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Sample records for proteins protect cells

  1. The anti-cell death FNK protein protects cells from death induced by freezing and thawing

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    Sudo, Kentaro; Asoh, Sadamitsu; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Ozaki, Daiya; Yamagata, Kumi; Ito, Hiromoto; Ohta, Shigeo

    2005-01-01

    The FNK protein, constructed from anti-apoptotic Bcl-x L with enhanced activity, was fused with the protein transduction domain (PTD) of the HIV/Tat protein to mediate the delivery of FNK into cells. The fusion protein PTD-FNK was introduced into chondrocytes in isolated articular cartilage-bone sections, cultured neurons, and isolated bone marrow mononuclear cells to evaluate its ability to prevent cell death induced by freezing and thawing. PTD-FNK protected the cells from freeze-thaw damage in a concentration-dependent manner. Addition of PTD-FNK with conventional cryoprotectants (dimethyl sulfoxide and hydroxyethyl starch) increased surviving cell numbers around 2-fold compared with controls treated only with the cryoprotectants. Notably, PTD-FNK allowed CD34 + cells among bone marrow mononuclear cells to survive more efficiently (12-fold more than the control cells) from two successive freeze-thaw cycles. Thus, PTD-FNK prevented cell death induced by freezing and thawing, suggesting that it provides for the successful cryopreservation of biological materials

  2. Moonlight-like proteins of the cell wall protect sessile cells of Candida from oxidative stress.

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    Serrano-Fujarte, Isela; López-Romero, Everardo; Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms of Candida species are associated with high morbidity and hospital mortality. Candida forms biofilms by adhering to human host epithelium through cell wall proteins (CWP) and simultaneously neutralizing the reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced during the respiratory burst by phagocytic cells. The purpose of this paper is to identify the CWP of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei and Candida parapsilosis expressed after exposure to different concentrations of H2O2 using a proteomic approach. CWP obtained from sessile cells, both treated and untreated with the oxidizing agent, were resolved by one and two-dimensional (2D-PAGE) gels and identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Some of these proteins were identified and found to correspond to moonlighting CWP such as: (i) glycolytic enzymes, (ii) heat shock, (iii) OSR proteins, (iv) general metabolic enzymes and (v) highly conserved proteins, which are up- or down-regulated in the presence or absence of ROS. We also found that the expression of these CWP is different for each Candida species. Moreover, RT-PCR assays allowed us to demonstrate that transcription of the gene coding for Eno1, one of the moonlight-like CWP identified in response to the oxidant agent, is differentially regulated. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration that, in response to oxidative stress, each species of Candida, differentially regulates the expression of moonlighting CWP, which may protect the organism from the ROS generated during phagocytosis. Presumptively, these proteins allow the pathogen to adhere and form a biofilm, and eventually cause invasive candidiasis in the human host. We propose that, in addition to the antioxidant mechanisms present in Candida, the moonlighting CWP also confer protection to these pathogens from oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein protects cells against locostatin-mediated inhibition of migration.

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    Anne N Shemon

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein (RKIP, also PEBP1, a member of the Phosphatidylethanolamine Binding Protein family, negatively regulates growth factor signaling by the Raf/MAP kinase pathway. Since an organic compound, locostatin, was reported to bind RKIP and inhibit cell migration by a Raf-dependent mechanism, we addressed the role of RKIP in locostatin function.We analyzed locostatin interaction with RKIP and examined the biological consequences of locostatin binding on RKIP function. NMR studies show that a locostatin precursor binds to the conserved phosphatidylethanolamine binding pocket of RKIP. However, drug binding to the pocket does not prevent RKIP association with its inhibitory target, Raf-1, nor affect RKIP phosphorylation by Protein Kinase C at a regulatory site. Similarly, exposure of wild type, RKIP-depleted HeLa cells or RKIP-deficient (RKIP(-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs to locostatin has no effect on MAP kinase activation. Locostatin treatment of wild type MEFs causes inhibition of cell migration following wounding. RKIP deficiency impairs migration further, indicating that RKIP protects cells against locostatin-mediated inhibition of migration. Locostatin treatment of depleted or RKIP(-/- MEFs reveals cytoskeletal disruption and microtubule abnormalities in the spindle.These results suggest that locostatin's effects on cytoskeletal structure and migration are caused through mechanisms independent of its binding to RKIP and Raf/MAP kinase signaling. The protective effect of RKIP against drug inhibition of migration suggests a new role for RKIP in potentially sequestering toxic compounds that may have deleterious effects on cells.

  4. Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein protects cells against locostatin-mediated inhibition of migration.

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    Shemon, Anne N; Eves, Eva M; Clark, Matthew C; Heil, Gary; Granovsky, Alexey; Zeng, Lingchun; Imamoto, Akira; Koide, Shohei; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2009-06-24

    Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein (RKIP, also PEBP1), a member of the Phosphatidylethanolamine Binding Protein family, negatively regulates growth factor signaling by the Raf/MAP kinase pathway. Since an organic compound, locostatin, was reported to bind RKIP and inhibit cell migration by a Raf-dependent mechanism, we addressed the role of RKIP in locostatin function. We analyzed locostatin interaction with RKIP and examined the biological consequences of locostatin binding on RKIP function. NMR studies show that a locostatin precursor binds to the conserved phosphatidylethanolamine binding pocket of RKIP. However, drug binding to the pocket does not prevent RKIP association with its inhibitory target, Raf-1, nor affect RKIP phosphorylation by Protein Kinase C at a regulatory site. Similarly, exposure of wild type, RKIP-depleted HeLa cells or RKIP-deficient (RKIP(-/-)) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to locostatin has no effect on MAP kinase activation. Locostatin treatment of wild type MEFs causes inhibition of cell migration following wounding. RKIP deficiency impairs migration further, indicating that RKIP protects cells against locostatin-mediated inhibition of migration. Locostatin treatment of depleted or RKIP(-/-) MEFs reveals cytoskeletal disruption and microtubule abnormalities in the spindle. These results suggest that locostatin's effects on cytoskeletal structure and migration are caused through mechanisms independent of its binding to RKIP and Raf/MAP kinase signaling. The protective effect of RKIP against drug inhibition of migration suggests a new role for RKIP in potentially sequestering toxic compounds that may have deleterious effects on cells.

  5. The cell-based L-glutathione protection assays to study endocytosis and recycling of plasma membrane proteins.

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    Cihil, Kristine M; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka

    2013-12-13

    Membrane trafficking involves transport of proteins from the plasma membrane to the cell interior (i.e. endocytosis) followed by trafficking to lysosomes for degradation or to the plasma membrane for recycling. The cell based L-glutathione protection assays can be used to study endocytosis and recycling of protein receptors, channels, transporters, and adhesion molecules localized at the cell surface. The endocytic assay requires labeling of cell surface proteins with a cell membrane impermeable biotin containing a disulfide bond and the N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester at 4 ºC - a temperature at which membrane trafficking does not occur. Endocytosis of biotinylated plasma membrane proteins is induced by incubation at 37 ºC. Next, the temperature is decreased again to 4 ºC to stop endocytic trafficking and the disulfide bond in biotin covalently attached to proteins that have remained at the plasma membrane is reduced with L-glutathione. At this point, only proteins that were endocytosed remain protected from L-glutathione and thus remain biotinylated. After cell lysis, biotinylated proteins are isolated with streptavidin agarose, eluted from agarose, and the biotinylated protein of interest is detected by western blotting. During the recycling assay, after biotinylation cells are incubated at 37 °C to load endocytic vesicles with biotinylated proteins and the disulfide bond in biotin covalently attached to proteins remaining at the plasma membrane is reduced with L-glutathione at 4 ºC as in the endocytic assay. Next, cells are incubated again at 37 °C to allow biotinylated proteins from endocytic vesicles to recycle to the plasma membrane. Cells are then incubated at 4 ºC, and the disulfide bond in biotin attached to proteins that recycled to the plasma membranes is reduced with L-glutathione. The biotinylated proteins protected from L-glutathione are those that did not recycle to the plasma membrane.

  6. A cell wall protein-based vaccine candidate induce protective immune response against Sporothrix schenckii infection.

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    Portuondo, Deivys Leandro; Batista-Duharte, Alexander; Ferreira, Lucas Souza; Martínez, Damiana Téllez; Polesi, Marisa Campos; Duarte, Roberta Aparecida; de Paula E Silva, Ana Carolina Alves; Marcos, Caroline Maria; Almeida, Ana Marisa Fusco de; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2016-02-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis caused by several closely related thermo-dimorphic fungi of the Sporothrix schenckii species complex, affecting humans and other mammals. In the last few years, new strategies have been proposed for controlling sporotrichosis owning to concerns about its growing incidence in humans, cats, and dogs in Brazil, as well as the toxicity and limited efficacy of conventional antifungal drugs. In this study, we assessed the immunogenicity and protective properties of two aluminum hydroxide (AH)-adsorbed S. schenckii cell wall protein (ssCWP)-based vaccine formulations in a mouse model of systemic S. schenckii infection. Fractioning by SDS-PAGE revealed nine protein bands, two of which were functionally characterized: a 44kDa peptide hydrolase and a 47kDa enolase, which was predicted to be an adhesin. Sera from immunized mice recognized the 47kDa enolase and another unidentified 71kDa protein, whereas serum from S. schenckii-infected mice recognized both these proteins plus another unidentified 9.4kDa protein. Furthermore, opsonization with the anti-ssCWP sera led to markedly increased phagocytosis and was able to strongly inhibit the fungus' adhesion to fibroblasts. Immunization with the higher-dose AH-adjuvanted formulation led to increased ex vivo release of IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17, whereas only IL-12 and IFN-γ were induced by the higher-dose non-adjuvanted formulation. Lastly, passive transference of the higher-dose AH-adjuvanted formulation's anti-ssCWP serum was able to afford in vivo protection in a subsequent challenge with S. schenckii, becoming a viable vaccine candidate for further testing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Pro-apoptotic protein Noxa regulates memory T cell population size and protects against lethal immunopathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensveen, Felix M.; Klarenbeek, Paul L.; van Gisbergen, Klaas P. J. M.; Pascutti, Maria F.; Derks, Ingrid A. M.; van Schaik, Barbera D. C.; ten Brinke, Anja; de Vries, Niek; Cekinovic, Durdica; Jonjic, Stipan; van Lier, René A. W.; Eldering, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Memory T cells form a highly specific defense layer against reinfection with previously encountered pathogens. In addition, memory T cells provide protection against pathogens that are similar, but not identical to the original infectious agent. This is because each T cell response harbors multiple

  8. Schisandrin B protects PC12 cells by decreasing the expression of amyloid precursor protein and vacuolar protein sorting 35★

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    Yan, Mingmin; Mao, Shanping; Dong, Huimin; Liu, Baohui; Zhang, Qian; Pan, Gaofeng; Fu, Zhiping

    2012-01-01

    PC12 cell injury was induced using 20 μM amyloid β-protein 25–35 to establish a model of Alzheimer's disease. The cells were then treated with 5, 10, and 25 μM Schisandrin B. Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assays and Hoechst 33342 staining results showed that with increasing Schisandrin B concentration, the survival rate of PC12 cells injured by amyloid β-protein 25–35 gradually increased and the rate of apoptosis gradually decreased. Reverse transcription-PCR, immunocytochemical staining and western blot results showed that with increasing Schisandrin B concentration, the mRNA and protein expression of vacuolar protein sorting 35 and amyloid precursor protein were gradually decreased. Vacuolar protein sorting 35 and amyloid precursor protein showed a consistent trend for change. These findings suggest that 5, 10, and 25 μM Schisandrin B antagonizes the cellular injury induced by amyloid β-protein 25–35 in a dose-dependent manner. This may be caused by decreasing the expression of vacuolar protein sorting 35 and amyloid precursor protein. PMID:25745458

  9. Stabilization of Nrf2 protein by D3T provides protection against ethanol-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells.

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    Jian Dong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated that maternal ethanol exposure induces a moderate increase in Nrf2 protein expression in mouse embryos. Pretreatment with the Nrf2 inducer, 3H-1, 2-dithiole-3-thione (D3T, significantly increases the Nrf2 protein levels and prevents apoptosis in ethanol-exposed embryos. The present study, using PC12 cells, was designed to determine whether increased Nrf2 stability is a mechanism by which D3T enhances Nrf2 activation and subsequent antioxidant protection. Ethanol and D3T treatment resulted in a significant accumulation of Nrf2 protein in PC 12 cells. CHX chase analysis has shown that ethanol treatment delayed the degradation of Nrf2 protein in PC12 cells. A significantly greater decrease in Nrf2 protein degradation was observed in the cells treated with D3T alone or with both ethanol and D3T. In addition, D3T treatment significantly reduced ethanol-induced apoptosis. These results demonstrate that the stabilization of Nrf2 protein by D3T confers protection against ethanol-induced apoptosis.

  10. Cuz1/Ynl155w, a Zinc-dependent Ubiquitin-binding Protein, Protects Cells from Metalloid-induced Proteotoxicity*

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    Hanna, John; Waterman, David; Isasa, Marta; Elsasser, Suzanne; Shi, Yuan; Gygi, Steven; Finley, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Protein misfolding is a universal threat to cells. The ubiquitin-proteasome system mediates a cellular stress response capable of eliminating misfolded proteins. Here we identify Cuz1/Ynl155w as a component of the ubiquitin system, capable of interacting with both the proteasome and Cdc48. Cuz1/Ynl155w is regulated by the transcription factor Rpn4, and is required for cells to survive exposure to the trivalent metalloids arsenic and antimony. A related protein, Yor052c, shows similar phenotypes, suggesting a multicomponent stress response pathway. Cuz1/Ynl155w functions as a zinc-dependent ubiquitin-binding protein. Thus, Cuz1/Ynl155w is proposed to protect cells from metalloid-induced proteotoxicity by delivering ubiquitinated substrates to Cdc48 and the proteasome for destruction. PMID:24297164

  11. The Stress Granule RNA-Binding Protein TIAR-1 Protects Female Germ Cells from Heat Shock in Caenorhabditis elegans

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    Gabriela Huelgas-Morales

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In response to stressful conditions, eukaryotic cells launch an arsenal of regulatory programs to protect the proteome. One major protective response involves the arrest of protein translation and the formation of stress granules, cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes containing the conserved RNA-binding proteins TIA-1 and TIAR. The stress granule response is thought to preserve mRNA for translation when conditions improve. For cells of the germline—the immortal cell lineage required for sexual reproduction—protection from stress is critically important for perpetuation of the species, yet how stress granule regulatory mechanisms are deployed in animal reproduction is incompletely understood. Here, we show that the stress granule protein TIAR-1 protects the Caenorhabditis elegans germline from the adverse effects of heat shock. Animals containing strong loss-of-function mutations in tiar-1 exhibit significantly reduced fertility compared to the wild type following heat shock. Analysis of a heat-shock protein promoter indicates that tiar-1 mutants display an impaired heat-shock response. We observed that TIAR-1 was associated with granules in the gonad core and oocytes during several stressful conditions. Both gonad core and oocyte granules are dynamic structures that depend on translation; protein synthesis inhibitors altered their formation. Nonetheless, tiar-1 was required for the formation of gonad core granules only. Interestingly, the gonad core granules did not seem to be needed for the germ cells to develop viable embryos after heat shock. This suggests that TIAR-1 is able to protect the germline from heat stress independently of these structures.

  12. The Stress Granule RNA-Binding Protein TIAR-1 Protects Female Germ Cells from Heat Shock in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Huelgas-Morales, Gabriela; Silva-García, Carlos Giovanni; Salinas, Laura S; Greenstein, David; Navarro, Rosa E

    2016-04-07

    In response to stressful conditions, eukaryotic cells launch an arsenal of regulatory programs to protect the proteome. One major protective response involves the arrest of protein translation and the formation of stress granules, cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes containing the conserved RNA-binding proteins TIA-1 and TIAR. The stress granule response is thought to preserve mRNA for translation when conditions improve. For cells of the germline-the immortal cell lineage required for sexual reproduction-protection from stress is critically important for perpetuation of the species, yet how stress granule regulatory mechanisms are deployed in animal reproduction is incompletely understood. Here, we show that the stress granule protein TIAR-1 protects the Caenorhabditis elegans germline from the adverse effects of heat shock. Animals containing strong loss-of-function mutations in tiar-1 exhibit significantly reduced fertility compared to the wild type following heat shock. Analysis of a heat-shock protein promoter indicates that tiar-1 mutants display an impaired heat-shock response. We observed that TIAR-1 was associated with granules in the gonad core and oocytes during several stressful conditions. Both gonad core and oocyte granules are dynamic structures that depend on translation; protein synthesis inhibitors altered their formation. Nonetheless, tiar-1 was required for the formation of gonad core granules only. Interestingly, the gonad core granules did not seem to be needed for the germ cells to develop viable embryos after heat shock. This suggests that TIAR-1 is able to protect the germline from heat stress independently of these structures. Copyright © 2016 Huelgas-Morales et al.

