energy of the HFS transition may be derived with high precision ( 10-5) and thus, via QED calculations, the Zemach radius of the proton. The experimental apparatus includes a precise fiber-SiPMT beam hodoscope and a crown of eight LaBr3 crystals and a few HPGe detectors for detection of the emitted characteristic X-rays. Preliminary runs to optimize the gas target filling and its operating conditions have been taken in 2014 and 2015-2016. The final run, with the pump laser to drive the HFS transition, is expected in 2018.

  7. Heavy quarks in proton

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)655637

    The measurement of prompt photon associated with a b jet in proton-proton interactions can provide us insight into the inner structure of proton. This is because precision of determination of parton distribution functions of b quark and gluon can be increased by such a measurement. The measurement of cross-section of prompt photon associated with a b jet (process $pp\\longrightarrow \\gamma + b + X$) at $\\sqrt{s}$= 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector is presented. Full 8 TeV dataset collected by ATLAS during the year 2012 was used in this analysis. Corresponding integrated luminosity is 20.3 $fb^{-1}$. Fiducial differential cross-section as a function of photon transverse momentum at particle level was extracted from data and compared with the prediction of leading order event generator Pythia 8. Cross-section extracted from data is normalised independently on the Monte Carlo prediction. Values of data distribution lie above Monte Carlo values. The difference can be explained by presence of higher order effects not ...

  8. [Why proton therapy? And how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thariat, Juliette; Habrand, Jean Louis; Lesueur, Paul; Chaikh, Abdulhamid; Kammerer, Emmanuel; Lecomte, Delphine; Batalla, Alain; Balosso, Jacques; Tessonnier, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Proton therapy is a radiotherapy, based on the use of protons, charged subatomic particles that stop at a given depth depending on their initial energy (pristine Bragg peak), avoiding any output beam, unlike the photons used in most of the other modalities of radiotherapy. Proton therapy has been used for 60 years, but has only become ubiquitous in the last decade because of recent major advances in particle accelerator technology. This article reviews the history of clinical implementation of protons, the nature of the technological advances that now allows its expansion at a lower cost. It also addresses the technical and physical specificities of proton therapy and the clinical situations for which proton therapy may be relevant but requires evidence. Different proton therapy techniques are possible. These are explained in terms of their clinical potential by explaining the current terminology (such as cyclotrons, synchrotrons or synchrocyclotrons, using superconducting magnets, fixed line or arm rotary with passive diffusion delivery or active by scanning) in basic words. The requirements associated with proton therapy are increased due to the precision of the depth dose deposit. The learning curve of proton therapy requires that clinical indications be prioritized according to their associated uncertainties (such as range uncertainties and movement in lung tumors). Many clinical indications potentially fall under proton therapy ultimately. Clinical strategies are explained in a paralleled manuscript. Copyright © 2018 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Proton permeation of lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deamer, D W

    1987-10-01

    Proton permeation of the lipid bilayer barrier has two unique features. First, permeability coefficients measured at neutral pH ranges are six to seven orders of magnitude greater than expected from knowledge of other monovalent cations. Second, proton conductance across planar lipid bilayers varies at most by a factor of 10 when pH is varied from near 1 to near 11. Two mechanisms have been proposed to account for this anomalous behavior: proton conductance related to contaminants of lipid bilayers, and proton translocation along transient hydrogen-bonded chains (tHBC) of associated water molecules in the membrane. The weight of evidence suggests that trace contaminants may contribute to proton conductance across planar lipid membranes at certain pH ranges, but cannot account for the anomalous proton flux in liposome systems. Two new results will be reported here which were designed to test the tHBC model. These include measurements of relative proton/potassium permeability in the gramicidin channel, and plots of proton flux against the magnitude of pH gradients. (1) The relative permeabilities of protons and potassium through the gramicidin channel, which contains a single strand of hydrogen-bonded water molecules, were found to differ by at least four orders of magnitude when measured at neutral pH ranges. This result demonstrates that a hydrogen-bonded chain of water molecules can provide substantial discrimination between protons and other cations. It was also possible to calculate that if approximately 7% of bilayer water was present in a transient configuration similar to that of the gramicidin channel, it could account for the measured proton flux. (2) The plot of proton conductance against pH gradient across liposome membranes was superlinear, a result that is consistent with one of three alternative tHBC models for proton conductance described by Nagle elsewhere in this volume.

  10. MUSE: Measuring the proton radius with muon-proton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernauer, Jan Christopher [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The proton radius has been measured so far using electron-proton scattering, electronic Hydrogen spectroscopy and muonic Hydrogen spectroscopy, the latter producing a much more accurate, but seven sigma different, result, leading to the now famous proton radius puzzle. The MUSE collaboration aims to complete the set of measurements by using muon scattering to determine the proton radius and to shed light on possible explanations of the discrepancy. The talk gives an overview of the experiment motivation and design and a status report on the progress.

  11. Vibrational spectroscopy on protons and deuterons in proton conducting perovskites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, M.; Poulsen, F.W.; Berg, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    A short review of IR-spectroscopy on protons in perovskite structure oxides is given. The nature of possible proton sites, libration and combination tones and degree of hydrogen bonding is emphasised. Three new spectroscopic experiments and/or interpretations are presented. An IR-microscopy exper......A short review of IR-spectroscopy on protons in perovskite structure oxides is given. The nature of possible proton sites, libration and combination tones and degree of hydrogen bonding is emphasised. Three new spectroscopic experiments and/or interpretations are presented. An IR...

  12. Benchmark measurements and simulations of dose perturbations due to metallic spheres in proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newhauser, Wayne D.; Rechner, Laura; Mirkovic, Dragan; Yepes, Pablo; Koch, Nicholas C.; Titt, Uwe; Fontenot, Jonas D.; Zhang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are increasingly used for dose calculations in proton therapy due to its inherent accuracy. However, dosimetric deviations have been found using Monte Carlo code when high density materials are present in the proton beamline. The purpose of this work was to quantify the magnitude of dose perturbation caused by metal objects. We did this by comparing measurements and Monte Carlo predictions of dose perturbations caused by the presence of small metal spheres in several clinical proton therapy beams as functions of proton beam range and drift space. Monte Carlo codes MCNPX, GEANT4 and Fast Dose Calculator (FDC) were used. Generally good agreement was found between measurements and Monte Carlo predictions, with the average difference within 5% and maximum difference within 17%. The modification of multiple Coulomb scattering model in MCNPX code yielded improvement in accuracy and provided the best overall agreement with measurements. Our results confirmed that Monte Carlo codes are well suited for predicting multiple Coulomb scattering in proton therapy beams when short drift spaces are involved. - Highlights: • We compared measurements and Monte Carlo predictions of dose perturbations caused by the metal objects in proton beams. • Different Monte Carlo codes were used, including MCNPX, GEANT4 and Fast Dose Calculator. • Good agreement was found between measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. • The modification of multiple Coulomb scattering model in MCNPX code yielded improved accuracy. • Our results confirmed that Monte Carlo codes are well suited for predicting multiple Coulomb scattering in proton therapy

  13. Enzymatic modification of starch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Susanne Langgård

    In the food industry approaches for using bioengineering are investigated as alternatives to conventional chemical and physical starch modification techniques in development of starches with specific properties. Enzyme-assisted post-harvest modification is an interesting approach to this, since...... it is considered a clean and energy saving technology. This thesis aimed to investigate the effect of using reaction conditions, simulating an industrial process, for enzymatic treatment of starch with branching enzyme (BE) from Rhodothermus obamensis. Thus treatements were conducted at 70°C using very high...... substrate concentration (30-40% dry matter (DM)) and high enzyme activity (750-2250 BE units (BEU)/g sample). Starches from various botanical sources, representing a broad range of properties, were used as substrates. The effects of the used conditions on the BE-reaction were evaluated by characterization...

  14. Measurement of small-angle antiproton-proton and proton-proton elastic scattering at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amos, N.; Block, M.M.; Bobbink, G.J.; Botje, M.A.J.; Favart, D.; Leroy, C.; Linde, F.; Lipnik, P.; Matheys, J-P.; Miller, D.

    1985-01-01

    Antiproton-proton and proton-proton small-angle elastic scattering was measured for centre-of-mass energies at the CERN Intersectung Storage Rings. In addition, proton-proton elastic scattering was measured at . Using the optical theorem, total cross sections are obtained with an accuracy of about

  15. Proton and carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy is an up-to-date guide to using proton and carbon ion therapy in modern cancer treatment. The book covers the physics and radiobiology basics of proton and ion beams, dosimetry methods and radiation measurements, and treatment delivery systems. It gives practical guidance on patient setup, target localization, and treatment planning for clinical proton and carbon ion therapy. The text also offers detailed reports on the treatment of pediatric cancers, lymphomas, and various other cancers. After an overview, the book focuses on the fundamental aspects of proton and carbon ion therapy equipment, including accelerators, gantries, and delivery systems. It then discusses dosimetry, biology, imaging, and treatment planning basics and provides clinical guidelines on the use of proton and carbon ion therapy for the treatment of specific cancers. Suitable for anyone involved with medical physics and radiation therapy, this book offers a balanced and critical assessment of state-of-the-art...

  16. Geometrically Consistent Mesh Modification

    KAUST Repository

    Bonito, A.

    2010-01-01

    A new paradigm of adaptivity is to execute refinement, coarsening, and smoothing of meshes on manifolds with incomplete information about their geometry and yet preserve position and curvature accuracy. We refer to this collectively as geometrically consistent (GC) mesh modification. We discuss the concept of discrete GC, show the failure of naive approaches, and propose and analyze a simple algorithm that is GC and accuracy preserving. © 2010 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  17. Radiation modification of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikaev, A.K.

    1987-01-01

    Industrial and radiation chemical processes of material modification based on cross-linking of polymers as a result of radiation are considered. Among them are production of cables and rods with irradiated modified insulation, production of hardened and thermo-shrinkaging polymer products (films, tubes, fashioned products), production of radiation cross-linked polyethylene foam, technology of radiation vulcanization of elastomers. Attention is paid to radiation plants on the basis of γ-sources and electron acceleratos as well as to radiation conditions

  18. The PIREX proton irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victoria, M.

    1995-01-01

    The proton Irradiation Experiment (PIREX) is a materials irradiation facility installed in a beam line of the 590 MeV proton accelerator at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Its main purpose is the testing of candidate materials for fusion reactor components. Protons of this energy produce simultaneously displacement damage and spallation products, amongst them helium and can therefore simulate any possible synergistic effects of damage and helium, that would be produced by the fusion neutrons

  19. The PIREX proton irradiation facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victoria, M. [Association EURATOM, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-10-01

    The proton Irradiation Experiment (PIREX) is a materials irradiation facility installed in a beam line of the 590 MeV proton accelerator at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Its main purpose is the testing of candidate materials for fusion reactor components. Protons of this energy produce simultaneously displacement damage and spallation products, amongst them helium and can therefore simulate any possible synergistic effects of damage and helium, that would be produced by the fusion neutrons.

  20. Search for proton decay: introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhaber, M.

    1984-01-01

    In interpreting contained events observed in various proton decay detectors one can sometimes postulate, though usually not unambiguously, a potential decay mode of the proton, called a candidate. It is called a candidate, because for any individual event it is not possible to exclude the possibility that it is instead due to cosmic ray background, chiefly atmospheric neutrinos. Some consistency checks are proposed which could help establish proton decay, if it does occur in the presently accessible lifetime window

  1. Proton irradiation and endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.H.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Salmon, Y.L.; Eason, R.L.; Boster, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Female rhesus monkeys given single total-body exposures of protons of varying energies developed endometriosis at a frequency significantly higher than that of nonirradiated animals of the same age. The minimum latency period was 7 years after exposure. The doses and energies of the radiation received were within the range that could be received by an aircrew member in near-earth orbit during a random solar flare event, leading to the conclusion that endometriosis should be a consideration in assessing the risk of delayed radiation effects in female crewmembers

  2. Proton nuclear scattering radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchazeaubeneix, J.C.; Faivre, J.C.; Garreta, D.

    1982-10-01

    Nuclear scattering of protons allows to radiograph objects with specific properties: direct 3- dimensional radiography, different information as compared to X-ray technique, hydrogen radiography. Furthermore, it is a well adapted method to gating techniques allowing the radiography of fast periodic moving systems. Results obtained on different objects (light and heavy materials) are shown and discussed. The dose delivery is compatible with clinical use, but at the moment, the irradiation time is too long between 1 and 4 hours. Perspectives to make the radiography faster and to get a practical method are discussed

  3. Proton nuclear scattering radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saudinos, J.

    1982-04-01

    Nuclear scattering of protons allows to radiograph objects with specific properties: 3-dimensional radiography, different information as compared to X-ray technique, hydrogen radiography. Furthermore the nuclear scattering radiography (NSR) is a well adapted method to gating techniques allowing the radiography of fast periodic moving objects. Results obtained on phantoms, formalin fixed head and moving object are shown and discussed. The dose delivery is compatible with clinical use, but at the moment, the irradiation time is too long between 1 and 4 hours. Perspectives to make the radiograph faster and to get a practical method are discussed

  4. Proton relativistic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Wilson Roberto Barbosa de

    1995-01-01

    In this dissertation, we present a model for the nucleon, which is composed by three relativistic quarks interacting through a contract force. The nucleon wave-function was obtained from the Faddeev equation in the null-plane. The covariance of the model under kinematical null-plane boots is discussed. The electric proton form-factor, calculated from the Faddeev wave-function, was in agreement with the data for low-momentum transfers and described qualitatively the asymptotic region for momentum transfers around 2 GeV. (author)

  5. Behavior Modification in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Mryon; Whitman, Joan

    1971-01-01

    This article presents the theoretical rationale for behavior modification, principally through its comparison with traditional psychotherapies, and suggests some behavior modification techniques for the classroom management of maladaptive behavior. (Author)

  6. Biomaterials modification by ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tonghe; Yi Zhongzhen; Zhang Xu; Wu Yuguang

    2001-01-01

    Ion beam technology is one of best ways for the modification of biomaterials. The results of ion beam modification of biomaterials are given. The method and results of improved biocompatibility are indicated by ion beam technology. The future development of ion beam modification of biomaterials is discussed

  7. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung towards the elastic limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjour-Shafiei, M.; Amir-Ahmadi, H. R.; Bacelar, J. C. S.; Castelijns, R.; Ermisch, K.; van Garderen, E.; Gašparić, I.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kiš, M.; Löhner, H.

    2005-05-01

    In oder to study proton-proton bremsstrahlung moving towards the elastic limit, a detection system, consisting of Plastic-ball and SALAD, was set up and an experiment at 190 MeV incident beam energy was performed. Here, the experimental setup and the data analysis procedure along with some results obtained in the measurement are discussed.

  8. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung towards the elastic limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahjour-Shafiei, M.; Amir-Ahmadi, H.R.; Bacelar, J.C.S.; Castelijns, R.; Ermisch, K.; Garderen, E. van; Harakeh, M.N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kis, M.; Loehner, H.; Gasparic, I.

    2005-01-01

    In oder to study proton-proton bremsstrahlung moving towards the elastic limit, a detection system, consisting of Plastic-ball and SALAD, was set up and an experiment at 190 MeV incident beam energy was performed. Here, the experimental setup and the data analysis procedure along with some results obtained in the measurement are discussed

  9. The FAIR proton linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kester, O.

    2015-01-01

    FAIR - the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe - constructed at GSI in Darmstadt comprises an international centre of heavy ion accelerators that will drive heavy ion and antimatter research. FAIR will provide worldwide unique accelerator and experimental facilities, allowing a large variety of fore-front research in physics and applied science. FAIR will deliver antiproton and ion beams of unprecedented intensities and qualities. The main part of the FAIR facility is a sophisticated accelerator system, which delivers beams to different experiments of the FAIR experimental collaborations - APPA, NuSTAR, CBM and PANDA - in parallel. Modern H-type cavities offer highest shunt impedances of resonant structures of heavy ion linacs at low beam energies < 20 MeV/u and enable the acceleration of intense proton and ion beams. One example is the interdigital H-type structure. The crossed-bar H-cavities extend these properties to high energies even beyond 100 MeV/u. Compared to conventional Alvarez cavities, these crossed-bar (CH) cavities feature much higher shunt impedance at low energies. The design of the proton linac is based on those cavities

  10. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  11. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-01-01

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions. PMID:16800884

  12. Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mei; Alekseev, Igor G; Alessi, James; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bravar, Alessandro; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruno, Donald; Bunce, Gerry; Butler, John J; Cameron, Peter; Connolly, Roger; De Long, Joseph; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Ganetis, George; Gardner, Chris J; Glenn, Joseph; Hayes, Thomas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Ingrassia, Peter; Iriso, Ubaldo; Laster, Jonathan S; Lee, Roger C; Luccio, Alfredo U; Luo, Yun; MacKay, William W; Makdisi, Yousef; Marr, Gregory J; Marusic, Al; McIntyre, Gary; Michnoff, Robert; Montag, Christoph; Morris, John; Nicoletti, Tony; Oddo, Peter; Oerter, Brian; Osamu, Jinnouchi; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smith, Kevin T; Svirida, Dima; Tepikian, Steven; Tomas, Rogelio; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Vetter, Kurt; Wilinski, Michelle; Zaltsman, Alex; Zelenski, Anatoli; Zeno, Keith; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider~(RHIC) provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC to avoid depolarizing resonances. In 2003, polarized proton beams were accelerated to 100~GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. RHIC polarized proton run experience demonstrates that optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limite...

  13. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S.Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W.W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.N.

    2003-01-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998, reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to √s=500 GeV

  14. Protonic decay of oriented nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadmensky, S.G.

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of the multiparticle theory of protonic decay, the angular distributions of protons emitted by oriented spherical and deformed nuclei in the laboratory frame and in the internal coordinate frame of deformed parent nuclei are constructed with allowance for symmetry with respect to time inversion. It is shown that, because of the deep-subbarrier character of protonic decay, the adiabatic approximation is not applicable to describing the angular distributions of protons emitted by oriented deformed nuclei and that the angular distribution of protons in the laboratory frame does not coincide with that in the internal coordinate frame. It is demonstrated that these angular distributions coincide only if the adiabatic and the semiclassical approximation are simultaneously valid

  15. Protein proton-proton dynamics from amide proton spin flip rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, Daniel S.; Zuiderweg, Erik R. P.

