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Sample records for proteins support permeability

  1. Transmembrane protein diffusion in gel-supported dual-leaflet membranes.

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    Wang, Chih-Ying; Hill, Reghan J

    2014-11-18

    Tools to measure transmembrane-protein diffusion in lipid bilayer membranes have advanced in recent decades, providing a need for predictive theoretical models that account for interleaflet leaflet friction on tracer mobility. Here we address the fully three-dimensional flows driven by a (nonprotruding) transmembrane protein embedded in a dual-leaflet membrane that is supported above and below by soft porous supports (e.g., hydrogel or extracellular matrix), each of which has a prescribed permeability and solvent viscosity. For asymmetric configurations, i.e., supports with contrasting permeability, as realized for cells in contact with hydrogel scaffolds or culture media, the diffusion coefficient can reflect interleaflet friction. Reasonable approximations, for sufficiently large tracers on low-permeability supports, are furnished by a recent phenomenological theory from the literature. Interpreting literature data, albeit for hard-supported membranes, provides a theoretical basis for the phenomenological Stokes drag law as well as strengthening assertions that nonhydrodynamic interactions are important in supported bilayer systems, possibly leading to overestimates of the membrane/leaflet viscosity. Our theory provides a theoretical foundation for future experimental studies of tracer diffusion in gel-supported membranes.

  2. Prediction of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs Permeability Using Support Vector Machine

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    R. Gholami

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Permeability is a key parameter associated with the characterization of any hydrocarbon reservoir. In fact, it is not possible to have accurate solutions to many petroleum engineering problems without having accurate permeability value. The conventional methods for permeability determination are core analysis and well test techniques. These methods are very expensive and time consuming. Therefore, attempts have usually been carried out to use artificial neural network for identification of the relationship between the well log data and core permeability. In this way, recent works on artificial intelligence techniques have led to introduce a robust machine learning methodology called support vector machine. This paper aims to utilize the SVM for predicting the permeability of three gas wells in the Southern Pars field. Obtained results of SVM showed that the correlation coefficient between core and predicted permeability is 0.97 for testing dataset. Comparing the result of SVM with that of a general regression neural network (GRNN revealed that the SVM approach is faster and more accurate than the GRNN in prediction of hydrocarbon reservoirs permeability.

  3. Gap junction protein connexin43 exacerbates lung vascular permeability.

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    James J O'Donnell

    Full Text Available Increased vascular permeability causes pulmonary edema that impairs arterial oxygenation and thus contributes to morbidity and mortality associated with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and sepsis. Although components of intercellular adhesive and tight junctions are critical for maintaining the endothelial barrier, there has been limited study of the roles of gap junctions and their component proteins (connexins. Since connexins can modulate inflammatory signaling in other systems, we hypothesized that connexins may also regulate pulmonary endothelial permeability. The relationships between connexins and the permeability response to inflammatory stimuli were studied in cultured human pulmonary endothelial cells. Prolonged treatment with thrombin, lipopolysaccharide, or pathological cyclic stretch increased levels of mRNA and protein for the major connexin, connexin43 (Cx43. Thrombin and lipopolysaccharide both increased intercellular communication assayed by transfer of microinjected Lucifer yellow. Although thrombin decreased transendothelial resistance in these cells, the response was attenuated by pretreatment with the connexin inhibitor carbenoxolone. Additionally, the decreases of transendothelial resistance produced by either thrombin or lipopolysaccharide were attenuated by reducing Cx43 expression by siRNA knockdown. Both carbenoxolone and Cx43 knockdown also abrogated thrombin-induced phosphorylation of myosin light chain. Taken together, these data suggest that increased lung vascular permeability induced by inflammatory conditions may be amplified via increased expression of Cx43 and intercellular communication among pulmonary endothelial cells.

  4. Role of platelets in maintenance of pulmonary vascular permeability to protein

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    Lo, S.K.; Burhop, K.E.; Kaplan, J.E.; Malik, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    The authors examined the role of platelets in maintenance of pulmonary vascular integrity by inducing thrombocytopenia in sheep using antiplatelet serum (APS). A causal relationship between thrombocytopenia and increase in pulmonary vascular permeability was established by platelet repletion using platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Sheep were chronically instrumented and lung lymph fistulas prepared to monitor pulmonary lymph flow (Q lym ). A balloon catheter was positioned in the left atrium to assess pulmonary vascular permeability to protein after raising the left atrial pressure (P la ). Thrombocytopenia was maintained for 3 days by daily intramuscular APS injections. In studies using cultured bovine pulmonary artery endothelial monolayers, transendothelia permeability of 125 I-labeled albumin was reduced 50 and 95%, respectively, when 2.5 x 10 7 or 5 x 10 7 platelets were added onto endothelial monolayers. However, addition of 5 x 10 6 platelets or 5 x 10 7 red blood cells did not reduce endothelial monolayer albumin permeability. Results indicate that platelets are required for the maintenance of pulmonary vascular permeability. Reduction in permeability appears to involve an interaction of platelets with the endothelium

  5. Scaffolding proteins in the development and maintenance of the epidermal permeability barrier.

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    Crawford, Melissa; Dagnino, Lina

    2017-10-02

    The skin of mammals and other terrestrial vertebrates protects the organism against the external environment, preventing heat, water and electrolyte loss, as well as entry of chemicals and pathogens. Impairments in the epidermal permeability barrier function are associated with the genesis and/or progression of a variety of pathological conditions, including genetic inflammatory diseases, microbial and viral infections, and photodamage induced by UV radiation. In mammals, the outside-in epidermal permeability barrier is provided by the joint action of the outermost cornified layer, together with assembled tight junctions in granular keratinocytes found in the layers underneath. Tight junctions serve as both outside-in and inside-out barriers, and impede paracellular movements of ions, water, macromolecules and microorganisms. At the molecular level, tight junctions consist of integral membrane proteins that form an extracellular seal between adjacent cells, and associate with cytoplasmic scaffold proteins that serve as links with the actin cytoskeleton. In this review, we address the roles that scaffold proteins play specifically in the establishment and maintenance of the epidermal permeability barrier, and how various pathologies alter or impair their functions.

  6. Bactericidal Permeability-Increasing Proteins Shape Host-Microbe Interactions

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    Fangmin Chen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We characterized bactericidal permeability-increasing proteins (BPIs of the squid Euprymna scolopes, EsBPI2 and EsBPI4. They have molecular characteristics typical of other animal BPIs, are closely related to one another, and nest phylogenetically among invertebrate BPIs. Purified EsBPIs had antimicrobial activity against the squid’s symbiont, Vibrio fischeri, which colonizes light organ crypt epithelia. Activity of both proteins was abrogated by heat treatment and coincubation with specific antibodies. Pretreatment under acidic conditions similar to those during symbiosis initiation rendered V. fischeri more resistant to the antimicrobial activity of the proteins. Immunocytochemistry localized EsBPIs to the symbiotic organ and other epithelial surfaces interacting with ambient seawater. The proteins differed in intracellular distribution. Further, whereas EsBPI4 was restricted to epithelia, EsBPI2 also occurred in blood and in a transient juvenile organ that mediates hatching. The data provide evidence that these BPIs play different defensive roles early in the life of E. scolopes, modulating interactions with the symbiont.

  7. Reservoir rock permeability prediction using support vector regression in an Iranian oil field

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    Saffarzadeh, Sadegh; Shadizadeh, Seyed Reza

    2012-01-01

    Reservoir permeability is a critical parameter for the evaluation of hydrocarbon reservoirs. It is often measured in the laboratory from reservoir core samples or evaluated from well test data. The prediction of reservoir rock permeability utilizing well log data is important because the core analysis and well test data are usually only available from a few wells in a field and have high coring and laboratory analysis costs. Since most wells are logged, the common practice is to estimate permeability from logs using correlation equations developed from limited core data; however, these correlation formulae are not universally applicable. Recently, support vector machines (SVMs) have been proposed as a new intelligence technique for both regression and classification tasks. The theory has a strong mathematical foundation for dependence estimation and predictive learning from finite data sets. The ultimate test for any technique that bears the claim of permeability prediction from well log data is the accurate and verifiable prediction of permeability for wells where only the well log data are available. The main goal of this paper is to develop the SVM method to obtain reservoir rock permeability based on well log data. (paper)

  8. Usefulness of vitamin A binding protein as a marker for capillary endothelial permeability

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    Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Suzuki, Yukio; Kanazawa, Minoru; Kubo, Atsushi; Kawashiro, Takeo [Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1992-06-01

    We performed a preliminary study to assess the usefulness of Vitamin A binding protein (VABP) as a gamma-camera marker for capillary endothelial permeability. We used a guinea pig model of endotoxin (LPS) induced acute lung injury. We calculated the concentration ratio of either {sup 125}I-albumin or {sup 125}I-VABP in lung tissue to that in plasma (tissue plasma ratio; T/P) as a parameter of capillary endothelial permeability. {sup 99m}Tc-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) was used as marker for pulmonary interstitial volume. We estimated wet to dry lung weight ratio as a parameter of lung water accumulation (W/D). LPS increased the T/P of {sup 125}I-albumin and W/D, suggesting the development of permeability edema. The T/P for {sup 125}I-VABP was also increased, indicating that {sup 125}I-VABP can be used to detect elevated capillary endothelial permeability. In both groups, LPS and saline, the T/P was higher for {sup 125}I-VABP than for {sup 125}I-albumin. These data suggest that the pulmonary capillary endothelium is more permeable to VABP than albumin. (author).

  9. Phase behaviour of disordered proteins underlying low density and high permeability of liquid organelles

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    Wei, Ming-Tzo; Elbaum-Garfinkle, Shana; Holehouse, Alex S.; Chen, Carlos Chih-Hsiung; Feric, Marina; Arnold, Craig B.; Priestley, Rodney D.; Pappu, Rohit V.; Brangwynne, Clifford P.

    2017-11-01

    Many intracellular membraneless organelles form via phase separation of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) or regions (IDRs). These include the Caenorhabditis elegans protein LAF-1, which forms P granule-like droplets in vitro. However, the role of protein disorder in phase separation and the macromolecular organization within droplets remain elusive. Here, we utilize a novel technique, ultrafast-scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, to measure the molecular interactions and full coexistence curves (binodals), which quantify the protein concentration within LAF-1 droplets. The binodals of LAF-1 and its IDR display a number of unusual features, including 'high concentration' binodal arms that correspond to remarkably dilute droplets. We find that LAF-1 and other in vitro and intracellular droplets are characterized by an effective mesh size of ∼3-8 nm, which determines the size scale at which droplet properties impact molecular diffusion and permeability. These findings reveal how specific IDPs can phase separate to form permeable, low-density (semi-dilute) liquids, whose structural features are likely to strongly impact biological function.

  10. Coxsackievirus protein 2B modifies endoplasmic reticulum membrane and plasma membrane permeability and facilitates virus release.

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    van Kuppeveld, F J; Hoenderop, J G; Smeets, R L; Willems, P H; Dijkman, H B; Galama, J M; Melchers, W J

    1997-01-01

    Digital-imaging microscopy was performed to study the effect of Coxsackie B3 virus infection on the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration and the Ca2+ content of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). During the course of infection a gradual increase in the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration was observed, due to the influx of extracellular Ca2+. The Ca2+ content of the ER decreased in time with kinetics inversely proportional to those of viral protein synthesis. Individual expression of protein 2B was sufficient to induce the influx of extracellular Ca2+ and to release Ca2+ from ER stores. Analysis of mutant 2B proteins showed that both a cationic amphipathic alpha-helix and a second hydrophobic domain in 2B were required for these activities. Consistent with a presumed ability of protein 2B to increase membrane permeability, viruses carrying a mutant 2B protein exhibited a defect in virus release. We propose that 2B gradually enhances membrane permeability, thereby disrupting the intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and ultimately causing the membrane lesions that allow release of virus progeny. PMID:9218794

  11. Knockout of MIMP protein in lactobacillus plantarum lost its regulation of intestinal permeability on NCM460 epithelial cells through the zonulin pathway.

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    Liu, Zhihua; Kang, Liang; Li, Chao; Tong, Chao; Huang, Meijin; Zhang, Xingwei; Huang, Nanqi; Moyer, Mary Pat; Qin, Huanlong; Wang, Jianping

    2014-10-03

    Previous studies indicated that the micro integral membrane protein located within the media place of the integral membrane protein of Lactobacillus plantarum CGMCC 1258 had protective effects against the intestinal epithelial injury. In our study, we mean to establish micro integral membrane protein -knockout Lactobacillus plantarum (LPKM) to investigate the change of its protective effects and verify the role of micro integral membrane protein on protection of normal intestinal barrier function. Binding assay and intestinal permeability were performed to verify the protective effects of micro integral membrane protein on intestinal permeability in vitro and in vivo. Molecular mechanism was also determined as the zonulin pathway. Clinical data were also collected for further verification of relationship between zonulin level and postoperative septicemia. LPKM got decreased inhibition of EPEC adhesion to NCM460 cells. LPKM had lower ability to alleviate the decrease of intestinal permeability induced by enteropathogenic-e.coli, and prevent enteropathogenic-e.coli -induced increase of zonulin expression. Overexpression of zonulin lowered the intestinal permeability regulated by Lactobacillus plantarum. There was a positive correlation between zonulin level and postoperative septicemia. Therefore, micro integral membrane protein could be necessary for the protective effects of Lactobacillus plantarum on intestinal barrier. MIMP might be a positive factor for Lactobacillus plantarum to protect the intestinal epithelial cells from injury, which could be related to the zonulin pathway.

  12. Plasma proteins in a standardised skin mini-erosion (I: permeability changes as a function of time

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    Ryan Terence J

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A standardised technique using a suction-induced mini-erosion that allows serial sampling of dermal interstitial fluid (IF for 5 to 6 days has been described. In the present study, we studied permeability changes as a function of time. Methods We examined IF concentrations of total protein concentration and the concentration of insulin (6.6 kDa, prealbumin (55 kDa, albumin (66 kDa, transferrin (80 kDa, IgG (150 kDa and alpha-2-macroglobulin (720 kDa as a function of time, using an extraction pressure of 200 mmHg below atmospheric. Results At 0 h after forming the erosion, mean total IF protein content (relative to plasma was 26 ± 13% (SD. For the individual proteins, the relative mean concentrations were 65 ± 36% for insulin, 48 ± 12% for albumin, 30 ± 19% for transferrin, 31 ± 15%for IgG and 19.5 ± 10% for alpha-2-macroglobulin. At 24 h, the total IF protein content was higher than at 0 h (56 ± 26% vs 26 ± 13%; p Conclusions The results indicate that fluid sampled at 0 h after forming the erosion represents dermal IF before the full onset of inflammation. From 24 h onward, the sampled fluid reflects a steady state of increased permeability induced by inflammation. This technique is promising as a tool for clinically sampling substances that are freely distributed in the body and as a model for studying inflammation and vascular permeability.

  13. Epithelial Cell Damage Activates Bactericidal/Permeability Increasing-Protein (BPI Expression in Intestinal Epithelium

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    Arjun Balakrishnan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available As the first line of defense against invading pathogen, intestinal epithelium produces various antimicrobial proteins (AMP that help in clearance of pathogen. Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI is a 55 kDa AMP that is expressed in intestinal epithelium. Dysregulation of BPI in intestinal epithelium is associated with various inflammatory diseases like Crohn’s Disease, Ulcerative colitis, and Infectious enteritis’s. In this paper, we report a direct correlation between intestinal damage and BPI expression. In Caco-2 cells, we see a significant increase in BPI levels upon membrane damage mediated by S. aureus infection and pore-forming toxins (Streptolysin and Listeriolysin. Cells detect changes in potassium level as a Danger-associated molecular pattern associated with cell damage and induce BPI expression in a p38 dependent manner. These results are further supported by in vivo findings that the BPI expression in murine intestinal epithelium is induced upon infection with bacteria which cause intestinal damage (Salmonella Typhimurium and Shigella flexneri whereas mutants that do not cause intestinal damage (STM ΔfliC and STM ΔinvC did not induce BPI expression. Our results suggest that epithelial damage associated with infection act as a signal to induce BPI expression.

  14. Rapid decision support tool based on novel ecosystem service variables for retrofitting of permeable pavement systems in the presence of trees.

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    Scholz, Miklas; Uzomah, Vincent C

    2013-08-01

    The retrofitting of sustainable drainage systems (SuDS) such as permeable pavements is currently undertaken ad hoc using expert experience supported by minimal guidance based predominantly on hard engineering variables. There is a lack of practical decision support tools useful for a rapid assessment of the potential of ecosystem services when retrofitting permeable pavements in urban areas that either feature existing trees or should be planted with trees in the near future. Thus the aim of this paper is to develop an innovative rapid decision support tool based on novel ecosystem service variables for retrofitting of permeable pavement systems close to trees. This unique tool proposes the retrofitting of permeable pavements that obtained the highest ecosystem service score for a specific urban site enhanced by the presence of trees. This approach is based on a novel ecosystem service philosophy adapted to permeable pavements rather than on traditional engineering judgement associated with variables based on quick community and environment assessments. For an example case study area such as Greater Manchester, which was dominated by Sycamore and Common Lime, a comparison with the traditional approach of determining community and environment variables indicates that permeable pavements are generally a preferred SuDS option. Permeable pavements combined with urban trees received relatively high scores, because of their great potential impact in terms of water and air quality improvement, and flood control, respectively. The outcomes of this paper are likely to lead to more combined permeable pavement and tree systems in the urban landscape, which are beneficial for humans and the environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Highly permeable polymeric membranes based on the incorporation of the functional water channel protein Aquaporin Z

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    Kumar, Manish; Grzelakowski, Mariusz; Zilles, Julie; Clark, Mark; Meier, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    The permeability and solute transport characteristics of amphiphilic triblock-polymer vesicles containing the bacterial water-channel protein Aquaporin Z (AqpZ) were investigated. The vesicles were made of a block copolymer with symmetric poly-(2-methyloxazoline)-poly-(dimethylsiloxane)-poly-(2-methyloxazoline) (PMOXA15-PDMS110-PMOXA15) repeat units. Light-scattering measurements on pure polymer vesicles subject to an outwardly directed salt gradient in a stopped-flow apparatus indicated that the polymer vesicles were highly impermeable. However, a large enhancement in water productivity (permeability per unit driving force) of up to ≈800 times that of pure polymer was observed when AqpZ was incorporated. The activation energy (Ea) of water transport for the protein-polymer vesicles (3.4 kcal/mol) corresponded to that reported for water-channel-mediated water transport in lipid membranes. The solute reflection coefficients of glucose, glycerol, salt, and urea were also calculated, and indicated that these solutes are completely rejected. The productivity of AqpZ-incorporated polymer membranes was at least an order of magnitude larger than values for existing salt-rejecting polymeric membranes. The approach followed here may lead to more productive and sustainable water treatment membranes, whereas the variable levels of permeability obtained with different concentrations of AqpZ may provide a key property for drug delivery applications. PMID:18077364

  16. Support vector regression to predict porosity and permeability: Effect of sample size

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    Al-Anazi, A. F.; Gates, I. D.

    2012-02-01

    Porosity and permeability are key petrophysical parameters obtained from laboratory core analysis. Cores, obtained from drilled wells, are often few in number for most oil and gas fields. Porosity and permeability correlations based on conventional techniques such as linear regression or neural networks trained with core and geophysical logs suffer poor generalization to wells with only geophysical logs. The generalization problem of correlation models often becomes pronounced when the training sample size is small. This is attributed to the underlying assumption that conventional techniques employing the empirical risk minimization (ERM) inductive principle converge asymptotically to the true risk values as the number of samples increases. In small sample size estimation problems, the available training samples must span the complexity of the parameter space so that the model is able both to match the available training samples reasonably well and to generalize to new data. This is achieved using the structural risk minimization (SRM) inductive principle by matching the capability of the model to the available training data. One method that uses SRM is support vector regression (SVR) network. In this research, the capability of SVR to predict porosity and permeability in a heterogeneous sandstone reservoir under the effect of small sample size is evaluated. Particularly, the impact of Vapnik's ɛ-insensitivity loss function and least-modulus loss function on generalization performance was empirically investigated. The results are compared to the multilayer perception (MLP) neural network, a widely used regression method, which operates under the ERM principle. The mean square error and correlation coefficients were used to measure the quality of predictions. The results demonstrate that SVR yields consistently better predictions of the porosity and permeability with small sample size than the MLP method. Also, the performance of SVR depends on both kernel function

  17. Acrolein Disrupts Tight Junction Proteins and Causes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Mediated Epithelial Cell Death Leading to Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction and Permeability.

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    Chen, Wei-Yang; Wang, Min; Zhang, Jingwen; Barve, Shirish S; McClain, Craig J; Joshi-Barve, Swati

    2017-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that environmental and dietary factors can affect intestinal epithelial integrity leading to gut permeability and bacterial translocation. Intestinal barrier dysfunction is a pathogenic process associated with many chronic disorders. Acrolein is an environmental and dietary pollutant and a lipid-derived endogenous metabolite. The impact of acrolein on the intestine has not been investigated before and is evaluated in this study, both in vitro and in vivo. Our data demonstrate that oral acrolein exposure in mice caused damage to the intestinal epithelial barrier, resulting in increased permeability and subsequently translocation of bacterial endotoxin-lipopolysaccharide into the blood. Similar results were seen in vitro using established Caco-2 cell monolayers wherein acrolein decreased barrier function and increased permeability. Acrolein also caused the down-regulation and/or redistribution of three representative tight junction proteins (ie, zonula occludens-1, Occludin, Claudin-1) that critically regulate epithelial paracellular permeability. In addition, acrolein induced endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated death of epithelial cells, which is an important mechanism contributing to intestinal barrier damage/dysfunction, and gut permeability. Overall, we demonstrate that exposure to acrolein affects the intestinal epithelium by decrease/redistribution of tight junction proteins and endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated epithelial cell death, thereby resulting in loss of barrier integrity and function. Our findings highlight the adverse consequences of environmental and dietary pollutants on intestinal barrier integrity/function with relevance to gut permeability and the development of disease. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Magnetic permeability based diagnostic test for the determination of the canine C-reactive protein concentration in undiluted whole blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibraimi, Filiz; Kriz, Kirstin; Merin, Henrik; Kriz, Dario

    2009-01-01

    We describe an one-step 11-min magnetic permeability based two-site immunoassay for C-reactive protein (CRP) utilizing polyclonal anti-canine CRP antibody conjugated dextran iron oxide nanoparticles (79 nm) as superparamagnetic labels and polyclonal anti-canine CRP conjugated silica microparticles (15 to 40 μm) as carriers. An inductance based magnetic permeability reader was used to detect the target analyte, CRP, in 10 μL whole blood samples, by measuring the magnetic permeability increase of the silica microparticle sediment due to immuno complex superparamagnetic nanoparticles. Measurements on standards showed a linear response between 0 and 17.5 mg/L CRP. Measurements performed on 16 whole blood samples from mixed breeds showed good correlation with a commercially available ELISA assay.

  19. Characterization of NaA Zeolite Oxygen Permeable Membrane on TiO2/α-Al2O3 Composite Support

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    Zhu Mengfu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The NaA zeolite membrane was synthesized on the surface of TiO2/α-Al2O3 composite support with TiO2 as modifier of α-Al2O3 porous tubular ceramic membrane support by crystallization method. The structure characterization indicated that the TiO2 of the support surface could effectively improve the surface properties of the support. It didn’t affect the crystallization of NaA synthesis liquid and synthesis process of NaA zeolite membrane. There were no obvious defects between the crystal particles with size of approximate 6μm. The perfect and complete membrane with thickness of approximate 15μm combined closely with support to connection together by TiO2 modified. The oxygen permeability of the membrane on TiO2/α-Al2O3 composite support improves of 47% compared with that of α-Al2O3 support. So the process of TiO2 modifying the surface of α-Al2O3 support should increase the oxygen permeability of the NaA zeolite membrane.

  20. Epithelial Permeability Alterations in an In Vitro Air-Liquid Interface Model of Allergic Fungal Rhinosinusitis

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    Den Beste, Kyle A.; Hoddeson, Elizabeth K.; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma; Wise, Sarah K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is an inflammatory upper-airway disease with numerous etiologies. Patients with a characteristic subtype of CRS, allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS), display increased expression of Th2 cytokines and antigen-specific IgE. Various sinonasal inflammatory conditions are associated with alterations in epithelial barrier function. The aim of this study was to compare epithelial permeability and intercellular junctional protein expression amongst cultured primary sinonasal cells from AFRS patients versus non-inflammatory controls. Methods Epithelial cells isolated from paranasal sinus mucosa of AFRS and non-inflammatory control patients were grown to confluence on permeable supports and transitioned to air-liquid interface (ALI). Trans-epithelial resistance (TER) was measured with a horizontal Ussing chamber to characterize the functional permeability of each cell type. After TER recordings were complete, a panel of intercellular junctional proteins was assessed by Western blot and immunofluorescence labeling followed by confocal microscopy. Results After 12 samples were measured from each group, we observed a 41% mean decrease in TER in AFRS cells (296±89 ohms × cm2) compared to control (503±134 ohms × cm2, P=0.006). TER deficits observed in AFRS were associated with decreased expression of the tight junction proteins occludin and Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A), and increased expression of a leaky tight junction protein claudin-2. Conclusions Cultured sinonasal epithelium from AFRS patients displayed increased epithelial permeability and altered expression of intercellular junctional proteins. Given that these cells were not incubated with inflammatory cytokines in vitro, the cultured AFRS epithelial alterations may represent a retained modification in protein expression from the in vivo phenotype. PMID:22927233

  1. Automation of cell-based drug absorption assays in 96-well format using permeable support systems.

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    Larson, Brad; Banks, Peter; Sherman, Hilary; Rothenberg, Mark

    2012-06-01

    Cell-based drug absorption assays, such as Caco-2 and MDCK-MDR1, are an essential component of lead compound ADME/Tox testing. The permeability and transport data they provide can determine whether a compound continues in the drug discovery process. Current methods typically incorporate 24-well microplates and are performed manually. Yet the need to generate absorption data earlier in the drug discovery process, on an increasing number of compounds, is driving the use of higher density plates. A simple, more efficient process that incorporates 96-well permeable supports and proper instrumentation in an automated process provides more reproducible data compared to manual methods. Here we demonstrate the ability to perform drug permeability and transport assays using Caco-2 or MDCKII-MDR1 cells. The assay procedure was automated in a 96-well format, including cell seeding, media and buffer exchanges, compound dispense, and sample removal using simple robotic instrumentation. Cell monolayer integrity was confirmed via transepithelial electrical resistance and Lucifer yellow measurements. Proper cell function was validated by analyzing apical-to-basolateral and basolateral-to-apical movement of rhodamine 123, a known P-glycoprotein substrate. Apparent permeability and efflux data demonstrate how the automated procedure provides a less variable method than manual processing, and delivers a more accurate assessment of a compound's absorption characteristics.

  2. Permeability of porour rhyolite

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    Cashman, K.; Rust, A.; Wright, H.; Roberge, J.

    2003-04-01

    The development of permeability in bubble-bearing magmas determines the efficiency of volatile escape during their ascent through volcanic conduits, which, in turn, controls their explosive potential. As permeability requires bubble connectivity, relationships between permeability and porosity in silicic magmas must be controlled by the formation, growth, deformation and coalescence of their constituent bubbles. Although permeability data on porous volcanic pyroclasts are limited, the database can be greatly extended by including data for ceramic and metallic foams1. Several studies indicate that a single number does not adequately describe the permeability of a foam because inertial effects, which predominate at high flow rates, cause deviations from Darcy's law. These studies suggest that permeability is best modeled using the Forschheimer equation to determine both the Darcy permeability (k1) and the non-Darcian (k2) permeability. Importantly, at the high porosities of ceramic foams (75-95%), both k1 and k2 are strongly dependent on pore size and geometry, suggesting that measurement of these parameters provides important information on foam structure. We determined both the connected porosity (by He-pycnometry) and the permeability (k1 and k2) of rhyolitic samples having a wide range in porosity (22-85%) and vesicle textures. In general, these data support previous observations of a power law relationship between connected porosity and Darcy permeability2. In detail, variations in k1 increase at higher porosities. Similarly, k2 generally increases in both mean and standard deviation with increasing porosity. Measurements made on three mutually perpendicular cores from individual pumice clasts suggest that some of the variability can be explained by anisotropy in the vesicle structure. By comparison with ceramic foams, we suggest that the remaining variability results from differences either in average vesicle size or, more likely, in the size of apertures

  3. Dietary fat and bile juice, but not obesity, are responsible for the increase in small intestinal permeability induced through the suppression of tight junction protein expression in LETO and OLETF rats

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    Suzuki Takuya

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increase in the intestinal permeability is considered to be associated with the inflammatory tone and development in the obesity and diabetes, however, the pathogenesis of the increase in the intestinal permeability is poorly understood. The present study was performed to determine the influence of obesity itself as well as dietary fat on the increase in intestinal permeability. Methods An obese rat strain, Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF, and the lean counter strain, Long Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO, were fed standard or high fat diets for 16 weeks. Glucose tolerance, intestinal permeability, intestinal tight junction (TJ proteins expression, plasma bile acids concentration were evaluated. In addition, the effects of rat bile juice and dietary fat, possible mediators of the increase in the intestinal permeability in the obesity, on TJ permeability were explored in human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Results The OLETF rats showed higher glucose intolerance than did the LETO rats, which became more marked with the prolonged feeding of the high fat diet. Intestinal permeability in the OLETF rats evaluated by the urinary excretion of intestinal permeability markers (Cr-EDTA and phenolsulfonphthalein was comparable to that in the LETO rats. Feeding the high fat diet increased intestinal permeability in both the OLETF and LETO rats, and the increases correlated with decreases in TJ proteins (claudin-1, claudin-3, occludin and junctional adhesion molecule-1 expression in the small, but not in the large intestine (cecum or colon. The plasma bile acids concentration was higher in rats fed the high fat diet. Exposure to bile juice and the fat emulsion increased TJ permeability with concomitant reductions in TJ protein expression (claudin-1, claudin-3, and junctional adhesion molecule-1 in the Caco-2 cell monolayers. Conclusion Excessive dietary fat and/or increased levels of luminal bile juice, but not genetic obesity, are

  4. Effect of temperature and relative humidity on the water vapour permeability and mechanical properties of cassava starch and soy protein concentrate based edible films.

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    Chinma, C E; Ariahu, C C; Alakali, J S

    2015-04-01

    The effect of temperature and relative humidity on the water vapour permeability (WVP) and mechanical properties of cassava starch and soy protein concentrate (SPC) based edible films containing 20 % glycerol level were studied. Tensile strength and elastic modulus of edible films increased with increase in temperature and decreased with increase in relative humidity, while elongation at break decreased. Water vapour permeability of the films increased (2.6-4.3 g.mm/m(2).day.kPa) with increase in temperature and relative humidity. The temperature dependence of water vapour permeation of cassava starch-soy protein concentrate films followed Arrhenius relationship. Activation energy (Ea) of water vapour permeation of cassava starch-soy protein concentrate edible films ranged from 1.9 to 5.3 kJ/mol (R (2)  ≥ 0.93) and increased with increase in SPC addition. The Ea values were lower for the bio-films than for polyvinylidene chloride, polypropylene and polyethylene which are an indication of low water vapour permeability of the developed biofilms compared to those synthetic films.

  5. Soils - Mean Permeability

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This digital spatial data set provides information on the magnitude and spatial pattern of depth-weighted, mean soil permeability throughout the State of Kansas. The...

  6. Site-specific modification of genome with cell-permeable Cre fusion protein in preimplantation mouse embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyoungmi; Kim, Hwain; Lee, Daekee

    2009-01-01

    Site-specific recombination (SSR) by Cre recombinase and its target sequence, loxP, is a valuable tool in genetic analysis of gene function. Recently, several studies reported successful application of Cre fusion protein containing protein transduction peptide for inducing gene modification in various mammalian cells including ES cell as well as in the whole animal. In this study, we show that a short incubation of preimplantation mouse embryos with purified cell-permeable Cre fusion protein results in efficient SSR. X-Gal staining of preimplantation embryos, heterozygous for Gtrosa26 tm1Sor , revealed that treatment of 1-cell or 2-cell embryos with 3 μM of Cre fusion protein for 2 h leads to Cre-mediated excision in 70-85% of embryos. We have examined the effect of the concentration of the Cre fusion protein and the duration of the treatment on embryonic development, established a condition for full term development and survival to adulthood, and demonstrated the germ line transmission of excised Gtrosa26 allele. Potential applications and advantages of the highly efficient technique described here are discussed.

  7. Lysosomal membrane permeability stimulates protein aggregate formation in neurons of a lysosomal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micsenyi, Matthew C; Sikora, Jakub; Stephney, Gloria; Dobrenis, Kostantin; Walkley, Steven U

    2013-06-26

    Protein aggregates are a common pathological feature of neurodegenerative diseases and several lysosomal diseases, but it is currently unclear what aggregates represent for pathogenesis. Here we report the accumulation of intraneuronal aggregates containing the macroautophagy adapter proteins p62 and NBR1 in the neurodegenerative lysosomal disease late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (CLN2 disease). CLN2 disease is caused by a deficiency in the lysosomal enzyme tripeptidyl peptidase I, which results in aberrant lysosomal storage of catabolites, including the subunit c of mitochondrial ATP synthase (SCMAS). In an effort to define the role of aggregates in CLN2, we evaluated p62 and NBR1 accumulation in the CNS of Cln2(-/-) mice. Although increases in p62 and NBR1 often suggest compromised degradative mechanisms, we found normal ubiquitin-proteasome system function and only modest inefficiency in macroautophagy late in disease. Importantly, we identified that SCMAS colocalizes with p62 in extra-lysosomal aggregates in Cln2(-/-) neurons in vivo. This finding is consistent with SCMAS being released from lysosomes, an event known as lysosomal membrane permeability (LMP). We predicted that LMP and storage release from lysosomes results in the sequestration of this material as cytosolic aggregates by p62 and NBR1. Notably, LMP induction in primary neuronal cultures generates p62-positive aggregates and promotes p62 localization to lysosomal membranes, supporting our in vivo findings. We conclude that LMP is a previously unrecognized pathogenic event in CLN2 disease that stimulates cytosolic aggregate formation. Furthermore, we offer a novel role for p62 in response to LMP that may be relevant for other diseases exhibiting p62 accumulation.

  8. Expressions of tight junction proteins Occludin and Claudin-1 are under the circadian control in the mouse large intestine: implications in intestinal permeability and susceptibility to colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh-oka Kyoko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: The circadian clock drives daily rhythms in behavior and physiology. A recent study suggests that intestinal permeability is also under control of the circadian clock. However, the precise mechanisms remain largely unknown. Because intestinal permeability depends on tight junction (TJ that regulates the epithelial paracellular pathway, this study investigated whether the circadian clock regulates the expression levels of TJ proteins in the intestine. METHODS: The expression levels of TJ proteins in the large intestinal epithelium and colonic permeability were analyzed every 4, 6, or 12 hours between wild-type mice and mice with a mutation of a key clock gene Period2 (Per2; mPer2(m/m. In addition, the susceptibility to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS-induced colitis was compared between wild-type mice and mPer2(m/m mice. RESULTS: The mRNA and protein expression levels of Occludin and Claudin-1 exhibited daily variations in the colonic epithelium in wild-type mice, whereas they were constitutively high in mPer2(m/m mice. Colonic permeability in wild-type mice exhibited daily variations, which was inversely associated with the expression levels of Occludin and Claudin-1 proteins, whereas it was constitutively low in mPer2(m/m mice. mPer2(m/m mice were more resistant to the colonic injury induced by DSS than wild-type mice. CONCLUSIONS: Occludin and Claudin-1 expressions in the large intestine are under the circadian control, which is associated with temporal regulation of colonic permeability and also susceptibility to colitis.

  9. Concentrations of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, soluble CD14 and plasma lipids in relation to endotoxaemia in patients with alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäfer, C.; Parlesak, Alexandr; Schütt, C.

    2002-01-01

    of endotoxin on its target cells (LPS-binding protein and sCD14) were increased. Endotoxin antagonists, such as bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein and high-density lipoprotein, were increased in the pre-cirrhotic stages, whereas a significant reduction of the latter was observed in cirrhosis. Low......-density lipoprotein remained unchanged. The elevation of binding factors in the pre-cirrhotic stages of alcoholic liver disease might attenuate the effects of endotoxaemia, whereas in cirrhosis the reduction of high density lipoprotein, to which large quantities of endotoxin bind, may contribute to its pro...

  10. Reduction in lipophilicity improved the solubility, plasma–protein binding, and permeability of tertiary sulfonamide RORc inverse agonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fauber, Benjamin P.; René, Olivier; de Leon Boenig, Gladys; Burton, Brenda; Deng, Yuzhong; Eidenschenk, Céline; Everett, Christine; Gobbi, Alberto; Hymowitz, Sarah G.; Johnson, Adam R.; La, Hank; Liimatta, Marya; Lockey, Peter; Norman, Maxine; Ouyang, Wenjun; Wang, Weiru; Wong, Harvey (Genentech); (Argenta)

    2014-08-01

    Using structure-based drug design principles, we identified opportunities to reduce the lipophilicity of our tertiary sulfonamide RORc inverse agonists. The new analogs possessed improved RORc cellular potencies with >77-fold selectivity for RORc over other nuclear receptors in our cell assay suite. The reduction in lipophilicity also led to an increased plasma–protein unbound fraction and improvements in cellular permeability and aqueous solubility.

  11. Radionuclide assessment of pulmonary microvascular permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groeneveld, A.B.J. [Medical Intensive Care Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Free University Hospital, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1997-04-01

    The literature has been reviewed to evaluate the technique and clinical value of radionuclide measurements of microvascular permeability and oedema formation in the lungs. Methodology, modelling and interpretation vary widely among studies. Nevertheless, most studies agree on the fact that the measurement of permeability via pulmonary radioactivity measurements of intravenously injected radiolabelled proteins versus that in the blood pool, the so-called pulmonary protein transport rate (PTR), can assist the clinician in discriminating between permeability oedema of the lungs associated with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and oedema caused by an increased filtration pressure, for instance in the course of cardiac disease, i.e. pressure-induced pulmonary oedema. Some of the techniques used to measure PTR are also able to detect subclinical forms of lung microvascular injury not yet complicated by permeability oedema. This may occur after cardiopulmonary bypass and major vascular surgery, for instance. By paralleling the clinical severity and course of the ARDS, the PTR method may also serve as a tool to evaluate new therapies for the syndrome. Taken together, the currently available radionuclide methods, which are applicable at the bedside in the intensive care unit, may provide a gold standard for detecting minor and major forms of acute microvascular lung injury, and for evaluating the severity, course and response to treatment. (orig.). With 2 tabs.

  12. Comparative field permeability measurement of permeable pavements using ASTM C1701 and NCAT permeameter methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Kayhanian, Masoud; Harvey, John T

    2013-03-30

    Fully permeable pavement is gradually gaining support as an alternative best management practice (BMP) for stormwater runoff management. As the use of these pavements increases, a definitive test method is needed to measure hydraulic performance and to evaluate clogging, both for performance studies and for assessment of permeability for construction quality assurance and maintenance needs assessment. Two of the most commonly used permeability measurement tests for porous asphalt and pervious concrete are the National Center for Asphalt Technology (NCAT) permeameter and ASTM C1701, respectively. This study was undertaken to compare measured values for both methods in the field on a variety of permeable pavements used in current practice. The field measurements were performed using six experimental section designs with different permeable pavement surface types including pervious concrete, porous asphalt and permeable interlocking concrete pavers. Multiple measurements were performed at five locations on each pavement test section. The results showed that: (i) silicone gel is a superior sealing material to prevent water leakage compared with conventional plumbing putty; (ii) both methods (NCAT and ASTM) can effectively be used to measure the permeability of all pavement types and the surface material type will not impact the measurement precision; (iii) the permeability values measured with the ASTM method were 50-90% (75% on average) lower than those measured with the NCAT method; (iv) the larger permeameter cylinder diameter used in the ASTM method improved the reliability and reduced the variability of the measured permeability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Methamphetamine transiently increases the blood-brain barrier permeability in the hippocampus: role of tight junction proteins and matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Tânia; Baptista, Sofia; Gonçalves, Joana; Leal, Ermelindo; Milhazes, Nuno; Borges, Fernanda; Ribeiro, Carlos F; Quintela, Oscar; Lendoiro, Elena; López-Rivadulla, Manuel; Ambrósio, António F; Silva, Ana P

    2011-09-09

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a powerful stimulant drug of abuse that has steadily gained popularity worldwide. It is known that METH is highly neurotoxic and causes irreversible damage of brain cells leading to neurological and psychiatric abnormalities. Recent studies suggested that METH-induced neurotoxicity might also result from its ability to compromise blood-brain barrier (BBB) function. Due to the crucial role of BBB in the maintenance of brain homeostasis and protection against toxic molecules and pathogenic organisms, its dysfunction could have severe consequences. In this study, we investigated the effect of an acute high dose of METH (30mg/kg) on BBB permeability after different time points and in different brain regions. For that, young adult mice were sacrificed 1h, 24h or 72h post-METH administration. METH increased BBB permeability, but this effect was detected only at 24h after administration, being therefore a transitory effect. Interestingly, we also found that the hippocampus was the most susceptible brain region to METH, comparing to frontal cortex and striatum. Moreover, in an attempt to identify the key players in METH-induced BBB dysfunction we further investigated potential alterations in tight junction (TJ) proteins and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). METH was able to decrease the protein levels of zonula occludens (ZO)-1, claudin-5 and occludin in the hippocampus 24h post-injection, and increased the activity and immunoreactivity of MMP-9. The pre-treatment with BB-94 (30mg/kg), a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, prevented the METH-induced increase in MMP-9 immunoreactivity in the hippocampus. Overall, the present data demonstrate that METH transiently increases the BBB permeability in the hippocampus, which can be explained by alterations on TJ proteins and MMP-9. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Simple clinical means of documenting increased pulmonary endothelial permeability to protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishkin, F.S.; Niden, A.; Kumar, A.; Thomas, A.; Reese, I.C.; Vasinrapee, P.

    1987-02-20

    The authors investigated a simple method that can be used at the bedside for documenting the net accumulation of albumin in the lung. The technique employs measurement with a computer-linked gamma camera of the activity ratio in an area of the right lung compared with the same-sized area in the heart at 20 minutes and three hours following intravenous injection of technetium Tc 99m albumin. They applied this measurement to three groups of patients: a control group and patients with roentgenographic evidence of edema classified according to clinically available criteria as either hydrostatic edema or permeability edema to see if they could document differences among these groups. In control patients this ratio did not increase by more than seven units between the 20-minute and three-hour measurements. Of 18 patients classified by other routine clinical means as having hydrostatic pulmonary edema, 89% showed no increase in lung albumin accumulation. In 29 patients with permeability edema associated with the so-called adult respiratory distress syndrome, 31% showed evidence of net pulmonary albumin accumulation. These findings suggest that some patients otherwise classified as having hydrostatic edema have concomitant permeability changes in the microvasculature and that permeability edema represents a spectrum of endothelial damage.

  15. Simple clinical means of documenting increased pulmonary endothelial permeability to protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishkin, F.S.; Niden, A.; Kumar, A.; Thomas, A.; Reese, I.C.; Vasinrapee, P.

    1987-01-01

    The authors investigated a simple method that can be used at the bedside for documenting the net accumulation of albumin in the lung. The technique employs measurement with a computer-linked gamma camera of the activity ratio in an area of the right lung compared with the same-sized area in the heart at 20 minutes and three hours following intravenous injection of technetium Tc 99m albumin. They applied this measurement to three groups of patients: a control group and patients with roentgenographic evidence of edema classified according to clinically available criteria as either hydrostatic edema or permeability edema to see if they could document differences among these groups. In control patients this ratio did not increase by more than seven units between the 20-minute and three-hour measurements. Of 18 patients classified by other routine clinical means as having hydrostatic pulmonary edema, 89% showed no increase in lung albumin accumulation. In 29 patients with permeability edema associated with the so-called adult respiratory distress syndrome, 31% showed evidence of net pulmonary albumin accumulation. These findings suggest that some patients otherwise classified as having hydrostatic edema have concomitant permeability changes in the microvasculature and that permeability edema represents a spectrum of endothelial damage

  16. Do the recommended standards for in vitro biopharmaceutic classification of drug permeability meet the "passive transport" criterion for biowaivers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žakelj, Simon; Berginc, Katja; Roškar, Robert; Kraljič, Bor; Kristl, Albin

    2013-01-01

    BCS based biowaivers are recognized by major regulatory agencies. An application for a biowaiver can be supported by or even based on "in vitro" measurements of drug permeability. However, guidelines limit the application of biowaivers to drug substances that are transported only by passive mechanisms. Regarding published permeability data as well as measurements obtained in our institution, one can rarely observe drug substances that conform to this very strict criterion. Therefore, we measured the apparent permeability coefficients of 13 drugs recommended by FDA's Guidance to be used as standards for "in vitro" permeability classification. The asymmetry of permeability data determined for both directions (mucosal-to-serosal and serosalto- mucosal) through the rat small intestine revealed significant active transport for four out of the nine high-permeability standards and for all four low-permeability standard drugs. As could be expected, this asymmetry was abolished at 4°C on rat intestine. The permeability of all nine high-permeability, but none of the low permeability standards, was also much lower when measured with intestinal tissue, Caco-2 cell monolayers or artificial membranes at 4°C compared to standard conditions (37°C). Additionally, concurrent testing of several standard drugs revealed that membrane transport can be affected by the use of internal permeability standards. The implications of the results are discussed regarding the regulatory aspects of biopharmaceutical classification, good practice in drug permeability evaluation and regarding the general relevance of transport proteins with broad specificity in drug absorption.

  17. Endoscopic biopsies in Ussing chambers evaluated for studies of macromolecular permeability in the human colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallon, Conny; Braaf, Ylva; Wolving, Mats; Olaison, Gunnar; Söderholm, Johan D

    2005-05-01

    Studies of mucosal permeability to protein antigens in humans are limited to in vitro techniques. The use of surgical specimens for such studies has major shortcomings. Endoscopic biopsies in Ussing chambers have been introduced as a means of studying secretion and transepithelial permeability, but have not been evaluated for studies of protein antigen uptake in human intestine. Standard forceps biopsies from the sigmoid colon of 24 healthy volunteers were mounted in Ussing chambers with an exposed tissue area of 1.76 mm2. 51Cr-EDTA (paracellular probe) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP; 45 kDa protein antigen) were used as permeability markers. Mucosal permeability, electrophysiology, histology and energy contents of the biopsies were studied over time. To evaluate the ability of the technique to detect permeability changes, the mucosa was modulated with capric acid, a medium-chain fatty acid, known to affect tight junctions. In the Ussing chamber the mucosal biopsies were viable for 160 min with stable levels of ATP and lactate, and only minor changes in morphology. Steady-state permeability with low variability was seen for both markers during the 30-90 min period. Exposure to capric acid induced a rapid decrease in short-circuit current (Isc) and a slower reversible decrease in transepithelial resistance (TER), as well as an increased permeability to 51Cr-EDTA and HRP. Endoscopic biopsies of human colon are viable in Ussing chambers and are reliable tools for studies of mucosal permeability to protein antigens. The technique offers a broad potential for studies of mucosal function in the pathophysiology of human gastrointestinal diseases.

  18. Determination of glucose exchange rates and permeability of erythrocyte membrane in preeclampsia and subsequent oxidative stress-related protein damage using dynamic-{sup 19}F-NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickinson, Elizabeth, E-mail: elizabeth.dickinson@york.ac.uk [University of York, Department of Chemistry (United Kingdom); Arnold, John R. P. [Selby College (United Kingdom); Fisher, Julie [University of Leeds, School of Chemistry (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    The cause of the pregnancy condition preeclampsia (PE) is thought to be endothelial dysfunction caused by oxidative stress. As abnormal glucose tolerance has also been associated with PE, we use a fluorinated-mimic of this metabolite to establish whether any oxidative damage to lipids and proteins in the erythrocyte membrane has increased cell membrane permeability. Data were acquired using {sup 19}F Dynamic-NMR (DNMR) to measure exchange of 3-fluoro-3-deoxyglucose (3-FDG) across the membrane of erythrocytes from 10 pregnant women (5 healthy control women, and 5 from women suffering from PE). Magnetisation transfer was measured using the 1D selective inversion and 2D EXSY pulse sequences, over a range of time delays. Integrated intensities from these experiments were used in matrix diagonalisation to estimate the values of the rate constants of exchange and membrane permeability. No significant differences were observed for the rate of exchange of 3-FDG and membrane permeability between healthy pregnant women and those suffering from PE, leading us to conclude that no oxidative damage had occurred at this carrier-protein site in the membrane.

  19. Determination of glucose exchange rates and permeability of erythrocyte membrane in preeclampsia and subsequent oxidative stress-related protein damage using dynamic-"1"9F-NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickinson, Elizabeth; Arnold, John R. P.; Fisher, Julie

    2017-01-01

    The cause of the pregnancy condition preeclampsia (PE) is thought to be endothelial dysfunction caused by oxidative stress. As abnormal glucose tolerance has also been associated with PE, we use a fluorinated-mimic of this metabolite to establish whether any oxidative damage to lipids and proteins in the erythrocyte membrane has increased cell membrane permeability. Data were acquired using "1"9F Dynamic-NMR (DNMR) to measure exchange of 3-fluoro-3-deoxyglucose (3-FDG) across the membrane of erythrocytes from 10 pregnant women (5 healthy control women, and 5 from women suffering from PE). Magnetisation transfer was measured using the 1D selective inversion and 2D EXSY pulse sequences, over a range of time delays. Integrated intensities from these experiments were used in matrix diagonalisation to estimate the values of the rate constants of exchange and membrane permeability. No significant differences were observed for the rate of exchange of 3-FDG and membrane permeability between healthy pregnant women and those suffering from PE, leading us to conclude that no oxidative damage had occurred at this carrier-protein site in the membrane.

  20. Apolipoprotein L1 confers pH-switchable ion permeability to phospholipid vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Jonathan; Pozzi, Nicola; Oliva, Jonathan; Edwards, John C

    2017-11-03

    Apolipoprotein L1 (ApoL1) is a human serum protein conferring resistance to African trypanosomes, and certain ApoL1 variants increase susceptibility to some progressive kidney diseases. ApoL1 has been hypothesized to function like a pore-forming colicin and has been reported to have permeability effects on both intracellular and plasma membranes. Here, to gain insight into how ApoL1 may function in vivo , we used vesicle-based ion permeability, direct membrane association, and intrinsic fluorescence to study the activities of purified recombinant ApoL1. We found that ApoL1 confers chloride-selective permeability to preformed phospholipid vesicles and that this selectivity is strongly pH-sensitive, with maximal activity at pH 5 and little activity above pH 7. When ApoL1 and lipid were allowed to interact at low pH and were then brought to neutral pH, chloride permeability was suppressed, and potassium permeability was activated. Both chloride and potassium permeability linearly correlated with the mass of ApoL1 in the reaction mixture, and both exhibited lipid selectivity, requiring the presence of negatively charged lipids for activity. Potassium, but not chloride, permease activity required the presence of calcium ions in both the association and activation steps. Direct assessment of ApoL1-lipid associations confirmed that ApoL1 stably associates with phospholipid vesicles, requiring low pH and the presence of negatively charged phospholipids for maximal binding. Intrinsic fluorescence of ApoL1 supported the presence of a significant structural transition when ApoL1 is mixed with lipids at low pH. This pH-switchable ion-selective permeability may explain the different effects of ApoL1 reported in intracellular and plasma membrane environments. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Effect of fortification with various types of milk proteins on the rheological properties and permeability of nonfat set yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Y; Serra, M; Horne, D S; Lucey, J A

    2009-01-01

    Yogurt base was prepared from reconstituted skim milk powder (SMP) with 2.5% protein and fortified with additional 1% protein (wt/wt) from 4 different milk protein sources: SMP, milk protein isolate (MPI), micellar casein (MC), and sodium caseinate (NaCN). Heat-treated yogurt mixes were fermented at 40 degrees C with a commercial yogurt culture until pH 4.6. During fermentation pH was monitored, and storage modulus (G') and loss tangent (LT) were measured using dynamic oscillatory rheology. Yield stress (sigma(yield)) and permeability of gels were analyzed at pH 4.6. Addition of NaCN significantly reduced buffering capacity of yogurt mix by apparently solubilizing part of the indigenous colloidal calcium phosphate (CCP) in reconstituted SMP. Use of different types of milk protein did not affect pH development except for MC, which had the slowest fermentation due to its very high buffering. NaCN-fortified yogurt had the highest G' and sigma(yield) values at pH 4.6, as well as maximum LT values. Partial removal of CCP by NaCN before fermentation may have increased rearrangements in yogurt gel. Soluble casein molecules in NaCN-fortified milks may have helped to increase G' and LT values of yogurt gels by increasing the number of cross-links between strands. Use of MC increased the CCP content but resulted in low G' and sigma(yield) at pH 4.6, high LT and high permeability. The G' value at pH 4.6 of yogurts increased in the order: SMP = MC yogurt. Practical Application: In yogurt processing, it is common to add additional milk solids to improve viscosity and textural attributes. There are many different types of milk protein powders that could potentially be used for fortification purposes. This study suggests that the type of milk protein used for fortification impacts yogurt properties and sodium caseinate gave the best textural results.

  2. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao

    2015-01-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observ...

  3. Mitochondrial nucleoid interacting proteins support mitochondrial protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, J; Cooper, H M; Reyes, A; Di Re, M; Sembongi, H; Litwin, T R; Gao, J; Neuman, K C; Fearnley, I M; Spinazzola, A; Walker, J E; Holt, I J

    2012-07-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomes and translation factors co-purify with mitochondrial nucleoids of human cells, based on affinity protein purification of tagged mitochondrial DNA binding proteins. Among the most frequently identified proteins were ATAD3 and prohibitin, which have been identified previously as nucleoid components, using a variety of methods. Both proteins are demonstrated to be required for mitochondrial protein synthesis in human cultured cells, and the major binding partner of ATAD3 is the mitochondrial ribosome. Altered ATAD3 expression also perturbs mtDNA maintenance and replication. These findings suggest an intimate association between nucleoids and the machinery of protein synthesis in mitochondria. ATAD3 and prohibitin are tightly associated with the mitochondrial membranes and so we propose that they support nucleic acid complexes at the inner membrane of the mitochondrion.

  4. Capsid protein VP4 of human rhinovirus induces membrane permeability by the formation of a size-selective multimeric pore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha Panjwani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-enveloped viruses must deliver their viral genome across a cell membrane without the advantage of membrane fusion. The mechanisms used to achieve this remain poorly understood. Human rhinovirus, a frequent cause of the common cold, is a non-enveloped virus of the picornavirus family, which includes other significant pathogens such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus. During picornavirus cell entry, the small myristoylated capsid protein VP4 is released from the virus, interacts with the cell membrane and is implicated in the delivery of the viral RNA genome into the cytoplasm to initiate replication. In this study, we have produced recombinant C-terminal histidine-tagged human rhinovirus VP4 and shown it can induce membrane permeability in liposome model membranes. Dextran size-exclusion studies, chemical crosslinking and electron microscopy demonstrated that VP4 forms a multimeric membrane pore, with a channel size consistent with transfer of the single-stranded RNA genome. The membrane permeability induced by recombinant VP4 was influenced by pH and was comparable to permeability induced by infectious virions. These findings present a molecular mechanism for the involvement of VP4 in cell entry and provide a model system which will facilitate exploration of VP4 as a novel antiviral target for the picornavirus family.

  5. Developments in permeable and low permeability barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jefferis, S.A.; Norris, G.H.; Thomas, A.O.

    1997-01-01

    The concept of the reactive treatment zone whereby pollutants are attenuated as they move along a pathway in the ground has enabled a re-thinking of many of the concepts of containment. In particular it offers the potential for the control of the flux from a contaminated area by controlling the contaminant concentration in the pathway(s) as well as or instead of using a low permeability barrier. The paper outlines the basic concepts of the reactive treatment zone and the use of permeable and low permeability reactive systems. The paper then gives a case history of the installation of a permeable barrier using an in-situ reaction chamber

  6. Ammonia and urea permeability of mammalian aquaporins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litman, Thomas; Søgaard, Rikke; Zeuthen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    significant at alkaline pH. It is debated whether the H(+) ion passes via the aquaporin or by some external route; the investigation of this problem requires the aquaporin-expressing cell to be voltage-clamped. The ammonia-permeable aquaporins differ from other aquaporins by having a less restrictive aromatic...... groups differ in the amino acid composition of their aromatic/arginine regions. The location of the ammonia-permeable aquaporins in the body parallels that of the Rh proteins. This applies to erythrocytes and to cells associated with nitrogen homeostasis and high rates of anabolism. In the liver, AQPs 8...

  7. Study on Surface Permeability of Concrete under Immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Xing, Feng; Dong, Biqin; Ma, Hongyan; Pan, Dong

    2014-01-28

    In this paper, concrete specimens are immersed in ultrapure water, to study the evolutions of surface permeability, pore structure and paste microstructure following the prolonging of immersion period. According to the results, after 30-day immersion, the surface permeability of concrete becomes higher as compared with the value before immersion. However, further immersion makes the surface permeability decrease, so that the value measured after 150-day immersion is only half that measured after 30-day immersion. The early increase in surface permeability should be mainly attributed to the leaching of calcium hydroxide, while the later decrease to the refinement of pore structure due to hydration. The two effects work simultaneously and compete throughout the immersion period. The proposed mechanisms get support from microscopic measurements and observations.

  8. Crustal permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Tom; Ingebritsen, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Permeability is the primary control on fluid flow in the Earth’s crust and is key to a surprisingly wide range of geological processes, because it controls the advection of heat and solutes and the generation of anomalous pore pressures.  The practical importance of permeability – and the potential for large, dynamic changes in permeability – is highlighted by ongoing issues associated with hydraulic fracturing for hydrocarbon production (“fracking”), enhanced geothermal systems, and geologic carbon sequestration.  Although there are thousands of research papers on crustal permeability, this is the first book-length treatment.  This book bridges the historical dichotomy between the hydrogeologic perspective of permeability as a static material property and the perspective of other Earth scientists who have long recognized permeability as a dynamic parameter that changes in response to tectonism, fluid production, and geochemical reactions. 

  9. Enhanced CAH dechlorination in a low permeability, variably-saturated medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J.P.; Sorenson, K.S.; Peterson, L.N.; Brennan, R.A.; Werth, C.J.; Sanford, R.A.; Bures, G.H.; Taylor, C.J.; ,

    2002-01-01

    An innovative pilot-scale field test was performed to enhance the anaerobic reductive dechlorination (ARD) of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) in a low permeability, variably-saturated formation. The selected technology combines the use of a hydraulic fracturing (fracking) technique with enhanced bioremediation through the creation of highly-permeable sand- and electron donor-filled fractures in the low permeability matrix. Chitin was selected as the electron donor because of its unique properties as a polymeric organic material and based on the results of lab studies that indicated its ability to support ARD. The distribution and impact of chitin- and sand-filled fractures to the system was evaluated using hydrologic, geophysical, and geochemical parameters. The results indicate that, where distributed, chitin favorably impacted redox conditions and supported enhanced ARD of CAHs. These results indicate that this technology may be a viable and cost-effective approach for remediation of low-permeability, variably saturated systems.

  10. Cell-permeable nanobodies for targeted immunolabelling and antigen manipulation in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herce, Henry D; Schumacher, Dominik; Schneider, Anselm F L; Ludwig, Anne K; Mann, Florian A; Fillies, Marion; Kasper, Marc-André; Reinke, Stefan; Krause, Eberhard; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M Cristina; Hackenberger, Christian P R

    2017-08-01

    Functional antibody delivery in living cells would enable the labelling and manipulation of intracellular antigens, which constitutes a long-thought goal in cell biology and medicine. Here we present a modular strategy to create functional cell-permeable nanobodies capable of targeted labelling and manipulation of intracellular antigens in living cells. The cell-permeable nanobodies are formed by the site-specific attachment of intracellularly stable (or cleavable) cyclic arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides to camelid-derived single-chain VHH antibody fragments. We used this strategy for the non-endocytic delivery of two recombinant nanobodies into living cells, which enabled the relocalization of the polymerase clamp PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) and tumour suppressor p53 to the nucleolus, and thereby allowed the detection of protein-protein interactions that involve these two proteins in living cells. Furthermore, cell-permeable nanobodies permitted the co-transport of therapeutically relevant proteins, such as Mecp2, into the cells. This technology constitutes a major step in the labelling, delivery and targeted manipulation of intracellular antigens. Ultimately, this approach opens the door towards immunostaining in living cells and the expansion of immunotherapies to intracellular antigen targets.

  11. Cell-permeable nanobodies for targeted immunolabelling and antigen manipulation in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herce, Henry D.; Schumacher, Dominik; Schneider, Anselm F. L.; Ludwig, Anne K.; Mann, Florian A.; Fillies, Marion; Kasper, Marc-André; Reinke, Stefan; Krause, Eberhard; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M. Cristina; Hackenberger, Christian P. R.

    2017-08-01

    Functional antibody delivery in living cells would enable the labelling and manipulation of intracellular antigens, which constitutes a long-thought goal in cell biology and medicine. Here we present a modular strategy to create functional cell-permeable nanobodies capable of targeted labelling and manipulation of intracellular antigens in living cells. The cell-permeable nanobodies are formed by the site-specific attachment of intracellularly stable (or cleavable) cyclic arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides to camelid-derived single-chain VHH antibody fragments. We used this strategy for the non-endocytic delivery of two recombinant nanobodies into living cells, which enabled the relocalization of the polymerase clamp PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) and tumour suppressor p53 to the nucleolus, and thereby allowed the detection of protein-protein interactions that involve these two proteins in living cells. Furthermore, cell-permeable nanobodies permitted the co-transport of therapeutically relevant proteins, such as Mecp2, into the cells. This technology constitutes a major step in the labelling, delivery and targeted manipulation of intracellular antigens. Ultimately, this approach opens the door towards immunostaining in living cells and the expansion of immunotherapies to intracellular antigen targets.

  12. Effect of Adsorbed Protein on the Hydraulic Permeability, Membrane and Streaming Potential Values Measured across a Microporous Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benavente, Juana; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    1998-01-01

    permeability decreases strongly when the pH decreases, having its minimum value at the isoelectric point of the protein; the apparent zeta potential values are also dependent on both pH and salt concentration. Differences in the streaming potential coefficient determined for two membranes fouled under......The effect of the adsorption of a protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), on the membrane potential, flux reduction and streaming potential measured across a microporous polysulphone membrane with different NaCl solutions and pH values is studied. From electrokinetic phenomena, information about...... the electrical properties of the membrane (fixed charge concentration and ionic transport numbers) or the membrane/solute interactions (streaming and zeta potentials) can be obtained. The influence of pH and ionic strength on volume flux and streaming potential values is considered. Results show that hydraulic...

  13. Multiple Targets for Novel Therapy of FSGS Associated with Circulating Permeability Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia J. Savin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A plasma component is responsible for altered glomerular permeability in patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Evidence includes recurrence after renal transplantation, remission after plasmapheresis, proteinuria in infants of affected mothers, transfer of proteinuria to experimental animals, and impaired glomerular permeability after exposure to patient plasma. Therapy may include decreasing synthesis of the injurious agent, removing or blocking its interaction with cells, or blocking signaling or enhancing cell defenses to restore the permeability barrier and prevent progression. Agents that may prevent the synthesis of the permeability factor include cytotoxic agents or aggressive chemotherapy. Extracorporeal therapies include plasmapheresis, immunoadsorption with protein A or anti-immunoglobulin, or lipopheresis. Oral or intravenous galactose also decreases Palb activity. Studies of glomeruli have shown that several strategies prevent the action of FSGS sera. These include blocking receptor-ligand interactions, modulating cell reactions using indomethacin or eicosanoids 20-HETE or 8,9-EET, and enhancing cytoskeleton and protein interactions using calcineurin inhibitors, glucocorticoids, or rituximab. We have identified cardiotrophin-like cytokine factor 1 (CLCF-1 as a candidate for the permeability factor. Therapies specific to CLCF-1 include potential use of cytokine receptor-like factor (CRLF-1 and inhibition of Janus kinase 2. Combined therapy using multiple modalities offers therapy to reverse proteinuria and prevent scarring.

  14. Biomimetic Membrane Arrays on Cast Hydrogel Supports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roerdink-Lander, Monique; Ibragimova, Sania; Rein Hansen, Christian

    2011-01-01

    , provides mechanical support but at the cost of small molecule transport through the membrane−support sandwich. To stabilize biomimetic membranes while allowing transport through a membrane−support sandwich, we have investigated the feasibility of using an ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE......)/hydrogel sandwich as the support. The sandwich is realized as a perforated surface-treated ETFE film onto which a hydrogel composite support structure is cast. We report a simple method to prepare arrays of lipid bilayer membranes with low intrinsic electrical conductance on the highly permeable, self......-supporting ETFE/hydrogel sandwiches. We demonstrate how the ETFE/hydrogel sandwich support promotes rapid self-thinning of lipid bilayers suitable for hosting membrane-spanning proteins....