  13. Enhancing T cell activation and antiviral protection by introducing the HIV-1 protein transduction domain into a DNA vaccine.

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    Leifert, J A; Lindencrona, J A; Charo, J; Whitton, J L

    2001-10-10

    Protein transduction domains (PTD), which can transport proteins or peptides across biological membranes, have been identified in several proteins of viral, invertebrate, and vertebrate origin. Here, we evaluate the immunological and biological consequences of including PTD in synthetic peptides and in DNA vaccines that contain CD8(+) T cell epitopes from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Synthetic PTD-peptides did not induce detectable CD8(+) T cell responses. However, fusion of an open reading frame encoding a PTD to an epitope minigene caused transfected tissue culture cells to stimulate epitope-specific T cells much more effectively. Kinetic studies indicated that the epitope reached the surface of transfected cells more rapidly and that the number of transfected cells needed to stimulate T cell responses was reduced by 35- to 50-fold when compared to cells transfected with a standard minigene plasmid. The mechanism underlying the effect of PTD linkage is not clear, but transit of the PTD-attached epitope from transfected cells to nontransfected cells (cross presentation) seemed to play, at most, a minimal role. Mice immunized once with the plasmid encoding the PTD-linked epitope showed a markedly accelerated CD8(+) T cell response and, unlike mice immunized with a standard plasmid, were completely protected against a normally lethal LCMV challenge administered only 8 days post-immunization.

  14. [Expression, purification and protective antigen analysis of cell wall protein MRP of Streptococcus suis type 2].

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    Wang, Ping-ping; Pian, Ya-ya; Yuan, Yuan; Zheng, Yu-ling; Jiang, Yong-qiang; Xiong, Zheng-ying

    2012-02-01

    To amplify the mrp gene of Streptococcus suis type 2 05ZYH33, express it in E.coli BL21 in order to acquire high purity recombinant protein MRP, then evaluate the protective antigen of recombinant protein MRP. Using PCR technology to obtain the product of mrp gene of 05ZYH33, and then cloned it into the expression vector pET28a(+). The recombinant protein was purified by affinity chromatography, later immunized New Zealand rabbit to gain anti-serum, then test the anti-serum titer by ELISA. The opsonophagocytic killing test demonstrated the abilities of protective antigen of MRP. The truncated of MRP recombinant protein in E.coli BL21 expressed by inclusion bodies, and purified it in high purity. After immunoprotection, the survival condition of CD-1 was significantly elevated. The survival rate of wild-type strain 05ZYH33 in blood was apparently decreased after anti-serum opsonophagocyticed, but the mutant delta; MRP showed no differences. MRP represent an important protective antigen activity.

  15. Protective role of klotho protein on epithelial cells upon co-culture with activated or senescent monocytes

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    Mytych, Jennifer, E-mail: jennifermytych@gmail.com [Institute of Applied Biotechnology and Basic Sciences, University of Rzeszow, Werynia 502, 36-100 Kolbuszowa (Poland); Centre of Applied Biotechnology and Basic Sciences, University of Rzeszow, Werynia 502, 36-100 Kolbuszowa (Poland); Wos, Izabela; Solek, Przemyslaw; Koziorowski, Marek [Institute of Applied Biotechnology and Basic Sciences, University of Rzeszow, Werynia 502, 36-100 Kolbuszowa (Poland); Centre of Applied Biotechnology and Basic Sciences, University of Rzeszow, Werynia 502, 36-100 Kolbuszowa (Poland)

    2017-01-15

    Monocytes ensure proper functioning and maintenance of epithelial cells, while good condition of monocytes is a key factor of these interactions. Although, it was shown that in some circumstances, a population of altered monocytes may appear, there is no data regarding their effect on epithelial cells. In this study, using direct co-culture model with LPS-activated and Dox-induced senescent THP-1 monocytes, we reported for the first time ROS-induced DNA damage, reduced metabolic activity, proliferation inhibition and cell cycle arrest followed by p16-, p21- and p27-mediated DNA damage response pathways activation, premature senescence and apoptosis induction in HeLa cells. Also, we show that klotho protein possessing anti-aging and anti-inflammatory characteristics reduced cytotoxic and genotoxic events by inhibition of insulin/IGF-IR and downregulation of TRF1 and TRF2 proteins. Therefore, klotho protein could be considered as a protective factor against changes caused by altered monocytes in epithelial cells. - Highlights: • Activated and senescent THP-1 monocytes induced cyto- and genotoxicity in HeLa cells. • Altered monocytes provoked oxidative and nitrosative stress-induced DNA damage. • DNA damage activated DDR pathways and lead to premature senescence and apoptosis. • Klotho reduced ROS/RNS-mediated toxicity through insulin/IGF-IR pathway inhibition. • Klotho protects HeLa cells from cyto- and genotoxicity induced by altered monocytes.

  16. Protective role of klotho protein on epithelial cells upon co-culture with activated or senescent monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mytych, Jennifer; Wos, Izabela; Solek, Przemyslaw; Koziorowski, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Monocytes ensure proper functioning and maintenance of epithelial cells, while good condition of monocytes is a key factor of these interactions. Although, it was shown that in some circumstances, a population of altered monocytes may appear, there is no data regarding their effect on epithelial cells. In this study, using direct co-culture model with LPS-activated and Dox-induced senescent THP-1 monocytes, we reported for the first time ROS-induced DNA damage, reduced metabolic activity, proliferation inhibition and cell cycle arrest followed by p16-, p21- and p27-mediated DNA damage response pathways activation, premature senescence and apoptosis induction in HeLa cells. Also, we show that klotho protein possessing anti-aging and anti-inflammatory characteristics reduced cytotoxic and genotoxic events by inhibition of insulin/IGF-IR and downregulation of TRF1 and TRF2 proteins. Therefore, klotho protein could be considered as a protective factor against changes caused by altered monocytes in epithelial cells. - Highlights: • Activated and senescent THP-1 monocytes induced cyto- and genotoxicity in HeLa cells. • Altered monocytes provoked oxidative and nitrosative stress-induced DNA damage. • DNA damage activated DDR pathways and lead to premature senescence and apoptosis. • Klotho reduced ROS/RNS-mediated toxicity through insulin/IGF-IR pathway inhibition. • Klotho protects HeLa cells from cyto- and genotoxicity induced by altered monocytes.

  17. A Plasmodium Promiscuous T Cell Epitope Delivered within the Ad5 Hexon Protein Enhances the Protective Efficacy of a Protein Based Malaria Vaccine.

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    Jairo Andres Fonseca

    Full Text Available A malaria vaccine is a public health priority. In order to produce an effective vaccine, a multistage approach targeting both the blood and the liver stage infection is desirable. The vaccine candidates also need to induce balanced immune responses including antibodies, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Protein-based subunit vaccines like RTS,S are able to induce strong antibody response but poor cellular reactivity. Adenoviral vectors have been effective inducing protective CD8+ T cell responses in several models including malaria; nonetheless this vaccine platform exhibits a limited induction of humoral immune responses. Two approaches have been used to improve the humoral immunogenicity of recombinant adenovirus vectors, the use of heterologous prime-boost regimens with recombinant proteins or the genetic modification of the hypervariable regions (HVR of the capsid protein hexon to express B cell epitopes of interest. In this study, we describe the development of capsid modified Ad5 vectors that express a promiscuous Plasmodium yoelii T helper epitope denominated PyT53 within the hexon HVR2 region. Several regimens were tested in mice to determine the relevance of the hexon modification in enhancing protective immune responses induced by the previously described protein-based multi-stage experimental vaccine PyCMP. A heterologous prime-boost immunization regime that combines a hexon modified vector with transgenic expression of PyCMP followed by protein immunizations resulted in the induction of robust antibody and cellular immune responses in comparison to a similar regimen that includes a vector with unmodified hexon. These differences in immunogenicity translated into a better protective efficacy against both the hepatic and red blood cell stages of P. yoelii. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a hexon modification is used to deliver a promiscuous T cell epitope. Our data support the use of such modification to enhance the immunogenicity

  18. Dioscorin protects tight junction protein expression in A549 human airway epithelium cells from dust mite damage.

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    Fu, Lin Shien; Ko, Ying Hsien; Lin, Kuo Wei; Hsu, Jeng Yuan; Chu, Jao Jia; Chi, Chin Shiang

    2009-12-01

    In addition to being an allergen, the trypsin activity of dust mite extract also destroys the tight junctions of bronchial epithelium. Such damage can lead to airway leakage, which increases airway exposure to allergens, irritants, and other pathogens. Dioscorin, the storage protein of yam, demonstrates anti-trypsin activity, as well as other potential anti-inflammatory effects. This study investigated the protective role of dioscorin for tight junctions. The immunofluorescence stains of zonula occludens (ZO-1), E-cadherin (EC) and desmoplakin (DP) proteins were compared. A cultured A549 cell line was used as a control and A549 cells were incubated with mite extract 100 mg/mL for 16 h, with or without dioscorin 100 mg/mL pretreatment for 8 h and with dioscorin 100 mg/mL alone for 16 h. Western blot was performed to detect changes in ZO-1, EC, and DP in the treated A549 cell lines. Loss of tight junction protein expression (ZO-1, EC, DP) was demonstrated after 16-h mite extract incubation. The defect could be restored if cells were pretreated with dioscorin for 8 h. In addition, dioscorin did not cause damage to the A549 cell lines in terms of cell survival or morphology. Western blot showed no change in the amount of tight junction protein under various conditions. Dioscorin is a potential protector of airway damage caused by mite extract.

  19. Netrin-1 Protects Hepatocytes Against Cell Death Through Sustained Translation During the Unfolded Protein Response.

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    Lahlali, Thomas; Plissonnier, Marie-Laure; Romero-López, Cristina; Michelet, Maud; Ducarouge, Benjamin; Berzal-Herranz, Alfredo; Zoulim, Fabien; Mehlen, Patrick; Parent, Romain

    2016-05-01

    Netrin-1, a multifunctional secreted protein, is up-regulated in cancer and inflammation. Netrin-1 blocks apoptosis induced by the prototypical dependence receptors deleted in colorectal carcinoma and uncoordinated phenotype-5. Although the unfolded protein response (UPR) triggers apoptosis on exposure to stress, it first attempts to restore endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis to foster cell survival. Importantly, UPR is implicated in chronic liver conditions including hepatic oncogenesis. Netrin-1's implication in cell survival on UPR in this context is unknown. Isolation of translational complexes, determination of RNA secondary structures by selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation and primer extension/dimethyl sulfate, bicistronic constructs, as well as conventional cell biology and biochemistry approaches were used on in vitro-grown hepatocytic cells, wild-type, and netrin-1 transgenic mice. HepaRG cells constitute a bona fide model for UPR studies in vitro through adequate activation of the 3 sensors of the UPR (protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK)), inositol requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α), and activated transcription factor 6 (ATF6). The netrin-1 messenger RNA 5'-end was shown to fold into a complex double pseudoknot and bear E-loop motifs, both of which are representative hallmarks of related internal ribosome entry site regions. Cap-independent translation of netrin 5' untranslated region-driven luciferase was observed on UPR in vitro. Unlike several structurally related oncogenic transcripts (l-myc, c-myc, c-myb), netrin-1 messenger RNA was selected for translation during UPR both in human hepatocytes and in mice livers. Depletion of netrin-1 during UPR induces apoptosis, leading to cell death through an uncoordinated phenotype-5A/C-mediated involvement of protein phosphatase 2A and death-associated protein kinase 1 in vitro and in netrin transgenic mice. UPR-resistant, internal ribosome entry site-driven netrin-1 translation leads to

  20. Protective antibody and CD8+ T-cell responses to the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein induced by a nanoparticle vaccine.

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    Stephen A Kaba

    Full Text Available The worldwide burden of malaria remains a major public health problem due, in part, to the lack of an effective vaccine against the Plasmodium falciparum parasite. An effective vaccine will most likely require the induction of antigen specific CD8(+ and CD4(+ T-cells as well as long-lasting antibody responses all working in concert to eliminate the infection. We report here the effective modification of a self-assembling protein nanoparticle (SAPN vaccine previously proven effective in control of a P. berghei infection in a rodent model to now present B- and T-cell epitopes of the human malaria parasite P. falciparum in a platform capable of being used in human subjects.To establish the basis for a SAPN-based vaccine, B- and CD8(+ T-cell epitopes from the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP and the universal CD4 T-helper epitope PADRE were engineered into a versatile small protein (∼125 amino acids that self-assembles into a spherical nanoparticle repetitively displaying the selected epitopes. P. falciparum epitope specific immune responses were evaluated in mice using a transgenic P. berghei malaria parasite of mice expressing the human malaria full-length P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (Tg-Pb/PfCSP. We show that SAPN constructs, delivered in saline, can induce high-titer, long-lasting (1 year protective antibody and poly-functional (IFNγ(+, IL-2(+ long-lived central memory CD8(+ T-cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these Ab or CD8(+ T-cells can independently provide sterile protection against a lethal challenge of the transgenic parasites.The SAPN construct induces long-lasting antibody and cellular immune responses to epitope specific sequences of the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP and prevents infection in mice by a transgenic P. berghei parasite displaying the full length PfCSP.

  1. Protective effect of bone morphogenetic protein 6 on RPE cells injury caused by H2O2

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    Li Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate the effect of bone morphogenetic protein 6(BMP-6on cellular morphology, proliferation and apoptosis of retinal pigment epithelial cells(ARPE-19incubated in hydrogen peroxide(H2O2. METHODS:ARPE-19 cells were cultured conventionally and divided into four groups. One group was untreated as blank group, the other three groups were incubated in 75μm/L H2O2, 150ng/mLBMP-6 or75μm/L H2O2+150ng/mL BMP-6. All the groups were incubated for 3h, 6h, 9h and 12h. We tested the cell viabilitity by MTT. We used flow cytometry to test the cell cycle and cell apoptosis.RESULTS:H2O2 significantly decreased the cell activity in time-dependent manner. The activity of cells with BMP-6+H2O2 was higher H2O2 group, and the differences between the two groups at 3h and 6h were significant(P2O2, while the cells with BMP-6 were less cell detachment and apoptosis. CONCLUSION:BMP-6 has protective effects on RPE cells from oxidative stress in certain extent.

  2. A novel mTOR activating protein protects dopamine neurons against oxidative stress by repressing autophagy related cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyou-Chan; Kim, Shin-Hee; Ha, Ji-Young; Kim, Sang-Tae; Son, Jin H

    2010-01-01

    Our previous microarray analysis identified a neuroprotective protein Oxi-alpha, that was down-regulated during oxidative stress (OS)-induced cell death in dopamine neurons [Neurochem. Res. (2004) vol. 29, pp. 1223]. Here we find that the phylogenetically conserved Oxi-alpha protects against OS by a novel mechanism: activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase and subsequent repression of autophagic vacuole accumulation and cell death. To the best of our knowledge, Oxi-alpha is the first molecule discovered in dopamine neurons, which activates mTOR kinase. Indeed, the down-regulation of Oxi-alpha by OS suppresses the activation of mTOR kinase. The pathogenic effect of down-regulated Oxi-alpha was confirmed by gene-specific knockdown experiment, which resulted in not only the repression of mTOR kinase and the subsequent phosphorylation of p70 S6 kinase and 4E-BP1, but also enhanced susceptibility to OS. In accordance with these observations, treatment with rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor and autophagy inducer, potentiated OS-induced cell death, while similar treatment with an autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine protected the dopamine cells. Our findings present evidence for the presence of a novel class of molecule involved in autophagic cell death triggered by OS in dopamine neurons.

  3. Immunisation With Immunodominant Linear B Cell Epitopes Vaccine of Manganese Transport Protein C Confers Protection against Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

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    Hui-Jie Yang

    Full Text Available Vaccination strategies for Staphylococcus aureus, particularly methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA infections have attracted much research attention. Recent efforts have been made to select manganese transport protein C, or manganese binding surface lipoprotein C (MntC, which is a metal ion associated with pathogen nutrition uptake, as potential candidates for an S. aureus vaccine. Although protective humoral immune responses to MntC are well-characterised, much less is known about detailed MntC-specific B cell epitope mapping and particularly epitope vaccines, which are less-time consuming and more convenient. In this study, we generated a recombinant protein rMntC which induced strong antibody response when used for immunisation with CFA/IFA adjuvant. On the basis of the results, linear B cell epitopes within MntC were finely mapped using a series of overlapping synthetic peptides. Further studies indicate that MntC113-136, MntC209-232, and MntC263-286 might be the original linear B-cell immune dominant epitope of MntC, furthermore, three-dimensional (3-d crystal structure results indicate that the three immunodominant epitopes were displayed on the surface of the MntC antigen. On the basis of immunodominant MntC113-136, MntC209-232, and MntC263-286 peptides, the epitope vaccine for S. aureus induces a high antibody level which is biased to TH2 and provides effective immune protection and strong opsonophagocytic killing activity in vitro against MRSA infection. In summary, the study provides strong proof of the optimisation of MRSA B cell epitope vaccine designs and their use, which was based on the MntC antigen in the development of an MRSA vaccine.