    2009-01-01

    Residue-specific amide proton spin-flip rates K were measured for peptide-free and peptide-bound calmodulin. K approximates the sum of NOE build-up rates between the amide proton and all other protons. This work outlines the theory of multi-proton relaxation, cross relaxation and cross correlation, and how to approximate it with a simple model based on a variable number of equidistant protons. This model is used to extract the sums of K-rates from the experimental data. Error in K is estimated using bootstrap methodology. We define a parameter Q as the ratio of experimental K-rates to theoretical K-rates, where the theoretical K-rates are computed from atomic coordinates. Q is 1 in the case of no local motion, but decreases to values as low as 0.5 with increasing domination of sidechain protons of the same residue to the amide proton flips. This establishes Q as a monotonous measure of local dynamics of the proton network surrounding the amide protons. The method is applied to the study of proton dynamics in Ca 2+ -saturated calmodulin, both free in solution and bound to smMLCK peptide. The mean Q is 0.81 ± 0.02 for free calmodulin and 0.88 ± 0.02 for peptide-bound calmodulin. This novel methodology thus reveals the presence of significant interproton disorder in this protein, while the increase in Q indicates rigidification of the proton network upon peptide binding, confirming the known high entropic cost of this process

  16. Soft X-ray induced chemical modification of polysaccharides in vascular plant cell walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cody, George D.; Brandes, Jay; Jacobsen, Chris; Wirick, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and micro carbon X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (C-XANES) can provide quantitative information regarding the distribution of the biopolymers cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin in vascular plant cell walls. In the case of angiosperms, flowering plants, C-XANES may also be able to distinguish variations in lignin monomer distributions throughout the cell wall. Polysaccharides are susceptible to soft X-ray irradiation induced chemical transformations that may complicate spectral analysis. The stability of a model polysaccharide, cellulose acetate, to variable doses of soft X-rays under conditions optimized for high quality C-XANES spectroscopy was investigated. The primary chemical effect of soft X-ray irradiation on cellulose acetate involves mass loss coincident with de-acetylation. A lesser amount of vinyl ketone formation also occurs. Reduction in irradiation dose via defocusing does enable high quality pristine spectra to be obtained. Radiation induced chemical modification studies of oak cell wall reveals that cellulose and hemicellulose are less labile to chemical modification than cellulose acetate. Strategies for obtaining pristine C-XANES spectra of polysaccharides are presented.

  17. Mechanism of equalization of proton and neutron radii and the Coulomb anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caurier, E.; Poves, A.; Zuker, A.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that a one parameter modification of the effective forces allows to resolve the Coulomb energy anomalies in the Ca region within the framework of Hartree Fock (HF) and isospin projected Hartree Fock (IPHF) theories. A simple microscopic mechanism of equalization of neutron and proton radii is invoked to produce results consistent with available data

  18. Deamidation reactions of protonated asparagine and glutamine investigated by ion spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempkes, L.J.M.; Martens, J.K.; Grzetic, J.; Berden, G.; Oomens, J.

    2016-01-01

    RATIONALE: Deamidation of Asn and Gln residues is a primary route for spontaneous post-translational protein modification. Several structures have been proposed for the deamidation products of the protonated amino acids. Here we verify these structures by ion spectroscopy, as well as the structures

  19. Proton femtoscopy at STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbroszczyk, H.P.

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of two-particle femtoscopy provides a powerful tool to study the properties of matter created in heavy-ion collisions. Applied to identical and nonidentical hadron pairs, it makes the study of space-time evolution of the source in femtoscopic scale possible. Baryon femtoscopy allows extraction of the radii of produced sources which can be compared to those deduced from identical pion studies, providing additional information about source characteristics. In this paper we present the correlation functions obtained for protons and antiprotons for Au + Au collisions at √ s NN = 62.4 and 200 GeV. On the other hand, as STAR experiment participates in the Beam Energy Scan (BES) program, we present theoretical predictions of p - p , p-bar - p-bar and p - p-bar femtoscopic measurements, based on UrQMD simulation for √ s NN = 5-39 GeV

  20. Proton synchrotron accelerator theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, E.J.N.

    1977-01-01

    This is the text of a series of lectures given as part of the CERN Academic Training Programme and primarily intended for young engineers and technicians in preparation for the running-in of the 400 GeV Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). Following the definition of basic quantities, the problems of betatron motion and the effect of momentum spread and orbital errors on the transverse motion of the beam are reviewed. Consideration is then given to multipole fields, chromaticity and non-linear resonances. After dealing with basic relations governing longitudinal beam dynamics, the space-charge, resistive-wall and other collective effects are treated, with reference to precautions in the SPS to prevent their occurrence. (Auth.)

  1. Proton decay: 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    Employing the current world average Λ/sub MS/ = 0.160 GeV as input, the minimal Georgi-Glashow SU(5) model predicts sin 2 theta/sub W/(m/sub W/) = 0.214, m/sub b//m/sub tau/ approx. = 2.8 and tau/sub p/ approx. = (0.4 approx. 12) x 10 29 yr. The first two predictions are in excellent agreement with experiment; but the implied proton lifetime is already somewhat below the present experimental bound. In this status report, uncertainties in tau/sub p/ are described and effects of appendages to the SU(5) model (such as new fermion generations, scalars, supersymmetry, etc.) are examined

  2. BROOKHAVEN: Proton goal reached

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    On March 30 the 35-year old Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) exceeded its updated design goal of 6 x 10 13 protons per pulse (ppp), by accelerating 6.3 x 10 13 ppp, a world record intensity. This goal was set 11 years ago and achieving it called for the construction of a new booster and the reconstruction of much of the AGS. The booster was completed in 1991, and reached its design intensity of 1.5 x 10 13 ppp in 1993. The AGS reconstruction was finished in 1994, and by July of that year the AGS claimed a new US record intensity for a proton synchrotron of 4 x 10 13 ppp, using four booster pulses. Reaching the design intensity was scheduled for 1995. In 1994, the AGS had seemed to be solidly limited to 4 x 10 13 ppp, but in 1995 the operations crew, working on their own in the quiet of the owl shift, steadily improved the intensity, regularly setting new records, much to the bemusement of the machine physicists. The physicists, however, did contribute. A second harmonic radiofrequency cavity in the booster increased the radiofrequency bucket area for capture, raising the booster intensity from 1.7 to 2.1 x 10 13 ppp. In the AGS, new radiofrequency power supplies raised the available voltage from 8 to 13 kV, greatly enhancing the beam loading capabilities of the system. A powerful new transverse damping system successfully controlled instabilities that otherwise would have destroyed the beam in less than a millisecond. Also in the AGS, 35th harmonic octupole resonances were found

  3. BROOKHAVEN: Proton goal reached

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1995-09-15

    On March 30 the 35-year old Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) exceeded its updated design goal of 6 x 10{sup 13} protons per pulse (ppp), by accelerating 6.3 x 10{sup 13} ppp, a world record intensity. This goal was set 11 years ago and achieving it called for the construction of a new booster and the reconstruction of much of the AGS. The booster was completed in 1991, and reached its design intensity of 1.5 x 10{sup 13} ppp in 1993. The AGS reconstruction was finished in 1994, and by July of that year the AGS claimed a new US record intensity for a proton synchrotron of 4 x 10{sup 13} ppp, using four booster pulses. Reaching the design intensity was scheduled for 1995. In 1994, the AGS had seemed to be solidly limited to 4 x 10{sup 13} ppp, but in 1995 the operations crew, working on their own in the quiet of the owl shift, steadily improved the intensity, regularly setting new records, much to the bemusement of the machine physicists. The physicists, however, did contribute. A second harmonic radiofrequency cavity in the booster increased the radiofrequency bucket area for capture, raising the booster intensity from 1.7 to 2.1 x 10{sup 13} ppp. In the AGS, new radiofrequency power supplies raised the available voltage from 8 to 13 kV, greatly enhancing the beam loading capabilities of the system. A powerful new transverse damping system successfully controlled instabilities that otherwise would have destroyed the beam in less than a millisecond. Also in the AGS, 35th harmonic octupole resonances were found.

  4. New proton conducting membranes for fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukumar, P R

    2006-07-01

    In order to synthesize proton-conducting materials which retain acids in the membrane during fuel cell operating conditions, the synthesis of poly(vinylphosphonic acid) grafted polybenzimidazole (PVPA grafted PBI) and the fabrication of multilayer membranes are mainly focussed in this dissertation. Synthesis of PVPA grafted PBI membrane can be done according to ''grafting through'' method. In ''grafting through'' method (or macromonomer method), monomer (e.g., vinylphosphonic acid) is radically copolymerized with olefin group attached macromonomer (e.g., allyl grafted PBI and vinylbenzyl grafted PBI). This approach is inherently limited to synthesize graft-copolymer with well-defined architectural and structural parameters. The incorporation of poly(vinylphosphonic acid) into PBI lead to improvements in proton conductivity up to 10-2 S/cm. Regarding multilayer membranes, the proton conducting layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly of polymers by various strong acids such as poly(vinylphosphonic acid), poly(vinylsulfonic acid) and poly(styrenesulfonic acid) paired with basic polymers such as poly(4-vinylimidazole) and poly(benzimidazole), which are appropriate for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell applications have been described. Proton conductivity increases with increasing smoothness of the film and the maximum measured conductivity was 10-4 S/cm at 25A C. Recently, anhydrous proton-conducting membranes with flexible structural backbones, which show proton-conducting properties comparable to Nafion have been focus of current research. The flexible backbone of polymer chains allow for a high segmental mobility and thus, a sufficiently low glass transition temperature (Tg), which is an essential factor to reach highly conductive systems. Among the polymers with a flexible chain backbone, poly(vinylphosphonic acid), poly(vinylbenzylphosphonic acid), poly(2-vinylbenzimidazole), poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid), poly(4-vinylimidazole), poly(4-vinylimidazole

  5. New proton conducting membranes for fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukumar, P.R.

    2006-07-01

    In order to synthesize proton-conducting materials which retain acids in the membrane during fuel cell operating conditions, the synthesis of poly(vinylphosphonic acid) grafted polybenzimidazole (PVPA grafted PBI) and the fabrication of multilayer membranes are mainly focussed in this dissertation. Synthesis of PVPA grafted PBI membrane can be done according to ''grafting through'' method. In ''grafting through'' method (or macromonomer method), monomer (e.g., vinylphosphonic acid) is radically copolymerized with olefin group attached macromonomer (e.g., allyl grafted PBI and vinylbenzyl grafted PBI). This approach is inherently limited to synthesize graft-copolymer with well-defined architectural and structural parameters. The incorporation of poly(vinylphosphonic acid) into PBI lead to improvements in proton conductivity up to 10-2 S/cm. Regarding multilayer membranes, the proton conducting layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly of polymers by various strong acids such as poly(vinylphosphonic acid), poly(vinylsulfonic acid) and poly(styrenesulfonic acid) paired with basic polymers such as poly(4-vinylimidazole) and poly(benzimidazole), which are appropriate for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell applications have been described. Proton conductivity increases with increasing smoothness of the film and the maximum measured conductivity was 10-4 S/cm at 25A C. Recently, anhydrous proton-conducting membranes with flexible structural backbones, which show proton-conducting properties comparable to Nafion have been focus of current research. The flexible backbone of polymer chains allow for a high segmental mobility and thus, a sufficiently low glass transition temperature (Tg), which is an essential factor to reach highly conductive systems. Among the polymers with a flexible chain backbone, poly(vinylphosphonic acid), poly(vinylbenzylphosphonic acid), poly(2-vinylbenzimidazole), poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid), poly(4-vinylimidazole), poly

  6. Enzymatic Modification of Sphingomyelin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due to its major role in maintaining the water-retaining properties of the epidermis, ceramide is of great commercial potential in cosmetic and pharmaceuticals such as hair and skin care products. Currently, chemical synthesis of ceramide is a costly process, and developments of alternative cost......-efficient, high yield production methods are of great interest. In the present study, the potential of producing ceramide through the enzymatic hydrolysis of sphingomyelin have been studied. sphingomyelin is a ubiquitous membrane-lipid and rich in dairy products or by-products. It has been verified...... that sphingomyelin modification gives a feasible approach to the potential production of ceramide. The reaction system has been improved through system evaluation and the optimization of several important factors, and phospholipase C from Clostridium perfringens shows higher activity towards the hydrolysis reaction...

  7. Two proton decay in 12O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumawat, M.; Singh, U.K.; Jain, S.K.; Saxena, G.; Kaushik, M.; Aggarwal, Mamta

    2017-01-01

    Two-proton radioactivity was observed experimentally in the decay of 45 Fe, 54 Zn and 48 Ni. From then many theoretical studies of one and two-proton radioactivity have been carried out within the framework of different models including RMF+BCS approach for medium mass region. Towards light mass region proton-proton correlations were observed in two-proton decay of 19 Mg and 16 Ne. Recently, different mechanism of two-proton emission from proton-rich nuclei 23 Al and 22 Mg has been investigated and transition from direct to sequential two-proton decay in sd shell nuclei is observed. Encouraged with these recent studies of two proton emission in light mass nuclei, we have applied our RMF+BCS approach for the study of two proton emission in light mass region and in this paper we present our result of two proton emission in 12 O

  8. Vector boson and Charmonium production in proton-lead and lead-lead collisions with ATLAS at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00241320; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Electroweak bosons do not interact strongly with the dense and hot medium formed in nuclear collisions, and thus should be sensitive to the nuclear modification of parton distribution functions (nPDFs). The in-medium modification of heavy charmonium states plays an important role in studying the hot and dense medium. The ATLAS detector, optimized to search for new physics in proton-proton collisions, is well equipped to measure Z and W bosons as well as quarkonium in the high occupancy environment produced in heavy ion collisions. Results from the ATLAS experiment on W and Z boson yields as a function of centrality, transverse momentum and rapidity, in lead-lead and proton-lead collisions are presented. Quarkonium results from proton-lead collisions are also presented.

  9. High intensity proton accelerator and its application (Proton Engineering Center)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi

    1995-01-01

    A plan called PROTON ENGINEERING CENTER has been proposed in JAERI. The center is a complex composed of research facilities and a beam shape and storage ring based on a proton linac with an energy of 1.5 GeV and an average current of 10 mA. The research facilities planned are OMEGA·Nuclear Energy Development Facility, Neutron Facility for Material Irradiation, Nuclear Data Experiment Facility, Neutron Factory, Meson Factory, Spallation Radioisotope Beam Facility, and Medium Energy Experiment Facility, where high intensity proton beam and secondary particle beams such as neutrons, π-mesons, muons, and unstable isotopes originated from the protons are available for promoting the innovative research of nuclear energy and basic science and technology. (author)

  10. The underlying event in proton-proton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel, F.

    2009-05-15

    In this thesis, studies of the underlying event in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s) = 10 TeV are presented. Crucial ingredient to underlying event models are multiple parton-parton scatters in single proton-proton collisions. The feasibility of measuring the underlying event was investigated with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using charged particles and charged-particle jets. Systematic uncertainties of the underlying event measurement due to detector misalignment and imperfect track reconstruction are found to be negligible after {integral}Ldt=1 pb{sup -1} of data are available. Different model predictions are compared with each other using fully simulated Monte Carlo samples. It is found, that distinct models differ strongly enough to tell them apart with early data. (orig.)

  11. Proton-proton elastic scattering measurements at COSY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagdasarian, Zara [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi (Georgia); Collaboration: ANKE-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    To construct the reliable phase shift analysis (PSA) that can successfully describe the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction it is necessary to measure variety of experimental observables for both proton-proton (pp) and neutron-proton (np) elastic scattering. The polarized beams and targets at COSY-ANKE facility allow a substantial contribution to the existing database. The experiment was carried out in April 2013 at ANKE using a transversely polarized proton beam incident on an unpolarized hydrogen cluster target. Six beam energies of T{sub p}=0.8,1.6,1.8,2.0,2.2,2.4 GeV were used. The aim of this talk is to present the preliminary results for the analyzing power (A{sub y}) for the pp elastic scattering in the so-far unexplored 5 <θ{sub cm}<30 angular range. Our measurements are also compared to the world data and current partial wave solutions.

  12. Where is the proton's spin?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, F.E.

    1988-01-01

    There has been much recent excitement arising from the claim by the EMC collaboration that none of the proton's spin is carried by quarks. There are many textbooks, including those written by some members of this audience, which assert that the proton's spin is carried by quarks. I will review the history of deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons from polarized protons, culminating in this most recent dramatic claim. I will show that, for the last decade, data have appeared consistent with predictions of the quark model and highlight what the new and potentially exciting data are. I will conclude with suggestions for the future. 33 refs

  13. Acceleration of polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1998-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Using a partial Siberian snake and a rf dipole that ensure stable adiabatic spin motion during acceleration has made it possible to accelerate polarized protons to 25 GeV at the Brookhaven AGS. Full Siberian snakes are being developed for RHIC to make the acceleration of polarized protons to 250 GeV possible. A similar scheme is being studied for the 800 GeV HERA proton accelerator

  14. Where is the proton's spin?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, F.E.

    1989-01-01

    There has been much recent excitement arising from the claim by the EMC collaboration that none of the proton's spin is carried by quarks. There are many textbooks, including those written by some members of this audience, which assert that the proton's spin is carried by quarks. I will review the history of deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons from polarized protons, culminating in this most recent dramatic claim. I will show that, for the last decade, data have appeared consistent with predictions of the quark model and highlight what the new and potentially exciting data are. I will conclude with suggestions for the future

  15. Measurement of proton autoneutralization potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, M.

    1984-09-01

    A proton space charge having multi-MeV kinetic energy was injected through a thin ground plane to extract electrons and produce a time-dependent autoneutralization space potential. An electon-emitting floating-potential resistive divider was used to measure the space potential during 20 ns of the proton current pulse. During this time, proton kinetic energy fell from 10.6 MeV to 8.5 MeV and thus the space potential (taken as 1.09 x the floating potential) fell from 5.8 kV to 4.6 kV

  16. Scattering of intermediate energy protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaumeaux, Alain.

    1980-06-01

    The scattering of 1 GeV protons appears to be a powerful means of investigating nuclear matter. We worked with SPESI and the formalism of Kerman-Mc Manus and Thaler. The amplitude of nucleon-nucleon scattering was studied as were the aspects of 1 GeV proton scattering (multiple scattering, absorption, spin-orbit coupling, N-N amplitude, KMT-Glauber comparison, second order effects). The results of proton scattering on 16 O, the isotopes of calcium, 58 Ni, 90 Zr and 208 Pb are given [fr

  17. Aspects of the fundamental theory of proton-proton scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, A

    1973-01-01

    After recalling the existence of a high energy bound on proton-proton total cross-sections, the author discusses the various phenomena which occur when these cross-sections rise and especially when they have the qualitative behaviour of the bound: rising elastic cross- sections, shrinking diffraction peak, validity of the Pomeranchuk theorem for total and elastic cross-sections, existence of a positive real part of the forward amplitude at high energies. (16 refs).