  15. Effect of permeability enhancers on paracellular permeability of acyclovir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Muge; Kaynak, Mustafa Sinan; Sahin, Selma

    2016-06-01

    According to Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS), acyclovir is a class III (high solubility, low permeability) compound, and it is transported through paracellular route by passive diffusion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of various pharmaceutical excipients on the intestinal permeability of acyclovir. The single-pass in-situ intestinal perfusion (SPIP) method was used to estimate the permeability values of acyclovir and metoprolol across different intestinal segments (jejunum, ileum and colon). Permeability coefficient (Peff ) of acyclovir was determined in the absence and presence of a permeation enhancer such as dimethyl β-cyclodextrin (DM-β-CD), sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), sodium caprate (Cap-Na) and chitosan chloride. All enhancers increased the permeability of paracellularly transported acyclovir. Although Cap-Na has the highest permeability-enhancing effect in all segments, permeation-enhancing effect of chitosan and SLS was only significant in ileum. On the other hand, DM-β-CD slightly decreased the permeability in all intestinal segments. These findings have potential implication concerning the enhancement of absorption of paracellularly transported compounds with limited oral bioavailability. In the case of acyclovir, Cap-Na either alone or in combination with SLS or chitosan has the potential to improve its absorption and bioavailability and has yet to be explored. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  16. Cell permeability beyond the rule of 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsson, Pär; Doak, Bradley C; Over, Björn; Kihlberg, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Drug discovery for difficult targets that have large and flat binding sites is often better suited to compounds beyond the "rule of 5" (bRo5). However, such compounds carry higher pharmacokinetic risks, such as low solubility and permeability, and increased efflux and metabolism. Interestingly, recent drug approvals and studies suggest that cell permeable and orally bioavailable drugs can be discovered far into bRo5 space. Tactics such as reduction or shielding of polarity by N-methylation, bulky side chains and intramolecular hydrogen bonds may be used to increase cell permeability in this space, but often results in decreased solubility. Conformationally flexible compounds can, however, combine high permeability and solubility, properties that are keys for cell permeability and intestinal absorption. Recent developments in computational conformational analysis will aid design of such compounds and hence prediction of cell permeability. Transporter mediated efflux occurs for most investigated drugs in bRo5 space, however it is commonly overcome by high local intestinal concentrations on oral administration. In contrast, there is little data to support significant impact of transporter-mediated intestinal absorption in bRo5 space. Current knowledge of compound properties that govern transporter effects of bRo5 drugs is limited and requires further fundamental and comprehensive studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Bovine Colostrum Supplementation During Running Training Increases Intestinal Permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant D. Brinkworth

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Endurance exercise training can increase intestinal permeability which may contribute to the development of gastrointestinal symptoms in some athletes. Bovine colostrum (BC supplementation reduces intestinal permeability induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This study aimed to determine whether BC could also reduce intestinal permeability induced by endurance exercise. Thirty healthy adult males (25.0 ± 4.7 yr; mean ± SD completed eight weeks of running three times per week for 45 minutes at their lactate threshold while consuming 60 g/day of BC, whey protein (WP or control (CON. Intestinal permeability was assessed at baseline and after eight weeks by measuring the ratio of urinary lactulose (L and rhamnose (R excretion. After eight weeks the L/R ratio increased significantly more in volunteers consuming BC (251 ± 140% compared with WP (21 ± 35%, P < 0.05 and CON (−7 ± 13%, P < 0.02. The increase in intestinal permeability with BC may have been due to BC inducing greater leakiness of tight junctions between enterocytes or by increasing macromolecular transport as it does in neonatal gut. Further research should investigate the potential for BC to increase intestinal macromolecular transport in adults.

  18. Cell-Permeable Parkin Proteins Suppress Parkinson Disease-Associated Phenotypes in Cultured Cells and Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Tam; Kim, Jaetaek; Ruley, H. Earl; Jo, Daewoong

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder of complex etiology characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons, particularly in the substantia nigra. Parkin, a tightly regulated E3 ubiquitin ligase, promotes the survival of dopaminergic neurons in both PD and Parkinsonian syndromes induced by acute exposures to neurotoxic agents. The present study assessed the potential of cell-permeable parkin (CP-Parkin) as a neuroprotective agent. Cellular uptake and tissue penetration of recombinant, enzymatically active parkin was markedly enhanced by the addition of a hydrophobic macromolecule transduction domain (MTD). The resulting CP-Parkin proteins (HPM13 and PM10) suppressed dopaminergic neuronal toxicity in cells and mice exposed to 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDH) and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). These included enhanced survival and dopamine expression in cultured CATH.a and SH-SY5Y neuronal cells; and protection against MPTP-induced damage in mice, notably preservation of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells with enhanced dopamine expression in the striatum and midbrain, and preservation of gross motor function. These results demonstrate that CP-Parkin proteins can compensate for intrinsic limitations in the parkin response and provide a therapeutic strategy to augment parkin activity in vivo. PMID:25019626

  19. Suitability of Torrent Permeability Tester to measure air-permeability of covercrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, C.; Gonzales-Gasca, C. [Institute of Construction Sciences ' Eduardo Torroja' , Madrid (Spain); Torrent, R. [Portland Cement Institute, (Argentina)

    2000-07-01

    Suitability of the Torrent Permeability Tester (TPT) to measure the permeability of covercrete to air, both in the laboratory and the field, is investigated, and test results obtained in laboratory studies are discussed. The tests performed included the determination of air permeability (TPT method), oxygen permeability (Cembureau method) and capillary suction, rapid chloride permeability test (ASTM C 1202), as well as a one-year carbonation depth test. Concrete specimens of various compositions and curing regimes were used in the tests; the gas-permeability tests were repeated on the same specimens after 28 days, than again at 6 months and 12 months. Test results confirmed the suitability of the TPT as a useful tool in the characterization of the quality the of concrete cover. It was found to be sensitive to changes in concrete quality; repeatable for sensitive properties such as gas permeability ; also, it was found to correlate well with other durability-related properties. 10 refs., 8 tabs., 8 figs.

  20. Dopamine enhances duodenal epithelial permeability via the dopamine D5 receptor in rodent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X-Y; Zhang, D-N; Wang, Y-A; Fan, R-F; Hong, F; Zhang, Y; Li, Y; Zhu, J-X

    2017-05-01

    The intestinal barrier is made up of epithelial cells and intercellular junctional complexes to regulate epithelial ion transport and permeability. Dopamine (DA) is able to promote duodenal epithelial ion transport through D1-like receptors, which includes subtypes of D 1 (D 1 R) and D 5 (D 5 R), but whether D1-like receptors influence the duodenal permeability is unclear. FITC-dextran permeability, short-circuit current (I SC ), Western blot, immunohistochemistry and ELISA were used in human D 5 R transgenic mice and hyperendogenous enteric DA (HEnD) rats in this study. Dopamine induced a downward deflection in I SC and an increase in FITC-dextran permeability of control rat duodenum, which were inhibited by the D1-like receptor antagonist, SCH-23390. However, DA decreased duodenal transepithelial resistance (TER), an effect also reversed by SCH-23390. A strong immunofluorescence signal for D 5 R, but not D 1 R, was observed in the duodenum of control rat. In human D 5 R knock-in transgenic mice, duodenal mucosa displayed an increased basal I SC with high FITC-dextran permeability and decreased TER with a lowered expression of tight junction proteins, suggesting attenuated duodenal barrier function in these transgenic mice. D 5 R knock-down transgenic mice manifested a decreased basal I SC with lowered FITC-dextran permeability. Moreover, an increased FITC-dextran permeability combined with decreased TER and tight junction protein expression in duodenal mucosa were also observed in HEnD rats. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that DA enhances duodenal permeability of control rat via D 5 R, which provides new experimental and theoretical evidence for the influence of DA on duodenal epithelial barrier function. © 2016 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Radiation Effects on the Cytoskeleton of Endothelial Cells and Endothelial Monolayer Permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabrys, Dorota; Greco, Olga; Patel, Gaurang; Prise, Kevin M.; Tozer, Gillian M.; Kanthou, Chryso

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of radiation on the endothelial cytoskeleton and endothelial monolayer permeability and to evaluate associated signaling pathways, which could reveal potential mechanisms of known vascular effects of radiation. Methods and Materials: Cultured endothelial cells were X-ray irradiated, and actin filaments, microtubules, intermediate filaments, and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin junctions were examined by immunofluorescence. Permeability was determined by the passage of fluorescent dextran through cell monolayers. Signal transduction pathways were analyzed using RhoA, Rho kinase, and stress-activated protein kinase-p38 (SAPK2/p38) inhibitors by guanosine triphosphate-RhoA activation assay and transfection with RhoAT19N. The levels of junction protein expression and phosphorylation of myosin light chain and SAPK2/p38 were assessed by Western blotting. The radiation effects on cell death were verified by clonogenic assays. Results: Radiation induced rapid and persistent actin stress fiber formation and redistribution of VE-cadherin junctions in microvascular, but not umbilical vein endothelial cells, and microtubules and intermediate filaments remained unaffected. Radiation also caused a rapid and persistent increase in microvascular permeability. RhoA-guanosine triphosphatase and Rho kinase were activated by radiation and caused phosphorylation of downstream myosin light chain and the observed cytoskeletal and permeability changes. SAPK2/p38 was activated by radiation but did not influence either the cytoskeleton or permeability. Conclusion: This study is the first to show rapid activation of the RhoA/Rho kinase by radiation in endothelial cells and has demonstrated a link between this pathway and cytoskeletal remodeling and permeability. The results also suggest that the RhoA pathway might be a useful target for modulating the permeability and other effects of radiation for therapeutic gain

  2. Dietary protein considerations to support active aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Benjamin T; Cermak, Naomi M; van Loon, Luc J C

    2014-11-01

    Given our rapidly aging world-wide population, the loss of skeletal muscle mass with healthy aging (sarcopenia) represents an important societal and public health concern. Maintaining or adopting an active lifestyle alleviates age-related muscle loss to a certain extent. Over time, even small losses of muscle tissue can hinder the ability to maintain an active lifestyle and, as such, contribute to the development of frailty and metabolic disease. Considerable research focus has addressed the application of dietary protein supplementation to support exercise-induced gains in muscle mass in younger individuals. In contrast, the role of dietary protein in supporting the maintenance (or gain) of skeletal muscle mass in active older persons has received less attention. Older individuals display a blunted muscle protein synthetic response to dietary protein ingestion. However, this reduced anabolic response can largely be overcome when physical activity is performed in close temporal proximity to protein consumption. Moreover, recent evidence has helped elucidate the optimal type and amount of dietary protein that should be ingested by the older adult throughout the day in order to maximize the skeletal muscle adaptive response to physical activity. Evidence demonstrates that when these principles are adhered to, muscle maintenance or hypertrophy over prolonged periods can be further augmented in active older persons. The present review outlines the current understanding of the role that dietary protein occupies in the lifestyle of active older adults as a means to increase skeletal muscle mass, strength and function, and thus support healthier aging.

  3. Actin-interacting protein 1 controls assembly and permeability of intestinal epithelial apical junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Susana; Baranwal, Somesh; Ivanov, Andrei I

    2015-05-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and tight junctions (TJs) are crucial regulators of the integrity and restitution of the intestinal epithelial barrier. The structure and function of epithelial junctions depend on their association with the cortical actin cytoskeleton that, in polarized epithelial cells, is represented by a prominent perijunctional actomyosin belt. The assembly and stability of the perijunctional cytoskeleton is controlled by constant turnover (disassembly and reassembly) of actin filaments. Actin-interacting protein (Aip) 1 is an emerging regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, playing a critical role in filament disassembly. In this study, we examined the roles of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of AJs and TJs in human intestinal epithelium. Aip1 was enriched at apical junctions in polarized human intestinal epithelial cells and normal mouse colonic mucosa. Knockdown of Aip1 by RNA interference increased the paracellular permeability of epithelial cell monolayers, decreased recruitment of AJ/TJ proteins to steady-state intercellular contacts, and attenuated junctional reassembly in a calcium-switch model. The observed defects of AJ/TJ structure and functions were accompanied by abnormal organization and dynamics of the perijunctional F-actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, loss of Aip1 impaired the apico-basal polarity of intestinal epithelial cell monolayers and inhibited formation of polarized epithelial cysts in 3-D Matrigel. Our findings demonstrate a previously unanticipated role of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of intestinal epithelial junctions and early steps of epithelial morphogenesis. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Water permeability is a measure of severity in acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Nicola; Pfeifle, Viktoria A; Kym, Urs; Keck, Simone; Galati, Virginie; Holland-Cunz, Stefan; Gros, Stephanie J

    2017-12-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most common indication for pediatric abdominal emergency surgery. Determination of the severity of appendicitis on clinical grounds is challenging. Complicated appendicitis presenting with perforation, abscess or diffuse peritonitis is not uncommon. The question remains why and when acute appendicitis progresses to perforation. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of water permeability on the severity of appendicitis. We show that AQP1 expression and water permeability in appendicitis correlate with the stage of inflammation and systemic infection parameters, leading eventually to perforation of the appendix. AQP1 is also expressed within the ganglia of the enteric nervous system and ganglia count increases with inflammation. Severity of appendicitis can be correlated with water permeability measured by AQP1 protein expression and increase of ganglia count in a progressive manner. This introduces the question if regulation of water permeability can present novel curative or ameliorating therapeutic options.

  5. Bactericidal/Permeability-increasing protein fold-containing family member A1 in airway host protection and respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, Clemente J; Cohn, Lauren

    2015-05-01

    Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein fold-containing family member A1 (BPIFA1), formerly known as SPLUNC1, is one of the most abundant proteins in respiratory secretions and has been identified with increasing frequency in studies of pulmonary disease. Its expression is largely restricted to the respiratory tract, being highly concentrated in the upper airways and proximal trachea. BPIFA1 is highly responsive to airborne pathogens, allergens, and irritants. BPIFA1 actively participates in host protection through antimicrobial, surfactant, airway surface liquid regulation, and immunomodulatory properties. Its expression is modulated in multiple lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, respiratory malignancies, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. However, the role of BPIFA1 in pulmonary pathogenesis remains to be elucidated. This review highlights the versatile properties of BPIFA1 in antimicrobial protection and its roles as a sensor of environmental exposure and regulator of immune cell function. A greater understanding of the contribution of BPIFA1 to disease pathogenesis and activity may clarify if BPIFA1 is a biomarker and potential drug target in pulmonary disease.

  6. Effects of irradiation on the pulmonary hemodynamics and the pulmonary vascular permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkuda, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Shinkichi; Okada, Shinichiroh

    1982-01-01

    In 4 sheeps, base lines of hemodynamics and lymph dynamics were observed for 2 hours, and then 1,000 rad of 60 Co was irradiated to the inferior lobes of the lung. Pulmonary hemodynamics and lymph dynamics were continuously observed, and water and protein permeability of the irradiated pulmonary vessels was evaluated. In 4 control sheeps, no change in pulmonary hemodynamics and lymph dynamics was noted. In the irradiated group, there was no remarkable change in pulmonary hemodynamics for 6 to 8 hours after 60 Co irradiation. Pulmonary lymph flow began to increase 2 hours after irradiation to about 1.7 times the base line level after 4 hours. The increase in pulmonary lymph flow was accompanied by decrease in plasma protein concentration and increase in protein concentration of the lung lymph, resulting in an apparent increase in the ratio of lymph/plasma protein concentration. Water and protein leak from the pulmonary vessels increased. A photomicroscopic observation revealed dilatation of the lymphatic vessels in the lung interstice and a mild pulmonary interstitial edema. Vascular damage, especially due to increased water and protein permeability of the lung capillary vessels, occurred immediately after 60 Co irradiation. (Ueda, J.)

  7. Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 Restores Gut Barrier Permeability in Chronically Low-Grade Inflamed Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Rebeca; Laval, Laure; Chain, Florian; Miquel, Sylvie; Natividad, Jane; Cherbuy, Claire; Sokol, Harry; Verdu, Elena F; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan; Bermudez-Humaran, Luis G; Smokvina, Tamara; Langella, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the efficacy of many probiotic strains in the management of gastrointestinal disorders associated with deregulated intestinal barrier function and/or structure. In particular, bifidobacteria have been studied for their efficacy to both prevent and treat a broad spectrum of animal and/or human gut disorders. The aim of the current work was thus to evaluate effects on intestinal barrier function of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494, a strain used in fermented dairy products. A chronic dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-induced low-grade inflammation model causing gut dysfunction in mice was used in order to study markers of inflammation, intestinal permeability, and immune function in the presence of the bacterial strain. In this chronic low-grade inflammation mice model several parameters pointed out the absence of an over active inflammation process. However, gut permeability, lymphocyte populations, and colonic cytokines were found to be altered. B. animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 was able to protect barrier functions by restoring intestinal permeability, colonic goblet cell populations, and cytokine levels. Furthermore, tight junction (TJ) proteins levels were also measured by qRT-PCR showing the ability of this strain to specifically normalize the level of several TJ proteins, in particular for claudin-4. Finally, B. lactis strain counterbalanced CD4(+) lymphocyte alterations in both spleen and mesenteric lymphoid nodes. It restores the Th1/Th2 ratio altered by the DNBS challenge (which locally augments CD4(+) Th1 cells) by increasing the Th2 response as measured by the increase in the production of major representative Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10). Altogether, these data suggest that B. animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 may efficiently prevent disorders associated with increased barrier permeability.

  8. The Effect of Excipients on the Permeability of BCS Class III Compounds and Implications for Biowaivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Alan; Hidalgo, Ismael J; Bode, Chris; Brown, William; Yazdanian, Mehran; Gonzalez, Mario A; Sagawa, Kazuko; Miller, Kevin; Jiang, Wenlei; Stippler, Erika S

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the FDA allows biowaivers for Class I (high solubility and high permeability) and Class III (high solubility and low permeability) compounds of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). Scientific evidence should be provided to support biowaivers for BCS Class I and Class III (high solubility and low permeability) compounds. Data on the effects of excipients on drug permeability are needed to demonstrate that commonly used excipients do not affect the permeability of BCS Class III compounds, which would support the application of biowaivers to Class III compounds. This study was designed to generate such data by assessing the permeability of four BCS Class III compounds and one Class I compound in the presence and absence of five commonly used excipients. The permeability of each of the compounds was assessed, at three to five concentrations, with each excipient in two different models: Caco-2 cell monolayers, and in situ rat intestinal perfusion. No substantial increases in the permeability of any of the compounds were observed in the presence of any of the tested excipients in either of the models, with the exception of disruption of Caco-2 cell monolayer integrity by sodium lauryl sulfate at 0.1 mg/ml and higher. The results suggest that the absorption of these four BCS Class III compounds would not be greatly affected by the tested excipients. This may have implications in supporting biowaivers for BCS Class III compounds in general.

  9. Zonulin, a newly discovered modulator of intestinal permeability, and its expression in coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, A; Not, T; Wang, W; Uzzau, S; Berti, I; Tommasini, A; Goldblum, S E

    2000-04-29

    We identified zonulin, a novel human protein analogue to the Vibrio cholerae derived Zonula occludens toxin, which induces tight junction disassembly and a subsequent increase in intestinal permeability in non-human primate intestinal epithelia. Zonulin expression was raised in intestinal tissues during the acute phase of coeliac disease, a clinical condition in which tight junctions are opened and permeability is increased.

  10. Bexarotene reduces blood-brain barrier permeability in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injured rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Xu

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 over-expression disrupts the blood-brain barrier (BBB in the ischemic brain. The retinoid X receptor agonist bexarotene suppresses MMP-9 expression in endothelial cells and displays neuroprotective effects. Therefore, we hypothesized that bexarotene may have a beneficial effect on I/R-induced BBB dysfunction.A total of 180 rats were randomized into three groups (n = 60 each: (i a sham-operation group, (ii a cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R group, and (iii an I/R+bexarotene group. Brain water content was measured by the dry wet weight method. BBB permeability was analyzed by Evans Blue staining and the magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent Omniscan. MMP-9 mRNA expression, protein expression, and activity were assessed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and gelatin zymography, respectively. Apolipoprotein E (apoE, claudin-5, and occludin expression were analyzed by Western blotting.After 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h post-I/R, several effects were observed with bexarotene administration: (i brain water content and BBB permeability were significantly reduced; (ii MMP-9 mRNA and protein expression as well as activity were significantly decreased; (iii claudin-5 and occludin expression were significantly increased; and (iv apoE expression was significantly increased.Bexarotene decreases BBB permeability in rats with cerebral I/R injury. This effect may be due in part to bexarotene's upregulation of apoE expression, which has been previously shown to reduce BBB permeability through suppressing MMP-9-mediated degradation of the tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin. This work offers insight to aid future development of therapeutic agents for cerebral I/R injury in human patients.

  11. Use of {gamma}-irradiation cross-linking to improve the water vapor permeability and the chemical stability of milk protein films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouattara, B.; Canh, L.T.; Vachon, C.; Mateescu, M.A.; Lacroix, M. E-mail: monique.lacroix@inrs-iaf.uquebec.ca

    2002-03-01

    {gamma}-irradiation was used to produce free-standing cross-linked milk proteins. Film forming solutions were prepared according to a method previously developed in our laboratory using calcium caseinate (cas) with various proportions of whey protein isolate (wpi) or whey protein concentrate (wpc). The following caseinate-whey protein (cas:wp) ratio were prepared: 100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, and 0:100. The WVP of the films was determined gravimetrically at 23 deg. C using a modified ASTM procedure. Molecular properties characterization was performed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). Results showed significant (p{<=}0.05) reduction of the WVP of protein films for the following formulations: cas:wpi or cas:wpc (100:0); cas:wpi (25:75); cas:wpc (25:75); and cas:wpc (0:100). Mixture of cas and wpi produced a synergistic effect. The strongest combined effect was obtained for cas:wpi (25:75) formulation with permeability values of 2.07 and 1.38 g mm/m{sup 2} d mm Hg for unirradiated and irradiated samples, respectively. {gamma}-irradiation also induced a substantial increase of high molecular weight protein components in film forming solutions. The predominant fraction was {>=}10x10{sup 6} Da for irradiated film forming solutions, compared to less than 0.2x10{sup 6} Da for native unirradiated solutions.

  12. Use of γ-irradiation cross-linking to improve the water vapor permeability and the chemical stability of milk protein films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouattara, B.; Canh, L.T.; Vachon, C.; Mateescu, M.A.; Lacroix, M.

    2002-01-01

    γ-irradiation was used to produce free-standing cross-linked milk proteins. Film forming solutions were prepared according to a method previously developed in our laboratory using calcium caseinate (cas) with various proportions of whey protein isolate (wpi) or whey protein concentrate (wpc). The following caseinate-whey protein (cas:wp) ratio were prepared: 100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, and 0:100. The WVP of the films was determined gravimetrically at 23 deg. C using a modified ASTM procedure. Molecular properties characterization was performed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). Results showed significant (p≤0.05) reduction of the WVP of protein films for the following formulations: cas:wpi or cas:wpc (100:0); cas:wpi (25:75); cas:wpc (25:75); and cas:wpc (0:100). Mixture of cas and wpi produced a synergistic effect. The strongest combined effect was obtained for cas:wpi (25:75) formulation with permeability values of 2.07 and 1.38 g mm/m 2 d mm Hg for unirradiated and irradiated samples, respectively. γ-irradiation also induced a substantial increase of high molecular weight protein components in film forming solutions. The predominant fraction was ≥10x10 6 Da for irradiated film forming solutions, compared to less than 0.2x10 6 Da for native unirradiated solutions

  13. Notional Permeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kik, R.; Van den Bos, J.P.; Maertens, J.; Verhagen, H.J.; Van der Meer, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Different layer design of a rock slope and under layers has a large effect on the strengths on the rock slope itself. In the stability formula developed of VAN DER MEER [1988] this effect is represented by the term Notional Permeability with symbol P. A more open, or permeable, structure underneath

  14. Polyethylene glycol versus dual sugar assay for gastrointestinal permeability analysis: is it time to choose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijck, Kim; Bessems, Babs Afm; van Eijk, Hans Mh; Buurman, Wim A; Dejong, Cornelis Hc; Lenaerts, Kaatje

    2012-01-01

    Increased intestinal permeability is an important measure of disease activity and prognosis. Currently, many permeability tests are available and no consensus has been reached as to which test is most suitable. The aim of this study was to compare urinary probe excretion and accuracy of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) assay and dual sugar assay in a double-blinded crossover study to evaluate probe excretion and the accuracy of both tests. Gastrointestinal permeability was measured in nine volunteers using PEG 400, PEG 1500, and PEG 3350 or lactulose-rhamnose. On 4 separate days, permeability was analyzed after oral intake of placebo or indomethacin, a drug known to increase intestinal permeability. Plasma intestinal fatty acid binding protein and calprotectin levels were determined to verify compromised intestinal integrity after indomethacin consumption. Urinary samples were collected at baseline, hourly up to 5 hours after probe intake, and between 5 and 24 hours. Urinary excretion of PEG and sugars was determined using high-pressure liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detection and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. Intake of indomethacin increased plasma intestinal fatty acid-binding protein and calprotectin levels, reflecting loss of intestinal integrity and inflammation. In this state of indomethacin-induced gastrointestinal compromise, urinary excretion of the three PEG probes and lactulose increased compared with placebo. Urinary PEG 400 excretion, the PEG 3350/PEG 400 ratio, and the lactulose/rhamnose ratio could accurately detect indomethacin-induced increases in gastrointestinal permeability, especially within 2 hours of probe intake. Hourly urinary excretion and diagnostic accuracy of PEG and sugar probes show high concordance for detection of indomethacin-induced increases in gastrointestinal permeability. This comparative study improves our knowledge of permeability analysis in man by providing a clear overview of both

  15. High-permeability criterion for BCS classification: segmental/pH dependent permeability considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Arik; Miller, Jonathan M; Hilfinger, John M; Yamashita, Shinji; Yu, Lawrence X; Lennernäs, Hans; Amidon, Gordon L

    2010-10-04

    The FDA classifies a drug substance as high-permeability when the fraction of dose absorbed (F(abs)) in humans is 90% or higher. This direct correlation between human permeability and F(abs) has been recently controversial, since the β-blocker sotalol showed high F(abs) (90%) and low Caco-2 permeability. The purpose of this study was to investigate the scientific basis for this disparity between permeability and F(abs). The effective permeabilities (P(eff)) of sotalol and metoprolol, a FDA standard for the low/high P(eff) class boundary, were investigated in the rat perfusion model, in three different intestinal segments with pHs corresponding to the physiological pH in each region: (1) proximal jejunum, pH 6.5; (2) mid small intestine, pH 7.0; and (3) distal ileum, pH 7.5. Both metoprolol and sotalol showed pH-dependent permeability, with higher P(eff) at higher pH. At any given pH, sotalol showed lower permeability than metoprolol; however, the permeability of sotalol determined at pH 7.5 exceeded/matched metoprolol's at pH 6.5 and 7.0, respectively. Physicochemical analysis based on ionization, pK(a) and partitioning of these drugs predicted the same trend and clarified the mechanism behind these observed results. Experimental octanol-buffer partitioning experiments confirmed the theoretical curves. An oral dose of metoprolol has been reported to be completely absorbed in the upper small intestine; it follows, hence, that metoprolol's P(eff) value at pH 7.5 is not likely physiologically relevant for an immediate release dosage form, and the permeability at pH 6.5 represents the actual relevant value for the low/high permeability class boundary. Although sotalol's permeability is low at pH 6.5 and 7.0, at pH 7.5 it exceeds/matches the threshold of metoprolol at pH 6.5 and 7.0, most likely responsible for its high F(abs). In conclusion, we have shown that, in fact, there is no discrepancy between P(eff) and F(abs) in sotalol's absorption; the data emphasize that

  16. Inflammasome Inhibition Suppresses Alveolar Cell Permeability Through Retention of Neuregulin-1 (NRG-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajanbabu Venugopal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neuregulin (NRG-1-human epidermal receptor (HER-2 signaling pathway is a key regulator of IL-1β-mediated pulmonary inflammation and epithelial permeability. The inflammasome is a newly discovered molecular platform required for caspase-1 activation and maturation of IL-1β. However, the role of the inflammasome in NRG-1-HER2 signaling-mediated alveolar cell permeability is unknown. Methods: The inflammasome was activated or inhibited in THP-1 cells; supernatants from these cells were added to A549 cells and human small airway epithelial cells (HSAEC. The protein expression of NRG-1 and phospho-HER2 (pHER2 were measured by Western blot analysis and epithelial permeability was measured using Lucifer yellow dye. Results: Results reveal that alveolar permeability in A549 cells and HSAEC is increased when treated with supernatants of inflammasome-activated THP-1 cells. Alveolar permeability is significantly suppressed when treated with supernatant of inflammasome-inhibited THP-1 cells. Inflammasome-mediated permeability is decreased when A549 cells and HSAEC are pretreated with IL-1β receptor antagonist (IL-1βRA. In addition, HER2 kinase inhibitor AG825 or NRG-1 inhibitor TAPI inhibits inflammasome-mediated permeability in A549 cells and HSAEC demonstrating critical roles of IL-1β, NRG-1, and HER2 in inflammasome-mediated alveolar permeability. Conclusion: These findings suggest that inflammasome-induced alveolar cell permeability is mediated by NRG-1/HER2 signaling through IL-1β regulation.

  17. Atrial natriuretic factor increases vascular permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockette, W.; Brennaman, B.

    1990-01-01

    An increase in central blood volume in microgravity may result in increased plasma levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). Since elevations in plasma ANF are found in clinical syndromes associated with edema, and since space motion sickness induced by microgravity is associated with an increase in central blood volume and facial edema, we determined whether ANF increases capillary permeability to plasma protein. Conscious, bilaterally nephrectomized male rats were infused with either saline, ANF + saline, or hexamethonium + saline over 2 h following bolus injections of 125I-albumin and 14C-dextran of similar molecular size. Blood pressure was monitored and serial determinations of hematocrits were made. Animals infused with 1.0 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 ANF had significantly higher hematocrits than animals infused with saline vehicle. Infusion of ANF increased the extravasation of 125I-albumin, but not 14C-dextran from the intravascular compartment. ANF also induced a depressor response in rats, but the change in blood pressure did not account for changes in capillary permeability to albumin; similar depressor responses induced by hexamethonium were not accompanied by increased extravasation of albumin from the intravascular compartment. ANF may decrease plasma volume by increasing permeability to albumin, and this effect of ANF may account for some of the signs and symptoms of space motion sickness

  18. The Effect of Excipients on the Permeability of BCS Class III Compounds and Implications for Biowaivers

    OpenAIRE

    Parr, Alan; Hidalgo, Ismael J.; Bode, Chris; Brown, William; Yazdanian, Mehran; Gonzalez, Mario A.; Sagawa, Kazuko; Miller, Kevin; Jiang, Wenlei; Stippler, Erika S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Currently, the FDA allows biowaivers for Class I (high solubility and high permeability) and Class III (high solubility and low permeability) compounds of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). Scientific evidence should be provided to support biowaivers for BCS Class I and Class III (high solubility and low permeability) compounds. Methods Data on the effects of excipients on drug permeability are needed to demonstrate that commonly used excipients do not affect the permea...

  19. Permeability measuremens of brazilian Eucalyptus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Rogério da Silva

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The permeability of Brazilian Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus citriodora wood was measured in a custom build gas analysis chamber in order to determine which species could be successfully treated with preservatives. Liquid permeability was tested using an emulsion of Neen oil and a control of distillated water. Air was used to test the gas phase permeability. For both Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus citriodora, the longitudinal permeability of gas was shown to be about twice as great as the liquid phase permeability. No radial permeability was observed for either wood. The permeability of air and water through the sapwood of Eucalyptus grandis was greater than that through the sapwood of Eucalyptus citriodora. The permeability of neen oil preservative through the sapwood of Eucalyptus grandis was also greater than through the sapwood of E. Citradora, but the difference was not statistically significant. Scanning Electron Microscopy images showed that the distribution and obstruction in the vessels could be correlated with observed permeability properties. Irrespective of the causes of differences in permeability between the species, the fluid phase flux through the sapwood of both species was significant, indicating that both Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus citriodora could be successfully treated with wood preservative.

  20. Intestinal Permeability: The Basics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingvar Bjarnason

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors review some of the more fundamental principles underlying the noninvasive assessment of intestinal permeability in humans, the choice of test markers and their analyses, and the practical aspects of test dose composition and how these can be changed to allow the specific assessment of regional permeability changes and other intestinal functions. The implications of increased intestinal permeability in the pathogenesis of human disease is discussed in relation to findings in patients with Crohn’s disease. A common feature of increased intestinal permeability is the development of a low grade enteropathy, and while quantitatively similar changes may be found in Crohn’s disease these seem to predict relapse of disease. Moreover, factors associated with relapse of Crohn’s disease have in common an action to increase intestinal permeability. While increased intestinal permeability does not seem to be important in the etiology of Crohn’s disease it may be a central mechanism in the clinical relapse of disease.

  1. Gyroid Nanoporous Membranes with Tunable Permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Li; Schulte, Lars; Clausen, Lydia D.

    2011-01-01

    -linked 1,2-polybutadiene (1,2-PB) membranes with uniform pores that, if needed, can be rendered hydrophilic. The gyroid porosity has the advantage of isotropic percolation with no need for structure prealignment. Closed (skin) or opened (nonskin) outer surface can be simply realized by altering...... the effective diffusion coefficients of a series of antibiotics, proteins, and other biomolecules; solute permeation is discussed in terms of hindered diffusion. The combination of uniform bulk morphology, isotropically percolating porosity, controlled surface chemistry, and tunable permeability is distinctive...

  2. Factors Determining the Oxygen Permeability of Biological Membranes: Oxygen Transport Across Eye Lens Fiber-Cell Plasma Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subczynski, Witold Karol; Widomska, Justyna; Mainali, Laxman

    2017-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-label oximetry allows the oxygen permeability coefficient to be evaluated across homogeneous lipid bilayer membranes and, in some cases, across coexisting membrane domains without their physical separation. The most pronounced effect on oxygen permeability is observed for cholesterol, which additionally induces the formation of membrane domains. In intact biological membranes, integral proteins induce the formation of boundary and trapped lipid domains with a low oxygen permeability. The effective oxygen permeability coefficient across the intact biological membrane is affected not only by the oxygen permeability coefficients evaluated for each lipid domain but also by the surface area occupied by these domains in the membrane. All these factors observed in fiber cell plasma membranes of clear human eye lenses are reviewed here.

  3. The fraction dose absorbed, in humans, and high jejunal human permeability relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Arik; Lennernäs, Hans; Amidon, Gordon L

    2012-06-04

    The drug intestinal permeability (P(eff)) measure has been widely used as one of the main factors governing both the rate and/or extent of drug absorption (F(abs)) in humans following oral administration. In this communication we emphasize the complexity behind and the care that must be taken with this in vivo P(eff) measurement. Intestinal permeability, considering the whole of the human intestine, is more complex than generally recognized, and this can lead to misjudgment regarding F(abs) and P(eff) in various settings, e.g. drug discovery, formulation design, drug development and regulation. Setting the adequate standard for the low/high permeability class boundary, the different experimental methods for the permeability measurement, and segmental-dependent permeability throughout the human intestine due to different mechanisms are some of the main points that are discussed. Overall, the use of jejunal P(eff) as a surrogate for extent of absorption is sound and scientifically justified; a compound with high jejunal P(eff) will have high F(abs), eliminating the risk for misclassification as a BCS class I drug. Much more care should be taken, however, when jejunal P(eff) does not support a high-permeability classification; a thorough examination may reveal high-permeability after all, attributable to e.g. segmental-dependent permeability due to degree of ionization or transporter expression. In this situation, the use of multiple permeability experimental methods, including the use of metabolism, which except for luminal degradation requires absorption, is prudent and encouraged.

  4. AFM characterization of protein net formation on a fibrous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assis O.B.G.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Lysozyme protein net is set on a glass fiber support using the self-assembly technique. Enzymatic film formation is followed by surface imaging via atomic force microscopy (AFM. Change in roughness as a function of deposition time is used as an indirect indicator of film formation. The objective was to form a protein film that would have no effect on the permeability of the medium, aiming at its application as a bioactive membrane or reactor suitable for bacteria and chemical interactions in aqueous media.

  5. The long noncoding RNA TUG1 regulates blood-tumor barrier permeability by targeting miR-144.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Heng; Xue, Yixue; Wang, Ping; Wang, Zhenhua; Li, Zhen; Hu, Yi; Li, Zhiqing; Shang, Xiuli; Liu, Yunhui

    2015-08-14

    Blood-tumor barrier (BTB) limits the delivery of chemotherapeutic agent to brain tumor tissues. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to play critical regulatory roles in various biologic processes of tumors. However, the role of lncRNAs in BTB permeability is unclear. LncRNA TUG1 (taurine upregulated gene 1) was highly expressed in glioma vascular endothelial cells from glioma tissues. It also upregulated in glioma co-cultured endothelial cells (GEC) from BTB model in vitro. Knockdown of TUG1 increased BTB permeability, and meanwhile down-regulated the expression of the tight junction proteins ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5. Both bioinformatics and luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that TUG1 influenced BTB permeability via binding to miR-144. Furthermore, Knockdown of TUG1 also down-regulated Heat shock transcription factor 2 (HSF2), a transcription factor of the heat shock transcription factor family, which was defined as a direct and functional downstream target of miR-144. HSF2 up-regulated the promoter activities and interacted with the promoters of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5 in GECs. In conclusion, our results indicate that knockdown of TUG1 increased BTB permeability via binding to miR-144 and then reducing EC tight junction protein expression by targeting HSF2. Thus, TUG1 may represent a useful future therapeutic target for enhancing BTB permeability.

  6. Intestinal permeability study of minoxidil: assessment of minoxidil as a high permeability reference drug for biopharmaceutics classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Makoto; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Zur, Moran; Dahan, Arik; Amidon, Gordon L

    2015-01-05

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate minoxidil as a high permeability reference drug for Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). The permeability of minoxidil was determined in in situ intestinal perfusion studies in rodents and permeability studies across Caco-2 cell monolayers. The permeability of minoxidil was compared with that of metoprolol, an FDA reference drug for BCS classification. In rat perfusion studies, the permeability of minoxidil was somewhat higher than that of metoprolol in the jejunum, while minoxidil showed lower permeability than metoprolol in the ileum. The permeability of minoxidil was independent of intestinal segment, while the permeability of metoprolol was region-dependent. Similarly, in mouse perfusion study, the jejunal permeability of minoxidil was 2.5-fold higher than that of metoprolol. Minoxidil and metoprolol showed similar permeability in Caco-2 study at apical pH of 6.5 and basolateral pH of 7.4. The permeability of minoxidil was independent of pH, while metoprolol showed pH-dependent transport in Caco-2 study. Minoxidil exhibited similar permeability in the absorptive direction (AP-BL) in comparison with secretory direction (BL-AP), while metoprolol had higher efflux ratio (ER > 2) at apical pH of 6.5 and basolateral pH of 7.4. No concentration-dependent transport was observed for either minoxidil or metoprolol transport in Caco-2 study. Verapamil did not alter the transport of either compounds across Caco-2 cell monolayers. The permeability of minoxidil was independent of both pH and intestinal segment in intestinal perfusion studies and Caco-2 studies. Caco-2 studies also showed no involvement of carrier mediated transport in the absorption process of minoxidil. These results suggest that minoxidil may be an acceptable reference drug for BCS high permeability classification. However, minoxidil exhibited higher jejunal permeability than metoprolol and thus to use minoxidil as a reference drug would raise the

  7. Polyethylene glycol versus dual sugar assay for gastrointestinal permeability analysis: is it time to choose?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Wijck K

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Kim van Wijck,1,2 Babs AFM Bessems,2 Hans MH van Eijk,2 Wim A Buurman,2 Cornelis HC Dejong,1,2 Kaatje Lenaerts1,21Top Institute Food and Nutrition, Wageningen, The Netherlands; 2Department of Surgery, NUTRIM School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, NetherlandsBackground: Increased intestinal permeability is an important measure of disease activity and prognosis. Currently, many permeability tests are available and no consensus has been reached as to which test is most suitable. The aim of this study was to compare urinary probe excretion and accuracy of a polyethylene glycol (PEG assay and dual sugar assay in a double-blinded crossover study to evaluate probe excretion and the accuracy of both tests.Methods: Gastrointestinal permeability was measured in nine volunteers using PEG 400, PEG 1500, and PEG 3350 or lactulose-rhamnose. On 4 separate days, permeability was analyzed after oral intake of placebo or indomethacin, a drug known to increase intestinal permeability. Plasma intestinal fatty acid binding protein and calprotectin levels were determined to verify compromised intestinal integrity after indomethacin consumption. Urinary samples were collected at baseline, hourly up to 5 hours after probe intake, and between 5 and 24 hours. Urinary excretion of PEG and sugars was determined using high-pressure liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detection and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively.Results: Intake of indomethacin increased plasma intestinal fatty acid-binding protein and calprotectin levels, reflecting loss of intestinal integrity and inflammation. In this state of indomethacin-induced gastrointestinal compromise, urinary excretion of the three PEG probes and lactulose increased compared with placebo. Urinary PEG 400 excretion, the PEG 3350/PEG 400 ratio, and the lactulose/rhamnose ratio could accurately detect indomethacin-induced increases in

  8. Ethamsylate and lung permeability in ventilated immature newborn rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, M; Sun, B; Robertson, B

    1994-01-01

    The leakage of proteins in the immature neonatal lung can reduce the effect of exogenous surfactant. The effect of ethamsylate, a more specific prostaglandin inhibitor than indomethacin and aspirin-like drugs, on alveolar albumin leak was studied in a group of 27 immature newborn rabbits (gestational age 27 days). A pilot study was carried out using 4 animals and low-dose ethamsylate (10 mg/kg). A second group of animals (n = 12) received at birth, by intravenous injection, ethamsylate (50 mg/kg) and 10% human albumin (7 ml/kg). Animals not receiving ethamsylate (n = 11) served as control group. After 30 min of artificial ventilation with standard tidal volume (10 ml/kg) the lungs were lavaged and the amount of human albumin in lung lavage fluid was determined by immunodiffusion. No statistically significant differences were found in lung-thorax compliance and vascular to alveolar albumin leak between ethamsylate-treated animals and controls (p > 0.5). However, there was a statistically significant negative correlation between protein leak and lung compliance (r = -0.41; p ethamsylate administration on neonatal lung permeability in the immature neonate confirming that lung permeability is inversely related to compliance.

  9. SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 and focal adhesion kinase protein interactions regulate pulmonary endothelium barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichger, Havovi; Braza, Julie; Duong, Huetran; Harrington, Elizabeth O

    2015-06-01

    Enhanced protein tyrosine phosphorylation is associated with changes in vascular permeability through formation and dissolution of adherens junctions and regulation of stress fiber formation. Inhibition of the protein tyrosine phosphorylase SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (SHP2) increases tyrosine phosphorylation of vascular endothelial cadherin and β-catenin, resulting in disruption of the endothelial monolayer and edema formation in the pulmonary endothelium. Vascular permeability is a hallmark of acute lung injury (ALI); thus, enhanced SHP2 activity offers potential therapeutic value for the pulmonary vasculature in diseases such as ALI, but this has not been characterized. To assess whether SHP2 activity mediates protection against edema in the endothelium, we assessed the effect of molecular activation of SHP2 on lung endothelial barrier function in response to the edemagenic agents LPS and thrombin. Both LPS and thrombin reduced SHP2 activity, correlated with decreased focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation (Y(397) and Y(925)) and diminished SHP2 protein-protein associations with FAK. Overexpression of constitutively active SHP2 (SHP2(D61A)) enhanced baseline endothelial monolayer resistance and completely blocked LPS- and thrombin-induced permeability in vitro and significantly blunted pulmonary edema formation induced by either endotoxin (LPS) or Pseudomonas aeruginosa exposure in vivo. Chemical inhibition of FAK decreased SHP2 protein-protein interactions with FAK concomitant with increased permeability; however, overexpression of SHP2(D61A) rescued the endothelium and maintained FAK activity and FAK-SHP2 protein interactions. Our data suggest that SHP2 activation offers the pulmonary endothelium protection against barrier permeability mediators downstream of the FAK signaling pathway. We postulate that further studies into the promotion of SHP2 activation in the pulmonary endothelium may offer a therapeutic approach for patients

  10. Sub-core permeability and relative permeability characterization with Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahasky, C.; Benson, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    This study utilizes preclinical micro-Positron Emission Tomography (PET) to image and quantify the transport behavior of pulses of a conservative aqueous radiotracer injected during single and multiphase flow experiments in a Berea sandstone core with axial parallel bedding heterogeneity. The core is discretized into streamtubes, and using the micro-PET data, expressions are derived from spatial moment analysis for calculating sub-core scale tracer flux and pore water velocity. Using the flux and velocity data, it is then possible to calculate porosity and saturation from volumetric flux balance, and calculate permeability and water relative permeability from Darcy's law. Full 3D simulations are then constructed based on this core characterization. Simulation results are compared with experimental results in order to test the assumptions of the simple streamtube model. Errors and limitations of this analysis will be discussed. These new methods of imaging and sub-core permeability and relative permeability measurements enable experimental quantification of transport behavior across scales.

  11. Permeability prediction in chalks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Prasad, Manika

    2011-01-01

    The velocity of elastic waves is the primary datum available for acquiring information about subsurface characteristics such as lithology and porosity. Cheap and quick (spatial coverage, ease of measurement) information of permeability can be achieved, if sonic velocity is used for permeability p...... significantly using the effective specific surface as the fluid-flow concept. The FZI unit is appropriate for highly permeable sedimentary rocks such as sandstones and limestones that have small surface areas....

  12. Tumor necrosis factor alpha increases epithelial barrier permeability by disrupting tight junctions in Caco-2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Cui

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α on intestinal epithelial cell permeability and the expression of tight junction proteins. Caco-2 cells were plated onto Transwell® microporous filters and treated with TNF-α (10 or 100 ng/mL for 0, 4, 8, 16, or 24 h. The transepithelial electrical resistance and the mucosal-to-serosal flux rates of the established paracellular marker Lucifer yellow were measured in filter-grown monolayers of Caco-2 intestinal cells. The localization and expression of the tight junction protein occludin were detected by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis, respectively. SYBR-Green-based real-time PCR was used to measure the expression of occludin mRNA. TNF-α treatment produced concentration- and time-dependent decreases in Caco-2 transepithelial resistance and increases in transepithelial permeability to the paracellular marker Lucifer yellow. Western blot results indicated that TNF-α decreased the expression of phosphorylated occludin in detergent-insoluble fractions but did not affect the expression of non-phosphorylated occludin protein. Real-time RT-PCR data showed that TNF-α did not affect the expression of occludin mRNA. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TNF-α increases Caco-2 monolayer permeability, decreases occludin protein expression and disturbs intercellular junctions.

  13. Covalent attachment of proteins to solid supports and surfaces via Sortase-mediated ligation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilyan Chan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is growing interest in the attachment of proteins to solid supports for the development of supported catalysts, affinity matrices, and micro devices as well as for the development of planar and bead based protein arrays for multiplexed assays of protein concentration, interactions, and activity. A critical requirement for these applications is the generation of a stable linkage between the solid support and the immobilized, but still functional, protein. METHODOLOGY: Solid supports including crosslinked polymer beads, beaded agarose, and planar glass surfaces, were modified to present an oligoglycine motif to solution. A range of proteins were ligated to the various surfaces using the Sortase A enzyme of S. aureus. Reactions were carried out in aqueous buffer conditions at room temperature for times between one and twelve hours. CONCLUSIONS: The Sortase A transpeptidase of S. aureus provides a general, robust, and gentle approach to the selective covalent immobilization of proteins on three very different solid supports. The proteins remain functional and accessible to solution. Sortase mediated ligation is therefore a straightforward methodology for the preparation of solid supported enzymes and bead based assays, as well as the modification of planar surfaces for microanalytical devices and protein arrays.

  14. Radioisotope albumin flux measurement of microvascular lung permeability: an independent parameter in acute respiratory failure?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegerle, S.; Nitzsche, E.U.; Reinhardt, M.J.; Moser, E.; Benzing, A.; Geiger, K.; Schulte Moenting, J.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the extent to which single measurements of microvascular lung permeability may be relevant as an additional parameter in a heterogenous clinical patient collective with Acute Lung Injury (ALI) and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). Methods: In 36 patients with pneumonia (13), non pneumogenic sepsis (9) or trauma (14) meeting the consensus conference criteria of ALI or ARDS double-isotope protein flux measurements ( 51 Cr erythrocytes as intravascular tracer, Tc-99m human albumin as diffusible tracer) of microvascular lung permeability were performed using the Normalized Slope Index (NSI). The examination was to determine whether there is a relationship between the clinical diagnosis of ALI/ARDS, impaired permeability and clinical parameters, that is the underlying disease, oxygenation, duration of mechanical ventilation and mean pulmonary-artery pressure (PAP). Results: At the time of study, 25 patients presented with increased permeability (NSI > 1 x 10 -3 min -1 ) indicating an exudative stage of disease, and 11 patients with normal permeability. The permeability impairment correlated with the underlying disease (p > 0.05). With respect to survival, there was a negative correlation to PAP (p [de

  15. Arabidopsis annexin1 mediates the radical-activated plasma membrane Ca²+- and K+-permeable conductance in root cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laohavisit, Anuphon; Shang, Zhonglin; Rubio, Lourdes; Cuin, Tracey A; Véry, Anne-Aliénor; Wang, Aihua; Mortimer, Jennifer C; Macpherson, Neil; Coxon, Katy M; Battey, Nicholas H; Brownlee, Colin; Park, Ohkmae K; Sentenac, Hervé; Shabala, Sergey; Webb, Alex A R; Davies, Julia M

    2012-04-01

    Plant cell growth and stress signaling require Ca²⁺ influx through plasma membrane transport proteins that are regulated by reactive oxygen species. In root cell growth, adaptation to salinity stress, and stomatal closure, such proteins operate downstream of the plasma membrane NADPH oxidases that produce extracellular superoxide anion, a reactive oxygen species that is readily converted to extracellular hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals, OH•. In root cells, extracellular OH• activates a plasma membrane Ca²⁺-permeable conductance that permits Ca²⁺ influx. In Arabidopsis thaliana, distribution of this conductance resembles that of annexin1 (ANN1). Annexins are membrane binding proteins that can form Ca²⁺-permeable conductances in vitro. Here, the Arabidopsis loss-of-function mutant for annexin1 (Atann1) was found to lack the root hair and epidermal OH•-activated Ca²⁺- and K⁺-permeable conductance. This manifests in both impaired root cell growth and ability to elevate root cell cytosolic free Ca²⁺ in response to OH•. An OH•-activated Ca²⁺ conductance is reconstituted by recombinant ANN1 in planar lipid bilayers. ANN1 therefore presents as a novel Ca²⁺-permeable transporter providing a molecular link between reactive oxygen species and cytosolic Ca²⁺ in plants.

  16. Gliadin, zonulin and gut permeability: Effects on celiac and non-celiac intestinal mucosa and intestinal cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Sandro; El Asmar, Ramzi; Di Pierro, Mariarosaria; Grazia Clemente, Maria; Tripathi, Amit; Sapone, Anna; Thakar, Manjusha; Iacono, Giuseppe; Carroccio, Antonio; D'Agate, Cinzia; Not, Tarcisio; Zampini, Lucia; Catassi, Carlo; Fasano, Alessio

    2006-04-01

    Little is known about the interaction of gliadin with intestinal epithelial cells and the mechanism(s) through which gliadin crosses the intestinal epithelial barrier. We investigated whether gliadin has any immediate effect on zonulin release and signaling. Both ex vivo human small intestines and intestinal cell monolayers were exposed to gliadin, and zonulin release and changes in paracellular permeability were monitored in the presence and absence of zonulin antagonism. Zonulin binding, cytoskeletal rearrangement, and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) redistribution were evaluated by immunofluorescence microscopy. Tight junction occludin and ZO-1 gene expression was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). When exposed to gliadin, zonulin receptor-positive IEC6 and Caco2 cells released zonulin in the cell medium with subsequent zonulin binding to the cell surface, rearrangement of the cell cytoskeleton, loss of occludin-ZO1 protein-protein interaction, and increased monolayer permeability. Pretreatment with the zonulin antagonist FZI/0 blocked these changes without affecting zonulin release. When exposed to luminal gliadin, intestinal biopsies from celiac patients in remission expressed a sustained luminal zonulin release and increase in intestinal permeability that was blocked by FZI/0 pretreatment. Conversely, biopsies from non-celiac patients demonstrated a limited, transient zonulin release which was paralleled by an increase in intestinal permeability that never reached the level of permeability seen in celiac disease (CD) tissues. Chronic gliadin exposure caused down-regulation of both ZO-1 and occludin gene expression. Based on our results, we concluded that gliadin activates zonulin signaling irrespective of the genetic expression of autoimmunity, leading to increased intestinal permeability to macromolecules.

  17. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  18. The role of multidrug resistance protein (MRP-1) as an active efflux transporter on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingineni, Karthik; Belekar, Vilas; Tangadpalliwar, Sujit R; Garg, Prabha

    2017-05-01

    Drugs acting on central nervous system (CNS) may take longer duration to reach the market as these compounds have a higher attrition rate in clinical trials due to the complexity of the brain, side effects, and poor blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability compared to non-CNS-acting compounds. The roles of active efflux transporters with BBB are still unclear. The aim of the present work was to develop a predictive model for BBB permeability that includes the MRP-1 transporter, which is considered as an active efflux transporter. A support vector machine model was developed for the classification of MRP-1 substrates and non-substrates, which was validated with an external data set and Y-randomization method. An artificial neural network model has been developed to evaluate the role of MRP-1 on BBB permeation. A total of nine descriptors were selected, which included molecular weight, topological polar surface area, ClogP, number of hydrogen bond donors, number of hydrogen bond acceptors, number of rotatable bonds, P-gp, BCRP, and MRP-1 substrate probabilities for model development. We identified 5 molecules that fulfilled all criteria required for passive permeation of BBB, but they all have a low logBB value, which suggested that the molecules were effluxed by the MRP-1 transporter.

  19. Modeling and design of light powered biomimicry micropump utilizing transporter proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Sze, Tsun-Kay Jackie; Dutta, Prashanta

    2014-11-01

    The creation of compact micropumps to provide steady flow has been an on-going challenge in the field of microfluidics. We present a mathematical model for a micropump utilizing Bacteriorhodopsin and sugar transporter proteins. This micropump utilizes transporter proteins as method to drive fluid flow by converting light energy into chemical potential. The fluid flow through a microchannel is simulated using the Nernst-Planck, Navier-Stokes, and continuity equations. Numerical results show that the micropump is capable of generating usable pressure. Designing parameters influencing the performance of the micropump are investigated including membrane fraction, lipid proton permeability, illumination, and channel height. The results show that there is a substantial membrane fraction region at which fluid flow is maximized. The use of lipids with low membrane proton permeability allows illumination to be used as a method to turn the pump on and off. This capability allows the micropump to be activated and shut off remotely without bulky support equipment. This modeling work provides new insights on mechanisms potentially useful for fluidic pumping in self-sustained bio-mimic microfluidic pumps. This work is supported in part by the National Science Fundation Grant CBET-1250107.

  20. Electrokinetic effects and fluid permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2003-01-01

    Fluid permeability of porous media depends mainly on connectivity of the pore space and two physical parameters: porosity and a pertinent length-scale parameter. Electrical imaging methods typically establish connectivity and directly measure electrical conductivity, which can then often be related to porosity by Archie's law. When electrical phase measurements are made in addition to the amplitude measurements, information about the pertinent length scale can then be obtained. Since fluid permeability controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the subsurface, inexpensive maps of permeability could improve planning strategies for remediation efforts. Detailed knowledge of fluid permeability is also important for oil field exploitation, where knowledge of permeability distribution in three dimensions is a common requirement for petroleum reservoir simulation and analysis, as well as for estimates on the economics of recovery

  1. Regulation of Aquaporin Z osmotic permeability in ABA tri-block copolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyuan Xie

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins are transmembrane water channel proteins present in biological plasma membranes that aid in biological water filtration processes by transporting water molecules through at high speeds, while selectively blocking out other kinds of solutes. Aquaporin Z incorporated biomimetic membranes are envisaged to overcome the problem of high pressure needed, and holds great potential for use in water purification processes, giving high flux while keeping energy consumption low. The functionality of aquaporin Z in terms of osmotic permeability might be regulated by factors such as pH, temperature, crosslinking and hydrophobic thickness of the reconstituted bilayers. Hence, we reconstituted aquaporin Z into vesicles that are made from a series of amphiphilic block copolymers PMOXA-PDMS-PMOXAs with various hydrophobic molecular weights. The osmotic permeability of aquaporin Z in these vesicles was determined through a stopped-flow spectroscopy. In addition, the temperature and pH value of the vesicle solutions were adjusted within wide ranges to investigate the regulation of osmotic permeability of aquaporin Z through external conditions. Our results show that aquaporin Z permeability was enhanced by hydrophobic mismatch. In addition, the water filtration mechanism of aquaporin Z is significantly affected by the concentration of H+ and OH- ions.

  2. Pore Structure and Effective Permeability of Metallic Filters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejtmánek, Vladimír; Veselý, M.; Čapek, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 410, č. 2013 (2013), 012110 ISSN 1742-6588. [International Conference on Mathematical Modelling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE) /1./. Budapest, 03.09.2012-07.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/1206 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : stochastic reconstruction * porous media * effective permeability Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  3. Mechanical and permeability properties of milk protein films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília I.S. Folegatti

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Edible films present a potential alternative for replacing plastic films used for packaging in food industry. One of the major advantages is the environmental appeal of this technology, which produces no packaging waste. Some films made with other edible materials have found commercial applications, and many more are being developed using a myriad of food based components. This paper focuses on some important characteristics of films produced with sodium and calcium caseinates. The effects of caseinate type and concentration, plasticizer concentration and pH were studied. Major parameters investigated were solubility, tensile properties, water vapour and oxygen permeabilities. Caseinate films showed high solubility at pH range 6.0-8.0 and complete insolubility at pH 3.0 and 4.0. Calcium caseinate films had a higher tensile strength and a lower % elongation at break than sodium caseinate films. There was not significant difference in water vapour and oxygen permeabilities between sodium and calcium caseinate films.Filmes comestíveis representam uma alternativa potencial para a substituição de filmes plásticos .empregados em embalagem de alimentos. Uma de suas maiores vantagens relaciona-se com o problema de poluição ambiental por não gerar material residual. Filmes elaborados com outros materiais comestíveis não protéicos têm encontrado aplicação comercial e muitos outros ainda estão sendo pesquisados, usando uma grande variedade de componentes alimentares. Este trabalho estuda algumas características importantes dos filmes produzidos com caseinatos de sódio e de cálcio. Os efeitos do tipo e concentração de caseinato, concentração de plastificante e do pH são investigados. Os parâmetros pesquisados foram a solubilidade, propriedades de tração e permeabilidade a vapor de água e oxigênio. Filmes de caseinato apresentaram alta solubilidade na faixa de pH entre 6.0 e 8.0 e completa insolubilidade em pH 3.0 e 4.0. Maior

  4. Compact rock material gas permeability properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huanling, E-mail: whl_hm@163.com [Key Laboratory of Coastal Disaster and Defence, Ministry of Education, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); LML, University of Lille, Cite Scientifique, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Xu, Weiya; Zuo, Jing [Institutes of Geotechnical Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Natural compact rocks, such as sandstone, granite, and rock salt, are the main materials and geological environment for storing underground oil, gas, CO{sub 2,} shale gas, and radioactive waste because they have extremely low permeabilities and high mechanical strengths. Using the inert gas argon as the fluid medium, the stress-dependent permeability and porosity of monzonitic granite and granite gneiss from an underground oil storage depot were measured using a permeability and porosity measurement system. Based on the test results, models for describing the relationships among the permeability, porosity, and confining pressure of rock specimens were analyzed and are discussed. A power law is suggested to describe the relationship between the stress-dependent porosity and permeability; for the monzonitic granite and granite gneiss (for monzonitic granite (A-2), the initial porosity is approximately 4.05%, and the permeability is approximately 10{sup −19} m{sup 2}; for the granite gneiss (B-2), the initial porosity is approximately 7.09%, the permeability is approximately 10{sup −17} m{sup 2}; and the porosity-sensitivity exponents that link porosity and permeability are 0.98 and 3.11, respectively). Compared with moderate-porosity and high-porosity rocks, for which φ > 15%, low-porosity rock permeability has a relatively lower sensitivity to stress, but the porosity is more sensitive to stress, and different types of rocks show similar trends. From the test results, it can be inferred that the test rock specimens’ permeability evolution is related to the relative particle movements and microcrack closure.

  5. Permeability During Magma Expansion and Compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnermann, Helge. M.; Giachetti, Thomas; Fliedner, Céline; Nguyen, Chinh T.; Houghton, Bruce F.; Crozier, Joshua A.; Carey, Rebecca J.

    2017-12-01

    Plinian lapilli from the 1060 Common Era Glass Mountain rhyolitic eruption of Medicine Lake Volcano, California, were collected and analyzed for vesicularity and permeability. A subset of the samples were deformed at a temperature of 975°, under shear and normal stress, and postdeformation porosities and permeabilities were measured. Almost all undeformed samples fall within a narrow range of vesicularity (0.7-0.9), encompassing permeabilities between approximately 10-15 m2 and 10-10 m2. A percolation threshold of approximately 0.7 is required to fit the data by a power law, whereas a percolation threshold of approximately 0.5 is estimated by fitting connected and total vesicularity using percolation modeling. The Glass Mountain samples completely overlap with a range of explosively erupted silicic samples, and it remains unclear whether the erupting magmas became permeable at porosities of approximately 0.7 or at lower values. Sample deformation resulted in compaction and vesicle connectivity either increased or decreased. At small strains permeability of some samples increased, but at higher strains permeability decreased. Samples remain permeable down to vesicularities of less than 0.2, consistent with a potential hysteresis in permeability-porosity between expansion (vesiculation) and compaction (outgassing). We attribute this to retention of vesicle interconnectivity, albeit at reduced vesicle size, as well as bubble coalescence during shear deformation. We provide an equation that approximates the change in permeability during compaction. Based on a comparison with data from effusively erupted silicic samples, we propose that this equation can be used to model the change in permeability during compaction of effusively erupting magmas.

  6. Small GTP-Binding Protein Rac Is an Essential Mediator of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Induced Endothelial Fenestrations and Vascular Permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, A.; Cao, R.; Tritsaris, K.

    2003-01-01

    fenestrated endothelium, a feature linked with increased vascular permeability. A cell-permeable Rac antagonist (TAT-RacN17) converted VEGF-induced, leaky vascular plexuses into well-defined vascular networks. In addition, this Rac mutant blocked formation of VEGF-induced endothelial fenestrations...... in mediation of VEGF-induced vascular permeability but less so in neovascularization. This may have conceptual implications for applying Rac antagonists in treatment and prevention of VEGF-induced vascular leakage and edema in connection with ischemic disorders....

  7. Permeability and Microstructure of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed YSZ Electrolytes for SOFCs on Various Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Michael; Kesler, Olivera

    2012-12-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte coatings for solid oxide fuel cells were deposited by suspension plasma spraying using a range of spray conditions and a variety of substrates, including finely structured porous stainless steel disks and cathode layers on stainless steel supports. Electrolyte permeability values and trends were found to be highly dependent on which substrate was used. The most gas-tight electrolyte coatings were those deposited directly on the porous metal disks. With this substrate, permeability was reduced by increasing the torch power and reducing the stand-off distance to produce dense coating microstructures. On the substrates with cathodes, electrolyte permeability was reduced by increasing the stand-off distance, which reduced the formation of segmentation cracks and regions of aligned and concentrated porosity. The formation mechanisms of the various permeability-related coating features are discussed and strategies for reducing permeability are presented. The dependences of electrolyte deposition efficiency and surface roughness on process conditions and substrate properties are also presented.

  8. LIFEGUARD proteins support plant colonization by biotrophic powdery mildew fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Corina; Hückelhoven, Ralph; Eichmann, Ruth

    2013-09-01

    Pathogenic microbes manipulate eukaryotic cells during invasion and target plant proteins to achieve host susceptibility. BAX INHIBITOR-1 (BI-1) is an endoplasmic reticulum-resident cell death suppressor in plants and animals and is required for full susceptibility of barley to the barley powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei. LIFEGUARD (LFG) proteins resemble BI-1 proteins in terms of predicted membrane topology and cell-death-inhibiting function in metazoans, but display clear sequence-specific distinctions. This work shows that barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and Arabidopsis thaliana genomes harbour five LFG genes, HvLFGa-HvLFGe and AtLFG1-AtLFG5, whose functions are largely uncharacterized. As observed for HvBI-1, single-cell overexpression of HvLFGa supports penetration success of B. graminis f.sp. hordei into barley epidermal cells, while transient-induced gene silencing restricts it. In penetrated barley epidermal cells, a green fluorescent protein-tagged HvLFGa protein accumulates at the site of fungal entry, around fungal haustoria and in endosomal or vacuolar membranes. The data further suggest a role of LFG proteins in plant-powdery mildew interactions in both monocot and dicot plants, because stable overexpression or knockdown of AtLFG1 or AtLFG2 also support or delay development of the powdery mildew fungus Erysiphe cruciferarum on the respective Arabidopsis mutants. Together, this work has identified new modulators of plant-powdery mildew interactions, and the data further support functional similarities between BI-1 and LFG proteins beyond cell death regulation.