  4. Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Protects Retinal Ganglion Cell From Optic Nerve Injury Induced Apoptosis via Yes Associated Protein

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    Jia-Xing Zhou

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS has been used in clinical studies. But little is known about its effects on the central nervous system (CNS, or its mechanism of action. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs are CNS neuronal cells that can be utilized as a classic model system to evaluate outcomes of LIPUS protection from external trauma-induced retinal injury. In this study, we aim to: (1 determine the pulse energy and the capability of LIPUS in RGC viability, (2 ascertain the protective role of LIPUS in optic nerve (ON crush-induced retinal injury, and 3 explore the cellular mechanisms of RGC apoptosis prevention by LIPUS.Methods: An ON crush model was set up to induce RGC death. LIPUS was used to treat mice eyes daily, and the retina samples were dissected for immunostaining and Western blot. The expression of yes-associated protein (YAP and apoptosis-related proteins was detected by immunostaining and Western blot in vitro and in vivo. Apoptosis of RGCs was evaluated by TUNEL staining, the survival of RGCs and retained axons were labeled by Fluoro-gold and Tuj1 antibody, respectively. Rotenone was used to set up an in vitro cellular degenerative model and siYAP was used to interfering the expression of YAP to detect the LIPUS protective function.Results: LIPUS protected RGC from loss and apoptosis in vivo and in vitro. The ratio of cleaved/pro-caspase3 also decreased significantly under LIPUS treatment. As a cellular mechanical sensor, YAP expression increased and YAP translocated to nucleus in LIPUS stimulation group, however, phospho-YAP was found to be decreased. When YAP was inhibited, the LIPUS could not protect RGC from caspase3-dependent apoptosis.Conclusion: LIPUS prevented RGCs from apoptosis in an ON crush model and in vitro cellular degenerative model, which indicates a potential treatment for further traumatic ON injury. The mechanism of protection is dependent on YAP activation and correlated with caspase-3 signaling.

  5. Protein degradation and protection against misfolded or damaged proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Alfred L.

    2003-12-01

    The ultimate mechanism that cells use to ensure the quality of intracellular proteins is the selective destruction of misfolded or damaged polypeptides. In eukaryotic cells, the large ATP-dependent proteolytic machine, the 26S proteasome, prevents the accumulation of non-functional, potentially toxic proteins. This process is of particular importance in protecting cells against harsh conditions (for example, heat shock or oxidative stress) and in a variety of diseases (for example, cystic fibrosis and the major neurodegenerative diseases). A full understanding of the pathogenesis of the protein-folding diseases will require greater knowledge of how misfolded proteins are recognized and selectively degraded.

  6. Small heat shock proteins mediate cell-autonomous and -nonautonomous protection in a Drosophila model for environmental-stress-induced degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Fumiko; Koonce, Noelle L; Guo, Linda; Fatima, Shahroz; Qiu, Catherine; Moon, Mackenzie T; Zheng, Yunzhen; Ordway, Richard W

    2016-09-01

    Cell and tissue degeneration, and the development of degenerative diseases, are influenced by genetic and environmental factors that affect protein misfolding and proteotoxicity. To better understand the role of the environment in degeneration, we developed a genetic model for heat shock (HS)-stress-induced degeneration in Drosophila This model exhibits a unique combination of features that enhance genetic analysis of degeneration and protection mechanisms involving environmental stress. These include cell-type-specific failure of proteostasis and degeneration in response to global stress, cell-nonautonomous interactions within a simple and accessible network of susceptible cell types, and precise temporal control over the induction of degeneration. In wild-type flies, HS stress causes selective loss of the flight ability and degeneration of three susceptible cell types comprising the flight motor: muscle, motor neurons and associated glia. Other motor behaviors persist and, accordingly, the corresponding cell types controlling leg motor function are resistant to degeneration. Flight motor degeneration was preceded by a failure of muscle proteostasis characterized by diffuse ubiquitinated protein aggregates. Moreover, muscle-specific overexpression of a small heat shock protein (HSP), HSP23, promoted proteostasis and protected muscle from HS stress. Notably, neurons and glia were protected as well, indicating that a small HSP can mediate cell-nonautonomous protection. Cell-autonomous protection of muscle was characterized by a distinct distribution of ubiquitinated proteins, including perinuclear localization and clearance of protein aggregates associated with the perinuclear microtubule network. This network was severely disrupted in wild-type preparations prior to degeneration, suggesting that it serves an important role in muscle proteostasis and protection. Finally, studies of resistant leg muscles revealed that they sustain proteostasis and the microtubule

  7. Cytoskeleton-interacting LIM-domain protein CRP1 suppresses cell proliferation and protects from stress-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latonen, Leena; Jaervinen, Paeivi M.; Laiho, Marikki

    2008-01-01

    Members of the cysteine-rich protein (CRP) family are actin cytoskeleton-interacting LIM-domain proteins known to act in muscle cell differentiation. We have earlier found that CRP1, a founding member of this family, is transcriptionally induced by UV radiation in human diploid fibroblasts [M. Gentile, L. Latonen, M. Laiho, Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis provoked by UV radiation-induced DNA damage are transcriptionally highly divergent responses, Nucleic Acids Res. 31 (2003) 4779-4790]. Here we show that CRP1 is induced by growth-inhibitory signals, such as increased cellular density, and cytotoxic stress induced by UV radiation or staurosporine. We found that high levels of CRP1 correlate with differentiation-associated morphology towards the myofibroblast lineage and that expression of ectopic CRP1 suppresses cell proliferation. Following UV- and staurosporine-induced stresses, expression of CRP1 provides a survival advantage evidenced by decreased cellular death and increased cellular metabolic activity and attachment. Our studies identify that CRP1 is a novel stress response factor, and provide evidence for its growth-inhibitory and cytoprotective functions

  8. Multidrug-resistance-associated protein plays a protective role in menadione-induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kyohei; Shibata, Tomohito; Oba, Tatsuya; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yoshikawa, Masahito; Tatsunami, Ryosuke; Takahashi, Kazuhiko; Tampo, Yoshiko

    2009-02-13

    Menadione, a redox-cycling quinone known to cause oxidative stress, binds to reduced glutathione (GSH) to form glutathione S-conjugate. Glutathione S-conjugates efflux is often mediated by multidrug-resistance-associated protein (MRP). We investigated the effect of a transporter inhibitor, MK571 (3-[[3-[2-(7-chloroquinolin-2-yl)vinyl]phenyl]-(2-dimethylcarbamoylethylsulfanyl)methylsulfanyl] propionic acid), on menadione-induced oxidative stress in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). BAECs were treated with menadione and MK571, and cell viability was measured. Modulation of intracellular GSH levels was performed with buthionine sulfoximine and GSH ethyl ester treatments. Intracellular superoxide was estimated by dihydroethidium oxidation using fluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry. Expression of MRP was determined by flow cytometry using phycoerythrin-conjugated anti-MRP monoclonal antibody. Intracellular GSH depletion by buthionine sulfoximine promoted the loss of viability of BAECs exposed to menadione. Exogenous GSH, which does not permeate the cell membrane, or GSH ethyl ester protected BAECs against the loss of viability induced by menadione. The results suggest that GSH binds to menadione outside the cells as well as inside. Pretreatment of BAECs with MK571 dramatically increased intracellular levels of superoxide generated from menadione, indicating that menadione may accumulate in the intracellular milieu. Finally, we found that MK571 aggravated menadione-induced toxicity in BAECs and that MRP levels were increased in menadione-treated cells. We conclude that MRP plays a vital role in protecting BAECs against menadione-induced oxidative stress, presumably due to its ability to transport glutathione S-conjugate.

  9. Respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein expressed in insect cells form protein nanoparticles that induce protective immunity in cotton rats.

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    Gale Smith

    Full Text Available Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV is an important viral agent causing severe respiratory tract disease in infants and children as well as in the elderly and immunocompromised individuals. The lack of a safe and effective RSV vaccine represents a major unmet medical need. RSV fusion (F surface glycoprotein was modified and cloned into a baculovirus vector for efficient expression in Sf9 insect cells. Recombinant RSV F was glycosylated and cleaved into covalently linked F2 and F1 polypeptides that formed homotrimers. RSV F extracted and purified from insect cell membranes assembled into 40 nm protein nanoparticles composed of multiple RSV F oligomers arranged in the form of rosettes. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of purified RSV F nanoparticles was compared to live and formalin inactivated RSV in cotton rats. Immunized animals induced neutralizing serum antibodies, inhibited virus replication in the lungs, and had no signs of disease enhancement in the respiratory track of challenged animals. RSV F nanoparticles also induced IgG competitive for binding of palivizumab neutralizing monoclonal antibody to RSV F antigenic site II. Antibodies to this epitope are known to protect against RSV when passively administered in high risk infants. Together these data provide a rational for continued development a recombinant RSV F nanoparticle vaccine candidate.

  10. Protein S is protective in pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urawa, M; Kobayashi, T; D'Alessandro-Gabazza, C N; Fujimoto, H; Toda, M; Roeen, Z; Hinneh, J A; Yasuma, T; Takei, Y; Taguchi, O; Gabazza, E C

    2016-08-01

    Essentials Epithelial cell apoptosis is critical in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Protein S, a circulating anticoagulant, inhibited apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. Overexpression of protein S in lung cells reduced bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Intranasal therapy with exogenous protein S ameliorated bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Background Pulmonary fibrosis is the terminal stage of interstitial lung diseases, some of them being incurable and of unknown etiology. Apoptosis plays a critical role in lung fibrogenesis. Protein S is a plasma anticoagulant with potent antiapoptotic activity. The role of protein S in pulmonary fibrosis is unknown. Objectives To evaluate the clinical relevance of protein S and its protective role in pulmonary fibrosis. Methods and Results The circulating level of protein S was measured in patients with pulmonary fibrosis and controls by the use of enzyme immunoassays. Pulmonary fibrosis was induced with bleomycin in transgenic mice overexpressing human protein S and wild-type mice, and exogenous protein S or vehicle was administered to wild-type mice; fibrosis was then compared in both models. Patients with pulmonary fibrosis had reduced circulating levels of protein S as compared with controls. Inflammatory changes, the levels of profibrotic cytokines, fibrosis score, hydroxyproline content in the lungs and oxygen desaturation were significantly reduced in protein S-transgenic mice as compared with wild-type mice. Wild-type mice treated with exogenous protein S showed significant decreases in the levels of inflammatory and profibrotic markers and fibrosis in the lungs as compared with untreated control mice. After bleomycin infusion, mice overexpressing human protein S showed significantly low caspase-3 activity, enhanced expression of antiapoptotic molecules and enhanced Akt and Axl kinase phosphorylation as compared with wild-type counterparts. Protein S also inhibited apoptosis of alveolar

  11. Protective effect of Sestrin2 on apoptosis of dendritic cells induced by high mobility group box-1 protein

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    Li-xue WANG

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the potential role of Sestrin2 (SESN2 in regulating the apoptosis of dendritic cells (DCs induced by high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1. Methods DCs (the murine DC cell line DC2.4 were cultured with or without HMGB1 stimulation (cultured with 10ng/ml HMGB1 for 8, 24 and 48 hours, or cultured with HMGB1 for 48 hours at different concentrations of 1, 10 and 100ng/ml, respectively, n=4. The protein level of SESN2, cleaved-caspase-3 and Bcl-2 were analyzed with Western blotting. Localization of SESN2 in cells was observed under confocal laser microscope (LSCM. Cell apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry. In addition, DC2.4 cells were transfected with lentivirus containing SESN2 LV-RNA, SESN2 siRNA sequence expressing plasmids or blank vector (NC, NS, n=4. These cells were then stimulated with HMGB1 (100ng/ml for 48 hours, and the apoptosis was accessed as mentioned above. Results Compared with the control group, the expression of SESN2 was obviously up-regulated after HMGB1 (10ng/ml stimulation for 24 and 48 hours (P<0.05. In a dose-dependent response, the expression of SESN2 was markedly enhanced in treatment with 1, 10, 100ng/ml HMGB1 for 48 hours (P<0.05. Compared with the control group (7.35%±1.33%, the percentage of apoptosis was significantly increased with 10, 100ng/ml HMGB1 for 48 hours [(17.02%±4.85%, 17.48%±4.04%, respectively, P<0.05 or P<0.01]. After transfection, compared with blank vector group, the apoptosis of SESN2 siRNA group obviously elevated [(65.96%±2.50% vs. (50.01%±2.07%, P<0.05], and cleaved-caspase-3 expression significantly increased while Bcl-2 expression obviously decreased. In SESN2 LV-RNA group, the apoptosis significantly decreased [(35.57%±1.69% vs. (49.04%±4.87%, P<0.05], and cleaved-caspase-3 expression decreased and Bcl-2 expression obviously increased compared with blank vector group (P<0.05. Conclusion SESN2 has a protective effect against HMGB1 induced apoptosis of DC2

  12. Polyphenols of leaves of Apium graveolensinhibit in vitro protein glycationand protect RINm5F cells against methylglyoxal-induced cytotoxicity

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    Rosa Martha Perez-Gutierrez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The health benefits of edible plants have been widely investigated and disseminated. However, only polyphenols have been found to have sufficient therapeutic potential to be considered in clinical trials. Fewer manuscripts have other applications such as prospective health benefits and disease treatment. Other components of edible plants are responsible for a range of other benefits including antimalarial, burns, flu, cancer, inflammation, diabetes, glycation, antimicrobial, prevention of neurodegeneration, analgesic, antimigraine activity, sedative activities, etc. Accordingly, the public needs to be informed of the potential edible plants have to act on different targets and maintain better control over diabetes compared to commercial drugs which can be toxic, have side effects, do not have the capacity to maintain blood glucose at normal levels, and do not protect the patient from the complications of diabetes over time. Consequently, edible plants, such as Apium graveolen, which have therapeutic targets on AGEs formation, are potentially a better alternative treatment for diabetes. Methods: The leaves of celery were extracted with methanol (CM. Polyphenols contents in CM were investigated by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass. The ability of the compounds to inhibit formation of AGEs was evaluated in vitro models using formation of AGE fluorescence intensity, level of fructosamine, Nε-(carboxymethyllysine (CML, methylglyoxal (MG-derived protein, and formation of amyloid cross β structure. Protein-oxidation was determined by thiol group and protein carbonyl content. Inhibition of MG-derived AGEs and MG-trapping ability were also measured. Additionally, insulin production was determined in methylglyoxal-treated pancreatic RINm5F cells assay. Results: Apigenin, kaempferol, apiin, rutin, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, chlorogenic acid, coumaroylquinic acid, and p-coumaric acid were the major polyphenols contained in CM

  13. SmgGDS is a transient nucleolar protein that protects cells from nucleolar stress and promotes the cell cycle by regulating DREAM complex gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonyo, P; Bergom, C; Brandt, A C; Tsaih, S-W; Sun, Y; Bigley, T M; Lorimer, E L; Terhune, S S; Rui, H; Flister, M J; Long, R M; Williams, C L

    2017-12-14

    The chaperone protein and guanine nucleotide exchange factor SmgGDS (RAP1GDS1) is a key promoter of cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. SmgGDS undergoes nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, suggesting that it has both cytoplasmic and nuclear functions that promote cancer. Previous studies indicate that SmgGDS binds cytoplasmic small GTPases and promotes their trafficking to the plasma membrane. In contrast, little is known about the functions of SmgGDS in the nucleus, or how these nuclear functions might benefit cancer cells. Here we show unique nuclear localization and regulation of gene transcription pathways by SmgGDS. Strikingly, SmgGDS depletion significantly reduces expression of over 600 gene products that are targets of the DREAM complex, which is a transcription factor complex that regulates expression of proteins controlling the cell cycle. The cell cycle regulators E2F1, MYC, MYBL2 (B-Myb) and FOXM1 are among the DREAM targets that are diminished by SmgGDS depletion. E2F1 is well known to promote G1 cell cycle progression, and the loss of E2F1 in SmgGDS-depleted cells provides an explanation for previous reports that SmgGDS depletion characteristically causes a G1 cell cycle arrest. We show that SmgGDS localizes in nucleoli, and that RNAi-mediated depletion of SmgGDS in cancer cells disrupts nucleolar morphology, signifying nucleolar stress. We show that nucleolar SmgGDS interacts with the RNA polymerase I transcription factor upstream binding factor (UBF). The RNAi-mediated depletion of UBF diminishes nucleolar localization of SmgGDS and promotes proteasome-mediated degradation of SmgGDS, indicating that nucleolar sequestration of SmgGDS by UBF stabilizes SmgGDS protein. The ability of SmgGDS to interact with UBF and localize in the nucleolus is diminished by expressing DiRas1 or DiRas2, which are small GTPases that bind SmgGDS and act as tumor suppressors. Taken together, our results support a novel nuclear role for SmgGDS in protecting malignant

  14. Protective Effects of Scutellarin on Human Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells against Hypoxia-Reoxygenation Injury and Its Possible Target-Related Proteins

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    Meina Shi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Scutellarin (SCU is one of the main components of traditional Chinese medicine plant Erigeron breviscapus (Vant. Hand.-Mazz. In this paper, we studied the protective effects of SCU on human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs against hypoxia-reoxygenation (HR injury and its possible target-related proteins. Results of MTT assay showed that pretreatment of SCU at doses of 1, 5, and 10 μM for 2 h could significantly inhibit the decrease in cell viability of HCMECs induced by HR injury. Subcellular fractions of cells treated with vehicle control, 1 μM SCU, HR injury, or 1 μM SCU + HR injury were separated by ultracentrifugation. The protein expression profiles of cytoplasm and membrane/nuclei fractions were checked using protein two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE. Proteins differentially expressed between control and SCU-treated group, control and HR group, or HR and SCU + HR group were identified using mass spectrometry (MS/MS. Possible interaction network of these target-related proteins was predicted using bioinformatic analysis. The influence of SCU on the expression levels of these proteins was confirmed using Western blotting assay. The results indicated that proteins such as p27BBP protein (EIF6, heat shock 60 kDa protein 1 (HSPD1, and chaperonin containing TCP1 subunit 6A isoform (CCT6A might play important roles in the effects of SCU.