  18. Proton-proton elastic scattering at ultrahigh energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, M.; Shaukat, M.A.; Fazal-e-Aleem

    1981-01-01

    Recent experimental results on proton-proton elastic scattering at high energies are discussed in the context of the comments by Chou and Yang. There does not appear to be any tendency that the experimental results would agree with the predictions of the geometrical model even at ultrahigh energies. The angular distribution structure as described by using the dipole pomeron is consistent with the experimental data at presently available high energies and predicts results quite different from the geometrical model. (author)

  19. Proton-proton elastic scattering at ultrahigh energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, M.; Shaukat, M.A.; Fazal-e-Aleem (University of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan). Dept. of Physics)

    1981-05-30

    Recent experimental results on proton-proton elastic scattering at high energies are discussed in the context of the comments by Chou and Yang. There does not appear to be any tendency that the experimental results would agree with the predictions of the geometrical model even at ultrahigh energies. The angular distribution structure as described by using the dipole pomeron is consistent with the experimental data at presently available high energies and predicts results quite different from the geometrical model.

  20. Minimal supersymmetric hybrid inflation, flipped SU(5) and proton decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, Mansoor Ur; Shafi, Qaisar [Bartol Research Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Wickman, Joshua R., E-mail: jwickman@udel.ed [Bartol Research Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2010-04-26

    Minimal supersymmetric hybrid inflation utilizes a canonical Kaehler potential and a renormalizable superpotential which is uniquely determined by imposing a U(1) R-symmetry. In computing the scalar spectral index n{sub s} we take into account modifications of the tree level potential caused by radiative and supergravity corrections, as well as contributions from the soft supersymmetry breaking terms with a negative soft mass-squared term allowed for the inflaton. All of these contributions play a role in realizing n{sub s} values in the range 0.96-0.97 preferred by WMAP. The U(1) R-symmetry plays an important role in flipped SU(5) by eliminating the troublesome dimension five proton decay. The proton decays into e{sup +}pi{sup 0} via dimension six operators arising from the exchange of superheavy gauge bosons with a lifetime of order 10{sup 34}-10{sup 36} years.

  1. High intensity negative proton beams from a SNICS ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, C.R.; Hollander, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    For the past year we have been involved in a project to develop an intense (> 100μA) negative proton beam from a SNICS (Source of Negative Ions by Cesium Sputtering) ion source. This report will cover how we accomplished and exceeded this goal by more than 40%. Included in these observations will be the following: A description of an effective method for making titanium hydride cathodes. How to overcome the limitations of the titanium hydride cathode. The modification of the SNICS source to improve output; including the installation of the conical ionizer and the gas cathode. A discussion of problems including: poisoning the proton beam with oxygen, alternative gas cathode materials, the clogging of the gas inlet, long burn-in times, and limited cathode life times. Finally, how to optimize source performance when using a gas cathode, and what is the mechanism by which a gas cathode operates; facts, fantasies, or myth

  2. Permeability coefficient of proton irradiated polyethylene terephatalate thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassani, L.C.; Santos, W.M.S.; Marechal, B.

    1983-01-01

    The principle of operation of an apparatus developed to study gas permation through thin films is described and the measurement method is discussed. Use is made of diffusion theory to obtain a expression for the permeability coefficient as a function of the rate of increase of the pressure in the receiving volume. The Gibbs function for permeation of Helium through Polyethylene Terephtalate (P.E.T.) is determined. The permeability coefficient of Helium is found to increase significantly with the range of the implanted protons although the incident charge has been kept constant. The hypothesis of structural modifications of the proton implanted P.E.T. seems to be confirmed by small angles X-rays scattering experiments on the irradiated samples. (Author) [pt

  3. Nuclear data for fast neutron and proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, M.B.; Jones, D.T.L.; Barschall, H.H.

    2001-01-01

    ICRU Report 63 entitled 'Nuclear Data for Neutron and Proton Radiotherapy and for Radiation Protection' has recently been published. The present paper presents an overview of this report, along with examples of some of the results obtained for evaluated nuclear cross sections and kerma coefficients. These cross sections are evaluated using a combination of measured data and the GNASH nuclear model code for elements of importance for biological, dosimetric, beam modification and shielding purposes. In the case of hydrogen both R-matrix and phase-shift scattering theories are used. Neutron cross sections and kerma coefficients were evaluated up to 100 MeV and proton cross sections up to 250 MeV. (author)

  4. Jet probes of the nuclear and proton wavefunctions in proton--lead collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Perepelitsa, Dennis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of high pT processes in ultrarelativistic proton-nucleus collisions are sensitive to changes in the partonic densities arising from the presence of the high-density nuclear environment. Such measurements are thought to serve as a benchmark of the so called "cold nuclear matter" effects, providing the context within which to understand the strong suppression of high pT processes observed in nucleus-nucleus collisions. However, measurements of the centrality dependence of jet production at forward (proton-going) rapidities may additionally shed light on the behavior of the proton wavefunction at large Bjorken-x. The latest ATLAS results for inclusive jets and charged particles in 31/nb of 5.02 TeV proton-lead collisions at the LHC are presented. The centrality in these collisions is characterized through the sum of the transverse energy in the lead-going forward calorimeter. The nuclear modification factors RpPb and RCP are presented for jets and high-pT charged particles as a function of transvers...

  5. Proton radiotherapy: some perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirn, T.F.

    1988-01-01

    A news article highlighting the use of protons in radiotherapy is presented. Development of stereotaxic radiosurgery is the result of contributions from physicists, radiologists, and neurosurgeons, says Jacob Fabrikant, MD, head of the Arteriovenous Malformation Program at the University of California's Lawrence Berkeley laboratory. It also appears to have been the product of Harvard University (Boston) and University of California (Berkeley) cooperation. Robert R. Wilson, PhD, now a professor emeritus at Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, is credited with proposing the medical use of charged particles. Wilson, a physicist, says that the idea occurred to him while he was at Berkeley in the mid-1940's, designing the cyclotron to be built at Harvard. Although he was aware of their work, he does not remember discussing it with Robert Stone, MD, or John Lawrence, MD, who only a few years earlier at Berkeley had begun the initial medical experiments with neutrons. Wilson says that it simply occurred to him that in certain instances charged particles had two advantages over x-rays

  6. Polarized protons at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1990-12-01

    The Physics case is presented for the use of polarized protons at RHIC for one or two months each year. This would provide a facility with polarizations of approx-gt 50% high luminosity ∼2.0 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1 , the possibility of both longitudinal and transverse polarization at the interaction regions, and frequent polarization reversal for control of systematic errors. The annual integrated luminosity for such running (∼10 6 sec per year) would be ∫ Ldt = 2 x 10 38 cm -2 -- roughly 20 times the total luminosity integrated in ∼ 10 years of operation of the CERN Collider (∼10 inverse picobarns, 10 37 cm -2 ). This facility would be unique in the ability to perform parity-violating measurements and polarization test of QCD. Also, the existence of p-p collisions in a new energy range would permit the study of ''classical'' reactions like the total cross section and elastic scattering, etc., and serve as a complement to measurements from p-bar p colliders. 11 refs

  7. The study of the irradiation-induced embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels. Analysis of surveillance test specimens of a commercial nuclear reactor pressure vessel studied by three-dimensional atom probe and positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Yasuyoshi; Toyama, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Masayuki

    2007-01-01

    The study of embrittlement of nuclear power reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is of critical importance for the safety assessment in the nuclear industry. Some origins of embrittlement are attributed to fine Cu precipitates, matrix defects, grain boundary segregation of P and late blooming phase. This review article described nanostructural observation by three-dimensional atom probe (3DAP) and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). The density and sizes of Cu-rich nanoprecipitates and grain boundary segregation are sensitively detected by 3DAP, and vacancies are probed by PAS. Element analysis around vacancies and fine microstructural Cu precipitates not containing vacancies are successfully observed by a coincidence doppler broadening method. The nanostructural evolution of irradiation-induced Cu-rich nanoprecipitates (CRNPs) and vacancy clusters in surveillance test specimens of commercial nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel welds of Doel-2 in Belgium were revealed by combining 3DAP and PAS. In both medium (0.13 wt%) and high (0.30 wt%) Cu welds, the CRNPs were found to form readily at the very beginning of the reactor lifetime. On the other hand, small vacancy clusters start appearing after the initial Cu precipitates and accumulate steadily with increasing neutron dose. The CRNPs were also observed at very low dose rate of neutrons in the test specimen of Calder Hall Reactor of Japan Atomic Power Company. The significant enhancement of these Cu precipitates results in the embrittlement in practical RPVs. At very high dose of 2.2x10 18 n/cm 2 by JMTR, the Cu precipitates were scarcely observed, and the irradiation-induced embrittlement was primarily caused from vacancy-impurity complexes and dislocation loops. (author)

  8. Proton-proton and deuteron-deuteron correlations in interactions of relativistic helium nuclei with protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galazka-Friedman, J.; Sobczak, T.; Stepaniak, J.; Zielinski, I.P.; Bano, M.; Hlavacova, J.; Martinska, G.; Patocka, J.; Seman, M.; Sandor, L.; Urban, J.

    1993-01-01

    The reactions 4 Hep→pp+X, 3 Hep→pp+X and 4 Hep→ddp have been investigated and the correlation function has been measured for protons and deuterons with small relative momenta. Strong positive correlation has been observed for protons related mainly to the final state interactions in 1 S 0 state. The root mean square radius of the proton source calculated from the correlation function has been found to be equal to (1.7±0.3) fm and (2.1±0.3) fm for 4 He and 3 He respectively. It agrees with the known radii of these nuclei. (orig.)

  9. Dynamics of Anti-Proton -- Protons and Anti-Proton -- Nucleus Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Galoyan, A; Uzhinsky, V

    2016-01-01

    A short review of simulation results of anti-proton-proton and anti-proton-nucleus interactions within the framework of Geant4 FTF (Fritiof) model is presented. The model uses the main assumptions of the Quark-Gluon-String Model or Dual Parton Model. The model assumes production and fragmentation of quark-anti-quark and diquark-anti-diquark strings in the mentioned interactions. Key ingredients of the model are cross sections of string creation processes and an usage of the LUND string fragmentation algorithm. They allow one to satisfactory describe a large set of experimental data, especially, a strange particle production, Lambda hyperons and K mesons.

  10. Parametric Model for Astrophysical Proton-Proton Interactions and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Niklas [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Observations of gamma-rays have been made from celestial sources such as active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts and supernova remnants as well as the Galactic ridge. The study of gamma rays can provide information about production mechanisms and cosmic-ray acceleration. In the high-energy regime, one of the dominant mechanisms for gamma-ray production is the decay of neutral pions produced in interactions of ultra-relativistic cosmic-ray nuclei and interstellar matter. Presented here is a parametric model for calculations of inclusive cross sections and transverse momentum distributions for secondary particles--gamma rays, e±, ve, $\\bar{v}$e, vμ and $\\bar{μ}$e--produced in proton-proton interactions. This parametric model is derived on the proton-proton interaction model proposed by Kamae et al.; it includes the diffraction dissociation process, Feynman-scaling violation and the logarithmically rising inelastic proton-proton cross section. To improve fidelity to experimental data for lower energies, two baryon resonance excitation processes were added; one representing the Δ(1232) and the other multiple resonances with masses around 1600 MeV/c2. The model predicts the power-law spectral index for all secondary particle to be about 0.05 lower in absolute value than that of the incident proton and their inclusive cross sections to be larger than those predicted by previous models based on the Feynman-scaling hypothesis. The applications of the presented model in astrophysics are plentiful. It has been implemented into the Galprop code to calculate the contribution due to pion decays in the Galactic plane. The model has also been used to estimate the cosmic-ray flux in the Large Magellanic Cloud based on HI, CO and gamma-ray observations. The transverse momentum distributions enable calculations when the proton distribution is anisotropic. It is shown that the gamma-ray spectrum and flux due to a

  11. Proton beam monitor chamber calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomà, C; Meer, D; Safai, S; Lorentini, S

    2014-01-01

    The first goal of this paper is to clarify the reference conditions for the reference dosimetry of clinical proton beams. A clear distinction is made between proton beam delivery systems which should be calibrated with a spread-out Bragg peak field and those that should be calibrated with a (pseudo-)monoenergetic proton beam. For the latter, this paper also compares two independent dosimetry techniques to calibrate the beam monitor chambers: absolute dosimetry (of the number of protons exiting the nozzle) with a Faraday cup and reference dosimetry (i.e. determination of the absorbed dose to water under IAEA TRS-398 reference conditions) with an ionization chamber. To compare the two techniques, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to convert dose-to-water to proton fluence. A good agreement was found between the Faraday cup technique and the reference dosimetry with a plane-parallel ionization chamber. The differences—of the order of 3%—were found to be within the uncertainty of the comparison. For cylindrical ionization chambers, however, the agreement was only possible when positioning the effective point of measurement of the chamber at the reference measurement depth—i.e. not complying with IAEA TRS-398 recommendations. In conclusion, for cylindrical ionization chambers, IAEA TRS-398 reference conditions for monoenergetic proton beams led to a systematic error in the determination of the absorbed dose to water, especially relevant for low-energy proton beams. To overcome this problem, the effective point of measurement of cylindrical ionization chambers should be taken into account when positioning the reference point of the chamber. Within the current IAEA TRS-398 recommendations, it seems advisable to use plane-parallel ionization chambers—rather than cylindrical chambers—for the reference dosimetry of pseudo-monoenergetic proton beams. (paper)

  12. On the proton radius problem

    OpenAIRE

    Giannini, M. M.; Santopinto, E.

    2013-01-01

    The recent values of the proton charge radius obtained by means of muonic-hydrogen laser spectroscopy are about $4\\%$ different from the electron scattering data. It has been suggested that the proton radius is actually measured in different frames and that, starting from a non relativistic quark model calculation, the Lorentz transformation of the form factors accounts properly for the discepancy. We shall show that the relation between the charge radii measured in different frames can be de...

  13. Modification of membrane sulfhydryl groups in bacteriostatic action of nitrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchman, G.W. III; Hansen, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism by which nitrite inhibits outgrowing spores of bacillus cereus T was examined by using techniques developed earlier for nitrite analogs. The morphological stage of inhibition, cooperativity effects, effect of pH on inhibition, kinetics of protection against tritiated iodoacetate incorporation into membrane sulfhydryl groups, and protection against the bacteriocidal effect of carboxymethylation of iodoacetate indicate that nitrite acts as a membrane-directed sulfhydryl agent. The mechanism by which nitrite modifies the chemical reactivity of the sulfhyrdyl group could be either direct covalent modification or inactivation through communication with another modified membrane component. Profiles of pH effects suggest that the active agent is the protonated form of nitrite. The nitrite concentrations which modify membrane sulfhydryl activity coincide with those which have a bacteriostatic effect. These results are consistent with membrane sulfhydryl modification as a component of the mechanism of nitrite-induced bacteriostasis in this aerobic sporeformer

  14. Electric dipole moment in KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} systematically modified by proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin Kweon, Jung; Lee, Cheol Eui [Department of Physics and Institute for Nano Science, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, S. J.; Kim, H. S. [Department of Applied Physics, Dankook University, Yongin 448-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-01

    We have carried out an impedance spectroscopy study on a series of proton-irradiated KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KDP) systems. A systematic modification was observed in the transverse dipole moment of the proton-irradiated KDP systems, associated with hydrogen-ion displacements, as obtained from dielectric constant measurements by using a mean-field approximation. Besides, intercorrelation of the charge transport with the dielectric properties was revealed, both having closely to do with the hydrogen-bond modification.

  15. Proton therapy project at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, K.; Akanuma, A.; Karasawa, K.

    1990-01-01

    Particle radiation which might present steeper dose distribution has received much attention as the third particle facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland. Proton conformation with sharp fall-off is considered to be the radiation beam suitable for confining high doses to a target volume without complications and for verifying which factor out of high RBE or physical dose distribution is more essential for local control in malignant tumors. This paper discusses the current status of the spot scanning method, which allows three dimensional conformation radiotherapy, and preliminary results. Preliminary dose distribution with proton conformation technique was acquired by modifying a computer program for treatment planning in pion treatment. In a patient with prostate carcinoma receiving both proton and pion radiation therapy, proton conformation was found to confine high doses to the target area and spare both the bladder and rectum well; and pion therapy was found to deliver non-homogeneous radiation to these organs. Although there are some obstacles in the proton project at PSI, experimental investigations are encouraging. The dynamic spot scanning method with combination of the kicker magnet, wobbler magnet, range shifter, patient transporter, and position sensitive monitor provides highly confined dose distribution, making it possible to increase total doses and thus to improve local control rate. Proton confirmation is considered to be useful for verifying possible biological effectiveness of negative pion treatment of PSI as well. (N.K.)