  9. The role of python eggshell permeability dynamics in a respiration-hydration trade-off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahlschmidt, Zachary R; Heulin, Benoit; DeNardo, Dale F

    2010-01-01

    Parental care is taxonomically widespread because it improves developmental conditions and thus fitness of offspring. Although relatively simplistic compared with parental behaviors of other taxa, python egg-brooding behavior exemplifies parental care because it mediates a trade-off between embryonic respiration and hydration. However, because egg brooding increases gas-exchange resistance between embryonic and nest environments and because female pythons do not adjust their brooding behavior in response to the increasing metabolic requirements of developing offspring, python egg brooding imposes hypoxic costs on embryos during the late stages of incubation. We conducted a series of experiments to determine whether eggshells coadapted with brooding behavior to minimize the negative effects of developmental hypoxia. We tested the hypotheses that python eggshells (1) increase permeability over time to accommodate increasing embryonic respiration and (2) exhibit permeability plasticity in response to chronic hypoxia. Over incubation, we serially measured the atomic and structural components of Children's python (Antaresia childreni) eggshells as well as in vivo and in vitro gas exchange across eggshells. In support of our first hypothesis, A. childreni eggshells exhibited a reduced fibrous layer, became more permeable, and facilitated greater gas exchange as incubation progressed. Our second hypothesis was not supported, as incubation O(2) concentration did not affect the shells' permeabilities to O(2) and H(2)O vapor. Our results suggest that python eggshell permeability changes during incubation but that the alterations over time are fixed and independent of environmental conditions. These findings are of broad evolutionary interest because they demonstrate that, even in relatively simple parental-care models, successful parent-offspring relationships depend on adjustments made by both the parent (i.e., egg-brooding behavioral shifts) and the offspring (i

  10. A cell-permeable dominant-negative survivin protein induces apoptosis and sensitizes prostate cancer cells to TNF-α therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanwar Jagat R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survivin is a member of the inhibitor-of-apoptosis (IAP family which is widely expressed by many different cancers. Overexpression of survivin is associated with drug resistance in cancer cells, and reduced patient survival after chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Agents that antagonize the function of survivin hold promise for treating many forms of cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a cell-permeable dominant-negative survivin protein would demonstrate bioactivity against prostate and cervical cancer cells grown in three dimensional culture. Results A dominant-negative survivin (C84A protein fused to the cell penetrating peptide poly-arginine (R9 was expressed in E. coli and purified by affinity chromatography. Western blot analysis revealed that dNSurR9-C84A penetrated into 3D-cultured HeLa and DU145 cancer cells, and a cell viability assay revealed it induced cancer cell death. It increased the activities of caspase-9 and caspase-3, and rendered DU145 cells sensitive to TNF-α via by a mechanism involving activation of caspase-8. Conclusions The results demonstrate that antagonism of survivin function triggers the apoptosis of prostate and cervical cancer cells grown in 3D culture. It renders cancer cells sensitive to the proapoptotic affects of TNF-α, suggesting that survivin blocks the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Combination of the biologically active dNSurR9-C84A protein or other survivin antagonists with TNF-α therapy warrants consideration as an approach to cancer therapy.

  11. Transcytosis Involvement in Transport System and Endothelial Permeability of Vascular Leakage during Dengue Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanettee Chanthick

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The major role of endothelial cells is to maintain homeostasis of vascular permeability and to preserve the integrity of vascular vessels to prevent fluid leakage. Properly functioning endothelial cells promote physiological balance and stability for blood circulation and fluid components. A monolayer of endothelial cells has the ability to regulate paracellular and transcellular pathways for transport proteins, solutes, and fluid. In addition to the paracellular pathway, the transcellular pathway is another route of endothelial permeability that mediates vascular permeability under physiologic conditions. The transcellular pathway was found to be associated with an assortment of disease pathogeneses. The clinical manifestation of severe dengue infection in humans is vascular leakage and hemorrhagic diatheses. This review explores and describes the transcellular pathway, which is an alternate route of vascular permeability during dengue infection that corresponds with the pathologic finding of intact tight junction. This pathway may be the route of albumin transport that causes endothelial dysfunction during dengue virus infection.

  12. Film Permeability Determination Using Static Permeability Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    The permeability of tarps to soil fumigant pesticides varies depending on the active ingredient chemical: dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), methyl bromide, chloropicrin, or other. The diffusion rate can be represented by the mass transfer coefficient (MTC).

  13. Permeability testing of biomaterial membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreesmann, L; Hajosch, R; Nuernberger, J Vaz; Schlosshauer, B [NMI Natural and Medical Sciences Institute at University Tuebingen, Markwiesenstr. 55, D-72770 Reutlingen (Germany); Ahlers, M [GELITA AG, Gammelsbacher Str. 2, D-69412 Eberbach (Germany)], E-mail: schlosshauer@nmi.de

    2008-09-01

    The permeability characteristics of biomaterials are critical parameters for a variety of implants. To analyse the permeability of membranes made from crosslinked ultrathin gelatin membranes and the transmigration of cells across the membranes, we combined three technical approaches: (1) a two-chamber-based permeability assay, (2) cell culturing with cytochemical analysis and (3) biochemical enzyme electrophoresis (zymography). Based on the diffusion of a coloured marker molecule in conjunction with photometric quantification, permeability data for a gelatin membrane were determined in the presence or absence of gelatin degrading fibroblasts. Cytochemical evaluation after cryosectioning of the membranes was used to ascertain whether fibroblasts had infiltrated the membrane inside. Zymography was used to investigate the potential release of proteases from fibroblasts, which are known to degrade collagen derivatives such as gelatin. Our data show that the diffusion equilibrium of a low molecular weight dye across the selected gelatin membrane is approached after about 6-8 h. Fibroblasts increase the permeability due to cavity formation in the membrane inside without penetrating the membrane for an extended time period (>21 days in vitro). Zymography indicates that cavity formation is most likely due to the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases. In summary, the combination of the depicted methods promises to facilitate a more rational development of biomaterials, because it provides a rapid means of determining permeability characteristics and bridges the gap between descriptive methodology and the mechanistic understanding of permeability alterations due to biological degradation.

  14. Permeability testing of biomaterial membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreesmann, L; Hajosch, R; Nuernberger, J Vaz; Schlosshauer, B; Ahlers, M

    2008-01-01

    The permeability characteristics of biomaterials are critical parameters for a variety of implants. To analyse the permeability of membranes made from crosslinked ultrathin gelatin membranes and the transmigration of cells across the membranes, we combined three technical approaches: (1) a two-chamber-based permeability assay, (2) cell culturing with cytochemical analysis and (3) biochemical enzyme electrophoresis (zymography). Based on the diffusion of a coloured marker molecule in conjunction with photometric quantification, permeability data for a gelatin membrane were determined in the presence or absence of gelatin degrading fibroblasts. Cytochemical evaluation after cryosectioning of the membranes was used to ascertain whether fibroblasts had infiltrated the membrane inside. Zymography was used to investigate the potential release of proteases from fibroblasts, which are known to degrade collagen derivatives such as gelatin. Our data show that the diffusion equilibrium of a low molecular weight dye across the selected gelatin membrane is approached after about 6-8 h. Fibroblasts increase the permeability due to cavity formation in the membrane inside without penetrating the membrane for an extended time period (>21 days in vitro). Zymography indicates that cavity formation is most likely due to the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases. In summary, the combination of the depicted methods promises to facilitate a more rational development of biomaterials, because it provides a rapid means of determining permeability characteristics and bridges the gap between descriptive methodology and the mechanistic understanding of permeability alterations due to biological degradation

  15. Acamprosate permeability across Caco-2 cell monolayer is predominantly paracellular

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonescu, Irina-Elena; Steffansen, Bente

    support area, thickness, and porosity). Results. The mean (± SD) Papp, exp of acamprosate and [14C]-mannitol across Caco-2 cell monolayers was measured as 0.19 ± 0.07 x 10-6 cm/s (n = 2, N = 3) and 0.35 ± 0.17 x 10-6 cm/s (n = 3, N = 4), respectively. Acamprosate PUBL and Pf were estimated as 200 - 3150 x...... role in acamprosate permeability, as only a very low fraction of acamprosate is in the neutral form at pH 7.4. The estimated acamprosate Ppara accounts for nearly 100% of the mathematically determined acamprosate Papp, calc (0.20 ± 0.10 x 10-6 cm/s), which matches well with the experimentally...... to the overall acamprosate apparent permeability. Methods. Acamprosate apparent permeability (Papp, exp) was determined across Caco-2 monolayers in the apical-to-basolateral transport direction using a buffer pH of 7.4 and several cell passages (N). Acamprosate concentrations were quantified by LC...

  16. Diagnosis of hydrostatic versus increased permeability pulmonary edema with chest radiographic criteria in critically ILL patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aberle, D.R.; Wiener-Kronish, J.P.; Webb, W.R.; Matthay, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    To evaluate chest radiographic criteria in distinguishing mechanisms of pulmonary edema, the authors studied 45 intubated patients with extensive edema. Edema type was clinically classified by the ratio of alveolar edema-to-plasma protein concentration in association with compatible clinical/hemodynamic parameters. Chest films were scored as hydrostatic, permeability, or mixed by three readers in blinded fashion based on cardiac size, vascular pedicle width, distribution of edema, effusions, peribronchial cuffs, septal lines, or air bronchograms. Overall radiographic score accurately identified 87% of patients with hydrostatic edema but only 60% of those with permeability edema. Edema distribution was most discriminating, with a patchy peripheral pattern relatively specific for clinical permeability edema. Hydrostatic features on chest radiograph were common with permeability edema, including effusions (36%), widened pedicle (56%), cuffs (72%), or septa (40%). The authors conclude that the chest radiograph is limited in distinguishing edema mechanism in the face of extensive pulmonary edema

  17. Permeability-Porosity Relationships of Subduction Zone Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, K.; Screaton, E.; Bekins, B.; Aiello, I.

    2008-12-01

    Permeability-porosity relationships for sediments from Northern Barbados, Costa Rica, Nankai, and Peru subduction zones were examined based on their sediment type and grain size distribution. Greater correlation was observed between permeability and porosity for siliciclastic sediments, diatom oozes, and nannofossil chalk than for nannofossil oozes. For siliciclastic sediments, grouping of sediments by clay content yields relationships that are generally consistent with results from other marine settings and suggest decreasing permeability for a given porosity as clay content increases. Correction of measured porosities for smectite content generally improves the quality of permeability-porosity relationships. The relationship between permeability and porosity for diatom oozes may be controlled by the amount of clay present in the ooze, causing diatom oozes to behave similarly to siliciclastic sediments. For a given porosity the nannofossil oozes have higher permeability values by 1.5 orders of magnitude than the siliciclastic sediments. However, the use of a permeability-porosity relation may not be appropriate for unconsolidated carbonates such as nannofossil oozes. This study provided insight to the effects of porosity correction for smectite, variations in lithology and grain size in permeability-porosity relationships. However, further progress in delineating controls on permeability will require more careful and better documented permeability tests on characterized samples.

  18. Gas and Water Permeability of Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, M. V.; Martin, P. L.; Romero, F. J.; Gutierrez-Rodirgo, V.; Barcala, J. M.

    2012-11-01

    The gas pressure of concrete samples was measured in an unsteady-state equipment working under low injection pressures and in a newly fine tuned steady-state setup working under different pressures. These measurements allowed the estimation of the intrinsic and relative gas permeability of the concrete and of the effect of boundary conditions on them. Permeability decreased with water content, but it was also greatly affected by the hydraulic history of concrete, i.e. if it had been previously dried or wetted. In particular, and for a given degree of saturation, the gas permeability of concrete previously saturated was lower than if the concrete had been just air dried or saturated after air drying. In any case, the gas permeability was about two orders of magnitude higher than the liquid water permeability (10-16 vs. 10-18 m2), probably due to the chemical reactions taking place during saturation (carbonation). The relative gas permeability of concrete increased sharply for water degrees of saturation smaller than 50%. The boundary conditions also affected the gas permeability, which seemed to be mostly conditioned by the back pressure and the confining pressure, increasing as the former increased and decreasing as the latter increased, i.e. decreasing as the effective pressure increased. Overall the increase of pressure head or injection pressure implied a decrease in gas permeability. External,microcracking during air-drying could not be ruled out as responsible for the decrease of permeability with confining pressure. The apparent permeability obtained applying the Klinkenberg method for a given effective pressure was only slightly smaller than the average of all the values measured for the same confining pressure range. For this reason it is considered that the Klinkenberg effect was not relevant in the range of pressures applied. (Author) 37 refs.

  19. Synthesis of ceramic hollow fiber supported zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) membranes with high hydrogen permeability

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Yichang; Wang, Bo; Lai, Zhiping

    2012-01-01

    Purification and recovery of hydrogen from hydrocarbons in refinery streams in the petrochemical industry is an emerging research field in the study of membrane gas separation. Hollow fiber membrane modules can be easily implemented into separation processes at the industrial scale. In this report, hollow yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) fiber-supported zeolitic imidazole framework-8 (ZIF-8) membranes were successfully prepared using a mild and environmentally friendly seeded growth method. Our single-component permeation studies demonstrated that the membrane had a very high hydrogen permeance (~15×10 -7mol/m 2sPa) and an ideal selectivity of H 2/C 3H 8 of more than 1000 at room temperature. This high membrane permeability and selectivity caused serious concentration polarization in the separation of H 2/C 3H 8 mixtures, which led to almost 50% drop in both the H 2 permeance and the separation factor. Enhanced mixing on the feed side could reduce the effect of the concentration polarization. Our experimental data also indicated that the membranes had excellent reproducibility and long-term stability, indicating that the hollow fiber-supported ZIF-8 membranes developed in this study have great potential in industry-scale separation of hydrogen. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Synthesis of ceramic hollow fiber supported zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) membranes with high hydrogen permeability

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Yichang

    2012-12-01

    Purification and recovery of hydrogen from hydrocarbons in refinery streams in the petrochemical industry is an emerging research field in the study of membrane gas separation. Hollow fiber membrane modules can be easily implemented into separation processes at the industrial scale. In this report, hollow yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) fiber-supported zeolitic imidazole framework-8 (ZIF-8) membranes were successfully prepared using a mild and environmentally friendly seeded growth method. Our single-component permeation studies demonstrated that the membrane had a very high hydrogen permeance (~15×10 -7mol/m 2sPa) and an ideal selectivity of H 2/C 3H 8 of more than 1000 at room temperature. This high membrane permeability and selectivity caused serious concentration polarization in the separation of H 2/C 3H 8 mixtures, which led to almost 50% drop in both the H 2 permeance and the separation factor. Enhanced mixing on the feed side could reduce the effect of the concentration polarization. Our experimental data also indicated that the membranes had excellent reproducibility and long-term stability, indicating that the hollow fiber-supported ZIF-8 membranes developed in this study have great potential in industry-scale separation of hydrogen. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Permeability of cork to gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, David P; Fonseca, Ana L; Pereira, Helen; Teodoro, Orlando M N D

    2011-04-27

    The permeability of gases through uncompressed cork was investigated. More than 100 samples were assessed from different plank qualities to provide a picture of the permeability distribution. A novel technique based on a mass spectrometer leak detector was used to directly measure the helium flow through the central area of small disks 10 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick. The permeability for nitrogen, oxygen, and other gases was measured by the pressure rise technique. Boiled and nonboiled cork samples from different sections were evaluated. An asymmetric frequency distribution ranging 3 orders of magnitude (roughly from 1 to 1000 μmol/(cm·atm·day)) for selected samples without macroscopic defects was found, having a peak below 100 μmol/(cm·atm·day). Correlation was found between density and permeability: higher density samples tend to show lower permeability. However, boiled cork showed a mean lower permeability despite having a lower density. The transport mechanism of gases through cork was also examined. Calculations suggest that gases permeate uncompressed cork mainly through small channels between cells under a molecular flow regime. The diameter of such channels was estimated to be in the range of 100 nm, in agreement with the plasmodesmata size in the cork cell walls.

  2. Clogging in permeable concrete: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Alalea; Wong, Hong S; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2017-05-15

    Permeable concrete (or "pervious concrete" in North America) is used to reduce local flooding in urban areas and is an important sustainable urban drainage system. However, permeable concrete exhibits reduction in permeability due to clogging by particulates, which severely limits service life. This paper reviews the clogging mechanism and current mitigating strategies in order to inform future research needs. The pore structure of permeable concrete and characteristics of flowing particulates influence clogging, which occurs when particles build-up and block connected porosity. Permeable concrete requires regular maintenance by vacuum sweeping and pressure washing, but the effectiveness and viability of these methods is questionable. The potential for clogging is related to the tortuosity of the connected porosity, with greater tortuosity resulting in increased potential for clogging. Research is required to develop permeable concrete that can be poured on-site, which produces a pore structure with significantly reduced tortuosity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Tritium Permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip Winston; Pattrick Calderoni; Paul Humrickhouse

    2012-07-01

    Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor and its high-temperature components requires information regarding the permeation of fission generated tritium and hydrogen product through candidate heat exchanger alloys. Release of fission-generated tritium to the environment and the potential contamination of the helium coolant by permeation of product hydrogen into the coolant system represent safety basis and product contamination issues. Of the three potential candidates for high-temperature components of the NGNP reactor design, only permeability for Incoloy 800H has been well documented. Hydrogen permeability data have been published for Inconel 617, but only in two literature reports and for partial pressures of hydrogen greater than one atmosphere, far higher than anticipated in the NGNP reactor. To support engineering design of the NGNP reactor components, the tritium permeability of Inconel 617 and Incoloy 800H was determined using a measurement system designed and fabricated at Idaho National Laboratory. The tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617, was measured in the temperature range 650 to 950°C and at primary concentrations of 1.5 to 6 parts per million volume tritium in helium. (partial pressures of 10-6 atm)—three orders of magnitude lower partial pressures than used in the hydrogen permeation testing. The measured tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617 deviated substantially from the values measured for hydrogen. This may be due to instrument offset, system absorption, presence of competing quantities of hydrogen, surface oxides, or other phenomena. Due to the challenge of determining the chemical composition of a mixture with such a low hydrogen isotope concentration, no categorical explanation of this offset has been developed.

  4. Tritium Permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip Winston; Pattrick Calderoni; Paul Humrickhouse

    2011-09-01

    Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor and its high-temperature components requires information regarding the permeation of fission generated tritium and hydrogen product through candidate heat exchanger alloys. Release of fission-generated tritium to the environment and the potential contamination of the helium coolant by permeation of product hydrogen into the coolant system represent safety basis and product contamination issues. Of the three potential candidates for high-temperature components of the NGNP reactor design, only permeability for Incoloy 800H has been well documented. Hydrogen permeability data have been published for Inconel 617, but only in two literature reports and for partial pressures of hydrogen greater than one atmosphere, far higher than anticipated in the NGNP reactor. To support engineering design of the NGNP reactor components, the tritium permeability of Inconel 617 and Incoloy 800H was determined using a measurement system designed and fabricated at Idaho National Laboratory. The tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617, was measured in the temperature range 650 to 950 C and at primary concentrations of 1.5 to 6 parts per million volume tritium in helium. (partial pressures of 10-6 atm) - three orders of magnitude lower partial pressures than used in the hydrogen permeation testing. The measured tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617 deviated substantially from the values measured for hydrogen. This may be due to instrument offset, system absorption, presence of competing quantities of hydrogen, surface oxides, or other phenomena. Due to the challenge of determining the chemical composition of a mixture with such a low hydrogen isotope concentration, no categorical explanation of this offset has been developed.

  5. Geothermal Permeability Enhancement - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe Beall; Mark Walters

    2009-06-30

    The overall objective is to apply known permeability enhancement techniques to reduce the number of wells needed and demonstrate the applicability of the techniques to other undeveloped or under-developed fields. The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) concept presented in this project enhances energy extraction from reduced permeability zones in the super-heated, vapor-dominated Aidlin Field of the The Geysers geothermal reservoir. Numerous geothermal reservoirs worldwide, over a wide temperature range, contain zones of low permeability which limit the development potential and the efficient recovery of heat from these reservoirs. Low permeability results from poorly connected fractures or the lack of fractures. The Enhanced Geothermal System concept presented here expands these technologies by applying and evaluating them in a systematic, integrated program.

  6. Acute effects of carprofen and meloxicam on canine gastrointestinal permeability and mucosal absorptive capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Melanie; Chandler, Marge L; Steiner, Jörg M; Farhadi, Ashkan; Welsh, Elizabeth; Pratschke, Kathryn; Shaw, Darren J; Williams, David A

    2007-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are frequently prescribed to dogs for their analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory properties. Their beneficial actions can be offset by gastrointestinal (GI) toxicosis. Endoscopy has traditionally been employed to detect GI lesions, but alterations in GI permeability precede the development of mucosal damage. Carprofen and meloxicam alter GI permeability and mucosal absorptive capacity of dogs. Twenty adult dogs treated with an NSAID for >7 days were evaluated by permeability tests while receiving either carprofen (10 dogs) or meloxicam (10 dogs). Prospective, longitudinal observational study. A 6-sugar permeability test (sucrose, lactulose, rhamnose, 3-O-methyl-D-glucose, D-xylose, and sucralose) was performed on the day before NSAID treatment, and after 3 and 8 days of treatment. There were no significant differences in the urinary recovery ratios of lactulose: rhamnose, D-xylose: 3-O-methyl-D-glucose, or sucralose recovery within either group at any time during the study. Sucrose permeability in the meloxicam group did not alter significantly over time. However, sucrose permeability in the carprofen group decreased significantly by day 3 (P = .049) and increased again by day 8 (P = .049), to a level that was not significantly different to permeability before treatment (P = .695). The absence of increased GI permeability and diminished mucosal absorptive capacity in this group of dogs does not support the development of acute GI toxicosis during treatment with either meloxicam or carprofen.

  7. Water and nonelectrolyte permeability of isolated rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpini, G.; Garrick, R.A.; Jones, M.J.; Nunes, R.; Tavoloni, N.

    1986-01-01

    We have measured the diffusive permeability coefficients of isolated rat hepatocytes to 3 H 2 O, [ 14 C]urea, [ 14 C]erythritol, [ 14 C]mannitol, [ 3 H]sucrose, and [ 3 H]inulin, employing a technique previously developed for erythrocytes (Redwood et al., J. Gen. Physiol 64:706-729, 1974). Diffusion coefficients for the tracer molecules were measured in packed hepatocytes, supernatant fluid, and intracellular medium (lysed hepatocytes) and were calculated assuming one-dimensional semi-infinite diffusion through a homogeneous medium. By applying the series-parallel pathway model, the following permeability coefficients (10(-5) cm/sec) for the hepatocyte plasma membrane were obtained. 3 H 2 O, 98.6 +/- 18.4; [ 14 C]urea, 18.2 +/- 5.3; [ 14 C]erythritol, 4.8 +/- 1.6; [ 14 C]mannitol, 3.1 +/- 1.4; [ 3 H]sucrose, 0; [ 3 H]inulin, 0. These results indicate that isolated rat hepatocytes are highly permeable to water and polar nonelectrolytes, when compared with other transporting epithelia. This relatively high cellular permeability is consistent with a model in which nonelectrolyte permeation is via an aqueous pathway of equivalent pore diameter of 8-12 A. The finding that [ 14 C]erythritol and [ 14 C]mannitol cross the hepatocyte plasma membrane indicates that these molecules enter the bile canaliculus through the transcellular route. Conversely, the failure of [ 3 H]sucrose and [ 3 H]inulin to permeate the hepatocyte in the isolated condition supports the concept that biliary entry of these large carbohydrates, at least that fraction which cannot be accounted for by a vesicular mechanism, must occur via the transjunctional shunt pathway

  8. A Reconciliation of Packed Column Permeability Data: Column Permeability as a Function of Particle Porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert M. Quinn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In his textbook teaching of packed bed permeability, Georges Guiochon uses mobile phase velocity as the fluid velocity term in his elaboration of the Darcy permeability equation. Although this velocity frame makes a lot of sense from a thermodynamic point of view, it is valid only with respect to permeability at a single theoretical boundary condition. In his more recent writings, however, Guiochon has departed from his long-standing mode of discussing permeability in terms of the Darcy equation and has embraced the well-known Kozeny-Blake equation. In this paper, his teaching pertaining to the constant in the Kozeny-Blake equation is examined and, as a result, a new correlation coefficient is identified and defined herein based on the velocity frame used in his teaching. This coefficient correlates pressure drop and fluid velocity as a function of particle porosity. We show that in their experimental protocols, Guiochon et al. have not adhered to a strict material balance of permeability which creates a mismatch of particle porosity and leads to erroneous conclusions regarding the value of the permeability coefficient in the Kozeny-Blake equation. By correcting the experimental data to properly reflect particle porosity we reconcile the experimental results of Guiochon and Giddings, resulting in a permeability reference chart which is presented here for the first time. This reference chart demonstrates that Guiochon’s experimental data, when properly normalized for particle porosity and other related discrepancies, corroborates the value of 267 for the constant in the Kozeny-Blake equation which was derived by Giddings in 1965.

  9. Crustal permeability: Introduction to the special issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Gleeson, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The topic of crustal permeability is of broad interest in light of the controlling effect of permeability on diverse geologic processes and also timely in light of the practical challenges associated with emerging technologies such as hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas production (‘fracking’), enhanced geothermal systems, and geologic carbon sequestration. This special issue of Geofluids is also motivated by the historical dichotomy between the hydrogeologic concept of permeability as a static material property that exerts control on fluid flow and the perspective of economic geologists, geophysicists, and crustal petrologists who have long recognized permeability as a dynamic parameter that changes in response to tectonism, fluid production, and geochemical reactions. Issues associated with fracking, enhanced geothermal systems, and geologic carbon sequestration have already begun to promote a constructive dialog between the static and dynamic views of permeability, and here we have made a conscious effort to include both viewpoints. This special issue also focuses on the quantification of permeability, encompassing both direct measurement of permeability in the uppermost crust and inferential permeability estimates, mainly for the deeper crust.

  10. In vivo analysis of intestinal permeability following hemorrhagic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaigh, Tom; Chang, Marisol; Richter, Michael; Mazor, Rafi; Kistler, Erik B

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the time course of intestinal permeability changes to proteolytically-derived bowel peptides in experimental hemorrhagic shock. METHODS: We injected fluorescently-conjugated casein protein into the small bowel of anesthetized Wistar rats prior to induction of experimental hemorrhagic shock. These molecules, which fluoresce when proteolytically cleaved, were used as markers for the ability of proteolytically cleaved intestinal products to access the central circulation. Blood was serially sampled to quantify the relative change in concentration of proteolytically-cleaved particles in the systemic circulation. To provide spatial resolution of their location, particles in the mesenteric microvasculature were imaged using in vivo intravital fluorescent microscopy. The experiments were then repeated using an alternate measurement technique, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextrans 20, to semi-quantitatively verify the ability of bowel-derived low-molecular weight molecules (< 20 kD) to access the central circulation. RESULTS: Results demonstrate a significant increase in systemic permeability to gut-derived peptides within 20 min after induction of hemorrhage (1.11 ± 0.19 vs 0.86 ± 0.07, P < 0.05) compared to control animals. Reperfusion resulted in a second, sustained increase in systemic permeability to gut-derived peptides in hemorrhaged animals compared to controls (1.2 ± 0.18 vs 0.97 ± 0.1, P < 0.05). Intravital microscopy of the mesentery also showed marked accumulation of fluorescent particles in the microcirculation of hemorrhaged animals compared to controls. These results were replicated using FITC dextrans 20 [10.85 ± 6.52 vs 3.38 ± 1.11 fluorescent intensity units (× 105, P < 0.05, hemorrhagic shock vs controls)], confirming that small bowel ischemia in response to experimental hemorrhagic shock results in marked and early increases in gut membrane permeability. CONCLUSION: Increased small bowel permeability in hemorrhagic

  11. Effect of temperature on sandstone permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Kjøller, Claus

    Hot water injection in geothermal sandstone aquifers is considered for seasonal energy storage in Denmark. However, an increase in the aquifer temperature might reduce permeability, and thereby increase production costs. An understanding of the factors that control permeability is required in order...... and the Klinkenberg procedure showed the expected correlation between the two measures, however, differences could be around one order of magnitude. In tight gas sandstones, permeability is often sensitive to net stress, which might change due to the pore pressure change in the Klinkenberg procedure. Besides...... affecting the Klinkenberg procedure, the combined effect of slip and changes in permeability would affect production during pressure depletion in tight gas sandstone reservoirs; therefore effects of gas slip and net stress on permeability were combined in a model based on the Klinkenberg equation. A lower...

  12. Nanoporous microbead supported bilayers: stability, physical characterization, and incorporation of functional transmembrane proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Ryan W. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Brozik, James A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Brozik, Susan Marie; Cox, Jason M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Lopez, Gabriel P. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Barrick, Todd A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Flores, Adrean (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-03-01

    The introduction of functional transmembrane proteins into supported bilayer-based biomimetic systems presents a significant challenge for biophysics. Among the various methods for producing supported bilayers, liposomal fusion offers a versatile method for the introduction of membrane proteins into supported bilayers on a variety of substrates. In this study, the properties of protein containing unilamellar phosphocholine lipid bilayers on nanoporous silica microspheres are investigated. The effects of the silica substrate, pore structure, and the substrate curvature on the stability of the membrane and the functionality of the membrane protein are determined. Supported bilayers on porous silica microspheres show a significant increase in surface area on surfaces with structures in excess of 10 nm as well as an overall decrease in stability resulting from increasing pore size and curvature. Comparison of the liposomal and detergent-mediated introduction of purified bacteriorhodopsin (bR) and the human type 3 serotonin receptor (5HT3R) are investigated focusing on the resulting protein function, diffusion, orientation, and incorporation efficiency. In both cases, functional proteins are observed; however, the reconstitution efficiency and orientation selectivity are significantly enhanced through detergent-mediated protein reconstitution. The results of these experiments provide a basis for bulk ionic and fluorescent dye-based compartmentalization assays as well as single-molecule optical and single-channel electrochemical interrogation of transmembrane proteins in a biomimetic platform.

  13. Mining protein function from text using term-based support vector machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Simon B; Nenadic, Goran; Stapley, Benjamin J

    2005-01-01

    Background Text mining has spurred huge interest in the domain of biology. The goal of the BioCreAtIvE exercise was to evaluate the performance of current text mining systems. We participated in Task 2, which addressed assigning Gene Ontology terms to human proteins and selecting relevant evidence from full-text documents. We approached it as a modified form of the document classification task. We used a supervised machine-learning approach (based on support vector machines) to assign protein function and select passages that support the assignments. As classification features, we used a protein's co-occurring terms that were automatically extracted from documents. Results The results evaluated by curators were modest, and quite variable for different problems: in many cases we have relatively good assignment of GO terms to proteins, but the selected supporting text was typically non-relevant (precision spanning from 3% to 50%). The method appears to work best when a substantial set of relevant documents is obtained, while it works poorly on single documents and/or short passages. The initial results suggest that our approach can also mine annotations from text even when an explicit statement relating a protein to a GO term is absent. Conclusion A machine learning approach to mining protein function predictions from text can yield good performance only if sufficient training data is available, and significant amount of supporting data is used for prediction. The most promising results are for combined document retrieval and GO term assignment, which calls for the integration of methods developed in BioCreAtIvE Task 1 and Task 2. PMID:15960835

  14. Possible links between intestinal permeablity and food processing: a potential therapeutic niche for glutamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Robert Rapin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased intestinal permeability is a likely cause of various pathologies, such as allergies and metabolic or even cardiovascular disturbances. Intestinal permeability is found in many severe clinical situations and in common disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome. In these conditions, substances that are normally unable to cross the epithelial barrier gain access to the systemic circulation. To illustrate the potential harmfulness of leaky gut, we present an argument based on examples linked to protein or lipid glycation induced by modern food processing. Increased intestinal permeability should be largely improved by dietary addition of compounds, such as glutamine or curcumin, which both have the mechanistic potential to inhibit the inflammation and oxidative stress linked to tight junction opening. This brief review aims to increase physician awareness of this common, albeit largely unrecognized, pathology, which may be easily prevented or improved by means of simple nutritional changes.

  15. Possible Links between Intestinal Permeablity and Food Processing: A Potential Therapeutic Niche for Glutamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapin, Jean Robert; Wiernsperger, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Increased intestinal permeability is a likely cause of various pathologies, such as allergies and metabolic or even cardiovascular disturbances. Intestinal permeability is found in many severe clinical situations and in common disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome. In these conditions, substances that are normally unable to cross the epithelial barrier gain access to the systemic circulation. To illustrate the potential harmfulness of leaky gut, we present an argument based on examples linked to protein or lipid glycation induced by modern food processing. Increased intestinal permeability should be largely improved by dietary addition of compounds, such as glutamine or curcumin, which both have the mechanistic potential to inhibit the inflammation and oxidative stress linked to tight junction opening. This brief review aims to increase physician awareness of this common, albeit largely unrecognized, pathology, which may be easily prevented or improved by means of simple nutritional changes. PMID:20613941

  16. Particulate matter air pollution causes oxidant-mediated increase in gut permeability in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshavarzian Ali

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to particulate matter (PM air pollution may be an important environmental factor leading to exacerbations of inflammatory illnesses in the GI tract. PM can gain access to the gastrointestinal (GI tract via swallowing of air or secretions from the upper airways or mucociliary clearance of inhaled particles. Methods We measured PM-induced cell death and mitochondrial ROS generation in Caco-2 cells stably expressing oxidant sensitive GFP localized to mitochondria in the absence or presence of an antioxidant. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to a very high dose of urban PM from Washington, DC (200 μg/mouse or saline via gastric gavage and small bowel and colonic tissue were harvested for histologic evaluation, and RNA isolation up to 48 hours. Permeability to 4kD dextran was measured at 48 hours. Results PM induced mitochondrial ROS generation and cell death in Caco-2 cells. PM also caused oxidant-dependent NF-κB activation, disruption of tight junctions and increased permeability of Caco-2 monolayers. Mice exposed to PM had increased intestinal permeability compared with PBS treated mice. In the small bowel, colocalization of the tight junction protein, ZO-1 was lower in the PM treated animals. In the small bowel and colon, PM exposed mice had higher levels of IL-6 mRNA and reduced levels of ZO-1 mRNA. Increased apoptosis was observed in the colon of PM exposed mice. Conclusions Exposure to high doses of urban PM causes oxidant dependent GI epithelial cell death, disruption of tight junction proteins, inflammation and increased permeability in the gut in vitro and in vivo. These PM-induced changes may contribute to exacerbations of inflammatory disorders of the gut.

  17. Water-Permeable Dialysis Membranes for Multi-Layered Micro Dialysis System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya eTo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of water-permeable dialysis membranes that are suitable for an implantable microdialysis system that does not use dialysis fluid. We developed a microdialysis system integrating microfluidic channels and nanoporous filtering membranes made of polyethersulfone (PES, aiming at a fully implantable system that drastically improves the quality of life of patients. Simplicity of the total system is crucial for the implantable dialysis system, where the pumps and storage tanks for the dialysis fluid pose problems. Hence, we focus on hemofiltration, which does not require the dialysis fluid but water-permeable membranes. We investigated the water-permeability of the PES membrane with respect to the concentrations of the PES, the additives, and the solvents in the casting solution. Sufficiently water-permeable membranes were found through in vitro experiments using whole bovine blood. The filtrate was verified to have the concentrations of low-molecular-weight molecules, such as sodium, potassium, urea, and creatinine, while proteins, such as albumin, were successfully blocked by the membrane. We conducted in vivo experiments using rats, where the system was connected to the femoral artery and jugular vein. The filtrate was successfully collected without any leakage of blood inside the system and it did not contain albumin but low-molecular-weight molecules whose concentrations were identical to those of the blood. The rat model with renal failure showed 100% increase of creatinine in 5 h, while rats connected to the system showed only a 7.4% increase, which verified the effectiveness of the proposed microdialysis system.

  18. Genetic Manipulation of Outer Membrane Permeability: Generating Porous Heterogeneous Catalyst Analogs in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, TN; Park, AHA; Bantat, S

    2014-12-01

    The limited permeability of the E. coli outer membrane can significantly hinder whole-cell biocatalyst performance. In this study, the SARS coronavirus small envelope protein (SCVE) was expressed in E. coli cells previously engineered for periplasmic expression of carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity. This maneuver increased small molecule uptake by the cells, resulting in increased apparent CA activity of the biocatalysts. The enhancements in activity were quantified using methods developed for traditional heterogeneous catalysis. The expression of the SCVE protein was found to significantly reduce the Thiele moduli (phi), as well as increase the effectiveness factors (eta), effective diffusivities (D-e), and permeabilities (P) of the biocatalysts. These catalytic improvements translated into superior performance of the biocatalysts for the precipitation of calcium carbonate from solution which is an attractive strategy for long-term sequestration of captured carbon dioxide. Overall, these results demonstrate that synthetic biology approaches can be used to enhance heterogeneous catalysts incorporated into microbial whole-cell scaffolds.

  19. Subchronic mild noise stress increases HRP permeability in rat small intestine in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, P. B.; van Raaij, M. T.; Dobbe, C. J.; Timmerman, A.; Kiliaan, A. J.; Taminiau, J. A.; Groot, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Recently we reported an increased trans- and paracellular protein permeability in rat small intestine after acute cold restraint stress. In the present study, we applied randomized 95- or 105-dB white noise pulses during 45 min/h, 12 h/day, duration 8 days, as a milder, but more chronic stressor to

  20. Analytical Expressions for Thermo-Osmotic Permeability of Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalvès, J.; Ji Yu, C.; Matray, J.-M.; Tremosa, J.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a new formulation for the thermo-osmotic permeability of natural pore solutions containing monovalent and divalent cations is proposed. The mathematical formulation proposed here is based on the theoretical framework supporting thermo-osmosis which relies on water structure alteration in the pore space of surface-charged materials caused by solid-fluid electrochemical interactions. The ionic content balancing the surface charge of clay minerals causes a disruption in the hydrogen bond network when more structured water is present at the clay surface. Analytical expressions based on our heuristic model are proposed and compared to the available data for NaCl solutions. It is shown that the introduction of divalent cations reduces the thermo-osmotic permeability by one third compared to the monovalent case. The analytical expressions provided here can be used to advantage for safety calculations in deep underground nuclear waste repositories.

  1. Supplemental protein in support of muscle mass and health: advantage whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devries, Michaela C; Phillips, Stuart M

    2015-03-01

    Skeletal muscle is an integral body tissue playing key roles in strength, performance, physical function, and metabolic regulation. It is essential for athletes to ensure that they have optimal amounts of muscle mass to ensure peak performance in their given sport. However, the role of maintaining muscle mass during weight loss and as we age is an emerging concept, having implications in chronic disease prevention, functional capacity, and quality of life. Higher-protein diets have been shown to: (1) promote gains in muscle mass, especially when paired with resistance training; (2) spare muscle mass loss during caloric restriction; and (3) attenuate the natural loss of muscle mass that accompanies aging. Protein quality is important to the gain and maintenance of muscle mass. Protein quality is a function of protein digestibility, amino acid content, and the resulting amino acid availability to support metabolic function. Whey protein is one of the highest-quality proteins given its amino acid content (high essential, branched-chain, and leucine amino acid content) and rapid digestibility. Consumption of whey protein has a robust ability to stimulate muscle protein synthesis. In fact, whey protein has been found to stimulate muscle protein synthesis to a greater degree than other proteins such as casein and soy. This review examines the existing data supporting the role for protein consumption, with an emphasis on whey protein, in the regulation of muscle mass and body composition in response to resistance training, caloric restriction, and aging. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  2. Dissociation of VE-PTP from VE-cadherin is required for leukocyte extravasation and for VEGF-induced vascular permeability in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broermann, Andre; Winderlich, Mark; Block, Helena; Frye, Maike; Rossaint, Jan; Zarbock, Alexander; Cagna, Giuseppe; Linnepe, Ruth; Schulte, Dörte; Nottebaum, Astrid Fee

    2011-01-01

    We have recently shown that vascular endothelial protein tyrosine phosphatase (VE-PTP), an endothelial membrane protein, associates with VE-cadherin and is required for optimal VE-cadherin function and endothelial cell contact integrity. The dissociation of VE-PTP from VE-cadherin is triggered by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and by the binding of leukocytes to endothelial cells in vitro, suggesting that this dissociation is a prerequisite for the destabilization of endothelial cell contacts. Here, we show that VE-cadherin/VE-PTP dissociation also occurs in vivo in response to LPS stimulation of the lung or systemic VEGF stimulation. To show that this dissociation is indeed necessary in vivo for leukocyte extravasation and VEGF-induced vascular permeability, we generated knock-in mice expressing the fusion proteins VE-cadherin-FK 506 binding protein and VE-PTP-FRB* under the control of the endogenous VE-cadherin promoter, thus replacing endogenous VE-cadherin. The additional domains in both fusion proteins allow the heterodimeric complex to be stabilized by a chemical compound (rapalog). We found that intravenous application of the rapalog strongly inhibited VEGF-induced (skin) and LPS-induced (lung) vascular permeability and inhibited neutrophil extravasation in the IL-1β inflamed cremaster and the LPS-inflamed lung. We conclude that the dissociation of VE-PTP from VE-cadherin is indeed required in vivo for the opening of endothelial cell contacts during induction of vascular permeability and leukocyte extravasation. PMID:22025303

  3. Cortactin deficiency is associated with reduced neutrophil recruitment but increased vascular permeability in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnoor, Michael; Lai, Frank P L; Zarbock, Alexander; Kläver, Ruth; Polaschegg, Christian; Schulte, Dörte; Weich, Herbert A; Oelkers, J Margit; Rottner, Klemens; Vestweber, Dietmar

    2011-08-01

    Neutrophil extravasation and the regulation of vascular permeability require dynamic actin rearrangements in the endothelium. In this study, we analyzed in vivo whether these processes require the function of the actin nucleation-promoting factor cortactin. Basal vascular permeability for high molecular weight substances was enhanced in cortactin-deficient mice. Despite this leakiness, neutrophil extravasation in the tumor necrosis factor-stimulated cremaster was inhibited by the loss of cortactin. The permeability defect was caused by reduced levels of activated Rap1 (Ras-related protein 1) in endothelial cells and could be rescued by activating Rap1 via the guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) exchange factor EPAC (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP). The defect in neutrophil extravasation was caused by enhanced rolling velocity and reduced adhesion in postcapillary venules. Impaired rolling interactions were linked to contributions of β(2)-integrin ligands, and firm adhesion was compromised by reduced ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1) clustering around neutrophils. A signaling process known to be critical for the formation of ICAM-1-enriched contact areas and for transendothelial migration, the ICAM-1-mediated activation of the GTPase RhoG was blocked in cortactin-deficient endothelial cells. Our results represent the first physiological evidence that cortactin is crucial for orchestrating the molecular events leading to proper endothelial barrier function and leukocyte recruitment in vivo.

  4. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part II: QSAR models of skin permeability and the relationships between skin permeability and skin sensitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Vinicius M. [Laboratory of Molecular Modeling and Design, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, GO 74605-220 (Brazil); Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Muratov, Eugene [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry, A.V. Bogatsky Physical–Chemical Institute NAS of Ukraine, Odessa 65080 (Ukraine); Fourches, Denis [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole [ILS/Contractor supporting the NTP Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods (NICEATM), P.O. Box 13501, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Andrade, Carolina H. [Laboratory of Molecular Modeling and Design, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, GO 74605-220 (Brazil); Tropsha, Alexander, E-mail: alex_tropsha@unc.edu [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Skin permeability is widely considered to be mechanistically implicated in chemically-induced skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been identified as skin sensitizers, there have been very few reports analyzing the relationships between molecular structure and skin permeability of sensitizers and non-sensitizers. The goals of this study were to: (i) compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset of chemicals studied for their skin permeability; (ii) develop and rigorously validate QSAR models to predict skin permeability; and (iii) explore the complex relationships between skin sensitization and skin permeability. Based on the largest publicly available dataset compiled in this study, we found no overall correlation between skin permeability and skin sensitization. In addition, cross-species correlation coefficient between human and rodent permeability data was found to be as low as R{sup 2} = 0.44. Human skin permeability models based on the random forest method have been developed and validated using OECD-compliant QSAR modeling workflow. Their external accuracy was high (Q{sup 2}{sub ext} = 0.73 for 63% of external compounds inside the applicability domain). The extended analysis using both experimentally-measured and QSAR-imputed data still confirmed the absence of any overall concordance between skin permeability and skin sensitization. This observation suggests that chemical modifications that affect skin permeability should not be presumed a priori to modulate the sensitization potential of chemicals. The models reported herein as well as those developed in the companion paper on skin sensitization suggest that it may be possible to rationally design compounds with the desired high skin permeability but low sensitization potential. - Highlights: • It was compiled the largest publicly-available skin permeability dataset. • Predictive QSAR models were developed for skin permeability. • No concordance between skin

  5. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part II: QSAR models of skin permeability and the relationships between skin permeability and skin sensitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Vinicius M.; Muratov, Eugene; Fourches, Denis; Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Andrade, Carolina H.; Tropsha, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Skin permeability is widely considered to be mechanistically implicated in chemically-induced skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been identified as skin sensitizers, there have been very few reports analyzing the relationships between molecular structure and skin permeability of sensitizers and non-sensitizers. The goals of this study were to: (i) compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset of chemicals studied for their skin permeability; (ii) develop and rigorously validate QSAR models to predict skin permeability; and (iii) explore the complex relationships between skin sensitization and skin permeability. Based on the largest publicly available dataset compiled in this study, we found no overall correlation between skin permeability and skin sensitization. In addition, cross-species correlation coefficient between human and rodent permeability data was found to be as low as R 2 = 0.44. Human skin permeability models based on the random forest method have been developed and validated using OECD-compliant QSAR modeling workflow. Their external accuracy was high (Q 2 ext = 0.73 for 63% of external compounds inside the applicability domain). The extended analysis using both experimentally-measured and QSAR-imputed data still confirmed the absence of any overall concordance between skin permeability and skin sensitization. This observation suggests that chemical modifications that affect skin permeability should not be presumed a priori to modulate the sensitization potential of chemicals. The models reported herein as well as those developed in the companion paper on skin sensitization suggest that it may be possible to rationally design compounds with the desired high skin permeability but low sensitization potential. - Highlights: • It was compiled the largest publicly-available skin permeability dataset. • Predictive QSAR models were developed for skin permeability. • No concordance between skin sensitization and

  6. Defining clogging potential for permeable concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Alalea; Wong, Hong S; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2018-08-15

    Permeable concrete is used to reduce urban flooding as it allows water to flow through normally impermeable infrastructure. It is prone to clogging by particulate matter and predicting the long-term performance of permeable concrete is challenging as there is currently no reliable means of characterising clogging potential. This paper reports on the performance of a range of laboratory-prepared and commercial permeable concretes, close packed glass spheres and aggregate particles of varying size, exposed to different clogging methods to understand this phenomena. New methods were developed to study clogging and define clogging potential. The tests involved applying flowing water containing sand and/or clay in cycles, and measuring the change in permeability. Substantial permeability reductions were observed in all samples, particularly when exposed to sand and clay simultaneously. Three methods were used to define clogging potential based on measuring the initial permeability decay, half-life cycle and number of cycles to full clogging. We show for the first time strong linear correlations between these parameters for a wide range of samples, indicating their use for service-life prediction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Different Methods of Predicting Permeability in Shale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbia, Ernest Ncha; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Krogsbøll, Anette

    by two to five orders of magnitudes at lower vertical effective stress below 40 MPa as the content of clay minerals increases causing heterogeneity in shale material. Indirect permeability from consolidation can give maximum and minimum values of shale permeability needed in simulating fluid flow......Permeability is often very difficult to measure or predict in shale lithology. In this work we are determining shale permeability from consolidation tests data using Wissa et al., (1971) approach and comparing the results with predicted permeability from Kozeny’s model. Core and cuttings materials...... effective stress to 9 μD at high vertical effective stress of 100 MPa. The indirect permeability calculated from consolidation tests falls in the same magnitude at higher vertical effective stress, above 40 MPa, as that of the Kozeny model for shale samples with high non-clay content ≥ 70% but are higher...

  8. Effect of mixed γ-plus neutron-radiation on permeability to taurine of peripheral blood leukocyte membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dokshina, G.A.; Naumenko, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    A study was made of permeability to taurine of cellular membranes of peripheral blood leukocytes in vitro under normal conditions and 24 k following mixed γ-plus neutron-irradiation in a dose of 3.5 Gy. It was established that radiation increases the taurine content of cells. The protein content of leukocytes also increases probably due to a better sorption of serum proteins of blood

  9. Permeability of sediment cores from methane hydrate deposit in the Eastern Nankai Trough, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Y.; Yoneda, J.; Egawa, K.; Ito, T.; Jin, Y.; Kida, M.; Suzuki, K.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Nagao, J.

    2013-12-01

    Effective and absolute permeability are key parameters for gas production from methane-hydrate-bearing sandy sediments. Effective and/or absolute permeability have been measured using methane-hydrate-bearing sandy cores and clayey and silty cores recovered from Daini Atsumi Knoll in the Eastern Nankai Trough during the 2012 JOGMEC/JAPEX Pressure coring operation. Liquid-nitrogen-immersed cores were prepared by rapid depressurization of pressure cores recovered by a pressure coring system referred to as the Hybrid PCS. Cores were shaped cylindrically on a lathe with spraying of liquid nitrogen to prevent hydrate dissociation. Permeability was measured by a flooding test or a pressure relaxation method under near in-situ pressure and temperature conditions. Measured effective permeability of hydrate-bearing sediments is less than tens of md, which are order of magnitude less than absolute permeability. Absolute permeability of clayey cores is approximately tens of μd, which would perform a sealing function as cap rocks. Permeability reduction due to a swelling effect was observed for a silty core during flooding test of pure water mimicking hydrate-dissociation-water. Swelling effect may cause production formation damage especially at a later stage of gas production from methane hydrate deposits. This study was financially supported by the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium) that carries out Japan's Methane Hydrate R&D Program conducted by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI).

  10. /GD-Tracker/ A software for blood-brain barrier permeability assessment\

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kala, David; Svoboda, Jan; Litvinec, Andrej; Pošusta, Antonín; Lisý, J.; Šulc, V.; Tomek, A.; Marusič, P.; Jiruška, Přemysl; Otáhal, Jakub

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 2 (2017), s. 43-48 ISSN 0301-5491 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-33115A; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : blood-brain barrier * MRI * Gd-DTPA * permeability * stroke * epileptogenesis * MATLAB * freeware * Gd-Tracker Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology

  11. Integrating Electrokinetic and Bioremediation Process for Treating Oil Contaminated Low Permeability Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Bimastyaji Surya; Effendi, Agus Jatnika; Helmy, Qomarudin

    2018-02-01

    Traditional oil mining activities always ignores environmental regulation which may cause contamination in soil and environment. Crude oil contamination in low-permeability soil complicates recovery process because it requires substantial energy for excavating and crushing the soil. Electrokinetic technology can be used as an alternative technology to treat contaminated soil and improve bioremediation process (biostimulation) through transfer of ions and nutrient that support microorganism growth. This study was conducted using a combination of electrokinetic and bioremediation processes. Result shows that the application of electrokinetic and bioremediation in low permeability soils can provide hydrocarbon removal efficiency up to 46,3% in 7 days operation. The highest amount of microorganism can be found in 3-days operation, which is 2x108 CFU/ml using surfactant as flushing fluid for solubilizing hydrocarbon molecules. Enhancing bioremediation using electrokinetic process is very potential to recover oil contaminated low permeability soil in the future.

  12. Effect of acute, slightly increased intra-abdominal pressure on intestinal permeability and oxidative stress in a rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Leng

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH is known as a common, serious complication in critically ill patients. Bacterial translocation and permeability changes are considered the pathophysiological bases for IAH-induced enterogenic endotoxemia and subsequent multiorgan failure. Nevertheless, the effects of slightly elevated intra-abdominal pressures (IAPs on the intestinal mucosa and the associated mechanisms remain unclear. METHODS: To investigate the acute effects of different nitrogen pneumoperitoneum grades on colonic mucosa, male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to six groups with different IAPs (0 [control], 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 mmHg, n = 6/group. During 90 min of exposure, we dynamically monitored the heart rate and noninvasive hemodynamic parameters. After gradual decompression, arterial blood gas analyses were conducted. Thereafter, structural injuries to the colonic mucosa were identified using light microscopy. Colon permeability was determined using the expression of tight junction proteins, combined with fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FD-4 absorption. The pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance was determined based on the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA and antioxidant enzymes. RESULTS: IAH significantly affected the histological scores of the colonic mucosa, tight junction protein expression, mucosal permeability, and pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance. Interestingly, elevations of IAP that were lower than the threshold for IAH also showed a similar, undesirable effect. In the 8 mmHg group, mild hyponatremia, hypocalcemia, and hypoxemia occurred, accompanied by reduced blood and abdominal perfusion pressures. Mild microscopic inflammatory infiltration and increased MDA levels were also detected. Moreover, an 8-mm Hg IAP markedly inhibited the expression of tight junction proteins, although no significant differences in FD-4 permeability were observed between the 0- and 8-mmHg groups. CONCLUSIONS: Acute exposure to slightly

  13. A process efficiency assessment of serum protein removal from milk using ceramic graded permeability microfiltration membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay-Marchand, D; Doyen, A; Britten, M; Pouliot, Y

    2016-07-01

    Microfiltration (MF) is a well-known process that can be used in the dairy industry to separate caseins from serum proteins (SP) in skim milk using membranes with a pore diameter of 0.1μm. Graded permeability ceramic membranes have been studied widely as means of improving milk fractionation by overcoming problems encountered with other MF membranes. The ideal operating parameters for process efficiency in terms of membrane selectivity, permeate flux, casein loss, SP transmission, energy consumption, and dilution with water remain to be determined for this membrane. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of transmembrane pressure (TMP), volumetric concentration factor (VCF), and diafiltration on overall process efficiency. Skim milk was processed using a pilot-scale MF system equipped with 0.72-m(2) graded permeability membranes with a pore size of 0.1μm. In the first experiment, in full recycle mode, TMP was set at 124, 152, 179, or 207 kPa by adjusting the permeate pressure at the outlet. Whereas TMP had no significant effect on permeate and retentate composition, 152 kPa was found to be optimal for SP removal during concentration and concentration or diafiltration experiments. When VCF was increased to 3×, SP rejection coefficient increased along with energy consumption and total casein loss, whereas SP removal rate decreased. Diafiltering twice allowed an increase in total SP removal but resulted in a substantial increase in energy consumption and casein loss. It also reduced the SP removal rate by diluting permeate. The membrane surface area required for producing cheese milk by blending whole milk, cream, and MF retentate (at different VCF) was estimated for different cheese milk casein concentrations. For a given casein concentration, the same quantity of permeate and SP would be produced, but less membrane surface area would be needed at a lower retentate VCF. Microfiltration has great potential as a process of adding value to conventional

  14. Quantifying porosity, compressibility and permeability in Shale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbia, Ernest Ncha; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Frykman, Peter

    strain data. We found that Kozeny's modelled permeability fall in the same order of magnitude with measured permeability for shale rich in kaolinite but overestimates permeability by two to three orders of magnitudes for shale with high content of smectite. The empirical Yang and Aplin model gives good...... permeability estimate comparable to the measured one for shale rich in smectite. This is probably because Yang and Aplin model was calibrated in London clay which is rich in smectite....

  15. Solid-phase synthesis of protein-polymers on reversible immobilization supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Hironobu; Carmali, Sheiliza; Baker, Stefanie L; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Russell, Alan J

    2018-02-27

    Facile automated biomacromolecule synthesis is at the heart of blending synthetic and biologic worlds. Full access to abiotic/biotic synthetic diversity first occurred when chemistry was developed to grow nucleic acids and peptides from reversibly immobilized precursors. Protein-polymer conjugates, however, have always been synthesized in solution in multi-step, multi-day processes that couple innovative chemistry with challenging purification. Here we report the generation of protein-polymer hybrids synthesized by protein-ATRP on reversible immobilization supports (PARIS). We utilized modified agarose beads to covalently and reversibly couple to proteins in amino-specific reactions. We then modified reversibly immobilized proteins with protein-reactive ATRP initiators and, after ATRP, we released and analyzed the protein polymers. The activity and stability of PARIS-synthesized and solution-synthesized conjugates demonstrated that PARIS was an effective, rapid, and simple method to generate protein-polymer conjugates. Automation of PARIS significantly reduced synthesis/purification timelines, thereby opening a path to changing how to generate protein-polymer conjugates.

  16. Microorganism Removal in Permeable Pavement Parking Lots ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three types of permeable pavements (pervious concrete, permeable interlocking concrete pavers, and porous asphalt) were monitored at the Edison Environmental Center in Edison, New Jersey for indicator organisms such as fecal coliform, enterococci, and E. coli. Results showed that porous asphalt had much lower concentration in monitored infiltrate compared to pervious concrete and permeable interlocking concrete pavers. Concentrations of monitored organisms in infiltrate from porous asphalt were consistently below the bathing water quality standard. Fecal coliform and enterococci exceeded bathing water quality standards more than 72% and 34% of the time for permeable interlocking concrete pavers and pervious concrete, respectively. Purpose is to evaluate the performance of permeable pavement in removing indicator organisms from infiltrating stormwater runoff.

  17. Supported silver clusters as nanoplasmonic transducers for protein sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fojan, Peter; Hanif, Muhammad; Bartling, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Transducers for optical sensing of proteins are prepared using cluster beam deposition on quartz substrates. Surface plasmon resonance phenomenon of the supported silver clusters is used for the detection. It is shown that surface immobilisation procedure providing adhesion of the silver clusters...... stages and protein immobilisation scheme the sensing of protein of interest can be assured using a relatively simple optical spectroscopy method....... an enhancement of the plasmon absorption band used for the detection. Atomic force microscopy study allows to suggest that immobilisation of antibodies on silver clusters has been achieved, thus giving a possibility to incubate and detect an antigen of interest. Hence, by applying the developed preparation...

  18. Rupturing Giant Plasma Membrane Vesicles to Form Micron-sized Supported Cell Plasma Membranes with Native Transmembrane Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Po-Chieh; Tanady, Kevin; Huang, Ling-Ting; Chao, Ling

    2017-11-09

    Being able to directly obtain micron-sized cell blebs, giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs), with native membrane proteins and deposit them on a planar support to form supported plasma membranes could allow the membrane proteins to be studied by various surface analytical tools in native-like bilayer environments. However, GPMVs do not easily rupture on conventional supports because of their high protein and cholesterol contents. Here, we demonstrate the possibility of using compression generated by the air-water interface to efficiently rupture GPMVs to form micron-sized supported membranes with native plasma membrane proteins. We demonstrated that not only lipid but also a native transmembrane protein in HeLa cells, Aquaporin 3 (AQP3), is mobile in the supported membrane platform. This convenient method for generating micron-sized supported membrane patches with mobile native transmembrane proteins could not only facilitate the study of membrane proteins by surface analytical tools, but could also enable us to use native membrane proteins for bio-sensing applications.

  19. Arabidopsis SNAREs SYP61 and SYP121 coordinate the trafficking of plasma membrane aquaporin PIP2;7 to modulate the cell membrane water permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachez, Charles; Laloux, Timothée; Reinhardt, Hagen; Cavez, Damien; Degand, Hervé; Grefen, Christopher; De Rycke, Riet; Inzé, Dirk; Blatt, Michael R; Russinova, Eugenia; Chaumont, François

    2014-07-01

    Plant plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) are aquaporins that facilitate the passive movement of water and small neutral solutes through biological membranes. Here, we report that post-Golgi trafficking of PIP2;7 in Arabidopsis thaliana involves specific interactions with two syntaxin proteins, namely, the Qc-SNARE SYP61 and the Qa-SNARE SYP121, that the proper delivery of PIP2;7 to the plasma membrane depends on the activity of the two SNAREs, and that the SNAREs colocalize and physically interact. These findings are indicative of an important role for SYP61 and SYP121, possibly forming a SNARE complex. Our data support a model in which direct interactions between specific SNARE proteins and PIP aquaporins modulate their post-Golgi trafficking and thus contribute to the fine-tuning of the water permeability of the plasma membrane. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  20. Use of Interface Treatment to Reduce Emissions from Residuals in Lower Permeability Zones to Groundwater flowing Through More Permeable Zones (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P.; Cavanagh, B.; Clifton, L.; Daniels, E.; Dahlen, P.

    2013-12-01

    Many soil and groundwater remediation technologies rely on fluid flow for contaminant extraction or reactant delivery (e.g., soil vapor extraction, pump and treat, in situ chemical oxidation, air sparging, enhanced bioremediation). Given that most unconsolidated and consolidated settings have permeability contrasts, the outcome is often preferential treatment of more permeable zones and ineffective treatment of the lower permeability zones. When this happens, post-treatment contaminant emissions from low permeability zone residuals can cause unacceptable long-term impacts to groundwater in the transmissive zones. As complete remediation of the impacted lower permeability zones may not be practicable with conventional technologies, one might explore options that lead to reduction of the contaminant emissions to acceptable levels, rather than full remediation of the lower permeability layers. This could be accomplished either by creating a sustained emission reaction/attenuation zone at the high-low permeability interface, or by creating a clean soil zone extending sufficiently far into the lower permeability layer to cause the necessary reduction in contaminant concentration gradient and diffusive emission. These options are explored in proof-of-concept laboratory-scale physical model experiments. The physical models are prepared with two layers of contrasting permeability and either dissolved matrix storage or nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) in the lower permeability layer. A dissolved oxidant is then delivered to the interface via flow across the higher permeability layer and changes in contaminant emissions from the low permeability zone are monitored before, during, and after oxidant delivery. The use of three oxidants (dissolved oxygen, hydrogen peroxide and sodium persulfate) for treatment of emissions from petroleum hydrocarbon residuals is examined.

  1. Controlling DC permeability in cast steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumner, Aaran, E-mail: aaran.sumner@nottingham.ac.uk [University of Nottingham, Nottingham University Park Campus, Nottingham NG7 2RD, England (United Kingdom); Gerada, Chris, E-mail: chris.gerada@nottingham.ac.uk [Electrical Machines, University of Nottingham, Tower Building, Nottingham NG7 2RD, England (United Kingdom); Brown, Neil, E-mail: neil.brown@cummins.com [Advanced Electrical Machines Research and Technology at Cummins Power Generation, Peterborough PE2 6FZ, England (United Kingdom); Clare, Adam, E-mail: adam.clare@nottingham.ac.uk [Advanced Manufacturing, University of Nottingham, University Park Campus, Nottingham NG7 2RD, England (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-01

    Annealing (at multiple cooling rates) and quenching (with tempering) was performed on specimens of cast steel of varying composition. The aim was to devise a method for selecting the steel with the highest permeability, from any given range of steels, and then increasing the permeability by heat treatment. Metallographic samples were imaged using optical microscopy to show the effect of the applied heat treatments on the microstructure. Commonly cast steels can have DC permeability altered by the careful selection of a heat treatment. Increases of up to 381% were achieved by annealing using a cooling rate of 6.0 °C/min. Annealing was found to cause the carbon present in the steel to migrate from grain boundaries and from within ferrite crystals into adjacent pearlite crystals. The migration of the carbon resulted in less carbon at grain boundaries and within ferrite crystals reducing the number of pinning sites between magnetic domains. This gives rise to a higher permeability. Quenching then tempering was found to cause the formation of small ferrite crystals with the carbon content of the steel predominately held in the martensitic crystal structures. The results show that with any given range of steel compositions the highest baseline DC permeability will be found with the steel that has the highest iron content and the lowest carbon content. For the samples tested in this paper a cooling rate of 4.5 °C/min resulted in the relative permeability of the sample with the highest baseline permeability, AS4, increasing from 783 to 1479 at 0.5 T. This paper shows how heat treatments commonly applied to hypoeutectoid cast steels, to improve their mechanical performance, can be used to also enhance electromagnetic properties of these alloys. The use of cast steels allows the creation of DC components for electrical machines not possible by the widely used method of stacking of electrical grade sheet steels. - Highlights: • A range of structural steels had their

  2. Controlling DC permeability in cast steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumner, Aaran; Gerada, Chris; Brown, Neil; Clare, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Annealing (at multiple cooling rates) and quenching (with tempering) was performed on specimens of cast steel of varying composition. The aim was to devise a method for selecting the steel with the highest permeability, from any given range of steels, and then increasing the permeability by heat treatment. Metallographic samples were imaged using optical microscopy to show the effect of the applied heat treatments on the microstructure. Commonly cast steels can have DC permeability altered by the careful selection of a heat treatment. Increases of up to 381% were achieved by annealing using a cooling rate of 6.0 °C/min. Annealing was found to cause the carbon present in the steel to migrate from grain boundaries and from within ferrite crystals into adjacent pearlite crystals. The migration of the carbon resulted in less carbon at grain boundaries and within ferrite crystals reducing the number of pinning sites between magnetic domains. This gives rise to a higher permeability. Quenching then tempering was found to cause the formation of small ferrite crystals with the carbon content of the steel predominately held in the martensitic crystal structures. The results show that with any given range of steel compositions the highest baseline DC permeability will be found with the steel that has the highest iron content and the lowest carbon content. For the samples tested in this paper a cooling rate of 4.5 °C/min resulted in the relative permeability of the sample with the highest baseline permeability, AS4, increasing from 783 to 1479 at 0.5 T. This paper shows how heat treatments commonly applied to hypoeutectoid cast steels, to improve their mechanical performance, can be used to also enhance electromagnetic properties of these alloys. The use of cast steels allows the creation of DC components for electrical machines not possible by the widely used method of stacking of electrical grade sheet steels. - Highlights: • A range of structural steels had their

  3. Maternal antibiotic-induced early changes in microbial colonization selectively modulate colonic permeability and inducible heat shock proteins, and digesta concentrations of alkaline phosphatase and TLR-stimulants in swine offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Edith Arnal

    Full Text Available Elevated intake of high energy diets is a risk factor for the development of metabolic diseases and obesity. High fat diets cause alterations in colonic microbiota composition and increase gut permeability to bacterial lipopolysaccharide, and subsequent low-grade chronic inflammation in mice. Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases are increasing worldwide and may involve alterations in microbiota-host dialog. Metabolic disorders appearing in later life are also suspected to reflect changes in early programming. However, how the latter affects the colon remains poorly studied. Here, we hypothesized that various components of colonic physiology, including permeability, ion exchange and protective inducible heat shock proteins (HSP are influenced in the short- and long-terms by early disturbances in microbial colonization. The hypothesis was tested in a swine model. Offspring were born to control mothers (n = 12 or mothers treated with the antibiotic (ATB amoxicillin around parturition (n = 11. Offspring were slaughtered between 14 and 42 days of age to study short-term effects. For long-term effects, young adult offspring from the same litters consumed a normal or a palm oil-enriched diet for 4 weeks between 140 and 169 days of age. ATB treatment transiently modified maternal fecal microbiota although the minor differences observed for offspring colonic microbiota were nonsignificant. In the short-term, consistently higher HSP27 and HSP70 levels and transiently increased horseradish peroxidase permeability in ATB offspring colon were observed. Importantly, long-term consequences included reduced colonic horseradish peroxidase permeability, and increased colonic digesta alkaline phosphatase (AP and TLR2- and TLR4-stimulant concentrations in rectal digesta in adult ATB offspring. Inducible HSP27 and HSP70 did not change. Interactions between early ATB treatment and later diet were noted for paracellular permeability and concentrations of colonic

  4. Hydrogen purifier module with membrane support

    Science.gov (United States)

    A hydrogen purifier utilizing a hydrogen-permeable membrane to purify hydrogen from mixed gases containing hydrogen is disclosed. Improved mechanical support for the permeable membrane is described, enabling forward or reverse differential pressurization of the membrane, which further stabilizes the membrane from wrinkling upon hydrogen uptake.