  15. Protective Effects of Scutellarin on Human Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells against Hypoxia-Reoxygenation Injury and Its Possible Target-Related Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Meina; Liu, Yingting; Feng, Lixing; Cui, Yingbo; Chen, Yajuan; Wang, Peng; Wu, Wenjuan; Chen, Chen; Liu, Xuan; Yang, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Scutellarin (SCU) is one of the main components of traditional Chinese medicine plant Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand.-Mazz. In this paper, we studied the protective effects of SCU on human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs) against hypoxia-reoxygenation (HR) injury and its possible target-related proteins. Results of MTT assay showed that pretreatment of SCU at doses of 1, 5, and 10 μM for 2 h could significantly inhibit the decrease in cell viability of HCMECs induced by HR injury. Subcellular fractions of cells treated with vehicle control, 1 μM SCU, HR injury, or 1 μM SCU + HR injury were separated by ultracentrifugation. The protein expression profiles of cytoplasm and membrane/nuclei fractions were checked using protein two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Proteins differentially expressed between control and SCU-treated group, control and HR group, or HR and SCU + HR group were identified using mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Possible interaction network of these target-related proteins was predicted using bioinformatic analysis. The influence of SCU on the expression levels of these proteins was confirmed using Western blotting assay. The results indicated that proteins such as p27BBP protein (EIF6), heat shock 60 kDa protein 1 (HSPD1), and chaperonin containing TCP1 subunit 6A isoform (CCT6A) might play important roles in the effects of SCU.

  16. Heat shock protein-27 protects human bronchial epithelial cells against oxidative stress–mediated apoptosis: possible implication in asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merendino, Anna M.; Paul, Catherine; Vignola, Antonio M.; Costa, Maria A.; Melis, Mario; Chiappara, Giuseppina; Izzo, V.; Bousquet, J.; Arrigo, André-Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Inflammation of the human bronchial epithelium, as observed in asthmatics, is characterized by the selective death of the columnar epithelial cells, which desquamate from the basal cells. Tissue repair initiates from basal cells that resist inflammation. Here, we have evaluated the extent of apoptosis as well as the Hsp27 level of expression in epithelial cells from bronchial biopsy samples taken from normal and asthmatic subjects. Hsp27 is a chaperone whose expression protects against oxidative stress. We report that in asthmatic subjects the basal epithelium cells express a high level of Hsp27 but no apoptotic morphology. In contrast, apoptotic columnar cells are devoid of Hsp27 expression. Moreover, we observed a decreased resistance to hydrogen peroxide–induced apoptosis in human bronchial epithelial 16–HBE cells when they were genetically modified to express reduced levels of Hsp27. PMID:12482203

  17. Protective Role of Hsp27 Protein Against Gamma Radiation-Induced Apoptosis and Radiosensitization Effects of Hsp27 Gene Silencing in Different Human Tumor Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aloy, Marie-Therese; Hadchity, Elie; Bionda, Clara; Diaz-Latoud, Chantal; Claude, Line; Rousson, Robert; Arrigo, Andre-Patrick; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The ability of heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) to protect cells from stressful stimuli and its increased levels in tumors resistant to anticancer therapeutics suggest that it may represent a target for sensitization to radiotherapy. In this study, we investigate the protective role of Hsp27 against radiation-induced apoptosis and the effect of its attenuation in highly expressing radioresistant cancer cell lines. Methods and Materials: We examined clonogenic death and the kinetics of apoptotic events in different tumor cell lines overexpressing or underexpressing Hsp27 protein irradiated with photons. The radiosensitive Jurkat cell line, which does not express Hsp27 constitutively or in response to γ-rays, was stably transfected with Hsp27 complementary DNA. Attenuation of Hsp27 expression was accomplished by antisense or RNAi (interfering RNA) strategies in SQ20B head-and-neck squamous carcinoma, PC3 prostate cancer, and U87 glioblastoma radioresistant cells. Results: We measured concentration-dependent protection against the cytotoxic effects of radiation in Jurkat-Hsp27 cells, which led to a 50% decrease in apoptotic cells at 48 hours in the highest expressing cells. Underlying mechanisms leading to radiation resistance involved a significant increase in glutathione levels associated with detoxification of reactive oxygen species, a delay in mitochondrial collapse, and caspase activation. Conversely, attenuation of Hsp27 in SQ20B cells, characterized by their resistance to apoptosis, sensitizes cells to irradiation. This was emphasized by increased apoptosis, decreased glutathione basal level, and clonogenic cell death. Sensitization to irradiation was confirmed in PC3 and U87 radioresistant cells. Conclusion: Hsp27 gene therapy offers a potential adjuvant to radiation-based therapy of resistant tumors

  18. Immunisation With Immunodominant Linear B Cell Epitopes Vaccine of Manganese Transport Protein C Confers Protection against Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Hui-Jie; Zhang, Jin-Yong; Wei, Chao; Yang, Liu-Yang; Zuo, Qian-Fei; Zhuang, Yuan; Feng, You-Jun; Srinivas, Swaminath; Zeng, Hao; Zou, Quan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination strategies for Staphylococcus aureus, particularly methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections have attracted much research attention. Recent efforts have been made to select manganese transport protein C, or manganese binding surface lipoprotein C (MntC), which is a metal ion associated with pathogen nutrition uptake, as potential candidates for an S. aureus vaccine. Although protective humoral immune responses to MntC are well-characterised, much less is known about detail...

  19. Far-infrared radiation protects viability in a cell model of Spinocerebellar Ataxia by preventing polyQ protein accumulation and improving mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jui-Chih; Wu, Shey-Lin; Hoel, Fredrik; Cheng, Yu-Shan; Liu, Ko-Hung; Hsieh, Mingli; Hoel, August; Tronstad, Karl Johan; Yan, Kuo-Chia; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Lin, Wei-Yong; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Su, Shih-Li; Liu, Chin-San

    2016-07-29

    Far infrared radiation (FIR) is currently investigated as a potential therapeutic strategy in various diseases though the mechanism is unknown. Presently, we tested if FIR mediates beneficial effects in a cell model of the neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3). SCA3 is caused by a mutation leading to an abnormal polyglutamine expansion (PolyQ) in ataxin-3 protein. The consequent aggregation of mutant ataxin-3 results in disruption of vital cell functions. In this study, neuroblastoma cells (SK-N-SH) was transduced to express either non-pathogenic ataxin-3-26Q or pathogenic ataxin-3-78Q proteins. The cells expressing ataxin-3-78Q demonstrated decreased viability, and increased sensitivity to metabolic stress in the presence rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration. FIR exposure was found to protect against these effects. Moreover, FIR improved mitochondrial respiratory function, which was significantly compromised in ataxin-3-78Q and ataxin-3-26Q expressing cells. This was accompanied by decreased levels of mitochondrial fragmentation in FIR treated cells, as observed by fluorescence microscopy and protein expression analysis. Finally, the expression profile LC3-II, Beclin-1 and p62 suggested that FIR prevent the autophagy inhibiting effects observed in ataxin-3-78Q expressing cells. In summary, our results suggest that FIR have rescuing effects in cells expressing mutated pathogenic ataxin-3, through recovery of mitochondrial function and autophagy.

  20. NK cells of the oldest seniors represent constant and resistant to stimulation high expression of cellular protective proteins SIRT1 and HSP70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszubowska, Lucyna; Foerster, Jerzy; Kaczor, Jan Jacek; Schetz, Daria; Ślebioda, Tomasz Jerzy; Kmieć, Zbigniew

    2018-01-01

    Natural killer cells (NK cells) are cytotoxic lymphocytes of innate immunity that reveal some immunoregulatory properties, however, their role in the process of ageing is not completely understood. The study aimed to analyze the expression of proteins involved in cellular stress response: sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in human NK cells with reference to the process of ageing. Non-stimulated and stimulated with IL-2, LPS or PMA with ionomycin cells originated from peripheral blood samples of: seniors aged over 85 ('the oldest'; n  = 25; 88.5 ± 0.5 years, mean ± SEM), seniors aged under 85 ('the old'; n  = 30; 75.6 ± 0.9 years) and the young ( n  = 31; 20.9 ± 0.3 years). The relationships between the levels of expression of cellular protective proteins in the studied population were also analyzed. The concentrations of carbonyl groups and 8-isoprostanes, markers of oxidative stress, in both stimulated and non-stimulated cultured NK cells were measured to assess the level of the oxidative stress in the cells. The oldest seniors varied from the other age groups by significantly higher expression of SIRT1 and HSP70 both in non-stimulated and stimulated NK cells. These cells also appeared to be resistant to further stimulations with IL-2, LPS or PMA with ionomycin. Highly positive correlations between SIRT1 and intracellular HSP70 in both stimulated and non-stimulated NK cells were observed. SOD2 presented low expression in non-stimulated cells, whereas its sensitivity to stimulation increased with age of donors. High positive correlations between SOD2 and surface HSP70 were observed. We found that the markers of oxidative stress in NK cells did not change with ageing. The oldest seniors revealed well developed adaptive stress response in NK cells with increased, constant levels of SIRT1 and intracellular HSP70. They presented also very high positive correlations between

  1. Netrin-1 Protects Hepatocytes Against Cell Death Through Sustained Translation During the Unfolded Protein ResponseSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lahlali

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Netrin-1, a multifunctional secreted protein, is up-regulated in cancer and inflammation. Netrin-1 blocks apoptosis induced by the prototypical dependence receptors deleted in colorectal carcinoma and uncoordinated phenotype-5. Although the unfolded protein response (UPR triggers apoptosis on exposure to stress, it first attempts to restore endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis to foster cell survival. Importantly, UPR is implicated in chronic liver conditions including hepatic oncogenesis. Netrin-1's implication in cell survival on UPR in this context is unknown. Methods: Isolation of translational complexes, determination of RNA secondary structures by selective 2’-hydroxyl acylation and primer extension/dimethyl sulfate, bicistronic constructs, as well as conventional cell biology and biochemistry approaches were used on in vitro–grown hepatocytic cells, wild-type, and netrin-1 transgenic mice. Results: HepaRG cells constitute a bona fide model for UPR studies in vitro through adequate activation of the 3 sensors of the UPR (protein kinase RNA–like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK, inositol requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α, and activated transcription factor 6 (ATF6. The netrin-1 messenger RNA 5'-end was shown to fold into a complex double pseudoknot and bear E-loop motifs, both of which are representative hallmarks of related internal ribosome entry site regions. Cap-independent translation of netrin 5' untranslated region–driven luciferase was observed on UPR in vitro. Unlike several structurally related oncogenic transcripts (l-myc, c-myc, c-myb, netrin-1 messenger RNA was selected for translation during UPR both in human hepatocytes and in mice livers. Depletion of netrin-1 during UPR induces apoptosis, leading to cell death through an uncoordinated phenotype-5A/C–mediated involvement of protein phosphatase 2A and death-associated protein kinase 1 in vitro and in netrin

  2. The Immunodominance Change and Protection of CD4+ T-Cell Responses Elicited by an Envelope Protein Domain III-Based Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine in Mice.

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    Hsin-Wei Chen

    Full Text Available Dengue is the leading cause of mosquito-borne viral infections and no vaccine is available now. Envelope protein domain III (ED3 is the major target for the binding of dengue virus neutralizing antibodies; however, the ED3-specifc T-cell response is less well understood. To investigate the T-cell responses to four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV-1 to 4, we immunized mice using either a tetravalent ED3-based DNA or protein vaccine, or combined both as a DNA prime-protein boost strategy (prime-boost. A significant serotype-dependent IFN-γ or IL-4 response was observed in mice immunized with either the DNA or protein vaccine. The IFN-γ response was dominant to DENV-1 to 3, whereas the IL-4 response was dominant to DENV-4. Although the similar IgG titers for the four serotypes were observed in mice immunized with the tetravalent vaccines, the neutralizing antibody titers varied and followed the order of 2 = 3>1>4. Interestingly, the lower IFN-γ response to DENV-4 is attributable to the immunodominance change between two CD4+ T-cell epitopes; one T-cell epitope located at E349-363 of DENV-1 to 3 was more immunogenic than the DENV-4 epitope E313-327. Despite DENV-4 specific IFN-γ responses were suppressed by immunodominance change, either DENV-4-specific IFN-γ or neutralizing antibody responses were still recalled after DENV-4 challenge and contributed to virus clearance. Immunization with the prime-boost elicited both IFN-γ and neutralizing antibody responses and provided better protection than either DNA or protein immunization. Our findings shed light on how ED3-based tetravalent dengue vaccines sharpen host CD4 T-cell responses and contribute to protection against dengue virus.

  3. Protective effect of the silkworm protein 30Kc6 on human vascular endothelial cells damaged by oxidized low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL.

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    Wei Yu

    Full Text Available Although the 30K family proteins are important anti-apoptotic molecules in silkworm hemolymph, the underlying mechanism remains to be investigated. This is especially the case in human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs. In this study, a 30K protein, 30Kc6, was successfully expressed and purified using the Bac-to-Bac baculovirus expression system in silkworm cells. Furthermore, the 30Kc6 expressed in Escherichia coli was used to generate a polyclonal antibody. Western blot analysis revealed that the antibody could react specifically with the purified 30Kc6 expressed in silkworm cells. The In vitro cell apoptosis model of HUVEC that was induced by oxidized low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL and in vivo atherosclerosis rabbit model were constructed and were employed to analyze the protective effects of the silkworm protein 30Kc6 on these models. The results demonstrated that the silkworm protein 30Kc6 significantly enhanced the cell viability in HUVEC cells treated with Ox-LDL, decreased the degree of DNA fragmentation and markedly reduced the level of 8-isoprostane. This could be indicative of the silkworm protein 30Kc6 antagonizing the Ox-LDL-induced cell apoptosis by inhibiting the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS generation. Furthermore, Ox-LDL activated the cell mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK, especially JNK and p38. As demonstrated with Western analysis, 30Kc6 inhibited Ox-LDL-induced cell apoptosis in HUVEC cells by preventing the MAPK signaling pathways. In vivo data have demonstrated that oral feeding of the silkworm protein 30Kc6 dramatically improved the conditions of the atherosclerotic rabbits by decreasing serum levels of total triglyceride (TG, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C and total cholesterol (TC. Furthermore, 30Kc6 alleviated the extent of lesions in aorta and liver in the atherosclerotic rabbits. These data are not only helpful in understanding the anti

  4. Circumsporozoite Protein-Specific Kd-Restricted CD8+ T Cells Mediate Protective Antimalaria Immunity in Sporozoite-Immunized MHC-I-Kd Transgenic Mice

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    Jing Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the roles of CD8+ T cells and a major preerythrocytic antigen, the circumsporozoite (CS protein, in contributing protective antimalaria immunity induced by radiation-attenuated sporozoites, have been shown by a number of studies, the extent to which these players contribute to antimalaria immunity is still unknown. To address this question, we have generated C57BL/6 (B6 transgenic (Tg mice, expressing Kd molecules under the MHC-I promoter, called MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice. In this study, we first determined that a single immunizing dose of IrPySpz induced a significant level of antimalaria protective immunity in MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice but not in B6 mice. Then, by depleting various T-cell subsets in vivo, we determined that CD8+ T cells are the main mediator of the protective immunity induced by IrPySpz. Furthermore, when we immunized (MHC-I-Kd-Tg × CS-Tg F1 mice with IrPySpz after crossing MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice with PyCS-transgenic mice (CS-Tg, which are unable to mount PyCS-specific immunity, we found that IrPySpz immunization failed to induce protective antimalaria immunity in (MHC-I-Kd-Tg × CS-Tg F1 mice, thus indicating the absence of PyCS antigen-dependent immunity in these mice. These results indicate that protective antimalaria immunity induced by IrPySpz in MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice is mediated by CS protein-specific, Kd-restricted CD8+ T cells.