  16. When the proton becomes larger

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC has just confirmed that, at high energy, protons behave as if they were becoming larger. In more technical terms, their total cross-section – a parameter linked to the proton-proton interaction probability – increases with energy. This phenomenon, expected from previous measurements performed at much lower energy, has now been confirmed for the first time at the LHC’s unprecedented energy.   One arm of a TOTEM T2 detector during its installation at interaction point 5. A composite particle like the proton is a complex system that in no way resembles a static Lego construction: sub-components move inside and interactions keep the whole thing together, but in a very dynamic way. This partly explains why even the very common proton can still be hiding secrets about its nature, decades after its discovery. One way of studying the inner properties of protons is to observe how they interact with each other, which, in technical terms, i...

  17. QED is not endangered by the proton's size

    CERN Document Server

    De Rujula, A

    2010-01-01

    Pohl et al. have reported a very precise measurement of the Lamb-shift in muonic Hydrogen, from which they infer the radius characterizing the proton's charge distribution. The result is 5 standard deviations away from the one of the CODATA compilation of physical constants. This has been interpreted as possibly requiring a 5.9 standard-deviation modification of the Rydberg constant, to a new value that would be precise to 3.3 parts in $10^{13}$, as well as putative evidence for physics beyond the standard model. I demonstrate that these options are unsubstantiated.

  18. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorhaus Daniel B

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions.

  19. Heteronuclear proton assisted recoupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paëpe, Gaël; Lewandowski, Józef R.; Loquet, Antoine; Eddy, Matt; Megy, Simon; Böckmann, Anja; Griffin, Robert G.

    2011-03-01

    We describe a theoretical framework for understanding the heteronuclear version of the third spin assisted recoupling polarization transfer mechanism and demonstrate its potential for detecting long-distance intramolecular and intermolecular 15N-13C contacts in biomolecular systems. The pulse sequence, proton assisted insensitive nuclei cross polarization (PAIN-CP) relies on a cross term between 1H-15N and 1H-13C dipolar couplings to mediate zero- and/or double-quantum 15N-13C recoupling. In particular, using average Hamiltonian theory we derive effective Hamiltonians for PAIN-CP and show that the transfer is mediated by trilinear terms of the form N±C∓Hz (ZQ) or N±C±Hz (DQ) depending on the rf field strengths employed. We use analytical and numerical simulations to explain the structure of the PAIN-CP optimization maps and to delineate the appropriate matching conditions. We also detail the dependence of the PAIN-CP polarization transfer with respect to local molecular geometry and explain the observed reduction in dipolar truncation. In addition, we demonstrate the utility of PAIN-CP in structural studies with 15N-13C spectra of two uniformly 13C,15N labeled model microcrystalline proteins—GB1, a 56 amino acid peptide, and Crh, a 85 amino acid domain swapped dimer (MW = 2 × 10.4 kDa). The spectra acquired at high magic angle spinning frequencies (ωr/2π > 20 kHz) and magnetic fields (ω0H/2π = 700-900 MHz) using moderate rf fields, yield multiple long-distance intramonomer and intermonomer 15N-13C contacts. We use these distance restraints, in combination with the available x-ray structure as a homology model, to perform a calculation of the monomer subunit of the Crh protein.

  20. Constraining gluon distributions in nuclei using dijets in proton-proton and proton-lead collisions at ${\\sqrt {\\smash [b]{s_{_{\\mathrm {NN}}}}}} = $ 5.02 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Sirunyan, Albert M; CMS Collaboration; Adam, Wolfgang; Ambrogi, Federico; Asilar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Flechl, Martin; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Krammer, Natascha; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Madlener, Thomas; Mikulec, Ivan; Rad, Navid; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Spanring, Markus; Spitzbart, Daniel; Taurok, Anton; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wittmann, Johannes; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Zarucki, Mateusz; Chekhovsky, Vladimir; Mossolov, Vladimir; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; De Wolf, Eddi A; Di Croce, Davide; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Pieters, Maxim; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; De Bruyn, Isabelle; De Clercq, Jarne; Deroover, Kevin; Flouris, Giannis; Lontkovskyi, Denys; Lowette, Steven; Marchesini, Ivan; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Python, Quentin; Skovpen, Kirill; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Beghin, Diego; Bilin, Bugra; Brun, Hugues; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Dorney, Brian; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Lenzi, Thomas; Luetic, Jelena; Postiau, Nicolas; Starling, Elizabeth; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Vannerom, David; Wang, Qun; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Gul, Muhammad; Khvastunov, Illia; Poyraz, Deniz; Roskas, Christos; Trocino, Daniele; Tytgat, Michael; Verbeke, Willem; Vermassen, Basile; Vit, Martina; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caputo, Claudio; David, Pieter; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Krintiras, Georgios; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Saggio, Alessia; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Zobec, Joze; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Correia Silva, Gilson; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Coelho, Eduardo; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Melo De Almeida, Miqueias; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Sanchez Rosas, Luis Junior; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Thiel, Mauricio; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, Felipe; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Calligaris, Luigi; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Misheva, Milena; Rodozov, Mircho; Shopova, Mariana; Sultanov, Georgi; Dimitrov, Anton; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Gao, Xuyang; Yuan, Li; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liao, Hongbo; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Yazgan, Efe; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Sijing; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Levin, Andrew; Li, Jing; Li, Linwei; Li, Qiang; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Wang, Yi; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Segura Delgado, Manuel Alejandro; Courbon, Benoit; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Mesic, Benjamin; Starodumov, Andrei; Susa, Tatjana; Ather, Mohsan Waseem; Attikis, Alexandros; Kolosova, Marina; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Ayala, Edy; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Abdalla, Hassan; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Ehataht, Karl; Kadastik, Mario; Raidal, Martti; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Kirschenmann, Henning; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Havukainen, Joona; Heikkilä, Jaana Kristiina; Jarvinen, Terhi; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Laurila, Santeri; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Siikonen, Hannu; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Leloup, Clément; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Negro, Giulia; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Titov, Maksym; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Amendola, Chiara; Antropov, Iurii; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Kucher, Inna; Lobanov, Artur; Martin Blanco, Javier; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Pigard, Philipp; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Stahl Leiton, Andre Govinda; Zabi, Alexandre; Zghiche, Amina; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Jansová, Markéta; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Tonon, Nicolas; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chanon, Nicolas; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Finco, Linda; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lattaud, Hugues; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Feld, Lutz; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Preuten, Marius; Rauch, Max Philip; Schomakers, Christian; Schulz, Johannes; Teroerde, Marius; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Albert, Andreas; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Ghosh, Saranya; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Keller, Henning; Knutzen, Simon; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Schmidt, Alexander; Teyssier, Daniel; Flügge, Günter; Hlushchenko, Olena; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Müller, Thomas; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Roy, Dennis; Sert, Hale; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Arndt, Till; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Babounikau, Illia; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bermúdez Martínez, Armando; Bertsche, David; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Botta, Valeria; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Danilov, Vladyslav; De Wit, Adinda; Defranchis, Matteo Maria; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Domínguez Damiani, Daniela; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eichhorn, Thomas; Elwood, Adam; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Geiser, Achim; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gunnellini, Paolo; Guthoff, Moritz; Haranko, Mykyta; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kleinwort, Claus; Knolle, Joscha; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Lenz, Teresa; Lipka, Katerina; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Meyer, Mareike; Missiroli, Marino; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Myronenko, Volodymyr; Pflitsch, Svenja Karen; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Savitskyi, Mykola; Saxena, Pooja; Schütze, Paul; Schwanenberger, Christian; Shevchenko, Rostyslav; Singh, Akshansh; Tholen, Heiner; Turkot, Oleksii; Vagnerini, Antonio; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wen, Yiwen; Wichmann, Katarzyna; Wissing, Christoph; Zenaiev, Oleksandr; Aggleton, Robin; Bein, Samuel; Benato, Lisa; Benecke, Anna; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hinzmann, Andreas; Karavdina, Anastasia; Kasieczka, Gregor; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Kurz, Simon; Kutzner, Viktor; Lange, Johannes; Marconi, Daniele; Multhaup, Jens; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Perieanu, Adrian; Reimers, Arne; Rieger, Oliver; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Sonneveld, Jory; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Troendle, Daniel; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baselga, Marta; Baur, Sebastian; Butz, Erik; Caspart, René; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; El Morabit, Karim; Faltermann, Nils; Freund, Benedikt; Giffels, Manuel; Harrendorf, Marco Alexander; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Kassel, Florian; Katkov, Igor; Kudella, Simon; Mildner, Hannes; Mitra, Soureek; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Schröder, Matthias; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Paspalaki, Garyfallia; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Karathanasis, George; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kontaxakis, Pantelis; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Papavergou, Ioanna; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Vellidis, Konstantinos; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Papakrivopoulos, Ioannis; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Gianneios, Paraskevas; Katsoulis, Panagiotis; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Mallios, Stavros; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Triantis, Frixos A; Tsitsonis, Dimitrios; Bartók, Márton; Csanad, Mate; Filipovic, Nicolas; Major, Péter; Nagy, Marton Imre; Pasztor, Gabriella; Surányi, Olivér; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Hunyadi, Ádám; Sikler, Ferenc; Vámi, Tamás Álmos; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Choudhury, Somnath; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Tiwari, Praveen Chandra; Bahinipati, Seema; Kar, Chandiprasad; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chauhan, Sushil; Chawla, Ridhi; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Rajat; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Amandeep; Kaur, Manjit; Kaur, Sandeep; Kumar, Ramandeep; Kumari, Priyanka; Lohan, Manisha; Mehta, Ankita; Sandeep, Kaur; Sharma, Sandeep; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Gola, Mohit; Keshri, Sumit; Kumar, Ashok; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Priyanka, Priyanka; Ranjan, Kirti; Shah, Aashaq; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Bhardwaj, Rishika; Bharti, Monika; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Bhowmik, Debabrata; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Mondal, Kuntal; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Rout, Prasant Kumar; Roy, Ashim; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Saha, Gourab; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Singh, Bipen; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Aziz, Tariq; Bhat, Muzamil Ahmad; Dugad, Shashikant; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Ravindra Kumar Verma, Ravindra; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhattacharya, Soham; Chatterjee, Suman; Das, Pallabi; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Karmakar, Saikat; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Sarkar, Tanmay; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Pandey, Shubham; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Di Florio, Adriano; Errico, Filippo; Fiore, Luigi; Gelmi, Andrea; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Ince, Merve; Lezki, Samet; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Borgonovi, Lisa; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Ciocca, Claudia; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Iemmi, Fabio; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Latino, Giuseppe; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Russo, Lorenzo; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Strom, Derek; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Ferro, Fabrizio; Ravera, Fabio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Benaglia, Andrea; Beschi, Andrea; Brianza, Luca; Brivio, Francesco; Ciriolo, Vincenzo; Di Guida, Salvatore; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Zuolo, Davide; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Crescenzo, Antonia; Fabozzi, Francesco; Fienga, Francesco; Galati, Giuliana; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Khan, Wajid Ali; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Voevodina, Elena; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Bragagnolo, Alberto; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Hoh, Siew Yan; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lujan, Paul; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Ronchese, Paolo; Rossin, Roberto; Simonetto, Franco; Tiko, Andres; Torassa, Ezio; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Ressegotti, Martina; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Cecchi, Claudia; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Manoni, Elisa; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Mariani, Valentina; Menichelli, Mauro; Rossi, Alessandro; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiga, Daniele; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Boccali, Tommaso; Borrello, Laura; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fedi, Giacomo; Fiori, Francesco; Giannini, Leonardo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Manca, Elisabetta; Mandorli, Giulio; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; Daci, Nadir; Del Re, Daniele; Di Marco, Emanuele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Longo, Egidio; Marzocchi, Badder; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Pandolfi, Francesco; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cenna, Francesca; Cometti, Simona; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Demaria, Natale; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Monteno, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Soldi, Dario; Staiano, Amedeo; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Vazzoler, Federico; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Jeongeun; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Moon, Chang-Seong; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Kim, Hyunchul; Moon, Dong Ho; Oh, Geonhee; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Kim, Hyunsoo; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Haneol; Lee, Kyeongpil; Nam, Kyungwook; Oh, Sung Bin; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Jeon, Dajeong; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Choi, Young-Il; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Duran-Osuna, Cecilia; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Ramirez-Sanchez, Gabriel; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Rabadán-Trejo, Raúl Iraq; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Reyes-Almanza, Rogelio; Ramírez García, Mateo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Eysermans, Jan; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Bheesette, Srinidhi; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Szleper, Michal; Traczyk, Piotr; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Pyskir, Andrzej; Walczak, Marek; Araujo, Mariana; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Galinhas, Bruno; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Seixas, Joao; Strong, Giles; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Golunov, Alexey; Golutvin, Igor; Karjavine, Vladimir; Korenkov, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Mitsyn, Valeri Valentinovitch; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Smirnov, Vitaly; Trofimov, Vladimir; Yuldashev, Bekhzod S; Zarubin, Anatoli; Zhiltsov, Victor; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sosnov, Dmitry; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stepennov, Anton; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Aushev, Tagir; Chadeeva, Marina; Parygin, Pavel; Philippov, Dmitry; Polikarpov, Sergey; Popova, Elena; Rusinov, Vladimir; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Rusakov, Sergey V; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Kaminskiy, Alexandre; Kodolova, Olga; Korotkikh, Vladimir; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Vardanyan, Irina; Barnyakov, Alexander; Blinov, Vladimir; Dimova, Tatyana; Kardapoltsev, Leonid; Skovpen, Yuri; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Godizov, Anton; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Mandrik, Petr; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Slabospitskii, Sergei; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Babaev, Anton; Baidali, Sergei; Okhotnikov, Vitalii; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Álvarez Fernández, Adrian; Bachiller, Irene; Barrio Luna, Mar; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cerrada, Marcos; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Moran, Dermot; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Triossi, Andrea; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Cuevas, Javier; Erice, Carlos; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Rodríguez Bouza, Víctor; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Vischia, Pietro; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chazin Quero, Barbara; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Fernández Manteca, Pedro José; García Alonso, Andrea; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Prieels, Cédric; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Akgun, Bora; Auffray, Etiennette; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bendavid, Joshua; Bianco, Michele; Bocci, Andrea; Botta, Cristina; Brondolin, Erica; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Yi; Cucciati, Giacomo; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Roeck, Albert; Deelen, Nikkie; Dobson, Marc; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Everaerts, Pieter; Fallavollita, Francesco; Fasanella, Daniele; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gilbert, Andrew; Gill, Karl; Glege, Frank; Guilbaud, Maxime; Gulhan, Doga; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jafari, Abideh; Janot, Patrick; Karacheban, Olena; Kieseler, Jan; Kornmayer, Andreas; Krammer, Manfred; Lange, Clemens; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Meijers, Frans; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Milenovic, Predrag; Moortgat, Filip; Mulders, Martijn; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pantaleo, Felice; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuel; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pitters, Florian Michael; Rabady, Dinyar; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Selvaggi, Michele; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Stakia, Anna; Steggemann, Jan; Tosi, Mia; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veckalns, Viesturs; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Caminada, Lea; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Wiederkehr, Stephan Albert; Backhaus, Malte; Bäni, Lukas; Berger, Pirmin; Chernyavskaya, Nadezda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dorfer, Christian; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Klijnsma, Thomas; Lustermann, Werner; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marionneau, Matthieu; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, Gaël; Perrozzi, Luca; Pigazzini, Simone; Quittnat, Milena; Ruini, Daniele; Sanz Becerra, Diego Alejandro; Schönenberger, Myriam; Shchutska, Lesya; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Vesterbacka Olsson, Minna Leonora; Wallny, Rainer; Zhu, De Hua; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Brzhechko, Danyyl; Canelli, Maria Florencia; De Cosa, Annapaola; Del Burgo, Riccardo; Donato, Silvio; Galloni, Camilla; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Neutelings, Izaak; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Schweiger, Korbinian; Seitz, Claudia; Takahashi, Yuta; Zucchetta, Alberto; Chang, Yu-Hsiang; Cheng, Kai-yu; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Chang, Paoti; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Kumar, Arun; Li, You-ying; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Paganis, Efstathios; Psallidas, Andreas; Steen, Arnaud; Asavapibhop, Burin; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Bat, Ayse; Boran, Fatma; Cerci, Salim; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dolek, Furkan; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Isik, Candan; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kara, Ozgun; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Kiminsu, Ugur; Oglakci, Mehmet; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Tok, Ufuk Guney; Turkcapar, Semra; Zorbakir, Ibrahim Soner; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Atakisi, Ismail Okan; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Tekten, Sevgi; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Agaras, Merve Nazlim; Atay, Serhat; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Komurcu, Yildiray; Sen, Sercan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Davignon, Olivier; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Penning, Bjoern; Sakuma, Tai; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Taylor, Joseph; Titterton, Alexander; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Linacre, Jacob; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Auzinger, Georg; Bainbridge, Robert; Bloch, Philippe; Borg, Johan; Breeze, Shane; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Casasso, Stefano; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Di Maria, Riccardo; Haddad, Yacine; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; James, Thomas; Komm, Matthias; Laner, Christian; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Martelli, Arabella; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Palladino, Vito; Pesaresi, Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Scott, Edward; Seez, Christopher; Shtipliyski, Antoni; Singh, Gurpreet; Stoye, Markus; Strebler, Thomas; Summers, Sioni; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Virdee, Tejinder; Wardle, Nicholas; Winterbottom, Daniel; Wright, Jack; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Mackay, Catherine Kirsty; Morton, Alexander; Reid, Ivan; Teodorescu, Liliana; Zahid, Sema; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Madrid, Christopher; Mcmaster, Brooks; Pastika, Nathaniel; Smith, Caleb; Bartek, Rachel; Dominguez, Aaron; Buccilli, Andrew; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; West, Christopher; Arcaro, Daniel; Bose, Tulika; Gastler, Daniel; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Benelli, Gabriele; Coubez, Xavier; Cutts, David; Hadley, Mary; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Hogan, Julie Managan; Kwok, Ka Hei Martin; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Lee, Jangbae; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Usai, Emanuele; Yu, David; Band, Reyer; Brainerd, Christopher; Breedon, Richard; Burns, Dustin; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Flores, Chad; Funk, Garrett; Ko, Winston; Kukral, Ota; Lander, Richard; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Shalhout, Shalhout; Shi, Mengyao; Stolp, Dustin; Taylor, Devin; Tos, Kyle; Tripathi, Mani; Wang, Zhangqier; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Bachtis, Michail; Bravo, Cameron; Cousins, Robert; Dasgupta, Abhigyan; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Mccoll, Nickolas; Regnard, Simon; Saltzberg, David; Schnaible, Christian; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Bouvier, Elvire; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Gary, J William; Ghiasi Shirazi, Seyyed Mohammad Amin; Hanson, Gail; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Si, Weinan; Wang, Long; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cittolin, Sergio; Derdzinski, Mark; Gerosa, Raffaele; Gilbert, Dylan; Hashemi, Bobak; Holzner, André; Klein, Daniel; Kole, Gouranga; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Letts, James; Masciovecchio, Mario; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Amin, Nick; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Citron, Matthew; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Gouskos, Loukas; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Ovcharova, Ana; Qu, Huilin; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; Wang, Sicheng; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Bornheim, Adolf; Lawhorn, Jay Mathew; Newman, Harvey B; Nguyen, Thong; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhang, Zhicai; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Mudholkar, Tanmay; Paulini, Manfred; Sun, Menglei; Vorobiev, Igor; Weinberg, Marc; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; MacDonald, Emily; Mulholland, Troy; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chaves, Jorge; Cheng, Yangyang; Chu, Jennifer; Datta, Abhisek; Mcdermott, Kevin; Mirman, Nathan; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Quach, Dan; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Tan, Shao Min; Tao, Zhengcheng; Thom, Julia; Tucker, Jordan; Wittich, Peter; Zientek, Margaret; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Alyari, Maral; Apollinari, Giorgio; Apresyan, Artur; Apyan, Aram; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Canepa, Anadi; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cremonesi, Matteo; Duarte, Javier; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Freeman, Jim; Gecse, Zoltan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Tiehui; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Pena, Cristian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Ristori, Luciano; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schneider, Basil; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strait, James; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Cadamuro, Luca; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Field, Richard D; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Joshi, Bhargav Madhusudan; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Shi, Kun; Sperka, David; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Joshi, Yagya Raj; Linn, Stephan; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Kolberg, Ted; Martinez, German; Perry, Thomas; Prosper, Harrison; Saha, Anirban; Schiber, Catherine; Sharma, Varun; Yohay, Rachel; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Noonan, Daniel; Rahmani, Mehdi; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Cavanaugh, Richard; Chen, Xuan; Dittmer, Susan; Evdokimov, Olga; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hangal, Dhanush Anil; Hofman, David Jonathan; Jung, Kurt; Kamin, Jason; Mills, Corrinne; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Tonjes, Marguerite; Varelas, Nikos; Wang, Hui; Wang, Xiao; Wu, Zhenbin; Zhang, Jingyu; Alhusseini, Mohammad; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Hung, Wai Ting; Maksimovic, Petar; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Boren, Samuel; Bowen, James; Bylinkin, Alexander; Castle, James; Khalil, Sadia; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Rogan, Christopher; Sanders, Stephen; Schmitz, Erich; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; Wang, Quan; Duric, Senka; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Kim, Doyeong; Maravin, Yurii; Mendis, Dalath Rachitha; Mitchell, Tyler; Modak, Atanu; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Feng, Yongbin; Ferraioli, Charles; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kellogg, Richard G; Kunkle, Joshua; Mignerey, Alice; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonwar, Suresh C; Wong, Kak; Abercrombie, Daniel; Allen, Brandon; Azzolini, Virginia; Baty, Austin; Bauer, Gerry; Bi, Ran; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Demiragli, Zeynep; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Harris, Philip; Hsu, Dylan; Hu, Miao; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lee, Yen-Jie; Luckey, Paul David; Maier, Benedikt; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Tatar, Kaya; Velicanu, Dragos; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Zhaozhong, Shi; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Evans, Andrew; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Turkewitz, Jared; Wadud, Mohammad Abrar; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Claes, Daniel R; Fangmeier, Caleb; Golf, Frank; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Kravchenko, Ilya; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Mclean, Christine; Nguyen, Duong; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Barberis, Emanuela; Freer, Chad; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Morse, David Michael; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Wamorkar, Tanvi; Wang, Bingran; Wisecarver, Andrew; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Charaf, Otman; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Bucci, Rachael; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Li, Wenzhao; Loukas, Nikitas; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Siddireddy, Prasanna; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Wayne, Mitchell; Wightman, Andrew; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Alimena, Juliette; Antonelli, Louis; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Francis, Brian; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Ji, Weifeng; Ling, Ta-Yung; Luo, Wuming; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Cooperstein, Stephane; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Higginbotham, Samuel; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Lange, David; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Luo, Jingyu; Marlow, Daniel; Mei, Kelvin; Ojalvo, Isabel; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Malik, Sudhir; Norberg, Scarlet; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Das, Souvik; Gutay, Laszlo; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Peng, Cheng-Chieh; Qiu, Hao; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Sun, Jian; Wang, Fuqiang; Xiao, Rui; Xie, Wei; Cheng, Tongguang; Dolen, James; Parashar, Neeti; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Freed, Sarah; Geurts, Frank JM; Kilpatrick, Matthew; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Shi, Wei; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Zhang, Aobo; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Duh, Yi-ting; Dulemba, Joseph Lynn; Fallon, Colin; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Taus, Rhys; Verzetti, Mauro; Agapitos, Antonis; Chou, John Paul; Gershtein, Yuri; Gómez Espinosa, Tirso Alejandro; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Montalvo, Roy; Nash, Kevin; Osherson, Marc; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Delannoy, Andrés G; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Kamon, Teruki; Luo, Sifu; Mueller, Ryan; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Safonov, Alexei; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; De Guio, Federico; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Mengke, Tielige; Muthumuni, Samila; Peltola, Timo; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Padeken, Klaas; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Verweij, Marta; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Hirosky, Robert; Joyce, Matthew; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Xia, Fan; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Poudyal, Nabin; Sturdy, Jared; Thapa, Prakash; Zaleski, Shawn; Brodski, Michael; Buchanan, James; Caillol, Cécile; Carlsmith, Duncan; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Hussain, Usama; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Woods, Nathaniel