    2012-07-24

    A hydrogen purifier utilizing a hydrogen-permeable membrane to purify hydrogen from mixed gases containing hydrogen is disclosed. Improved mechanical support for the permeable membrane is described, enabling forward or reverse differential pressurization of the membrane, which further stabilizes the membrane from wrinkling upon hydrogen uptake.

  5. Frictional stability-permeability relationships for fractures in shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yi; Elsworth, Derek; Wang, Chaoyi; Ishibashi, Takuya; Fitts, Jeffrey P.

    2017-03-01

    There is wide concern that fluid injection in the subsurface, such as for the stimulation of shale reservoirs or for geological CO2 sequestration (GCS), has the potential to induce seismicity that may change reservoir permeability due to fault slip. However, the impact of induced seismicity on fracture permeability evolution remains unclear due to the spectrum of modes of fault reactivation (e.g., stable versus unstable). As seismicity is controlled by the frictional response of fractures, we explore friction-stability-permeability relationships through the concurrent measurement of frictional and hydraulic properties of artificial fractures in Green River shale (GRS) and Opalinus shale (OPS). We observe that carbonate-rich GRS shows higher frictional strength but weak neutral frictional stability. The GRS fracture permeability declines during shearing while an increased sliding velocity reduces the rate of permeability decline. By comparison, the phyllosilicate-rich OPS has lower friction and strong stability while the fracture permeability is reduced due to the swelling behavior that dominates over the shearing induced permeability reduction. Hence, we conclude that the friction-stability-permeability relationship of a fracture is largely controlled by mineral composition and that shale mineral compositions with strong frictional stability may be particularly subject to permanent permeability reduction during fluid infiltration.

  6. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part II: QSAR models of skin permeability and the relationships between skin permeability and skin sensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Vinicius M.; Muratov, Eugene; Fourches, Denis; Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Andrade, Carolina H.; Tropsha, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Skin permeability is widely considered to be mechanistically implicated in chemically-induced skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been identified as skin sensitizers, there have been very few reports analyzing the relationships between molecular structure and skin permeability of sensitizers and non-sensitizers. The goals of this study were to: (i) compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset of chemicals studied for their skin permeability; (ii) develop and rigorously validate QSAR models to predict skin permeability; and (iii) explore the complex relationships between skin sensitization and skin permeability. Based on the largest publicly available dataset compiled in this study, we found no overall correlation between skin permeability and skin sensitization. In addition, cross-species correlation coefficient between human and rodent permeability data was found to be as low as R2=0.44. Human skin permeability models based on the random forest method have been developed and validated using OECD-compliant QSAR modeling workflow. Their external accuracy was high (Q2ext = 0.73 for 63% of external compounds inside the applicability domain). The extended analysis using both experimentally-measured and QSAR-imputed data still confirmed the absence of any overall concordance between skin permeability and skin sensitization. This observation suggests that chemical modifications that affect skin permeability should not be presumed a priori to modulate the sensitization potential of chemicals. The models reported herein as well as those developed in the companion paper on skin sensitization suggest that it may be possible to rationally design compounds with the desired high skin permeability but low sensitization potential. PMID:25560673

  7. Permeability measurements on rock samples from Unzen Scientific Drilling Project Drill Hole 4 (USDP-4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tohru; Shimizu, Yuhta; Noguchi, Satoshi; Nakada, Setsuya

    2008-07-01

    Permeability measurement was made on five rock samples from USDP-4 cores. Rock samples were collected from the conduit zone and its country rock. One sample (C14-1-1) is considered as a part of the feeder dyke for the 1991-1995 eruption. The transient pulse method was employed under confining pressure up to 50 MPa. Compressional wave velocity was measured along with permeability. The measured permeability ranges from 10 - 19 to 10 - 17 m 2 at the atmospheric pressure, and is as low as that reported for tight rocks such as granite. The permeability decreases with increasing confining pressure, while the compressional wave velocity increases. Assuming that pores are parallel elliptical tubes, the pressure dependence of permeability requires aspect ratio of 10 - 4 -10 - 2 at the atmospheric pressure. The pore aperture is estimated to be less than 1 μm. The estimated aspect ratio and pore aperture suggest that connectivity of pores is maintained by narrow cracks. The existence of cracks is supported by the pressure dependence of compressional wave velocity. Narrow cracks (< 1 μm) are observed in dyke samples, and they must have been created after solidification. Dyke samples do not provide us information of pore structures during degassing, since exsolved gas has mostly escaped and pores governing the gas permeable flow should have been lost. Both dyke and country rock samples provide us information of materials around ascending magma. Although the measured small-scale permeability cannot be directly applied to geological-scale processes, it gives constrains on studies of large-scale permeability.

  8. Transverse Chemotactic Migration of Bacteria from High to Low Permeability Regions in a Dual Permeability Porous Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R.; Olson, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    Low permeability regions sandwiched between high permeability regions such as clay lenses are difficult to treat using conventional treatment methods. Trace concentrations of contaminants such as non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) remain trapped in these regions and over the time diffuse out into surrounding water thereby acting as a long term source of groundwater contamination. Bacterial chemotaxis (directed migration toward a contaminant source), may be helpful in enhancing bioremediation of such contaminated sites. This study is focused on simulating a two-dimensional dual-permeability groundwater contamination scenario using microfluidic devices and evaluating transverse chemotactic migration of bacteria from high to low permeability regions. A novel bi-layer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device was fabricated using photolithography and soft lithography techniques to simulate contamination of a dual- permeability region due to leakage from an underground storage tank into a low permeability region. This device consists of a porous channel through which a bacterial suspension (Escherchia Coli HCB33) is flown and another channel for injecting contaminant/chemo-attractant (DL-aspertic acid) into the porous channel. The pore arrangement in the porous channel contains a 2-D low permeability region surrounded by high permeability regions on both sides. Experiments were performed under chemotactic and non-chemotactic (replacing attractant with buffer solution in the non porous channel) conditions. Images were captured in transverse pore throats at cross-sections 4.9, 9.8, and 19.6 mm downstream from the attractant injection point and bacteria were enumerated in the middle of each pore throat. Bacterial chemotaxis was quantified in terms of the change in relative bacterial counts in each pore throat at cross-sections 9.8 and 19.6 mm with respect to counts at the cross-section at 4.9 mm. Under non-chemotactic conditions, relative bacterial count was observed

  9. Integrating Electrokinetic and Bioremediation Process for Treating Oil Contaminated Low Permeability Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surya Ramadan Bimastyaji

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional oil mining activities always ignores environmental regulation which may cause contamination in soil and environment. Crude oil contamination in low-permeability soil complicates recovery process because it requires substantial energy for excavating and crushing the soil. Electrokinetic technology can be used as an alternative technology to treat contaminated soil and improve bioremediation process (biostimulation through transfer of ions and nutrient that support microorganism growth. This study was conducted using a combination of electrokinetic and bioremediation processes. Result shows that the application of electrokinetic and bioremediation in low permeability soils can provide hydrocarbon removal efficiency up to 46,3% in 7 days operation. The highest amount of microorganism can be found in 3-days operation, which is 2x108 CFU/ml using surfactant as flushing fluid for solubilizing hydrocarbon molecules. Enhancing bioremediation using electrokinetic process is very potential to recover oil contaminated low permeability soil in the future.

  10. Selectively gas-permeable composite membrane and process for production thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okita, K.; Asako, S.

    1984-01-01

    A selectively gas-permeable composite membrane and a process for producing said composite membrane are described. The composite membrane comprises a polymeric material support and a thin membrane deposited on the support, said thin membrane being obtained by glow discharge plasma polymerization of an organosilane compound containing at least one double bond or triple bond. Alternatively, the composite membrane comprises a polymeric material support having an average pore diameter of at least 0.1 micron, a hardened or cross-linked polyorganosiloxane layer on the support, and a thin membrane on the polyorganosiloxane layer, said thin membrane being obtained by plasma polymerization due to glow discharge of an organosilane compound containing at least one double bond or triple bond

  11. Modelling of water permeability in cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guang, Ye; Lura, Pietro; van Breugel, K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a network model to predict the permeability of cement paste from a numerical simulation of its microstructure. Based on a linked list pore network structure, the effective hydraulic conductivity is estimated and the fluid flow is calculated according to the Hagen-Poiseuille law....... The pressure gradient at all nodes is calculated with the Gauss elimination method and the absolute permeability of the pore network is calculated directly from Darcy's law. Finally, the permeability model is validated by comparison with direct water permeability measurements. According to this model...

  12. Bentonite Permeability at Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Daniels

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Repository designs frequently favour geological disposal of radioactive waste with a backfill material occupying void space around the waste. The backfill material must tolerate the high temperatures produced by decaying radioactive waste to prevent its failure or degradation, leading to increased hydraulic conductivity and reduced sealing performance. The results of four experiments investigating the effect of temperature on the permeability of a bentonite backfill are presented. Bentonite is a clay commonly proposed as the backfill in repository designs because of its high swelling capacity and very low permeability. The experiments were conducted in two sets of purpose-built, temperature controlled apparatus, designed to simulate isotropic pressure and constant volume conditions within the testing range of 4–6 MPa average effective stress. The response of bentonite during thermal loading at temperatures up to 200 °C was investigated, extending the previously considered temperature range. The results provide details of bentonite’s intrinsic permeability, total stress, swelling pressure and porewater pressure during thermal cycles. We find that bentonite’s hydraulic properties are sensitive to thermal loading and the type of imposed boundary condition. However, the permeability change is not large and can mostly be accounted for by water viscosity changes. Thus, under 150 °C, temperature has a minimal impact on bentonite’s hydraulic permeability.

  13. Small intestinal efflux mediated by MRP2 and BCRP shifts sulfasalazine intestinal permeability from high to low, enabling its colonic targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Arik; Amidon, Gordon L

    2009-08-01

    Sulfasalazine is characterized by low intestinal absorption, which essentially enables its colonic targeting and therapeutic action. The mechanisms behind this low absorption have not yet been elucidated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of efflux transporters in the intestinal absorption of sulfasalazine as a potential mechanism for its low small-intestinal absorption and colonic targeting following oral administration. The effects of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) inhibitors on sulfasalazine bidirectional permeability were studied across Caco-2 cell monolayers, including dose-response analysis. Sulfasalazine in vivo permeability was then investigated in the rat jejunum by single-pass perfusion, in the presence vs. absence of inhibitors. Sulfasalazine exhibited 19-fold higher basolateral-to-apical (BL-AP) than apical-to-basolateral (AP-BL) Caco-2 permeability, indicative of net mucosal secretion. MRP2 inhibitors (MK-571 and indomethacin) and BCRP inhibitors [fumitremorgin C (FTC) and pantoprazole] significantly increased AP-BL and decreased BL-AP sulfasalazine Caco-2 transport in a concentration-dependent manner. No effect was observed with the P-gp inhibitors verapamil and quinidine. The IC50 values of the specific MRP2 and BCRP inhibitors MK-571 and FTC on sulfasalazine secretion were 21.5 and 2.0 microM, respectively. Simultaneous inhibition of MRP2 and BCRP completely abolished sulfasalazine Caco-2 efflux. Without inhibitors, sulfasalazine displayed low (vs. metoprolol) in vivo intestinal permeability in the rat model. MK-571 or FTC significantly increased sulfasalazine permeability, bringing it to the low-high permeability boundary. With both MK-571 and FTC present, sulfasalazine displayed high permeability. In conclusion, efflux transport mediated by MRP2 and BCRP, but not P-gp, shifts sulfasalazine permeability from high to low, thereby enabling its

  14. Vascular endothelial growth factors enhance the permeability of the mouse blood-brain barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shize Jiang

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB impedes entry of many drugs into the brain, limiting clinical efficacy. A safe and efficient method for reversibly increasing BBB permeability would greatly facilitate central nervous system (CNS drug delivery and expand the range of possible therapeutics to include water soluble compounds, proteins, nucleotides, and other large molecules. We examined the effect of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF on BBB permeability in Kunming (KM mice. Human VEGF165 was administered to treatment groups at two concentrations (1.6 or 3.0 µg/mouse, while controls received equal-volume saline. Changes in BBB permeability were measured by parenchymal accumulation of the contrast agent Gd-DTPA as assessed by 7 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Mice were then injected with Evans blue, sacrificed 0.5 h later, and perfused transcardially. Brains were removed, fixed, and sectioned for histological study. Both VEGF groups exhibited a significantly greater signal intensity from the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia than controls (P<0.001. Evans blue fluorescence intensity was higher in the parenchyma and lower in the cerebrovasculature of VEGF-treated animals compared to controls. No significant brain edema was observed by diffusion weighted MRI (DWI or histological staining. Exogenous application of VEGF can increase the permeability of the BBB without causing brain edema. Pretreatment with VEGF may be a feasible method to facilitate drug delivery into the CNS.

  15. Negative permeability from random particle composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Shahid, E-mail: shussain2@qinetiq.com

    2017-04-15

    Artificial media, such as those composed of periodically-spaced wires for negative permittivity and split ring resonators for negative permeability have been extensively investigated for negative refractive index (NRI) applications (Smith et al., 2004; Pendry et al., 1999) [1,2]. This paper presents an alternative method for producing negative permeability: granular (or particulate) composites incorporating magnetic fillers. Artificial media, such as split-ring resonators, are designed to produce a magnetic resonance feature, which results in negative permeability over a narrow frequency range about the resonance frequency. The position of the feature is dependent upon the size of the inclusion. The material in this case is anisotropic, such that the feature is only observable when the materials are orientated in a specific direction relative to the applied field. A similar resonance can be generated in magnetic granular (particulate) materials: ferromagnetic resonance from the natural spin resonance of particles. Although the theoretical resonance profiles in granular composites shows the permeability dipping to negative values, this is rarely observed experimentally due to resonance damping effects. Results are presented for iron in spherical form and in flake form, dispersed in insulating host matrices. The two particle shapes show different permeability performance, with the magnetic flakes producing a negative contribution. This is attributed to the stronger coupling with the magnetic field resulting from the high aspect ratio of the flakes. The accompanying ferromagnetic resonance is strong enough to overcome the effects of damping and produce negative permeability. The size of random particle composites is not dictated by the wavelength of the applied field, so the materials are potentially much thinner than other, more traditional artificial composites at microwave frequencies. - Highlights: • Negative permeability from random particle composites is

  16. Permeability enhancement by shock cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Reuschlé, Thierry; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The permeability of an efficient reservoir, e.g. a geothermal reservoir, should be sufficient to permit the circulation of fluids. Generally speaking, permeability decreases over the life cycle of the geothermal system. As a result, is usually necessary to artificially maintain and enhance the natural permeability of these systems. One of the methods of enhancement -- studied here -- is thermal stimulation (injecting cold water at low pressure). This goal of this method is to encourage new thermal cracks within the reservoir host rocks, thereby increasing reservoir permeability. To investigate the development of thermal microcracking in the laboratory we selected two granites: a fine-grained (Garibaldi Grey granite, grain size = 0.5 mm) and a course-grained granite (Lanhelin granite, grain size = 2 mm). Both granites have an initial porosity of about 1%. Our samples were heated to a range of temperatures (100-1000 °C) and were either cooled slowly (1 °C/min) or shock cooled (100 °C/s). A systematic microstructural (2D crack area density, using standard stereological techniques, and 3D BET specific surface area measurements) and rock physical property (porosity, P-wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability) analysis was undertaken to understand the influence of slow and shock cooling on our reservoir granites. Microstructurally, we observe that the 2D crack surface area per unit volume and the specific surface area increase as a result of thermal stressing, and, for the same maximum temperature, crack surface area is higher in the shock cooled samples. This observation is echoed by our rock physical property measurements: we see greater changes for the shock cooled samples. We can conclude that shock cooling is an extremely efficient method of generating thermal microcracks and modifying rock physical properties. Our study highlights that thermal treatments are likely to be an efficient method for the "matrix" permeability enhancement of

  17. Herbal medicines that benefit epidermal permeability barrier function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhi Hu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal permeability barrier function plays a critical role in regulating cutaneous functions. Hence, researchers have been searching for effective and affordable regimens to enhance epidermal permeability barrier function. In addition to topical stratum corneum lipids, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, and liver X receptor ligands, herbal medicines have been proven to benefit epidermal permeability barrier function in both normal and diseased skin, including atopic dermatitis, glucocorticoid-induced skin damage, and UVB-damaged skin. The potential mechanisms by which herbal medicines improve the permeability barrier include stimulation of epidermal differentiation, lipid production, antimicrobial peptide expression, and antioxidation. Therefore, utilization of herbal medicines could be a valuable alternative approach to enhance epidermal permeability barrier function in order to prevent and/or treat skin disorders associated with permeability barrier abnormalities.

  18. Design, synthesis, and biological activities of novel hexahydropyrazino[1,2-a]indole derivatives as potent inhibitors of apoptosis (IAP) proteins antagonists with improved membrane permeability across MDR1 expressing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiokawa, Zenyu; Hashimoto, Kentaro; Saito, Bunnai; Oguro, Yuya; Sumi, Hiroyuki; Yabuki, Masato; Yoshimatsu, Mie; Kosugi, Yohei; Debori, Yasuyuki; Morishita, Nao; Dougan, Douglas R; Snell, Gyorgy P; Yoshida, Sei; Ishikawa, Tomoyasu

    2013-12-15

    We previously reported octahydropyrrolo[1,2-a]pyrazine derivative 2 (T-3256336) as a potent antagonist for inhibitors of apoptosis (IAP) proteins. Because compound 2 was susceptible to MDR1 mediated efflux, we developed another scaffold, hexahydropyrazino[1,2-a]indole, using structure-based drug design. The fused benzene ring of this scaffold was aimed at increasing the lipophilicity and decreasing the basicity of the scaffold to improve the membrane permeability across MDR1 expressing cells. We established a chiral pool synthetic route to yield the desired tricyclic chiral isomers. Chemical modification of the core scaffold led to a representative compound 50, which showed strong inhibition of IAP binding (X chromosome-linked IAP [XIAP]: IC50 23 nM and cellular IAP [cIAP]: IC50 1.1 nM) and cell growth inhibition (MDA-MB-231 cells: GI50 2.8 nM) with high permeability and low potential of MDR1 substrate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Surface-subsurface turbulent interaction at the interface of a permeable bed: influence of the wall permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T.; Blois, G.; Best, J.; Christensen, K. T.

    2017-12-01

    Coarse-gravel river beds possess a high degree of permeability. Flow interactions between surface and subsurface flow across the bed interface is key to a number of natural processes occurring in the hyporheic zone. In fact, it is increasingly recognized that these interactions drive mass, momentum and energy transport across the interface, and consequently control biochemical processes as well as stability of sediments. The current study explores the role of the wall permeability in surface and subsurface flow interaction under controlled experimental conditions on a physical model of a gravel bed. The present wall model was constructed by five layers of cubically arranged spheres (d=25.4mm, where d is a diameter) providing 48% of porosity. Surface topography was removed by cutting half of a diameter on the top layer of spheres to render the flow surface smooth and highlight the impact of the permeability on the overlying flow. An impermeable smooth wall was also considered as a baseline of comparison for the permeable wall flow. To obtain basic flow statistics, low-frame-rate high-resolution PIV measurements were performed first in the streamwise-wall-normal (x-y) plane and refractive-index matching was employed to optically access the flow within the permeable wall. Time-resolved PIV experiments in the same facility were followed to investigate the flow interaction across the wall interface in sptaio-temporal domain. In this paper, a detailed analysis of the first and second order velocity statistics as well as the amplitude modulation for the flow overlying the permeable smooth wall will be presented.

  20. Evaluation of permeability and swelling pressure of compacted bentonite using a calcium hydroxide solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyagi, Takayoshi; Maeda, Munehiro; Mihara, Morihiro; Tanaka, Masuhiro

    1998-12-01

    Tests to determine the swelling pressure, permeability, compressive strength and elastic modulus of Ca-Na exchanged bentonite, Na-bentonite and Ca-bentonite at the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation have mainly used distilled water. However, disposal facilities for TRU waste will use cementateous material for packaging, backfill as well as structural support. In this case, a large amount of calcium will dissolve in groundwater flowing through the cementateous material. Therefore, it is important to investigate the mechanical properties of bentonite in calcium-rich water as part of the disposal research program for TRU waste. In order to understand the effect of the chemical composition of water on the basic mechanical properties of bentonite - part of evaluating the disposal concepts for TRU waste disposal - we tested the permeability of compacted bentonite under saturated conditions using a calcium hydroxide solution. The aqueous solution represents water dominated by the calcium component. Na-bentonite, Ca-Na exchanged bentonite and Ca-bentonite were used for swelling pressure measurement tests and permeability testing. Measures of the maximum and equilibrium swelling pressure as well as permeability we obtained. The dry density of bentonite was varied between tests. Results show that swelling pressure and permeability are dependent on dry density. In separate tests using Ca-bentonite, the bentonite-mixing rate was varied as an independent parameter. Results show that there is little change in the swelling pressure and permeability between tests using calcium hydroxide solution and distilled water for all bentonite types. (author)

  1. Active intestinal drug absorption and the solubility-permeability interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porat, Daniel; Dahan, Arik

    2018-02-15

    The solubility-permeability interplay deals with the question: what is the concomitant effect on the drug's apparent permeability when increasing the apparent solubility with a solubility-enabling formulation? The solubility and the permeability are closely related, exhibit certain interplay between them, and ongoing research throughout the past decade shows that treating the one irrespectively of the other may be insufficient. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the current knowledge on the solubility-permeability interplay when using solubility-enabling formulations for oral lipophilic drugs, highlighting active permeability aspects. A solubility-enabling formulation may affect the permeability in opposite directions; the passive permeability may decrease as a result of the apparent solubility increase, according to the solubility-permeability tradeoff, but at the same time, certain components of the formulation may inhibit/saturate efflux transporters (when relevant), resulting in significant apparent permeability increase. In these cases, excipients with both solubilizing and e.g. P-gp inhibitory properties may lead to concomitant increase of both the solubility and the permeability. Intelligent development of such formulation will account for the simultaneous effects of the excipients' nature/concentrations on the two arms composing the overall permeability: the passive and the active arms. Overall, thorough mechanistic understanding of the various factors involved in the solubility-permeability interplay may allow developing better solubility-enabling formulations, thereby exploiting the advantages analyzed in this article, offering oral delivery solution even for BCS class IV drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Principal permeability determination from multiple horizontal well tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Economides, M. [Texas A and M Univ., TX (United States); Munoz, A.; Ehlig-Economides, C.

    1998-12-31

    A method for obtaining principal permeability magnitudes and direction that requires only the linear flow regime from transient tests in three horizontal wells oriented in three distinct and arbitrary directions, is described. Well design optimization strategies require knowledge of both the principal permeability orientation as well as the horizontal permeability magnitudes. When the degree of horizontal permeability anisotropy (i.e. permeability in the bedding plane with respect to direction) is significant, the productivity of a long horizontal well will depend greatly on its direction, especially when the well is first brought into production. Productivities have been found to deviate substantially among wells in the same reservoir and this deviation has been attributed to differences in well orientation. In view of this fact, measuring permeability anisotropy becomes a compelling necessity. The success of the proposed method is illustrated by a case study in which the principal permeability magnitudes and direction from three wells were used to predict the productivity of a fourth well within 10 per cent. Use of the computed principal permeabilities from the case study, it was possible to forecast the cumulative production to show the significance of well trajectory optimization on the discounted cash flow and the net present value. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Improved Planar Resonant RF Sensor for Retrieval of Permittivity and Permeability of Materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shafi, K.T.M.; Jha, Abhishek Kumar; Akhtar, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 17 (2017), s. 5479-5486 ISSN 1530-437X Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : inter digital capacitor * permeability * magneto-dielectric Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering OBOR OECD: Electrical and electronic engineering Impact factor: 2.512, year: 2016

  4. Permeability Tests on Eastern Scheldt Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kim Parsberg

    on the characteristics of the soil matrix, the permeability is determined for different void ratios. All tests are performed on reconstituted specimens of Eastern Scheldt Sand. The permeability is determined by use of a falling head apparatus. Finally the test results are briefly summarised and a relationship between......The flow through porous media plays an important role in various engineering disciplines, as for example in ground water hydrology and soil mechanics. In the present study the permeability is determined for a fine, saturated sand. As the flow through a porous media strongly depends...

  5. In vitro blood-brain barrier permeability predictions for GABAA receptor modulating piperine analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigenmann, Daniela Elisabeth; Dürig, Carmen; Jähne, Evelyn Andrea; Smieško, Martin; Culot, Maxime; Gosselet, Fabien; Cecchelli, Romeo; Helms, Hans Christian Cederberg; Brodin, Birger; Wimmer, Laurin; Mihovilovic, Marko D; Hamburger, Matthias; Oufir, Mouhssin

    2016-06-01

    The alkaloid piperine from black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) and several synthetic piperine analogs were recently identified as positive allosteric modulators of γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors. In order to reach their target sites of action, these compounds need to enter the brain by crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We here evaluated piperine and five selected analogs (SCT-66, SCT-64, SCT-29, LAU397, and LAU399) regarding their BBB permeability. Data were obtained in three in vitro BBB models, namely a recently established human model with immortalized hBMEC cells, a human brain-like endothelial cells (BLEC) model, and a primary animal (bovine endothelial/rat astrocytes co-culture) model. For each compound, quantitative UHPLC-MS/MS methods in the range of 5.00-500ng/mL in the corresponding matrix were developed, and permeability coefficients in the three BBB models were determined. In vitro predictions from the two human BBB models were in good agreement, while permeability data from the animal model differed to some extent, possibly due to protein binding of the screened compounds. In all three BBB models, piperine and SCT-64 displayed the highest BBB permeation potential. This was corroborated by data from in silico prediction. For the other piperine analogs (SCT-66, SCT-29, LAU397, and LAU399), BBB permeability was low to moderate in the two human BBB models, and moderate to high in the animal BBB model. Efflux ratios (ER) calculated from bidirectional permeability experiments indicated that the compounds were likely not substrates of active efflux transporters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Damage-induced permeability changes around underground excavations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coll, C.

    2005-07-01

    The storage of nuclear waste in deep geological formations is now considered more and more as a potential solution. During excavation, a disturbed zone develops in which damaging can be important and which can lead eventually to the failure of the rock. Fluid flow and permeability in the rock mass can be significantly modified producing a possible security risk. Our work consisted in an experimental study of the hydro-mechanical coupling of two argillaceous rocks: Boom clay (Mol, Belgium) and Opalinus clay (Mont-Terri, Switzerland). Triaxial tests were performed in a saturated state to study the permeability evolution of both clays with isotropic and deviatoric stresses. Argillaceous rocks are geo-materials with complex behaviour governed by numerous coupled processes. Strong physico-chemical interactions between the fluid and the solid particles and their very low permeability required the modification of the experimental set up. Moreover, specific procedures were developed to measure permeability and to detect strain localisation in shear bands. We show that for Boom Clay, permeability is not significantly influenced by strain localisation. For Opalinus clay, fracturing can induce an increase of the permeability at low confining pressure. (author)

  7. Long-term Metal Performance of Three Permeable Pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA constructed a 4,000-m2 parking lot surfaced with three permeable pavements (permeable interlocking concrete pavers, pervious concrete, and porous asphalt) on the Edison Environmental Center in Edison, NJ in 2009. Samples from each permeable pavement infiltrate were collected...

  8. Permeable Pavement Research - Edison, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation provides the background and summary of results collected at the permeable pavement parking lot monitored at the EPA facility in Edison, NJ. This parking lot is surfaced with permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete, and porous asphalt. ...

  9. Acute high-intensity interval running increases markers of gastrointestinal damage and permeability but not gastrointestinal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Jamie N; Impey, Samuel G; Doran, Dominic A; Fleming, Simon C; Morton, James P; Close, Graeme L

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of high-intensity interval running on markers of gastrointestinal (GI) damage and permeability alongside subjective symptoms of GI discomfort. Eleven male runners completed an acute bout of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) (eighteen 400-m runs at 120% maximal oxygen uptake) where markers of GI permeability, intestinal damage, and GI discomfort symptoms were assessed and compared with resting conditions. Compared with rest, HIIT significantly increased serum lactulose/rhamnose ratio (0.051 ± 0.016 vs. 0.031 ± 0.021, p = 0.0047; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.006 to 0.036) and sucrose concentrations (0.388 ± 0.217 vs. 0.137 ± 0.148 mg·L -1 ; p HIIT and resting conditions. Plasma intestinal-fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) was significantly increased (p HIIT whereas no changes were observed during rest. Mild symptoms of GI discomfort were reported immediately and at 24 h post-HIIT, although these symptoms did not correlate to GI permeability or I-FABP. In conclusion, acute HIIT increased GI permeability and intestinal I-FABP release, although these do not correlate with symptoms of GI discomfort. Furthermore, by using serum sampling, we provide data showing that it is possible to detect changes in intestinal permeability that is not observed using urinary sampling over a shorter time-period.

  10. Permeability Barrier Generation in the Martian Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schools, Joe; Montési, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Permeability barriers develop when a magma produced in the interior of a planet rises into the cooler lithosphere and crystallizes more rapidly than the lithosphere can deform (Sparks and Parmentier, 1991). Crystallization products may then clog the porous network in which melt is propagating, reducing the permeability to almost zero, i.e., forming a permeability barrier. Subsequent melts cannot cross the barrier. Permeability barriers have been useful to explain variations in crustal thickness at mid-ocean ridges on Earth (Magde et al., 1997; Hebert and Montési, 2011; Montési et al., 2011). We explore here under what conditions permeability barriers may form on Mars.We use the MELTS thermodynamic calculator (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995; Ghiorso et al., 2002; Asimow et al., 2004) in conjunction with estimated Martian mantle compositions (Morgan and Anders, 1979; Wänke and Dreibus, 1994; Lodders and Fegley, 1997; Sanloup et al., 1999; Taylor 2013) to model the formation of permeability barriers in the lithosphere of Mars. In order to represent potential past and present conditions of Mars, we vary the lithospheric thickness, mantle potential temperature (heat flux), oxygen fugacity, and water content.Our results show that permeability layers can develop in the thermal boundary layer of the simulated Martian lithosphere if the mantle potential temperature is higher than ~1500°C. The various Martian mantle compositions yield barriers in the same locations, under matching variable conditions. There is no significant difference in barrier location over the range of accepted Martian oxygen fugacity values. Water content is the most significant influence on barrier development as it reduces the temperature of crystallization, allowing melt to rise further into the lithosphere. Our lower temperature and thicker lithosphere model runs, which are likely the most similar to modern Mars, show no permeability barrier generation. Losing the possibility of having a permeability

  11. A novel representation for apoptosis protein subcellular localization prediction using support vector machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Liao, Bo; Li, Dachao; Zhu, Wen

    2009-07-21

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, plays an important role in development of an organism. Obtaining information on subcellular location of apoptosis proteins is very helpful to understand the apoptosis mechanism. In this paper, based on the concept that the position distribution information of amino acids is closely related with the structure and function of proteins, we introduce the concept of distance frequency [Matsuda, S., Vert, J.P., Ueda, N., Toh, H., Akutsu, T., 2005. A novel representation of protein sequences for prediction of subcellular location using support vector machines. Protein Sci. 14, 2804-2813] and propose a novel way to calculate distance frequencies. In order to calculate the local features, each protein sequence is separated into p parts with the same length in our paper. Then we use the novel representation of protein sequences and adopt support vector machine to predict subcellular location. The overall prediction accuracy is significantly improved by jackknife test.

  12. Effects of carbohydrate/protein ratio on the microstructure and the barrier and sorption properties of wheat starch-whey protein blend edible films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiak, Ewelina; Lenart, Andrzej; Debeaufort, Frédéric

    2017-02-01

    Starch and whey protein isolate and their mixtures were used for making edible films. Moisture sorption isotherms, water vapour permeability, sorption of aroma compounds, microstructure, water contact angle and surface properties were investigated. With increasing protein content, the microstructure changes became more homogeneous. The water vapour permeability increases with both the humidity gradient and the starch content. For all films, the hygroscopicity increases with starch content. Surface properties change according to the starch/whey protein ratio and are mainly related to the polar component of the surface tension. Films composed of 80% starch and 20% whey proteins have more hydrophobic surfaces than the other films due to specific interactions. The effect of carbohydrate/protein ratio significantly influences the microstructure, the surface wettability and the barrier properties of wheat starch-whey protein blend films. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Permeability of skin and oral mucosa to water and horseradish peroxidase as related to the thickness of the permeability barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squier, C.A.; Hall, B.K.

    1985-01-01

    The permeability of porcine skin and keratinized and nonkeratinized oral mucosa to tritium-labeled water and horseradish peroxidase (HRPO) was determined using perfusion chambers. Small blocks from each tissue were also incubated with HRPO and the extent of penetration visualized microscopically; this enabled measurements to be made of the thickness of the permeability barrier to this water-soluble tracer. Results obtained after inverting the oral mucosa in the chambers or adding metabolic inhibitors indicated that both compounds diffuse across the tissue. The permeability constants derived directly in the study showed that skin was less permeable than oral mucosa and that the floor of the mouth was significantly more permeable than all other regions. When these constants were normalized in terms of a standard permeability barrier thickness and the different tissues compared, the values obtained for skin were again less than those of the oral regions but, of these, the buccal mucosa was significantly higher. The difference in permeability between epidermis and keratinized oral epithelium may be due to differences in the volume density of membrane-coating granules known to exist between the tissues; differences between the oral mucosal regions may reflect differences in the nature of the intercellular barrier material

  14. Update to Permeable Pavement Research at the Edison ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA’s Urban Watershed Management Branch (UWMB) has been monitoring the permeable pavement demonstration site at the Edison Environmental Center, NJ since 2010. This site has three different types of permeable pavements including interlocking concrete permeable pavers, pervious concrete, and porous asphalt. The permeable pavements are limited to parking spaces while adjacent driving lanes are impermeable and drain to the permeable surfaces. The parking lot is instrumented for continuous monitoring with thermistors and water content reflectometers that measure moisture as infiltrate passes through the storage gallery beneath the permeable pavements into the underlying native soil. Each permeable surface of the parking lot has four lined sections that capture infiltrate in tanks for water quality analyses; these tanks are capable of holding volumes up to 4.1 m3, which represents up to 38 mm (1.5 in.) for direct rainfall on the porous pavement and runoff from adjacent driving lanes that drain into the permeable surface.Previous technical releases concerning the demonstration site focused on monitoring techniques, observed chloride and nutrient concentrations, surface hydrology, and infiltration and evaporation rates. This presentation summarizes these past findings and addresses current water quality efforts including pH, solids analysis, total organic carbon, and chemical oxygen demand. Stormwater runoff continues to be a major cause of water pollution in

  15. Influence of Cholesterol on the Oxygen Permeability of Membranes: Insight from Atomistic Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Rachel J; Smith, Casey R; Bueche, Kristina; Angles, Gary; Pias, Sally C

    2017-06-06

    Cholesterol is widely known to alter the physical properties and permeability of membranes. Several prior works have implicated cell membrane cholesterol as a barrier to tissue oxygenation, yet a good deal remains to be explained with regard to the mechanism and magnitude of the effect. We use molecular dynamics simulations to provide atomic-resolution insight into the influence of cholesterol on oxygen diffusion across and within the membrane. Our simulations show strong overall agreement with published experimental data, reproducing the shapes of experimental oximetry curves with high accuracy. We calculate the upper-limit transmembrane oxygen permeability of a 1-palmitoyl,2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine phospholipid bilayer to be 52 ± 2 cm/s, close to the permeability of a water layer of the same thickness. With addition of cholesterol, the permeability decreases somewhat, reaching 40 ± 2 cm/s at the near-saturating level of 62.5 mol % cholesterol and 10 ± 2 cm/s in a 100% cholesterol mimic of the experimentally observed noncrystalline cholesterol bilayer domain. These reductions in permeability can only be biologically consequential in contexts where the diffusional path of oxygen is not water dominated. In our simulations, cholesterol reduces the overall solubility of oxygen within the membrane but enhances the oxygen transport parameter (solubility-diffusion product) near the membrane center. Given relatively low barriers to passing from membrane to membrane, our findings support hydrophobic channeling within membranes as a means of cellular and tissue-level oxygen transport. In such a membrane-dominated diffusional scheme, the influence of cholesterol on oxygen permeability is large enough to warrant further attention. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Atelocollagen Formulation Containing Oligonucleotide on Endothelial Permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Hanai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atelocollagen is a major animal protein that is used as a highly biocompatible biomaterial. To date, atelocollagen has been used as an effective drug delivery technology to sustain the release of antitumor proteins and to enhance the antitumor activity of oligonucleotides in in vivo models. However, the biological effects of this technology are not fully understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of atelocollagen on endothelial paracellular barrier function. An atelocollagen formulation containing oligonucleotides specifically increased the permeability of two types of endothelial cells, and the change was dependent on the molecular size, structure of the oligonucleotides used and the concentrations of the oligonucleotide and atelocollagen in the formulation. An immunohistochemical examination revealed that the formulation had effects on the cellular skeleton and intercellular structure although it did not affect the expression of adherens junction or tight junction proteins. These changes were induced through p38 MAP kinase signaling. It is important to elucidate the biological functions of atelocollagen in order to be able to exploit its drug delivery properties.

  17. Biostable glucose permeable polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    A new biostable glucose permeable polymer has been developed which is useful, for example, in implantable glucose sensors. This biostable glucose permeable polymer has a number of advantageous characteristics and, for example, does not undergo hydrolytic cleavage and degradation, thereby providing...... a composition that facilitates long term sensor stability in vivo. The versatile characteristics of this polymer allow it to be used in a variety of contexts, for example to form the body of an implantable glucose sensor. The invention includes the polymer composition, sensor systems formed from this polymer...

  18. AAnti-leakage mechanism and effect of sodium aescinate on the permeability of blood-brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping GUO

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To study the anti-leakage mechanism and protective effect of sodium aescinate on the blood-brain barrier of rats acutely exposed to hypoxia. Methods  Seventy-five healthy SD rats were randomly divided into 3 groups (25 each: normoxic control (NC, simple hypoxic (SH and drug treated (DT group. Acute hypoxia brain edema rat model was established by a simulation of acute high-altitude hypoxia for 5 days. The cerebral water content was determined by dry-wet method. The permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB was evaluated by Evans blue (EB method. The pathological change of the brain was detected by HE staining. The state of BBB tight junction (TJ and ultrastructures of the brain tissues were observed by lanthanum nitrate tracer method under transmission electron microscope (TEM. Protein and mRNA expression of Occludin, Zo-1 and Claudin-5 were investigated by immunohistochemistry, Western-blotting and real-time PCR respectively. Results  After exposure to acute hypoxia for 5 days, compared with NC group, the water content of brain in SH group increased obviously (PPPPPConclusion  Acute hypoxia exposure may lead to a remarkable decline of the expressions of rat's brain Occludin protein and the Occludin, Zo-1 and Claudin-5 mRNA, and an obvious increase of BBB permeability. Sodium aescinate can up-regulate the expression level of these molecules and decrease BBB permeability, thus playing a profitable role of anti-leakage and BBB protection.

  19. PHO-ERK1/2 interaction with mitochondria regulates the permeability transition pore in cardioprotective signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Reséndiz, Sauri; Zazueta, Cecilia

    2014-07-11

    The molecular mechanism(s) by which extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and other kinases communicate with downstream targets have not been fully determined. Multiprotein signaling complexes undergoing spatiotemporal redistribution may enhance their interaction with effector proteins promoting cardioprotective response. Particularly, it has been proposed that some active kinases in association with caveolae may converge into mitochondria. Therefore, in this study we investigate if PHO-ERK1/2 interaction with mitochondria may provide a mechanistic link in the regulation of these organelles in cardioprotective signaling. Using a model of dilated cardiomyopathy followed by ischemia-reperfusion injury, we determined ERK1/2 signaling at the level of mitochondria and evaluated its effect on the permeability transition pore. The most important finding of the present study is that, under cardioprotective conditions, a subpopulation of activated ERK1/2 was directed to the mitochondrial membranes through vesicular trafficking, concurring with increased phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins and inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening. In addition, our results suggest that vesicles enriched with caveolin-3 could form structures that may drive ERK1/2, GSK3β and Akt to mitochondria. Signaling complexes including PHO-ERK, PHO-Akt, PHO-eNOS and caveolin-3 contribute to cardioprotection by directly targeting the mitochondrial proteome and regulating the opening of the permeability transition pore in this model. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Stress induces endotoxemia and low-grade inflammation by increasing barrier permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin ede Punder

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs are the leading causes of work absence, disability and mortality worldwide. Most of these diseases are associated with low-grade inflammation. Here we hypothesize that stresses (defined as homeostatic disturbances can induce low-grade inflammation by increasing the availability of water, sodium and energy-rich substances to meet the increased metabolic demand induced by the stressor. One way of triggering low-grade inflammation is by increasing intestinal barrier permeability through activation of various components of the stress system. Although beneficial to meet the demands necessary during stress, increased intestinal barrier permeability also raises the possibility of the translocation of bacteria and their toxins across the intestinal lumen into the blood circulation. In combination with modern life-style factors, the increase in bacteria/bacterial toxin translocation arising from a more permeable intestinal wall causes a low-grade inflammatory state. We support this hypothesis with numerous studies finding associations with NCDs and markers of endotoxemia, suggesting that this process plays a pivotal and perhaps even a causal role in the development of low-grade inflammation and its related diseases.

  1. Membrane Protein Mobility and Orientation Preserved in Supported Bilayers Created Directly from Cell Plasma Membrane Blebs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Mark J; Hsia, Chih-Yun; Singh, Rohit R; Haider, Huma; Kumpf, Julia; Kawate, Toshimitsu; Daniel, Susan

    2016-03-29

    Membrane protein interactions with lipids are crucial for their native biological behavior, yet traditional characterization methods are often carried out on purified protein in the absence of lipids. We present a simple method to transfer membrane proteins expressed in mammalian cells to an assay-friendly, cushioned, supported lipid bilayer platform using cell blebs as an intermediate. Cell blebs, expressing either GPI-linked yellow fluorescent proteins or neon-green fused transmembrane P2X2 receptors, were induced to rupture on glass surfaces using PEGylated lipid vesicles, which resulted in planar supported membranes with over 50% mobility for multipass transmembrane proteins and over 90% for GPI-linked proteins. Fluorescent proteins were tracked, and their diffusion in supported bilayers characterized, using single molecule tracking and moment scaling spectrum (MSS) analysis. Diffusion was characterized for individual proteins as either free or confined, revealing details of the local lipid membrane heterogeneity surrounding the protein. A particularly useful result of our bilayer formation process is the protein orientation in the supported planar bilayer. For both the GPI-linked and transmembrane proteins used here, an enzymatic assay revealed that protein orientation in the planar bilayer results in the extracellular domains facing toward the bulk, and that the dominant mode of bleb rupture is via the "parachute" mechanism. Mobility, orientation, and preservation of the native lipid environment of the proteins using cell blebs offers advantages over proteoliposome reconstitution or disrupted cell membrane preparations, which necessarily result in significant scrambling of protein orientation and typically immobilized membrane proteins in SLBs. The bleb-based bilayer platform presented here is an important step toward integrating membrane proteomic studies on chip, especially for future studies aimed at understanding fundamental effects of lipid interactions

  2. Effect of aggregate grain size distribution on properties of permeable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) ratio on the mechanical properties of permeable concrete is investigated. The aim of this study is to prepare permeable concrete mixture with optimum properties in terms of strength and permeability. For this purpose, five different permeable ...

  3. Minoxidil sulfate induced the increase in blood-brain tumor barrier permeability through ROS/RhoA/PI3K/PKB signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yan-ting; Xue, Yi-xue; Wang, Yan-feng; Wang, Jin-hui; Chen, Xia; ShangGuan, Qian-ru; Lian, Yan; Zhong, Lei; Meng, Ying-nan

    2013-12-01

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel (KATP channel) activator, minoxidil sulfate (MS), can selectively increase the permeability of the blood-tumor barrier (BTB); however, the mechanism by which this occurs is still under investigation. Using a rat brain glioma (C6) model, we first examined the expression levels of occludin and claudin-5 at different time points after intracarotid infusion of MS (30 μg/kg/min) by western blotting. Compared to MS treatment for 0 min group, the protein expression levels of occludin and claudin-5 in brain tumor tissue of rats showed no changes within 1 h and began to decrease significantly after 2 h of MS infusion. Based on these findings, we then used an in vitro BTB model and selective inhibitors of diverse signaling pathways to investigate whether reactive oxygen species (ROS)/RhoA/PI3K/PKB pathway play a key role in the process of the increase of BTB permeability induced by MS. The inhibitor of ROS or RhoA or PI3K or PKB significantly attenuated the expression of tight junction (TJ) protein and the increase of the BTB permeability after 2 h of MS treatment. In addition, the significant increases in RhoA activity and PKB phosphorylation after MS administration were observed, which were partly inhibited by N-2-mercaptopropionyl glycine (MPG) or C3 exoenzyme or LY294002 pretreatment. The present study indicates that the activation of signaling cascades involving ROS/RhoA/PI3K/PKB in BTB was required for the increase of BTB permeability induced by MS. Taken together, all of these results suggested that MS might increase BTB permeability in a time-dependent manner by down-regulating TJ protein expression and this effect could be related to ROS/RhoA/PI3K/PKB signal pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Permeability, storage and hydraulic diffusivity controlled by earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, E. E.; Fulton, P. M.; Xue, L.

    2016-12-01

    Earthquakes can increase permeability in fractured rocks. In the farfield, such permeability increases are attributed to seismic waves and can last for months after the initial earthquake. Laboratory studies suggest that unclogging of fractures by the transient flow driven by seismic waves is a viable mechanism. These dynamic permeability increases may contribute to permeability enhancement in the seismic clouds accompanying hydraulic fracking. Permeability enhancement by seismic waves could potentially be engineered and the experiments suggest the process will be most effective at a preferred frequency. We have recently observed similar processes inside active fault zones after major earthquakes. A borehole observatory in the fault that generated the M9.0 2011 Tohoku earthquake reveals a sequence of temperature pulses during the secondary aftershock sequence of an M7.3 aftershock. The pulses are attributed to fluid advection by a flow through a zone of transiently increased permeability. Directly after the M7.3 earthquake, the newly damaged fault zone is highly susceptible to further permeability enhancement, but ultimately heals within a month and becomes no longer as sensitive. The observation suggests that the newly damaged fault zone is more prone to fluid pulsing than would be expected based on the long-term permeability structure. Even longer term healing is seen inside the fault zone of the 2008 M7.9 Wenchuan earthquake. The competition between damage and healing (or clogging and unclogging) results in dynamically controlled permeability, storage and hydraulic diffusivity. Recent measurements of in situ fault zone architecture at the 1-10 meter scale suggest that active fault zones often have hydraulic diffusivities near 10-2 m2/s. This uniformity is true even within the damage zone of the San Andreas fault where permeability and storage increases balance each other to achieve this value of diffusivity over a 400 m wide region. We speculate that fault zones

  5. A drainage data-based calculation method for coalbed permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Feng-peng; Li, Zhi-ping; Fu, Ying-kun; Yang, Zhi-hao

    2013-01-01

    This paper establishes a drainage data-based calculation method for coalbed permeability. The method combines material balance and production equations. We use a material balance equation to derive the average pressure of the coalbed in the production process. The dimensionless water production index is introduced into the production equation for the water production stage. In the subsequent stage, which uses both gas and water, the gas and water production ratio is introduced to eliminate the effect of flush-flow radius, skin factor, and other uncertain factors in the calculation of coalbed methane permeability. The relationship between permeability and surface cumulative liquid production can be described as a single-variable cubic equation by derivation. The trend shows that the permeability initially declines and then increases after ten wells in the southern Qinshui coalbed methane field. The results show an exponential relationship between permeability and cumulative water production. The relationship between permeability and cumulative gas production is represented by a linear curve and that between permeability and surface cumulative liquid production is represented by a cubic polynomial curve. The regression result of the permeability and surface cumulative liquid production agrees with the theoretical mathematical relationship. (paper)

  6. Permeability changes of coal cores and briquettes under tri-axial stress conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wierzbicki, M.; Konečný, Pavel; Kožušníková, Alena

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 4 (2014), s. 1129-1138 ISSN 0860-7001 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : coal * gas permeability * tri-axial stress * coal briquettes Subject RIV: DH - Mining, incl. Coal Mining Impact factor: 0.608, year: 2013 http://mining.archives.pl

  7. Evaluation of permeability of compacted bentonite ground considering heterogeneity by geostatistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yukihisa; Nakamura, Kunihiko; Kudo, Kohji; Hironaga, Michihiko; Nakagami, Motonori; Niwase, Kazuhito; Komatsu, Shin-ichi

    2007-01-01

    The permeability of the bentonite ground as an engineered barrier is possibly designed to the value which is lower than that determined in terms of required performance because of heterogeneous distribution of permeability in the ground, which might be considerable when the ground is created by the compaction method. The effect of heterogeneity in the ground on the permeability of the bentonite ground should be evaluated by overall permeability of the ground, whereas in practice, the effect is evaluated by the distribution of permeability in the ground. Thus, in this study, overall permeability of the bentonite ground is evaluated from the permeability of the bentonite ground is evaluated from the permeability distribution determined using the geostatistical method with the dry density data as well as permeability data of the undisturbed sample recovered from the bentonite ground. Consequently, it was proved through this study that possibility of overestimation of permeability of the bentonite ground can be reduced if the overall permeability is used. (author)

  8. In vivo human buccal permeability of nicotine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adrian, Charlotte L; Olin, Helle B D; Dalhoff, Kim

    2006-01-01

    The aim was to examine the in vivo buccal pH-dependent permeability of nicotine in humans and furthermore compare the in vivo permeability of nicotine to previous in vitro permeability data. The buccal permeability of nicotine was examined in a three-way cross-over study in eight healthy non......-smokers using a buccal perfusion cell. The disappearance of nicotine from perfusion solutions with pH 6.0, 7.4, and 8.1 was studied for 3h. The apparent permeability of nicotine (P(app)) was determined at each pH value. Parotid saliva was collected in an attempt to assess systemic levels of nicotine....... The disappearance rate of nicotine increased significantly as the pH increased, which resulted in P(app) values of 0.57+/-0.55 x 10(-4), 2.10+/-0.23 x 10(-4), and 3.96+/-0.54 x 10(-4)cms(-1) (mean+/-S.D.) at pH 6.0, 7.4, and 8.1, respectively. A linear relationship (R(2)=0.993) was obtained between the P...

  9. Zonulin upregulation is associated with increased gut permeability in subjects with type 1 diabetes and their relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapone, Anna; de Magistris, Laura; Pietzak, Michelle; Clemente, Maria G; Tripathi, Amit; Cucca, Francesco; Lampis, Rosanna; Kryszak, Deborah; Cartenì, Maria; Generoso, Maddalena; Iafusco, Dario; Prisco, Francesco; Laghi, Francesca; Riegler, Gabriele; Carratu, Romano; Counts, Debra; Fasano, Alessio

    2006-05-01

    Zonulin, a protein that modulates intestinal permeability, is upregulated in several autoimmune diseases and is involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes in the BB/Wor animal model of the disease. To verify the association between serum zonulin levels and in vivo intestinal permeability in patients with type 1 diabetes, both parameters were investigated in different stages of the autoimmune process. Forty-two percent (141 of 339) of the patients had abnormal serum zonulin levels, as compared with age-matched control subjects. The increased zonulin levels correlated with increased intestinal permeability in vivo and changes in claudin-1, claudin-2, and myosin IXB genes expression, while no changes were detected in ZO1 and occludin genes expression. When tested in serum samples collected during the pre-type 1 diabetes phase, elevated serum zonulin was detected in 70% of subjects and preceded by 3.5 +/- 0.9 years the onset of the disease in those patients who went on to develop type 1 diabetes. Combined, these results suggest that zonulin upregulation is associated with increased intestinal permeability in a subgroup of type 1 diabetic patients. Zonulin upregulation seems to precede the onset of the disease, providing a possible link between increased intestinal permeability, environmental exposure to non-self antigens, and the development of autoimmunity in genetically susceptible individuals.

  10. Partial Support Ventilation and Mitochondrial-Targeted Antioxidants Protect against Ventilator-Induced Decreases in Diaphragm Muscle Protein Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Matthew B; Smuder, Ashley J; Nelson, W Bradley; Wiggs, Michael P; Shimkus, Kevin L; Fluckey, James D; Szeto, Hazel H; Powers, Scott K

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life-saving intervention in patients in respiratory failure. Unfortunately, prolonged MV results in the rapid development of diaphragm atrophy and weakness. MV-induced diaphragmatic weakness is significant because inspiratory muscle dysfunction is a risk factor for problematic weaning from MV. Therefore, developing a clinical intervention to prevent MV-induced diaphragm atrophy is important. In this regard, MV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy occurs due to both increased proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis. While efforts to impede MV-induced increased proteolysis in the diaphragm are well-documented, only one study has investigated methods of preserving diaphragmatic protein synthesis during prolonged MV. Therefore, we evaluated the efficacy of two therapeutic interventions that, conceptually, have the potential to sustain protein synthesis in the rat diaphragm during prolonged MV. Specifically, these experiments were designed to: 1) determine if partial-support MV will protect against the decrease in diaphragmatic protein synthesis that occurs during prolonged full-support MV; and 2) establish if treatment with a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant will maintain diaphragm protein synthesis during full-support MV. Compared to spontaneously breathing animals, full support MV resulted in a significant decline in diaphragmatic protein synthesis during 12 hours of MV. In contrast, diaphragm protein synthesis rates were maintained during partial support MV at levels comparable to spontaneous breathing animals. Further, treatment of animals with a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant prevented oxidative stress during full support MV and maintained diaphragm protein synthesis at the level of spontaneous breathing animals. We conclude that treatment with mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants or the use of partial-support MV are potential strategies to preserve diaphragm protein synthesis during prolonged MV.

  11. Partial Support Ventilation and Mitochondrial-Targeted Antioxidants Protect against Ventilator-Induced Decreases in Diaphragm Muscle Protein Synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Hudson

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation (MV is a life-saving intervention in patients in respiratory failure. Unfortunately, prolonged MV results in the rapid development of diaphragm atrophy and weakness. MV-induced diaphragmatic weakness is significant because inspiratory muscle dysfunction is a risk factor for problematic weaning from MV. Therefore, developing a clinical intervention to prevent MV-induced diaphragm atrophy is important. In this regard, MV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy occurs due to both increased proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis. While efforts to impede MV-induced increased proteolysis in the diaphragm are well-documented, only one study has investigated methods of preserving diaphragmatic protein synthesis during prolonged MV. Therefore, we evaluated the efficacy of two therapeutic interventions that, conceptually, have the potential to sustain protein synthesis in the rat diaphragm during prolonged MV. Specifically, these experiments were designed to: 1 determine if partial-support MV will protect against the decrease in diaphragmatic protein synthesis that occurs during prolonged full-support MV; and 2 establish if treatment with a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant will maintain diaphragm protein synthesis during full-support MV. Compared to spontaneously breathing animals, full support MV resulted in a significant decline in diaphragmatic protein synthesis during 12 hours of MV. In contrast, diaphragm protein synthesis rates were maintained during partial support MV at levels comparable to spontaneous breathing animals. Further, treatment of animals with a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant prevented oxidative stress during full support MV and maintained diaphragm protein synthesis at the level of spontaneous breathing animals. We conclude that treatment with mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants or the use of partial-support MV are potential strategies to preserve diaphragm protein synthesis during prolonged MV.

  12. The permeability and consolidation of deep-sea sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultheiss, P.J.; Gunn, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents permeability and consolidation data for a wide range of sediment types. Permeability is one of the two parameters which are needed to directly quantify pore water advection in deep sea sediments and which are being investigated in high-level radioactive waste study areas. While it is desirable that these parameters should be measured in situ it is argued that values of permeability can be measured sufficiently accurately in the laboratory from core samples. Consequently, an apparatus has been developed which enables sediment permeability to be measured at decreasing void ratios during a back-pressured consolidation test. Data presented in this report from over 60 samples have established the major differences in permeability between various sediment types and how permeability changes as a function of burial depth and void ratio. Samples from two study areas in the North Atlantic Ocean, King's Trough Flank (KTF) and Great Meteor East (GME), have been compared with samples of Red Clay (RC) obtained from the NW Pacific Ocean. Results are presented and discussed. (author)

  13. Transformable ferroelectric control of dynamic magnetic permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Changjun; Jia, Chenglong; Wang, Fenglong; Zhou, Cai; Xue, Desheng

    2018-02-01

    Magnetic permeability, which measures the response of a material to an applied magnetic field, is crucial to the performance of magnetic devices and related technologies. Its dynamic value is usually a complex number with real and imaginary parts that describe, respectively, how much magnetic power can be stored and lost in the material. Control of permeability is therefore closely related to energy redistribution within a magnetic system or energy exchange between magnetic and other degrees of freedom via certain spin-dependent interactions. To avoid a high power consumption, direct manipulation of the permeability with an electric field through magnetoelectric coupling leads to high efficiency and simple operation, but remains a big challenge in both the fundamental physics and material science. Here we report unambiguous evidence of ferroelectric control of dynamic magnetic permeability in a Co /Pb (Mg1/3Nb2/3) 0.7Ti0.3O3 (Co/PMN-PT) heterostructure, in which the ferroelectric PMN-PT acts as an energy source for the ferromagnetic Co film via an interfacial linear magnetoelectric interaction. The electric field tuning of the magnitude and line shape of the permeability offers a highly localized means of controlling magnetization with ultralow power consumption. Additionally, the emergence of negative permeability promises a new way of realizing functional nanoscale metamaterials with adjustable refraction index.

  14. Accurate control testing for clay liner permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, R J

    1991-08-01

    Two series of centrifuge tests were carried out to evaluate the use of centrifuge modelling as a method of accurate control testing of clay liner permeability. The first series used a large 3 m radius geotechnical centrifuge and the second series a small 0.5 m radius machine built specifically for research on clay liners. Two permeability cells were fabricated in order to provide direct data comparisons between the two methods of permeability testing. In both cases, the centrifuge method proved to be effective and efficient, and was found to be free of both the technical difficulties and leakage risks normally associated with laboratory permeability testing of fine grained soils. Two materials were tested, a consolidated kaolin clay having an average permeability coefficient of 1.2{times}10{sup -9} m/s and a compacted illite clay having a permeability coefficient of 2.0{times}10{sup -11} m/s. Four additional tests were carried out to demonstrate that the 0.5 m radius centrifuge could be used for linear performance modelling to evaluate factors such as volumetric water content, compaction method and density, leachate compatibility and other construction effects on liner leakage. The main advantages of centrifuge testing of clay liners are rapid and accurate evaluation of hydraulic properties and realistic stress modelling for performance evaluations. 8 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Permeability, zonulin production, and enteropathy in dermatitis herpetiformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smecuol, Edgardo; Sugai, Emilia; Niveloni, Sonia; Vázquez, Horacio; Pedreira, Silvia; Mazure, Roberto; Moreno, María Laura; Label, Marcelo; Mauriño, Eduardo; Fasano, Alessio; Meddings, Jon; Bai, Julio César

    2005-04-01

    Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) is characterized by variable degrees of enteropathy and increased intestinal permeability. Zonulin, a regulator of tight junctions, seems to play a key role in the altered intestinal permeability that characterizes the early phase of celiac disease. Our aim was to assess both intestinal permeability and serum zonulin levels in a group of patients with DH having variable grades of enteropathy. We studied 18 DH patients diagnosed on the basis of characteristic immunoglobulin (Ig)A granular deposits in the dermal papillae of noninvolved skin. Results were compared with those of classic celiac patients, patients with linear IgA dermatosis, and healthy controls. According to Marsh's classification, 5 patients had no evidence of enteropathy (type 0), 4 patients had type II, 2 patients had type IIIb damage, and 7 patients had a more severe lesion (type IIIc). Intestinal permeability (lactulose/mannitol ratio [lac/man]) was abnormal in all patients with DH. Patients with more severe enteropathy had significantly greater permeability ( P zonulin concentration (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) for patients with DH was 2.1 +/- .3 ng/mg with 14 of 16 (87.5%) patients having abnormally increased values. In contrast, patients with linear IgA dermatosis had normal histology, normal intestinal permeability, and negative celiac serology. Increased intestinal permeability and zonulin up-regulation are common and concomitant findings among patients with DH, likely involved in pathogenesis. Increased permeability can be observed even in patients with no evidence of histologic damage in biopsy specimens. Patients with linear IgA dermatosis appear to be a distinct population with no evidence of gluten sensitivity.

  16. Proteins and amino acids are fundamental to optimal nutrition support in critically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijs, P.J.M.; Cynober, L.; DeLegge, M.; Kreymann, G.; Wernerman, J.; Wolfe, R.R.

    2014-01-01

    Proteins and amino acids are widely considered to be subcomponents in nutritional support. However, proteins and amino acids are fundamental to recovery and survival, not only for their ability to preserve active tissue (protein) mass but also for a variety of other functions. Understanding the

  17. Therapeutic benefits of enhancing permeability barrier for atopic eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Man

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory role of epidermal permeability barrier function in cutaneous inflammation has been well appreciated. While barrier disruption induces cutaneous inflammation, improvement of permeability barrier function alleviates inflammation. Studies have demonstrated that improvement of epidermal permeability barrier function not only prevents the development of atopic eczema, but also delays the relapse of these diseases. Moreover, enhancing the epidermal permeability barrier also alleviates atopic eczema. Furthermore, co-applications of barrier enhancing products with glucocorticoids can increase the therapeutic efficacy and reduce the adverse effects of glucocorticoids in the treatment of atopic eczema. Therefore, utilization of permeability barrier enhancing products alone or in combination with glucocorticoids could be a valuable approach in the treatment of atopic eczema. In this review, we discuss the benefits of improving the epidermal permeability barrier in the management of atopic eczema.

  18. Preliminary study of soil permeability properties using principal component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulianti, M.; Sudriani, Y.; Rustini, H. A.

    2018-02-01

    Soil permeability measurement is undoubtedly important in carrying out soil-water research such as rainfall-runoff modelling, irrigation water distribution systems, etc. It is also known that acquiring reliable soil permeability data is rather laborious, time-consuming, and costly. Therefore, it is desirable to develop the prediction model. Several studies of empirical equations for predicting permeability have been undertaken by many researchers. These studies derived the models from areas which soil characteristics are different from Indonesian soil, which suggest a possibility that these permeability models are site-specific. The purpose of this study is to identify which soil parameters correspond strongly to soil permeability and propose a preliminary model for permeability prediction. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to 16 parameters analysed from 37 sites consist of 91 samples obtained from Batanghari Watershed. Findings indicated five variables that have strong correlation with soil permeability, and we recommend a preliminary permeability model, which is potential for further development.

  19. Characterizing gas permeability and pore properties of Czech granitic rocks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konečný, Pavel; Kožušníková, Alena

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2016), s. 331-338 ISSN 1214-9705 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA105/09/0089; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : granitic rocks * permeability * pore properties Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.699, year: 2016 https://www.irsm.cas.cz/materialy/acta_content/2016_doi/Konecny_AGG_2016_0015.pdf

  20. Long-term performance monitoring for a permeable reactive barrier at the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center, Elizabeth City, North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puls, R W; Blowes, D W; Gillham, R W

    1999-08-12

    A continuous hanging iron wall was installed in June, 1996, at the U. S. Coast Guard (USCG) Support Center near Elizabeth City, NC, United States, to treat overlapping plumes of chromate and chlorinated solvent compounds. The wall was emplaced using a continuous trenching machine whereby native soil and aquifer sediment was removed and the iron simultaneously emplaced in one continuous excavation and fill operation. To date, there have been seven rounds (November 1996, March 1997, June 1997, September 1997, December 1997, March 1998, and June 1998) of performance monitoring of the wall. At this time, this is the only full-scale continuous 'hanging' wall installed as a permeable reactive barrier to remediate both chlorinated solvent compounds and chromate in groundwater. Performance monitoring entails the following: sampling of 10-5 cm PVC compliance wells and 15 multi-level samplers for the following constituents: TCE, cis-dichloroethylene (c-DCE), vinyl chloride, ethane, ethene, acetylene, methane, major anions, metals, Cr(VI), Fe(II), total sulfides, dissolved H(2), Eh, pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, alkalinity, and turbidity. Electrical conductivity profiles have been conducted using a Geoprobe to verify emplacement of the continuous wall as designed and to locate upgradient and downgradient wall interfaces for coring purposes. Coring has been conducted in November, 1996, in June and September, 1997, and March, 1998, to evaluate the rate of corrosion on the iron surfaces, precipitate buildup (particularly at the upgradient interface), and permeability changes due to wall emplacement. In addition to several continuous vertical cores, angled cores through the 0.6-m thick wall have been collected to capture upgradient and downgradient wall interfaces along approximate horizontal flow paths for mineralogic analyses.

  1. Particulate matter air pollution disrupts endothelial cell barrier via calpain-mediated tight junction protein degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ting

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to particulate matter (PM is a significant risk factor for increased cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality. The mechanism of PM-mediated pathophysiology remains unknown. However, PM is proinflammatory to the endothelium and increases vascular permeability in vitro and in vivo via ROS generation. Objectives We explored the role of tight junction proteins as targets for PM-induced loss of lung endothelial cell (EC barrier integrity and enhanced cardiopulmonary dysfunction. Methods Changes in human lung EC monolayer permeability were assessed by Transendothelial Electrical Resistance (TER in response to PM challenge (collected from Ft. McHenry Tunnel, Baltimore, MD, particle size >0.1 μm. Biochemical assessment of ROS generation and Ca2+ mobilization were also measured. Results PM exposure induced tight junction protein Zona occludens-1 (ZO-1 relocation from the cell periphery, which was accompanied by significant reductions in ZO-1 protein levels but not in adherens junction proteins (VE-cadherin and β-catenin. N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, 5 mM reduced PM-induced ROS generation in ECs, which further prevented TER decreases and atteneuated ZO-1 degradation. PM also mediated intracellular calcium mobilization via the transient receptor potential cation channel M2 (TRPM2, in a ROS-dependent manner with subsequent activation of the Ca2+-dependent protease calpain. PM-activated calpain is responsible for ZO-1 degradation and EC barrier disruption. Overexpression of ZO-1 attenuated PM-induced endothelial barrier disruption and vascular hyperpermeability in vivo and in vitro. Conclusions These results demonstrate that PM induces marked increases in vascular permeability via ROS-mediated calcium leakage via activated TRPM2, and via ZO-1 degradation by activated calpain. These findings support a novel mechanism for PM-induced lung damage and adverse cardiovascular outcomes.