  5. Vaccination of mice using the West Nile virus E-protein in a DNA prime-protein boost strategy stimulates cell-mediated immunity and protects mice against a lethal challenge.

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    Marina De Filette

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that is endemic in Africa, the Middle East, Europe and the United States. There is currently no antiviral treatment or human vaccine available to treat or prevent WNV infection. DNA plasmid-based vaccines represent a new approach for controlling infectious diseases. In rodents, DNA vaccines have been shown to induce B cell and cytotoxic T cell responses and protect against a wide range of infections. In this study, we formulated a plasmid DNA vector expressing the ectodomain of the E-protein of WNV into nanoparticles by using linear polyethyleneimine (lPEI covalently bound to mannose and examined the potential of this vaccine to protect against lethal WNV infection in mice. Mice were immunized twice (prime--boost regime with the WNV DNA vaccine formulated with lPEI-mannose using different administration routes (intramuscular, intradermal and topical. In parallel a heterologous boost with purified recombinant WNV envelope (E protein was evaluated. While no significant E-protein specific humoral response was generated after DNA immunization, protein boosting of DNA-primed mice resulted in a marked increase in total neutralizing antibody titer. In addition, E-specific IL-4 T-cell immune responses were detected by ELISPOT after protein boost and CD8(+ specific IFN-γ expression was observed by flow cytometry. Challenge experiments using the heterologous immunization regime revealed protective immunity to homologous and virulent WNV infection.

  6. Silibinin activates AMP-activated protein kinase to protect neuronal cells from oxygen and glucose deprivation-re-oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhi; Ding, Sheng-quan; Shen, Ya-fang

    2014-11-14

    In this study, we explored the cytoprotective potential of silibinin against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal cell damages, and studied underling mechanisms. In vitro model of ischemic stroke was created by keeping neuronal cells (SH-SY5Y cells and primary mouse cortical neurons) in an OGD condition followed by re-oxygenation. Pre-treatment of silibinin significantly inhibited OGD/re-oxygenation-induced necrosis and apoptosis of neuronal cells. OGD/re-oxygenation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) reduction were also inhibited by silibinin. At the molecular level, silibinin treatment in SH-SY5Y cells and primary cortical neurons led to significant AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling activation, detected by phosphorylations of AMPKα1, its upstream kinase liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and the downstream target acetyl-CoA Carboxylase (ACC). Pharmacological inhibition or genetic depletion of AMPK alleviated the neuroprotective ability of silibinin against OGD/re-oxygenation. Further, ROS scavenging ability by silibinin was abolished with AMPK inhibition or silencing. While A-769662, the AMPK activator, mimicked silibinin actions and suppressed ROS production and neuronal cell death following OGD/re-oxygenation. Together, these results show that silibinin-mediated neuroprotection requires activation of AMPK signaling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ursodeoxycholic acid protects cardiomyocytes against cobalt chloride induced hypoxia by regulating transcriptional mediator of cells stress hypoxia inducible factor 1α and p53 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Anis Syamimi; Hanafi, Noorul Izzati; Sheikh Abdul Kadir, Siti Hamimah; Md Noor, Julina; Abdul Hamid Hasani, Narimah; Ab Rahim, Sharaniza; Siran, Rosfaiizah

    2017-10-01

    In hepatocytes, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) activates cell signalling pathways such as p53, intracellular calcium ([Ca 2+ ] i ), and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-receptor via Gα i -coupled-receptor. Recently, UDCA has been shown to protect the heart against hypoxia-reoxygenation injury. However, it is not clear whether UDCA cardioprotection against hypoxia acts through a transcriptional mediator of cells stress, HIF-1α and p53. Therefore, in here, we aimed to investigate whether UDCA could protect cardiomyocytes (CMs) against hypoxia by regulating expression of HIF-1α, p53, [Ca 2+ ] i , and S1P-Gα i -coupled-receptor. Cardiomyocytes were isolated from newborn rats (0-2 days), and hypoxia was induced by using cobalt chloride (CoCl 2 ). Cardiomyocytes were treated with UDCA and cotreated with either FTY720 (S1P-receptor agonist) or pertussis toxin (PTX; Gα i inhibitor). Cells were subjected for proliferation assay, beating frequency, QuantiGene Plex assay, western blot, immunofluorescence, and calcium imaging. Our findings showed that UDCA counteracted the effects of CoCl 2 on cell viability, beating frequency, HIF-1α, and p53 protein expression. We found that these cardioprotection effects of UDCA were similar to FTY720, S1P agonist. Furthermore, we observed that UDCA protects CMs against CoCl 2 -induced [Ca 2+ ] i dynamic alteration. Pharmacological inhibition of the Gα i -sensitive receptor did not abolish the cardioprotection of UDCA against CoCl 2 detrimental effects, except for cell viability and [Ca 2+ ] i . Pertussis toxin is partially effective in inhibiting UDCA protection against CoCl 2 effects on CM cell viability. Interestingly, PTX fully inhibits UDCA cardioprotection on CoCl 2 -induced [Ca 2+ ] i dynamic changes. We conclude that UDCA cardioprotection against CoCl 2 -induced hypoxia is similar to FTY720, and its actions are not fully mediated by the Gα i -coupled protein sensitive pathways. Ursodeoxycholic acid is the most hydrophilic bile

  8. Fatty acid transport protein-2 inhibitor Grassofermata/CB5 protects cells against lipid accumulation and toxicity

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    Saini, Nipun; Black, Paul N.; Montefusco, David; DiRusso, Concetta C., E-mail: cdirusso2@unl.edu

    2015-09-25

    The inhibition of the fatty acid uptake into non-adipose tissues provides an attractive target for prevention of lipotoxicity leading to obesity-associated non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes. Fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) are bifunctional proteins involved in the uptake and activation of fatty acids by esterification with coenzyme A. Here we characterize Grassofermata/CB5, previously identified as a fatty acid uptake inhibitor directed against HsFATP2. The compound was effective in inhibiting the uptake of fatty acids in the low micro-molar range (IC{sub 50} 8–11 μM) and prevented palmitate-mediated lipid accumulation and cell death in cell lines that are models for intestines, liver, muscle and pancreas. In adipocytes, uptake inhibition was less effective (IC{sub 50} 58 μM). Inhibition was specific for long chain fatty acids and was ineffective toward medium chain fatty acids, which are transported by diffusion. Kinetic analysis of Grassofermata-dependent FA transport inhibition verified a non-competitive mechanism. By comparison with Grassofermata, several atypical antipsychotic drugs previously implicated as inhibitors of FA uptake were ineffectual. In mice Grassofermata decreased absorption of {sup 13}C-oleate demonstrating its potential as a therapeutic agent. - Highlights: • Grassofermata is a small compound inhibitor of FATP2. • Uptake inhibition is specific for long chain fatty acids. • Uptake kinetics shows low specificity for adipocytes compared to other cell types. • Inhibition is by a non-competitive mechanism. • Atypical antipsychotics do not inhibit FA uptake by comparison with Grassofermata.

  9. Fatty acid transport protein-2 inhibitor Grassofermata/CB5 protects cells against lipid accumulation and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, Nipun; Black, Paul N.; Montefusco, David; DiRusso, Concetta C.

    2015-01-01

    The inhibition of the fatty acid uptake into non-adipose tissues provides an attractive target for prevention of lipotoxicity leading to obesity-associated non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes. Fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) are bifunctional proteins involved in the uptake and activation of fatty acids by esterification with coenzyme A. Here we characterize Grassofermata/CB5, previously identified as a fatty acid uptake inhibitor directed against HsFATP2. The compound was effective in inhibiting the uptake of fatty acids in the low micro-molar range (IC 50 8–11 μM) and prevented palmitate-mediated lipid accumulation and cell death in cell lines that are models for intestines, liver, muscle and pancreas. In adipocytes, uptake inhibition was less effective (IC 50 58 μM). Inhibition was specific for long chain fatty acids and was ineffective toward medium chain fatty acids, which are transported by diffusion. Kinetic analysis of Grassofermata-dependent FA transport inhibition verified a non-competitive mechanism. By comparison with Grassofermata, several atypical antipsychotic drugs previously implicated as inhibitors of FA uptake were ineffectual. In mice Grassofermata decreased absorption of 13 C-oleate demonstrating its potential as a therapeutic agent. - Highlights: • Grassofermata is a small compound inhibitor of FATP2. • Uptake inhibition is specific for long chain fatty acids. • Uptake kinetics shows low specificity for adipocytes compared to other cell types. • Inhibition is by a non-competitive mechanism. • Atypical antipsychotics do not inhibit FA uptake by comparison with Grassofermata

  10. Sickle cell protection from malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eridani, Sandro

    2011-10-19

    A linkage between presence of Sickle Haemoglobin (HbS) and protection from malaria infection and clinical manifestations in certain areas was suspected from early observations and progressively elucidated by more recent studies. Research has confirmed the abovementioned connection, but also clarified how such protection may be abolished by coexistence of sickle cell trait (HbS trait) and alpha thalassemia, which may explain the relatively low incidence of HbS trait in the Mediterranean. The mechanisms of such protective effect are now being investigated: factors of genetic, molecular and immunological nature are prominent. As for genetic factors attention is given to the role of the red blood cell (RBC) membrane complement regulatory proteins as polymorphisms of these components seem to be associated with resistance to severe malaria; genetic ligands like the Duffy group blood antigen, necessary for erythrocytic invasion, and human protein CD36, a major receptor for P. falciparum-infected RBC's, are also under scrutiny: attention is focused also on plasmodium erythrocyte-binding antigens, which bind to RBC surface components. Genome-wide linkage and association studies are now carried out too, in order to identify genes associated with malaria resistance. Only a minor role is attributed to intravascular sickling, phagocytosis and haemolysis, while specific molecular mechanisms are the object of intensive research: among these a decisive role is played by a biochemical sequence, involving activation of haeme oxygenase (HMO-1), whose effect appears mediated by carbon monoxide (CO). A central role in protection from malaria is also played by immunological factors, which may stimulate antibody production to plasmodium antigens in the early years of life; the role of agents like pathogenic CD8 T-cells has been suggested while the effects of molecular actions on the immunity mechanism are presently investigated. It thus appears that protection from malaria can be

  11. The Cerato-Platanin protein Epl-1 from Trichoderma harzianum is involved in mycoparasitism, plant resistance induction and self cell wall protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Eriston Vieira; Costa, Mariana do Nascimento; de Paula, Renato Graciano; de Azevedo, Rafael Ricci; da Silva, Francilene Lopes; Noronha, Eliane F; Ulhoa, Cirano José; Monteiro, Valdirene Neves; Cardoza, Rosa Elena; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Silva, Roberto Nascimento

    2015-12-09

    Trichoderma harzianum species are well known as biocontrol agents against important fungal phytopathogens. Mycoparasitism is one of the strategies used by this fungus in the biocontrol process. In this work, we analyzed the effect of Epl-1 protein, previously described as plant resistance elicitor, in expression modulation of T. harzianum genes involved in mycoparasitism process against phytopathogenic fungi; self cell wall protection and recognition; host hyphae coiling and triggering expression of defense-related genes in beans plants. The results indicated that the absence of Epl-1 protein affects the expression of all mycoparasitism genes analyzed in direct confrontation assays against phytopathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum as well as T. harzianum itself; the host mycoparasitic coiling process and expression modulation of plant defense genes showing different pattern compared with wild type strain. These data indicated the involvement T. harzianum Epl-1 in self and host interaction and also recognition of T. harzianum as a symbiotic fungus by the bean plants.

  12. Cold Shock Induced Protein RBM3 but Not Mild Hypothermia Protects Human SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells From MPP+-Induced Neurotoxicity

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    Hai-Jie Yang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The cold shock protein RBM3 can mediate mild hypothermia-related protection in neurodegeneration such as Alzheimer's disease. However, it remains unclear whether RBM3 and mild hypothermia provide same protection in model of Parkinson's disease (PD, the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. In this study, human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells subjected to insult by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+ served as an in-vitro model of PD. Mild hypothermia (32°C aggravated MPP+-induced apoptosis, which was boosted when RBM3 was silenced by siRNA. In contrast, overexpression of RBM3 significantly reduced this apoptosis. MPP+ treatment downregulated the expression of RBM3 both endogenously and exogenously and suppressed its induction by mild hypothermia (32°C. In conclusion, our data suggest that cold shock protein RBM3 provides neuroprotection in a cell model of PD, suggesting that RBM3 induction may be a suitable strategy for PD therapy. However, mild hypothermia exacerbates MPP+-induced apoptosis even that RBM3 could be synthesized during mild hypothermia.

  13. Erdosteine protects HEI-OC1 auditory cells from cisplatin toxicity through suppression of inflammatory cytokines and induction of Nrf2 target proteins

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    Kim, Se-Jin [Department of Microbiology, Center for Metabolic Function Regulation (CMFR), Wonkwang University, College of Medicine, 460 Iksandae-ro, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Channy [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Lee, Joon No [Department of Microbiology, Center for Metabolic Function Regulation (CMFR), Wonkwang University, College of Medicine, 460 Iksandae-ro, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Hyewon; Hong, Gi-yeon [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wonkwang University, College of Medicine, 460 Iksandae-ro, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Sung K.; Lim, David J. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Choe, Seong-Kyu, E-mail: seongkyu642@wku.ac.kr [Department of Microbiology, Center for Metabolic Function Regulation (CMFR), Wonkwang University, College of Medicine, 460 Iksandae-ro, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Raekil, E-mail: rkpark@wku.ac.kr [Department of Microbiology, Center for Metabolic Function Regulation (CMFR), Wonkwang University, College of Medicine, 460 Iksandae-ro, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Cisplatin has many adverse effects, which are a major limitation to its use, including ototoxicity, neurotoxicity, and nephrotoxicity. This study aims to elucidate the protective mechanisms of erdosteine against cisplatin in HEI-OC1 cells. Pretreatment with erdosteine protects HEI-OC1 cells from cisplatin-medicated apoptosis, which is characterized by increase in nuclear fragmentation, DNA laddering, sub-G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase, H2AX phosphorylation, PARP cleavage, and caspase-3 activity. Erdosteine significantly suppressed the production of reactive nitrogen/oxygen species and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 in cisplatin-treated cells. Studies using pharmacologic inhibitors demonstrated that phosphatidylinositol-3-kinases (PI3K) and protein kinase B (Akt) have protective roles in the action of erdosteine against cisplatin in HEI-OC1 cells. In addition, pretreatment with erdosteine clearly suppressed the phosphorylation of p53 (Ser15) and expression of p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis. Erdosteine markedly induces expression of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which may contribute to the increase in expression of glutathione redox genes γ-L-glutamate-L-cysteine-ligase catalytic and γ-L-glutamate-L-cysteine-ligase modifier subunits, as well as in the antioxidant genes HO-1 and SOD2 in cisplatin-treated HEI-OC1 cells. Furthermore, the increase in expression of phosphorylated p53 induced by cisplatin is markedly attenuated by pretreatment with erdosteine in the mitochondrial fraction. This increased expression may inhibit the cytosolic expression of the apoptosis-inducing factor, cytochrome c, and Bax/Bcl-xL ratio. Thus, our results suggest that treatment with erdosteine is significantly attenuated cisplatin-induced damage through the activation of Nrf2-dependent antioxidant genes, inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines, activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling, and mitochondrial-related inhibition of pro

  14. Erdosteine protects HEI-OC1 auditory cells from cisplatin toxicity through suppression of inflammatory cytokines and induction of Nrf2 target proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Se-Jin; Park, Channy; Lee, Joon No; Lim, Hyewon; Hong, Gi-yeon; Moon, Sung K.; Lim, David J.; Choe, Seong-Kyu; Park, Raekil