    2018-01-01

    The pseudorapidity distributions of dijets as a function of their average transverse momentum ($ p_{\\mathrm{T}}^{text{ave}} $) are measured in proton-lead (pPb) and proton-proton (pp) collisions. The data samples were collected by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC, at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 5.02 TeV. A significant modification of the pPb spectra with respect to the pp spectra is observed in all $p_{\\mathrm{T}}^{text{ave}}$ intervals investigated. The ratios of the pPb and pp distributions are compared to next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations with unbound nucleon and nuclear parton distribution functions (PDFs). These results give the first evidence that the gluon PDF at large Bjorken $x$ in lead ions is strongly suppressed with respect to the PDF in unbound nucleons.

  1. Sparse-view proton computed tomography using modulated proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jiseoc; Kim, Changhwan; Cho, Seungryong, E-mail: scho@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Byungjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, 110–746 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Jungwon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, 138–736 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seyjoon; Lee, Se Byeong [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, 410–769 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sungyong [Proton Therapy Center, McLaren Cancer Institute, Flint, Michigan 48532 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Proton imaging that uses a modulated proton beam and an intensity detector allows a relatively fast image acquisition compared to the imaging approach based on a trajectory tracking detector. In addition, it requires a relatively simple implementation in a conventional proton therapy equipment. The model of geometric straight ray assumed in conventional computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction is however challenged by multiple-Coulomb scattering and energy straggling in the proton imaging. Radiation dose to the patient is another important issue that has to be taken care of for practical applications. In this work, the authors have investigated iterative image reconstructions after a deconvolution of the sparsely view-sampled data to address these issues in proton CT. Methods: Proton projection images were acquired using the modulated proton beams and the EBT2 film as an intensity detector. Four electron-density cylinders representing normal soft tissues and bone were used as imaged object and scanned at 40 views that are equally separated over 360°. Digitized film images were converted to water-equivalent thickness by use of an empirically derived conversion curve. For improving the image quality, a deconvolution-based image deblurring with an empirically acquired point spread function was employed. They have implemented iterative image reconstruction algorithms such as adaptive steepest descent-projection onto convex sets (ASD-POCS), superiorization method–projection onto convex sets (SM-POCS), superiorization method–expectation maximization (SM-EM), and expectation maximization-total variation minimization (EM-TV). Performance of the four image reconstruction algorithms was analyzed and compared quantitatively via contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and root-mean-square-error (RMSE). Results: Objects of higher electron density have been reconstructed more accurately than those of lower density objects. The bone, for example, has been reconstructed

  2. Delayed protons and properties of proton-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnaukhov, V.A.

    1976-01-01

    The object of the investigation is to study the properties of proton-rich nuclei. The emphasis in the proposed survey is made on investigations in the range of Z > 50. Measurement of the total energy in emission of delayed protons (DP) enables one to determine the difference between the masses of initial and final isotopes. The statistical model of the DP emission is used for describing the proton spectrum. A comparison of the DP experimental and theoretical spectra shows that the presence of local resonances in the strength functions of the β dacay is rather a rule than an exception. Studies into the fine structure of the proton spectra supply information of the density of nuclei considerably removed from the β-stability line at the excitation energies of 3-7 MeV. The aproaches for retrieval of nuclear information with the aid of proton radiators developed so far can serve as a good basis for systematic investigation over a wide range of A and Z

  3. Two-proton radioactivity in proton-rich fp shell nuclei at high spin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggarwal, Mamta [Nuclear Science Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Post Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2006-07-15

    Two-proton radioactivity in extremely proton-rich fp shell nuclei at high spins is investigated in a theoretical framework. Separation energy and entropy fluctuate with spin and hence affect the location of the proton drip line.

  4. Two-proton radioactivity in proton-rich fp shell nuclei at high spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mamta

    2006-01-01

    Two-proton radioactivity in extremely proton-rich fp shell nuclei at high spins is investigated in a theoretical framework. Separation energy and entropy fluctuate with spin and hence affect the location of the proton drip line

  5. External proton and Li beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuff, Juan A.; Burlon, Alejandro A.; Debray, Mario E.; Kesque, Jose M.; Kreiner, Andres J.; Stoliar, Pablo A.; Naab, Fabian; Ozafran, Mabel J.; Vazquez, Monica E.; Perez de la Hoz, A.; Somacal, Hector; Valda, Alejandro; Canevas, S.; Ruffolo, M.; Tasat, D.R.; Muhlmann, M. C.

    2000-01-01

    In the frame of a feasibility study to introduce proton therapy in Argentina in a collaborative agreement between the Physics and Radiobiology Departments of the National Atomic Energy Commission or Argentina and the Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay, France, external proton and Li beams were produced at the TANDAR accelerator in Buenos Aires. The specific aim of this work was to start radiobiology studies on cell cultures and small laboratory animals. In particular we seek to determine here the relative biological effectiveness, RBE, for proton and Li beams as a function of energy for different tumor and normal cell lines. The 24 MeV proton beam was diffused using a 25 μm gold foil and extracted through a Kapton window to obtain a homogeneous field (constant to 95%) of about 7 cm in diameter. Measurements were carried out with quasi-monoenergetic beams (of 20.2 ± 0.07 MeV, 2.9 ± 0.10 MeV y 1.5 ± 0.1 MeV for protons and 21.4 ± 0.4 MeV for Lithium). Proton fluence and Bragg peaks were measured. The dose delivered in each case was monitored on-line with a calibrated transmission ionization chamber. Three cell lines PDV, PDVC 57 and V 79 (as a reference) were irradiated with γ-rays, proton and lithium beams with linear energy transfer (LET) from 2 to 100 keV/μm. RBE values in the range of 1.2-5.9 were obtained. In addition preliminary studies on chromosomal aberrations and viability of alveolar macrophages were carried out. (author)

  6. Proton-proton Scattering Above 3 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Sibirtsev, J. Haidenbauer, H.-W. Hammer S. Krewald ,Ulf-G. Meissner

    2010-01-01

    A large set of data on proton-proton differential cross sections, analyzing powers and the double-polarization parameter A{sub NN} is analyzed employing the Regge formalism. We find that the data available at proton beam momenta from 3 GeV/c to 50 GeV/c exhibit features that are very well in line with the general characteristics of Regge phenomenology and can be described with a model that includes the {rho}, {omega}, f{sub 2}, and a{sub 2} trajectories and single-Pomeron exchange. Additional data, specifically for spin-dependent observables at forward angles, would be very helpful for testing and refining our Regge model.

  7. Proton-proton reaction rates at extreme energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, Motohiko

    1993-01-01

    Results on proton-antiproton reaction rates (total cross-section) at collision energies of 1.8 TeV from experiments at Fermilab have suggested a lower rate of increase with energy compared to the extrapolation based on results previously obtained at CERN's proton-antiproton collider (CERN Courier, October 1991). Now an independent estimate of the values for the proton-proton total cross-section for collision energies from 5 to 30 TeV has been provided by the analysis of cosmic ray shower data collected over ten years at the Akeno Observatory operated by the Institute for Cosmic Ray Research of University of Tokyo. These results are based on the inelastic cross-section for collisions of cosmic ray protons with air nuclei at energies in the range10 16-18 eV. A new extensive air shower experiment was started at Akeno, 150 km west of Tokyo, in 1979 with a large array of detectors, both on the ground and under a 1-metre concrete absorber. This measured the total numbers of electrons and muons of energies above 1GeV for individual showers with much better accuracy than before. Data collection was almost continuous for ten years without any change in the triggering criteria for showers above10 16 eV. The mean free path for proton-air nuclei collisions has been determined from the zenith angle of the observed frequency of air showers which have the same effective path length for development in the atmosphere and the same primary energy

  8. The Structure of the Proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, E. E.; Hofstadter, R.

    1956-04-01

    The structure and size of the proton have been studied by means of the methods of high-energy electron scattering. The elastic scattering of electrons from protons in polyethylene has been investigated at the following energies in the laboratory system: 200, 300, 400, 500, 550 Mev. The range of laboratory angles examined has been 30 degrees to 135 degrees. At the largest angles and the highest energy, the cross section for scattering shows a deviation below that expected from a point proton by a factor of about nine. The magnitude and variation with angle of the deviations determine a structure factor for the proton, and thereby determine the size and shape of the charge and magnetic-moment distributions within the proton. An interpretation, consistent at all energies and angles and agreeing with earlier results from this laboratory, fixes the rms radius at 0.77 {plus or minus} 0.10 x 10{sup -13} cm for each of the charge and moment distributions. The shape of the density function is not far from a Gaussian with rms radius 0.70 x 10{sup -13} cm or an exponential with rms radius 0.80 x 10 {sup -13} cm. An equivalent interpretation of the experiments would ascribe the apparent size to a breakdown of the Coulomb law and the conventional theory of electromagnetism.

  9. LHC Report: Ions cross protons

    CERN Multimedia

    Reyes Alemany Fernandez for the LHC team

    2013-01-01

    The LHC starts the New Year facing a new challenge: proton-lead collisions in the last month before the shutdown in mid-February.    The first stable beams were achieved on 20 January with 13 individual bunches per beam. In the next fill, the first bunch-trains were injected and stable beams were achieved with 96 proton on 120 ion bunches.  This fill was very important because we were able to study the so-called moving long-range beam-beam encounters. Long-range encounters, which are also seen in proton-proton runs, occur when the bunches in the two beams “see” each other as they travel in the same vacuum chamber at either side of the experiments.  The situation becomes more complicated with proton-lead ions because the two species have different revolution times (until the frequencies are locked at top energy- see “Cogging exercises”) and thus these encounters move. We found that this effect does not cause significant beam losses...

  10. High energy proton PIXE [HEPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, J.S.C.

    1993-01-01

    Studies of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) have been widespread and detailed in recent years and despite the fact that most data obtained are from low energy 1-3 MeV experiments, the value of higher energy proton work with its emphasis on K X-ray emission has become more marked as time has progressed. The purpose of this review paper is to outline the history of analysis using high energy protons and to compare and contrast the results obtained with those from lower energy analysis using more firmly established analytical techniques. The work described will concentrate exclusively on proton induced processes and will attempt to outline the rationale for selecting an energy, greater than 20 and up to 70 MeV protons for initiating particles. The relative ease and accuracy of the measurements obtained will be addressed. Clearly such X-ray studies should be seen as complementing low energy work in many instances rather than competing directly with them. However, it will be demonstrated that above a Z value of approximately 20, K X-ray analysis using high energy protons is the only way to go in this type of analysis. (author)

  11. ATLAS proton-proton event containing four muons

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    An event with four identified muons from a proton-proton collision in ATLAS. This event is consistent with coming from two Z particles decaying: both Z particles decay to two muons each. Such events are produced by Standard Model processes without Higgs particles. They are also a possible signature for Higgs particle production, but many events must be analysed together in order to tell if there is a Higgs signal. This view is a zoom into the central part of the detector. The four muons are picked out as red tracks. Other tracks and deposits of energy in the calorimeters are shown in yellow.

  12. ATLAS proton-proton event containing two high energy photons

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    An event where two energetic photons ("gammas") are produced in a proton-proton collision in ATLAS. Many events of this type are produced by well-understood Standard Model processes ("backgrounds") which do not involve Higgs particles. A small excess of events of this type with similar masses could indicate evidence for Higgs particle production, but any specific event is most likely to be from the background. The photons are indicated, in the different projections and views, by the clusters of energy shown in yellow.

  13. Concept for a Future Super Proton-Proton Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jingyu; et al.

    2015-07-12

    Following the discovery of the Higgs boson at LHC, new large colliders are being studied by the international high-energy community to explore Higgs physics in detail and new physics beyond the Standard Model. In China, a two-stage circular collider project CEPC-SPPC is proposed, with the first stage CEPC (Circular Electron Positron Collier, a so-called Higgs factory) focused on Higgs physics, and the second stage SPPC (Super Proton-Proton Collider) focused on new physics beyond the Standard Model. This paper discusses this second stage.