  2. Recent Developments in the Site-Specific Immobilization of Proteins onto Solid Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarero, J A

    2007-02-21

    Immobilization of proteins onto surfaces is of great importance in numerous applications, including protein analysis, drug screening, and medical diagnostics, among others. The success of all these technologies relies on the immobilization technique employed to attach a protein to the corresponding surface. Non-specific physical adsorption or chemical cross-linking with appropriate surfaces results in the immobilization of the protein in random orientations. Site-specific covalent attachment, on the other hand, leads to molecules being arranged in a definite, orderly fashion and allows the use of spacers and linkers to help minimize steric hindrances between the protein and the surface. The present work reviews the latest chemical and biochemical developments for the site-specific covalent attachment of proteins onto solid supports.

  3. Using artificial intelligence to predict permeability from petrographic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maqsood Ali; Adwait Chawathe [New Mexico Petroleum Recovery Research Centre (Mexico)

    2000-10-01

    Petrographic data collected during thin section analysis can be invaluable for understanding the factors that control permeability distribution. Reliable prediction of permeability is important for reservoir characterization. The petrographic elements (mineralogy, porosity types, cements and clays, and pore morphology) interact with each other uniquely to generate a specific permeability distribution. It is difficult to quantify accurately this interaction and its consequent effect on permeability, emphasizing the non-linear nature of the process. To capture these non-linear interactions, neural networks were used to predict permeability from petrographic data. The neural net was used as a multivariate correlative tool because of its ability to learn the non-linear relationships between multiple input and output variables. The study was conducted on the upper Queen formation called the Shattuck Member (Permian age). The Shattuck Member is composed of very fine-grained arkosic sandstone. The core samples were available from the Sulimar Queen and South Lucky Lake fields located in Chaves County, New Mexico. Nineteen petrographic elements were collected for each permeability value using a combined minipermeameter-petrographic technique. In order to reduce noise and overfitting the permeability model, these petrographic elements were screened, and their control (ranking) with respect to permeability was determined using fuzzy logic. Since the fuzzy logic algorithm provides unbiased ranking, it was used to reduce the dimensionality of the input variables. Based on the fuzzy logic ranking, only the most influential petrographic elements were selected as inputs for permeability prediction. The neural net was trained and tested using data from Well 1-16 in the Sulimar Queen field. Relying on the ranking obtained from the fuzzy logic analysis, the net was trained using the most influential three, five, and ten petrographic elements. A fast algorithm (the scaled conjugate

  4. Borehole stoneley waves and permeability: Laboratory results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, K.W.; Plona, T.J.; Froelich, B.; Liu, H.L.

    1987-01-01

    Recent interest in full waveform sonic logging has created the need for full waveform laboratory experiments on model boreholes. Of particular interest is the investigation of Stoneley waves and their interaction with permeable formations. The authors describe experimental results that show how Stoneley wave slowness and attenuation are affected by formation permeability. Both slowness and attenuation (1/Q) are observed to increase with formation permeability. This increase is frequency dependent, being greatest at low frequencies. The presence of simulated mudcakes on the borehole wall reduces the permeability effect on Stoneley waves, but does not eliminate it. The mudcake effect is frequency dependent, being greatest at low frequencies. In our experiments on rocks, the laboratory data is in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions. In a very well characterized synthetic porous material, theory and experiment are in good quantitative agreement

  5. Detecting protein-protein interactions in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottschalk, Marie; Bach, Anders; Hansen, Jakob Lerche

    2009-01-01

    to the endogenous C-terminal peptide of the NMDA receptor, as evaluated by a cell-free protein-protein interaction assay. However, it is important to address both membrane permeability and effect in living cells. Therefore a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay was established, where the C......-terminal of the NMDA receptor and PDZ2 of PSD-95 were fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Renilla luciferase (Rluc) and expressed in COS7 cells. A robust and specific BRET signal was obtained by expression of the appropriate partner proteins and subsequently, the assay was used to evaluate a Tat......The PDZ domain mediated interaction between the NMDA receptor and its intracellular scaffolding protein, PSD-95, is a potential target for treatment of ischemic brain diseases. We have recently developed a number of peptide analogues with improved affinity for the PDZ domains of PSD-95 compared...

  6. Permeability Tests on Silkeborg Sand No. 0000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Willy; Jakobsen, Kim Parsberg

    on the characteristics of the soil matrix, the permeability is determined for different void ratios. All tests are performed on reconstituted specimens of Silkeborg Sand No. 0000. The permeability is determined by use of a falling head apparatus. The apparatus, test procedures and the analysis method are described......The flow through porous media plays an important role in various engineering disciplines, as for example in ground water hydrology and soil mechanics. In the present study the permeability is determined for a fine, saturated sand. As the flow through a porous media strongly depends...

  7. Quantifying Evaporation in a Permeable Pavement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies quantifying evaporation from permeable pavement systems are limited to a few laboratory studies and one field application. This research quantifies evaporation for a larger-scale field application by measuring the water balance from lined permeable pavement sections. Th...

  8. Upscaling of permeability field of fractured rock system: Numerical examples

    KAUST Repository

    Bao, K.; Salama, Amgad; Sun, S.

    2012-01-01

    When the permeability field of a given porous medium domain is heterogeneous by the existence of randomly distributed fractures such that numerical investigation becomes cumbersome, another level of upscaling may be required. That is such complex permeability field could be relaxed (i.e., smoothed) by constructing an effective permeability field. The effective permeability field is an approximation to the real permeability field that preserves certain quantities and provides an overall acceptable description of the flow field. In this work, the effective permeability for a fractured rock system is obtained for different coarsening scenarios starting from very coarse mesh all the way towards the fine mesh simulation. In all these scenarios, the effective permeability as well as the pressure at each cell is obtained. The total flux at the exit boundary is calculated in all these cases, and very good agreement is obtained.

  9. Unsaturated and Saturated Permeabilities of Fiber Reinforcement: Critics and Suggestions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Hae ePARK

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In general, permeability measurement results show a strong scattering according to the measurement method, the type of test fluid and the fluid injection condition, even though permeability is regarded as a unique property of porous medium. In particular, the discrepancy between the unsaturated and saturated permeabilities for the same fabric has been widely reported. In the literature, relative permeability has been adopted to model the unsaturated flow. This approach has some limits in the modeling of double-scale porosity medium. We address this issue of permeability measurement by rigorously examining the mass conservation condition. Finally, we identify that the pressure gradient is non-linear with positive curvature in the unsaturated flow and a misinterpretation of pressure gradient is the main reason for the difference between the saturated and unsaturated permeabilities of the same fiber reinforcement. We propose to use a fixed value of permeability and to modify the mass conservation equation if there are air voids which are entrapped inside the fiber tow. Finally, we also suggest some guidelines and future perspectives to obtain more consistent permeability measurement results.

  10. Interactions Between Diet and the Intestinal Microbiota Alter Intestinal Permeability and Colitis Severity in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, Sean R; Britton, Graham J; Contijoch, Eduardo J; Vennaro, Olivia H; Mortha, Arthur; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Grinspan, Ari; Clemente, Jose C; Merad, Miriam; Faith, Jeremiah J

    2018-03-01

    It is not clear how the complex interactions between diet and the intestinal microbiota affect development of mucosal inflammation or inflammatory bowel disease. We investigated interactions between dietary ingredients, nutrients, and the microbiota in specific pathogen-free (SPF) and germ-free (GF) mice given more than 40 unique diets; we quantified individual and synergistic effects of dietary macronutrients and the microbiota on intestinal health and development of colitis. C56BL/6J SPF and GF mice were placed on custom diets containing different concentrations and sources of protein, fat, digestible carbohydrates, and indigestible carbohydrates (fiber). After 1 week, SPF and GF mice were given dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) to induce colitis. Disease severity was determined based on the percent weight change from baseline, and modeled as a function of the concentration of each macronutrient in the diet. In unchallenged mice, we measured intestinal permeability by feeding mice labeled dextran and measuring levels in blood. Feces were collected and microbiota were analyzed by 16S rDNA sequencing. We collected colons from mice and performed transcriptome analyses. Fecal microbiota varied with diet; the concentration of protein and fiber had the strongest effect on colitis development. Among 9 fiber sources tested, psyllium, pectin, and cellulose fiber reduced the severity of colitis in SPF mice, whereas methylcellulose increased severity. Increasing dietary protein increased the density of the fecal microbiota and the severity of colitis in SPF mice, but not in GF mice or mice given antibiotics. Psyllium fiber reduced the severity of colitis through microbiota-dependent and microbiota-independent mechanisms. Combinatorial perturbations to dietary casein protein and psyllium fiber in parallel accounted for most variation in gut microbial density and intestinal permeability in unchallenged mice, as well as the severity of DSS-induced colitis; changes in 1 ingredient

  11. Effect Of Hot Water Injection On Sandstone Permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2012-01-01

    of published results regarding the effect of temperature on sandstone permeability. These tests are performed with mineral oil, nitrogen gas, distilled water and solutions of NaCl, KCl, CaCl2 as well as brines that contain a mixture of salts. Thirteen sandstone formations, ranging from quartz arenites...... to formations with a significant fraction of fine particles including clay minerals are investigated. The porosities range from 0.10 to 0.30 and permeabilities span the range from 1 to 1000 md. To compare different rock types, specific surface is determined from permeability and porosity using Kozeny’s equation...... not account for all the permeability reductions observed. Permeablity reduction occurs both when distilled water is the saturating fluid as well as in tests with NaCl, KCl or CaCl2 solutions, however, this is not the case in tests with mineral oil or nitrogen gas. The formation of a filter cake or influx...

  12. Effect of caloric restriction on gut permeability, inflammation markers, and fecal microbiota in obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Beate; Skurk, Thomas; Hastreiter, Ljiljana; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Fischer, Sandra; Büttner, Janine; Kellerer, Teresa; Clavel, Thomas; Rychlik, Michael; Haller, Dirk; Hauner, Hans

    2017-09-20

    Recent findings suggest an association between obesity, loss of gut barrier function and changes in microbiota profiles. Our primary objective was to examine the effect of caloric restriction and subsequent weight reduction on gut permeability in obese women. The impact on inflammatory markers and fecal microbiota was also investigated. The 4-week very-low calorie diet (VLCD, 800 kcal/day) induced a mean weight loss of 6.9 ± 1.9 kg accompanied by a reduction in HOMA-IR (Homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance), fasting plasma glucose and insulin, plasma leptin, and leptin gene expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Plasma high-molecular weight adiponectin (HMW adiponectin) was significantly increased after VLCD. Plasma levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) were significantly decreased after 28 days of VLCD. Using three different methods, gut paracellular permeability was decreased after VLCD. These changes in clinical parameters were not associated with major consistent changes in dominant bacterial communities in feces. In summary, a 4-week caloric restriction resulted in significant weight loss, improved gut barrier integrity and reduced systemic inflammation in obese women.

  13. Fast Laplace solver approach to pore-scale permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arns, C. H.; Adler, P. M.

    2018-02-01

    We introduce a powerful and easily implemented method to calculate the permeability of porous media at the pore scale using an approximation based on the Poiseulle equation to calculate permeability to fluid flow with a Laplace solver. The method consists of calculating the Euclidean distance map of the fluid phase to assign local conductivities and lends itself naturally to the treatment of multiscale problems. We compare with analytical solutions as well as experimental measurements and lattice Boltzmann calculations of permeability for Fontainebleau sandstone. The solver is significantly more stable than the lattice Boltzmann approach, uses less memory, and is significantly faster. Permeabilities are in excellent agreement over a wide range of porosities.

  14. The antiestrogen endoxifen protects rat liver mitochondria from permeability transition pore opening and oxidative stress at concentrations that do not affect the phosphorylation efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Mariana P.C.; Silva, Filomena S.G.; Santos, Armanda E.; Santos, Maria S.; Custódio, José B.A.

    2013-01-01

    Endoxifen (EDX) is a key active metabolite of tamoxifen (TAM) with higher affinity and specificity to estrogen receptors that also inhibits aromatase activity. It is safe and well tolerated by healthy humans, but its use requires toxicological characterization. In this study, the effects of EDX on mitochondria, the primary targets for xenobiotic-induced toxicity, were monitored to clarify its potential side effects. EDX up to 30 nmol/mg protein did not affect the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. At 50 nmol EDX/mg protein, EDX decreased the ADP phosphorylation rate and a partial collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ), that parallels a state 4 stimulation, was observed. As the stimulation of state 4 was not inhibited by oligomycin and 50 nmol EDX/mg protein caused a slight decrease in the light scattering of mitochondria, these data suggest that EDX promotes membrane permeabilization to protons, whereas TAM at the same concentration induced mitochondrial membrane disruption. Moreover, EDX at 10 nmol/mg protein prevented and reversed the Ca 2+ -induced depolarization of ΔΨ and the release of mitochondrial Ca 2+ , similarly to cyclosporine A, indicating that EDX did not affect Ca 2+ uptake, but directly interfered with the proteins of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) megacomplex, inhibiting MPT induction. At this concentration, EDX exhibited antioxidant activity that may account for the protective effect against MPT pore opening. In conclusion, EDX within the range of concentrations reached in tissues did not significantly damage the bioenergetic functions of mitochondria, contrarily to the prodrug TAM, and prevented the MPT pore opening and the oxidative stress in mitochondria, supporting that EDX may be a less toxic drug for women with breast carcinoma. - Highlights: ► Mitochondria are important targets of Endoxifen. ► Endoxifen prevents mitochondrial permeability transition. ► Endoxifen prevents oxidative stress in

  15. The antiestrogen endoxifen protects rat liver mitochondria from permeability transition pore opening and oxidative stress at concentrations that do not affect the phosphorylation efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Mariana P.C.; Silva, Filomena S.G.; Santos, Armanda E. [Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal); Santos, Maria S. [Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Department of Life Sciences, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University of Coimbra, 3004-517 Coimbra (Portugal); Custódio, José B.A., E-mail: custodio@ci.uc.pt [Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2013-02-15

    Endoxifen (EDX) is a key active metabolite of tamoxifen (TAM) with higher affinity and specificity to estrogen receptors that also inhibits aromatase activity. It is safe and well tolerated by healthy humans, but its use requires toxicological characterization. In this study, the effects of EDX on mitochondria, the primary targets for xenobiotic-induced toxicity, were monitored to clarify its potential side effects. EDX up to 30 nmol/mg protein did not affect the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. At 50 nmol EDX/mg protein, EDX decreased the ADP phosphorylation rate and a partial collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ), that parallels a state 4 stimulation, was observed. As the stimulation of state 4 was not inhibited by oligomycin and 50 nmol EDX/mg protein caused a slight decrease in the light scattering of mitochondria, these data suggest that EDX promotes membrane permeabilization to protons, whereas TAM at the same concentration induced mitochondrial membrane disruption. Moreover, EDX at 10 nmol/mg protein prevented and reversed the Ca{sup 2+}-induced depolarization of ΔΨ and the release of mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+}, similarly to cyclosporine A, indicating that EDX did not affect Ca{sup 2+} uptake, but directly interfered with the proteins of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) megacomplex, inhibiting MPT induction. At this concentration, EDX exhibited antioxidant activity that may account for the protective effect against MPT pore opening. In conclusion, EDX within the range of concentrations reached in tissues did not significantly damage the bioenergetic functions of mitochondria, contrarily to the prodrug TAM, and prevented the MPT pore opening and the oxidative stress in mitochondria, supporting that EDX may be a less toxic drug for women with breast carcinoma. - Highlights: ► Mitochondria are important targets of Endoxifen. ► Endoxifen prevents mitochondrial permeability transition. ► Endoxifen prevents oxidative

  16. Calculation of large scale relative permeabilities from stochastic properties of the permeability field and fluid properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenormand, R.; Thiele, M.R. [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France)

    1997-08-01

    The paper describes the method and presents preliminary results for the calculation of homogenized relative permeabilities using stochastic properties of the permeability field. In heterogeneous media, the spreading of an injected fluid is mainly sue to the permeability heterogeneity and viscosity fingering. At large scale, when the heterogeneous medium is replaced by a homogeneous one, we need to introduce a homogenized (or pseudo) relative permeability to obtain the same spreading. Generally, is derived by using fine-grid numerical simulations (Kyte and Berry). However, this operation is time consuming and cannot be performed for all the meshes of the reservoir. We propose an alternate method which uses the information given by the stochastic properties of the field without any numerical simulation. The method is based on recent developments on homogenized transport equations (the {open_quotes}MHD{close_quotes} equation, Lenormand SPE 30797). The MHD equation accounts for the three basic mechanisms of spreading of the injected fluid: (1) Dispersive spreading due to small scale randomness, characterized by a macrodispersion coefficient D. (2) Convective spreading due to large scale heterogeneities (layers) characterized by a heterogeneity factor H. (3) Viscous fingering characterized by an apparent viscosity ration M. In the paper, we first derive the parameters D and H as functions of variance and correlation length of the permeability field. The results are shown to be in good agreement with fine-grid simulations. The are then derived a function of D, H and M. The main result is that this approach lead to a time dependent . Finally, the calculated are compared to the values derived by history matching using fine-grid numerical simulations.

  17. Estimation of permeability and permeability anisotropy in horizontal wells through numerical simulation of mud filtrate invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Nelson [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Exploracao e Producao; Altman, Raphael; Rasmus, John; Oliveira, Jansen [Schlumberger Servicos de Petroleo Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes how permeability and permeability anisotropy is estimated in horizontal wells using LWD (logging-while-drilling) laterolog resistivity data. Laterolog-while-drilling resistivity passes of while-drilling and timelapse (while reaming) were used to capture the invasion process. Radial positions of water based mud invasion fronts were calculated from while-drilling and reaming resistivity data. The invasion process was then recreated by constructing forward models with a fully implicit, near-wellbore numerical simulation such that the invasion front at a given time was consistent with the position of the front predicted by resistivity inversions. The radial position of the invasion front was shown to be sensitive to formation permeability. The while-drilling environment provides a fertile scenario to investigate reservoir dynamic properties because mud cake integrity and growth is not fully developed which means that the position of the invasion front at a particular point in time is more sensitive to formation permeability. The estimation of dynamic formation properties in horizontal wells is of particular value in marginal fields and deep-water offshore developments where running wireline and obtaining core is not always feasible, and where the accuracy of reservoir models can reduce the risk in field development decisions. (author)

  18. In vitro and in vivo activation of mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore using triiodothyronine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Endlicher, R.; Drahota, Zdeněk; Červinková, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 2 (2016), s. 321-331 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GB14-36804G Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : rat liver mitochondria * membrane permeability transition pore * thyroid hormones Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016

  19. Long-term bioventing performance in low-permeability soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, M.B.; Stanin, F.T.; Downey, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    Short-term and long-term bioventing treatability testing has shown that in situ air injection and extraction is a practical method for sustaining increased oxygen levels and enhancing aerobic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in low-permeability soils. At several test sites, initial physical parameter analysis of soils and air permeability tests indicated that impacted soils (fine sandy silts and clays) had low air permeabilities. Measurements of depleted soil-gas oxygen levels and increased soil-gas carbon dioxide levels indicated that the natural process of aerobic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons was oxygen-limited. Initial treatability testing consisted of air permeability tests to measure the permeability of the soils to air and in situ respiration tests to measure the rates at which native microorganisms could biodegrade the contaminants when provided with sufficient oxygen. During the long-term treatment period, active air injection or extraction systems were operated for 1 year or longer. Soil gas was periodically monitored within the treatment zone to evaluate the success of the bioventing systems in increasing soil-gas oxygen levels in the low-permeability soils. Follow-up respiration tests and soil and soil-gas sampling were conducted to evaluate changes in respiration rates and contaminant concentrations with time

  20. Study on Surface Permeability of Concrete under Immersion

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jun; Xing, Feng; Dong, Biqin; Ma, Hongyan; Pan, Dong

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, concrete specimens are immersed in ultrapure water, to study the evolutions of surface permeability, pore structure and paste microstructure following the prolonging of immersion period. According to the results, after 30-day immersion, the surface permeability of concrete becomes higher as compared with the value before immersion. However, further immersion makes the surface permeability decrease, so that the value measured after 150-day immersion is only half that measured af...

  1. Stress dependence of permeability of intact and fractured shale cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Noort, Reinier; Yarushina, Viktoriya

    2016-04-01

    Whether a shale acts as a caprock, source rock, or reservoir, understanding fluid flow through shale is of major importance for understanding fluid flow in geological systems. Because of the low permeability of shale, flow is thought to be largely confined to fractures and similar features. In fracking operations, fractures are induced specifically to allow for hydrocarbon exploration. We have constructed an experimental setup to measure core permeabilities, using constant flow or a transient pulse. In this setup, we have measured the permeability of intact and fractured shale core samples, using either water or supercritical CO2 as the transporting fluid. Our measurements show decreasing permeability with increasing confining pressure, mainly due to time-dependent creep. Furthermore, our measurements show that for a simple splitting fracture, time-dependent creep will also eliminate any significant effect of this fracture on permeability. This effect of confinement on fracture permeability can have important implications regarding the effects of fracturing on shale permeability, and hence for operations depending on that.

  2. Synthetic Rock Analogue for Permeability Studies of Rock Salt with Mudstone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwu Yin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the permeability of surrounding rock (salt rock and mudstone interlayer is an important topic, which acts as a key parameter to characterize the tightness of gas storage. The goal of experiments that test the permeability of gas storage facilities in rock salt is to develop a synthetic analogue to use as a permeability model. To address the permeability of a mudstone/salt layered and mixed rock mass in Jintan, Jiangsu Province, synthetic mixed and layered specimens using the mudstone and the salt were fabricated for permeability testing. Because of the gas “slippage effect”, test results are corrected by the Klinkenberg method, and the permeability of specimens is obtained by regression fitting. The results show that the permeability of synthetic pure rock salt is 6.9 × 10−20 m2, and its porosity is 3.8%. The permeability of synthetic mudstone rock is 2.97 × 10−18 m2, with a porosity 17.8%. These results are close to those obtained from intact natural specimens. We also find that with the same mudstone content, the permeability of mixed specimens is about 40% higher than for the layered specimens, and with an increase in the mudstone content, the Klinkenberg permeability increases for both types of specimens. The permeability and mudstone content have a strong exponential relationship. When the mudstone content is below 40%, the permeability increases only slightly with mudstone content, whereas above this threshold, the permeability increases rapidly with mudstone content. The results of the study are of use in the assessment of the tightness of natural gas storage facilities in mudstone-rich rock salt formations in China.

  3. Permeability of gypsum samples dehydrated in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milsch, Harald; Priegnitz, Mike; Blöcher, Guido

    2011-09-01

    We report on changes in rock permeability induced by devolatilization reactions using gypsum as a reference analog material. Cylindrical samples of natural alabaster were dehydrated in air (dry) for up to 800 h at ambient pressure and temperatures between 378 and 423 K. Subsequently, the reaction kinetics, so induced changes in porosity, and the concurrent evolution of sample permeability were constrained. Weighing the heated samples in predefined time intervals yielded the reaction progress where the stoichiometric mass balance indicated an ultimate and complete dehydration to anhydrite regardless of temperature. Porosity showed to continuously increase with reaction progress from approximately 2% to 30%, whilst the initial bulk volume remained unchanged. Within these limits permeability significantly increased with porosity by almost three orders of magnitude from approximately 7 × 10-19 m2 to 3 × 10-16 m2. We show that - when mechanical and hydraulic feedbacks can be excluded - permeability, reaction progress, and porosity are related unequivocally.

  4. Octopus microvasculature: permeability to ferritin and carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, J

    1979-01-01

    The permeability of Octopus microvasculature was investigated by intravascular injection of carbon and ferritin. Vessels were tight to carbon while ferritin penetrated the pericyte junction, and was found extravascularly 1-2 min after its introduction. Vesicles occurred rarely in pericytes; fenestrae were absent. The discontinuous endothelial layer did not consitute a permeability barrier. The basement membrane, although retarding the movement of ferritin, was permeable to it; carbon did not penetrate the basement membrane. Evidence indicated that ferritin, and thus similarly sized and smaller water soluble materials, traverse the pericyte junction as a result of bulk fluid flow. Comparisons are made with the convective (or junctional) and slower, diffusive (or vesicular) passage of materials known to occur across the endothelium of continuous capillaries in mammals. Previous macrophysiological determinations concerning the permeability of Octopus vessels are questioned in view of these findings. Possible reasons for some major structural differences in the microcirculatory systems of cephalopods and vertebrates are briefly discussed.

  5. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2003-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  6. Laboratory measurement of permeability upscaling: Results for the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tidwell, V.C.; Wilson, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Parameterization of predictive models is often complicated by the inability to make measurements at the same scale at which one wishes to perform the analysis. This disparity in scales necessitates the use of some averaging or upscaling model to compute the desired effective media properties. In efforts to better model permeability upscaling, laboratory experiments have been conducted on a series of rock samples with different genetic origins. These experiments involve the collection of exhaustive permeability data sets at different sample supports (i.e., sample volumes) using a specially designed minipermeameter test system. Here the authors present a synopsis of such a data set collected from a block of volcanic tuff

  7. Prediction of permeability changes in an excavation response zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Naoto; Ishii, Takashi; Kuroda, Hidetaka; Tada, Hiroyuki

    1992-01-01

    In geologic disposal of radioactive wastes, stress changes due to cavern excavation may expand the existing fractures and create possible bypasses for groundwater. This paper proposes a simple method for predicting permeability changes in the excavation response zones. Numerical analyses using this method predict that the response zones created by cavern excavation would differ greatly in thickness and permeability depending on the depth of the cavern site and the initial in-situ stress, that when the cavern site is deeper, response zones would expand more and permeability would increases more, and that if the ratio of horizontal to vertical in-situ stress is small, extensive permeable zones at the crown and the bottom would occur, whereas if the ratio is large, extensive permeable zones would occur in the side walls. (orig.)

  8. The Hybrid of Classification Tree and Extreme Learning Machine for Permeability Prediction in Oil Reservoir

    KAUST Repository

    Prasetyo Utomo, Chandra

    2011-06-01

    Permeability is an important parameter connected with oil reservoir. Predicting the permeability could save millions of dollars. Unfortunately, petroleum engineers have faced numerous challenges arriving at cost-efficient predictions. Much work has been carried out to solve this problem. The main challenge is to handle the high range of permeability in each reservoir. For about a hundred year, mathematicians and engineers have tried to deliver best prediction models. However, none of them have produced satisfying results. In the last two decades, artificial intelligence models have been used. The current best prediction model in permeability prediction is extreme learning machine (ELM). It produces fairly good results but a clear explanation of the model is hard to come by because it is so complex. The aim of this research is to propose a way out of this complexity through the design of a hybrid intelligent model. In this proposal, the system combines classification and regression models to predict the permeability value. These are based on the well logs data. In order to handle the high range of the permeability value, a classification tree is utilized. A benefit of this innovation is that the tree represents knowledge in a clear and succinct fashion and thereby avoids the complexity of all previous models. Finally, it is important to note that the ELM is used as a final predictor. Results demonstrate that this proposed hybrid model performs better when compared with support vector machines (SVM) and ELM in term of correlation coefficient. Moreover, the classification tree model potentially leads to better communication among petroleum engineers concerning this important process and has wider implications for oil reservoir management efficiency.

  9. Apple Polysaccharide inhibits microbial dysbiosis and chronic inflammation and modulates gut permeability in HFD-fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Li, Qian; Zang, Yue; Zhao, Yang; Liu, Nan; Wang, Yifei; Xu, Xiaotao; Liu, Li; Mei, Qibing

    2017-06-01

    The saying "An apple a day keeps the doctor away" has been known for over 150 years, and numerous studies have shown that apple consumption is closely associated with reduced risks of chronic diseases. It has been well accepted that dysbiosis is the reflection of various chronic diseases. Therefore, this study investigates the effects of apple polysaccharides (AP) on gut dysbiosis. High-fat diet (HFD) fed rats were treated for 14 weeks with AP. The microbiota composition, microbiota-generated short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), gut permeability and chronic inflammation were analyzed. AP treatment showed higher abundance of Bacteroidetes and Lactobacillus while lower Firmicutes and Fusobacteium. AP significantly increased total SCFAs level that contributed by acetic acid and isobutyric acid. Moreover, AP dramatically alleviated dysbiosis-associated gut permeability and chronic inflammation with decreased plasma LBP, up-regulation of Occludin, down-regulation of tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-a), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), chemokine ligand 1 (CXCL-1) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β). The potential mechanism is due to the fact that AP reduces gut permeability, which involves the induction of autophagy in goblet cells. Therefore, AP exerts health benefits through inhibiting gut dysbiosis and chronic inflammation and modulating gut permeability in HFD-induced dysbiosis rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Diagenetic effect on permeabilities of geothermal sandstone reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weibel, Rikke; Olivarius, Mette; Kristensen, Lars

    The Danish subsurface contains abundant sedimentary deposits, which can be utilized for geothermal heating. The Upper Triassic – Lower Jurassic continental-marine sandstones of the Gassum Formation has been utilised as a geothermal reservoir for the Thisted Geothermal Plant since 1984 extracting...... and permeability is caused by increased diagenetic changes of the sandstones due to increased burial depth and temperatures. Therefore, the highest water temperatures typically correspond with the lowest porosities and permeabilities. Especially the permeability is crucial for the performance of the geothermal......-line fractures. Continuous thin chlorite coatings results in less porosity- and permeability-reduction with burial than the general reduction with burial, unless carbonate cemented. Therefore, localities of sandstones characterized by these continuous chlorite coatings may represent fine geothermal reservoirs...

  11. Wood Permeability in Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus dunnii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Nogueira Rezende

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to evaluate the flow of air and water in Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus dunnii wood. Wood was collected from four trees aged 37 years in an experimental plantation of the Federal University of Lavras, Brazil. Planks were cut off the basal logs to produce specimens for air and water permeability testing. Results indicated that the longitudinal permeability to air and water of E. grandis wood were, on average, 5% and 10% higher, respectively, than that of E. dunnii wood. E. grandis and E. dunnii wood showed neither air nor water flow in the test for permeability transversal to the fibers, and longitudinal permeability to air exceeded that to water by approximately 50 fold in both species.

  12. Super enhanced permeability and retention (SUPR) effects in tumors following near infrared photoimmunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hisataka; Choyke, Peter L.

    2016-06-01

    To date, the delivery of nano-sized therapeutic agents to cancers largely relies on enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effects that are caused by the leaky nature of cancer vasculature. However, nano-sized agents delivered in this way have demonstrated limited success in oncology due to the relatively small magnitude of the EPR effect. For achieving superior delivery of nano-sized agents, super-enhanced permeability and retention (SUPR) effects are needed. Near infrared photo-immunotherapy (NIR-PIT) is a recently reported therapy that treats tumors with light therapy and subsequently causes an increase in nano-drug delivery up to 24-fold compared with untreated tumors in which only the EPR effect is present. SUPR effects could enhance delivery into tumor beds of a wide variety of nano-sized agents including particles, antibodies, and protein binding small molecular agents. Therefore, taking advantage of the SUPR effects after NIR-PIT may be a promising avenue to utilize a wide variety of nano-drugs in a highly effective manner.

  13. Fractal Theory for Permeability Prediction, Venezuelan and USA Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldana, Milagrosa; Altamiranda, Dignorah; Cabrera, Ana

    2014-05-01

    Inferring petrophysical parameters such as permeability, porosity, water saturation, capillary pressure, etc, from the analysis of well logs or other available core data has always been of critical importance in the oil industry. Permeability in particular, which is considered to be a complex parameter, has been inferred using both empirical and theoretical techniques. The main goal of this work is to predict permeability values on different wells using Fractal Theory, based on a method proposed by Pape et al. (1999). This approach uses the relationship between permeability and the geometric form of the pore space of the rock. This method is based on the modified equation of Kozeny-Carman and a fractal pattern, which allows determining permeability as a function of the cementation exponent, porosity and the fractal dimension. Data from wells located in Venezuela and the United States of America are analyzed. Employing data of porosity and permeability obtained from core samples, and applying the Fractal Theory method, we calculated the prediction equations for each well. At the beginning, this was achieved by training with 50% of the data available for each well. Afterwards, these equations were tested inferring over 100% of the data to analyze possible trends in their distribution. This procedure gave excellent results in all the wells in spite of their geographic distance, generating permeability models with the potential to accurately predict permeability logs in the remaining parts of the well for which there are no core samples, using even porority logs. Additionally, empirical models were used to determine permeability and the results were compared with those obtained by applying the fractal method. The results indicated that, although there are empirical equations that give a proper adjustment, the prediction results obtained using fractal theory give a better fit to the core reference data.

  14. Intestinal permeability of 51Cr-labelled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in patients with Crohn's disease and their healthy relatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainsworth, M.; Eriksen, J.; Rasmussen, J.W.; Muckadell, O.B.S. de

    1989-01-01

    An increased intestinal permeability has been proposed as an aetiologic factor in Crohn's disease. The 24-h urinary excretion of 100 μCi 51 Cr-labelled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was used to test the permeability in 15 patients with Crohn's disease and in 20 healthy first-degree relatives, who were known to have a genetic predisposition to inflammatory bowel disease. Twenty-eight healthy persons not related to patients with inflammatory bowel disease served as control material. The 51 Cr-EDTA excretion of the relatives was not significantly higher than that of the controls, whereas patients with Crohn's disease had a significantly higher excretion than both the relatives and the controls. Among patients the increased excretion was found only if the small intestine was involved. It is concluded that 1) as a group, patient with Crohn's disease in the small intestine have an increased intestinal permeability, in contrast to their healthy relatives, who have a normal permeability; 2) a considerable overlap of the results of the 51 Cr-EDTA test was found between the groups studied, and the test is not suitable for evaluating individual patients; 3) the results do not support the hypothesis of an increase in intestinal permeability as an aetiologic factor in Crohn's disease. 29 refs

  15. Permeable pavement study (Edison)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — While permeable pavement is increasingly being used to control stormwater runoff, field-based, side-by-side investigations on the effects different pavement types...

  16. Gas permeability of ice-templated, unidirectional porous ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seuba, Jordi; Deville, Sylvain; Guizard, Christian; Stevenson, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the gas flow behavior of unidirectional porous ceramics processed by ice-templating. The pore volume ranged between 54% and 72% and pore size between 2.9 ?m and 19.1 ?m. The maximum permeability (?? m?) was measured in samples with the highest total pore volume (72%) and pore size (19.1 ?m). However, we demonstrate that it is possible to achieve a similar permeability (?? m?) at 54% pore volume by modification of the pore shape. These results were compared with those reported and measured for isotropic porous materials processed by conventional techniques. In unidirectional porous materials tortuosity (?) is mainly controlled by pore size, unlike in isotropic porous structures where ? is linked to pore volume. Furthermore, we assessed the applicability of Ergun and capillary model in the prediction of permeability and we found that the capillary model accurately describes the gas flow behavior of unidirectional porous materials. Finally, we combined the permeability data obtained here with strength data for these materials to establish links between strength and permeability of ice-templated materials.

  17. Permeability and stress-jump effects on magnetic drug targeting in a permeable microvessel using Darcy model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, S., E-mail: sachinshaw@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics and Statistical Sciences, Botswana International University of Science and Technology, Private Bag 16, Palapye (Botswana); Sutradhar, A.; Murthy, PVSN [Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302, West Bengal (India)

    2017-05-01

    In the present paper, we investigated the influence of permeability of the carrier particle and stress jump condition on the porous spherical surface in magnetic drug targeting through a permeable microvessel. The nature of blood is defined by non-Newtonian Casson fluid in the core region of the microvessel and Newtonian fluid in the peripheral region which is located near the surface of the wall of the microvessel. The magnetic particles are considered as spherical and in nanosize, embedded in the carrier particle along with drug particles. A magnet is placed near the tumor position to generate a magnetic field. The relative motion of the carrier particle is the resultant of the fluidic force, magnetic force and Saffman drag force which are calculated for the spherical carrier particle. Trajectories of the carrier particle along the radial and axial direction are calculated. Effect of different parameters such as stress-jump constant, permeability of the carrier particle, pressure gradient, yield stress, Saffman force, volume fraction of the embedded magnetic nanoparticles, permeability of the microvessel wall, and the radius of the carrier particle on the trajectory of the carrier particle are discussed and displayed graphically. - Highlights: • In the present manuscript, we considered the porous carrier particle which provide a larger surface area contact with the fluid than the solid spherical carrier particle. It shows that the porous carrier particle are captured easily than the solid carrier particle. • Introduce Suffman force on the carrier particle which commences an additional resistance which acts opposite to the surface wall and helps the particles to go away from the tumor position. • Considered stress jump condition at the surface of the porous carrier particle which enhanced the tendency of the carrier particle to be capture near the tumor. • Used Darcy model to define the permeability of the wall of the microvessel.

  18. Stationary and Dynamic Permeability and Coupling Coefficient Measurements in Sintered Glass Bead Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueven, I.; Steeb, H.; Luding, S.

    2014-12-01

    Electrokinetic waves describe the coupling between seismic and electromagnetic waves that exist in porous media. The coupling between them arise from an electrochemical boundary layer between grain and fluid interface of saturated porous media. Acoustical waves cause a disturbance of the electrical fluid charge within the double layer, which therefore creates an electric streaming current (seismoelectric effect). Inversely, electromagnetic waves can generate mechanical signals (electroseismic effect). Electrokinetic conversion potentially combines high seismic resolution with good electromagnetic hydrocarbon sensitivity. The (stationary and frequency-dependent) streaming potential coefficient is a key property, which gives rise to the coupling between electromagnetic and acoustical waves. It depends strongly on the fluid conductivity, porosity, tortuosity, permeability, pore throat and zeta potential of porous media. We examine experimentally both, the stationary and dynamic permeabilities and coupling coefficients of sintered glass bead systems. For this purpose a multi-purpose measuring cell was developed which allows us to carry out - besides common ultrasound experiments - also to perform stationary and frequency-dependent permeability and coupling coefficient measurements. For the experiments sintered mono- and slightly polydisperse glass bead samples with different glass bead diameters between 0.4 and 8mm and porosities ranging between 21 and 39% were used. The stationary and dynamic permeability and streaming potential measurements are supported by μCT scans which enable us a deeper insight into the porous medium. Based on the μCT scans of the produced sintered glass bead samples essential influence parameters, like tortuosity, porosity, effective particle diameters and pore throats in different regions of the entire scanned region have been analyzed in detail to understand the laboratory experiments, cf. Illustration 1. In addition lattice Boltzmann

  19. Properties of the malarial proteins Pf2, Pf9 and PfP0, which support ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Properties of the malarial proteins Pf2, Pf9 and PfP0, which support their roles as immune targets. Antibodies raised to each of these proteins (or purified from immune adults) inhibit the growth of Plasmodium falciparum at the red cell invasion step. The proteins are localized on the parasite cell surface. Each protein is ...

  20. Detection of semi-volatile organic compounds in permeable ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract The Edison Environmental Center (EEC) has a research and demonstration permeable parking lot comprised of three different permeable systems: permeable asphalt, porous concrete and interlocking concrete permeable pavers. Water quality and quantity analysis has been ongoing since January, 2010. This paper describes a subset of the water quality analysis, analysis of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) to determine if hydrocarbons were in water infiltrated through the permeable surfaces. SVOCs were analyzed in samples collected from 11 dates over a 3 year period, from 2/8/2010 to 4/1/2013.Results are broadly divided into three categories: 42 chemicals were never detected; 12 chemicals (11 chemical test) were detected at a rate of less than 10% or less; and 22 chemicals were detected at a frequency of 10% or greater (ranging from 10% to 66.5% detections). Fundamental and exploratory statistical analyses were performed on these latter analyses results by grouping results by surface type. The statistical analyses were limited due to low frequency of detections and dilutions of samples which impacted detection limits. The infiltrate data through three permeable surfaces were analyzed as non-parametric data by the Kaplan-Meier estimation method for fundamental statistics; there were some statistically observable difference in concentration between pavement types when using Tarone-Ware Comparison Hypothesis Test. Additionally Spearman Rank order non-parame

  1. Integrating Electrokinetic and Bioremediation Process for Treating Oil Contaminated Low Permeability Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Surya Ramadan Bimastyaji; Jatnika Effendi Agus; Helmy Qomarudin

    2018-01-01

    Traditional oil mining activities always ignores environmental regulation which may cause contamination in soil and environment. Crude oil contamination in low-permeability soil complicates recovery process because it requires substantial energy for excavating and crushing the soil. Electrokinetic technology can be used as an alternative technology to treat contaminated soil and improve bioremediation process (biostimulation) through transfer of ions and nutrient that support microorganism gr...

  2. Gliadin induces an increase in intestinal permeability and zonulin release by binding to the chemokine receptor CXCR3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Karen M; Lu, Ruliang; Brownley, Julie; Lu, Bao; Gerard, Craig; Thomas, Karen; Rallabhandi, Prasad; Shea-Donohue, Terez; Tamiz, Amir; Alkan, Sefik; Netzel-Arnett, Sarah; Antalis, Toni; Vogel, Stefanie N; Fasano, Alessio

    2008-07-01

    Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by gliadin, a component of the grain protein gluten. Gliadin induces an MyD88-dependent zonulin release that leads to increased intestinal permeability, a postulated early element in the pathogenesis of celiac disease. We aimed to establish the molecular basis of gliadin interaction with intestinal mucosa leading to intestinal barrier impairment. Alpha-gliadin affinity column was loaded with intestinal mucosal membrane lysates to identify the putative gliadin-binding moiety. In vitro experiments with chemokine receptor CXCR3 transfectants were performed to confirm binding of gliadin and/or 26 overlapping 20mer alpha-gliadin synthetic peptides to the receptor. CXCR3 protein and gene expression were studied in intestinal epithelial cell lines and human biopsy specimens. Gliadin-CXCR3 interaction was further analyzed by immunofluorescence microscopy, laser capture microscopy, real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and immunoprecipitation/Western blot analysis. Ex vivo experiments were performed using C57BL/6 wild-type and CXCR3(-/-) mouse small intestines to measure intestinal permeability and zonulin release. Affinity column and colocalization experiments showed that gliadin binds to CXCR3 and that at least 2 alpha-gliadin 20mer synthetic peptides are involved in this binding. CXCR3 is expressed in mouse and human intestinal epithelia and lamina propria. Mucosal CXCR3 expression was elevated in active celiac disease but returned to baseline levels following implementation of a gluten-free diet. Gliadin induced physical association between CXCR3 and MyD88 in enterocytes. Gliadin increased zonulin release and intestinal permeability in wild-type but not CXCR3(-/-) mouse small intestine. Gliadin binds to CXCR3 and leads to MyD88-dependent zonulin release and increased intestinal permeability.

  3. 4EBP-Dependent Signaling Supports West Nile Virus Growth and Protein Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shives, Katherine D; Massey, Aaron R; May, Nicholas A; Morrison, Thomas E; Beckham, J David

    2016-10-18

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a (+) sense, single-stranded RNA virus in the Flavivirus genus. WNV RNA possesses an m7 GpppN m 5' cap with 2'- O -methylation that mimics host mRNAs preventing innate immune detection and allowing the virus to translate its RNA genome through the utilization of cap-dependent translation initiation effectors in a wide variety of host species. Our prior work established the requirement of the host mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) for optimal WNV growth and protein expression; yet, the roles of the downstream effectors of mTORC1 in WNV translation are unknown. In this study, we utilize gene deletion mutants in the ribosomal protein kinase called S6 kinase (S6K) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP) pathways downstream of mTORC1 to define the role of mTOR-dependent translation initiation signals in WNV gene expression and growth. We now show that WNV growth and protein expression are dependent on mTORC1 mediated-regulation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein/eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP/eIF4E) interaction and eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F) complex formation to support viral growth and viral protein expression. We also show that the canonical signals of mTORC1 activation including ribosomal protein s6 (rpS6) and S6K phosphorylation are not required for WNV growth in these same conditions. Our data suggest that the mTORC1/4EBP/eIF4E signaling axis is activated to support the translation of the WNV genome.

  4. 4EBP-Dependent Signaling Supports West Nile Virus Growth and Protein Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine D. Shives

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a (+ sense, single-stranded RNA virus in the Flavivirus genus. WNV RNA possesses an m7GpppNm 5′ cap with 2′-O-methylation that mimics host mRNAs preventing innate immune detection and allowing the virus to translate its RNA genome through the utilization of cap-dependent translation initiation effectors in a wide variety of host species. Our prior work established the requirement of the host mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 for optimal WNV growth and protein expression; yet, the roles of the downstream effectors of mTORC1 in WNV translation are unknown. In this study, we utilize gene deletion mutants in the ribosomal protein kinase called S6 kinase (S6K and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP pathways downstream of mTORC1 to define the role of mTOR-dependent translation initiation signals in WNV gene expression and growth. We now show that WNV growth and protein expression are dependent on mTORC1 mediated-regulation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein/eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP/eIF4E interaction and eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F complex formation to support viral growth and viral protein expression. We also show that the canonical signals of mTORC1 activation including ribosomal protein s6 (rpS6 and S6K phosphorylation are not required for WNV growth in these same conditions. Our data suggest that the mTORC1/4EBP/eIF4E signaling axis is activated to support the translation of the WNV genome.

  5. The permeability of concrete for reactor containment vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, R.H.

    1983-07-01

    Review of the literature pertaining to water, water vapour and gas transmission through concrete revealed conflicting views on the mechanisms involved and the influence of mix design parameters such as initial porosities and water/cement ratio. Consideration of the effects of ageing and of construction defects in field concrete were totally neglected in published work. Permeability data from three published papers were compared with permeability calculated according to Powers. The ratio of calculated to observed permeability varied from 40 x 10 -3 to 860 x 10 -3 for one group: from 0.17 x 10 3 to 8.6 x 10 3 in the second; and from 24 x 10 3 to 142 x 10 3 for the third. There were therefore wide discrepancies within each group of data and between groups. A bibliography was prepared and an exploratory experimental programme was mounted to determine the relative importance of key parameters such as cement type, porosity and water/cement ratio. Contrary to frequently cited references it was found that permeability of concrete was not significantly influenced by water/cement ratio when the starting porosity was constant. If water/cement ratio was held constant, however, the permeability was strongly influenced by starting porosity. It was also found that with constant water/cement ratio permeability increased with cement content. The value of fly ash and blast furnace slag in partial substitution for Portland cement is neglected in the literature but it is important since such substitutions alleviate alkali-silicate reactions. Permeability of concrete was significantly decreased by partial substitution of Portland cement with fly ash but there was no benefit in the use of blast furnace slag

  6. The diaphragms of fenestrated endothelia: gatekeepers of vascular permeability and blood composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Radu V; Tse, Dan; Deharvengt, Sophie J; Smits, Nicole C; Xu, Yan; Luciano, Marcus R; McGarry, Caitlin L; Buitendijk, Maarten; Nemani, Krishnamurthy V; Elgueta, Raul; Kobayashi, Takashi; Shipman, Samantha L; Moodie, Karen L; Daghlian, Charles P; Ernst, Patricia A; Lee, Hong-Kee; Suriawinata, Arief A; Schned, Alan R; Longnecker, Daniel S; Fiering, Steven N; Noelle, Randolph J; Gimi, Barjor; Shworak, Nicholas W; Carrière, Catherine

    2012-12-11

    Fenestral and stomatal diaphragms are endothelial subcellular structures of unknown function that form on organelles implicated in vascular permeability: fenestrae, transendothelial channels, and caveolae. PV1 protein is required for diaphragm formation in vitro. Here, we report that deletion of the PV1-encoding Plvap gene in mice results in the absence of diaphragms and decreased survival. Loss of diaphragms did not affect the fenestrae and transendothelial channels formation but disrupted the barrier function of fenestrated capillaries, causing a major leak of plasma proteins. This disruption results in early death of animals due to severe noninflammatory protein-losing enteropathy. Deletion of PV1 in endothelium, but not in the hematopoietic compartment, recapitulates the phenotype of global PV1 deletion, whereas endothelial reconstitution of PV1 rescues the phenotype. Taken together, these data provide genetic evidence for the critical role of the diaphragms in fenestrated capillaries in the maintenance of blood composition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A non-erasable magnetic memory based on the magnetic permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrie, J.R.; Wieland, K.A.; Burke, R.A.; Newburgh, G.A.; Burnette, J.E.; Fischer, G.A.; Edelstein, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    A non-erasable memory based on using differences in the magnetic permeability is demonstrated. The method can potentially store information indefinitely. Initially the high permeability bits were 10–50 μm wide lines of sputtered permalloy (Ni 81 Fe 19 ) on a glass substrate. In a second writing technique a continuous film of amorphous, high permeability ferromagnetic Metglas (Fe 78 Si 13 B 9 ) was sputtered onto a similar glass substrate. Low permeability, crystalline 50 μm wide lines were then written in the film by laser heating. Both types of written media were read by applying an external probe field that is locally modified by the permeability of each bit. The modifications in the probe field were read by a nearby set of 10 micron wide magnetic tunnel junctions with a signal-to-noise ratio of up to 45 dB. This large response to changes in bit permeability is not altered after the media has been exposed to a 6400 Oe field. While being immediately applicable for data archiving and secure information storage, higher densities are possible with smaller read and write heads. - Highlights: • We demonstrate a non-erasable memory based on changes in the magnetic permeability. • Large change in permeability occur when Metglas changes from amorphous to crystalline. • Micron size regions of Metglas can be crystallized using a laser. • Permeability changes read by observing deviations of a probe field with an MTJ

  8. Detection of semi-volatile organic compounds in permeable pavement infiltrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract The Edison Environmental Center (EEC) performs research on green infrastructure (GI) treatment options. One such treatment option is the use of permeable pavements. EEC constructed a parking lot comprised of three different permeable systems: permeable asphalt, porous ...

  9. Foam film permeability: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajzadeh, R; Krastev, R; Zitha, Pacelli L J

    2008-02-28

    The mass transfer of gas through foam films is a prototype of various industrial and biological processes. The aim of this paper is to give a perspective and critical overview of studies carried out to date on the mass transfer of gas through foam films. Contemporary experimental data are summarized, and a comprehensive overview of the theoretical models used to explain the observed effects is given. A detailed description of the processes that occur when a gas molecule passes through each layer that forms a foam film is shown. The permeability of the film-building surfactant monolayers plays an important role for the whole permeability process. It can be successfully described by the models used to explain the permeability of surfactant monolayers on aqueous sub-phase. For this reason, the present paper briefly discusses the surfactant-induced resistance to mass transfer of gases through gas-liquid interface. One part of the paper discusses the experimental and theoretical aspects of the foam film permeability in a train of foam films in a matrix or a cylinder. This special case is important to explain the gas transfer in porous media or in foams. Finally, this paper will highlight the gaps and challenges and sketch possible directions for future research.

  10. Effect of desensitizing agents on dentin permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihata, Hiroshi; Kanehira, Masafumi; Nagai, Tomoko; Finger, Werner J; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi; Komatsu, Masashi

    2009-06-01

    To investigate the in vitro efficacy of two dentin desensitizing products at reducing liquid permeability through human dentin discs. The tested hypothesis was that the products, in spite of different chemical mechanisms were not different at reducing or eliminating flow through dentin discs. Dentin slices (1 mm thick) were prepared from 16 extracted human third molars and their permeability was indirectly recorded in a split chamber model, using a chemiluminescence technique, after EDTA treatment (control), after soaking with albumin, and after desensitizer application. Two products were studied: MS Coat, a self-curing resin-containing oxalate product, and Gluma Desensitizer, a glutaraldehyde/HEMA-based agent without initiator. The dentin slices were mounted between an upper chamber, filled with an aqueous solution of 1% potassium ferricyanide and 0.3% hydrogen peroxide, and a lower chamber filled with 1% sodium hydroxide solution and 0.02% luminol. The upper solution was pressurized, and upon contact with the luminol solution a photochemical signal was generated and recorded as a measure of permeability throughout two consecutive pressurizing cycles at 2.5 and 13 kPa (26 and 133 cm H2O), respectively. The permeability of the control and albumin-soaked samples was similarly high. After application of the desensitizing agents, dentin permeability was reduced to virtually zero at both pressure levels (P < 0.001).

  11. Evolution of permeability in diatomaceous rocks mediated by pressure solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuhara, Hideaki; Kinoshita, Naoki; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Kishida, Kiyoshi

    2007-01-01

    A conceptual model is presented to follow the evolution of permeability in diatomaceous rocks mediated by pressure solution. The progress of compaction and the evolution of permeability may be followed with time. Specifically, the main minerals of diatomaceous rocks that are quartz, cristobalite, and amorphous silica, are focused to examine differences of the permeability evolutions among them at effective stresses of 5, and 10 MPa, and temperatures of 20 and 90degC. The rates and magnitudes of permeability reduction increase with increase of the dissolution rate constants. Ultimate permeabilities reduce to the order of 90% at the completion of dissolution-mediated compaction. (author)

  12. Permeability of WIPP Salt During Damage Evolution and Healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BODNER, SOL R.; CHAN, KWAI S.; MUNSON, DARRELL E.

    1999-01-01

    The presence of damage in the form of microcracks can increase the permeability of salt. In this paper, an analytical formulation of the permeability of damaged rock salt is presented for both initially intact and porous conditions. The analysis shows that permeability is related to the connected (i.e., gas accessible) volumetric strain and porosity according to two different power-laws, which may be summed to give the overall behavior of a porous salt with damage. This relationship was incorporated into a constitutive model, known as the Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, which has been formulated to describe the inelastic flow behavior of rock salt due to coupled creep, damage, and healing. The extended model was used to calculate the permeability of rock salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site under conditions where damage evolved with stress over a time period. Permeability changes resulting from both damage development under deviatoric stresses and damage healing under hydrostatic pressures were considered. The calculated results were compared against experimental data from the literature, which indicated that permeability in damaged intact WIPP salt depends on the magnitude of the gas accessible volumetric strain and not on the total volumetric strain. Consequently, the permeability of WIPP salt is significantly affected by the kinetics of crack closure, but shows little dependence on the kinetics of crack removal by sintering

  13. Compression characteristics and permeability of saturated Gaomiaozi ca-bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Wenjing; Sun De'an; Fang Lei

    2012-01-01

    The compression characteristics and permeability of compacted Gaomiaozi Ca-bentonite saturated by the water uptake tests are studied by conducting a series of one-dimension compression tests. The permeability coefficient can be calculated by the Terzaghi's one-dimensional consolidation theory after the consolidation coefficient is obtained by the square root of time method. It is found that the compression curves of compacted specimens saturated by the water uptake tests tend to be consistent in the relatively high stress range. The compression indexes show a linear decrease with increasing dry density and the swelling index is a constant. The permeability coefficient decreases with increasing compression stress, and they show the linear relationship in double logarithmic coordinates. Meanwhile, the permeability coefficient shows a linear decrease with decreasing void ratio, which has no relationship with initial states, stress states and stress paths. The permeability coefficient k of GMZ Ca-bentonite at dry density Pd of 1.75 g/cm 3 can be calculated as 2.0 × 10 -11 cm/s by the linear relationship between Pd and log k. It is closed to the permeability coefficient of GMZ Ca-bentonite with the same dry density published in literature, which testifies that the method calculating the permeability coefficient is feasible from the consolidation coefficient obtained by the consolidation test. (authors)

  14. HIV-1 Tat reduces nephrin in human podocytes: a potential mechanism for enhanced glomerular permeability in HIV-associated nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doublier, Sophie; Zennaro, Cristina; Spatola, Tiziana; Lupia, Enrico; Bottelli, Antonella; Deregibus, Maria Chiara; Carraro, Michele; Conaldi, Pier Giulio; Camussi, Giovanni

    2007-02-19

    To determine whether HIV-1 Tat may directly alter glomerular permeability in HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). Heavy proteinuria is a hallmark of HIVAN. The slit diaphragm is the ultimate glomerular filtration barrier critical for maintaining the efficiency of the ultrafiltration unit of the kidney. In this study, we evaluated the direct effect of Tat protein on the permeability of isolated glomeruli and on the expression of nephrin, the main slit diaphragm component, by human cultured podocytes. Permeability was studied by measuring the permeability to albumin in isolated rat glomeruli. We also evaluated the expression of nephrin in human cultured podocytes by using immunofluorescence and Western blot. We found that Tat increased albumin permeability in isolated glomeruli, and rapidly induced the redistribution and loss of nephrin in cultured podocytes. Pretreatment of glomeruli and podocytes with blocking antibodies showed that Tat reduced nephrin expression by engaging vascular endothelial growth factor receptors types 2 and 3 and the integrin alphavbeta3. Pre-incubation of podocytes with two platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonists prevented the loss and redistribution of nephrin induced by Tat, suggesting that PAF is an intracellular mediator of Tat action. Tat induced a rapid PAF synthesis by podocytes. When podocytes transfected to overexpress PAF-acetylhydrolase, the main catabolic enzyme of PAF, were stimulated with Tat, the redistribution and loss of nephrin was abrogated. The present results define a mechanism by which Tat may reduce nephrin expression in podocytes, thus increasing glomerular permeability. This provides new insights in the understanding of HIVAN pathogenesis.

  15. Increased intestinal permeability, measured by serum zonulin, is associated with metabolic risk markers in overweight pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokkala, Kati; Pellonperä, Outi; Röytiö, Henna; Pussinen, Pirkko; Rönnemaa, Tapani; Laitinen, Kirsi

    2017-04-01

    Increased intestinal permeability with subsequent metabolic endotoxemia, i.e., elevated circulating levels of bacterial lipopolysaccharide, LPS, has been introduced as a novel initiator of obesity related metabolic disturbances in non-pregnant individuals. The objective was to investigate the extent to which intestinal permeability, measured by serum zonulin concentration, is related to metabolic endotoxemia and metabolic risk markers in overweight pregnant women. This was a cross-sectional study including 100 pregnant overweight women in early pregnancy. Serum zonulin was analyzed using ELISA, and markers for metabolic endotoxemia (LPS), inflammation (high-sensitive C-reactive protein and glycoprotein acetylation GlyA), glucose metabolism (fasting glucose and insulin), and lipid metabolism were measured. Higher serum zonulin concentration associated positively with LPS (P=0.02), inflammatory markers (Pzonulin quartiles). All the observed associations were confirmed (Pzonulin concentration, i.e., increased intestinal permeability, contributes to metabolic endotoxemia, systemic inflammation, and insulin resistance in overweight pregnant women. By reinforcing intestinal barrier, it may be possible to manipulate maternal metabolism during pregnancy with subsequent health benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dissociation of changes in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier from catecholamine-induced changes in blood pressure of normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar, R.; Domer, F.R.; Taylor, B.

    1982-01-01

    Researchers have studied the effects of the pressor catecholamine, dopamine, and the depressor catecholamine, isoproterenol, on the systemic blood pressure and the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to albumin in normotensive (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. The rats were anesthetized with pentobarbital. The permeability of the BBB to protein was measured by the extravasation of radioiodinated serum albumin (RISA). The permeability was decreased by both catecholamines despite the dose-dependent, yet opposite, changes in blood pressure in the WKY rats. The blood pressure response to both of the catecholamines was enhanced in the SHR rats. Isoproterenol caused a decrease in the permeability of the BBB in the SHR but dopamine did not. Results with both WKY and SHR rats are suggestive of an adrenergically-mediated decrease in movement across the BBB of compounds of large molecular weight, regardless of changes in blood pressure

  17. Identification of two immortalized cell lines, ECV304 and bEnd3, for in vitro permeability studies of blood-brain barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Yang

    Full Text Available To identify suitable cell lines for a mimetic system of in vivo blood-brain barrier (BBB for drug permeability assessment, we characterized two immortalized cell lines, ECV304 and bEnd3 in the respect of the tightness, tight junction proteins, P-glycoprotein (P-gp function and discriminative brain penetration. The ECV304 monoculture achieved higher transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER and lower permeability to Lucifer yellow than bEnd3. However, co-culture with rat glioma C6 cells impaired the integrity of ECV304 and bEnd3 cell layers perhaps due to the heterogeneity among C6 cells in inducing BBB characteristics. The immunostaining of ZO-1 delivered distinct bands along cell borders on both cell lines while those of occludin and claudin-5 were diffused and weak. P-gp functionality was only proved in bEnd3 by Rhodamine 123 (R123 uptake assay. A permeability test of reference compounds displayed a similar rank order (digoxin < R123 < quinidine, verapamil < propranolol in ECV304 and bEnd3 cells. In comparison with bEnd3, ECV304 developed tighter barrier for the passage of reference compounds and higher discrimination between transcellular and paracellular transport. However, the monoculture models of ECV304 and bEnd3 fail to achieve the sufficient tightness of in vitro BBB permeability models with high TEER and evident immunostaining of tight junction proteins. Further strategies to enhance the paracellular tightness of both cell lines to mimic in vivo BBB tight barrier deserve to be conducted.

  18. Permeability model of sintered porous media: analysis and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flórez Mera, Juan Pablo; Chiamulera, Maria E.; Mantelli, Marcia B. H.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, the permeability of porous media fabricated from copper powder sintering process was modeled and measured, aiming the use of the porosity as input parameter for the prediction of the permeability of sintering porous media. An expression relating the powder particle mean diameter with the permeability was obtained, based on an elementary porous media cell, which is physically represented by a duct formed by the arrangement of spherical particles forming a simple or orthorhombic packing. A circular duct with variable section was used to model the fluid flow within the porous media, where the concept of the hydraulic diameter was applied. Thus, the porous is modeled as a converging-diverging duct. The electrical circuit analogy was employed to determine two hydraulic resistances of the cell: based on the Navier-Stokes equation and on the Darcýs law. The hydraulic resistances are compared between themselves and an expression to determine the permeability as function of average particle diameter is obtained. The atomized copper powder was sifted to reduce the size dispersion of the particles. The porosities and permeabilities of sintered media fabricated from powders with particle mean diameters ranging from 20 to 200 microns were measured, by means of the image analysis method and using an experimental apparatus. The permeability data of a porous media, made of copper powder and saturated with distilled water, was used to compare with the permeability model. Permeability literature models, which considers that powder particles have the same diameter and include porosity data as input parameter, were compared with the present model and experimental data. This comparison showed to be quite good.

  19. In situ permeability testing of rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, E.W.; Lagus, P.L.; Broce, R.D.; Lie, K.

    1981-04-01

    Storage of transuranic (TRU) wastes in bedded salt formations requires a knowledge of the in situ permeability of SENM rock salt. Since assumptions for safety assessments have been made in which these wastes could generate gas pressures on the order of the lithostatic pressure over geologic time scales, the permeability of the surrounding formation becomes an important parameter for determining the manner in which the gases will be contained or dispersed. This report describes the series of tests conducted in the AEC-7 borehole, located near the WIPP site, to determine the in situ gas flow characteristics of the bedded salt. In these tests, compressed air was injected into the borehole and flow into the surrounding formation measured. These measured flow rates were interpreted in terms of formation permeabilities and porosities which were, in turn, used as modeling parameters for the repository response analysis. Two series of field tests were performed. The first series consisted of a number of whole-hole flow tests conducted to provide preliminary design information required for future operation of a guarded straddle packer system capable of measuring permeabilities > or = 0.1 μdarcy. The second series of tests were conducted using the Systems, Science and Software (S-Cubed) designed guarded straddle packer system. In these interval permeability tests, 100-foot lengths of borehole were isolated and the flow characteristics of the surrounding formation examined. In this report, a complete description of the test procedures, instrumentation, and measurement techniques is first given. The analytical/numerical methods used for data interpretation are then presented, followed by results of the interval and permeability tests. (The whole-hole tests are summarized in Appendix A.) Conclusions are presented in the final section

  20. Modeling stress/strain-dependent permeability changes for deep geoenergy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Antonio Pio; Rutqvist, Jonny

    2016-04-01

    Rock permeability is a key parameter in deep geoenergy systems. Stress and strain changes induced at depth by fluid injection or extraction may substantially alter the rock permeability in an irreversible way. With regard to the geoenergies, some applications require the permeability to be enhanced to improve productivity. The rock permeability is generally enhanced by shearing process of faults and fractures (e.g. hydroshearing for Enhanced and Deep Geothermal Systems), or the creation of new fractures (e.g. hydrofracturing for shale gas). However, such processes may, at the same time, produce seismicity that can be felt by the local population. Moreover, the increased permeability due to fault reactivation may pose at risk the sealing capacity of a storage site (e.g. carbon sequestration or nuclear waste disposal), providing then a preferential pathway for the stored fluids to escape at shallow depth. In this work we present a review of some recent applications aimed at understanding the coupling between stress (or strain) and permeability. Examples of geoenergy applications include both EGS and CO2 sequestration. To investigate both "wanted" and "unwanted" effects, THM simulations have been carried out with the TOUGH-FLAC simulator. Our studies include constitutive equations relating the permeability to mean effective stress, effective normal stress, volumetric strain, as well as accounting for permeability variation as related to fault/fracture reactivation. Results show that the geomechanical effects have a large role in changing the permeability, hence affecting fluids leakage, reservoir enhancement, as well as the induced seismicity.

  1. The coupling of dynamics and permeability in the hydrocarbon accumulation period controls the oil-bearing potential of low permeability reservoirs: a case study of the low permeability turbidite reservoirs in the middle part of the third member of Shahejie Formation in Dongying Sag

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Tian; Cao, Ying-Chang; Wang, Yan-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    The relationships between permeability and dynamics in hydrocarbon accumulation determine oilbearing potential (the potential oil charge) of low permeability reservoirs. The evolution of porosity and permeability of low permeability turbidite reservoirs of the middle part of the third member...... facies A and diagenetic facies B do not develop accumulation conditions with low accumulation dynamics in the late accumulation period for very low permeability. At more than 3000 m burial depth, a larger proportion of turbidite reservoirs are oil charged due to the proximity to the source rock. Also...