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin has many adverse effects, which are a major limitation to its use, including ototoxicity, neurotoxicity, and nephrotoxicity. This study aims to elucidate the protective mechanisms of erdosteine against cisplatin in HEI-OC1 cells. Pretreatment with erdosteine protects HEI-OC1 cells from cisplatin-medicated apoptosis, which is characterized by increase in nuclear fragmentation, DNA laddering, sub-G 0 /G 1 phase, H2AX phosphorylation, PARP cleavage, and caspase-3 activity. Erdosteine significantly suppressed the production of reactive nitrogen/oxygen species and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 in cisplatin-treated cells. Studies using pharmacologic inhibitors demonstrated that phosphatidylinositol-3-kinases (PI3K) and protein kinase B (Akt) have protective roles in the action of erdosteine against cisplatin in HEI-OC1 cells. In addition, pretreatment with erdosteine clearly suppressed the phosphorylation of p53 (Ser15) and expression of p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis. Erdosteine markedly induces expression of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which may contribute to the increase in expression of glutathione redox genes γ-L-glutamate-L-cysteine-ligase catalytic and γ-L-glutamate-L-cysteine-ligase modifier subunits, as well as in the antioxidant genes HO-1 and SOD2 in cisplatin-treated HEI-OC1 cells. Furthermore, the increase in expression of phosphorylated p53 induced by cisplatin is markedly attenuated by pretreatment with erdosteine in the mitochondrial fraction. This increased expression may inhibit the cytosolic expression of the apoptosis-inducing factor, cytochrome c, and Bax/Bcl-xL ratio. Thus, our results suggest that treatment with erdosteine is significantly attenuated cisplatin-induced damage through the activation of Nrf2-dependent antioxidant genes, inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines, activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling, and mitochondrial-related inhibition of pro

  15. Recombinant heat shock protein 27 (HSP27/HSPB1) protects against cadmium-induced oxidative stress and toxicity in human cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Olmedo, Daiana G; Biaggio, Veronica S; Koumbadinga, Geremy A; Gómez, Nidia N; Shi, Chunhua; Ciocca, Daniel R; Batulan, Zarah; Fanelli, Mariel A; O'Brien, Edward R

    2017-05-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a carcinogen with several well-described toxicological effects in humans, but its molecular mechanisms are still not fully understood. Overexpression of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27/HSPB1)-a multifunctional protein chaperone-has been shown to protect cells from oxidative damage and apoptosis triggered by Cd exposure. The aims of this work were to investigate the potential use of extracellular recombinant HSP27 to prevent/counteract Cd-induced cellular toxicity and to evaluate if peroxynitrite was involved in the development of Cd-induced toxicity. Here, we report that the harmful effects of Cd correlated with changes in oxidative stress markers: upregulation of reactive oxygen species, reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, increment in lipid peroxidation, peroxynitrite (PN), and protein nitration; intracellular HSP27 was reduced. Treatments with Cd (100 μM) for 24 h or with the peroxynitrite donor, SIN-1, decreased HSP27 levels (~50%), suggesting that PN formation is responsible for the reduction of HSP27. Pre-treatments of the cells either with Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) (a pharmacological inhibitor of NO synthase) or with recombinant HSP27 (rHSP27) attenuated the disruption of the cellular metabolism induced by Cd, increasing in a 55 and 52%, respectively, the cell viability measured by CCK-8. Cd induced necrotic cell death pathways, although apoptosis was also activated; pre-treatment with L-NAME or rHSP27 mitigated cell death. Our findings show for the first time a direct relationship between Cd-induced toxicity and PN production and a role for rHSP27 as a potential therapeutic agent that may counteract Cd toxicity.

  16. Protective effects of transforming growth factor β2 in intestinal epithelial cells by regulation of proteins associated with stress and endotoxin responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duc Ninh Nguyen

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor (TGF-β2 is an important anti-inflammatory protein in milk and colostrum. TGF-β2 supplementation appears to reduce gut inflammatory diseases in early life, such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC in young mice. However, the molecular mechanisms by which TGF-β2 protects immature intestinal epithelial cells (IECs remain to be more clearly elucidated before interventions in infants can be considered. Porcine IECs PsIc1 were treated with TGF-β2 and/or lipopolysaccharide (LPS, and changes in the cellular proteome were subsequently analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-MS and LC-MS-based proteomics. TGF-β2 alone induced the differential expression of 13 proteins and the majority of the identified proteins were associated with stress responses, TGF-β and Toll-like receptor 4 signaling cascades. In particular, a series of heat shock proteins had similar differential trends as previously shown in the intestine of NEC-resistant preterm pigs and young mice. Furthermore, LC-MS-based proteomics and Western blot analyses revealed 20 differentially expressed proteins following treatment with TGF-β2 in LPS-challenged IECs. Thirteen of these proteins were associated with stress response pathways, among which five proteins were altered by LPS and restored by TGF-β2, whereas six were differentially expressed only by TGF-β2 in LPS-challenged IECs. Based on previously reported biological functions, these patterns indicate the anti-stress and anti-inflammatory effects of TGF-β2 in IECs. We conclude that TGF-β2 of dietary or endogenous origin may regulate the IEC responses against LPS stimuli, thereby supporting cellular homeostasis and innate immunity in response to bacterial colonization, and the first enteral feeding in early life.

  17. Tumor cell surface proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, S.J.; Braslawsky, G.R.; Flynn, K.; Foote, L.J.; Friedman, E.; Hotchkiss, J.A.; Huang, A.H.L.; Lankford, P.K.

    1982-01-01

    Cell surface proteins mediate interaction between cells and their environment. Unique tumor cell surface proteins are being identified and quantified in several tumor systems to address the following questions: (i) how do tumor-specific proteins arise during cell transformation; (ii) can these proteins be used as markers of tumor cell distribution in vivo; (iii) can cytotoxic drugs be targeted specifically to tumor cells using antibody; and (iv) can solid state radioimmunoassay of these proteins provide a means to quantify transformation frequencies. A tumor surface protein of 180,000 M/sub r/ (TSP-180) has been identified on cells of several lung carcinomas of BALB/c mice. TSP-180 was not detected on normal lung tissue, embryonic tissue, or other epithelial or sarcoma tumors, but it was found on lung carcinomas of other strains of mice. Considerable amino acid sequence homology exists among TSP-180's from several cell sources, indicating that TSP-180 synthesis is directed by normal cellular genes although it is not expressed in normal cells. The regulation of synthesis of TSP-180 and its relationship to normal cell surface proteins are being studied. Monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to TSP-180 have been developed. The antibodies have been used in immunoaffinity chromatography to isolate TSP-180 from tumor cell sources. This purified tumor antigen was used to immunize rats. Antibody produced by these animals reacted at different sites (epitopes) on the TSP-180 molecule than did the original MoAb. These sera and MoAb from these animals are being used to identify normal cell components related to the TSP-180 molecule

  18. Random copolymers that protect proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander-Katz, Alfredo; Van Lehn, Reid C.

    2018-03-01

    Scientists have tried and in some limited cases succeeded to harness proteins to do chemistry (1) or use them in functional materials. However, most proteins only function correctly if they fold into specific conformations, which typically occurs with the assistance of other proteins (such as chaperones, translocons, or transporters) that mediate structure formation, membrane insertion, and intracellular trafficking (2, 3). Several methods have been used to improve protein stability in nonbiological environments—including micelle encapsulation, polymer conjugation, and sol-gel trapping (4)—but for most intended applications, they suffer from low levels of functionality, difficult chemical postfunctionalization, or the requirement of very specific solvent environments. On page 1239 of this issue, Panganiban et al. (5) introduce an approach for stabilizing proteins in disparate solvent environments that does not suffer from these drawbacks.

  19. Dynamin-Related Protein 1 Inhibitors Protect against Ischemic Toxicity through Attenuating Mitochondrial Ca2+ Uptake from Endoplasmic Reticulum Store in PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Tian

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular calcium homeostasis disorder and mitochondrial dysfunction are involved in many acute and chronic brain diseases, including ischemic brain injury. An imbalance in mitochondrial fission and fusion is one of the most important structural abnormalities found in a large number of mitochondrial dysfunction related diseases. Here, we investigated the effects of mitochondrial division inhibitor A (mdivi A and mdivi B, two small molecule inhibitors of mitochondrial fission protein dunamin-related protein 1 (Drp-1, in neuronal injury induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD in PC12 cells. We found that mdivi A and mdivi B inhibited OGD-induced neuronal injury through attenuating apoptotic cell death. These two inhibitors also preserved mitochondrial function, as evidenced by reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and cytochrome c release, as well as prevented loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP. Moreover, mdivi A and mdivi B significantly suppressed mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, but had no effect on cytoplasmic Ca2+ after OGD injury. The results of calcium imaging and immunofluorescence staining showed that Drp-1 inhibitors attenuated endoplasmic reticulum (ER Ca2+ release and prevented ER morphological changes induced by OGD. These results demonstrate that Drp-1 inhibitors protect against ischemic neuronal injury through inhibiting mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake from the ER store and attenuating mitochondrial dysfunction.

  20. Endothelial microparticles released by activated protein C protect beta cells through EPCR/PAR1 and annexin A1/FPR2 pathways in islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutter, Guillaume; Kassem, Mohamad; El Habhab, Ali; Baltzinger, Philippe; Abbas, Malak; Boisrame-Helms, Julie; Amoura, Lamia; Peluso, Jean; Yver, Blandine; Fatiha, Zobairi; Ubeaud-Sequier, Geneviève; Kessler, Laurence; Toti, Florence

    2017-11-01

    Islet transplantation is associated with early ischaemia/reperfusion, localized coagulation and redox-sensitive endothelial dysfunction. In animal models, islet cytoprotection by activated protein C (aPC) restores islet vascularization and protects graft function, suggesting that aPC triggers various lineages. aPC also prompts the release of endothelial MP that bear EPCR, its specific receptor. Microparticles (MP) are plasma membrane procoagulant vesicles, surrogate markers of stress and cellular effectors. We measured the cytoprotective effects of aPC on endothelial and insulin-secreting Rin-m5f β-cells and its role in autocrine and paracrine MP-mediated cell crosstalk under conditions of oxidative stress. MP from aPC-treated primary endothelial (EC) or β-cells were applied to H 2 O 2 -treated Rin-m5f. aPC activity was measured by enzymatic assay and ROS species by dihydroethidium. The capture of PKH26-stained MP and the expression of EPCR were probed by fluorescence microscopy and apoptosis by flow cytometry. aPC treatment enhanced both annexin A1 (ANXA1) and PAR-1 expression in EC and to a lesser extent in β-cells. MP from aPC-treated EC (eM aPC ) exhibited high EPCR and annexin A1 content, protected β-cells, restored insulin secretion and were captured by 80% of β cells in a phosphatidylserine and ANXA1-dependent mechanism. eMP activated EPCR/PAR-1 and ANXA1/FPR2-dependent pathways and up-regulated the expression of EPCR, and of FPR2/ALX, the ANXA1 receptor. Cytoprotection was confirmed in H 2 O 2 -treated rat islets with increased viability (62% versus 48% H 2 O 2 ), reduced apoptosis and preserved insulin secretion in response to glucose elevation (16 versus 5 ng/ml insulin per 10 islets). MP may prove a promising therapeutic tool in the protection of transplanted islets. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  1. Baicalin Protects against TNF-α-Induced Injury by Down-Regulating miR-191a That Targets the Tight Junction Protein ZO-1 in IEC-6 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Ren; Chen, Jian; Wu, Qihui; Kuang, Zaoyuan

    2017-04-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) plays an important role in the developing process of inflammatory bowel disease. Tight junction protein zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), one of epithelial junctional proteins, maintains the permeability of intestinal barrier. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanism of the protective effect of baicalin on TNF-α-induced injury and ZO-1 expression in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We found that baicalin pretreatment significantly improved cell viability and cell migration following TNF-α stimulation. miR-191a inhibitor increased the protective effect of baicalin on cell motility injured by TNF-α. In addition, miR-191a down-regulated the mRNA and protein level of its target gene ZO-1. TNF-α stimulation increased miR-191a expression, leading to the decline of ZO-1 mRNA and protein. Moreover, pretreatment with baicalin reversed TNF-α induced decrease of ZO-1 and increase of miR-191a, miR-191a inhibitor significantly enhanced ZO-1 protein expression restored by baicalin. These results indicate that baicalin exerts a protective effect on IEC-6 (rat small intestinal epithelial cells) cells against TNF-α-induced injury, which is at least partly via inhibiting the expression of miR-191a, thus increasing ZO-1 mRNA and protein levels.

  2. Combination of pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA with whole cell pertussis vaccine increases protection against pneumococcal challenge in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Leonor S Oliveira

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of respiratory acute infections around the world. In Latin America, approximately 20,000 children under 5 years of age die of pneumococcal diseases annually. Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA is among the best-characterized pneumococcal antigens that confer protection in animal models of pneumococcal infections and, as such, is a good alternative for the currently available conjugated vaccines. Efficient immune responses directed to PspA in animal models have already been described. Nevertheless, few low cost adjuvants for a subunit pneumococcal vaccine have been proposed to date. Here, we have tested the adjuvant properties of the whole cell Bordetella pertussis vaccine (wP that is currently part of the DTP (diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine administrated to children in several countries, as an adjuvant to PspA. Nasal immunization of BALB/c mice with a combination of PspA5 and wP or wP(low--a new generation vaccine that contains low levels of B. pertussis LPS--conferred protection against a respiratory lethal challenge with S. pneumoniae. Both PspA5-wP and PspA5-wP(low vaccines induced high levels of systemic and mucosal antibodies against PspA5, with similar profile, indicating no essential requirement for B. pertussis LPS in the adjuvant properties of wP. Accordingly, nasal immunization of C3H/HeJ mice with PspA5-wP conferred protection against the pneumococcal challenge, thus ruling out a role for TLR4 responses in the adjuvant activity and the protection mechanisms triggered by the vaccines. The high levels of anti-PspA5 antibodies correlated with increased cross-reactivity against PspAs from different clades and also reflected in cross-protection. In addition, passive immunization experiments indicated that antibodies played an important role in protection in this model. Finally, subcutaneous immunization with a combination of PspA5 with DTP(low protected mice against challenge with two

  3. [The protective properties of the endotoxin protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, V I; Belkin, Z P; Egorova, T P

    1991-08-01

    The isolation and properties of endotoxin protein, or lipid A-associated protein (LAP), from Shigella sonnei were described earlier (Zh. mikrobiol. epidemiol. immunobiol., 1991, No. 4, pp. 11-17, and No. 7). In this report the data on its protective activity are presented. In experiments on mice one nanogram of LAP injected i. v. protected 50% of the animals against i. p. challenge with 40 LD50 of virulent S. sonnei. Guinea pigs injected s. c. with 10 micrograms of LAP were protected against local (keratoconjunctival) challenge with S. sonnei, the efficiency of immunization being 58%. LAP preparations containing no detectable amounts of O-antigen (less than 0.003%) were found to have a protective effect. Hyperimmune anti-LAP rabbit serum prevented local infection when incubated with S. sonnei challenge inoculum before injection into guinea pigs. Both active and passive protection induced by LAP was specific since no effect was observed in animals challenged with Shigella flexneri. In the homologous system the protective effect of anti-LAP serum was abolished by the addition of protein-free LPS. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that the protective activity of LAP depends on the presence of minute amounts of O-antigen whose immunogenic effect is greatly amplified by the protein component of the natural endotoxin complex.

  4. Alphavirus-based Vaccines Encoding Nonstructural Proteins of Hepatitis C Virus Induce Robust and Protective T-cell Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ip, Peng; Boerma, Annemarie; Regts, Joke; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Wilschut, Jan; Nijman, Hans W.; Daemen, Toos

    An absolute prerequisite for a therapeutic vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the potency to induce HCV-specific vigorous and broad-spectrum T-cell responses. Here, we generated three HCV vaccines based on a recombinant Semliki Forest virus (rSFV) vector expressing all-or a part of

  5. Protective effect of surface layer proteins isolated from four Lactobacillus strains on hydrogen-peroxide-induced HT-29 cells oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin-Bin; Meng, Jun; Zhang, Qiu-Xiang; Kang, Ting-Ting; Lu, Rong-Rong

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the antioxidant effect of the surface layer proteins (SLPs) and their mechanism. We investigated four SLPs which were extracted from L. casei zhang, L. rhamnosus, L. gasseri and L. acidophilus NCFM respectively using LiCl. The protective effect of SLPs on H 2 O 2 -induced HT-29 cells oxidative injury was investigated. As results, SLPs (100μg/mL) could significantly mitigate HT-29 cells cytotoxicity, improve the activities of total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), decrease the contents of malondialdehyde (MDA) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), compared with H 2 O 2 -induced group (Pproteins of caspase-3 and caspase-9 (Pcells induced by H 2 O 2 , and the mechanism could be attributed to SLPs' ability to enhance the activity of the intracellular antioxidant enzyme system, reduce ROS accumulation and to inhibit apoptosis by regulating mitochondrial pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Rhizoma Dioscoreae extract protects against alveolar bone loss by regulating the cell cycle: A predictive study based on the protein‑protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Song, Chang-Heng; Zhang, Fang-Zhen; Chen, Yan-Jing; Xiang, Li-Hua; Xiao, Gary Guishan; Ju, Da-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Rhizoma Dioscoreae extract (RDE) exhibits a protective effect on alveolar bone loss in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. The aim of this study was to predict the pathways or targets that are regulated by RDE, by re‑assessing our previously reported data and conducting a protein‑protein interaction (PPI) network analysis. In total, 383 differentially expressed genes (≥3‑fold) between alveolar bone samples from the RDE and OVX group rats were identified, and a PPI network was constructed based on these genes. Furthermore, four molecular clusters (A‑D) in the PPI network with the smallest P‑values were detected by molecular complex detection (MCODE) algorithm. Using Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) tools, two molecular clusters (A and B) were enriched for biological process in Gene Ontology (GO). Only cluster A was associated with biological pathways in the IPA database. GO and pathway analysis results showed that cluster A, associated with cell cycle regulation, was the most important molecular cluster in the PPI network. In addition, cyclin‑dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) may be a key molecule achieving the cell‑cycle‑regulatory function of cluster A. From the PPI network analysis, it was predicted that delayed cell cycle progression in excessive alveolar bone remodeling via downregulation of CDK1 may be another mechanism underling the anti‑osteopenic effect of RDE on alveolar bone.