  14. Concept for a Future Super Proton-Proton Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jingyu; Chai, Weiping; Chen, Fusan; Chen, Nian; Chou, Weiren; Dong, Haiyi; Gao, Jie; Han, Tao; Leng, Yongbin; Li, Guangrui; Gupta, Ramesh; Li, Peng; Li, Zhihui; Liu, Baiqi; Liu, Yudong; Lou, Xinchou; Luo, Qing; Malamud, Ernie; Mao, Lijun; Palmer, Robert B.; Peng, Quanling; Peng, Yuemei; Ruan, Manqi; Sabbi, GianLuca; Su, Feng; Su, Shufang; Stratakis, Diktys; Sun, Baogeng; Wang, Meifen; Wang, Jie; Wang, Liantao; Wang, Xiangqi; Wang, Yifang; Wang, Yong; Xiao, Ming; Xing, Qingzhi; Xu, Qingjin; Xu, Hongliang; Xu, Wei; Witte, Holger; Yan, Yingbing; Yang, Yongliang; Yang, Jiancheng; Yuan, Youjin; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Yuhong; Zheng, Shuxin; Zhu, Kun; Zhu, Zian; Zou, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Following the discovery of the Higgs boson at LHC, new large colliders are being studied by the international high-energy community to explore Higgs physics in detail and new physics beyond the Standard Model. In China, a two-stage circular collider project CEPC-SPPC is proposed, with the first stage CEPC (Circular Electron Positron Collier, a so-called Higgs factory) focused on Higgs physics, and the second stage SPPC (Super Proton-Proton Collider) focused on new physics beyond the Standard Model. This paper discusses this second stage.

  15. Parity Non-Conservation in Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, V.R.; B.F. Gibson; J.A. Carlson; R. Schiavilla

    2002-01-01

    The parity non-conserving longitudinal asymmetry in proton-proton (pp) elastic scattering is calculated in the lab-energy range 0-350 MeV using contemporary, realistic strong-interaction potentials combined with a weak-interaction potential comprised of rho- and omega-meson exchanges as exemplified by the DDH model. Values for the rho- and omega-meson coupling constants, h rho rho rho and h rho rho omega , are determined from comparison with the measured asymmetries at 13.6 MeV, 45 MeV, and 221 MeV

  16. 8 MeV electron beam induced modifications in the thermal, structural and electrical properties of nanophase CeO2 for potential electronics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babitha, K. K.; Sreedevi, A.; Priyanka, K. P.; Ganesh, S.; Varghese, Thomas

    2018-06-01

    The effect of 8 MeV electron beam irradiation on the thermal, structural and electrical properties of CeO2 nanoparticles synthesized by chemical precipitation route was investigated. The dose dependent effect of electron irradiation was studied using various characterization techniques such as, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and impedance spectroscopy. Systematic investigation based on the results of structural studies confirm that electron beam irradiation induces defects and particle size variation on CeO2 nanoparticles, which in turn results improvements in AC conductivity, dielectric constant and loss tangent. Structural modifications and high value of dielectric constant for CeO2 nanoparticles due to electron beam irradiation make it as a promising material for the fabrication of gate dielectric in metal oxide semiconductor devices.

  17. Conceptual design of proton beam window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teraoku, Takuji; Kaminaga, Masanori; Terada, Atsuhiko; Ishikura, Syuichi; Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Hino, Ryutaro

    2001-01-01

    In a MW-scale neutron scattering facility coupled with a high-intensity proton accelerator, a proton beam window is installed as the boundary between a high vacuum region of the proton beam transport line and a helium environment around the target assembly working as a neutron source. The window is cooled by water so as to remove high volumetric heat generated by the proton beam. A concept of the flat-type proton beam window consisting of two plates of 3 mm thick was proposed, which was found to be feasible under the proton beam power of 5 MW through thermal-hydraulic and structural strength analyses. (authors)

  18. Radiation-induced instability of MnS precipitates and its possible consequences on irradiation-induced stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Sanecki, J.E.; Garner, F.A.

    1996-12-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a significant materials issue for the light water reactor (LWR) industry and may also pose a problem for fusion power reactors that will use water as coolant. A new metallurgical process is proposed that involves the radiation-induced release into solution of minor impurity elements not usually thought to participate in IASCC. MnS-type precipitates, which contain most of the sulfur in stainless steels, are thought to be unstable under irradiation. First, Mn transmutes strongly to Fe in thermalized neutron spectra. Second, cascade-induced disordering and the inverse Kirkendall effect operating at the incoherent interfaces of MnS precipitates are thought to act as a pump to export Mn from the precipitate into the alloy matrix. Both of these processes will most likely allow sulfur, which is known to exert a deleterious influence on intergranular cracking, to re-enter the matrix. To test this hypothesis, compositions of MnS-type precipitates contained in several unirradiated and irradiated heats of Type 304, 316, and 348 stainless steels (SSs) were analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. Evidence is presented that shows a progressive compositional modification of MnS precipitates as exposure to neutrons increases in boiling water reactors. As the fluence increases, the Mn level in MnS decreases, whereas the Fe level increases. The S level also decreases relative to the combined level of Mn and Fe. MnS precipitates were also found to be a reservoir of other deleterious impurities such as F and O which could be also released due to radiation-induced instability of the precipitates

  19. Family symmetries and proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Hitoshi; Kaplan, D.B.

    1994-01-01

    The proton decay modes p → K 0 e + and p → K 0 μ + may be visible in certain supersymmetric theories, and if seen would provide evidence for new flavor physics at extremely short distances. These decay modes can arise from the dimension five operator (Q 1 Q 1 Q 2 L 1,2 ), where Q i and L i are i th generation quark and lepton superfields respectively. Such an operator is not generated at observable levels due to gauge or Higgs boson exchange in a minimal GUT. However in theories that explain the fermion mass hierarchy, it may be generated at the Planck scale with a strength such that the decays p → K 0 ell + are both compatible with the proton lifetime and visible at Super-Kamiokande. Observable proton decay can even occur in theories without unification

  20. The search for proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, T.; Kaneyuki, K.; McGrew, C.; Mohapatra, R.; Peterson, E.; Cline, D.B.

    1994-01-01

    The conservation of the quantum number called baryon number, like lepton (or family) number, is an empirical fact even though there are very good reasons to expect otherwise. Experimentalists have been searching for baryon number violating decays of the proton and neutron for decades now without success. Theorists have evolved deep understanding of the relationship between the natural forces in the development of various Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) that nearly universally predict baryon number violating proton decay, or related phenomena like n-bar n oscillations. With this in mind, the Proton Decay Working Group reviewed the current experimental and theoretical status of the search for baryon number violation with an eye to the advancement in the next decade

  1. Proton and neutron structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rock, S.

    1991-01-01

    New result on charged lepton scattering from hydrogen and deuterium targets by the BCDMS, NMC and SLAC collaborations have greatly increased our knowledge of the structure functions of protons and neutrons. The disagreement between the high energy muon scattering cross sections obtained by the EMC and BCDMS collaborations have been almost completely resolved by comparison with a global analysis of old and new SLAC data and a reanalysis of EMC data. We now have a consistent set of structure functions which covers an approximate range 1 ≤ Q 2 ≤ 200 (GeV/c) 2 and 0.07 ≤ x ≤ 0.7. The ratio of neutron to proton structure functions decreases with increasing Q 2 for values of x ≥ 0.1. The difference between proton and neutron structure functions approaches zero as x decreases, consistent with the expected √x behavior. (orig.)

  2. Structural dynamic modifications via models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The study shows that as many as half of the matrix ... the dynamicist's analytical modelling skill which would appear both in the numerator as. Figure 2. ..... Brandon J A 1990 Strategies for structural dynamic modification (New York: John Wiley).

  3. Modifications to Replacement Costs System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godec, M.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this memorandum is to document the improvements and modifications made to the Replacement Costs of Crude Oil (REPCO) Supply Analysis System. While some of this work was performed under our previous support contract to DOE/ASFE, we are presenting all modifications and improvements are presented here for completeness. The memo primarily documents revisions made to the Lower-48 Onshore Model. Revisions and modifications made to other components and models in the REPCO system which are documented elsewhere are only highlighted in this memo. Generally, the modifications made to the Lower-48 Onshore Model reflect changes that have occurred in domestic drilling, oil field costs, and reserves since 1982, the date of the most recent available data used for the original Replacement Costs report, published in 1985

  4. Standard approach to plant modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mecredy, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Organizational and management approaches to the design, installation, and turnover of nuclear plant modifications have changed dramatically in the last 10 to 15 yr. In response to these changes, organizational and individual responsibilities have been defined and management systems have been established at Rochester Gas and Electric (RG and E) Corporation to ensure that high-quality plant modifications are installed in a timely manner that satisfies user needs at minimal cost

  5. Superconducting proton ring for PETRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baynham, E.

    1979-01-01

    A powerful new facility for colliding beam physics could be provided by adding a proton storage ring in the range of several hundred GeV to the electron-positron storage ring PETRA at DESY. This can be achieved in an economic way utilizing the PETRA tunnel and taking advantage of the higher magnetic fields of superconducting magnets which would be placed above or below the PETRA magnets. A central field of 4 Tesla in the bending magnets corresponds to a proton energy of 225 GeV. (orig.)

  6. Protons in near earth orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Alcaraz, J; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Ao, L; Arefev, A; Azzarello, P; Babucci, E; Baldini, L; Basile, M; Barancourt, D; Barão, F; Barbier, G; Barreira, G; Battiston, R; Becker, R; Becker, U; Bellagamba, L; Béné, P; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Biland, A; Bizzaglia, S; Blasko, S; Bölla, G; Boschini, M; Bourquin, Maurice; Bruni, G; Buénerd, M; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Cavalletti, R; Camps, C; Cannarsa, P; Capell, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Chang, Y H; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, Z G; Chernoplekov, N A; Chiarini, A; Tzi Hong Chiueh; Chuang, Y L; Cindolo, F; Commichau, V; Contin, A; Cotta-Ramusino, A; Crespo, P; Cristinziani, M; Da Cunha, J P; Dai, T S; Deus, J D; Dinu, N; Djambazov, L; D'Antone, I; Dong, Z R; Emonet, P; Engelberg, J; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Esposito, G; Extermann, Pierre; Favier, Jean; Feng, C C; Fiandrini, E; Finelli, F; Fisher, P H; Flaminio, R; Flügge, G; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Yu; Gervasi, M; Giusti, P; Grandi, D; Gu, W Q; Hangarter, K; Hasan, A; Hermel, V; Hofer, H; Huang, M A; Hungerford, W; Ionica, M; Ionica, R; Jongmanns, M; Karlamaa, K; Karpinski, W; Kenney, G; Kenny, J; Kim, W; Klimentov, A; Kossakowski, R; Koutsenko, V F; Laborie, G; Laitinen, T; Lamanna, G; Laurenti, G; Lebedev, A; Lee, S C; Levi, G; Levchenko, P M; Liu, C L; Liu Hong Tao; Lolli, M; Lopes, I; Lu, G; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luckey, D; Lustermann, W; Maña, C; Margotti, A; Massera, F; Mayet, F; McNeil, R R; Meillon, B; Menichelli, M; Mezzanotte, F; Mezzenga, R; Mihul, A; Molinari, G; Mourão, A M; Mujunen, A; Palmonari, F; Pancaldi, G; Papi, A; Park, I H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, E; Pesci, A; Pevsner, A; Pilastrini, R; Pimenta, M; Plyaskin, V; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Postolache, V; Prati, E; Produit, N; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Raupach, F; Recupero, S; Ren, D; Ren, Z; Ribordy, M; Richeux, J P; Riihonen, E; Ritakari, J; Röser, U; Roissin, C; Sagdeev, R; Santos, D; Sartorelli, G; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E S; Shoutko, V; Shoumilov, E; Siedling, R; Son, D; Song, T; Steuer, M; Sun, G S; Suter, H; Tang, X W; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tornikoski, M; Torromeo, G; Torsti, J; Trümper, J E; Ulbricht, J; Urpo, S; Usoskin, I; Valtonen, E; Van den Hirtz, J; Velcea, F; Velikhov, E P; Verlaat, B; Vetlitskii, I; Vezzu, F; Vialle, J P; Viertel, Gert M; Vitè, Davide F; Von Gunten, H P; Waldmeier-Wicki, S; Wallraff, W; Wang, B C; Wang, J Z; Wang, Y H; Wiik, K; Williams, C; Wu, S X; Xia, P C; Yan, J L; Yan Lu Guang; Yang, C G; Yang, M; Ye Shu Wei; Yeh, P; Xu, Z Z; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, D X; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, W Z; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A

    2000-01-01

    The proton spectrum in the kinetic energy range 0.1 to 200 GeV was measuredby the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) during space shuttle flight STS-91 atan altitude of 380 km. Above the geomagnetic cutoff the observed spectrum isparameterized by a power law. Below the geomagnetic cutoff a substantial secondspectrum was observed concentrated at equatorial latitudes with a flux ~ 70m^-2 sec^-1 sr^-1. Most of these second spectrum protons follow a complicatedtrajectory and originate from a restricted geographic region.

  7. The proton-antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, L.

    1988-01-01

    The subject of this lecture is the CERN Proton-Antiproton (panti p) Collider, in which John Adams was intimately involved at the design, development, and construction stages. Its history is traced from the original proposal in 1966, to the first panti p collisions in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) in 1981, and to the present time with drastically improved performance. This project led to the discovery of the intermediate vector boson in 1983 and produced one of the most exciting and productive physics periods in CERN's history. (orig.)

  8. Active interrogation using energetic protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Christopher L.; Chung, Kiwhan; Greene, Steven J.; Hogan, Gary E.; Makela, Mark; Mariam, Fesseha; Milner, Edward C.; Murray, Matthew; Saunders, Alexander; Spaulding, Randy; Wang, Zhehui; Waters, Laurie; Wysocki, Frederick

    2010-01-01

    Energetic proton beams provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and they can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections and neutron yields for delayed neutrons and gamma rays using 800 MeV and 4 GeV proton beams with a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Measurements of neutron energies yield suggest a signature unique to fissile material. Results are presented in this paper.

  9. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Preface Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsFuel CellsTypes of Fuel CellsAdvantages of Fuel CellsProton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsMembraneCatalystCatalyst LayerGas Diffusion MediumMicroporous LayerMembrane Electrode AssemblyPlateSingle CellStackSystemCell Voltage Monitoring Module (CVM)Fuel Supply Module (FSM)Air Supply Module (ASM)Exhaust Management Module (EMM)Heat Management Module (HMM)Water Management Module (WMM)Internal Power Supply Module (IPM)Power Conditioning Module (PCM)Communications Module (COM)Controls Module (CM)SummaryThermodynamics and KineticsTheoretical EfficiencyVoltagePo

  10. Proton therapy of hypophyseal adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirakova, E.I.; Kirpatovskaya, L.E.; Lyass, F.M.; Snigireva, R.Ya.; Krymskij, V.A.; Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Ehksperimental'noj Ehndokrinologii i Khimii Gormonov)

    1983-01-01

    The authors present the results of proton therapy in 59 patients with different hypophyseal adenomas. The period of observation lasted from 6 mos. to 5 yrs. Irradiation was done using a multifield-convergent method and a proton beam of the ITEF synchrotron. The beam energy was 200 MeV, the beam diameter 7-15 mm. Radiation response and immediate results were evaluated for all the patients. The least favorable results were noted in the patients with prolactinomas, for which, in addition to irradiation, parlodel therapy is needed. No marked radiation reactions, neurological complications and manifestations of hypopituitarism were observed with the chosen doses and schemes of irradiation

  11. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    1989-01-01

    This volume reviews the physics studied at the CERN proton-antiproton collider during its first phase of operation, from the first physics run in 1981 to the last one at the end of 1985. The volume consists of a series of review articles written by physicists who are actively involved with the collider research program. The first article describes the proton-antiproton collider facility itself, including the antiproton source and its principle of operation based on stochastic cooling. The subsequent six articles deal with the various physics subjects studied at the collider. Each article descr

  12. Search for Sphalerons in Proton-Proton Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John

    2016-04-14

    In a recent paper, Tye and Wong (TW) have argued that sphaleron-induced transitions in high-energy proton-proton collisions should be enhanced compared to previous calculations, based on a construction of a Bloch wave function in the periodic sphaleron potential and the corresponding pass band structure. Here we convolute the calculations of TW with parton distribution functions and simulations of final states to explore the signatures of sphaleron transitions at the LHC and possible future colliders. We calculate the increase of sphaleron transition rates in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 13/14/33/100 TeV for different sphaleron barrier heights, while recognising that the rates have large overall uncertainties. We use a simulation to show that LHC searches for microscopic black holes should have good efficiency for detecting sphaleron-induced final states, and discuss their experimental signatures and observability in Run 2 of the LHC and beyond. We recast the early ATLAS Run-2 search...

  13. Proton beam therapy how protons are revolutionizing cancer treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Yajnik, Santosh

    2013-01-01

    Proton beam therapy is an emerging technology with promise of revolutionizing the treatment of cancer. While nearly half of all patients diagnosed with cancer in the US receive radiation therapy, the majority is delivered via electron accelerators, where photons are used to irradiate cancerous tissue. Because of the physical properties of photon beams, photons may deposit energy along their entire path length through the body. On the other hand, a proton beam directed at a tumor travels in a straight trajectory towards its target, gives off most of its energy at a defined depth called the Bragg peak, and then stops. While photons often deposit more energy within the healthy tissues of the body than within the cancer itself, protons can deposit most of their cancer-killing energy within the area of the tumor. As a result, in the properly selected patients, proton beam therapy has the ability to improve cure rates by increasing the dose delivered to the tumor and simultaneously reduce side-effects by decreasing...

  14. Correlated stopping, proton clusters and higher order proton cumulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bzdak, Adam [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Krakow (Poland); Koch, Volker [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Skokov, Vladimir [RIKEN/BNL, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-05-15

    We investigate possible effects of correlations between stopped nucleons on higher order proton cumulants at low energy heavy-ion collisions. We find that fluctuations of the number of wounded nucleons N{sub part} lead to rather nontrivial dependence of the correlations on the centrality; however, this effect is too small to explain the large and positive four-proton correlations found in the preliminary data collected by the STAR collaboration at √(s) = 7.7 GeV. We further demonstrate that, by taking into account additional proton clustering, we are able to qualitatively reproduce the preliminary experimental data. We speculate that this clustering may originate either from collective/multi-collision stopping which is expected to be effective at lower energies or from a possible first-order phase transition, or from (attractive) final state interactions. To test these ideas we propose to measure a mixed multi-particle correlation between stopped protons and a produced particle (e.g. pion, antiproton). (orig.)