  2. Biomimetic carriers mimicking leukocyte plasma membrane to increase tumor vasculature permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomba, R.; Parodi, A.; Evangelopoulos, M.; Acciardo, S.; Corbo, C.; De Rosa, E.; Yazdi, I. K.; Scaria, S.; Molinaro, R.; Furman, N. E. Toledano; You, J.; Ferrari, M.; Salvatore, F.; Tasciotti, E.

    2016-10-01

    Recent advances in the field of nanomedicine have demonstrated that biomimicry can further improve targeting properties of current nanotechnologies while simultaneously enable carriers with a biological identity to better interact with the biological environment. Immune cells for example employ membrane proteins to target inflamed vasculature, locally increase vascular permeability, and extravasate across inflamed endothelium. Inspired by the physiology of immune cells, we recently developed a procedure to transfer leukocyte membranes onto nanoporous silicon particles (NPS), yielding Leukolike Vectors (LLV). LLV are composed of a surface coating containing multiple receptors that are critical in the cross-talk with the endothelium, mediating cellular accumulation in the tumor microenvironment while decreasing vascular barrier function. We previously demonstrated that lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA-1) transferred onto LLV was able to trigger the clustering of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) on endothelial cells. Herein, we provide a more comprehensive analysis of the working mechanism of LLV in vitro in activating this pathway and in vivo in enhancing vascular permeability. Our results suggest the biological activity of the leukocyte membrane can be retained upon transplant onto NPS and is critical in providing the particles with complex biological functions towards tumor vasculature.

  3. Hydrogeology of rocks of low permeability: region studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llamas, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrogeological regional studies on low permeability rocks are rather scarce in comparison to similar studies on normal permeability rocks. Economic and technological difficulties to develop ground water from these terrains may be the main cause of this scarcity. Several facts may indicate that these studies will increase in the near future. First, the need to supply water to the people living in underdeveloped arid zones over extensive areas of low permeability rocks. Second, the relevant role that some low permeability large groundwater basins may play in conjunctive ground and surface-water use. And last but not least the feasibility of some low permeability rock areas as sites for nuclear waste repositories. Some specific difficulties in these regional studies may be: a) intrinsic difficulties in obtaining representative water samples and measuring hydraulic heads; b) scarcity of observation and/or pumping wells; c) important hydraulic head and chemical properties variations in a vertical direction; d) old groundwater ages; this may require paleohydrological considerations to understand certain apparent anomalies. In most of these regional studies hydrogeochemical methods and modelling (flow and mass transport) may be very valuable tools. 77 references, 7 figures

  4. Hydrogen permeability through metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarev, A.A.; Tsvetkov, I.V.; Marenkov, E.D.; Yarko, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms of hydrogen permeability through one-layer and multi-layer membranes are considered. The effect of surface roughness, crystal defects, cracks and pores is described. Mathematical description of the processes is given [ru

  5. Prediction and analysis of beta-turns in proteins by support vector machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tho Hoan; Satou, Kenji; Ho, Tu Bao

    2003-01-01

    Tight turn has long been recognized as one of the three important features of proteins after the alpha-helix and beta-sheet. Tight turns play an important role in globular proteins from both the structural and functional points of view. More than 90% tight turns are beta-turns. Analysis and prediction of beta-turns in particular and tight turns in general are very useful for the design of new molecules such as drugs, pesticides, and antigens. In this paper, we introduce a support vector machine (SVM) approach to prediction and analysis of beta-turns. We have investigated two aspects of applying SVM to the prediction and analysis of beta-turns. First, we developed a new SVM method, called BTSVM, which predicts beta-turns of a protein from its sequence. The prediction results on the dataset of 426 non-homologous protein chains by sevenfold cross-validation technique showed that our method is superior to the other previous methods. Second, we analyzed how amino acid positions support (or prevent) the formation of beta-turns based on the "multivariable" classification model of a linear SVM. This model is more general than the other ones of previous statistical methods. Our analysis results are more comprehensive and easier to use than previously published analysis results.

  6. Involvement of membrane lipids in radiation damage to potassium-ion permeability of Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, S [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. for Medical Science; Akamatsu, Y

    1978-02-01

    Radiation damage to K/sup +/ permeability of an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph of E.coli grown with oleate or linolenate was investigated at different temperatures. A remarkable effect of radiation was observed at 0/sup 0/C with cells that had been grown in linolenate at 42/sup 0/C. This indicates that, besides protein, membrane lipids at least are involved in the radiation damage. The damage also seems to be affected by the fluidity of membrane lipids.

  7. Permeable Pavement Research at the Edison Environmental Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are few detailed studies of full-scale, replicated, actively-used permeable pavement systems. Practitioners need additional studies of permeable pavement systems in its intended application (parking lot, roadway, etc.) across a range of climatic events, daily usage conditio...

  8. Permeability of the small intestine to [51Cr]EDTA in children with acute gastroenteritis or eczema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forget, P.; Sodoyez-Goffaux, F.; Zappitelli, A.

    1985-01-01

    Increased gut permeability to macromolecules is thought to be an important factor in the development of food hypersensitivity. The latter can develop in the course of acute gastroenteritis and could play a role in infantile eczema. The authors studied gut permeability in 10 normal adults, 11 control children, 7 children with acute gastroenteritis, and 8 patients with infantile eczema, making use of [ 51 Cr]EDTA as probe molecule. [ 51 Cr]EDTA was given orally (50-100 microCi); 24-h urinary excretion of [ 51 Cr]EDTA was measured and expressed as a percentage of the oral dose. Mean and standard error were 2.35 +/- 0.24, 2.51 +/- 0.21, 9.96 +/- 3.44, and 10.90 +/- 2.05 in normal adults, control children, and gastroenteritis and eczema patients, respectively. Differences between controls and either gastroenteritis (p less than 0.001) or eczema (p less than 0.001) patients are significant. The results support the hypothesis that increased gut permeability could play a role in food hypersensitivity

  9. Highly permeable, cement-bounded backfilling mortars for SMA repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, F.; Mayer, G.; Wittmann, F.H.

    1994-03-01

    In low- and intermediate-level waste repositories, gas is produced due e.g. to corrosion. This gas must be able to escape from the repository in order to prevent damage to the repository structure. A cement-based backfill should take over this function. For this purpose, the composition of cement-based materials was varied to study their influence on porosity and permeability. In parallel to this study the behaviour of fresh concrete, the liberation of the heat of hydration and the hardened concrete properties were investigated. To characterize the permeability of cement-based materials the following parameters are important: 1) composition of the material (pore fabric), 2) storage conditions (degree of saturation), 3) degree of hydration (age), 4) measuring fluid. A change in the composition of cement-based materials can vary the permeability by ten orders of magnitude. It is shown that, by using dense aggregates, the transport of the fluid takes place through the matrix and along the aggregate/matrix interface. By using porous aggregates the permeability can be increased by two orders of magnitude. In the case of a dense matrix, porous aggregates do not alter the permeability. Increasing the matrix content or interface content increases permeability. Hence light weight mortars are an obvious choice. Like-grained mixes showed higher permeabilities in combination with better mechanical properties but, in comparison to normal mixes, they showed worse flow properties. With the composition cement-: water-: aggregate content 1:0.4:5.33 the likegrained mix with aggregates ranging from 2 to 3 mm proved to be a suitable material. With a low compaction after 28 days this mix reaches a permeability of 4.10 -12 m 2 and an uniaxial cylinder compressive strength of 16 N/mm 2 . (author) 58 figs., 23 tabs., refs

  10. Preparation of Modified Films with Protein from Grouper Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecante, A.; Granados-Navarrete, S.; Martínez-García, C.

    2016-01-01

    A protein concentrate (PC) was obtained from Grouper fish skin and it was used to prepare films with different amounts of sorbitol and glycerol as plasticizers. The best performing films regarding resistance were then modified with various concentrations of CaCl2, CaSO4 (calcium salts), and glucono-δ-lactone (GDL) with the purpose of improving their mechanical and barrier properties. These films were characterized by determining their mechanical properties and permeability to water vapor and oxygen. Formulations with 5% (w/v) protein and 75% sorbitol and 4% (w/v) protein with a mixture of 15% glycerol and 15% sorbitol produced adequate films. Calcium salts and GDL increased the tensile fracture stress but reduced the fracture strain and decreased water vapor permeability compared with control films. The films prepared represent an attractive alternative for being used as food packaging materials. PMID:27597950

  11. A theoretical model for gas permeability in a composite membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, D. A

    2009-01-01

    We present in this work an analytical expression for permeability in a two-layer composite membrane, which was derived assuming the same hypothesis as those of Adzumi model for permeability in a homogeneous membrane. Whereas in Adzumi model permeability shows a linear dependence on the mean pressure, our model for a composite membrane related permeability to pressure through a rather complex expression, which covers the whole range of flow, from molecular-Knudsen to viscous-Poiseuille regimes. The expression obtained for permeability contained information of membrane structural properties as pore size, porosity and thickness of each layer, as well as gas nature and operational conditions. Our two-layer-model expression turns into Adzumi formula when the structure of the layers approach to each other. [es

  12. Using soft computing techniques to predict corrected air permeability using Thomeer parameters, air porosity and grain density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooruddin, Hasan A.; Anifowose, Fatai; Abdulraheem, Abdulazeez

    2014-03-01

    Soft computing techniques are recently becoming very popular in the oil industry. A number of computational intelligence-based predictive methods have been widely applied in the industry with high prediction capabilities. Some of the popular methods include feed-forward neural networks, radial basis function network, generalized regression neural network, functional networks, support vector regression and adaptive network fuzzy inference system. A comparative study among most popular soft computing techniques is presented using a large dataset published in literature describing multimodal pore systems in the Arab D formation. The inputs to the models are air porosity, grain density, and Thomeer parameters obtained using mercury injection capillary pressure profiles. Corrected air permeability is the target variable. Applying developed permeability models in recent reservoir characterization workflow ensures consistency between micro and macro scale information represented mainly by Thomeer parameters and absolute permeability. The dataset was divided into two parts with 80% of data used for training and 20% for testing. The target permeability variable was transformed to the logarithmic scale as a pre-processing step and to show better correlations with the input variables. Statistical and graphical analysis of the results including permeability cross-plots and detailed error measures were created. In general, the comparative study showed very close results among the developed models. The feed-forward neural network permeability model showed the lowest average relative error, average absolute relative error, standard deviations of error and root means squares making it the best model for such problems. Adaptive network fuzzy inference system also showed very good results.

  13. Prediction of endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins using fragmented amino acid composition and support vector machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The endoplasmic reticulum plays an important role in many cellular processes, which includes protein synthesis, folding and post-translational processing of newly synthesized proteins. It is also the site for quality control of misfolded proteins and entry point of extracellular proteins to the secretory pathway. Hence at any given point of time, endoplasmic reticulum contains two different cohorts of proteins, (i proteins involved in endoplasmic reticulum-specific function, which reside in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum, called as endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins and (ii proteins which are in process of moving to the extracellular space. Thus, endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins must somehow be distinguished from newly synthesized secretory proteins, which pass through the endoplasmic reticulum on their way out of the cell. Approximately only 50% of the proteins used in this study as training data had endoplasmic reticulum retention signal, which shows that these signals are not essentially present in all endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins. This also strongly indicates the role of additional factors in retention of endoplasmic reticulum-specific proteins inside the endoplasmic reticulum. Methods This is a support vector machine based method, where we had used different forms of protein features as inputs for support vector machine to develop the prediction models. During training leave-one-out approach of cross-validation was used. Maximum performance was obtained with a combination of amino acid compositions of different part of proteins. Results In this study, we have reported a novel support vector machine based method for predicting endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins, named as ERPred. During training we achieved a maximum accuracy of 81.42% with leave-one-out approach of cross-validation. When evaluated on independent dataset, ERPred did prediction with sensitivity of 72.31% and specificity of 83

  14. Intestinal permeability and nutritional status in developmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Nilian Carla Silva; Mendonca, Jacqueline Nakau; Portari, Guilherme Vannucchi; Jordao Junior, Alceu Afonso; Marchini, Julio Sergio; Chiarello, Paula Garcia

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a developmental disorder with a possible connection between dietary components and triggering or worsening of symptoms. An altered intestinal permeability might allow absorption of incompletely digested peptides (gluten and casein) that could produce opioid-like activity on the brain, causing significant changes in behavior. To assess the intestinal permeability and nutritional status of participants with developmental disorders to determine if changes in the intestinal mucosal barrier and/or injury to the intercellular junctions have occurred that might justify application of further dietary modifications. To assess intestinal permeability, the research team analyzed participants urine under fasting conditions, using gas chromatography to determine chromatographic peaks. To assess nutritional status, the team determined participants heights and weights and performed a bioelectric bioimpedance examination at least 4 hours after their most recent meal. In addition, the team determined food intake using three diet diaries. They asked participants and caregivers to register each food consumed during 2 nonconsecutive weekdays and 1 weekend day. The study occurred at the Ribeirao Preto School of Medicine, Sao Paulo University. Seven participants aged 9 to 23 years with developmental disorders (the developmental group, DG) completed the study. The research team recruited them through the Association of Friends of the Autistic Persons of Ribeirao Preto in Ribeirao Preto, Brazil. The control group (CG) consisted of nonsmoking healthy volunteers in the general population who were similar in age to the experimental group and did not suffer from diseases that potentially could influence nutritional status and intestinal function. To assess intestinal permeability, participants ingested 150 mL of an isosmolar solution of the sugars mannitol (2 g) and lactulose (7.5 g) under fasting conditions and the researchers collected all voided urine over a period of 5 hours

  15. Blood-brain barrier permeability and brain uptake mechanism of kainic Acid and dihydrokainic Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gynther, Mikko; Petsalo, Aleksanteri; Hansen, Steen Honoré

    2015-01-01

    tools in various in vivo central nervous system disease models in rodents, as well as being templates in the design of novel ligands affecting the glutamatergic system. Both molecules are highly polar but yet capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We used an in situ rat brain perfusion...... technique to determine the brain uptake mechanism and permeability across the BBB. To determine KA and DHK concentrations in the rat brain, simple and rapid sample preparation and liquid chromatography mass spectrometer methods were developed. According to our results the BBB permeability of KA and DHK...... is low, 0.25 × 10(-6) and 0.28 × 10(-6) cm/s for KA and DHK, respectively. In addition, the brain uptake is mediated by passive diffusion, and not by active transport. Furthermore, the non-specific plasma and brain protein binding of KA and DHK was determined to be low, which means that the unbound drug...

  16. Bile salt-induced increases in duodenal brush-border membrane proton permeability, fluidity, and fragility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, D.L.; Hirst, B.H.

    1990-01-01

    Rabbit duodenal brush-border membrane vesicles were treated in vitro with deoxycholate, glycodeoxycholate, or taurodeoxycholate. Intravesicular [14C]glucose space at equilibrium, 0.54 microliters/mg protein, was reduced by exposure to the three bile salts in a concentration (0.1-5.0 mM)-dependent manner, equatable with increased membrane fragility. Net proton permeability (Pnet), determined by acridine orange fluorescence quenching, was increased from 6.3 x 10(-4) cm/sec in untreated vesicles, by approximately 120, 150, and 170%, by treatment with bile salts at 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mM, respectively. The three bile salts were equipotent. The increases in membrane fragility and Pnet were not accompanied by significant increases in membrane fluidity, as assessed from steady-state and time-resolved diphenylhexatriene fluorescence anisotropy. The data demonstrate direct effects of bile salts on duodenal apical membrane fragility and proton permeability that are likely to be early events in bile salt-induced mucosal damage

  17. Nitrogen Transformations in Three Types of Permeable Pavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2009, USEPA constructed a 0.4-ha (1-ac) parking lot at the Edison Environmental Center in Edison, NJ, that incorporated three different permeable pavement types - permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete (PC), and porous asphalt (PA). The driving lanes...

  18. Surface sedimentation at permeable pavement systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støvring, Jan; Dam, Torben; Jensen, Marina Bergen

    2018-01-01

    Newly installed permeable pavement (PP) systems provide high surface infiltration capacity, but the accumulation of sediments causes a decrease in capacity over time, eventually leading to surface clogging. With the aim of investigating local sedimentation processes and the importance of restorat......Newly installed permeable pavement (PP) systems provide high surface infiltration capacity, but the accumulation of sediments causes a decrease in capacity over time, eventually leading to surface clogging. With the aim of investigating local sedimentation processes and the importance...

  19. A new structure of permeable pavement for mitigating urban heat island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Li, Tian; Peng, Hangyu

    2018-09-01

    The urban heat island (UHI) effect has been a great threat to human habitation, and how to mitigate this problem has been a global concern over decades. This paper addresses the cooling effect of a novel permeable pavement called evaporation-enhancing permeable pavement, which has capillary columns in aggregate and a liner at the bottom. To explore the efficiency of mitigating the UHI, bench-scale permeable pavement units with capillary columns were developed and compared with conventional permeable pavement. Criteria of capillary capacities of the column, evaporation rates, and surface temperature of the pavements were monitored under simulated rainfall and Shanghai local weather conditions. Results show the capillary column was important in increasing evaporation by lifting water from the bottom to the surface, and the evaporation-enhancing permeable pavement was cooler than a conventional permeable pavement by as much as 9.4°C during the experimental period. Moreover, the cooling effect of the former pavement could persist more than seven days under the condition of no further rainfall. Statistical analysis result reveals that evaporation-enhancing permeable pavement can mitigate the UHI effect significantly more than a conventional permeable pavement. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. An overview of site-specific delivery of orally administered proteins ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oral delivery of proteins and peptides poses one of the greatest challenges in controlled drug delivery due to degradation by proteolytic enzymes, poor membrane permeability and large molecular size. Therapeutic proteins/peptides are useful in correcting metabolic disorders (e.g., insulin in diabetes mellitus), ...

  1. Influence of demagnetizing field on the permeability of soft magnetic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, G.Q.; Li, Z.W.; Chen, Linfeng; Wu, Y.P.; Ong, C.K.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of demagnetizing field on the effective permeability of magnetic composites has been investigated. A theoretical expression of the effective permeability has been obtained and discussed according to four typical composites with spheres, needles, flakes, and aligned prolate ellipsoidal particles. The results indicate that the demagnetizing field within the particles can reduce the effective permeability significantly. In order to increase the effective permeability, it is necessary to decrease the demagnetizing field within the particles. A linear relationship between effective permeability and volume fraction is also observed for composites filled with spherical particles at low volume fraction

  2. PIWIL1/piRNA-DQ593109 Regulates the Permeability of the Blood-Tumor Barrier via the MEG3/miR-330-5p/RUNX3 Axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyuan Shen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The blood-tumor barrier (BTB restricts the efficient delivery of anti-glioma drugs to cranial glioma tissues. Increased BTB permeability may allow greater delivery of the therapeutic agents. Increasing evidence has revealed that PIWI proteins and PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs play an important role in tumor progression. However, whether PIWI proteins and piRNAs regulate BTB permeability remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that the PIWIL1/piRNA-DQ593109 (piR-DQ593109 complex was the predominant regulator of BTB permeability. Briefly, PIWIL1 was upregulated in glioma endothelial cells (GECs. Furthermore, piR-DQ593109 was also overexpressed in GECs, as revealed via a piRNA microarray. Downregulation of PIWIL1 or piR-DQ593109 increased the permeability of the BTB. Moreover, PIWIL1 and piR-DQ593109, which formed a piRNA-induced silencing complex, degraded the long non-coding RNA maternally expressed 3 (MEG3 in a sequenced-dependent manner. Furthermore, restoring MEG3 released post-transcriptional inhibition of Runt related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3 by sponging miR-330-5p. In addition, RUNX3 bounded to the promoter regions and reduced the promoter activities of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5, which significantly impaired the expression levels of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5. In conclusion, downregulating PIWIL1 and piR-DQ593109 increased BTB permeability through the MEG3/miR-330-5p/RUNX3 axis. These data may provide insight into glioma treatment.

  3. Compressible fluid flow through rocks of variable permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, W.

    1977-01-01

    The effectiveness of course-grained igneous rocks as shelters for burying radioactive waste can be assessed by determining the rock permeabilities at their in situ pressures and stresses. Analytical and numerical methods were used to solve differential equations of one-dimensional fluid flow through rocks with permeabilities from 10 4 to 1 nD. In these calculations, upstream and downstream reservoir volumes of 5, 50, and 500 cm 3 were used. The optimal size combinations of the two reservoirs were determined for measurements of permeability, stress, strain, acoustic velocity, and electrical conductivity on low-porosity, coarse-grained igneous rocks

  4. Investigation clogging dynamic of permeable pavement systems using embedded sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaghmanesh, Mostafa; Borst, Michael

    2018-02-01

    Permeable pavement is a stormwater control measure commonly selected in both new and retrofit applications. However, there is limited information about the clogging mechanism of these systems that effects the infiltration. A permeable pavement site located at the Seitz Elementary School, on Fort Riley, Kansas was selected for this study. An 80-space parking lot was built behind the school as part of an EPA collaboration with the U.S. Army. The parking lot design includes a permeable interlocking concrete pavement section along the downgradient edge. This study monitored the clogging progress of the pavement section using twelve water content reflectometers and three buried tipping bucket rain gauges. This clogging dynamic investigation was divided into three stages namely pre-clogged, transitional, and clogged. Recorded initial relative water content of all three stages were significantly and negatively correlated to antecedent dry weather periods with stronger correlations during clogged conditions. The peak relative water content correlation with peak rainfall 10-min intensity was significant for the water content reflectometers located on the western edge away from the eastern edge; this correlation was strongest during transition stage. Once clogged, rainfall measurements no longer correlated with the buried tipping bucket rain gauges. Both water content reflectometers and buried tipping bucket rain gauges showed the progress of surface clogging. For every 6 mm of rain, clogging advanced 1 mm across the surface. The results generally support the hypothesis that the clogging progresses from the upgradient to the downgradient edge. The magnitude of the contributing drainage area and rainfall characteristics are effective factors on rate and progression of clogging.

  5. Preliminary study of the irradiation-induced modification of skin permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, R.; Istin, M.

    1978-01-01

    Irradiation of the skin of an animal leads immediately to a strong increase in vascular permeability. If a dye is at once injected intraveinously it diffuses very rapidly in the irradiated zone, this becomes highly coloured and the colour intensity measurement gives a clue to the severity of the lesions produced. This phenomenon has been used in the past as a pharmacological test to study vascular permeability and is employed in this work to observe the effect of diosmine-titrated flavonoids on vascular permeability in inflammatory diseases. The capillary permeability increase due to local γ irradiation of rabbit skin has been accurately determined by measurement of the colouration observed after injection of Geigy Blue. Diosmine, injected intraperitoneally, protects the vascular system against increased permeability due to ionising radiations [fr

  6. Effects of insulin combined with idebenone on blood-brain barrier permeability in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan-Na; Liu, Li-Bo; Xue, Yi-Xue; Wang, Ping

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the effect of insulin combined with idebenone on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in experimental streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats as well as the underlying mechanisms. With a diabetic rat model, we show that insulin and idebenone normalize body weight and water intake and restore BBB permeability and that their combination displays a synergistic effect. The results from transmission electron microscopy show that the combination of insulin and idebenone significantly closed the tight junction (TJ) in diabetic rats. The results from Western blotting in diabetic rats show that the upregulation of TJ-associated proteins occludin, and zonula occludens (ZO)-1 caused by the combination of insulin and idebenone is more remarkable than that with either agent alone. In addition, the activations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and the expression levels of receptors for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) were significantly decreased after treatment with insulin and idebenone in diabetic rats. These results suggest that the combination of insulin and idebenone could decrease the BBB permeability in diabetic rats by upregulating the expression of occludin, claudin-5, and ZO-1 and that the ROS/AGE/RAGE/NF-κB signal pathway might be involved in the process. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Measurement of radon permeability through polyethylene membrane using scintillation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashry, A.H.; Abou-Leila, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Abdalla, A.M., E-mail: aymanabdalla62@hotmail.co [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Najran University, Najran, P.O. Box. 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Advanced Materials and Nano-Engineering Laboratory (AMNEL), Centre for Advanced Materials and Nano-Engineering (CAMNE), Najran University, Najran, P.O. Box. 11001 (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-01-15

    The permeability of Radon 222 through polyethylene membranes has been studied using activated charcoal technique. The permeability constant of Radon 222 through low-density polyethylene, linear low-density Polyethylene and high density polyethylene samples has been measured. There is a considerable agreement between the values obtained by our method and the method suggested by W. Arafa [2002. Permeability of radon 222 through some materials. Radiat. Meas. 35, 207-211], and SSNTD technique suggested by A. Hafez and G. Somogyi [1986. Determination of radon and thoron permeability through some plastics by track technique. Int. J. Radiat. Appl. Instrum. Nucl. Track Radiat. Meas. 12 (1-6), 697-700]. In this work Radon permeability through different polyethylene membranes has been measured using three different methods, i.e. solid state nuclear track technique, W. Arafa [2002. Permeability of radon 222 through some materials. Radiat. Meas. 35, 207-211]method and our proposed method. In addition to this, in this study, the diffusion coefficient of radon in charcoal as well as solubility of Radon in polyethylene membrane has been taken into consideration.

  8. Measurement of radon permeability through polyethylene membrane using scintillation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashry, A.H.; Abou-Leila, M.; Abdalla, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    The permeability of Radon 222 through polyethylene membranes has been studied using activated charcoal technique. The permeability constant of Radon 222 through low-density polyethylene, linear low-density Polyethylene and high density polyethylene samples has been measured. There is a considerable agreement between the values obtained by our method and the method suggested by W. Arafa [2002. Permeability of radon 222 through some materials. Radiat. Meas. 35, 207-211], and SSNTD technique suggested by A. Hafez and G. Somogyi [1986. Determination of radon and thoron permeability through some plastics by track technique. Int. J. Radiat. Appl. Instrum. Nucl. Track Radiat. Meas. 12 (1-6), 697-700]. In this work Radon permeability through different polyethylene membranes has been measured using three different methods, i.e. solid state nuclear track technique, W. Arafa [2002. Permeability of radon 222 through some materials. Radiat. Meas. 35, 207-211] method and our proposed method. In addition to this, in this study, the diffusion coefficient of radon in charcoal as well as solubility of Radon in polyethylene membrane has been taken into consideration.

  9. Measurement of relative permeability of fuel cell diffusion media

    KAUST Repository

    Hussaini, I.S.

    2010-06-01

    Gas diffusion layer (GDL) in PEM fuel cells plays a pivotal role in water management. Modeling of liquid water transport through the GDL relies on knowledge of relative permeability functions in the in-plane and through-plane directions. In the present work, air and water relative permeabilities are experimentally determined as functions of saturation for typical GDL materials such as Toray-060, -090, -120 carbon paper and E-Tek carbon cloth materials in their plain, untreated forms. Saturation is measured using an ex situ gravimetric method. Absolute and relative permeability functions in the two directions of interest are presented and new correlations for in-plane relative permeability of water and air are established. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Polysulfone - CNT composite membrane with enhanced water permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirani, Bhakti; Kar, Soumitra; Aswal, V. K.; Bindal, R. C.; Goyal, P. S.

    2018-04-01

    Polymeric membranes are routinely used for water purification. The performance of these conventional membranes can be improved by incorporating nanomaterials, such as metal oxide nanoparticle and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). This manuscript reports the synthesis and characterization of polysulfone (Psf) based nanocomposite membranes where multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and oleic acid coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles have been impregnated onto the polymeric host matrix. The performance of the membranes was evaluated by water permeability and solute rejection measurements. It was observed that the permeability of Psf membrane increases three times at 0.1% loading of MWCNT without compromise in selectivity. It was further observed that the increase in permeability is not affected upon addition of Fe3O4 nanoparticles into the membrane. In order to get a better insight into the membrane microstructure, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies were carried out. There is a good correlation between the water permeability and the pore sizes of the membranes as measured using SANS.

  11. Structural and permeability characterization of biosynthetic PVA hydrogels designed for cell-based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafea, Eman H; Poole-Warren, Laura A; Martens, Penny J

    2014-01-01

    Incorporation of extracellular matrix (ECM) components to synthetic hydrogels has been shown to be the key for successful cell encapsulation devices, by providing a biofunctional microenvironment for the encapsulated cells. However, the influence of adding ECM components into synthetic hydrogels on the permeability as well as the physical and mechanical properties of the hydrogel has had little attention. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of incorporated ECM analogues on the permeability performance of permselective synthetic poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogels in addition to examining the physico-mechanical characteristics. PVA was functionalized with a systematically increased number of methacrylate functional groups per chain (FG/c) to tailor the permselectivity of UV photopolymerized hydrogel network. Heparin and gelatin were successfully incorporated into PVA network at low percentage (1%), and co-hydrogels were characterized for network properties and permeability to bovine serum albumin (BSA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) proteins. Incorporation of these ECM analogues did not interfere with the base PVA network characteristics, as the controlled hydrogel mesh sizes, swelling and compressive modulii remained unchanged. While the permeation profiles of both BSA and IgG were not affected by the addition of heparin and gelatin as compared with pure PVA, increasing the FG/c from 7 to 20 significantly limited the diffusion of the larger IgG. Consequently, biosynthetic hydrogels composed of PVA with high FG/c and low percent ECM analogues show promise in their ability to be permselective for various biomedical applications.

  12. Support vector machines for prediction and analysis of beta and gamma-turns in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tho Hoan; Satou, Kenji; Ho, Tu Bao

    2005-04-01

    Tight turns have long been recognized as one of the three important features of proteins, together with alpha-helix and beta-sheet. Tight turns play an important role in globular proteins from both the structural and functional points of view. More than 90% tight turns are beta-turns and most of the rest are gamma-turns. Analysis and prediction of beta-turns and gamma-turns is very useful for design of new molecules such as drugs, pesticides, and antigens. In this paper we investigated two aspects of applying support vector machine (SVM), a promising machine learning method for bioinformatics, to prediction and analysis of beta-turns and gamma-turns. First, we developed two SVM-based methods, called BTSVM and GTSVM, which predict beta-turns and gamma-turns in a protein from its sequence. When compared with other methods, BTSVM has a superior performance and GTSVM is competitive. Second, we used SVMs with a linear kernel to estimate the support of amino acids for the formation of beta-turns and gamma-turns depending on their position in a protein. Our analysis results are more comprehensive and easier to use than the previous results in designing turns in proteins.

  13. Comparison of Mass Transfer Models for Determination of the Intestinal Permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Zakeri-Milani

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: In determination of the permeability of the intestinal wall by external perfusion techniques, several models have been proposed. In the present study three models were used for experimental results that differ in their convection and diffusion assumptions. Material and Methods: Permeability coefficients for 13 compounds (metoprolol, propranolol, naproxen, ketoprofen, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide, cimetidine, ranitidine, atenolol, piroxicam, antipyrine, ibuprofen and carbamazepine with known human intestinal permeability values were determined in anaesthetized rats by different mass transfer models and plotted versus the observed human intestinal permeabilities. Results: The calculated dimensionless wall permeability values were in the range of 0.37 - 4.85, 0.38-6.54 and 0.41-16.59 for complete radial mixing, mixing tank and laminar flow models respectively. The results indicated that all of the models work relatively well for our data despite fundamentally different assumptions. The wall permeabilities were in the order laminar flow > mixing tank > complete radial mixing. Conclusion: Although laminar flow model provides the most direct measure of the intrinsic wall permeability, it has limitations for highly permeable drugs such as ibuprofen. The normal physiological hydrodynamics is more complex and more investigation is required to find out the real hydrodynamics.

  14. A permeability model for coal and other fractured, sorptive-elastic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, E.P.; Christiansen, R.L. [Marathon Oil Co., Houston, TX (United States). Research & Development Facility

    2008-09-15

    This paper describes the derivation of a new equation that can be used to model the permeability behavior of a fractured, sorptive-elastic medium, such as coal, under variable stress conditions. The equation is applicable to confinement pressure schemes commonly used during the collection of permeability data in the laboratory. The model is derived for cubic geometry under biaxial or hydrostatic confining pressures. The model is designed to handle changes in permeability caused by adsorption and desorption of gases onto and from the matrix blocks in fractured media. The model equations can be used to calculate permeability changes caused by the production of methane (CH{sub 4}) from coal as well as the injection of gases, such as carbon dioxide, for sequestration in coal. Sensitivity analysis of the model found that each of the input variables can have a significant impact on the outcome of the permeability forecast as a function of changing pore pressure, thus, accurate input data are essential. The permeability model also can be used as a tool to determine input parameters for field simulations by curve fitting laboratory-generated permeability data. The new model is compared to two other widely used coal-permeability models using a hypothetical coal with average properties.

  15. Update to Permeable Pavement Research at the Edison Environmental Center - abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract The EPA’s Urban Watershed Management Branch (UWMB) has been monitoring the permeable pavement demonstration site at the Edison Environmental Center, NJ since 2010. This site has three different types of permeable pavement including: interlocking concrete permeable pavers...

  16. Update to permeable pavement research at the Edison Environmental Center - slides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: The EPA’s Urban Watershed Management Branch (UWMB) has been monitoring the permeable pavement demonstration site at the Edison Environmental Center, NJ since 2010. This site has three different types of permeable pavement including: interlocking concrete permeable paver...

  17. Permeability of crust is key to crispness retention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirte, A.; Hamer, R.J.; Meinders, M.B.J.; Primo-Martin, C.

    2010-01-01

    Bread loses crispness rapidly after baking because water originating from the wet crumb accumulates in the dry crust. This water accumulation might be increased by the dense and low permeable character of the bread crust. Our objective was to investigate the influence of permeability of the crust on

  18. Hybrid green permeable pave with hexagonal modular pavement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, M A; Abustan, I; Hamzah, M O

    2013-01-01

    Modular permeable pavements are alternatives to the traditional impervious asphalt and concrete pavements. Pervious pore spaces in the surface allow for water to infiltrate into the pavement during rainfall events. As of their ability to allow water to quickly infiltrate through the surface, modular permeable pavements allow for reductions in runoff quantity and peak runoff rates. Even in areas where the underlying soil is not ideal for modular permeable pavements, the installation of under drains has still been shown to reflect these reductions. Modular permeable pavements have been regarded as an effective tool in helping with stormwater control. It also affects the water quality of stormwater runoff. Places using modular permeable pavement has been shown to cause a significant decrease in several heavy metal concentrations as well as suspended solids. Removal rates are dependent upon the material used for the pavers and sub-base material, as well as the surface void space. Most heavy metals are captured in the top layers of the void space fill media. Permeable pavements are now considered an effective BMP for reducing stormwater runoff volume and peak flow. This study examines the extent to which such combined pavement systems are capable of handling load from the vehicles. Experimental investigation were undertaken to quantify the compressive characteristics of the modular. Results shows impressive results of achieving high safety factor for daily life vehicles.

  19. Steady flow in voids and closed cracks in permeable media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, J.

    1985-03-01

    This paper considers what happens when a steady flow in a permeable medium meets two concentric spheres which have different permeabilities. This can form a first stage model for water flow near an engineered cavity in rock or a concreted waste package placed in filler material as in a nuclear waste repository. Results are obtained in terms of the simplest spherical harmonics, which lets them be used easily. Included are the well-known result that a highly permeable sphere will see only a few times the flux which would occur if it had the permeability of its surroundings, and the less well-known result, though unsurprising, that a spherical region surrounded by a highly permeable shell will see almost no flow, as it will almost all by-pass. A companion paper will include more geometrical effects by replacing the spheres by ellipsoids. (author)

  20. Towards a Biohybrid Lung: Endothelial Cells Promote Oxygen Transfer through Gas Permeable Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Sarah; Finocchiaro, Nicole; Donay, Christine; Thiebes, Anja Lena; Hesselmann, Felix; Arens, Jutta; Djeljadini, Suzana; Wessling, Matthias; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Cornelissen, Christian Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    In patients with respiratory failure, extracorporeal lung support can ensure the vital gas exchange via gas permeable membranes but its application is restricted by limited long-term stability and hemocompatibility of the gas permeable membranes, which are in contact with the blood. Endothelial cells lining these membranes promise physiological hemocompatibility and should enable prolonged application. However, the endothelial cells increase the diffusion barrier of the blood-gas interface and thus affect gas transfer. In this study, we evaluated how the endothelial cells affect the gas exchange to optimize performance while maintaining an integral cell layer. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were seeded on gas permeable cell culture membranes and cultivated in a custom-made bioreactor. Oxygen transfer rates of blank and endothelialized membranes in endothelial culture medium were determined. Cell morphology was assessed by microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Both setups provided oxygenation of the test fluid featuring small standard deviations of the measurements. Throughout the measuring range, the endothelial cells seem to promote gas transfer to a certain extent exceeding the blank membranes gas transfer performance by up to 120%. Although the underlying principles hereof still need to be clarified, the results represent a significant step towards the development of a biohybrid lung.

  1. Aquaporin Protein-Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Virginia Roche

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins are tetrameric membrane-bound channels that facilitate transport of water and other small solutes across cell membranes. In eukaryotes, they are frequently regulated by gating or trafficking, allowing for the cell to control membrane permeability in a specific manner. Protein–protein interactions play crucial roles in both regulatory processes and also mediate alternative functions such as cell adhesion. In this review, we summarize recent knowledge about aquaporin protein–protein interactions; dividing the interactions into three types: (1 interactions between aquaporin tetramers; (2 interactions between aquaporin monomers within a tetramer (hetero-tetramerization; and (3 transient interactions with regulatory proteins. We particularly focus on the structural aspects of the interactions, discussing the small differences within a conserved overall fold that allow for aquaporins to be differentially regulated in an organism-, tissue- and trigger-specific manner. A deep knowledge about these differences is needed to fully understand aquaporin function and regulation in many physiological processes, and may enable design of compounds targeting specific aquaporins for treatment of human disease.

  2. Soluble CD40 ligand directly alters glomerular permeability and may act as a circulating permeability factor in FSGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doublier, Sophie; Zennaro, Cristina; Musante, Luca; Spatola, Tiziana; Candiano, Giovanni; Bruschi, Maurizio; Besso, Luca; Cedrino, Massimo; Carraro, Michele; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Camussi, Giovanni; Lupia, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    CD40/CD40 ligand (CD40L) dyad, a co-stimulatory bi-molecular complex involved in the adaptive immune response, has also potent pro-inflammatory actions in haematopoietic and non-haematopoietic cells. We describe here a novel role for soluble CD40L (sCD40L) as modifier of glomerular permselectivity directly acting on glomerular epithelial cells (GECs). We found that stimulation of CD40, constitutively expressed on GEC cell membrane, by the sCD40L rapidly induced redistribution and loss of nephrin in GECs, and increased albumin permeability in isolated rat glomeruli. Pre-treatment with inhibitors of CD40-CD40L interaction completely prevented these effects. Furthermore, in vivo injection of sCD40L induced a significant reduction of nephrin and podocin expression in mouse glomeruli, although no significant increase of urine protein/creatinine ratio was observed after in vivo injection. The same effects were induced by plasma factors partially purified from post-transplant plasma exchange eluates of patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and were blocked by CD40-CD40L inhibitors. Moreover, 17 and 34 kDa sCD40L isoforms were detected in the same plasmapheresis eluates by Western blotting. Finally, the levels of sCD40Lwere significantly increased in serum of children both with steroid-sensitive and steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (NS), and in adult patients with biopsy-proven FSGS, compared to healthy subjects, but neither in children with congenital NS nor in patients with membranous nephropathy. Our results demonstrate that sCD40L directly modifies nephrin and podocin distribution in GECs. Moreover, they suggest that sCD40L contained in plasmapheresis eluates from FSGS patients with post-transplant recurrence may contribute, presumably cooperating with other mediators, to FSGS pathogenesis by modulating glomerular permeability.

  3. Soluble CD40 ligand directly alters glomerular permeability and may act as a circulating permeability factor in FSGS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Doublier

    Full Text Available CD40/CD40 ligand (CD40L dyad, a co-stimulatory bi-molecular complex involved in the adaptive immune response, has also potent pro-inflammatory actions in haematopoietic and non-haematopoietic cells. We describe here a novel role for soluble CD40L (sCD40L as modifier of glomerular permselectivity directly acting on glomerular epithelial cells (GECs. We found that stimulation of CD40, constitutively expressed on GEC cell membrane, by the sCD40L rapidly induced redistribution and loss of nephrin in GECs, and increased albumin permeability in isolated rat glomeruli. Pre-treatment with inhibitors of CD40-CD40L interaction completely prevented these effects. Furthermore, in vivo injection of sCD40L induced a significant reduction of nephrin and podocin expression in mouse glomeruli, although no significant increase of urine protein/creatinine ratio was observed after in vivo injection. The same effects were induced by plasma factors partially purified from post-transplant plasma exchange eluates of patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS, and were blocked by CD40-CD40L inhibitors. Moreover, 17 and 34 kDa sCD40L isoforms were detected in the same plasmapheresis eluates by Western blotting. Finally, the levels of sCD40Lwere significantly increased in serum of children both with steroid-sensitive and steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (NS, and in adult patients with biopsy-proven FSGS, compared to healthy subjects, but neither in children with congenital NS nor in patients with membranous nephropathy. Our results demonstrate that sCD40L directly modifies nephrin and podocin distribution in GECs. Moreover, they suggest that sCD40L contained in plasmapheresis eluates from FSGS patients with post-transplant recurrence may contribute, presumably cooperating with other mediators, to FSGS pathogenesis by modulating glomerular permeability.

  4. Integration of pneumatic fracturing with bioremediation from the enhanced removal of BTX from low permeability gasoline-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatraman, S.N.; Kosson, D.S.; Schuring, J.R.; Boland, T.M.

    1995-01-01

    A pilot-scale evaluation of the integrated pneumatic fracturing and bioremediation system was carried out to demonstrate the enhanced removal of BTX from a gasoline contaminated, low permeability soil formation. The fracturing enhanced subsurface permeability by an average of over 36 times, and established an extended bioremediation zone supporting aerobic, denitrifying and methanogenic populations. Subsurface amendment injections consisting of phosphate and nitrogen were made periodically over a 50-week period to stimulate microbial activity. Results indicate that 79% of the soil-phase BTX was removed during the field test, with over 85% of the mass removed attributable to bioremediation

  5. Small-bowel permeability in collagenous colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildt, Signe; Madsen, Jan L; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    Collagenous colitis (CC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that affects the colon. However, some patients with CC present with accompanying pathologic small-bowel manifestations such as coeliac disease, defects in bile acid absorption and histopathologic changes in small-intestinal biopsies......, indicating that CC is a pan-intestinal disease. In small-intestinal disease, the intestinal barrier function may be impaired, and the permeability of the small intestine altered. The purpose of this research was to study small-bowel function in patients with CC as expressed by intestinal permeability....

  6. Analytical Estimation of Water-Oil Relative Permeabilities through Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saboorian-Jooybari Hadi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Modeling multiphase flow through fractures is a key issue for understanding flow mechanism and performance prediction of fractured petroleum reservoirs, geothermal reservoirs, underground aquifers and carbon-dioxide sequestration. One of the most challenging subjects in modeling of fractured petroleum reservoirs is quantifying fluids competition for flow in fracture network (relative permeability curves. Unfortunately, there is no standard technique for experimental measurement of relative permeabilities through fractures and the existing methods are very expensive, time consuming and erroneous. Although, several formulations were presented to calculate fracture relative permeability curves in the form of linear and power functions of flowing fluids saturation, it is still unclear what form of relative permeability curves must be used for proper modeling of flow through fractures and consequently accurate reservoir simulation. Basically, the classic linear relative permeability (X-type curves are used in almost all of reservoir simulators. In this work, basic fluid flow equations are combined to develop a new simple analytical model for water-oil two phase flow in a single fracture. The model gives rise to simple analytic formulations for fracture relative permeabilities. The model explicitly proves that water-oil relative permeabilities in fracture network are functions of fluids saturation, viscosity ratio, fluids density, inclination of fracture plane from horizon, pressure gradient along fracture and rock matrix wettability, however they were considered to be only functions of saturations in the classic X-type and power (Corey [35] and Honarpour et al. [28, 29] models. Eventually, validity of the proposed formulations is checked against literature experimental data. The proposed fracture relative permeability functions have several advantages over the existing ones. Firstly, they are explicit functions of the parameters which are known for

  7. Preparation of Modified Films with Protein from Grouper Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Valdivia-López

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A protein concentrate (PC was obtained from Grouper fish skin and it was used to prepare films with different amounts of sorbitol and glycerol as plasticizers. The best performing films regarding resistance were then modified with various concentrations of CaCl2, CaSO4 (calcium salts, and glucono-δ-lactone (GDL with the purpose of improving their mechanical and barrier properties. These films were characterized by determining their mechanical properties and permeability to water vapor and oxygen. Formulations with 5% (w/v protein and 75% sorbitol and 4% (w/v protein with a mixture of 15% glycerol and 15% sorbitol produced adequate films. Calcium salts and GDL increased the tensile fracture stress but reduced the fracture strain and decreased water vapor permeability compared with control films. The films prepared represent an attractive alternative for being used as food packaging materials.

  8. Solubility and Permeability Studies of Aceclofenac in Different Oils

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The solubility and permeability of aceclofenac were compared with the hydroalcoholic solution of ... the use of lipid based systems such as micro- or .... carriers/vehicles for enhanced solubility and permeability ... modifications: A recent review.

  9. Histophilus somni Stimulates Expression of Antiviral Proteins and Inhibits BRSV Replication in Bovine Respiratory Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Lin

    Full Text Available Our previous studies showed that bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV followed by Histophilus somni causes more severe bovine respiratory disease and a more permeable alveolar barrier in vitro than either agent alone. However, microarray analysis revealed the treatment of bovine alveolar type 2 (BAT2 epithelial cells with H. somni concentrated culture supernatant (CCS stimulated up-regulation of four antiviral protein genes as compared with BRSV infection or dual treatment. This suggested that inhibition of viral infection, rather than synergy, may occur if the bacterial infection occurred before the viral infection. Viperin (or radical S-adenosyl methionine domain containing 2--RSAD2 and ISG15 (IFN-stimulated gene 15--ubiquitin-like modifier were most up-regulated. CCS dose and time course for up-regulation of viperin protein levels were determined in treated bovine turbinate (BT upper respiratory cells and BAT2 lower respiratory cells by Western blotting. Treatment of BAT2 cells with H. somni culture supernatant before BRSV infection dramatically reduced viral replication as determined by qRT PCR, supporting the hypothesis that the bacterial infection may inhibit viral infection. Studies of the role of the two known H. somni cytotoxins showed that viperin protein expression was induced by endotoxin (lipooligosaccharide but not by IbpA, which mediates alveolar permeability and H. somni invasion. A naturally occurring IbpA negative asymptomatic carrier strain of H. somni (129Pt does not cause BAT2 cell retraction or permeability of alveolar cell monolayers, so lacks virulence in vitro. To investigate initial steps of pathogenesis, we showed that strain 129Pt attached to BT cells and induced a strong viperin response in vitro. Thus colonization of the bovine upper respiratory tract with an asymptomatic carrier strain lacking virulence may decrease viral infection and the subsequent enhancement of bacterial respiratory infection in vivo.

  10. Physicochemical and microstructural characterization of gum tragacanth added whey protein based films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonyali, Bade; Cikrikci, Sevil; Oztop, Mecit Halil

    2018-03-01

    Edible films of gum tragacanth (GT) with whey protein were fabricated to see how the incorporation of GT influenced whey protein based film properties. Whey protein isolate (WPI) was replaced with GT at different ratios as 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2% of WPI. Optical, mechanical, permeability and microstructural properties, as well as moisture sorption and solubility behavior of films were measured. The findings indicated that combination of WPI and GT in film formulation led to less strength, more flexible, less soluble films with lower permeability to water and with higher opacity. The results suggested that the addition of GT to WPI could lead to obtain modified WPI based edible films with desirable properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A fractal model for predicting permeability and liquid water relative permeability in the gas diffusion layer (GDL) of PEMFCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guangli; Zhao, Zongchang; Ming, Pingwen; Abuliti, Abudula; Yin, Caoyong

    In this study, a fractal model is developed to predict the permeability and liquid water relative permeability of the GDL (TGP-H-120 carbon paper) in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), based on the micrographs (by SEM, i.e. scanning electron microscope) of the TGP-H-120. Pore size distribution (PSD), maximum pore size, porosity, diameter of the carbon fiber, pore tortuosity, area dimension, hydrophilicity or hydrophobicity, the thickness of GDL and saturation are involved in this model. The model was validated by comparison between the predicted results and experimental data. The results indicate that the water relative permeability in the hydrophobicity case is much higher than in the hydrophilicity case. So, a hydrophobic carbon paper is preferred for efficient removal of liquid water from the cathode of PEMFCs.

  12. Culture and the Immune System: Cultural Consonance in Social Support and C-reactive Protein in Urban Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, William W; Balieiro, Mauro C; Ribeiro, Rosane P; Dos Santos, José Ernesto

    2016-06-01

    In this article, we examine the distribution of a marker of immune system stimulation-C-reactive protein-in urban Brazil. Social relationships are associated with immunostimulation, and we argue that cultural dimensions of social support, assessed by cultural consonance, are important in this process. Cultural consonance is the degree to which individuals, in their own beliefs and behaviors, approximate shared cultural models. A measure of cultural consonance in social support, based on a cultural consensus analysis regarding sources and patterns of social support in Brazil, was developed. In a survey of 258 persons, the association of cultural consonance in social support and C-reactive protein was examined, controlling for age, sex, body mass index, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, depressive symptoms, and a social network index. Lower cultural consonance in social support was associated with higher C-reactive protein. Implications of these results for future research are discussed. © 2016 by the American Anthropological Association.

  13. Wave transmission over permeable submerged breakwaters; Transmision del oleaje en rompeolas sumergidos permeables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-y-Zurvia-Flores, Jaime Roberto; Fragoso-Sandoval, Lucio [Instituto Politecnico Nacional(Mexico)

    2008-10-15

    The permeable submerged breakwaters represent a coastal protection alternative, where some degree of wave energy transmission is acceptable. Such would be the case of tourist beach protection in Mexico. In previous researches, like those performed by D'Angremond et al. (1996), Seabrook and Hall (1998), and Briganti et al. (2003), the empirical formulas developed, give only some limited information over the spatial distribution of wave energy over the structure. Therefore, a decision was made to conduct a study on a reduced physical model of a permeable submerged breakwater based on the results presented by those researchers and with possible applications. Therefore this paper presents the development of a study of wave transmission over permeable submerged breakwaters performed in a reduced physical model of different sections of a submerged rockfill breakwater of the trapezoidal type. This was done in a narrow wave flume with a hydraulic irregular wave generator controlled by a computer that was used to generate and to reproduce different types of irregular waves to be used in the tests. It also has a wave meter with four sensors, and they are connected to a computer in order to process the wave data. The main objective of the study was to determine in an experimental way the influence of the several parameters of submerged breakwater over the wave transmission coefficient. Our experimental results were comparable to those obtained by D'Angremond et al. (1996) and Seabrook and Hall (1998). The results show that the sumerged breakwater parameters of most influence over the wave transmission coefficient were relative submergence and the relative width crest of the sumerged breakwater, and that the formula by Seabrook and Hall correlates best with our results. [Spanish] Los rompeolas sumergidos permeables representan actualmente una alternativa de proteccion de costas, donde un cierto grado de transmision de energia del oleaje es aceptable, como seria el

  14. Effects of Hydrolysed Whey Proteins on the Techno-Functional Characteristics of Whey Protein-Based Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Noller

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pure whey protein isolate (WPI-based cast films are very brittle due to its strong formation of protein cross-linking of disulphide bonding, hydrogen bonding as well as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. However, this strong cross-linking is the reason for its final barrier performance. To overcome film brittleness of whey protein layers, plasticisers like glycerol are used. It reduces intermolecular interactions, increases the mobility of polymer chains and thus film flexibility can be achieved. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of hydrolysed whey protein isolate (WPI in whey protein isolate-based cast films on their techno-functional properties. Due to the fact, that the addition of glycerol is necessary but at the same time increases the free volume in the film leading to higher oxygen and water vapour permeability, the glycerol concentration was kept constant. Cast films with different ratios of hydrolysed and not hydrolysed WPI were produced. They were characterised in order to determine the influence of the lower molecular weight caused by the addition of hydrolysed WPI on the techno-functional properties. This study showed that increasing hydrolysed WPI concentrations significantly change the mechanical properties while maintaining the oxygen and water vapour permeability. The tensile and elastic film properties decreased significantly by reducing the average molecular weight whereas the yellowish coloration and the surface tension considerably increased. This study provided new data which put researchers and material developers in a position to tailor the characteristics of whey protein based films according to their intended application and further processing.

  15. OBSERVATION AND ANALYSIS OF A PRONOUNCED PERMEABILITY AND POROSITY SCALE-EFFECT IN UNSATURATED FRACTURED TUFF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. VESSELINOV; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    Over 270 single-hole (Guzman et al., 1996) and 44 cross-hole pneumatic injection tests (Illman et al., 1998; Illman, 1999) have been conducted at the Apache Leap Research Site (ALRS) near Superior, Arizona. They have shown that the pneumatic pressure behavior of fractured tuff at the site is amenable to analysis by methods which treat the rock as a continuum on scales ranging from meters to tens of meters, and that this continuum is representative primarily of interconnected fractures. Both the single-hole and cross-hole test results are free of skin effect. Single-hole tests have yielded estimates of air permeability at various locations throughout the tested rock volume, on a nominal support scale of about 1 m. The corresponding log permeability data exhibit spatial behavior characteristic of a random fractal and yield a kriged estimate of how these 1-m scale log permeabilities vary in three-dimensional space (Chen et al., 2000). Cross-hole tests have been analyzed by means of a three-dimensional inverse model (Vesselinov et al., 2000) in two ways: (a) by interpreting pressure records from individual borehole monitoring intervals, one at a time, while treating the rock as if it was spatially uniform; and (b) by using the inverse model to interpret pressure records from multiple tests and borehole monitoring intervals simultaneously, while treating the rock as a random fractal characterized by a power variogram. The first approach has yielded equivalent air permeabilities and air-filled porosities for a rock volume characterized by a length-scale of several tens of meters. Comparable results have been obtained by means of type-curves (Illman and Neuman, 2001). The second approach amounts to three-dimensional pneumatic tomography, or stochastic imaging, of the rock. It has yielded a high-resolution geostatistical estimate of how air permeability and air-filled porosity, defined over grid blocks having a length-scale of 1 m, vary throughout the modeled rock volume

  16. Permeability and Dispersion Coefficients in Rocks with Fracture Network - 12140

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.K.; Htway, M.Z. [Handong Global University, 3 Namsong-ri, Heunghae-eub, Buk-gu, Pohang, Kyungbuk, 791-708 (Korea, Republic of); Yim, S.P. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O.Box 150, Yusong, Daejon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    Fluid flow and solute transport are considered for a rock medium with a fracture network with regard to the effective permeability and the dispersion coefficients. To investigate the effects of individual fractures a three-fracture system is chosen in which two are parallel and the third one connects the two at different angles. Specifically the micro-cell boundary-value problems(defined through multiple scale analysis) are solved numerically by using finite elements to calculate the permeability and dispersion coefficients. It is shown that the permeability depends significantly on the pattern of the fracture distribution and the dispersion coefficient is influenced by both the externally imposed pressure gradient (which also reflects the flow field) and the direction of the gradient of solute concentration on the macro-scale. From the calculations of the permeability and dispersion coefficients for solute in a rock medium with a fracture network the following conclusions are drawn. 1. The permeability of fractured medium depends on the primary orientation of the fracture network and is influenced by the connecting fractures in the medium. 2. The cross permeability, e.g., permeability in the direction normal to the direction of the external pressure gradient is rather insensitive to the orientation of the fracture network. 3. Calculation of permeability is most efficiently achieved with optimal discretization across individual fractures and is rather insensitive to the discretization along the fracture.. 4. The longitudinal dispersion coefficient Dxx of a fractured medium depends on both the macro-scale concentration gradient and the direction of the flow (pressure gradient). Hence both features must be considered when investigating solute transport in a fractured medium. (authors)

  17. Modelling of hydrogen permeability of membranes for high-purity hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaika, Yury V.; Rodchenkova, Natalia I.

    2017-11-01

    High-purity hydrogen is required for clean energy and a variety of chemical technology processes. Different alloys, which may be well-suited for use in gas-separation plants, were investigated by measuring specific hydrogen permeability. One had to estimate the parameters of diffusion and sorption to numerically model the different scenarios and experimental conditions of the material usage (including extreme ones), and identify the limiting factors. This paper presents a nonlinear mathematical model taking into account the dynamics of sorption-desorption processes and reversible capture of diffusing hydrogen by inhomogeneity of the material’s structure, and also modification of the model when the transport rate is high. The results of numerical modelling allow to obtain information about output data sensitivity with respect to variations of the material’s hydrogen permeability parameters. Furthermore, it is possible to analyze the dynamics of concentrations and fluxes that cannot be measured directly. Experimental data for Ta77Nb23 and V85Ni15 alloys were used to test the model. This work is supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Project No. 15-01-00744).

  18. Permeability of salt-crystal interfaces to brine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilpatrick, L.O.; Baes, C.F. Jr.; Shor, A.J.; Canonico, C.M.

    1982-06-01

    To investigate the movement of brine along grain boundaries in polycrystalline salt, measurements have been made of the radial flow of brine through the interface between cylindrical salt crystals under axial stresses to 140 bar and temperatures to 80 0 C. For constant conditions, the total flow of brine showed a linear dependence on the logarithm of time, and the reciprocal permeability increased linearly with time. Loss of salt from the interface by pressure solution effects was more than enough to account for the decrease in the apparent thickness of the interface (i.e., that which may be estimated for an interface of the same permeability formed by plane parallel surfaces). This apparent thickness, initially as large as 10 μm, decreased to as little as 0.2 μm with exposure to stress and flowing brine. It decreased quickly with sudden increases in axial stress and usually increased, though not reversibly, with decreases in stress. The rate of increase in the reciprocal permeability with time was roughly proportional to the stress and to the square of the hydraulic pressure drop. Assuming similar apparent thicknesses for the grain boundaries in polycrystalline salt, permeabilities are predicted that are quite consistent with the low values reported for stressed core specimens

  19. Study on road surface source pollution controlled by permeable pavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chaocheng

    2018-06-01

    The increase of impermeable pavement in urban construction not only increases the runoff of the pavement, but also produces a large number of Non-Point Source Pollution. In the process of controlling road surface runoff by permeable pavement, a large number of particulate matter will be withheld when rainwater is being infiltrated, so as to control the source pollution at the source. In this experiment, we determined the effect of permeable road surface to remove heavy pollutants in the laboratory and discussed the related factors that affect the non-point pollution of permeable pavement, so as to provide a theoretical basis for the application of permeable pavement.

  20. Cross-property relations and permeability estimation in model porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, L.M.; Martys, N.; Bentz, D.P.; Garboczi, E.J.; Torquato, S.

    1993-01-01

    Results from a numerical study examining cross-property relations linking fluid permeability to diffusive and electrical properties are presented. Numerical solutions of the Stokes equations in three-dimensional consolidated granular packings are employed to provide a basis of comparison between different permeability estimates. Estimates based on the Λ parameter (a length derived from electrical conduction) and on d c (a length derived from immiscible displacement) are found to be considerably more reliable than estimates based on rigorous permeability bounds related to pore space diffusion. We propose two hybrid relations based on diffusion which provide more accurate estimates than either of the rigorous permeability bounds

  1. Calculation of Permeability inside the Basket including one Fuel Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Seung Hwan; Bang, Kyung Sik; Lee, Ju an; Choi, Woo Seok [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In general, the porous media model and the effective thermal conductivity were used to simply the fuel assembly. The methods of calculating permeability were compared considering the flow inside a basket which includes a nuclear fuel. Detailed fuel assembly was a computational modeling and the flow characteristics were investigated. The flow inside the basket which included a fuel assembly is analyzed by CFD. As the height of the fuel assembly increases, the pressure drop linearly increased. The inertia resistance could be neglected. Three methods to calculate the permeability were compared. The permeability by the friction factor is 50% less than the permeability by wall shear stress and pressure drop.

  2. Claudin-8d is a cortisol-responsive barrier protein in the gill epithelium of trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosov, Dennis; Kelly, Scott P

    2017-10-01

    The influence of claudin (Cldn) 8 tight junction (TJ) proteins on cortisol-mediated alterations in gill epithelium permeability was examined using a primary cultured trout gill epithelium model. Genes encoding three Cldn-8 proteins ( cldn-8b, -8c and -8d ) have been identified in trout and all are expressed in the model gill epithelium. Cortisol treatment 'tightened' the gill epithelium, as indicated by increased transepithelial resistance (TER) and reduced paracellular [ 3 H]polyethylene glycol (MW 400 Da; PEG-400) flux. This occurred in association with elevated cldn-8d mRNA abundance, but no alterations in cldn-8b and -8c mRNA abundance were observed. Transcriptional knockdown (KD) of cldn-8d inhibited a cortisol-induced increase in Cldn-8d abundance and reduced the 'epithelium tightening' effect of cortisol in association with increased paracellular PEG-400 flux. Under simulated in vivo conditions (i.e. apical freshwater), cldn-8d KD hindered a cortisol-mediated reduction in basolateral to apical Na + and Cl - flux (i.e. reduced the ability of cortisol to mitigate ion loss). However, cldn-8d KD did not abolish the tightening effect of cortisol on the gill epithelium. This is likely due, in part, to the effect of cortisol on genes encoding other TJ proteins, which in some cases appeared to exhibit a compensatory response. Data support the idea that Cldn-8d is a barrier protein of the gill epithelium TJ that contributes significantly to corticosteroid-mediated alterations in gill epithelium permeability. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  3. The transient receptor potential, TRP4, cation channel is a novel member of the family of calmodulin binding proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Trost, C; Bergs, C; Himmerkus, N; Flockerzi, V

    2001-01-01

    The mammalian gene products, transient receptor potential (trp)1 to trp7, are related to the Drosophila TRP and TRP-like ion channels, and are candidate proteins underlying agonist-activated Ca(2+)-permeable ion channels. Recently, the TRP4 protein has been shown to be part of native store-operated Ca(2+)-permeable channels. These channels, most likely, are composed of other proteins in addition to TRP4. In the present paper we report the direct interaction of TRP4 and calmodulin (CaM) by: (1...

  4. Permeability criteria for effective function of passive countercurrent multiplier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, H E; Knepper, M A; Chou, C L

    1996-01-01

    The urine concentrating effect of the mammalian renal inner medulla has been attributed to countercurrent multiplication of a transepithelial osmotic difference arising from passive absorption of NaCl from thin ascending limbs of long loops of Henle. This study assesses, both mathematically and experimentally, whether the permeability criteria for effective function of this passive hypothesis are consistent with transport properties measured in long loops of Henle of chinchilla. Mathematical simulations incorporating loop of Henle transepithelial permeabilities idealized for the passive hypothesis generated a steep inner medullary osmotic gradient, confirming the fundamental feasibility of the passive hypothesis. However, when permeabilities measured in chinchilla were used, no inner medullary gradient was generated. A key parameter in the apparent failure of the passive hypothesis is the long-loop descending limb (LDL) urea permeability, which must be small to prevent significant transepithelial urea flux into inner medullary LDL. Consequently, experiments in isolated perfused thin LDL were conducted to determine whether the urea permeability may be lower under conditions more nearly resembling those in the inner medulla. LDL segments were dissected from 30-70% of the distance along the inner medullary axis of the chinchilla kidney. The factors tested were NaCl concentration (125-400 mM in perfusate and bath), urea concentration (5-500 mM in perfusate and bath), calcium concentration (2-8 mM in perfusate and bath), and protamine concentration (300 micrograms/ml in perfusate). None of these factors significantly altered the measured urea permeability, which exceeded 20 x 10(-5) cm/s for all conditions. Simulation results show that this moderately high urea permeability in LDL is an order of magnitude too high for effective operation of the passive countercurrent multiplier.

  5. Microfluidic passive permeability assay using nanoliter droplet interface lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisisako, Takasi; Portonovo, Shiva A; Schmidt, Jacob J

    2013-11-21

    Membrane permeability assays play an important role in assessing drug transport activities across biological membranes. However, in conventional parallel artificial membrane permeability assays (PAMPA), the membrane model used is dissimilar to biological membranes physically and chemically. Here, we describe a microfluidic passive permeability assay using droplet interface bilayers (DIBs). In a microfluidic network, nanoliter-sized donor and acceptor aqueous droplets are alternately formed in cross-flowing oil containing phospholipids. Subsequently, selective removal of oil through hydrophobic pseudo-porous sidewalls induces the contact of the lipid monolayers, creating arrayed planar DIBs between the donor and acceptor droplets. Permeation of fluorescein from the donor to the acceptor droplets was fluorometrically measured. From the measured data and a simple diffusion model we calculated the effective permeabilities of 5.1 × 10(-6) cm s(-1), 60.0 × 10(-6) cm s(-1), and 87.6 × 10(-6) cm s(-1) with donor droplets at pH values of 7.5, 6.4 and 5.4, respectively. The intrinsic permeabilities of specific monoanionic and neutral fluorescein species were obtained similarly. We also measured the permeation of caffeine in 10 min using UV microspectroscopy, obtaining a permeability of 20.8 × 10(-6) cm s(-1). With the small solution volumes, short measurement time, and ability to measure a wide range of compounds, this device has considerable potential as a platform for high-throughput drug permeability assays.