  7. Dendrobium nobile Lindley and its bibenzyl component moscatilin are able to protect retinal cells from ischemia/hypoxia by dowregulating placental growth factor and upregulating Norrie disease protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Wen-Haur; Lai, Ming-Yi; Pan, Hwai-Tzong; Shiu, Huei-Wen; Chen, Mi-Mi; Chao, Hsiao-Ming

    2018-06-22

    Presumably, progression of developmental retinal vascular disorders is mainly driven by persistent ischemia/hypoxia. An investigation into vision-threatening retinal ischemia remains important. Our aim was to evaluate, in relation to retinal ischemia, protective effects and mechanisms of Dendrobium nobile Lindley (DNL) and its bibenzyl component moscatilin. The therapeutic mechanisms included evaluations of levels of placental growth factor (PLGF) and Norrie disease protein (NDP). An oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) model involved cells cultured in DMEM containing 1% O 2 , 94% N 2 and 0 g/L glucose. High intraocular pressure (HIOP)-induced retinal ischemia was created by increasing IOP to 120 mmHg for 60 min in Wistar rats. The methods included electroretinogram (ERG), histopathology, MTT assay and biochemistry. When compared with cells cultured in DMEM containing DMSO (DMSO+DMEM), cells subjected to OGD and pre-administrated with DMSO (DMSO+OGD) showed a significant reduction in the cell viability and NDP expression. Moreover, cells that received OGD and 1 h pre-administration of 0.1 μM moscatilin (Pre-OGD Mos 0.1 μM) showed a significant counteraction of the OGD-induced decreased cell viability. Furthermore, compared with the DMSO+OGD group (44.54 ± 3.15%), there was significant elevated NDP levels in the Pre-OGD Mos 0.1 μM group (108.38 ± 29.33%). Additionally, there were significant ischemic alterations, namely reduced ERG b-wave, less numerous retinal ganglion cells, decreased inner retinal thickness, and reduced/enhanced amacrine's ChAT/Müller's GFAP or vimentin immunolabelings. Moreover, there were significantly increased protein levels of HIF-1α, VEGF, PKM2, RBP2 and, particularly, PLGF (pg/ml; Sham vs. Vehicle: 15.11 ± 1.58 vs. 39.53 ± 5.25). These ischemic effects were significantly altered when 1.0 g/Kg/day DNL (DNL1.0 + I/R or I/R+ DNL1.0) was applied before and/or after ischemia, but not vehicle (Vehicle+I/R). Of

  8. Protection of naturally occurring antioxidants against oxidative damages to protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Hongping; Zhang Zhaoxia; Hao Shumei; Wang Wenfeng; Yao Side

    2006-01-01

    One of the most compelling theories explaining age-related deterioration is the free radical theory of aging. It has been shown that reactive oxygen species are involved in oxidative damages to biomolecules and this is related to a number of diseases. Proteins, the second most abundant components of cells (next to water by weight), are now increasingly recognized as major biological targets of oxidative damages. Convincing evidences have indicated that damages to protein have been implicated in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, cancer, and aging. Antioxidant has been the subject of great attention because they are known to lower the risk of cardiovascular and other diseases. Hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives (HCAs) are antioxidants abundant in tea, red wine, fruits, beverages and various medicinal plants. Results showed that they exhibit remarkable activity for scavenging oxidizing radicals and triplet states. The protective effects of four kinds of HCAs on oxidative damages to lysozyme were investigated in our lab. Protein damages induced by two different paradigms: riboflavin-sensitized photooxidation and hydroxyl ( . OH)-mediated oxidation, were investigated using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. HCAs were found to inhibit the cross-linking of protein induced by riboflavin-mediated photooxidation. HCAs also exhibited protection effect on lysozyme damage induced by γ-ray irradiation. The rate constants for quenching triplet state of riboflavin by lysozyme and HCAs were obtained using laser flash photolysis. The protective mechanism was proposed based on the dynamic study. HCAs were found to protect protein against oxidation by scavenging oxidizing species and repairing the damaged protein. (authors)

  9. Protective role of allicin (diallyl thiosulfinate) on cell surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cell membranes. Glycoconjugates are released into the circulation through increased turnover, secretion, and/or shedding from ... present in medicinal plant possess protective effects [15]. ... The protein-bound hexose in plasma, erythrocyte.

  10. Kaempferol acts through mitogen-activated protein kinases and protein kinase B/AKT to elicit protection in a model of neuroinflammation in BV2 microglial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, SE; Sapkota, K; Kim, S; Kim, H; Kim, SJ

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Kaempferol, a dietary flavonoid and phyto-oestrogen, is known to have anti-inflammatory properties. Microglial activation has been implicated in various neurodegenerative diseases. Anti-inflammatory effects of kaempferol and the underlying mechanisms were investigated by using LPS-stimulated microglial BV2 cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Cell viability was measured using MTT and neutral red assays. elisa, Western blot, immunocytochemistry and electrophoretic mobility-shift assay were used to analyse NO, PGE2, TNF-α and IL-1β production, inducible NOS (iNOS), COX-2 expression and the involvement of signalling pathways such as toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), MAPK cascades, PKB (AKT) and NF-κB. Accumulation of reaction oxygen species (ROS) was measured by nitroblue tetrazolium and 2′7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate assay. Matrix metalloproteinase activity was investigated by zymography and immunoblot assay. Phagocytotic activity was assessed by use of latex beads. KEY RESULTS Kaempferol significantly attenuated LPS-induced NO, PGE2, TNF-α, IL-1β and ROS production and phagocytosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Kaempferol suppressed the expression of iNOS, COX-2, MMP-3 and blocked the TLR4 activation. Moreover, kaempferol inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB activation and p38 MAPK, JNK and AKT phosphorylation. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Kaempferol was able to reduce LPS-induced inflammatory mediators through the down-regulation of TLR4, NF-κB, p38 MAPK, JNK and AKT suggesting that kaempferol has therapeutic potential for the treatment of neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:21449918

  11. Novel staphylococcal glycosyltransferases SdgA and SdgB mediate immunogenicity and protection of virulence-associated cell wall proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter L W Hazenbos

    Full Text Available Infection of host tissues by Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis requires an unusual family of staphylococcal adhesive proteins that contain long stretches of serine-aspartate dipeptide-repeats (SDR. The prototype member of this family is clumping factor A (ClfA, a key virulence factor that mediates adhesion to host tissues by binding to extracellular matrix proteins such as fibrinogen. However, the biological siginificance of the SDR-domain and its implication for pathogenesis remain poorly understood. Here, we identified two novel bacterial glycosyltransferases, SdgA and SdgB, which modify all SDR-proteins in these two bacterial species. Genetic and biochemical data demonstrated that these two glycosyltransferases directly bind and covalently link N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc moieties to the SDR-domain in a step-wise manner, with SdgB appending the sugar residues proximal to the target Ser-Asp repeats, followed by additional modification by SdgA. GlcNAc-modification of SDR-proteins by SdgB creates an immunodominant epitope for highly opsonic human antibodies, which represent up to 1% of total human IgG. Deletion of these glycosyltransferases renders SDR-proteins vulnerable to proteolysis by human neutrophil-derived cathepsin G. Thus, SdgA and SdgB glycosylate staphylococcal SDR-proteins, which protects them against host proteolytic activity, and yet generates major eptopes for the human anti-staphylococcal antibody response, which may represent an ongoing competition between host and pathogen.

  12. High Frequency of CD4+ T Cells Specific for the TB10.4 Protein Correlates with Protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hervas-Stubbs, S.; Majlessi, L.; Šimšová, Marcela; Morová, Jana; Rojas, M. J.; Nouzé, C.; Brodin, P.; Šebo, Peter; Leclerc, C.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 6 (2006), s. 3396-3407 ISSN 0019-9567 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS5020311 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : t cell s * mycobacterium tuberculosis * protein Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.004, year: 2006

  13. Insect peptide CopA3-induced protein degradation of p27Kip1 stimulates proliferation and protects neuronal cells from apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Seung Taek; Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Min Bum; Nam, Hyo Jung; Kang, Jin Ku; Park, Mi Jung; Lee, Ik Hwan; Seok, Heon; Lee, Dong Gun; Hwang, Jae Sam; Kim, Ho

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •CopA3 peptide isolated from the Korean dung beetle has antimicrobial activity. •Our study reported that CopA3 has anticancer and immunosuppressive effects. •We here demonstrated that CopA3 has neurotropic and neuroprotective effects. •CopA3 degrades p27Kip1 protein and this mediates effects of CopA3 on neuronal cells. -- Abstract: We recently demonstrated that the antibacterial peptide, CopA3 (a D-type disulfide dimer peptide, LLCIALRKK), inhibits LPS-induced macrophage activation and also has anticancer activity in leukemia cells. Here, we examined whether CopA3 could affect neuronal cell proliferation. We found that CopA3 time-dependently increased cell proliferation by up to 31 ± 2% in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, and up to 29 ± 2% in neural stem cells isolated from neonatal mouse brains. In both cell types, CopA3 also significantly inhibited the apoptosis and viability losses caused by 6-hydroxy dopamine (a Parkinson disease-mimicking agent) and okadaic acid (an Alzheimer’s disease-mimicking agent). Immunoblotting revealed that the p27Kip1 protein (a negative regulator of cell cycle progression) was markedly degraded in CopA3-treated SH-SY5Y cells. Conversely, an adenovirus expressing p27Kip1 significantly inhibited the antiapoptotic effects of CopA3 against 6-hydroxy dopamine- and okadaic acid-induced apoptosis, and decreased the neurotropic effects of CopA3. These results collectively suggest that CopA3-mediated protein degradation of p27Kip1 may be the main mechanism through which CopA3 exerts neuroprotective and neurotropic effects

  14. Insect peptide CopA3-induced protein degradation of p27Kip1 stimulates proliferation and protects neuronal cells from apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Seung Taek; Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Min Bum; Nam, Hyo Jung; Kang, Jin Ku; Park, Mi Jung; Lee, Ik Hwan [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Daejin University, Pocheon, Gyeonggido 487-711 (Korea, Republic of); Seok, Heon [Department of Biomedical Science, Jungwon University, Goesan, Chungcheongbukdo 367-700 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Gun [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jae Sam [Department of Agricultural Biology, National Academy of Agricultural Science, RDA, Suwon 441-707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ho, E-mail: hokim@daejin.ac.kr [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Daejin University, Pocheon, Gyeonggido 487-711 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •CopA3 peptide isolated from the Korean dung beetle has antimicrobial activity. •Our study reported that CopA3 has anticancer and immunosuppressive effects. •We here demonstrated that CopA3 has neurotropic and neuroprotective effects. •CopA3 degrades p27Kip1 protein and this mediates effects of CopA3 on neuronal cells. -- Abstract: We recently demonstrated that the antibacterial peptide, CopA3 (a D-type disulfide dimer peptide, LLCIALRKK), inhibits LPS-induced macrophage activation and also has anticancer activity in leukemia cells. Here, we examined whether CopA3 could affect neuronal cell proliferation. We found that CopA3 time-dependently increased cell proliferation by up to 31 ± 2% in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, and up to 29 ± 2% in neural stem cells isolated from neonatal mouse brains. In both cell types, CopA3 also significantly inhibited the apoptosis and viability losses caused by 6-hydroxy dopamine (a Parkinson disease-mimicking agent) and okadaic acid (an Alzheimer’s disease-mimicking agent). Immunoblotting revealed that the p27Kip1 protein (a negative regulator of cell cycle progression) was markedly degraded in CopA3-treated SH-SY5Y cells. Conversely, an adenovirus expressing p27Kip1 significantly inhibited the antiapoptotic effects of CopA3 against 6-hydroxy dopamine- and okadaic acid-induced apoptosis, and decreased the neurotropic effects of CopA3. These results collectively suggest that CopA3-mediated protein degradation of p27Kip1 may be the main mechanism through which CopA3 exerts neuroprotective and neurotropic effects.

  15. Caspase 1 activation is protective against hepatocyte cell death by up-regulating beclin 1 protein and mitochondrial autophagy in the setting of redox stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qian; Gao, Wentao; Loughran, Patricia; Shapiro, Rick; Fan, Jie; Billiar, Timothy R; Scott, Melanie J

    2013-05-31

    Caspase 1 activation can be induced by oxidative stress, which leads to the release of the proinflammatory cytokines IL1β and IL18 in myeloid cells and a potentially damaging inflammatory response. However, little is known about the role of caspase 1 in non-immune cells, such as hepatocytes, that express and activate the inflammasome but do not produce a significant amount of IL1β/IL18. Here we demonstrate that caspase 1 activation protects against cell death after redox stress induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation in hepatocytes. Mechanistically, we show that caspase 1 reduces mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species by increasing mitochondrial autophagy and subsequent clearance of mitochondria in hepatocytes after hypoxia/reoxygenation. Caspase 1 increases autophagic flux through up-regulating autophagy initiator beclin 1 during redox stress and is an important cell survival factor in hepatocytes. We find that during hemorrhagic shock with resuscitation, an in vivo mouse model associated with severe hepatic redox stress, caspase 1 activation is also protective against liver injury and excessive oxidative stress through the up-regulation of beclin 1. Our findings suggest an alternative role for caspase 1 activation in promoting adaptive responses to oxidative stress and, more specifically, in limiting reactive oxygen species production and damage in cells and tissues where IL1β/IL18 are not highly expressed.

  16. Caspase 1 Activation Is Protective against Hepatocyte Cell Death by Up-regulating Beclin 1 Protein and Mitochondrial Autophagy in the Setting of Redox Stress*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qian; Gao, Wentao; Loughran, Patricia; Shapiro, Rick; Fan, Jie; Billiar, Timothy R.; Scott, Melanie J.

    2013-01-01

    Caspase 1 activation can be induced by oxidative stress, which leads to the release of the proinflammatory cytokines IL1β and IL18 in myeloid cells and a potentially damaging inflammatory response. However, little is known about the role of caspase 1 in non-immune cells, such as hepatocytes, that express and activate the inflammasome but do not produce a significant amount of IL1β/IL18. Here we demonstrate that caspase 1 activation protects against cell death after redox stress induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation in hepatocytes. Mechanistically, we show that caspase 1 reduces mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species by increasing mitochondrial autophagy and subsequent clearance of mitochondria in hepatocytes after hypoxia/reoxygenation. Caspase 1 increases autophagic flux through up-regulating autophagy initiator beclin 1 during redox stress and is an important cell survival factor in hepatocytes. We find that during hemorrhagic shock with resuscitation, an in vivo mouse model associated with severe hepatic redox stress, caspase 1 activation is also protective against liver injury and excessive oxidative stress through the up-regulation of beclin 1. Our findings suggest an alternative role for caspase 1 activation in promoting adaptive responses to oxidative stress and, more specifically, in limiting reactive oxygen species production and damage in cells and tissues where IL1β/IL18 are not highly expressed. PMID:23589298

  17. CD4+ T Cells Mediate Aspergillosis Vaccine Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Arevalo, Diana; Kalkum, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Adaptive effector CD4 + T cells play essential roles in the defense against fungal infections, especially against invasive aspergillosis (IA). Such protective CD4 + T cells can be generated through immunization with specialized antifungal vaccines, as has been demonstrated for pulmonary Aspergillus fumigatus infections in mouse experiments. Adaptive transfer of fungal antigen-specific CD4 + T cells conferred protection onto non-immunized naive mice, an experimental approach that could potentially become a future treatment option for immunosuppressed IA patients, focusing on the ultimate goal to improve their otherwise dim chances for survival. Here, we describe the different techniques to analyze CD4 + T cell immune responses after immunization with a recombinant fungal protein. We present three major methods that are used to analyze the role of CD4 + T cells in protection against A. fumigatus challenge. They include (1) transplantation of CD4 + T cells from vaccinated mice into immunosuppressed naive mice, observing increasing protection of the cell recipients, (2) depletion of CD4 + T cells from vaccinated mice, which abolishes vaccine protection, and (3) T cell proliferation studies following stimulation with overlapping synthetic peptides or an intact protein vaccine. The latter can be used to validate immunization status and to identify protective T cell epitopes in vaccine antigens. In the methods detailed here, we used versions of the well-studied Asp f3 protein expressed in a bacterial host, either as the intact full length protein or its N-terminally truncated version, comprised of residues 15-168. However, these methods are generally applicable and can well be adapted to study other protein-based subunit vaccines.