  15. Proton-90Zr interaction at sub-coulomb proton energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laird, C.E.; Flynn, D.; Hershberger, R.L.; Gabbard, F.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements have been made of proton elastic scattering differential cross sections for proton scattering at 135 0 and 165 0 from 2 to 7 MeV, of inelastic scattering cross sections for proton scattering from 3.9 to 5.7 MeV, and of the radiative capture cross sections from 1.9 to 5.7 MeV detecting primary and cascade gamma rays. Optical potentials with Hauser-Feshbach and coupled-channel models have been used to analyze the data. This analysis yields an energy dependent absorptive potential of W = 2.63+.73 whose mean value of 5 MeV at E/sub p/ = 4 MeV is consistent with previously reported, but anomalously small values. The diffuseness of the real potential is .54 fm, which is consistent with values found for 92 Zr and 94 Zr. The adopted model values are used to deduce a total proton strength function which displays the features of both the 3s and the 3p single particle resonances

  16. From 2D to 3D: Proton Radiography and Proton CT in proton therapy: A simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E.R.; van Goethem, M.-J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, Aleksandra

    (1) Purpose In order to reduce the uncertainty in translation of the X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) image into a map of proton stopping powers (3-4% and even up to 10% in regions containing bones [1-8]), proton radiography is being studied as an alternative imaging technique in proton therapy. We

  17. Quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conesa del Valle, Z.; Corcella, G.; Fleuret, F.; Ferreiro, E.G.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kopeliovich, B.; Lansberg, J.P.; Lourenco, C.; Martinez, G.; Papadimitriou, V.; Satz, H.; Scomparin, E.; Ullrich, T.; Teryaev, O.; Vogt, R.; Wang, J.X.

    2011-01-01

    We present a brief overview of the most relevant current issues related to quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions along with some perspectives. After reviewing recent experimental and theoretical results on quarkonium production in pp and pA collisions, we discuss the emerging field of polarisation studies. Afterwards, we report on issues related to heavy-quark production, both in pp and pA collisions, complemented by AA collisions. To put the work in broader perpectives, we emphasize the need for new observables to investigate the quarkonium production mechanisms and reiterate the qualities that make quarkonia a unique tool for many investigations in particle and nuclear physics.

  18. Polarized protons and parity violating asymmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueman, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    The potential for utilizing parity violating effects, associated with polarized protons, to study the standard model, proton structure, and new physics at the SPS Collider is summarized. 24 references

  19. A new version of PIRK (elastic pion-nucleus scattering) to handle differing proton and neutron radii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funsten, H.O.

    1979-01-01

    This program is a modification of the Eisenstein-Miller program (1974) for calculating elastic pion-nucleus differential cross sections using free π-N scattering amplitudes. This revision permits the use of separate proton and neutron radii for the nuclear density function rho(r). (Auth.)

  20. Lowering of proton mass with respect to neutron state in g'-quark electromagnetic soliton theory: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebrun, J.-P.M.

    1988-01-01

    The modification of electrodynamics for the g'-quark permitting chiral invariance, CA, and PCAC to hold effords to relate the nucleon electromagnetic mass splitting to the pionic case previously treated by Ward's identities. This gives correct sign and order of magnitude for his effect and finite positive proton charge

  1. High intensity circular proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, M.K.

    1987-12-01

    Circular machines suitable for the acceleration of high intensity proton beams include cyclotrons, FFAG accelerators, and strong-focusing synchrotrons. This paper discusses considerations affecting the design of such machines for high intensity, especially space charge effects and the role of beam brightness in multistage accelerators. Current plans for building a new generation of high intensity 'kaon factories' are reviewed. 47 refs

  2. Rise in proton structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazal-e-Aleem; Rashid, H.; Ali, S.

    1996-08-01

    By the choice of a new scale factor we obtain a good qualitative fit to the HERA data for the proton structure function in the small x region which exhibits double asymptotic scaling. Any scaling violations in the future measurements when made in smaller bins will be of immense value. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs

  3. Uncertainties in the proton lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.; Nanopoulos, D.V.; Rudaz, S.; Gaillard, M.K.

    1980-04-01

    We discuss the masses of the leptoquark bosons m(x) and the proton lifetime in Grand Unified Theories based principally on SU(5). It is emphasized that estimates of m(x) based on the QCD coupling and the fine structure constant are probably more reliable than those using the experimental value of sin 2 theta(w). Uncertainties in the QCD Λ parameter and the correct value of α are discussed. We estimate higher order effects on the evolution of coupling constants in a momentum space renormalization scheme. It is shown that increasing the number of generations of fermions beyond the minimal three increases m(X) by almost a factor of 2 per generation. Additional uncertainties exist for each generation of technifermions that may exist. We discuss and discount the possibility that proton decay could be 'Cabibbo-rotated' away, and a speculation that Lorentz invariance may be violated in proton decay at a detectable level. We estimate that in the absence of any substantial new physics beyond that in the minimal SU(5) model the proton lifetimes is 8 x 10 30+-2 years

  4. Proton exciting X ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xinpei

    1986-04-01

    The analyzing capability of proton exciting X ray analysis for different elements in organisms was discussed, and dealing with examples of trace element analysis in the human body and animal organisms, such as blood serum, urine, and hair. The sensitivity, accuracy, and capability of multielement analysis were discussed. Its strong points for the trace element analysis in biomedicine were explained

  5. Playing with Protons CREATIONS Demonstrator

    CERN Multimedia

    Alexopoulos, Angelos

    2017-01-01

    This document describes Playing with Protons, a CMS education initiative that seeks to enhance teachers’ pedagogical practice with creative, hands-on methodologies through which 10-12 year old students can, in turn, get engaged effectively with science, technology and innovation.

  6. Proton-beam energy analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belan, V.N.; Bolotin, L.I.; Kiselev, V.A.; Linnik, A.F.; Uskov, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe a magnetic analyzer for measurement of proton-beam energy in the range from 100 keV to 25 MeV. The beam is deflected in a uniform transverse magnetic field and is registered by photographing a scintillation screen. The energy spectrum of the beam is constructed by microphotometry of the photographic film

  7. Proton gyromagnetic precision measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Deming; Deming Zhu

    1991-01-01

    A computerized control and measurement system used in the proton gyromagnetic precision meausrement is descirbed. It adopts the CAMAC data acquisition equipment, using on-line control and analysis with the HP85 and PDP-11/60 computer systems. It also adopts the RSX11M computer operation system, and the control software is written in FORTRAN language

  8. Resist materials for proton micromachining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, J.A. van; Sanchez, J.L.; Xu, B.; Osipowicz, T.; Watt, F.

    1999-01-01

    The production of high aspect ratio microstructures is a potential growth area. The combination of deep X-ray lithography with electroforming and micromolding (i.e. LIGA) is one of the main techniques used to produce 3D microstructures. The new technique of proton micromachining employs focused MeV protons in a direct write process which is complementary to LIGA, e.g. micromachining with 2 MeV protons results in microstructures with a height of 63 μm and lateral sub-micrometer resolution in PMMA resist. The aim of this paper is to investigate the capabilities of proton micromachining as a lithographic technique. This involves the study of different types of resists. The dose distribution of high molecular weight PMMA is compared with three other types of resist: First the positive photo resist AZ P4620 will be discussed and then PMGI SF 23, which can be used as a deep UV, e-beam or X-ray resist. Finally SU-8, a new deep UV negative type of chemically amplified resist will be discussed. All these polymers are applied using the spin coating technique at thicknesses of between 1 and 36 μm

  9. Proton Therapy at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    The brochure deals with the following topics: radiation therapy and its significance, proton therapy - worldwide and at PSI, advantages of the protons, the new proton therapy facility at PSI, therapy at PSI using the spot-scan technique. figs., tabs., refs

  10. Neutrino proton scattering and the isosinglet term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, D.H.

    1990-01-01

    Elastic neutrino proton scattering is sensitive to the SU(3) axial isosinglet term which is in turn dependent on the strangeness content of the proton. The uncertainties in the analysis of a neutrino proton elastic scattering experiment are discussed, and an experiment which is insensitive to many of the difficulties of the previous experiment is described

  11. Energizing porters by proton-motive force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, N

    1994-11-01

    It is generally accepted that the chemistry of water was the most crucial determinant in shaping life on earth. Among the more important chemical features of water is its dissociation into protons and hydroxyl ions. The presence of relatively high proton concentrations in the ambient solution resulted in the evolution of proton pumps during the dawn of life on earth. These proton pumps maintained neutral pH inside the cells and generated electrochemical gradients of protons (proton-motive force) across their membranes. The existence of proton-motive force enabled the evolution of porters driven by it that are most probably among the more primitive porters in the world. The directionality of the substrate transport by the porters could be to both sides of the membranes because they can serve as proton symporters or antiporters. One of the most important subjects of this meeting is the mechanism by which proton-motive and other ion-motive forces drive the transport processes through porters. Is there a common mechanism of action for all proton-driven porters? Is there some common partial reaction by which we can identify the way that porters are energized by proton-motive force? Is there a common coupling between proton movement and uptake or secretion of certain molecules? Even a partial answer to one of these questions would advance our knowledge... or confusion. As my mentor Efraim Racker used to say: 'If you are not totally confused you do not understand the issue'.

  12. Proton hexality in local grand unification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerste, Stefan; Nilles, Hans Peter [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics and Physikalisches Institut; Ramos-Sanchez, Saul [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Vaudrevange, Patrick K.S. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics

    2010-07-15

    Proton hexality is a discrete symmetry that avoids the problem of too fast proton decay in the supersymmetric extension of the standard model. Unfortunately it is inconsistent with conventional grand unification. We show that proton hexality can be incorporated in the scheme of ''Local Grand Unification'' discussed in the framework of model building in (heterotic) string theory. (orig.)

  13. Epigenetic Modifications and Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu A. Kowluru

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy remains one of the most debilitating chronic complications, but despite extensive research in the field, the exact mechanism(s responsible for how retina is damaged in diabetes remains ambiguous. Many metabolic pathways have been implicated in its development, and genes associated with these pathways are altered. Diabetic environment also facilitates epigenetics modifications, which can alter the gene expression without permanent changes in DNA sequence. The role of epigenetics in diabetic retinopathy is now an emerging area, and recent work has shown that genes encoding mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Sod2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 are epigenetically modified, activates of epigenetic modification enzymes, histone lysine demethylase 1 (LSD1, and DNA methyltransferase are increased, and the micro RNAs responsible for regulating nuclear transcriptional factor and VEGF are upregulated. With the growing evidence of epigenetic modifications in diabetic retinopathy, better understanding of these modifications has potential to identify novel targets to inhibit this devastating disease. Fortunately, the inhibitors and mimics targeted towards histone modification, DNA methylation, and miRNAs are now being tried for cancer and other chronic diseases, and better understanding of the role of epigenetics in diabetic retinopathy will open the door for their possible use in combating this blinding disease.

  14. The surface modification of polystyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tremlett, C.

    2000-03-01

    Polymers have ideal bulk properties for many applications. However, adhesion to many polymers is poor without surface pretreatment. This can result, for example, in peeling paint and printing, adhesive joint failure and bio-incompatibility. In applications such as painting, printing, adhesive bonding and biocompatibility, various cleaning or surface chemical modifications may be employed. A commodity polymer where pretreatment is sometimes needed is polystyrene. This project investigated, in detail, the effects of a novel method of modification namely mediated electrochemical oxidation (MEO), as a mode of surface modification on polystyrene and a comparison was made with other polymers. The resulting modification was investigated using a range of surface analysis techniques to obtain complementary information. These included, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, contact angles, static secondary ion mass spectrometry, atomic force microscopy, chemical derivatization, scanning electron microscopy, attenuated total reflection Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy and composite lap shear joint testing. It has been shown that MEO modifies the surface of polystyrene introduced oxygen mainly as hydroxyl groups, and a small number of carbonyl groups, that are positioned only on the backbone hydrocarbon chain. This modification improved adhesion, was stable and samples could be stored in aqueous media. The resulting hydroxylation was further derivatized using an amino acid to provide a specialised surface. This was very different from the multiple oxygen functionalities introduced in the comparison studies by UV/ozone and plasma treatments. (author)

  15. Proton-proton, anti-proton-anti-proton, proton-anti-proton correlations in Au+Au collisions measured by STAR at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gos, H.P.

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of two-particle correlations provides a powerful tool to study the properties of hot and dense matter created in heavy-ion collisions at ultra-relativistic energies. Applied to identical and non-identical hadron pairs, it makes the study of space-time evolution of the source in femtoscopic scale possible. Baryon femtoscopy allows extraction of the radii of produced sources which can be compared to those deduced from identical pion studies, providing complete information about the source characteristics. In this paper we present the correlation functions obtained for identical and non-identical baryon pairs of protons and anti-protons. The data were collected recently in Au+Au collisions at √(s NN )=62 GeV and √(s NN )=200 GeV by the STAR detector at the RHIC accelerator. We introduce corrections to the baryon-baryon correlations taking into account: residual correlations from weak decays, particle identification probability and the fraction of primary baryons. Finally we compare our results to theoretical predictions. (orig.)

  16. Proton exchange membranes based on PVDF/SEBS blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokrini, A.; Huneault, M.A. [Industrial Materials Institute, National Research Council of Canada, 75 de Mortagne Blvd., Boucherville, Que. (Canada J4B 6Y4)

    2006-03-09

    Proton-conductive polymer membranes are used as an electrolyte in the so-called proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Current commercially available membranes are perfluorosulfonic acid polymers, a class of high-cost ionomers. This paper examines the potential of polymer blends, namely those of styrene-(ethylene-butylene)-styrene block copolymer (SEBS) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), in the proton exchange membrane application. SEBS/PVDF blends were prepared by twin-screw extrusion and the membranes were formed by calendering. SEBS is a phase-segregated material where the polystyrene blocks can be selectively functionalized offering high ionic conductivity, while PVDF insures good dimensional stability and chemical resistance to the films. Proton conductivity of the films was obtained by solid-state grafting of sulfonic acid moieties. The obtained membranes were characterized in terms of conductivity, ionic exchange capacity and water uptake. In addition, the membranes were characterized in terms of morphology, microstructure and thermo-mechanical properties to establish the blends morphology-property relationships. Modification of interfacial properties between SEBS and PVDF was found to be a key to optimize the blends performance. Addition of a methyl methacrylate-butyl acrylate-methyl methacrylate block copolymer (MMA-BA-MMA) was found to compatibilize the blend by reducing the segregation scale and improving the blend homogeneity. Mechanical resistance of the membranes was also improved through the addition of this compatibilizer. As little as 2wt.% compatibilizer was sufficient for complete interfacial coverage and lead to improved mechanical properties. Compatibilized blend membranes also showed higher conductivities, 1.9x10{sup -2} to 5.5x10{sup -3}Scm{sup -1}, and improved water management. (author)

  17. Microwave-assisted routes for rapid and efficient modification of layered perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarian-Tefaghi, S; Wiley, J B

    2018-02-27

    Recent advances in exploiting microwave radiation in the topochemical modification of layered oxide perovskites are presented. Such methods work well for rapid bulk synthetic steps used in the production of novel inorganic-organic hybrids (protonation, grafting, intercalation, and in situ click reactions), exfoliation to produce dispersed nanosheets, and post-exfoliation processing to rapidly vary nanosheet surface groups. Compared to traditional methods that often take days, microwave methods can produce quality products in as little as 1-2 h.

  18. Repair of γ-irradiation-induced DNA single-strand breaks in human bone marrow cells. Analysis of unfractionated and CD34+ cells using single-cell gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankinen, Maarit H.; Vilpo, Juhani A.

    1997-01-01

    Human bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) were separated by density gradient centrifugation, and a subpopulation of progenitor cells was further isolated using anti-CD34-coated magnetic beads. The cells were irradiated with γ-rays (0.93-5.43 Gy) from a 137 Cs source. The extent of DNA damage, i.e., single-strand breaks (SSBs) and alkali-labile lesions of individual cells, was investigated using the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis technique. The irradiation resulted in a dose-dependent increase in DNA migration, reflecting the number of detectable DNA lesions. An approximately similar extent of SSB formation was observed in BMMNCs and CD34+ cells. Damage was repaired when the cells were incubated at 37C: a fast initial repair phase was followed by a slower rejoining of SSBs in both BMMNC and CD34+ cell populations. A significantly longer time was required to repair the lesions caused by 5.43 Gy than those caused by 0.93 Gy. In the present work we report, for the first time, the induction and repair of DNA SSBs at the level of single human bone marrow cells when exposed to ionizing radiation at clinically relevant doses. These data, together with our previous results with human blood granulocytes and lymphocytes, indicate an approximately similar extent of formation and repair of γ-irradiation-induced DNA SSBs in immature and mature human hematopoietic cells

  19. Response of thyroid follicular cells to gamma irradiation compared to proton irradiation. I. Initial characterization of DNA damage, micronucleus formation, apoptosis, cell survival, and cell cycle phase redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, L. M.; Murray, D. K.; Bant, A. M.; Kazarians, G.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.; Tran, D. T.