  6. Characterization and estimation of permeability correlation structure from performance data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ershaghi, I.; Al-Qahtani, M. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    In this study, the influence of permeability structure and correlation length on the system effective permeability and recovery factors of 2-D cross-sectional reservoir models, under waterflood, is investigated. Reservoirs with identical statistical representation of permeability attributes are shown to exhibit different system effective permeability and production characteristics which can be expressed by a mean and variance. The mean and variance are shown to be significantly influenced by the correlation length. Detailed quantification of the influence of horizontal and vertical correlation lengths for different permeability distributions is presented. The effect of capillary pressure, P{sub c1} on the production characteristics and saturation profiles at different correlation lengths is also investigated. It is observed that neglecting P{sub c} causes considerable error at large horizontal and short vertical correlation lengths. The effect of using constant as opposed to variable relative permeability attributes is also investigated at different correlation lengths. Next we studied the influence of correlation anisotropy in 2-D reservoir models. For a reservoir under five-spot waterflood pattern, it is shown that the ratios of breakthrough times and recovery factors of the wells in each direction of correlation are greatly influenced by the degree of anisotropy. In fully developed fields, performance data can aid in the recognition of reservoir anisotropy. Finally, a procedure for estimating the spatial correlation length from performance data is presented. Both the production performance data and the system`s effective permeability are required in estimating the correlation length.

  7. PreBIND and Textomy – mining the biomedical literature for protein-protein interactions using a support vector machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baskin Berivan

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of experimentally verified molecular interaction and biological pathway data are present in the unstructured text of biomedical journal articles where they are inaccessible to computational methods. The Biomolecular interaction network database (BIND seeks to capture these data in a machine-readable format. We hypothesized that the formidable task-size of backfilling the database could be reduced by using Support Vector Machine technology to first locate interaction information in the literature. We present an information extraction system that was designed to locate protein-protein interaction data in the literature and present these data to curators and the public for review and entry into BIND. Results Cross-validation estimated the support vector machine's test-set precision, accuracy and recall for classifying abstracts describing interaction information was 92%, 90% and 92% respectively. We estimated that the system would be able to recall up to 60% of all non-high throughput interactions present in another yeast-protein interaction database. Finally, this system was applied to a real-world curation problem and its use was found to reduce the task duration by 70% thus saving 176 days. Conclusions Machine learning methods are useful as tools to direct interaction and pathway database back-filling; however, this potential can only be realized if these techniques are coupled with human review and entry into a factual database such as BIND. The PreBIND system described here is available to the public at http://bind.ca. Current capabilities allow searching for human, mouse and yeast protein-interaction information.

  8. Lipids in the Assembly of Membrane Proteins and Organization of Protein Supercomplexes: Implications for Lipid-Linked Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdanov, Mikhail; Mileykovskaya, Eugenia; Dowhan, William

    2008-01-01

    Lipids play important roles in cellular dysfunction leading to disease. Although a major role for phospholipids is in defining the membrane permeability barrier, phospholipids play a central role in a diverse range of cellular processes and therefore are important factors in cellular dysfunction and disease. This review is focused on the role of phospholipids in normal assembly and organization of the membrane proteins, multimeric protein complexes, and higher order supercomplexes. Since lipi...

  9. Quantifying tidally driven benthic oxygen exchange across permeable sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGinnis, Daniel F.; Sommer, Stefan; Lorke, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Continental shelves are predominately (approximate to 70%) covered with permeable, sandy sediments. While identified as critical sites for intense oxygen, carbon, and nutrient turnover, constituent exchange across permeable sediments remains poorly quantified. The central North Sea largely consists...... of permeable sediments and has been identified as increasingly at risk for developing hypoxia. Therefore, we investigate the benthic O-2 exchange across the permeable North Sea sediments using a combination of in situ microprofiles, a benthic chamber, and aquatic eddy correlation. Tidal bottom currents drive...... the variable sediment O-2 penetration depth (from approximate to 3 to 8 mm) and the concurrent turbulence-driven 25-fold variation in the benthic sediment O-2 uptake. The O-2 flux and variability were reproduced using a simple 1-D model linking the benthic turbulence to the sediment pore water exchange...

  10. Changes in permeability caused by transient stresses: field observations, experiments, and mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Michael; Beresnev, Igor; Brodsky, Emily E.; Elkhoury, Jean E.; Elsworth, Derek; Ingebritsen, Steve E.; Mays, David C.; Wang, Chi-Yuen

    2012-01-01

    Oscillations in stress, such as those created by earthquakes, can increase permeability and fluid mobility in geologic media. In natural systems, strain amplitudes as small as 10–6 can increase discharge in streams and springs, change the water level in wells, and enhance production from petroleum reservoirs. Enhanced permeability typically recovers to prestimulated values over a period of months to years. Mechanisms that can change permeability at such small stresses include unblocking pores, either by breaking up permeability-limiting colloidal deposits or by mobilizing droplets and bubbles trapped in pores by capillary forces. The recovery time over which permeability returns to the prestimulated value is governed by the time to reblock pores, or for geochemical processes to seal pores. Monitoring permeability in geothermal systems where there is abundant seismicity, and the response of flow to local and regional earthquakes, would help test some of the proposed mechanisms and identify controls on permeability and its evolution.

  11. Leptin-induced cardioprotection involves JAK/STAT signaling that may be linked to the mitochondrial permeability transition pore

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Christopher C. T.; Dixon, Richard A.; Wynne, Abigail M.; Theodorou, Louise; Ong, Sang-Ging; Subrayan, Sapna; Davidson, Sean M.; Hausenloy, Derek J.; Yellon, Derek M.

    2010-01-01

    Leptin-induced protection against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury involves the activation of the reperfusion injury salvage kinase pathway, incorporating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt/protein kinase B and p44/42 MAPK, and the inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP). Recently published data indicate that the JAK/STAT signaling pathway, which mediates the metabolic actions of leptin, also plays a pivotal role in cardioprotection. Consequently, in the...

  12. Quantitative proteomics reveals new insights into calcium-mediated resistance mechanisms in Aspergillus flavus against the antifungal protein PgAFP in cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Josué; Owens, Rebecca A; Doyle, Sean; Núñez, Félix; Asensio, Miguel A

    2017-09-01

    The ability of Aspergillus flavus to produce aflatoxins in dairy products presents a potential hazard. The antifungal protein PgAFP from Penicillium chrysogenum inhibits various foodborne toxigenic fungi, including Aspergillus flavus. However, PgAFP did not inhibit A. flavus growth in cheese, which was related to the associated cation content. CaCl 2 increased A. flavus permeability and prevented PgAFP-mediated inhibition in potato dextrose broth (PDB). PgAFP did not elicit any additional increase in permeability of CaCl 2 -incubated A. flavus. Furthermore, PgAFP did not alter metabolic capability, chitin deposition, or hyphal viability of A. flavus grown with CaCl 2 . Comparative proteomic analysis after PgAFP treatment of A. flavus in calcium-enriched PDB revealed increased abundance of 125 proteins, including oxidative stress-related proteins, as determined by label-free mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics. Seventy proteins were found at lower abundance, with most involved in metabolic pathways and biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. These changes do not support the blockage of potential PgAFP receptors in A. flavus by calcium as the main cause of the protective role. A. flavus resistance appears to be mediated by calcineurin, G-protein, and γ-glutamyltranspeptidase that combat oxidative stress and impede apoptosis. These findings could serve to design strategies to improve PgAFP activity against aflatoxigenic moulds in dairy products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Xenon NMR measurements of permeability and tortuosity in reservoir rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruopeng; Pavlin, Tina; Rosen, Matthew Scott; Mair, Ross William; Cory, David G; Walsworth, Ronald Lee

    2005-02-01

    In this work we present measurements of permeability, effective porosity and tortuosity on a variety of rock samples using NMR/MRI of thermal and laser-polarized gas. Permeability and effective porosity are measured simultaneously using MRI to monitor the inflow of laser-polarized xenon into the rock core. Tortuosity is determined from measurements of the time-dependent diffusion coefficient using thermal xenon in sealed samples. The initial results from a limited number of rocks indicate inverse correlations between tortuosity and both effective porosity and permeability. Further studies to widen the number of types of rocks studied may eventually aid in explaining the poorly understood connection between permeability and tortuosity of rock cores.

  14. Effect of ionising radiation exposure on structure and permeability of epithelial junctions in rat ileum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebrum, F.; Dublineau, I.; Grison, S.; Strup, C.; Griffiths, N.M.

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of the digestive tract to ionising radiation results in both morphological and functional alterations of the small intestine. However little is known about the effect of irradiation on the junctions playing a major role in the maintenance of epithelial barrier integrity. Thus the aim of this study was to investigate, in rat ileum, the effect of radiation exposure on the permeability of the epithelial barrier in parallel with the localization of certain inter- and intra-cellular proteins of tight and adherent junctions

  15. Design and optimization of porous ceramic supports for asymmetric ceria-based oxygen transport membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Foghmoes, Søren Preben Vagn; Pećanac, G.

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure, mechanical properties and gas permeability of porous supports of Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95−δ (CGO) were investigated as a function of sintering temperature and volume fraction of pore former for use in planar asymmetric oxygen transport membranes (OTMs). With increasing the pore former...... content from 11 vol% to 16 vol%, the gas permeabilities increased by a factor of 5 when support tapes were sintered to comparable densities. The improved permeabilities were due to a more favourable microstructure with larger interconnected pores at a porosity of 45% and a fracture strength of 47±2 MPa (m...

  16. Improved Prediction of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Through Machine Learning with Combined Use of Molecular Property-Based Descriptors and Fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yaxia; Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2018-03-21

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of a compound determines whether the compound can effectively enter the brain. It is an essential property which must be accounted for in drug discovery with a target in the brain. Several computational methods have been used to predict the BBB permeability. In particular, support vector machine (SVM), which is a kernel-based machine learning method, has been used popularly in this field. For SVM training and prediction, the compounds are characterized by molecular descriptors. Some SVM models were based on the use of molecular property-based descriptors (including 1D, 2D, and 3D descriptors) or fragment-based descriptors (known as the fingerprints of a molecule). The selection of descriptors is critical for the performance of a SVM model. In this study, we aimed to develop a generally applicable new SVM model by combining all of the features of the molecular property-based descriptors and fingerprints to improve the accuracy for the BBB permeability prediction. The results indicate that our SVM model has improved accuracy compared to the currently available models of the BBB permeability prediction.

  17. Prediction of Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins from Sequences Using Support Vector Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seizi Someya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrate-binding proteins are proteins that can interact with sugar chains but do not modify them. They are involved in many physiological functions, and we have developed a method for predicting them from their amino acid sequences. Our method is based on support vector machines (SVMs. We first clarified the definition of carbohydrate-binding proteins and then constructed positive and negative datasets with which the SVMs were trained. By applying the leave-one-out test to these datasets, our method delivered 0.92 of the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve. We also examined two amino acid grouping methods that enable effective learning of sequence patterns and evaluated the performance of these methods. When we applied our method in combination with the homology-based prediction method to the annotated human genome database, H-invDB, we found that the true positive rate of prediction was improved.

  18. DNA excision repair in permeable human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, W.K.; Bodell, W.J.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    U.v. irradiation of confluent human fibroblasts activated DNA repair, aspects of which were characterized in the cells after they were permeabilized. Incubation of intact cells for 20 min between irradiation and harvesting was necessary to obtain a maximum rate of reparative DNA synthesis. Cells harvested immediately after irradiation before repair was initiated displayed only a small stimulation of DNA synthesis, indicating that permeable cells have a reduced capacity to recognize pyrimidine dimers and activate repair. The distribution of sizes of DNA strands labeled during 10 min of reparative DNA synthesis resembled that of parental DNA. However, during a 60-min incubation of permeable cells at 37 degrees C, parental DNA and DNA labeled by reparative DNA synthesis were both cleaved to smaller sizes. Cleavage also occurred in unirradiated cells, indicating that endogenous nuclease was active during incubation. Repair patches synthesized in permeable cells displayed increased sensitivity to digestion by micrococcal nuclease. However, the change in sensitivity during a chase with unlabeled DNA precursors was small, suggesting that reassembly of nucleosome structure at sites of repair was impaired. To examine whether this deficiency was due to a preponderance of incomplete or unligated repair patches, 3H-labeled (repaired) DNA was purified, then digested with exonuclease III and nuclease S1 to probe for free 3' ends and single-stranded regions. About 85% of the [3H]DNA synthesized during a 10-min pulse resisted digestion, suggesting that a major fraction of the repair patches that were filled were also ligated. U.v. light-activated DNA synthesis in permeable cells, therefore, appears to represent the continuation of reparative gap-filling at sites of excision repair activated within intact cells. Gap-filling and ligation were comparatively efficient processes in permeable cells

  19. Determination of Intrinsic Permeability for Packed Waste of Indonesian Solid Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benno Rahardyan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Gas permeability and intrinsic permeability are the major parameters to promote aeration for packed waste. The objectives of this research are to identify physical parameters of gas transfer from a various type of packed wastes and examine ventilation design theory for landfill to enhance waste stabilization. Method to determine value of gas permeability and intrinsic permeability for packed waste is by flushing the packed column containing various type and physical characteristics of wastes with an air pump. Permeability was calculated by measuring pressure gradient on sampling points of the column using inclined manometer at distance 10 cm, 23 cm, 46 cm, 69 cm, 92 cm and 115 cm from origin. Gas permeability is specifically relied on physical parameters of wastes as follows, density, moisture content, particle size and gas velocity on the surface of compacted waste layer. Compost has finer pore structure and smaller pore size than leaves as well as mixed organic (65% and inorganic wastes (35%. The experiment found the intrinsic permeability of leaves waste are in the order of 10-11 to 10-8 m2, 10-11 to 10-9 m2 for compost and 10-9 m2 for mixed organic (65% and inorganic wastes (35%.

  20. Modeling the Hydrologic Processes of a Permeable Pavement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    A permeable pavement system can capture stormwater to reduce runoff volume and flow rate, improve onsite groundwater recharge, and enhance pollutant controls within the site. A new unit process model for evaluating the hydrologic performance of a permeable pavement system has be...

  1. Performances of Metal Concentrations from Three Permeable Pavement Infiltrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designed and constructed a 4000-m2 parking lot in Edison, New Jersey in 2009. The parking lot is surfaced with three permeable pavements: permeable interlocking concrete pavers, pervious concrete, and porous asphalt. Water sampling was con...

  2. A Systematic Procedure to Describe Shale Gas Permeability Evolution during the Production Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, B.; Tsau, J. S.; Barati, R.

    2017-12-01

    Gas flow behavior in shales is complex due to the multi-physics nature of the process. Pore size reduces as the in-situ stress increases during the production process, which will reduce intrinsic permeability of the porous media. Slip flow/pore diffusion enhances gas apparent permeability, especially under low reservoir pressures. Adsorption not only increases original gas in place but also influences gas flow behavior because of the adsorption layer. Surface diffusion between free gas and adsorption phase enhances gas permeability. Pore size reduction and the adsorption layer both have complex impacts on gas apparent permeability and non-Darcy flow might be a major component in nanopores. Previously published literature is generally incomplete in terms of coupling of all these four physics with fluid flow during gas production. This work proposes a methodology to simultaneously take them into account to describe a permeability evolution process. Our results show that to fully describe shale gas permeability evolution during gas production, three sets of experimental data are needed initially: 1) intrinsic permeability under different in-situ stress, 2) adsorption isotherm under reservoir conditions and 3) surface diffusivity measurement by the pulse-decay method. Geomechanical effects, slip flow/pore diffusion, adsorption layer and surface diffusion all play roles affecting gas permeability. Neglecting any of them might lead to misleading results. The increasing in-situ stress during shale gas production is unfavorable to shale gas flow process. Slip flow/pore diffusion is important for gas permeability under low pressures in the tight porous media. They might overwhelm the geomechanical effect and enhance gas permeability at low pressures. Adsorption layer reduces the gas permeability by reducing the effective pore size, but the effect is limited. Surface diffusion increases gas permeability more under lower pressures. The total gas apparent permeability might

  3. Altered Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Novel Imaging Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Gaurav; Jones, Jordan T; Lee, Gregory; Altaye, Mekibib; Beebe, Dean W; Meyers-Eaton, Jamie; Wiley, Kasha; Brunner, Hermine I; DiFrancesco, Mark W

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate a safe, noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method to measure regional blood-brain barrier integrity and investigate its relationship with neurocognitive function and regional gray matter volume in juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this cross-sectional, case-control study, capillary permeability was measured as a marker of blood-brain barrier integrity in juvenile SLE patients and matched healthy controls, using a combination of arterial spin labeling and diffusion-weighted brain MRI. Regional gray matter volume was measured by voxel-based morphometry. Correlation analysis was done to investigate the relationship between regional capillary permeability and regional gray matter volume. Formal neurocognitive testing was completed (measuring attention, visuoconstructional ability, working memory, and psychomotor speed), and scores were regressed against regional blood-brain barrier integrity among juvenile SLE patients. Formal cognitive testing confirmed normal cognitive ability in all juvenile SLE subjects (n = 11) included in the analysis. Regional capillary permeability was negatively associated (P = 0.026) with neurocognitive performance concerning psychomotor speed in the juvenile SLE cohort. Compared with controls (n = 11), juvenile SLE patients had significantly greater capillary permeability involving Brodmann's areas 19, 28, 36, and 37 and caudate structures (P < 0.05 for all). There is imaging evidence of increased regional capillary permeability in juvenile SLE patients with normal cognitive performance using a novel noninvasive MRI technique. These blood-brain barrier outcomes appear consistent with functional neuronal network alterations and gray matter volume loss previously observed in juvenile SLE patients with overt neurocognitive deficits, supporting the notion that blood-brain barrier integrity loss precedes the loss of cognitive ability in juvenile SLE. Longitudinal studies are needed to

  4. Effect of CH4 on the CO2 breakthrough pressure and permeability of partially saturated low-permeability sandstone in the Ordos Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Yu, Qingchun

    2018-01-01

    The behavior of CO2 that coexists with CH4 and the effect of CH4 on the CO2 stream need to be deeply analyzed and studied, especially in the presence of water. Our previous studies investigated the breakthrough pressure and permeability of pure CO2 in five partially saturated low-permeability sandstone core samples from the Ordos Basin, and we concluded that rocks with a small pore size and low permeability show considerable sealing capacity even under unsaturated conditions. In this paper, we selected three of these samples for CO2-CH4 gas-mixture breakthrough experiments under various degrees of water saturation. The breakthrough experiments were performed by increasing the gas pressure step by step until breakthrough occurred. Then, the effluent gas mixture was collected for chromatographic partitioning analysis. The results indicate that CH4 significantly affects the breakthrough pressure and permeability of CO2. The presence of CH4 in the gas mixture increases the interfacial tension and, thus, the breakthrough pressure. Therefore, the injected gas mixture that contains the highest (lowest) mole fraction of CH4 results in the largest (smallest) breakthrough pressure. The permeability of the gas mixture is greater than that for pure CO2 because of CH4, and the effective permeability decreases with increased breakthrough pressure. Chromatographic partitioning of the effluent mixture gases indicates that CH4 breaks through ahead of CO2 as a result of its weaker solubility in water. Correlations are established between (1) the breakthrough pressure and water saturation, (2) the effective permeability and water saturation, (3) the breakthrough pressure and effective permeability, and (4) the mole fraction of CO2/CH4 in the effluent mixture gases and water saturation. These results deepen our understanding of the multi-phase flow behavior in the porous media under unsaturated conditions, which have implications for formulating emergency response plans for gas

  5. A multi-state magnetic memory dependent on the permeability of Metglas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, J. R.; Wieland, K. A.; Timmerwilke, J. M.; Barron, S. C.; Burke, R. A.; Newburgh, G. A.; Burnette, J. E.; Fischer, G. A.; Edelstein, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    A three-state magnetic memory was developed based on differences in the magnetic permeability of a soft ferromagnetic media, Metglas 2826MB (Fe40Ni38Mo4B18). By heating bits of a 250 nm thick Metglas film with 70-100 mW of laser power, we were able to tune the local microstructure, and hence, the permeability. Ternary memory states were created by using lower laser power to enhance the initial permeability through localized atomic rearrangement and higher power to reduce the permeability through crystallization. The permeability of the bits was read by detecting variations in an external 32 Oe probe field within 10 μm of the media via a magnetic tunnel junction read head. Compared to data based on remanent magnetization, these multi-permeability bits have enhanced insensitivity to unexpected field and temperature changes. We found that data was not corrupted after exposure to fields of 1 T or temperatures of 423 K, indicating the effectiveness of this multi-state approach for safely storing large amounts of data.

  6. A multi-state magnetic memory dependent on the permeability of Metglas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrie, J. R.; Wieland, K. A.; Timmerwilke, J. M.; Burke, R. A.; Newburgh, G. A.; Fischer, G. A.; Edelstein, A. S.; Barron, S. C.; Burnette, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    A three-state magnetic memory was developed based on differences in the magnetic permeability of a soft ferromagnetic media, Metglas 2826MB (Fe 40 Ni 38 Mo 4 B 18 ). By heating bits of a 250 nm thick Metglas film with 70–100 mW of laser power, we were able to tune the local microstructure, and hence, the permeability. Ternary memory states were created by using lower laser power to enhance the initial permeability through localized atomic rearrangement and higher power to reduce the permeability through crystallization. The permeability of the bits was read by detecting variations in an external 32 Oe probe field within 10 μm of the media via a magnetic tunnel junction read head. Compared to data based on remanent magnetization, these multi-permeability bits have enhanced insensitivity to unexpected field and temperature changes. We found that data was not corrupted after exposure to fields of 1 T or temperatures of 423 K, indicating the effectiveness of this multi-state approach for safely storing large amounts of data

  7. The complex initial reluctivity, permeability and susceptibility spectra of magnetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, N. C.

    2015-03-01

    The HF complex permeability spectrum of a magnetic material is deduced from the measured impedance spectrum, which is then normalized to a series permeability spectrum. However, this series permeability spectrum has previously been shown to correspond to a parallel magnetic circuit, which is not appropriate. Some of the implications of this truth are examined. This electric/magnetic duality has frustrated efforts to interpret the shape of the complex magnetic permeability spectra of materials, and has hindered the application of impedance spectroscopy to magnetic materials. In the presence of magnetic loss, the relationship between the relative magnetic permeability and the magnetic susceptibility is called into question. The use of reluctivity spectra for expressing magnetic material properties is advocated. The relative loss factor, tanδm/μi is shown to be an approximation for the imaginary part of the reluctivity. A single relaxation model for the initial reluctivity spectra of magnetic materials is presented, and its principles are applied to measurements of a high permeability ferrite. The results are presented as contour plots of the spectra as a function of temperature.

  8. Urban permeable pavement system design based on “sponge city” concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, M. M.; Zhu, J. W.; Gao, W. F.; Xu, D. P.; Zhao, M.

    2017-08-01

    Based on the “sponge city” concept, to implement the goal of building a city within the city to solve the sponge waterlogging, rational utilization of water resources, reduce water pollution this paper, combined with the city planning level in China, establishes the design system of city road flooding from the macro, medium and micro level, explore the design method of city water permeable pavement system, and has a practical significance the lower flood risk water ecological problems. On the macro level, we established an urban pavement sponge system under the regional ecological pattern by “spot permeable open space - low impact developing rain water road system - catchment area and catchment wetland”. On a medium level, this paper proposed the permeable suitability of pavement and the planning control indicators when combined with urban functional districts to conduct permeable pavement roads plans and controls. On micro level, the paper studied sponge technology design of permeable pavement from road structure, surface material, and other aspects aimed at the pavement permeability requirements.

  9. Permeability and dispersivity of variable-aperture fracture systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, Y.W.; Tsang, C.F.

    1990-01-01

    A number of recent experiments have pointed out the need of including the effects of aperture variation within each fracture in predicting flow and transport properties of fractured media. This paper introduces a new approach in which medium properties, such as the permeability to flow and dispersivity in tracer transport, are correlated to only three statistical parameters describing the fracture aperture probability distribution and the aperture spatial correlation. We demonstrate how saturated permeability and relative permeabilities for flow, as well as dispersion for solute transport in fractures may be calculated. We are in the process of examining the applicability of these concepts to field problems. Results from the evaluation and analysis of the recent Stripa-3D field data are presented. 13 refs., 10 figs

  10. Effective High-Frequency Permeability of Compacted Metal Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkovskaya, I. I.; Semenov, V. E.; Rybakov, K. I.

    2018-03-01

    We propose a model for determination of the effective complex permeability of compacted metal-powder media. It is based on the equality of the magnetic moment in a given volume of the media with the desired effective permeability to the total magnetic moment of metal particles in the external high-frequency magnetic field, which arises due to excitation of electric eddy currents in the particles. Calculations within the framework of the proposed model allow us to refine the values of the real and imaginary components of the permeability of metal powder compacts in the microwave band. The conditions of applicability of the proposed model are formulated, and their fulfillment is verified for metal powder compacts in the microwave and millimeter wavelength bands.

  11. Apparent permeability of electrical steel under PWM magnetisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, A.J.; Leicht, J.; Anderson, P.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years much attention has been paid to material performance under pulse width modulation (PWM) excitation conditions, which is of increasing importance to motor applications particularly in energy efficient variable speed drive systems. It is well known that in general, losses increase significantly with reducing modulation index, the increase depending on parameters such as silicon contents, thickness and grain size. The effect of the PWM waveform on permeability has attracted little attention until now. So in this paper its influence on the permeability of electrical steel is analysed and characterised. A prediction approach based on the permeability under sine wave excitation and total harmonic distortion is introduced which results in errors below 10% for non-electrical steel at 1.5 T

  12. Permeability dependence of streaming potential coefficient in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thanh, L.D.; Sprik, R.

    2015-01-01

    In theory, the streaming potential coefficient depends not only on the zeta potential but also on the permeability of the rocks that partially determines the surface conductivity of the rocks. However, in practice, it is hard to show the permeability dependence of streaming potential coefficients

  13. Water sorption and water permeability properties of edible film made from potato peel waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Hajar OTHMAN

    Full Text Available Abstract The water sorption and permeability properties of edible film produced from potato peel waste was investigated under different levels of relative humidity (23, 33, 43, 57, 75% RH and temperatures (5, 30, 50 °C. The water sorption behaviour and isotherms of the film were investigated by fitting water sorption data to the Peleg model and the Guggenheim, Anderson de Boer model (GAB model. The amount of moisture content, time required for the moisture content of the film to reach equilibrium, water sorption rate, and water sorption capacity increased when the relative humidity increased. The effect of temperature on moisture content, water sorption rate, water sorption capacity, and monolayer moisture content is complex and related to the water activity as well as the moisture content. Based on R2 and RMSE values, the Peleg and GAB models were respectively determined as excellent models to predict the water sorption properties of the films, thus supporting the reliability of water sorption behaviour prediction. The water vapour transmission rate and water vapour permeability increased with an increase in relative humidity and temperature. The sorption and permeability properties of the film are worth investigation since the final application of the film as food packaging is ultimately dependent on these behaviours.

  14. Instrumentation for Measurement of Gas Permeability of Polymeric Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upchurch, Billy T.; Wood, George M.; Brown, Kenneth G.; Burns, Karen S.

    1993-01-01

    A mass spectrometric 'Dynamic Delta' method for the measurement of gas permeability of polymeric membranes has been developed. The method is universally applicable for measurement of the permeability of any gas through polymeric membrane materials. The usual large sample size of more than 100 square centimeters required for other methods is not necessary for this new method which requires a size less than one square centimeter. The new method should fulfill requirements and find applicability for industrial materials such as food packaging, contact lenses and other commercial materials where gas permeability or permselectivity properties are important.

  15. Determination of hydrogen permeability in commercial and modified superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Peterman, W.

    1983-01-01

    The results of hydrogen permeability measurements on several iron- and cobalt-base alloys as well as on two long-ranged ordered alloys over the range of 705 to 870 C (1300 to 1600 F) are summarized. The test alloys included wrought alloys N-155, IN 800, A-286, 19-9DL, and 19-9DL modifications with aluminum, niobium, and misch metal. In addition, XF-818, CRM-6D, SA-F11, and HS-31 were evaluated. Two wrought long-range ordered alloys, Ni3Al and (Fe,Ni)3(V,Al) were also evaluated. All tests were conducted at 20.7 MPa pressure in either pure and/or 1% CO2-doped H2 for test periods as long as 133 h. Detailed analyses were conducted to determine the relative permeability rankings of these alloys and the effect of doping, exit surface oxidation, specimen design variations, and test duration on permeability coefficient, and permeation activation energies were determined. The two long-range ordered alloys had the lowest permeability coefficients in pure H2 when compared with the eight commercial alloys and their modifications. With CO2 doping, significant decrease in permeability was observed in commercial alloys--no doped tests were conducted with the long-range ordered alloys.

  16. Transparent anodes for polymer photovoltaics: Oxygen permeability of PEDOT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M.; Carlé, Jon Eggert; Cruys-Bagger, N.

    2007-01-01

    The oxygen permeability of the transparent organic anode poly(3,4,-ethylene dioxythiophene) with paratoluenesulphonate as the anion (PEDOT:pTS) was determined to be 2.5 +/- 0.7 x 10(-15) cm(3) (STP) CM cm(-2) S-1 Pa-1, and is thus comparable in magnitude to the oxygen permeability of polyethylene......The oxygen permeability of the transparent organic anode poly(3,4,-ethylene dioxythiophene) with paratoluenesulphonate as the anion (PEDOT:pTS) was determined to be 2.5 +/- 0.7 x 10(-15) cm(3) (STP) CM cm(-2) S-1 Pa-1, and is thus comparable in magnitude to the oxygen permeability...... of polyethyleneterephthalate (PET). The oxygen diffusion through bilayers of polyethylene (PE) and PEDOT:pTS and bilayers of PET and PEDOT:pTS was established. The bilayer structures were applied as the carrier substrate and the transparent anode in polymer-based photovoltaic devices employing a mixture of poly(1-methoxy-4......-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylenevinylene) (MEH-PPV) and [6,6]-phenyt-C-61-butanoicacidmethylester (PCBM) as the active layer and aluminium as the cathode. The oxygen permeability of the layers and the aluminium cathode was correlated with the lifetime of the solar cell devices. It was found that the performance...

  17. An integrated approach to permeability modeling using micro-models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini, A.H.; Leuangthong, O.; Deutsch, C.V. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Canadian Section, Calgary, AB (Canada)]|[Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    An important factor in predicting the performance of steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) well pairs is the spatial distribution of permeability. Complications that make the inference of a reliable porosity-permeability relationship impossible include the presence of short-scale variability in sand/shale sequences; preferential sampling of core data; and uncertainty in upscaling parameters. Micro-modelling is a simple and effective method for overcoming these complications. This paper proposed a micro-modeling approach to account for sampling bias, small laminated features with high permeability contrast, and uncertainty in upscaling parameters. The paper described the steps and challenges of micro-modeling and discussed the construction of binary mixture geo-blocks; flow simulation and upscaling; extended power law formalism (EPLF); and the application of micro-modeling and EPLF. An extended power-law formalism to account for changes in clean sand permeability as a function of macroscopic shale content was also proposed and tested against flow simulation results. There was close agreement between the model and simulation results. The proposed methodology was also applied to build the porosity-permeability relationship for laminated and brecciated facies of McMurray oil sands. Experimental data was in good agreement with the experimental data. 8 refs., 17 figs.

  18. Analysis of Fault Permeability Using Mapping and Flow Modeling, Hickory Sandstone Aquifer, Central Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieto Camargo, Jorge E., E-mail: jorge.nietocamargo@aramco.com; Jensen, Jerry L., E-mail: jjensen@ucalgary.ca [University of Calgary, Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering (Canada)

    2012-09-15

    Reservoir compartments, typical targets for infill well locations, are commonly created by faults that may reduce permeability. A narrow fault may consist of a complex assemblage of deformation elements that result in spatially variable and anisotropic permeabilities. We report on the permeability structure of a km-scale fault sampled through drilling a faulted siliciclastic aquifer in central Texas. Probe and whole-core permeabilities, serial CAT scans, and textural and structural data from the selected core samples are used to understand permeability structure of fault zones and develop predictive models of fault zone permeability. Using numerical flow simulation, it is possible to predict permeability anisotropy associated with faults and evaluate the effect of individual deformation elements in the overall permeability tensor. We found relationships between the permeability of the host rock and those of the highly deformed (HD) fault-elements according to the fault throw. The lateral continuity and predictable permeability of the HD fault elements enhance capability for estimating the effects of subseismic faulting on fluid flow in low-shale reservoirs.

  19. TRP channel proteins and signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minke, Baruch; Cook, Boaz

    2002-04-01

    TRP channel proteins constitute a large and diverse family of proteins that are expressed in many tissues and cell types. This family was designated TRP because of a spontaneously occurring Drosophila mutant lacking TRP that responded to a continuous light with a transient receptor potential (hence TRP). In addition to responses to light, TRPs mediate responses to nerve growth factor, pheromones, olfaction, mechanical, chemical, temperature, pH, osmolarity, vasorelaxation of blood vessels, and metabolic stress. Furthermore, mutations in several members of TRP-related channel proteins are responsible for several diseases, such as several tumors and neurodegenerative disorders. TRP-related channel proteins are found in a variety of organisms, tissues, and cell types, including nonexcitable, smooth muscle, and neuronal cells. The large functional diversity of TRPs is also reflected in their diverse permeability to ions, although, in general, they are classified as nonselective cationic channels. The molecular domains that are conserved in all members of the TRP family constitute parts of the transmembrane domains and in most members also the ankyrin-like repeats at the NH2 terminal of the protein and a "TRP domain" at the COOH terminal, which is a highly conserved 25-amino acid stretch with still unknown function. All of the above features suggest that members of the TRP family are "special assignment" channels, which are recruited to diverse signaling pathways. The channels' roles and characteristics such as gating mechanism, regulation, and permeability are determined by evolution according to the specific functional requirements.

  20. Glutathione metabolism in Bangladeshi children with increased small bowel permeability and impaired growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar Roy, Swapan; Tomkins, A.; Johnson, A.

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether intestinal permeability during diarrhoea is associated with increased requirement of Sulphur Containing Amino Acid (SCAA); Changes in SCAA metabolism are associated with decreased urinary sulphate and increased excretion of proline from collagen; Rates of turnover SCAA would change as intestinal permeability improves during different dietary levels of SCAA in nutritional regimes. Hypothesis: Supplementation of a standard diet with sulphur containing amino acids is necessary to meet requirements for sulphur under conditions of growth faltering, diarrhoea and increased intestinal permeability. Subjects: Children with persistent diarrhoea aged between 4 months to 18 months and height for age less than 95%. Study site: International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research Bangladesh. Methods: At the baseline, children will be classified into low and normal ISE (Inorganic Sulphar excretion) then each group will be divided into two subgroups. A total of 40 children will be studied (20 in each group). One group will receive a dietary supplement of SCAA and another group will receive an isonitrogenous standard diet for six weeks. Children will be assessed for intestinal permeability at baseline and after two weeks of admission. Before and at six weeks of admission the children will receive a regular drink containing 15 N Glyceine at the rate of 2ml/kg/hr. Blood and urine samples will be collected at baseline and at the end of the supplementation i.e. at 6 weeks. Incorporation of 15 N Glyceine, plasma and red cell glutathione will be assessed by isotope rationing. Urine will be assessed for 15 N enrichment of urea and ammonia, which will used as an assessment of body protein turnover Folate status of these patients will be determined before and after supplementation with SCAA. Benefit of the study: The results of the study will provide specific information on the requirement of Sulphur containing amino acid during malnutrition and persistent

  1. Forecast on Water Locking Damage of Low Permeable Reservoir with Quantum Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingyuan; Sun, Yuxue; Feng, Fuping; Zhao, Fulei; Sui, Dianjie; Xu, Jianjun

    2018-01-01

    It is of great importance in oil-gas reservoir protection to timely and correctly forecast the water locking damage, the greatest damage for low permeable reservoir. An analysis is conducted on the production mechanism and various influence factors of water locking damage, based on which a quantum neuron is constructed based on the information processing manner of a biological neuron and the principle of quantum neural algorithm, besides, the quantum neural network model forecasting the water locking of the reservoir is established and related software is also made to forecast the water locking damage of the gas reservoir. This method has overcome the defects of grey correlation analysis that requires evaluation matrix analysis and complicated operation. According to the practice in Longxi Area of Daqing Oilfield, this method is characterized by fast operation, few system parameters and high accuracy rate (the general incidence rate may reach 90%), which can provide reliable support for the protection technique of low permeable reservoir.

  2. Permeability of Aluminium Foams Produced by Replication Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim L. Cherny

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The replication casting process is used for manufacturing open-pore aluminum foams with advanced performances, such as stability and repeatability of foam structure with porosity over 60%. A simple foam structure model based on the interaction between sodium chloride solid particles poorly wetted by melted aluminum, which leads to the formation of air pockets (or “air collars”, is proposed for the permeability of porous material. The equation for the minimum pore radius of replicated aluminum foam is derived. According to the proposed model, the main assumption of the permeability model consists in a concentration of flow resistance in a circular aperture of radius rmin. The permeability of aluminum open-pore foams is measured using transformer oil as the fluid, changing the fractions of initial sodium chloride. Measured values of minimum pore size are close to theoretically predicted ones regardless of the particle shape. The expression for the permeability of replicated aluminum foam derived on the basis of the “bottleneck” model of porous media agrees well with the experimental data. The obtained data can be applied for commercial filter cells and pneumatic silencers.

  3. Increasing the permeability of Escherichia coli using MAC13243

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muheim, Claudio; Götzke, Hansjörg; Eriksson, Anna U.

    2017-01-01

    molecules that make the outer membrane of Escherichia coli more permeable. We identified MAC13243, an inhibitor of the periplasmic chaperone LolA that traffics lipoproteins from the inner to the outer membrane. We observed that cells were (1) more permeable to the fluorescent probe 1-N...

  4. Oxidation catalysts on alkaline earth supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2017-03-21

    An oxidation catalyst includes a support including particles of an alkaline earth salt, and first particles including a palladium compound on the support. The oxidation catalyst can also include precious metal group (PMG) metal particles in addition to the first particles intermixed together on the support. A gas permeable polymer that provides a continuous phase can completely encapsulate the particles and the support. The oxidation catalyst may be used as a gas sensor, where the first particles are chemochromic particles.

  5. Investigation of negative permeability metamaterials for wireless power transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Wenhui; Mi, Chunting Chris; He, Fei; Jiang, Meng; Hua, Dengxin

    2017-11-01

    In order to enhance the transmission efficiency of wireless power transfer (WPT), a negative permeability metamaterials (NPM) with a structure of honeycomb composed by units of hexagon-shaped spirals copper is proposed in this paper. The unit parameters of the NPM are optimized, to make sure the negative permeability at the special frequency. The S-parameters of the designed NPM are measured by a network analyzer and the permeability is extracted, it shows the honeycomb NPM has a negative permeability at 6.43 MHz. A two-coil WPT is setup and the transmission efficiency of WPT embedded with NPM at the different position and with different structure are investigated. The measured results show that the 2-slab honeycomb NPM have a good perform compared with the 1-slab NPM, and the efficiency can be increased up to 51%. The results show that honeycomb NPM embedded in the WPT help to improve the transmission efficiency remarkable.

  6. Investigation of negative permeability metamaterials for wireless power transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhui Xin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to enhance the transmission efficiency of wireless power transfer (WPT, a negative permeability metamaterials (NPM with a structure of honeycomb composed by units of hexagon-shaped spirals copper is proposed in this paper. The unit parameters of the NPM are optimized, to make sure the negative permeability at the special frequency. The S-parameters of the designed NPM are measured by a network analyzer and the permeability is extracted, it shows the honeycomb NPM has a negative permeability at 6.43 MHz. A two-coil WPT is setup and the transmission efficiency of WPT embedded with NPM at the different position and with different structure are investigated. The measured results show that the 2-slab honeycomb NPM have a good perform compared with the 1-slab NPM, and the efficiency can be increased up to 51%. The results show that honeycomb NPM embedded in the WPT help to improve the transmission efficiency remarkable.

  7. Studies of cesium permeability of potassium transporter from Arabidopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Yamagami, Mutsumi; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi; Inaba, Jiro; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Hazama, Akihiro

    2007-01-01

    Cs-137 is an important radionuclide for safety assessment of nuclear facilities, and its transfer via plants is an important route from the environment to humans. Studies of Cs uptake mechanisms by plants are essential for understanding 137 Cs movement in soil-to-plant systems and in plants. Since uptake of Cs is considered to be mediated by K transport protein, we investigated Cs + permeability of two Arabidopsis K + transporters, AKT2 and AtHKT1, by using Xenopus oocytes expression systems and two-electrode voltage-clamp technique under various pH conditions. The data showed AKT2 and AtHKT1 did not transport Cs + at external pH in the 5.5-7.5 range. These results indicated that AKT2 and AtHKT1 did not contribute to Cs + influx into cells under physiological conditions in plants. (author)

  8. RCRA corrective measures using a permeable reactive iron wall US Coast Guard Support Center, Elizabeth City, North Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmithors, W.L.; Vardy, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    A chromic acid release was discovered at a former electroplating shop at the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. Initial investigative activities indicated that chromic acid had migrated into the subsurface soils and groundwater. In addition, trichloroethylene (TCE) was also discovered in groundwater during subsequent investigations of the hexavalent chromium (Cr VI) plume. Corrective measures were required under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The in-situ remediation method, proposed under RCRA Interim Measures to passively treat the groundwater contaminants, uses reactive zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate the chlorinated compounds and to mineralize the hexavalent chromium. A 47 meter by 0.6 meter subsurface permeable iron wall was installed downgradient of the source area to a depth of 7 meters using a direct trenching machine. The iron filings were placed in the ground as the soils were excavated from the subsurface. This is the first time that direct trenching was used to install reactive zero-valent iron filings. Over 250 metric tons of iron filings were used as the reactive material in the barrier wall. Installation of the iron filings took one full day. Extensive negotiations with regulatory agencies were required to use this technology under the current facility Hazardous Waste Management Permit. All waste soils generated during the excavation activities were contained and treated on site. Once contaminant concentrations were reduced the waste soils were used as fill material

  9. Short-Term Overfeeding with Dairy Cream Does Not Modify Gut Permeability, the Fecal Microbiota, or Glucose Metabolism in Young Healthy Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Beate; Skurk, Thomas; Lagkouvardos, Llias; Fischer, Sandra; Büttner, Janine; Lichtenegger, Martina; Clavel, Thomas; Lechner, Andreas; Rychlik, Michael; Haller, Dirk; Hauner, Hans

    2018-01-01

    High-fat diets (HFDs) have been linked to low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance. The main purpose of the present study was to assess whether acute overfeeding with an HFD affects insulin sensitivity, gut barrier function, and fecal microbiota in humans. In a prospective intervention study, 24 healthy men [mean ± SD: age 23.0 ± 2.8 y, body mass index (in kg/m2) 23.0 ± 2.1] received an HFD (48% of energy from fat) with an additional 1000 kcal/d (as whipping cream) above their calculated energy expenditure for 7 d. Insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp), gut permeability (sugar and polyethylene glycol absorption tests, plasma zonulin), and gut microbiota profiles (high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing) were assessed before and after overfeeding, and 14 d after intervention. Additionally, inflammation markers such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, leptin, high-molecular-weight adiponectin, calprotectin, regulated on activation normal, T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were measured in plasma by ELISA. Finally, lipid parameters were analyzed in serum by a laboratory service. Although participants gained 0.9 ± 0.6 kg (P zonulin, a marker of paracellular gut permeability, were unchanged. Moreover, overfeeding was not associated with consistent changes in gut microbiota profiles, but marked alterations were observed in a subgroup of 6 individuals. Our findings suggest that short-term overfeeding with an HFD does not significantly impair insulin sensitivity and gut permeability in normal-weight healthy men, and that changes in dominant communities of fecal bacteria occur only in certain individuals. The study was registered in the German Clinical Trial Register as DRKS00006211. © 2018 American Society for Nutrition. All rights reserved.

  10. The permeability evolution of tuffisites and outgassing from dense rhyolitic magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, M. J.; Tuffen, H.; Wadsworth, F. B.; Reuschlé, T.; Castro, J. M.; Schipper, C. I.

    2017-12-01

    Recent observations of rhyolitic lava effusion from eruptions in Chile indicate that simultaneous pyroclastic venting facilitates outgassing. Venting from conduit-plugging lava domes is pulsatory and occurs through shallow fracture networks that deliver pyroclastic debris and exsolved gases to the surface. However, these fractures become blocked as the particulate fracture infill sinters viscously, thus drastically reducing permeability. Tuffisites, fossilized debris-filled fractures of this venting process, are abundant in pyroclastic material ejected during hybrid explosive-effusive activity. Dense tuffisite-hosting obsidian bombs ejected from Volcán Chaitén (Chile) in 2008 afford an opportunity to better understand the permeability evolution of tuffisites within low-permeability conduit plugs, wherein gas mobility is reliant upon fracture pathways. We use laboratory measurements of the permeability and porosity of tuffisites that preserve different degrees of sintering, combined with a grainsize-based sintering model and constraints on pressure-time paths from H2O diffusion, to place first-order constraints on tuffisite permeability evolution. Inferred timescales of sintering-driven tuffisite compaction and permeability loss, spanning minutes to hours, coincide with observed vent pulsations during hybrid rhyolitic activity and, more broadly, timescales of pressurization accompanying silicic lava dome extrusion. We therefore conclude that sintering exerts a first-order control on fracture-assisted outgassing from low-permeability, conduit-plugging silicic magma.

  11. LEAK AND GAS PERMEABILITY TESTING DURING SOIL-GAS SAMPLING AT HAL'S CHEVRON LUST SITE IN GREEN RIVER, UTAH

    Science.gov (United States)

    The results of gas permeability and leak testing during active soil-gas sampling at Hal’s Chevron LUST Site in Green River, Utah are presented. This study was conducted to support development of a passive soil-gas sampling method. Gas mixtures containing helium and methane were...

  12. Corneal and conjunctival drug permeability: Systematic comparison and pharmacokinetic impact in the eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Eva; Del Amo, Eva M; Toropainen, Elisa; Tengvall-Unadike, Unni; Ranta, Veli-Pekka; Urtti, Arto; Ruponen, Marika

    2018-07-01

    On the surface of the eye, both the cornea and conjunctiva are restricting ocular absorption of topically applied drugs, but barrier contributions of these two membranes have not been systemically compared. Herein, we studied permeability of 32 small molecular drug compounds across an isolated porcine cornea and built a quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) model for the permeability. Corneal drug permeability (data obtained for 25 drug molecules) showed a 52-fold range in permeability (0.09-4.70 × 10 -6  cm/s) and the most important molecular descriptors in predicting the permeability were hydrogen bond donor, polar surface area and halogen ratio. Corneal permeability values were compared to their conjunctival drug permeability values. Ocular drug bioavailability and systemic absorption via conjunctiva were predicted for this drug set with pharmacokinetic calculations. Drug bioavailability in the aqueous humour was simulated to be drug across the conjunctiva to the blood circulation restricts significantly ocular drug bioavailability and, therefore, ocular absorption does not increase proportionally with the increasing corneal drug permeability. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. In vitro porcine blood-brain barrier model for permeability studies: pCEL-X software pKa(FLUX) method for aqueous boundary layer correction and detailed data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Siti R; Avdeef, Alex; Abbott, N Joan

    2014-12-18

    In vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) models from primary brain endothelial cells can closely resemble the in vivo BBB, offering valuable models to assay BBB functions and to screen potential central nervous system drugs. We have recently developed an in vitro BBB model using primary porcine brain endothelial cells. The model shows expression of tight junction proteins and high transendothelial electrical resistance, evidence for a restrictive paracellular pathway. Validation studies using small drug-like compounds demonstrated functional uptake and efflux transporters, showing the suitability of the model to assay drug permeability. However, one limitation of in vitro model permeability measurement is the presence of the aqueous boundary layer (ABL) resulting from inefficient stirring during the permeability assay. The ABL can be a rate-limiting step in permeation, particularly for lipophilic compounds, causing underestimation of the permeability. If the ABL effect is ignored, the permeability measured in vitro will not reflect the permeability in vivo. To address the issue, we explored the combination of in vitro permeability measurement using our porcine model with the pKa(FLUX) method in pCEL-X software to correct for the ABL effect and allow a detailed analysis of in vitro (transendothelial) permeability data, Papp. Published Papp using porcine models generated by our group and other groups are also analyzed. From the Papp, intrinsic transcellular permeability (P0) is derived by simultaneous refinement using a weighted nonlinear regression, taking into account permeability through the ABL, paracellular permeability and filter restrictions on permeation. The in vitro P0 derived for 22 compounds (35 measurements) showed good correlation with P0 derived from in situ brain perfusion data (r(2)=0.61). The analysis also gave evidence for carrier-mediated uptake of naloxone, propranolol and vinblastine. The combination of the in vitro porcine model and the software

  14. Endothelial cell permeability during hantavirus infection involves factor XII-dependent increased activation of the kallikrein-kinin system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon L Taylor

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS are diseases caused by hantavirus infections and are characterized by vascular leakage due to alterations of the endothelial barrier. Hantavirus-infected endothelial cells (EC display no overt cytopathology; consequently, pathogenesis models have focused either on the influx of immune cells and release of cytokines or on increased degradation of the adherens junction protein, vascular endothelial (VE-cadherin, due to hantavirus-mediated hypersensitization of EC to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. To examine endothelial leakage in a relevant in vitro system, we co-cultured endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC to generate capillary blood vessel-like structures. In contrast to results obtained in monolayers of cultured EC, we found that despite viral replication in both cell types as well as the presence of VEGF, infected in vitro vessels neither lost integrity nor displayed evidence of VE-cadherin degradation. Here, we present evidence for a novel mechanism of hantavirus-induced vascular leakage involving activation of the plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS. We show that incubation of factor XII (FXII, prekallikrein (PK, and high molecular weight kininogen (HK plasma proteins with hantavirus-infected EC results in increased cleavage of HK, higher enzymatic activities of FXIIa/kallikrein (KAL and increased liberation of bradykinin (BK. Measuring cell permeability in real-time using electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS, we identified dramatic increases in endothelial cell permeability after KKS activation and liberation of BK. Furthermore, the alterations in permeability could be prevented using inhibitors that directly block BK binding, the activity of FXIIa, or the activity of KAL. Lastly, FXII binding and autoactivation is increased on the surface of hantavirus-infected EC. These data are the first to demonstrate KKS activation

  15. Mathematical Model to Predict the Permeability of Water Transport in Concrete Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon Ndubuisi Eluozo

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical model to predict the permeability of water transport in concrete has been established, the model is to monitor the rate of water transport in concrete structure. The process of this water transport is based on the constituent in the mixture of concrete. Permeability established a relation on the influence of the micropores on the constituent that made of concrete, the method of concrete placement determine the rate of permeability deposition in concrete structure, permeability es...

  16. Stress state evaluation in low carbon and TRIP steels by magnetic permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouli, M.-E.; Giannakis, M

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic permeability is an indicative factor for the steel health monitoring. The measurements of magnetic permeability lead to the evaluation of the stress state of any ferromagnetic steel. The magnetic permeability measurements were conducted on low carbon and TRIP steel samples, which were subjected to both tensile and compressive stresses. The results indicated a direct correlation of the magnetic permeability with the mechanical properties, the stress state and the microstructural features of the examined samples. (paper)

  17. Ascorbic acid attenuates endothelial permeability triggered by cell-free hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuck, Jamie L; Bastarache, Julie A; Shaver, Ciara M; Fessel, Joshua P; Dikalov, Sergey I; May, James M; Ware, Lorraine B

    2018-01-01

    Increased endothelial permeability is central to shock and organ dysfunction in sepsis but therapeutics targeted to known mediators of increased endothelial permeability have been unsuccessful in patient studies. We previously reported that cell-free hemoglobin (CFH) is elevated in the majority of patients with sepsis and is associated with organ dysfunction, poor clinical outcomes and elevated markers of oxidant injury. Others have shown that Vitamin C (ascorbate) may have endothelial protective effects in sepsis. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that high levels of CFH, as seen in the circulation of patients with sepsis, disrupt endothelial barrier integrity. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were grown to confluence and treated with CFH with or without ascorbate. Monolayer permeability was measured by Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) or transfer of 14 C-inulin. Viability was measured by trypan blue exclusion. Intracellular ascorbate was measured by HPLC. CFH increased permeability in a dose- and time-dependent manner with 1 mg/ml of CFH increasing inulin transfer by 50% without affecting cell viability. CFH (1 mg/ml) also caused a dramatic reduction in intracellular ascorbate in the same time frame (1.4 mM without CFH, 0.23 mM 18 h after 1 mg/ml CFH, p < 0.05). Pre-treatment of HUVECs with ascorbate attenuated CFH induced permeability. CFH increases endothelial permeability in part through depletion of intracellular ascorbate. Supplementation of ascorbate can attenuate increases in permeability mediated by CFH suggesting a possible therapeutic approach in sepsis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Are self-reported gastrointestinal symptoms among older adults associated with increased intestinal permeability and psychological distress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganda Mall, John-Peter; Östlund-Lagerström, Lina; Lindqvist, Carl Mårten; Algilani, Samal; Rasoal, Dara; Repsilber, Dirk; Brummer, Robert J; V Keita, Åsa; Schoultz, Ida

    2018-03-20

    Despite the substantial number of older adults suffering from gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms little is known regarding the character of these complaints and whether they are associated with an altered intestinal barrier function and psychological distress. Our aim was to explore the relationship between self-reported gut health, intestinal permeability and psychological distress among older adults. Three study populations were included: 1) older adults with GI symptoms (n = 24), 2) a group of older adults representing the general elderly population in Sweden (n = 22) and 3) senior orienteering athletes as a potential model of healthy ageing (n = 27). Questionnaire data on gut-health, psychological distress and level of physical activity were collected. Intestinal permeability was measured by quantifying zonulin in plasma. The level of systemic and local inflammation was monitored by measuring C-reactive protein (CRP), hydrogen peroxide in plasma and calprotectin in stool samples. The relationship between biomarkers and questionnaire data in the different study populations was illustrated using a Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Older adults with GI symptoms displayed significantly higher levels of both zonulin and psychological distress than both general older adults and senior orienteering athletes. The PCA analysis revealed a separation between senior orienteering athletes and older adults with GI symptoms and showed an association between GI symptoms, psychological distress and zonulin. Older adults with GI symptoms express increased plasma levels of zonulin, which might reflect an augmented intestinal permeability. In addition, this group suffer from higher psychological distress compared to general older adults and senior orienteering athletes. This relationship was further confirmed by a PCA plot, which illustrated an association between GI symptoms, psychological distress and intestinal permeability.

  19. Determination of hydrogen permeability in uncoated and coated superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Vesely, E. J., Jr.; Hill, V. L.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen permeability, diffusivity, and solubility data were obtained for eight wrought and cast high temperature alloys over the range 650 to 815 C. Data were obtained for both uncoated alloys and wrought alloys coated with four commercially available coatings. Activation energies for permeability, diffusivity and solubility were calculated.

  20. Application of gamma irradiation on forming protein-based edible films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabato, Susy Frey

    2000-01-01

    In the last decade considerable interest has been addressed to the development of protein-based edible films due to their application in the food industry, as a substitute to traditional plastic films. The use of soy and whey proteins to form those films has been investigated, using heat, chemical and enzymatic processes. Gamma irradiation was recently reported to form caseinate-based edible films, due to the increase of the cohesive strength of the proteins by the formation of cross-links. This work aimed to verify the role of the gamma irradiation in the process of forming edible films from soy protein isolate (SPI) alone and in complex mixtures, that is, mixed with whey protein isolate (WPI), with carbethoxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and with poly(vinyl)alcohol (PVA). Gamma irradiation treatment improved significantly the mechanical properties for all films. The mechanical behavior is strongly related to the formulation, showing synergy between the gamma irradiation and the CMC, mainly for SPI-based films. SPI-based films presented a trend to decrease the water vapor permeability values when irradiated. The CMC addition showed significant improvements on the permeability for films from SPI and from the mixture of SPI with WPI. (author)

  1. Permeable reactive barriers for pollutant removal from groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, F.G.; Meggyes, T.

    2001-01-01

    The removal of pollutants from the groundwater using permeable reactive barriers is a novel in-situ groundwater remediation technology. The most relevant decontamination processes used are chemical reduction, oxidation, precipitation and sorption, for which examples are given. Some common organic pollutants are halogenated hydrocarbons, aromatic and nitroaromatic compounds which can be treated in reactive barriers successfully. Lead, chromium and, in particular, uranium are dealt with in great detail among inorganic pollutants because of their occurrence in many European countries. Construction methods for cut-off walls and reactive barriers exhibit similar features. Apart from conventional methods, drilling, deep soil mixing, jet technology, arrays of wells, injected systems and biobarriers are applied to construct permeable reactive barriers. Permeable reactive barriers bear great potential for the future in remediation engineering. (orig.)

  2. Determinants for membrane association and permeabilization of the coxsackievirus 2B protein and the identification of the Golgi complex as the target organelle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Arjan S; Wessels, Els; Dijkman, Henri B P M; Galama, Jochem M D; Melchers, Willem J G; Willems, Peter H G M; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2003-01-10

    The 2B protein of enterovirus is responsible for the alterations in the permeability of secretory membranes and the plasma membrane in infected cells. The structural requirements for the membrane association and the subcellular localization of this essential virus protein, however, have not been defined. Here, we provide evidence that the 2B protein is an integral membrane protein in vivo that is predominantly localized at the Golgi complex upon individual expression. Addition of organelle-specific targeting signals to the 2B protein revealed that the Golgi localization is an absolute prerequisite for the ability of the protein to modify plasma membrane permeability. Expression of deletion mutants and heterologous proteins containing specific domains of the 2B protein demonstrated that each of the two hydrophobic regions could mediate membrane binding individually. However, the presence of both hydrophobic regions was required for the correct membrane association, efficient Golgi targeting, and the membrane-permeabilizing activity of the 2B protein, suggesting that the two hydrophobic regions are cooperatively involved in the formation of a membrane-integral complex. The formation of membrane-integral pores by the 2B protein in the Golgi complex and the possible mechanism by which a Golgi-localized virus protein modifies plasma membrane permeability are discussed.

  3. An efficient permeability scaling-up technique applied to the discretized flow equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urgelli, D.; Ding, Yu [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France)

    1997-08-01

    Grid-block permeability scaling-up for numerical reservoir simulations has been discussed for a long time in the literature. It is now recognized that a full permeability tensor is needed to get an accurate reservoir description at large scale. However, two major difficulties are encountered: (1) grid-block permeability cannot be properly defined because it depends on boundary conditions; (2) discretization of flow equations with a full permeability tensor is not straightforward and little work has been done on this subject. In this paper, we propose a new method, which allows us to get around both difficulties. As the two major problems are closely related, a global approach will preserve the accuracy. So, in the proposed method, the permeability up-scaling technique is integrated in the discretized numerical scheme for flow simulation. The permeability is scaled-up via the transmissibility term, in accordance with the fluid flow calculation in the numerical scheme. A finite-volume scheme is particularly studied, and the transmissibility scaling-up technique for this scheme is presented. Some numerical examples are tested for flow simulation. This new method is compared with some published numerical schemes for full permeability tensor discretization where the full permeability tensor is scaled-up through various techniques. Comparing the results with fine grid simulations shows that the new method is more accurate and more efficient.

  4. Determination of filtrations and permeability of an earth dam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, H.R.; Baro, G.B.; Gillen, Ricardo.

    1975-11-01

    The aim of this work was to measure with the aid of a radioactive tracer the speed flow of the water filtrating from Sumampa Dam in northeastern Catamarca, while being in operation, and with these data determine if the actual permeability corresponds to the projected one. Iodine-131 was used as tracer and periodical samples were taken from the down stream water in order to determine its activity concentration. In previous perforations ionic interchange resines were used so as to measure simultaneously the fixed Iodine-131. The permeability of the dam was calculated from the obtained speed based on time-concentration curves and applying Darcy formulas for permeability. (author) [es

  5. Groundwater protection from cadmium contamination by permeable reactive barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Natale, F. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria chimica, Universita di Federico II, P.le Tecchio, 80-80125 Naples (Italy)], E-mail: fdinatal@unina.it; Di Natale, M.; Greco, R. [Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca in Ingegneria Ambientale (CIRIAM), Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Seconda Universita di Napoli, via Roma 29-81031 Aversa (Caserta) (Italy); Lancia, A. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria chimica, Universita di Federico II, P.le Tecchio, 80-80125 Naples (Italy); Laudante, C.; Musmarra, D. [Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca in Ingegneria Ambientale (CIRIAM), Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Seconda Universita di Napoli, via Roma 29-81031 Aversa (Caserta) (Italy)

    2008-12-30

    This work studies the reliability of an activated carbon permeable reactive barrier in removing cadmium from a contaminated shallow aquifer. Laboratory tests have been performed to characterize the equilibrium and kinetic adsorption properties of the activated carbon in cadmium-containing aqueous solutions. A 2D numerical model has been used to describe pollutant transport within a groundwater and the pollutant adsorption on the permeable adsorbing barrier (PRB). In particular, it has been considered the case of a permeable adsorbing barrier (PAB) used to protect a river from a Cd(II) contaminated groundwater. Numerical results show that the PAB can achieve a long-term efficiency by preventing river pollution for several months.

  6. Study on the Permeability Characteristics of Polyurethane Soil Stabilizer Reinforced Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A polymer material of polyurethane soil stabilizer (PSS is used to reinforce the sand. To understand the permeability characteristics of PSS reinforced sand, a series of reinforcement layer form test, single-hole permeability test, and porous permeability test of sand reinforced with PSS have been performed. Reinforcement mechanism is discussed with scanning electron microscope images. The results indicated that the permeability resistance of sand reinforced with polyurethane soil stabilizer is improved through the formation of reinforcement layer on the sand surface. The thickness and complete degree of the reinforcement layer increase with the increasing of curing time and PSS concentration. The water flow rate decreases with the increasing of curing time or PSS concentration. The permeability coefficient decreases with the increasing of curing time and PSS concentration and increases with the increasing of depth in specimen. PSS fills up the voids of sand and adsorbs on the surface of sand particle to reduce or block the flowing channels of water to improve the permeability resistance of sand. The results can be applied as the reference for chemical reinforcement sandy soil engineering, especially for surface protection of embankment, slope, and landfill.

  7. Permeability of Granite Including Macro-Fracture Naturally Filled with Fine-Grained Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nara, Yoshitaka; Kato, Masaji; Niri, Ryuhei; Kohno, Masanori; Sato, Toshinori; Fukuda, Daisuke; Sato, Tsutomu; Takahashi, Manabu

    2018-03-01

    Information on the permeability of rock is essential for various geoengineering projects, such as geological disposal of radioactive wastes, hydrocarbon extraction, and natural hazard risk mitigation. It is especially important to investigate how fractures and pores influence the physical and transport properties of rock. Infiltration of groundwater through the damage zone fills fractures in granite with fine-grained minerals. However, the permeability of rock possessing a fracture naturally filled with fine-grained mineral grains has yet to be investigated. In this study, the permeabilities of granite samples, including a macro-fracture filled with clay and a mineral vein, are investigated. The permeability of granite with a fine-grained mineral vein agrees well with that of the intact sample, whereas the permeability of granite possessing a macro-fracture filled with clay is lower than that of the macro-fractured sample. The decrease in the permeability is due to the filling of fine-grained minerals and clay in the macro-fracture. It is concluded that the permeability of granite increases due to the existence of the fractures, but decreases upon filling them with fine-grained minerals.