    2001-01-01

    The RBE of protons has been assumed to be equivalent to that of photons. The objective of this study was to determine whether radiation-induced DNA and chromosome damage, apoptosis, cell killing and cell cycling in organized epithelial cells was influenced by radiation quality. Thyroid-stimulating hormone-dependent Fischer rat thyroid cells, established as follicles, were exposed to gamma rays or proton beams delivered acutely over a range of physical doses. Gamma-irradiated cells were able to repair DNA damage relatively rapidly so that by 1 h postirradiation they had approximately 20% fewer exposed 3' ends than their counterparts that had been irradiated with proton beams. The persistence of free ends of DNA in the samples irradiated with the proton beam implies that either more initial breaks or a quantitatively different type of damage had occurred. These results were further supported by an increased frequency of chromosomal damage as measured by the presence of micronuclei. Proton-beam irradiation induced micronuclei at a rate of 2.4% per gray, which at 12 Gy translated to 40% more micronuclei than in comparable gamma-irradiated cultures. The higher rate of micronucleus formation and the presence of larger micronuclei in proton-irradiated cells was further evidence that a qualitatively more severe class of damage had been induced than was induced by gamma rays. Differences in the type of damage produced were detected in the apoptosis assay, wherein a significant lag in the induction of apoptosis occurred after gamma irradiation that did not occur with protons. The more immediate expression of apoptotic cells in the cultures irradiated with the proton beam suggests that the damage inflicted was more severe. Alternatively, the cell cycle checkpoint mechanisms required for recovery from such damage might not have been invoked. Differences based on radiation quality were also evident in the alpha components of cell survival curves (0.05 Gy(-1) for gamma rays, 0

  20. Pair angular correlations for pions, kaons and protons in proton-proton collisions in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Zaborowska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents the correlation functions in $\\Delta\\eta\\, \\Delta\\phi$ space for pairs of pions, kaons and protons. The studies were carried out on the set of proton-proton collisions at the centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV, obtained in ALICE, A Large Ion Collider Experiment at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The analysis was performed for two charge combinations (like-sign pairs and unlike-sign pairs) as well as for three multiplicity ranges. Angular correlations are a rich source of information about the elementary particles behaviour. They result in from the interplay of numerous effects, including resonances’ decays, Coulomb interactions and energy and momentum conservation. In case of identical particles quantum statistics needs to be taken into account. Moreover, particles differ in terms of quark content. Kaons, carrying the strange quark obey the strangeness conservation law. In the production of protons baryon number must be conserved. These features are reflected...

  1. Drug Addiction and DNA Modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Amber N; Feng, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Drug addiction is a complex disorder which can be influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Research has shown that epigenetic modifications can translate environmental signals into changes in gene expression, suggesting that epigenetic changes may underlie the causes and possibly treatment of substance use disorders. This chapter will focus on epigenetic modifications to DNA, which include DNA methylation and several recently defined additional DNA epigenetic changes. We will discuss the functions of DNA modifications and methods for detecting them, followed by a description of the research investigating the function and consequences of drug-induced changes in DNA methylation patterns. Understanding these epigenetic changes may provide us translational tools for the diagnosis and treatment of addiction in the future.

  2. Minimal modification to tribimaximal mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xiaogang; Zee, A.

    2011-01-01

    We explore some ways of minimally modifying the neutrino mixing matrix from tribimaximal, characterized by introducing at most one mixing angle and a CP violating phase thus extending our earlier work. One minimal modification, motivated to some extent by group theoretic considerations, is a simple case with the elements V α2 of the second column in the mixing matrix equal to 1/√(3). Modifications by keeping one of the columns or one of the rows unchanged from tribimaximal mixing all belong to the class of minimal modification. Some of the cases have interesting experimentally testable consequences. In particular, the T2K and MINOS collaborations have recently reported indications of a nonzero θ 13 . For the cases we consider, the new data sharply constrain the CP violating phase angle δ, with δ close to 0 (in some cases) and π disfavored.

  3. Medium modifications of vector mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, L.M.

    2004-01-01

    The omega photoproduction in nuclear medium with the ELSA facility at Bonn and the present status of the HADES collaboration to investigate the in-medium hadron properties in proton, heavy ions and hadron induced reactions at GSI, Darmstadt are presented. Efforts are under way to utilise the electron beam at Indore for experimental hadron physics in order to step into the intermediate energy nuclear physics regime. The skeletal outline of the high energy electron beam now available at CAT, Indore is discussed

  4. Dielectron production in proton-proton collisions with ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Koehler, Markus K

    Ultrarelativistic hadron collisions, such as delivered since a couple of years at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), provide new insights into the properties of strongly interacting matter at high temperatures and densities, which is expected to have existed a few of a millionth seconds after the big bang. Electromagnetic probes, such as leptons and photons, are emitted during the entire collision. Since they do not undergo strong interactions, they reflect the entire evolution of the collision.\\\\ Pairs of leptons, so called dileptons, have the advantage compared to real photons, that they do not only carry momentum, but also have a non-zero invariant mass. The invariant mass spectrum of dileptons is a superposition of several components and allows to address different characteristics of the medium.\\\\ To understand dielectron production in heavy-ion collisions, reference measurements in proton-proton (pp) collisions are necessary. pp collisions reflect the vacuum contribution of the particles produced in heavy-...

  5. Search for Sphalerons in Proton-Proton Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Satco, Daria

    2017-01-01

    In view of new possibilities becoming more realistic with FCC design and of recent promising results regarding $(B+L)$-violating processes detection we concentrated our research on generation and analysis of sphaleron transitions. The existence of instanton and sphaleron solutions which are associated with transitions between different vacuum states is well known since 1980s. However first calculations of instanton rate killed any hope to detect them even at very high energies while the calculation of sphaleron transitions rate is a tricky problem which continue being widely discussed. In our research we used HERBVI package to generate baryon- and lepton-number violating processes in proton-proton collisions at typical energies 14, 33, 40 and 100 TeV in order to estimate the upper limit on the sphaleron cross-section. We considered the background processes and determined the zero background regions.

  6. Experimental support at proton--proton colliding beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, K.

    1977-01-01

    Proton--proton colliding beam facilities have a number of special features which increase the importance of support for experiments when compared to fixed target accelerators: (1) the laboratory system is very close to the center-of-mass system; this affects the geometry and general size of the experiments; (2) the primary p--p interaction is inaccessible, that is, it takes place in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber; and (3) the experiment detection system is necessarily inside the machine structure and becomes very closely linked to it in many respects. An overall picture is given of experimental support based on experience at the CERN ISR under the following headings: Experimental Areas, Scheduling, Intersection Vacuum Chambers, Machine Background, and Magnets for Experiments. The first two of these topics concern the requirements in space and time of an experiment, while the last three are all related to the close interaction between experiment and machine

  7. Role of the irradiation temperature on the modifications of swift-heavy-ion irradiated polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melot, M.; Ngono-Ravache, Y.; Balanzat, E.

    2003-01-01

    The damage processes triggered by swift heavy ions, SHI, can be very different to those induced by classical low ionising particles. This is due to the very high electronic stopping power, (dE/dx) e , of SHI. This paper concerns the effects of SHI on polyethylene, PE. In PE, low (dE/dx) e irradiations induce crosslinking and in-chain double bond formation. At high (dE/dx) e , the creation yield of vinyl groups becomes significant. Above a (dE/dx) e threshold, alkyne and allene groups appear. We present results on low temperature irradiations that bring new enlightenment on the damage process by preventing the migration of radiation-induced radicals and molecules. Two SHI specific modifications are studied: vinyl groups and alkyne end groups. We have irradiated PE films with oxygen and sulphur beams at 13.6 and 11.2 MeV/amu, respectively. The modifications were followed by in situ infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). We have performed irradiations at 8 and 290 K. The samples irradiated at 8 K have been annealed up to 290 K for investigating the effect of radical migration. Lowering the irradiation temperature to 8 K increases the creation yield of vinyl groups and alkyne end groups. The enhancement factor between 290 and 8 K is around three. Consequently the formation of defects specific to SHI irradiations is sensitive to radical migration and hence requires some time. During annealing, the alkyne concentration remains stable indicating that the creation of this group cannot be induced by radical recombination. The annealing spectra of vinyl groups are more complex

  8. Recent advances on Zeolite modification for direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makertihartha, I. G. B. N.; Zunita, M.; Rizki, Z.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.

    2017-03-01

    The increase of energy demand and global warming issues has driven studies of alternative energy sources. The polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) can be an alternative energy source by (partially) replacing the use of fossil fuel which is in line with the green technology concept. However, the usage of hydrogen as a fuel has several disadvantages mainly transportation and storage related to its safety aspects. Recently, alcohol has gained attention as an energy source for fuel cell application, namely direct alcohol fuel cell (DAFC). Among alcohols, high-mass energy density methanol and ethanol are widely used as direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) and direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC), respectively. Currently, the performance of DMFC is still rudimentary. Furthermore, the use of ethanol gives some additional privileges such as non-toxic property, renewable, ease of production in great quantity by the fermentation of sugar-containing raw materials. Direct alcohol fuel cell (DAFC) still has weakness in the low proton conductivity and high alcohol crossover. Therefore, to increase the performance of DAFC, modification using zeolite has been performed to improve proton conductivity and decrease alcohol crossover. Zeolite also has high thermal resistance properties, thereby increasing DAFC performance. This paper will discuss briefly about modification of catalyst and membrane for DAFC using zeolite. Zeolite modification effect on fuel cell performance especially proton conductivity and alcohol crossover will be presented in detail.

  9. ACCELERATION OF POLARIZED PROTONS AT RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HUANG, H.

    2002-01-01

    Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) ended its second year of operation in January 2002 with five weeks of polarized proton collisions. Polarized protons were successfully injected in both RHIC rings and maintained polarization during acceleration up to 100 GeV per ring using two Siberian snakes in each ring. This is the first time that polarized protons have been accelerated to 100 GeV. The machine performance and accomplishments during the polarized proton run will be reviewed. The plans for the next polarized proton run will be outlined

  10. Construction and test of a proton detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranefeld, G.

    1990-08-01

    Nonmagnetic proton detectors will be used in future at the ELAN experiment. For this purpose a prototype of a proton telescope has being designed. The detector consists of three scintillation counters which are used as dE/dx counter, energy (stopping) counter and veto counter. This telescope was calibrated by using elastic electron proton scattering and tested with quasielastic electrodisintegration of the deuteron. These are no principal problems to identify the protons. In the electrodisintegration of the deuteron a missing mass resolution of ± 5.1 MeV was achieved. It has been shown, that such detectors are well suited for proton detection. (orig.) [de

  11. Proton conduction in biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Jin Jung [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Lee, Kyu Won; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Cheol Eui, E-mail: rscel@korea.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seunho [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology and UBITA, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Chanho [Naraebio Research Laboratories, 177 Dangha-ri, Bongdam-eup, Hawseong-si 445-892 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-07

    Protonic currents play a vital role in electrical signalling in living systems. It has been suggested that succinoglycan plays a specific role in alfalfa root nodule development, presumably acting as the signaling molecules. In this regard, charge transport and proton dynamics in the biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan have been studied by means of electrical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, a dielectric dispersion in the system has revealed that the electrical conduction is protonic rather electronic. Besides, our laboratory- and rotating-frame {sup 1}H NMR measurements have elucidated the nature of the protonic conduction, activation of the protonic motion being associated with a glass transition.

  12. Fine structure in deformed proton emitting nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonzogni, A. A.; Davids, C. N.; Woods, P. J.; Seweryniak, D.; Carpenter, M. P.; Ressler, J. J.; Schwartz, J.; Uusitalo, J.; Walters, W. B.

    1999-01-01

    In a recent experiment to study the proton radioactivity of the highly deformed 131 Eu nucleus, two proton lines were detected. The higher energy one was assigned to the ground-state to ground-state decay, while the lower energy, to the ground-state to the 2 + state decay. This constitutes the first observation of fine structure in proton radioactivity. With these four measured quantities, proton energies, half-life and branching ratio, it is possible to determine the Nilsson configuration of the ground state of the proton emitting nucleus as well as the 2 + energy and nuclear deformation of the daughter nucleus. These results will be presented and discussed

  13. Neutron-proton mass difference in finite nuclei and the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meissner, U.G.; Rakhimov, A.M.; Wirzba, A.; Yakhshiev, U.T.

    2008-01-01

    The neutron-proton mass difference in finite nuclei is studied in the framework of a medium-modified Skyrme model. The possible interplay between the effective nucleon mass in finite nuclei and the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly is discussed. In particular, we find that a correct description of the properties of mirror nuclei leads to a stringent restriction of possible modifications of the nucleon's effective mass in nuclei. (orig.)

  14. DNA modification by alkylating compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruglyakova, E.E.

    1985-09-01

    Results are given for research on the physico-chemical properties of alkylating compounds - nitroso alkyl ureas (NAU) which possess a broad spectrum of biological activity, such as mutagenic, carcinogenic, and anti-tumor action that is due to the alkylation and carbamoylation of DNA as well as other cellular components. Identified chemical products of NAU interaction with DNA and its components are cited. Structural conversions of a DNA macromolecule resulting from its chemical modification are examined. NAU are used to discuss possible biological consequences of DNA modification. 148 references.

  15. Corrosion principles and surface modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, J.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter examines the important strategies provided by the newer ideas of corrosion science and engineering that surface modification techniques must utilize to help prevent corrosion, especially the most damaging kind of aqueous corrosion, localized corrosion. Provides a brief introduction to the principles underlying the phenomenon of corrosion in order to use them to discuss surface modification strategies to combat corrosion. Discusses the electrochemistry of corrosion; the thermodynamics of corrosion; the kinetics of corrosion; thermodynamic strategies; and kinetic strategies (formation of more protective passive films; resistance to breakdown; ductility; repassivation)

  16. Proton and non-proton activation of ASIC channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Gautschi

    Full Text Available The Acid-Sensing Ion Channels (ASIC exhibit a fast desensitizing current when activated by pH values below 7.0. By contrast, non-proton ligands are able to trigger sustained ASIC currents at physiological pHs. To analyze the functional basis of the ASIC desensitizing and sustained currents, we have used ASIC1a and ASIC2a mutants with a cysteine in the pore vestibule for covalent binding of different sulfhydryl reagents. We found that ASIC1a and ASIC2a exhibit two distinct currents, a proton-induced desensitizing current and a sustained current triggered by sulfhydryl reagents. These currents differ in their pH dependency, their sensitivity to the sulfhydryl reagents, their ionic selectivity and their relative magnitude. We propose a model for ASIC1 and ASIC2 activity where the channels can function in two distinct modes, a desensitizing mode and a sustained mode depending on the activating ligands. The pore vestibule of the channel represents a functional site for binding non-proton ligands to activate ASIC1 and ASIC2 at neutral pH and to prevent channel desensitization.

  17. Proton and non-proton activation of ASIC channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautschi, Ivan; van Bemmelen, Miguel Xavier; Schild, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    The Acid-Sensing Ion Channels (ASIC) exhibit a fast desensitizing current when activated by pH values below 7.0. By contrast, non-proton ligands are able to trigger sustained ASIC currents at physiological pHs. To analyze the functional basis of the ASIC desensitizing and sustained currents, we have used ASIC1a and ASIC2a mutants with a cysteine in the pore vestibule for covalent binding of different sulfhydryl reagents. We found that ASIC1a and ASIC2a exhibit two distinct currents, a proton-induced desensitizing current and a sustained current triggered by sulfhydryl reagents. These currents differ in their pH dependency, their sensitivity to the sulfhydryl reagents, their ionic selectivity and their relative magnitude. We propose a model for ASIC1 and ASIC2 activity where the channels can function in two distinct modes, a desensitizing mode and a sustained mode depending on the activating ligands. The pore vestibule of the channel represents a functional site for binding non-proton ligands to activate ASIC1 and ASIC2 at neutral pH and to prevent channel desensitization.

  18. Golden Jubilee photos: ISR - The first proton-proton interactions

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    At the inauguration ceremony for the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) on 16 October 1971, the man in charge of their construction, Kjell Johnsen, presented the "key" to the machine to Edoardo Amaldi, President of Council. Seated on the stage with them for this symbolic event were Victor Weisskopf, Marcel Antonioz, Willy Jentschke (seen on the left of the photo) and Werner Heisenberg (on the far right). On 27 January that year, in a world premier, signals produced by proton-proton collisions had been observed at the ISR. The protons, supplied by the PS, were injected into two identical rings, each measuring 300 metres in diameter, and collided head on at the 8 points where the rings intersected. The installation, which remained in operation until 1984, gave physicists access to a wide range of energies for hadron physics, hitherto restricted to the data from cosmic ray studies. The many technological challenges that were met at the ISR, in the fields of vacuum technology and stochastic cooling for instance,...

  19. Proton-rich nuclear statistical equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitenzahl, I.R.; Timmes, F.X.; Marin-Lafleche, A.; Brown, E.; Magkotsios, G.; Truran, J.

    2008-01-01

    Proton-rich material in a state of nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) is one of the least studied regimes of nucleosynthesis. One reason for this is that after hydrogen burning, stellar evolution proceeds at conditions of an equal number of neutrons and protons or at a slight degree of neutron-richness. Proton-rich nucleosynthesis in stars tends to occur only when hydrogen-rich material that accretes onto a white dwarf or a neutron star explodes, or when neutrino interactions in the winds from a nascent proto-neutron star or collapsar disk drive the matter proton-rich prior to or during the nucleosynthesis. In this Letter we solve the NSE equations for a range of proton-rich thermodynamic conditions. We show that cold proton-rich NSE is qualitatively different from neutron-rich NSE. Instead of being dominated by the Fe-peak nuclei with the largest binding energy per nucleon that have a proton-to-nucleon ratio close to the prescribed electron fraction, NSE for proton-rich material near freezeout temperature is mainly composed of 56Ni and free protons. Previous results of nuclear reaction network calculations rely on this nonintuitive high-proton abundance, which this Letter explains. We show how the differences and especially the large fraction of free protons arises from the minimization of the free energy as a result of a delicate competition between the entropy and nuclear binding energy.

  20. Principles and practice of proton beam therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Indra J

    2015-01-01

    Commissioned by The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) for their June 2015 Summer School, this is the first AAPM monograph printed in full color. Proton therapy has been used in radiation therapy for over 70 years, but within the last decade its use in clinics has grown exponentially. This book fills in the proton therapy gap by focusing on the physics of proton therapy, including beam production, proton interactions, biology, dosimetry, treatment planning, quality assurance, commissioning, motion management, and uncertainties. Chapters are written by the world's leading medical physicists who work at the pioneering proton treatment centers around the globe. They share their understandings after years of experience treating thousands of patients. Case studies involving specific cancer treatments show that there is some art to proton therapy as well as state-of-the-art science. Even though the focus lies on proton therapy, the content provided is also valuable to heavy charged particle th...