  8. The potential of permeability damage during thermal recovery of Cold Lake bitumen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Z.; Wiwchar, B.; Gunter, W. D. [Alberta Research Council, Devon, AB (Canada); Dudley, J. S. [Imperial Oil Resources, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1999-09-01

    Methods and results of coreflood tests designed to evaluate permeability damage caused by Clearwater formation clays in the Cold Lake area of Alberta are described. Three periods of permeability damage were encountered, the first during and shortly after the core was heated to 250 degrees C. Experimental evidence suggests that thermally activated grain crushing and subsequent fines migration were responsible for this initial permeability loss. The second period of damage was a gradual process which resulted in 65 per cent and 78 percent of permeability loss for the two corefloods, respectively. This phase of the permeability damage was considered to have been the result of hydrothermal reactions (berthierine to Fe-saponite). The third period of permeability damage occurred when fresh water was injected into the core. This was attributed to osmotic swelling of the Fe-saponite. A comparison of field evidence with experimental results revealed certain discrepancies, suspected to be due to the kinetics of the reaction, including disruption of berthierine grain coats and permeability damage due to subsequent fines migration. To err on the safe side, it is recommended that thermal recovery wells should be completed away from berthierine-rich zones. 15 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  9. Mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) desensitization increases sea urchin spermatozoa fertilization rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrezan-Nitao, Elis; Boni, Raianna; Marques-Santos, Luis Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) is a protein complex whose opening promotes an abrupt increase in mitochondrial inner membrane permeability. Calcium signaling pathways are described in gametes and are involved in the fertilization process. Although mitochondria may act as Ca(2+) store and have a fast calcium-releasing mechanism through MPTP, its contribution to fertilization remains unclear. The work aimed to investigate the MPTP phenomenon in sea urchin spermatozoa and its role on the fertilization. Several pharmacological tools were used to evaluate the MPTP's physiology. Our results demonstrated that MPTP occurs in male gametes in a Ca(2+) - and voltage-dependent manner and it is sensitive to cyclosporine A. Additionally, our data show that MPTP opening does not alter ROS generation in sperm cells. Inhibition of MPTP in spermatozoa strongly improved the fertilization rate, which may involve mechanisms that increase the spermatozoa lifespan. The present work is the first report of the presence of a voltage- and Ca(2+) -dependent MPTP in gametes of invertebrates and indicates MPTP opening as another evolutionary feature shared by sea urchins and mammals. Studies about MPTP in sea urchin male gametes may contribute to the elucidation of several mechanisms involved in sperm infertility. © 2016 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  10. Cell-permeable intrinsic cellular inhibitors of apoptosis protect and rescue intestinal epithelial cells from radiation-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki-Horibuchi, Shiori; Yasuda, Takeshi; Sakaguchi, Nagako; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Akashi, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    One of the important mechanisms for gastrointestinal (GI) injury following high-dose radiation exposure is apoptosis of epithelial cells. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) and cellular IAP2 (cIAP2) are intrinsic cellular inhibitors of apoptosis. In order to study the effects of exogenously added IAPs on apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells, we constructed bacterial expression plasmids containing genes of XIAP (full-length, BIR2 domain and BIR3-RING domain with and without mutations of auto-ubiquitylation sites) and cIAP2 proteins fused to a protein-transduction domain (PTD) derived from HIV-1 Tat protein (TAT) and purified these cell-permeable recombinant proteins. When the TAT-conjugated IAPs were added to rat intestinal epithelial cells IEC6, these proteins were effectively delivered into the cells and inhibited apoptosis, even when added after irradiation. Our results suggest that PTD-mediated delivery of IAPs may have clinical potential, not only for radioprotection but also for rescuing the GI system from radiation injuries. (author)

  11. Viscous fingering with permeability heterogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, C.; Homsy, G.M.

    1992-01-01

    Viscous fingering in miscible displacements in the presence of permeability heterogeneities is studied using two-dimensional simulations. The heterogeneities are modeled as stationary random functions of space with finite correlation scale. Both the variance and scale of the heterogeneities are varied over modest ranges. It is found that the fingered zone grows linearly in time in a fashion analogous to that found in homogeneous media by Tan and Homsy [Phys. Fluids 31, 1330 (1988)], indicating a close coupling between viscous fingering on the one hand and flow through preferentially more permeable paths on the other. The growth rate of the mixing zone increases monotonically with the variance of the heterogeneity, as expected, but shows a maximum as the correlation scale is varied. The latter is explained as a ''resonance'' between the natural scale of fingers in homogeneous media and the correlation scale

  12. Can Hypocaloric, High-Protein Nutrition Support Be Used in Complicated Bariatric Patients to Promote Weight Loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Mara Lee; Crowley, Nina

    2015-08-01

    Bariatric surgery, an effective treatment for morbid obesity, may result in complications that require nutrition support. Common goals for nutrition support in post-bariatric surgery patients include nutrition repletion, avoiding overfeeding, preserving lean body mass, and promoting wound healing. It is often questioned if continued weight loss can be part of the nutrition goals and if weight loss is safe for patients who become critically ill following bariatric surgery. Recent clinical practice guidelines from both the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) and Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) have recommended the use of hypocaloric, high-protein nutrition support in both critically and non-critically ill obese patients. Hypocaloric feedings of 50%-70% of estimated energy requirements based on predictive equations or obesity. Two small studies in complicated post-bariatric surgery patients requiring nutrition support have shown that the strategy of hypocaloric, high-protein feedings can result in positive outcomes, including positive nitrogen balance, wound healing, weight loss, and successful transition to oral diets. Additional research, including large, randomized studies, is still needed to validate these findings. However, based on a review of available clinical practice guidelines, predictive equations, indirect calorimetry, case studies, and systematic reviews, hypocaloric, high-protein nutrition support appears to at least be equal to eucaloric feedings and may be a useful tool for clinicians to achieve continued weight loss in complicated bariatric surgery patients requiring nutrition support. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  13. EDZ and permeability in clayey rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levasseur, Severine; Collin, Frederic; Charlier, Robert; Besuelle, Pierre; Chambon, Rene; Viggiani, Cino

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Deep geological layers are being considered as potential host rocks for the high level radioactivity waste disposals. During drilling in host rocks, an excavated damaged zone - EDZ is created. The fluid transmissivity may be modified in this damaged zone. This paper deals with the permeability evolution in relation with diffuse and/or localized crack propagation in the material. We mainly focus on argillaceous rocks and on some underground laboratories: Mol URL in Boom clay, Bure URL in Callovo-Oxfordian clay and Mont-Terri URL in Opalinus clay. First, observations of damage around galleries are summarized. Structure of damage in localized zone or in fracture has been observed at underground gallery scale within the excavation damaged zone (EDZ). The first challenge for a correct understanding of all the processes occurring within the EDZ is the characterization at the laboratory scale of the damage and localization processes. The observation of the initiation and propagation of the localized zones needs for advanced techniques. X-ray tomography is a non-destructive imaging technique that allows quantification of internal features of an object in 3D. If mechanical loading of a specimen is applied inside a X-ray CT apparatus, successive 3D images at different loading steps show the evolution of the specimen. However, in general volumetric strain in a shear band is small compared to the shear strain and, unfortunately, in tomographic images grey level is mainly sensitive to the local mass density field. Such a limitation has been recently overcome by complementing X-ray tomography with 3D Volumetric Digital Image Correlation (V-DIC) which allows the determination of the full strain tensor field. Then it is possible to further explore the progression of localized deformation in the specimen. The second challenge is the robust modelling of the strain localized process. In fact, modelling the damage process with finite

  14. Drug-permeability and transporter assays in Caco-2 and MDCK cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Donna A

    2011-12-01

    The human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 and Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cell lines provide in vitro tools to assess a drug's permeability and transporter interactions during discovery and development. The cells, when cultured on semiporous filters, form confluent monolayers that model the intestinal epithelial barrier for permeability, transporter and drug-interaction assays. The applications of these assays in pharmaceutical research include qualitative prediction and ranking of absorption, determining mechanism(s) of permeability, formulation effects on drug permeability, and the potential for transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions. This review focuses on recent examples of Caco-2 and Madin-Darby canine kidney cells assays for drug permeability including transfected and knock-down cells, miniaturization and automation, and assay combinations to better understand and predict intestinal drug absorption.

  15. Effect of temperature on the permeability of gas adsorbed coal under triaxial stress conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangchen; Yan, Xiaopeng; Kang, Yili

    2018-04-01

    The combined effects of gas sorption, stress and temperature play a significant role in the changing behavior of gas permeability in coal seams. The effect of temperature on nitrogen and methane permeability of naturally fractured coal is investigated. Coal permeability, P-wave velocity and axial strain were simultaneously measured under two effective stresses and six different temperatures. The results showed that the behavior of nitrogen and methane permeability presented nonmonotonic changes with increasing temperature. The variation in the P-wave velocity and axial strain showed a good correspondence with coal permeability. A higher effective stress limited the bigger deformation and caused the small change in permeability. Methane adsorption and desorption significantly influence the mechanical properties of coal and play an important role in the variations in coal permeability. The result of coal permeability during a complete stress-strain process showed that the variation in permeability is determined by the evolution of the internal structure. The increase in the temperature of the gas saturated coal causes the complex interaction between matrix swelling, matrix shrinkage and micro-fracture generation, which leads to the complex changes in coal structure and permeability. These results are helpful to understand the gas transport mechanism for exploiting coal methane by heat injection.

  16. Hydrogen solubility and permeability of Nb-W-Mo alloy membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awakura, Y.; Nambu, T.; Matsumoto, Y.; Yukawa, H.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The concept for alloy design of Nb-based hydrogen permeable membrane has been applied to Nb-W-Mo ternary alloy in order to improve further the resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen permeability. → The alloying effects of Mo on the hydriding properties of Nb-W alloy have been elucidated. → The addition of Mo and/or W into niobium improves the resistance to hydrogen embrittlement by reducing the dissolved hydrogen concentration in the alloy. → Nb-W-Mo alloy possesses excellent hydrogen permeability together with strong resistance to hydrogen embrittlement. - Abstract: The alloying effects of molybdenum on the hydrogen solubility, the resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and the hydrogen permeability are investigated for Nb-W-Mo system. It is found that the hydrogen solubility decreases by the addition of molybdenum into Nb-W alloy. As a result, the resistance to hydrogen embrittlement improves by reducing the hydrogen concentration in the alloy. It is demonstrated that Nb-5 mol%W-5 mol%Mo alloy possesses excellent hydrogen permeability without showing any hydrogen embrittlement when used under appropriate hydrogen permeation conditions, i.e., temperature and hydrogen pressures.

  17. Microstructure-based characterization of permeability using a random walk model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, F F; Yang, Y S

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative transport properties of materials are analysed using a random walk model, based on the microscopic compositional distribution of compositions in the materials. A material sample is defined on a simple-cubic lattice, with volume fractions specified for each composition on every volume pixel (voxel). The quantitative relation between bulk permeability and fine-scale anisotropy is investigated by assuming fully anisotropic and fully isotropic voxel morphology. Such a study has prompted an analytic approximate formulation to predict bulk permeability range for a heterogeneous multi-component system that lacks detailed microstructure information. The numerical approach is verified on synthetic structures with known permeability. The analysis technique is applied to a real-world rock sample, as illustrated by a case study detailed in this paper. The investigations show that the bulk permeability is affected significantly by fine length scale anisotropy. (paper)

  18. Porosity, permeability, and their relationship in granite, basalt, and tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    This report discusses the porosity, storage, and permeability of fractured (mainly crystalline) rock types proposed as host rock for nuclear waste repositories. The emphasis is on the inter-relationships of these properties, but a number of reported measurements are included as well. The porosity of rock is shown to consist of fracture porosity and matrix porosity; techniques are described for determining the total interconnected porosity through both laboratory and field measurement. Permeability coefficient, as obtained by experiments ranging from laboratory to crustal scale, is discussed. Finally, the problem of determining the relationship between porosity and permeability is discussed. There is no simple, all encompassing relationship that describes the dependence of permeability upon porosity. However, two particular cases have been successfully analyzed: flow through a single rough fracture, and flow through isotropic porous rock. These two cases are discussed in this report

  19. Permeability Measurements of Rock Samples from Conduit Drilling at Unzen Volcano, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Noguchi, S.; Nakada, S.

    2006-12-01

    The last eruption of Unzen Volcano (1990-1995) was effusive to form lava domes, though magmas at depths are estimated to have contained volatile materials enough to cause explosive eruptions [e.g., Sato et al., 1995]. Most of volatile materials should have escaped from ascending magmas. The escape of gas is controlled by permeability of magmas and country rocks. Unzen Scientific Drilling Project sampled both the latest conduit and its country rock (USDP-4). In order to understand degassing processes, we have measured the permeability of these rock samples. Four cube samples with edges of 25 mm were cut from USDP-4 cores C1, C12 (country rock), C13 and C14 (conduit). Sample C1 is considered as Old Unzen Lava, and Sample C12 volcanic breccia. The transient pulse method was employed to measure the permeability. It applies a step of the fluid pressure difference across a specimen, and measures the decay rate of the fluid pressure difference. This method can be applied to samples with very low permeability, since it determines the permeability without measuring the fluid flux. Nitrogen gas was used as a pore fluid. Our permeametry system is built in a pressure vessel, and the confining pressure and the pore fluid pressure can be controlled independently. The temperature of the measurement system is kept constant within 0.1 degree. The temperature control and the background leak rate limit the measurable permeability to be higher than 10^{-20} m2. Measurements were first conducted under the atmospheric pressure. The permeability in a rock sample varies with the direction by a factor less than 5. Sample C1 has the lowest permeability (10^{-19} m2), and Sample C12 the highest value (10^{-17 m2). The permeability of C13 and C14 is of the order of 10^{- 18} m2. Though only a trace of vesicles can be seen in conduit samples, the interconnection is still maintained. The pressure dependence of the permeability is now investigated up to 50 MPa. The permeability of C13 and C14

  20. Morphine induces expression of platelet-derived growth factor in human brain microvascular endothelial cells: implication for vascular permeability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxiu Wen

    Full Text Available Despite the advent of antiretroviral therapy, complications of HIV-1 infection with concurrent drug abuse are an emerging problem. Morphine, often abused by HIV-infected patients, is known to accelerate neuroinflammation associated with HIV-1 infection. Detailed molecular mechanisms of morphine action however, remain poorly understood. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF has been implicated in a number of pathological conditions, primarily due to its potent mitogenic and permeability effects. Whether morphine exposure results in enhanced vascular permeability in brain endothelial cells, likely via induction of PDGF, remains to be established. In the present study, we demonstrated morphine-mediated induction of PDGF-BB in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, an effect that was abrogated by the opioid receptor antagonist-naltrexone. Pharmacological blockade (cell signaling and loss-of-function (Egr-1 approaches demonstrated the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, PI3K/Akt and the downstream transcription factor Egr-1 respectively, in morphine-mediated induction of PDGF-BB. Functional significance of increased PDGF-BB manifested as increased breach of the endothelial barrier as evidenced by decreased expression of the tight junction protein ZO-1 in an in vitro model system. Understanding the regulation of PDGF expression may provide insights into the development of potential therapeutic targets for intervention of morphine-mediated neuroinflammation.

  1. Low Permeability Polyimide Insulation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Resodyn Technologies proposes a new technology that enables the application of polyimide based cryogenic insulation with low hydrogen permeability. This effort...

  2. Permeability testing of fractures in climax stock granite at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, W.A.

    1980-01-01

    Permeability tests conducted in the Climax stock granitic rock mass indicate that the bulk rock permeability can be highly variable. If moderately to highly fractured zones are encountered, the permeability values may lie in the range of 10 -4 to 10 -1 darcies. If, on the other hand, only intact rock or healed fractures are encountered, the permeability is found to be less than 10 -9 darcies. In order to assess the thermomechanical effect on fracture permeability, discrete fractures will be packed off and tested periodically throughout the thermal cycle caused by the emplacement of spent nuclear fuel in the Climax stock

  3. Porosity, petrophysics and permeability of the Whitby Mudstone (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houben, M.; Barnhoorn, A.; Hardebol, N.; Ifada, M.; Boersma, Q.; Douma, L.; Peach, C. J.; Bertotti, G.; Drury, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    Typically pore diameters in shales range from the µm down to the nm scale and the effective permeability of shale reservoirs is a function of the interconnectivity between the pore space and the natural fracture network present. The length and spacing of mechanical induced and natural fractures is one of the factors controlling gas produtivity from unconventional reservoirs. Permeability of the Whitby Mudstone measured on 1 inch cores was linked to microstructure and combined with natural fracture spacing present in outcrops along the Yorkshire coast (UK) to get insight into possible fluid pathways from reservoir to well. We used a combination of different techniques to characterize the porosity (gas adsorption, Scanning Electron Microscopy), mineralogy (X-Ray Fluorescence, X-Ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy) and permeability (pressure step decay) of the Whitby Mudstone. In addition, we mapped the natural fracture network as present in outcrops along the Yorkshire coast (UK) at the 10-2-101m scale. Mineralogically we are dealing with a rock that is high in clay content and has an average organic matter content of about 10%. Results show a low porosity (max. 7%) as well as low permeability for the Whitby Mudstone. The permeability, measured parallel to bedding, depends on the confining pressure and is 86 nanodarcy at 10 MPa effective confining pressure and decreases to 16 nanodarcy at 40 MPa effective confining pressure. At the scale of observation the average distance to nearest natural fracture is in the order of 0.13 meter and 90 percent of all matrix elements are spaced within 0.4 meter to the nearest fracture. By assuming darcy flow, a permeability of 100 nanodarcy and 10% of overpressure we calculated that for the Whitby mudstone most of the gas resides in the matrix for less than 60 days until it reaches the fracture network.

  4. Sex difference in the sensitivity of cardiac mitochondrial permeability transition pore to calcium load

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Milerová, Marie; Drahota, Zdeněk; Chytilová, Anna; Tauchmannová, Kateřina; Houštěk, Josef; Ošťádal, Bohuslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 412, 1-2 (2016), s. 147-154 ISSN 0300-8177 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GB14-36804G; GA MZd(CZ) NT14050; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-10267S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1162 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : heart * mitochondrial permeability transition pore * sex difference * calcium-induced swelling Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 2.669, year: 2016

  5. Proteins and amino acids are fundamental to optimal nutrition support in critically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijs, Peter JM; Cynober, Luc; DeLegge, Mark; Kreymann, Georg; Wernerman, Jan; Wolfe, Robert R

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we present the growing scientific evidence showing the importance of protein and amino acid provision in nutritional support and their impact on preservation of muscle mass and patient outcomes.

  6. METHODOLOGY FOR CALCULATION OF HORIZONTAL WATER PERMEABILITY COEFFICIENT IN SOIL CAPILLARY BORDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Michnevich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows that for overall estimation of soil water permeability it is necessary to know a horizontal water permeability value of a soil capillary border in addition to coefficients of filtration and permeability. Relations allowing to determine soil permeability in the area of incomplete saturation, are given in the paper. For a fully developed capillary border some calculation formulae have been obtained in the form of algebraic polynomial versus soil grading (grain composition. These formulae allow to make more accurate calculations while designing and operating  reclamation works.

  7. Improvement of air permeability of Bubbfil nanofiber membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Fei-Yan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanofiber membranes always have extremely high filter efficiency and remarkably low pressure drop. In order to further improve air permeability of bubbfil nanofiber membranes, the plasma technology is used for surface treatment in this paper. The results show that plasma treatment can improve air permeability by 4.45%. Under higher power plasma treatment, earthworm like etchings are produced on the membrane surface with fractal dimensions of about 1.138.

  8. Theory and test research on permeability of coal and rock body influenced by mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qing-xin Qi; Hong-yan Li; You-gang Wang; Zhi-gang Deng; Hang Lan; Yong-wei Peng; Chun-rui Li [China Coal Research Institute, Beijing (China)

    2009-06-15

    Stress distribution rules and deformation and failure properties of coal and rock bodies influenced by mining were analyzed. Experimental research on permeability of coal and rock samples under different loading conditions was finished in the laboratory. In-situ measurement of coal permeability influenced by actual mining was done as well. Theory analysis show that permeability varied with damage development of coal and rock under stress, and the influence of fissure on permeability was greatest. Laboratory results show that under different loading conditions permeability was different and it varied with stress, which indicated that permeability was directly related to the loading process. In-situ tests showed that permeability is related to abutment stress to some degree. The above results may be referenced to gas prevention and drainage. 11 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Modification of permeability of frog perineurium to [14C]-sucrose by stretch and hypertonicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weerasuriya, A.; Rapoport, S.I.; Taylor, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    An in vitro method has been developed to determine quantitatively the permeability of the perineurium to radiotracers at room temperature. The permeability to [ 14 C]sucrose of the isolated perineurium of the sciatic nerve of the frog, Rana pipiens, was measured at rest length, when the perineurium was stretched and after the perineurium had been subjected to hypertonic treatment. Mean permeability at rest length was calculated to be 5.6 +- 0.27 (S.E.M., n=45)x10 -7 cm/sec, and both stretch and hypertonic treatment increased the permeability. A 10% stretch increased permeability reversibly, whereas a 20% stretch or immersion of the perineurium in a hypertonic bath increased permeability irreversibly. Altered permeability under these conditions might be related to changes in the ultrastructure of tight junctions in the perineurium. (Auth.)

  10. Investigation clogging dynamic of permeable pavement systems using embedded sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permeable pavement is a stormwater control measure commonly selected in both new and retrofit applications. However, there is limited information about the clogging mechanism of these systems that effects the infiltration. A permeable pavement site located at the Seitz Elementary...

  11. Urban evaporation rates for water-permeable pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, P; Göbel, P; Coldewey, W G

    2010-01-01

    In urban areas the natural water balance is disturbed. Infiltration and evaporation are reduced, resulting in a high surface runoff and a typical city climate, which can lead to floods and damages. Water-permeable pavements have a high infiltration rate that reduces surface runoff by increasing the groundwater recharge. The high water retention capacity of the street body of up to 51 l/m(2) and its connection via pores to the surface lead to higher evaporation rates than impermeable surfaces. A comparison of these two kinds of pavements shows a 16% increase in evaporation levels of water-permeable pavements. Furthermore, the evaporation from impermeable pavements is linked directly to rain events due to fast-drying surfaces. Water-permeable pavements show a more evenly distributed evaporation after a rain event. Cooling effects by evaporative heat loss can improve the city climate even several days after rain events. On a large scale use, uncomfortable weather like sultriness or dry heat can be prevented and the urban water balance can be attenuated towards the natural.

  12. Ammonia gas permeability of meat packaging materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Faris; Hijaz, Faraj; Kastner, Curtis L; Smith, J Scott

    2011-03-01

    Meat products are packaged in polymer films designed to protect the product from exterior contaminants such as light, humidity, and harmful chemicals. Unfortunately, there is almost no data on ammonia permeability of packaging films. We investigated ammonia permeability of common meat packaging films: low-density polyethylene (LDPE; 2.2 mil), multilayer polyolefin (MLP; 3 mil), and vacuum (V-PA/PE; 3 mil, 0.6 mil polyamide/2.4 mil polyethylene). The films were fabricated into 10 × 5 cm pouches and filled with 50 mL deionized water. Pouches were placed in a plexiglass enclosure in a freezer and exposed to 50, 100, 250, or 500 ppm ammonia gas for 6, 12, 24, and 48 h at -17 ± 3 °C and 21 ± 3 °C. At freezing temperatures, no ammonia residues were detected and no differences in pH were found in the water. At room temperature, ammonia levels and pH of the water increased significantly (P packaging materials have low ammonia permeability and protect meat products exposed to ammonia leaks during frozen storage.

  13. Acid extraction by supported liquid membranes containing basic carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danesi, P.R.; Cianetti, C.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1983-01-01

    The extraction of HNO 3 (nitric acid) from aqueous solutions by permeation through a number of supported liquid membranes containing basic carriers dissolved in diethylbenzene has been studied. The results have shown that the best permeations are obtained with long chain aliphatic amines (TLA, Primene JM-T) followed by TOPO (trioctylphosphine oxide) and then by other monofunctional and bifunctional organophosphorous basic carriers. The influence of an aliphatic diluent on the permeability of HNO 3 through a supported liquid membrane containing TLA as carrier was also investigated. In this case the permeability to HNO 3 decreases as a result of the lower diffusion coefficient of the acid-carrier complex in the more vicous aliphatic solvent. 4 figures

  14. Water Permeability of Pervious Concrete Is Dependent on the Applied Pressure and Testing Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghong Qin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Falling head method (FHM and constant head method (CHM are, respectively, used to test the water permeability of permeable concrete, using different water heads on the testing samples. The results indicate the apparent permeability of pervious concrete decreasing with the applied water head. The results also demonstrate the permeability measured from the FHM is lower than that from the CHM. The fundamental difference between the CHM and FHM is examined from the theory of fluid flowing through porous media. The testing results suggest that the water permeability of permeable concrete should be reported with the applied pressure and the associated testing method.

  15. Study on Storm-Water Management of Grassed Swales and Permeable Pavement Based on SWMM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguang Xie

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Grassed swales and permeable pavement that have greater permeable underlying surface relative to hard-pressing surface can cooperate with the city pipe network on participating in urban storm flood regulation. This paper took Nanshan village in Jiangsu Province as an example, the storm-water management model (SWMM was used to conceptualize the study area reasonably, and the low-impact development (LID model and the traditional development model were established in the region. Based on the storm-intensity equation, the simulation scene employed the Chicago hydrograph model to synthesize different rainfall scenes with different rainfall repetition periods, and then contrasted the storm-flood-management effect of the two models under the condition of using LID facilities. The results showed that when the rainfall repetition period ranged from 0.33a to 10a (a refers to the rainfall repetition period, the reduction rate of total runoff in the research area that adopted LID ranged from 100% to 27.5%, while the reduction rate of peak flow ranged from 100% to 15.9%, and when the values of unit area were the same, the combined system (permeable pavement + grassed swales worked more efficiently than the sum of the individuals in the reduction of total runoff and peak flow throughout. This research can provide technical support and theoretical basis for urban LID design.

  16. Fracture network topology and characterization of structural permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansberry, Rowan; King, Rosalind; Holford, Simon

    2017-04-01

    There are two fundamental requirements for successful geothermal development: elevated temperatures at accessible depths, and a reservoir from which fluids can be extracted. The Australian geothermal sector has successfully targeted shallow heat, however, due in part to the inherent complexity of targeting permeability, obtaining adequate flow rates for commercial production has been problematic. Deep sedimentary aquifers are unlikely to be viable geothermal resources due to the effects of diagenetic mineral growth on rock permeability. Therefore, it is likely structural permeability targets, exploiting natural or induced fracture networks will provide the primary means for fluid flow in geothermal, as well as unconventional gas, reservoirs. Recent research has focused on the pattern and generation of crustal stresses across Australia, while less is known about the resultant networks of faults, joints, and veins that can constitute interconnected sub-surface permeability pathways. The ability of a fracture to transmit fluid is controlled by the orientation and magnitude of the in-situ stress field that acts on the fracture walls, rock strength, and pore pressure, as well as fracture properties such as aperture, orientation, and roughness. Understanding the distribution, orientation and character of fractures is key to predicting structural permeability. This project focuses on extensive mapping of fractures over various scales in four key Australian basins (Cooper, Otway, Surat and Perth) with the potential to host geothermal resources. Seismic attribute analysis is used in concert with image logs from petroleum wells, and field mapping to identify fracture networks that are usually not resolved in traditional seismic interpretation. We use fracture network topology to provide scale-invariant characterisation of fracture networks from multiple data sources to assess similarity between data sources, and fracture network connectivity. These results are compared with

  17. Artificial neural network models for prediction of intestinal permeability of oligopeptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Min-Kook

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral delivery is a highly desirable property for candidate drugs under development. Computational modeling could provide a quick and inexpensive way to assess the intestinal permeability of a molecule. Although there have been several studies aimed at predicting the intestinal absorption of chemical compounds, there have been no attempts to predict intestinal permeability on the basis of peptide sequence information. To develop models for predicting the intestinal permeability of peptides, we adopted an artificial neural network as a machine-learning algorithm. The positive control data consisted of intestinal barrier-permeable peptides obtained by the peroral phage display technique, and the negative control data were prepared from random sequences. Results The capacity of our models to make appropriate predictions was validated by statistical indicators including sensitivity, specificity, enrichment curve, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve (the ROC score. The training and test set statistics indicated that our models were of strikingly good quality and could discriminate between permeable and random sequences with a high level of confidence. Conclusion We developed artificial neural network models to predict the intestinal permeabilities of oligopeptides on the basis of peptide sequence information. Both binary and VHSE (principal components score Vectors of Hydrophobic, Steric and Electronic properties descriptors produced statistically significant training models; the models with simple neural network architectures showed slightly greater predictive power than those with complex ones. We anticipate that our models will be applicable to the selection of intestinal barrier-permeable peptides for generating peptide drugs or peptidomimetics.

  18. permeability of twenty-two small diameter hardwoods growing on southern pine sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.T. Choong; F.O. Tesora

    1974-01-01

    Gas permeability of hardwoods growing on southern pine sites is significantly affected by moisture content in the longitudinal direction. The ratio of permeability in the transverse to longitudinal directions is from 12,000:1 for post oak to over 1,000,000:1 for other oaks, but it is not affected by moisture. Although variation in longitudinal permeability varies...

  19. Microwave permeability of stripe patterned FeCoN thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yuping [Temasek Laboratories, National University of Singapore, 5A Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117411 (Singapore); Yang, Yong, E-mail: tslyayo@nus.edu.sg [Temasek Laboratories, National University of Singapore, 5A Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117411 (Singapore); Ma, Fusheng; Zong, Baoyu; Yang, Zhihong [Temasek Laboratories, National University of Singapore, 5A Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117411 (Singapore); Ding, Jun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117574 (Singapore)

    2017-03-15

    Magnetic stripe patterns are of great importance for microwave applications owing to their highly tunable microwave permeability by adjusting the geometrical dimensions. In this work, stripe patterned FeCoN films with 160 nm thickness are fabricated by using standard UV photolithography. Their microwave permeability are investigated systematically via both experiment and micromagnetic simulation. The good agreement between experimental and simulation results suggests that stripe width is crucial for the microwave magnetic properties of the stripe pattern. It is demonstrated by simulation that with increasing stripe width from 1 to 80 µm the initial permeability shows a continuous growth from about 8–322, whiles the resonance frequency drops dramatically from 18.7 to 3.1 GHz at 4 µm gap size. Smaller gap size would result in slightly increased initial permeability due to larger magnetic volume ratio, accompanied by decreased resonance frequency because of stronger magnetostatic interaction. Moreover, the experimental investigation on stripe length effect indicates that the stripe length should be kept as long as possible to achieve uniform bulk resonance mode and high permeability value. Insufficient stripe length would result in low frequency edge mode and decayed bulk mode. This study could provide valuable guidelines on the selection of proper geometry dimensions of FeCoN stripe patterns for high frequency applications. - Highlights: • This work presents a systematic study on permeability of FeCoN stripe pattern. • Geometrical parameters of the stripe pattern are systematically optimized. • Several important conclusions has been obtained. • The results offer guideline on FeCoN stripe patterns for high frequency applications.

  20. Permeability of commercial solvents through living human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ursin, C; Hansen, C M; Van Dyk, J W

    1995-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for measuring the steady state rate of permeation of commercial solvents through living human skin. To get the most consistent results, it was necessary with some solvents to normalize the solvent permeation rate of a given skin sample with its [3H]water permeation...... rate. For other solvents this was not necessary, so the un-normalized data were used. High [3H]water permeation rate also was used as a criterion for "defective" skin samples that gave erroneous permeability rates, especially for solvents having slow permeability. The linearity of the steady state data...... was characterized by calculation of the "percent error of the slope." The following permeability rates (g/m2h) of single solvents were measured: dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), 176; N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, 171; dimethyl acetamide, 107; methyl ethyl ketone, 53; methylene chloride, 24; [3H]water, 14.8; ethanol, 11...

  1. Initial permeability and vickers hardness of thermally aged FeCu alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, H.; Onuki, T.; Kamada, Y.; Ara, K.; Kobayashi, S.; Takahashi, S.

    2007-01-01

    The initial permeability obtained from small AC field excitation is a more useful parameter for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of ferromagnetic materials than one obtained from a major hysteresis loop from the viewpoints of electricity consumption and real-time measurements. In this paper, in order to study the possibility of applying magnetic methods to pressure vessel surveillance at nuclear power plants, permeability of the thermally aged Fe-Cu specimens were evaluated using impedance measurements and the hardness of those specimens was also evaluated. The Vickers hardness increases as aging time increases. The permeability of the cold-rolled specimen decreases with thermal aging. On the other hand, the permeability of as-received specimens increased at first then decreases as thermal aging goes

  2. Vascular permeability-increasing effect of the leaf essential oil of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines ... Analysis of the differences in vascular permeability between treatment groups showed that, Ocimum oil, in intensity and duration, was significantly (p < 0.05) more effective in increasing cutaneous capillary permeability over a 24h period after ...

  3. Electrical conductivity and magnetic permeability measurement of case hardened steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yong

    2015-03-01

    For case carburized steels, electrical conductivity and magnetic permeability profiles are needed to develop model-based case depth characterization techniques for the purpose of nondestructive quality control. To obtain fast and accurate measurement of these material properties, four-point potential drop approaches are applied on circular-shaped discs cut from steel rings with different case depths. First, a direct current potential drop (DCPD) approach is applied to measure electrical conductivity. Subsequently, an alternating current potential drop (ACPD) approach is used to measure magnetic permeability. Practical issues in measurement design and implementation are discussed. Depth profiles of electrical conductivity and magnetic permeability are reported.

  4. Effect of confining pressure on permeability behavior of Beishan granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Like; Li Yunfeng; Zhao Xingguang; Tan Guohuan

    2012-01-01

    By using of the Electro-Hydraulic Servo-controlled Rock Mechanics Testing System (MTS 815.04) in the University of Hong Kong, a series of permeability tests were performed on specimens of Beishan granite at different confining pressures. The result indicates that: (1) there is a decrease of permeability due to progressive closure of initial microcracks and the corresponding volumetric strain is compressive when the confining pressures increase from 2.5 MPa to 15 MPa, (2) when the confining pressures decrease from 15 MPa to 2.5 MPa, there is an increase of permeability in this stage in relation with the volumetric dilation. (authors)

  5. Laboratory-scale measurements of effective relative permeability for layered sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butts, M.G.; Korsgaard, S.

    1996-12-31

    Predictions of the impact of remediation or the extent of contamination resulting from spills of gasoline, solvents and other petroleum products, must often be made in complex geological environments. Such problems can be treated by introducing the concept of effective parameters that incorporate the effects of soil layering or other heterogeneities into a large-scale flow description. Studies that derive effective multiphase parameters are few, and approximations are required to treat the non-linear multiphase flow equations. The purpose of this study is to measure effective relative permeabilities for well-defined multi-layered soils at the laboratory scale. Relative permeabilities were determined for homogeneous and layered, unconsolidated sands using the method of Jones and Roszelle (1978). The experimental data show that endpoint relative permeabilities are important in defining the shape of the relative permeability curves, but these cannot be predicted by estimation methods base on capillary pressure data. The most significant feature of the measured effective relative permeability curves is that the entrapped (residual) oil saturation is significantly larger than the residual saturation of the individual layers. This observation agrees with previous theoretical predictions of large-scale entrapment Butts, 1993 and (1995). Enhanced entrapment in heterogeneous soils has several important implications for spill remediation, for example, the reduced efficiency of direct recovery. (au) 17 refs.

  6. Laboratory-scale measurements of effective relative permeability for layered sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butts, M.G.; Korsgaard, S.

    1996-01-01

    Predictions of the impact of remediation or the extent of contamination resulting from spills of gasoline, solvents and other petroleum products, must often be made in complex geological environments. Such problems can be treated by introducing the concept of effective parameters that incorporate the effects of soil layering or other heterogeneities into a large-scale flow description. Studies that derive effective multiphase parameters are few, and approximations are required to treat the non-linear multiphase flow equations. The purpose of this study is to measure effective relative permeabilities for well-defined multi-layered soils at the laboratory scale. Relative permeabilities were determined for homogeneous and layered, unconsolidated sands using the method of Jones and Roszelle (1978). The experimental data show that endpoint relative permeabilities are important in defining the shape of the relative permeability curves, but these cannot be predicted by estimation methods base on capillary pressure data. The most significant feature of the measured effective relative permeability curves is that the entrapped (residual) oil saturation is significantly larger than the residual saturation of the individual layers. This observation agrees with previous theoretical predictions of large-scale entrapment Butts, 1993 and (1995). Enhanced entrapment in heterogeneous soils has several important implications for spill remediation, for example, the reduced efficiency of direct recovery. (au) 17 refs

  7. The low/high BCS permeability class boundary: physicochemical comparison of metoprolol and labetalol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zur, Moran; Gasparini, Marisa; Wolk, Omri; Amidon, Gordon L; Dahan, Arik

    2014-05-05

    Although recognized as overly conservative, metoprolol is currently the common low/high BCS permeability class boundary reference compound, while labetalol was suggested as a potential alternative. The purpose of this study was to identify the various characteristics that the optimal marker should exhibit, and to investigate the suitability of labetalol as the permeability class reference drug. Labetalol's BCS solubility class was determined, and its physicochemical properties and intestinal permeability were thoroughly investigated, both in vitro and in vivo in rats, considering the complexity of the whole of the small intestine. Labetalol was found to be unequivocally a high-solubility compound. In the pH range throughout the small intestine (6.5-7.5), labetalol exhibited pH-dependent permeability, with higher permeability at higher pH values. While in vitro octanol-buffer partitioning (Log D) values of labetalol were significantly higher than those of metoprolol, the opposite was evident in the in vitro PAMPA permeability assay. The results of the in vivo perfusion studies in rats lay between the two contradictory in vitro studies; metoprolol was shown to have moderately higher rat intestinal permeability than labetalol. Theoretical distribution of the ionic species of the drugs was in corroboration with the experimental in vitro and the in vivo data. We propose three characteristics that the optimal permeability class reference drug should exhibit: (1) fraction dose absorbed in the range of 90%; (2) the optimal marker drug should be absorbed largely via passive transcellular permeability, with no/negligible carrier-mediated active intestinal transport (influx or efflux); and (3) the optimal marker drug should preferably be nonionizable. The data presented in this paper demonstrate that neither metoprolol nor labetalol can be regarded as optimal low/high-permeability class boundary standard. While metoprolol is too conservative due to its complete absorption

  8. Thermomechanical effects on permeability for a 3-D model of YM rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, P A; Blair, S C; Wang, H F

    1999-01-01

    The authors estimate how thermomechanical processes affect the spatial variability of fracture permeability for a 3-D model representing Topopah Spring tuff at the nuclear-waste repository horizon in Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Using a finite-difference code, they compute thermal stress changes. They evaluate possible permeability enhancement resulting from shear slip along various mapped fracture sets after 50 years of heating, for rock in the near-field environment of the proposed repository. The results indicate permeability enhancement of a factor of 2 for regions about 10 to 30 m above drifts, for north-south striking vertical fractures. Shear slip and permeability increases of a factor of 4 can occur in regions just above drifts, for east-west striking vertical fractures. Information on how permeability may change over the lifetime of a geologic repository is important to the prediction and evaluation of repository performance

  9. Experimental study of very low permeability rocks using a high accuracy permeameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larive, Elodie

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of fluid flow through 'tight' rocks is important to provide a better understanding of physical processes involved in several industrial and natural problems. These include deep nuclear waste repositories, management of aquifers, gas, petroleum or geothermal reservoirs, or earthquakes prevention. The major part of this work consisted of the design, construction and use of an elaborate experimental apparatus allowing laboratory permeability measurements (fluid flow) of very low permeability rocks, on samples at a centimetric scale, to constrain their hydraulic behaviour at realistic in-situ conditions. The accuracy permeameter allows the use of several measurement methods, the steady-state flow method, the transient pulse method, and the sinusoidal pore pressure oscillation method. Measurements were made with the pore pressure oscillation method, using different waveform periods, at several pore and confining pressure conditions, on different materials. The permeability of one natural standard, Westerly granite, and an artificial one, a micro-porous cement, were measured, and results obtained agreed with previous measurements made on these materials showing the reliability of the permeameter. A study of a Yorkshire sandstone shows a relationship between rock microstructure, permeability anisotropy and thermal cracking. Microstructure, porosity and permeability concepts, and laboratory permeability measurements specifications are presented, the permeameter is described, and then permeability results obtained on the investigated materials are reported [fr

  10. Cocrystals of Hydrochlorothiazide: Solubility and Diffusion/Permeability Enhancements through Drug-Coformer Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanphui, Palash; Devi, V Kusum; Clara, Deepa; Malviya, Nidhi; Ganguly, Somnath; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2015-05-04

    Hydrochlorothiazide (HCT) is a diuretic and a BCS class IV drug with low solubility and low permeability, exhibiting poor oral absorption. The present study attempts to improve the physicochemical properties of the drug using a crystal engineering approach with cocrystals. Such multicomponent crystals of HCT with nicotinic acid (NIC), nicotinamide (NCT), 4-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), succinamide (SAM), and resorcinol (RES) were prepared using liquid-assisted grinding, and their solubilities in pH 7.4 buffer were evaluated. Diffusion and membrane permeability were studied using a Franz diffusion cell. Except for the SAM and NIC cocrystals, all other binary systems exhibited improved solubility. All of the cocrystals showed improved diffusion/membrane permeability compared to that of HCT with the exception of the SAM cocrystal. When the solubility was high, as in the case of PABA, NCT, and RES cocrystals, the flux/permeability dropped slightly. This is in agreement with the expected interplay between solubility and permeability. Improved solubility/permeability is attributed to new drug-coformer interactions. Cocrystals of SAM, however, showed poor solubility and flux. This cocrystal contains a primary sulfonamide dimer synthon similar to that of HCT polymorphs, which may be a reason for its unusual behavior. Hirshfeld surface analysis was carried out in all cases to determine whether a correlation exists between cocrystal permeability and drug-coformer interactions.

  11. Steam-water relative permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambusso, W.; Satik, C.; Home, R.N. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A set of relative permeability relations for simultaneous flow of steam and water in porous media have been measured in steady state experiments conducted under the conditions that eliminate most errors associated with saturation and pressure measurements. These relations show that the relative permeabilities for steam-water flow in porous media vary approximately linearly with saturation. This departure from the nitrogen/water behavior indicates that there are fundamental differences between steam/water and nitrogen/water flows. The saturations in these experiments were measured by using a high resolution X-ray computer tomography (CT) scanner. In addition the pressure gradients were obtained from the measurements of liquid phase pressure over the portions with flat saturation profiles. These two aspects constitute a major improvement in the experimental method compared to those used in the past. Comparison of the saturation profiles measured by the X-ray CT scanner during the experiments shows a good agreement with those predicted by numerical simulations. To obtain results that are applicable to general flow of steam and water in porous media similar experiments will be conducted at higher temperature and with porous rocks of different wetting characteristics and porosity distribution.

  12. Integrated petrophysical and reservoir characterization workflow to enhance permeability and water saturation prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amri, Meshal; Mahmoud, Mohamed; Elkatatny, Salaheldin; Al-Yousef, Hasan; Al-Ghamdi, Tariq

    2017-07-01

    Accurate estimation of permeability is essential in reservoir characterization and in determining fluid flow in porous media which greatly assists optimize the production of a field. Some of the permeability prediction techniques such as Porosity-Permeability transforms and recently artificial intelligence and neural networks are encouraging but still show moderate to good match to core data. This could be due to limitation to homogenous media while the knowledge about geology and heterogeneity is indirectly related or absent. The use of geological information from core description as in Lithofacies which includes digenetic information show a link to permeability when categorized into rock types exposed to similar depositional environment. The objective of this paper is to develop a robust combined workflow integrating geology and petrophysics and wireline logs in an extremely heterogeneous carbonate reservoir to accurately predict permeability. Permeability prediction is carried out using pattern recognition algorithm called multi-resolution graph-based clustering (MRGC). We will bench mark the prediction results with hard data from core and well test analysis. As a result, we showed how much better improvements are achieved in the permeability prediction when geology is integrated within the analysis. Finally, we use the predicted permeability as an input parameter in J-function and correct for uncertainties in saturation calculation produced by wireline logs using the classical Archie equation. Eventually, high level of confidence in hydrocarbon volumes estimation is reached when robust permeability and saturation height functions are estimated in presence of important geological details that are petrophysically meaningful.

  13. Microscopic and low Reynolds number flows between two intersecting permeable walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egashira, R.; Fujikawa, T.; Yaguchi, H.; Fujikawa, S.

    2018-06-01

    Two-dimensional Navier–Stokes equations are solved in an analytical way to clarify characteristics of low-Re flows in a microscopic channel consisting of two intersecting permeable walls, the intersection of which is supposed to be a sink or a source. Such flows are, therefore, considered to be an extension of the so-called Jeffery–Hamel flow to the permeable wall case. A set of nonlinear forth-order ordinary differential equations are obtained, and their solutions are sought for the small permeable velocity compared with the main flow one by a perturbation method. The solutions contain the solutions found in the past, such as the flow between two parallel permeable walls studied by Berman and the Jeffery–Hamel flow between the impermeable walls as special cases. Velocity distribution and friction loss in pressure along the main stream are represented in the explicit manner and compared with those of the Jeffery–Hamel flow. Numerical examples show that the wall permeability has a great influence on the friction loss. Furthermore, it is shown that the convergent main flow accompanied with the fluid addition through the walls is inversely directed away from the origin due to the balance of the main flow and the permeable one, while the flow accompanied with fluid suction is just directed toward the origin regardless of conditions.

  14. Simultaneous inversion of airborne electromagnetic data for resistivity and magnetic permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beard, L.P.; Nyquist, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    Where the magnetic permeability of rock or soil exceeds that of free space, the effect on airborne electromagnetic systems is to produce a frequency-independent shift in the in-phase response of the system while altering the quadrature response only slightly. The magnitude of the in-phase shift increases as (1) the relative magnetic permeability is increased, (2) the amount of magnetic material is increased, and (3) the airborne sensor gets nearer the earth's surface. Over resistive, magnetic ground, the shift may be evinced by negative in-phase measurements at low frequencies; but over more conductive ground, the same shift may go unnoticed because of the large positive in-phase response. If the airborne sensor is flown at low levels, the magnitude of the shift may be large enough to affect automatic inversion routines that do not take this shift into account, producing inaccurate estimated resistivities, usually overestimates. However, layered-earth inversion algorithms that incorporate magnetic permeability as an additional inversion parameter may improve the resistivity estimates. The authors demonstrate this improvement using data collected over hazardous waste sites near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. Using resistivity inversion without magnetic permeability, the waste sites are almost invisible to the sensors. When magnetic permeability is included as an inversion parameter, the sites are detected, both by improved resistivity estimates and by estimated magnetic permeability

  15. Permeability of different size waste particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Gavelytė

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The world and life style is changing, but the most popular disposal route for waste is landfill globally until now. We have to think about waste prevention and preparing for re-use or recycling firstly, according to the waste disposal hierarchy. Disposed waste to the landfill must be the last opportunity. In a landfill, during waste degradation processes leachate is formed that can potentially cause clogging of bottom drainage layers. To ensure stability of a landfill construction, the physical properties of its components have to be controlled. The hydrology of precipitation, evaporation, runoff and the hydraulic performance of the capping and liner materials are important controls of the moisture content. The water balance depends also on the waste characteristics and waste particle size distribution. The aim of this paper is to determine the hydraulic permeability in a landfill depending on the particle size distribution of municipal solid waste disposed. The lab experiment results were compared with the results calculated with DEGAS model. Samples were taken from a landfill operated for five years. The samples particle sizes are: >100 mm, 80 mm, 60 mm, 40 mm, 20 mm, 0.01 mm and <0.01 mm. The permeability test was conducted using the column test. The paper presents the results of experiment and DEGAS model water permeability with waste particle size.

  16. Fluid flow simulation and permeability computation in deformed porous carbonate grainstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano, Miller; Tondi, Emanuele; Mancini, Lucia; Lanzafame, Gabriele; Trias, F. Xavier; Arzilli, Fabio; Materazzi, Marco; Torrieri, Stefano

    2018-05-01

    In deformed porous carbonates, the architecture of the pore network may be modified by deformation or diagenetic processes altering the permeability with respect to the pristine rock. The effects of the pore texture and morphology on permeability in porous rocks have been widely investigated due to the importance during the evaluation of geofluid reservoirs. In this study, these effects are assessed by combining synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (SR micro-CT) and computational fluid dynamics. The studied samples pertain to deformed porous carbonate grainstones highly affected by deformation bands (DBs) exposed in Northwestern Sicily and Abruzzo regions, Italy. The high-resolution SR micro-CT images of the samples, acquired at the SYRMEP beamline of the Elettra - Sincrotrone Trieste laboratory (Italy), were used for simulating a pressure-driven flow by using the lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM). For the experiments, a multiple relaxation time (MRT) model with the D3Q19 scheme was used to avoid viscosity-dependent results of permeability. The permeability was calculated using Darcy's law once steady conditions were reached. After the simulations, the pore-network properties (effective porosity, specific surface area, and geometrical tortuosity) were calculated using 3D images of the velocity fields. These images were segmented considering a velocity threshold value higher than zero. The study showed that DBs may generate significant heterogeneity and anisotropy of the permeability of the evaluated rock samples. Cataclasis and cementation process taking place within the DBs reduce the effective porosity and therefore the permeability. Contrary to this, pressure dissolution and faulting may generate connected channels which contribute to the permeability only parallel to the DB.

  17. Mechanisms of formation damage in matrix-permeability geothermal wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergosh, J.L.; Wiggins, R.B.; Enniss, D.O.

    1982-04-01

    Tests were conducted to determine mechanisms of formation damage that can occur in matrix permeability geothermal wells. Two types of cores were used in the testing, actual cores from the East Mesa Well 78-30RD and cores from a fairly uniform generic sandstone formation. Three different types of tests were run. The East Mesa cores were used in the testing of the sensitivity of core to filtrate chemistry. The tests began with the cores exposed to simulated East Mesa brine and then different filtrates were introduced and the effects of the fluid contrast on core permeability were measured. The East Mesa cores were also used in the second series of tests which tested formation sandstone cores were used in the third test series which investigated the effects of different sizes of entrained particles in the fluid. Tests were run with both single-particle sizes and distributions of particle mixes. In addition to the testing, core preparation techniques for simulating fracture permeability were evaluated. Three different fracture formation mechanisms were identified and compared. Measurement techniques for measuring fracture size and permeability were also developed.

  18. Wetting phase permeability in a partially saturated horizontal fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholl, M.J.; Glass, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    Fractures within geologic media can dominate the hydraulic properties of the system. Therefore, conceptual models used to assess the potential for radio-nuclide migration in unsaturated fractured rock such as that composing Yucca Mountain, Nevada, must be consistent with flow processes in individual fractures. A major obstacle to the understanding and simulation of unsaturated fracture flow is the paucity of physical data on both fracture aperture structure and relative permeability. An experimental procedure is developed for collecting detailed data on aperture and phase structure from a transparent analog fracture. To facilitate understanding of basic processes and provide a basis for development of effective property models, the simplest possible rough-walled fracture is used. Stable phase structures of varying complexity are created within the horizontal analog fracture. Wetting phase permeability is measured under steady-state conditions. A process based model for wetting phase relative permeability is then explored. Contributions of the following processes to reduced wetting phase permeability under unsaturated conditions are considered: reduction in cross-sectional flow area, increased path length, localized flow restriction, and preferential occupation of large apertures by the non-wetting phase

  19. Intestinal Permeability of β-Lapachone and Its Cyclodextrin Complexes and Physical Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangas-Sanjuan, Victor; Gutiérrez-Nieto, Jorge; Echezarreta-López, Magdalena; González-Álvarez, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Marta; Casabó, Vicente-Germán; Bermejo, Marival; Landin, Mariana

    2016-12-01

    β-Lapachone (βLAP) is a promising, poorly soluble, antitumoral drug. βLAP combination with cyclodextrins (CDs) improves its solubility and dissolution but there is not enough information about the impact of cyclodextrins on βLAP intestinal permeability. The objectives of this work were to characterize βLAP intestinal permeability and to elucidate cyclodextrins effect on the dissolution properties and on the intestinal permeability. The final goal was to evaluate CDs influence on the oral absorption of βLAP. Binary systems (physical mixtures and inclusion complexes) including βLAP and CDs (β-cyclodextrin: βCD, random-methyl-β-cyclodextrin: RMβCD and sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin: SBEβCD) have been prepared and analysed by differential scanning calorimetry. βLAP (and its combinations with CDs) absorption rate coefficients and effective permeability values have been determined in vitro in MDCK or MDCK-Mdr1 monolayers and in situ in rat by a closed loop perfusion technique. DSC results confirmed the formation of the inclusion complexes. βLAP-CDs inclusion complexes improve drug solubility and dissolution rate in comparison with physical mixtures. βLAP presented a high permeability value which can provide complete oral absorption. Its oral absorption is limited by its low solubility and dissolution rate. Cyclodextrin (both as physical mixtures and inclusion complexes) showed a positive effect on the intestinal permeability of βLAP. Complexation with CDs does not reduce βLAP intestinal permeability in spite of the potential negative effect of the reduction in free fraction of the drug. The use of RMβCD or SBEβCD inclusion complexes could benefit βLAP oral absorption by enhancing its solubility, dissolution rate and permeability.

  20. Research on the performance of sand-based environmental-friendly water permeable bricks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Runze; Mandula; Chai, Jinyi

    2018-02-01

    This paper examines the effects of the amount of admixture, the water cement ratio, the aggregate grading, and the cement aggregate ratio on the mechanical service properties and of porous concrete pavement bricks including strength, water permeability, frost resistance, and wear resistance. The admixture can enhance the performance of water permeable brick, and optimize the design mix. Experiments are conducted to determine the optimal mixing ratios which are given as; (1) the admixture (self-developed) within the content of 5% of the cement quality; (2) water-cement ratio equal to 0.34; (3) cement-aggregate ratio equal to 0.25; (4) fine aggregate of 70% (particle size 0.6-2.36mm); and coarse aggregate of 30% (particle size: 2.36-4.75mm). The experimental results that the sand-based permeable concrete pavement brick has a strength of 35.6MPa and that the water permeability coefficient is equal to 3.5×10-2cm/s. In addition, it was found that the concrete water permeable brick has good frost resistance and surface wear resistance, and that the its production costs are much lower than the similar sand-based water permeable bricks in China.

  1. Non-monotonic permeability variation during colloidal transport: Governing equations and analytical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chequer, L.; Russell, T.; Behr, A.; Genolet, L.; Kowollik, P.; Badalyan, A.; Zeinijahromi, A.; Bedrikovetsky, P.

    2018-02-01

    Permeability decline associated with the migration of natural reservoir fines impairs the well index of injection and production wells in aquifers and oilfields. In this study, we perform laboratory corefloods using aqueous solutions with different salinities in engineered rocks with different kaolinite content, yielding fines migration and permeability alteration. Unusual permeability growth has been observed at high salinities in rocks with low kaolinite concentrations. This has been attributed to permeability increase during particle detachment and re-attachment of already mobilised fines by electrostatic attraction to the rock in stagnant zones of the porous space. We refine the traditional model for fines migration by adding mathematical expressions for the particle re-attachment rate, particle detachment with delay relative to salinity decrease, and the attached-concentration-dependency of permeability. A one-dimensional flow problem that accounts for those three effects allows for an exact analytical solution. The modified model captures the observed effect of permeability increase at high water salinities in rocks with low kaolinite concentrations. The developed model matches the coreflooding data with high accuracy, and the obtained model coefficients vary within their usual intervals.

  2. Permeability of hydrogen isotopes through Pd-Ag membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi

    1981-01-01

    This paper represents the permeabilities, diffusion coefficients and isotope effects for hydrogen and deuterium through Pd-25 wt.% Ag alloy tubes The feed gas H 2 or D 2 flowing into the permeation cell was preheated before it reached to the outer surface of the permeation tube made of palladium-silver alloy. Permeation time lag method could be successfully carried out with the present apparatus to measure both permeability and diffusion coefficient. The square-root pressure dependence for the permeation of hydrogen isotopes was observed. The observed systematic temperature dependence indicates that the approximation of the Arrhenius' relation was effective within this experimental conditions. Some tendency of permeation fluxes in relation to the reciprocal temperature, 1/T, was seen. The permeability ratio was larger than the square root of isotopic mass ratio, and it decreased with temperature rise. On the contrary, the diffusion coefficient ratio was much smaller than the square root of isotopic mass ratio. (Kato, T.)

  3. Permeability of commercial solvents through living human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ursin, C; Hansen, C M; Van Dyk, J W

    1995-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for measuring the steady state rate of permeation of commercial solvents through living human skin. To get the most consistent results, it was necessary with some solvents to normalize the solvent permeation rate of a given skin sample with its [3H]water permeation...... rate. For other solvents this was not necessary, so the un-normalized data were used. High [3H]water permeation rate also was used as a criterion for "defective" skin samples that gave erroneous permeability rates, especially for solvents having slow permeability. The linearity of the steady state data...... of DMSO and octyl acetate were measured. No octyl acetate was detected and the permeability of DMSO was proportional to its mole fraction in the mixture. The effect of two hours of solvent exposure on the viability of skin (based on DNA synthesis) was measured and found to be very dependent on the solvent....

  4. Measurement of HTO permeability of materials for protective appliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, H.; Tomooka, M.; Kato, S.; Murata, M.; Kinouchi, N.; Yamamoto, H.

    1992-01-01

    Tritiated water (HTO) vapor permeabilities were measured for plastic and rubber films used for protective appliances (suits, gloves, wrappings, etc.). The measurement data prove that polyehylene and butyl rubbers are materials suitable for HTO protective appliances with their lower permeability. The data also indicate that desiccating protective appliances before reuse is effective for restoring their original resistances to penetrating HTO vapor when they are repeatedly used. (author)

  5. Evolution of permeability in siliceous rocks induced by mineral dissolution and precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuhara, Hideaki; Kinoshita, Naoki; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Shinichiro; Kishida, Kiyoshi

    2007-01-01

    A conceptual model is presented to follow the evolution of permeability in siliceous rocks mediated by pressure solution. Specifically, the main minerals of siliceous rocks that are quartz, cristobalite, and amorphous silica, are focused to examine differences of the permeability evolutions among them at effective pressures of 1, 5, and 10 MPa, and temperatures of 20 and 90degC. The rates and magnitudes of permeability reduction increase with increases of the pressures and temperatures applied. Ultimate permeabilities reduced by the order of 90 % at the completion of dissolution-mediated compaction at 10 MPa and 90degC. Precipitation may augment more degradation of flow transport in time. (author)

  6. Electrically Driven Ion Separations in Permeable Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruening, Merlin [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2017-04-21

    Membranes are attractive for a wide range of separations due to their low energy costs and continuous operation. To achieve practical fluxes, most membranes consist of a thin, selective skin on a highly permeable substrate that provides mechanical strength. Thus, this project focused on creating new methods for forming highly selective ultrathin skins as well as modeling transport through these coatings to better understand their unprecedented selectivities. The research explored both gas and ion separations, and the latter included transport due to concentration, pressure and electrical potential gradients. This report describes a series of highlights of the research and then provides a complete list of publications supported by the grant. These publications have been cited more than 4000 times. Perhaps the most stunning finding is the recent discovery of monovalent/divalent cation and anion selectivities around 1000 when modifying cation- and anion-exchange membranes with polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs). This discovery builds on many years of exciting research. (Citation numbers refer to the journal articles in the bibliography.)

  7. Gas-liquid Relative Permeability Estimation in 2D Porous Media by Lattice Boltzmann Method: Low Viscosity Ratio 2D LBM Relative Permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh Mahmoudi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This work is a primary achievement in studying the CO2 and N2–oil systems. To predict gas-liquid relative permeability curves, a Shan-Chen type multicomponent multiphase lattice Boltzmann model for two-phase flow through 2D porous media is developed. Periodic and bounce back boundary conditions are applied to the model with the Guo scheme for the external body force (i.e., the pressure gradient. The influence of relationship between cohesion and adsorption parameters and the interfacial tension values in Young's equation, pore structure (micro scan image derived porous media response is compared with corresponding porosity and permeability ideal sphere pack structure, and saturation distribution on relative permeability curves are studied with the aim to achieve the realistic stable condition for the simulation of gas-liquid systems with a low viscosity ratio.

  8. Reconstitution of CO2 Regulation of SLAC1 Anion Channel and Function of CO2-Permeable PIP2;1 Aquaporin as CARBONIC ANHYDRASE4 Interactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeise, Brian; Xu, Danyun; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Boron, Walter F.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2016-01-01

    Dark respiration causes an increase in leaf CO2 concentration (Ci), and the continuing increases in atmospheric [CO2] further increases Ci. Elevated leaf CO2 concentration causes stomatal pores to close. Here, we demonstrate that high intracellular CO2/HCO3− enhances currents mediated by the Arabidopsis thaliana guard cell S-type anion channel SLAC1 upon coexpression of any one of the Arabidopsis protein kinases OST1, CPK6, or CPK23 in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Split-ubiquitin screening identified the PIP2;1 aquaporin as an interactor of the βCA4 carbonic anhydrase, which was confirmed in split luciferase, bimolecular fluorescence complementation, and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. PIP2;1 exhibited CO2 permeability. Mutation of PIP2;1 in planta alone was insufficient to impair CO2- and abscisic acid-induced stomatal closing, likely due to redundancy. Interestingly, coexpression of βCA4 and PIP2;1 with OST1-SLAC1 or CPK6/23-SLAC1 in oocytes enabled extracellular CO2 enhancement of SLAC1 anion channel activity. An inactive PIP2;1 point mutation was identified that abrogated water and CO2 permeability and extracellular CO2 regulation of SLAC1 activity. These findings identify the CO2-permeable PIP2;1 as key interactor of βCA4 and demonstrate functional reconstitution of extracellular CO2 signaling to ion channel regulation upon coexpression of PIP2;1, βCA4, SLAC1, and protein kinases. These data further implicate SLAC1 as a bicarbonate-responsive protein contributing to CO2 regulation of S-type anion channels. PMID:26764375

  9. Biologically Complex Planar Cell Plasma Membranes Supported on Polyelectrolyte Cushions Enhance Transmembrane Protein Mobility and Retain Native Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han-Yuan; Chen, Wei-Liang; Ober, Christopher K; Daniel, Susan

    2018-01-23

    Reconstituted supported lipid bilayers (SLB) are widely used as in vitro cell-surface models because they are compatible with a variety of surface-based analytical techniques. However, one of the challenges of using SLBs as a model of the cell surface is the limited complexity in membrane composition, including the incorporation of transmembrane proteins and lipid diversity that may impact the activity of those proteins. Additionally, it is challenging to preserve the transmembrane protein native orientation, function, and mobility in SLBs. Here, we leverage the interaction between cell plasma membrane vesicles and polyelectrolyte brushes to create planar bilayers from cell plasma membrane vesicles that have budded from the cell surface. This approach promotes the direct incorporation of membrane proteins and other species into the planar bilayer without using detergent or reconstitution and preserves membrane constituents. Furthermore, the structure of the polyelectrolyte brush serves as a cushion between the planar bilayer and rigid supporting surface, limiting the interaction of the cytosolic domains of membrane proteins with this surface. Single particle tracking was used to analyze the motion of GPI-linked yellow fluorescent proteins (GPI-YFP) and neon-green fused transmembrane P2X2 receptors (P2X2-neon) and shows that this platform retains over 75% mobility of multipass transmembrane proteins in its native membrane environment. An enzyme accessibility assay confirmed that the protein orientation is preserved and results in the extracellular domain facing toward the bulk phase and the cytosolic side facing the support. Because the platform presented here retains the complexity of the cell plasma membrane and preserves protein orientation and mobility, it is a better representative mimic of native cell surfaces, which may find many applications in biological assays aimed at understanding cell membrane phenomena.

  10. System level permeability modeling of porous hydrogen storage materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanouff, Michael P.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Voskuilen, Tyler (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-01-01

    A permeability model for hydrogen transport in a porous material is successfully applied to both laboratory-scale and vehicle-scale sodium alanate hydrogen storage systems. The use of a Knudsen number dependent relationship for permeability of the material in conjunction with a constant area fraction channeling model is shown to accurately predict hydrogen flow through the reactors. Generally applicable model parameters were obtained by numerically fitting experimental measurements from reactors of different sizes and aspect ratios. The degree of channeling was experimentally determined from the measurements and found to be 2.08% of total cross-sectional area. Use of this constant area channeling model and the Knudsen dependent Young & Todd permeability model allows for accurate prediction of the hydrogen uptake performance of full-scale sodium alanate and similar metal hydride systems.

  11. Model for Stress-induced Protein Degradation in Lemna minor1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Robert J.; Roberts, Keith; Davies, David D.

    1980-01-01

    Transfer of Lemna minor fronds to adverse or stress conditions produces a large increase in the rate of protein degradation. Cycloheximide partially inhibits stress-induced protein degradation and also partially inhibits the protein degradation which occurs in the absence of stress. The increased protein degradation does not appear to be due to an increase in activity of soluble proteolytic enzymes. Biochemical evidence indicates that stress, perhaps acting via hormones, affects the permeability of certain membranes, particularly the tonoplast. A general model for stress-induced protein degradation is presented in which changes in membrane properties allow vacuolar proteolytic enzymes increased access to cytoplasmic proteins. PMID:16661588

  12. Investigation on the Permeability Evolution of Gypsum Interlayer Under High Temperature and Triaxial Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Meng; Yechao, You; Jie, Chen; Yaoqing, Hu

    2017-08-01

    The permeability of the surrounding rock is a critical parameter for the designing and assessment of radioactive waste disposal repositories in the rock salt. Generally, in the locations that are chosen for radioactive waste storage, the bedded rock salt is a sedimentary rock that contains NaCl and Na2SO4. Most likely, there are also layers of gypsum ( {CaSO}_{ 4} \\cdot 2 {H}_{ 2} {O)} present in the salt deposit. Radioactive wastes emit a large amount of heat and hydrogen during the process of disposal, which may result in thermal damage of the surrounding rocks and cause a great change in their permeability and tightness. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the permeability evolution of the gypsum interlayer under high temperature and high pressure in order to evaluate the tightness and security of the nuclear waste repositories in bedded rock salt. In this study, a self-designed rock triaxial testing system by which high temperature and pressure can be applied is used; the μCT225kVFCB micro-CT system is also employed to investigate the permeability and microstructure of gypsum specimens under a constant hydrostatic pressure of 25 MPa, an increasing temperature (ranging from 20 to 650 °C), and a variable inlet gas pressure (1, 2, 4, 6 MPa). The experimental results show: (a) the maximum permeability measured during the whole experiment is less than 10-17 m2, which indicates that the gypsum interlayer has low permeability under high temperature and pressure that meet the requirements for radioactive waste repository. (b) Under the same temperature, the permeability of the gypsum specimen decreases at the beginning and then increases as the pore pressure elevates. When the inlet gas pressure is between 0 and 2 MPa, the Klinkenberg effect is very pronounced. Then, as the pore pressure increases, the movement behavior of gas molecules gradually changes from free motion to forced directional motion. So the role of free movement of gas molecules gradually

  13. Ground-water flow in low permeability environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzil, Christopher E.

    1986-01-01

    Certain geologic media are known to have small permeability; subsurface environments composed of these media and lacking well developed secondary permeability have groundwater flow sytems with many distinctive characteristics. Moreover, groundwater flow in these environments appears to influence the evolution of certain hydrologic, geologic, and geochemical systems, may affect the accumulation of pertroleum and ores, and probably has a role in the structural evolution of parts of the crust. Such environments are also important in the context of waste disposal. This review attempts to synthesize the diverse contributions of various disciplines to the problem of flow in low-permeability environments. Problems hindering analysis are enumerated together with suggested approaches to overcoming them. A common thread running through the discussion is the significance of size- and time-scale limitations of the ability to directly observe flow behavior and make measurements of parameters. These limitations have resulted in rather distinct small- and large-scale approaches to the problem. The first part of the review considers experimental investigations of low-permeability flow, including in situ testing; these are generally conducted on temporal and spatial scales which are relatively small compared with those of interest. Results from this work have provided increasingly detailed information about many aspects of the flow but leave certain questions unanswered. Recent advances in laboratory and in situ testing techniques have permitted measurements of permeability and storage properties in progressively “tighter” media and investigation of transient flow under these conditions. However, very large hydraulic gradients are still required for the tests; an observational gap exists for typical in situ gradients. The applicability of Darcy's law in this range is therefore untested, although claims of observed non-Darcian behavior appear flawed. Two important nonhydraulic

  14. Bronchoalveolar permeability changes in rats inhaling gas/particle combinations during rest or exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhalla, D.K.; Phalen, R.F.; Mannix, R.C.; Lavan, S.M.; Crocker, T.T.

    1986-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar (BA) injury in rats exposed at rest or exercise to air pollutants was studied by c