  18. S-nitrosylation of TRIM72 at cysteine 144 is critical for protection against oxidation-induced protein degradation and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohr, Mark J; Evangelista, Alicia M; Ferlito, Marcella; Steenbergen, Charles; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2014-04-01

    Oxidative stress and membrane damage following myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury are important contributors to cardiomyocyte death and the loss of myocardial function. Our previous study identified cysteine 144 (C144) of tripartite motif-containing protein 72 (TRIM72) as a potential site for S-nitrosylation (SNO). TRIM72 is a cardioprotective membrane repair protein that can be both activated and targeted for degradation by different oxidative modifications. Consistent with the potential regulation of TRIM72 by various oxidative modifications, we found that SNO levels increased at C144 of TRIM72 with ischemic preconditioning. Therefore, to investigate the role of C144 in the regulation of TRIM72 function, we mutated C144 of TRIM72 to a serine residue (TRIM72(C144S)), and expressed either TRIM72(WT) or TRIM72(C144S) in HEK-293 cells, which lack endogenous TRIM72, in order to examine the effect of this mutation on the functional stability of TRIM72 and on cell survival. We hypothesized that SNO of TRIM72 stabilizes the protein, thus allowing for membrane repair and enhanced cell survival. Upon treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), we found that TRIM72(WT) levels were decreased, but not TRIM72(C144S) and this correlated with increased H2O2-induced cell death in TRIM72(WT) cells. Additionally, we found that treatment with the cardioprotective S-nitrosylating agent S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), was able to preserve TRIM72(WT) protein levels and enhance TRIM72(WT)-mediated cell survival, but had no effect on TRIM72(C144S) levels. Consistent with our hypothesis, GSNO was also found to increase SNO levels and inhibit H2O2-induced irreversible oxidation for TRIM72(WT) without affecting TRIM72(C144S). In further support of our hypothesis, GSNO blocked the ischemia/reperfusion-induced decrease in TRIM72 levels and reduced infarct size in a Langendorff-perfused heart model. The results of these studies have important implications for cardioprotection and suggest that

  19. Sickle cell protection from malaria: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Eridani

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A linkage between presence of Sickle Haemoglobin (HbS and protection from malaria infection and clinical manifestations in certain areas was suspected from early observations and progressively elucidated by more recent studies. Research has confirmed the abovementioned connection, but also clarified how such protection may be abolished by coexistence of sickle cell trait (HbS trait and alpha thalassemia, which may explain the relatively low incidence of HbS trait in the Mediterranean. The mechanisms of such protective effect are now being investigated: factors of genetic, molecular and immunological nature are prominent. As for genetic factors attention is given to the role of the red blood cell (RBC membrane complement regulatory proteins as polymorphisms of these components seem to be associated with resistance to severe malaria; genetic ligands like the Duffy group blood antigen, necessary for erythrocytic invasion, and human protein CD36, a major receptor for P. falciparum-infected RBC‘s, are also under scrutiny: attention is focused also on plasmodium erythrocyte-binding antigens, which bind to RBC surface components. Genome-wide linkage and association studies are now carried out too, in order to identify genes associated with malaria resistance. Only a minor role is attributed to intravascular sickling, phagocytosis and haemolysis, while specific molecular mechanisms are the object of intensive research: among these a decisive role is played by a biochemical sequence, involving activation of haeme oxygenase (HMO-1, whose effect appears mediated by carbon monoxide (CO. A central role in protection from malaria is also played by immunological factors, which may stimulate antibody production to plasmodium antigens in the early years of life; the role of agents like pathogenic CD8 T-cells has been suggested while the effects of molecular actions on the immunity mechanism are presently investigated. It thus appears that protection from

  20. Protosappanin B protects PC12 cells against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced neuronal death by maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis via induction of ubiquitin-dependent p53 protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ke-Wu; Liao, Li-Xi; Zhao, Ming-Bo; Song, Fang-Jiao; Yu, Qian; Jiang, Yong; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2015-03-15

    Protosappanin B (PTB) is a bioactive dibenzoxocin derivative isolated from Caesalpinia sappan L. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effects and the potential mechanisms of PTB on oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-injured PC12 cells. Results showed that PTB significantly increased cell viability, inhibited cell apoptosis and up-regulated the expression of growth-associated protein 43 (a marker of neural outgrowth). Moreover, our study revealed that PTB effectively maintained mitochondrial homeostasis by up-regulation of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), inhibition of cytochrome c release from mitochondria and inactivation of mitochondrial caspase-9/3 apoptosis pathway. Further study showed that PTB significantly promoted cytoplasmic component degradation of p53 protein, a key negative regulator for mitochondrial function, resulting in a release of Bcl-2 from p53-Bcl-2 complex and an enhancing translocation of Bcl-2 to mitochondrial outer membrane. Finally, we found the degradation of p53 protein was induced by PTB via activation of a MDM2-dependent ubiquitination process. Taken together, our findings provided a new viewpoint of neuronal protection strategy for anoxia and ischemic injury with natural small molecular dibenzoxocin derivative by activating ubiquitin-dependent p53 protein degradation as well as increasing mitochondrial function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Protective Effects of Maillard Reaction Products of Whey Protein Concentrate against Oxidative Stress through an Nrf2-Dependent Pathway in HepG2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyo, Min Cheol; Yang, Sung-Yong; Chun, Su-Hyun; Oh, Nam Su; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2016-09-01

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC), which contains α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin, is utilized widely in the food industry. The Maillard reaction is a complex reaction that produces Maillard reaction products (MRPs), which are associated with the formation of antioxidant compounds. In this study, the hepatoprotection activity of MRPs of WPC against oxidative stress through the nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-dependent antioxidant pathway in HepG2 cells was examined. Glucose-whey protein concentrate conjugate (Glc-WPC) was obtained from Maillard reaction between WPC and glucose. The fluorescence intensity of Glc-WPC increased after 7 d compared to native WPC, and resulted in loss of 48% of the free amino groups of WPC. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) patterns of Glc-WPC showed the presence of a high-molecular-weight portion. Treatment of HepG2 cells with Glc-WPC increased cell viability in the presence of oxidative stress, inhibited the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP), and increased the glutathione level. Nrf2 translocation and Nrf2, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)H)-quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NOQ1), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), glutamate-L-cysteine ligase (GCL)M and GCLC mRNA levels were increased by Glc-WPC. Also, Glc-WPC increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). The results of this study demonstrate that Glc-WPC activates the Nrf2-dependent pathway through the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK in HepG2 cells, and induces production of antioxidant enzymes and phase II enzymes.

  2. Intradermal delivery of Shigella IpaB and IpaD type III secretion proteins: kinetics of cell recruitment and antigen uptake, mucosal and systemic immunity, and protection across serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Shannon J; Diaz-McNair, Jovita; Andar, Abhay U; Drachenberg, Cinthia B; van de Verg, Lillian; Walker, Richard; Picking, Wendy L; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2014-02-15

    Shigella is one of the leading pathogens contributing to the vast pediatric diarrheal disease burden in low-income countries. No licensed vaccine is available, and the existing candidates are only partially effective and serotype specific. Shigella type III secretion system proteins IpaB and IpaD, which are conserved across Shigella spp., are candidates for a broadly protective, subunit-based vaccine. In this study, we investigated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of IpaB and IpaD administered intradermally (i.d.) with a double-mutant of the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (dmLT) adjuvant using microneedles. Different dosage levels of IpaB and IpaD, with or without dmLT, were tested in mice. Vaccine delivery into the dermis, recruitment of neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, and Langerhans cells, and colocalization of vaccine Ag within skin-activated APC were demonstrated through histology and immunofluorescence microscopy. Ag-loaded neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, and Langerhans cells remained in the tissue at least 1 wk. IpaB, IpaD, and dmLT-specific serum IgG- and IgG-secreting cells were produced following i.d. immunization. The protective efficacy was 70% against Shigella flexneri and 50% against Shigella sonnei. Similar results were obtained when the vaccine was administered intranasally, with the i.d. route requiring 25-40 times lower doses. Distinctively, IgG was detected in mucosal secretions; secretory IgA, as well as mucosal and systemic IgA Ab-secreting cells, were seemingly absent. Vaccine-induced T cells produced IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, IL-17, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10. These results demonstrate the potential of i.d. vaccination with IpaB and IpaD to prevent Shigella infection and support further studies in humans.

  3. Fenofibrate dose not protect glioma cells from irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, Jae Lim; Kim, Won Dong; Park, Woo Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Fenofibrate(FF) is a ligand for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α and used clinically as a hypolipidemic drug. FF has been reported to have a radioprotective effect of newborn cells in the dentate gyrus 1) and inhibit radiation-induced microglial pro-inflammatory response 2). However, if FF also protect tumor cells, it can not be used clinically during radiotherapy. Thus, we're interested in whether FF has an radioprotective effect of brain tumor cells or not Although the radiosensitive G0/G1 phase cells were increased, radiosensitization by FF was not observed in three human glioma cells. This may be due to counterbalance of radiosensitizing and radioprotecting proteins increased by FF. Taken together, FF neither radiosensitize nor radioprotect glioma cells, so it can be used to protect normal neural cells from radiation damage

  4. Reprogramming cells with synthetic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoxiao; Malik, Vikas; Jauch, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of one cell type into another cell type by forcibly expressing specific cocktails of transcription factors (TFs) has demonstrated that cell fates are not fixed and that cellular differentiation can be a two-way street with many intersections. These experiments also illustrated the sweeping potential of TFs to "read" genetically hardwired regulatory information even in cells where they are not normally expressed and to access and open up tightly packed chromatin to execute gene expression programs. Cellular reprogramming enables the modeling of diseases in a dish, to test the efficacy and toxicity of drugs in patient-derived cells and ultimately, could enable cell-based therapies to cure degenerative diseases. Yet, producing terminally differentiated cells that fully resemble their in vivocounterparts in sufficient quantities is still an unmet clinical need. While efforts are being made to reprogram cells nongenetically by using drug-like molecules, defined TF cocktails still dominate reprogramming protocols. Therefore, the optimization of TFs by protein engineering has emerged as a strategy to enhance reprogramming to produce functional, stable and safe cells for regenerative biomedicine. Engineering approaches focused on Oct4, MyoD, Sox17, Nanog and Mef2c and range from chimeric TFs with added transactivation domains, designer transcription activator-like effectors to activate endogenous TFs to reprogramming TFs with rationally engineered DNA recognition principles. Possibly, applying the complete toolkit of protein design to cellular reprogramming can help to remove the hurdles that, thus far, impeded the clinical use of cells derived from reprogramming technologies.

  5. Andrographolide stimulates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2-heme oxygenase 1 signaling in primary cerebral endothelial cells for definite protection against ischemic stroke in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Ting-Lin; Chen, Ray-Jade; Jayakumar, Thanasekaran; Lu, Wan-Jung; Hsieh, Cheng-Ying; Hsu, Ming-Jen; Yang, Chih-Hao; Chang, Chao-Chien; Lin, Yen-Kuang; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2016-04-01

    Stroke pathogenesis involves complex oxidative stress-related pathways. The nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) pathways have been considered molecular targets in pharmacologic intervention for ischemic diseases. Andrographolide, a labdane diterpene, has received increasing attention in recent years because of its various pharmacologic activities. We determined that andrographolide modulates the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-Nrf2-HO-1 signaling cascade in primary cerebral endothelial cells (CECs) to provide positive protection against middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced ischemic stroke in rats. In the present study, andrographolide (10 μM) increased HO-1 protein and messenger RNA expressions, Nrf2 phosphorylation, and nuclear translocation in CECs, and these activities were disrupted by a p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, but not by the extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibitor PD98059 or c-Jun amino-terminal kinase inhibitor SP600125. Similar results were observed in confocal microscopy analysis. Moreover, andrographolide-induced Nrf2 and HO-1 protein expressions were significantly inhibited by Nrf2 small interfering RNA. Moreover, HO-1 knockdown attenuated the protective effect of andrographolide against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced CEC death. Andrographolide (0.1 mg/kg) significantly suppressed free radical formation, blood-brain barrier disruption, and brain infarction in MCAO-insulted rats, and these effects were reversed by the HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX. The mechanism is attributable to HO-1 activation, as directly evidenced by andrographolide-induced pronounced HO-1 expression in brain tissues, which was highly localized in the cerebral capillary. In conclusion, andrographolide increased Nrf2-HO-1 expression through p38 MAPK regulation, confirming that it provides protection against MCAO-induced brain injury. These findings provide strong evidence that andrographolide could

  6. Semicarbazone EGA Inhibits Uptake of Diphtheria Toxin into Human Cells and Protects Cells from Intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie Schnell

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Diphtheria toxin is a single-chain protein toxin that invades human cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. In acidic endosomes, its translocation domain inserts into endosomal membranes and facilitates the transport of the catalytic domain (DTA from endosomal lumen into the host cell cytosol. Here, DTA ADP-ribosylates elongation factor 2 inhibits protein synthesis and leads to cell death. The compound 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenylsemicarbazone (EGA has been previously shown to protect cells from various bacterial protein toxins which deliver their enzymatic subunits from acidic endosomes to the cytosol, including Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin and the binary clostridial actin ADP-ribosylating toxins C2, iota and Clostridium difficile binary toxin (CDT. Here, we demonstrate that EGA also protects human cells from diphtheria toxin by inhibiting the pH-dependent translocation of DTA across cell membranes. The results suggest that EGA might serve for treatment and/or prevention of the severe disease diphtheria.

  7. Protection against hyperthermic cell killing by alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, A.; Henle, K.J.; Moss, A.J.; Nagle, W.A.

    1987-01-01

    Compounds capable of protecting cells against hyperthermia may provide new insights into potential mechanisms of thermotolerance and cellular heat death. The authors characterized heat protection by alanine and related compounds as a function of concentration, temperature and preincubation time. Alanine was added either to complete medium or to HBSS before hyperthermia. Maximal heat protection required 3 hr, 37 0 ; longer preincubation intervals resulted in lower levels of protection. Addition of alanine to medium after hyperthermia had no protective effect. Protection was concentration dependent with a 20- or 200-fold increase in cell survival after 40 min, 45 0 C at 60 mM in medium or in HBSS, respectively. Higher alanine concentrations up to 120mM did not significantly increase heat protection. A 45 0 -heat survival curve showed that 100mM alanine increased the D/sub q/ by approx. 12 min with little change in the D/sub o/. Hyperthermia of 1 hr at temperatures between 42 0 and 45 0 indicated that 100mM alanine shifted the isotoxic temperature by 0.5 Celsius degrees. Polymers of either L or D,L alanine and related compounds, like pyruvate, also protected cells against heat killing. These results indicate that heat protection by alanine shows characteristics that are not shared by polyhydroxy compounds

  8. Protective effects of transforming growth factor β2 in intestinal epithelial cells by regulation of proteins associated with stress and endotoxin responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Jiang, Pingping; Jacobsen, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    electrophoresis-MS and LC-MS-based proteomics. TGF-β2 alone induced the differential expression of 13 proteins and the majority of the identified proteins were associated with stress responses, TGF-β and Toll-like receptor 4 signaling cascades. In particular, a series of heat shock proteins had similar...... with stress response pathways, among which five proteins were altered by LPS and restored by TGF-β2, whereas six were differentially expressed only by TGF-β2 in LPS-challenged IECs. Based on previously reported biological functions, these patterns indicate the anti-stress and anti-inflammatory effects of TGF...

  9. Periarteriolar Glioblastoma Stem Cell Niches Express Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niche Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hira, Vashendriya V. V.; Wormer, Jill R.; Kakar, Hala; Breznik, Barbara; van der Swaan, Britt; Hulsbos, Renske; Tigchelaar, Wikky; Tonar, Zbynek; Khurshed, Mohammed; Molenaar, Remco J.; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2018-01-01

    In glioblastoma, a fraction of malignant cells consists of therapy-resistant glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) residing in protective niches that recapitulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niches in bone marrow. We have previously shown that HSC niche proteins stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α),

  10. Reprogramming cells with synthetic proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiao Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Conversion of one cell type into another cell type by forcibly expressing specific cocktails of transcription factors (TFs has demonstrated that cell fates are not fixed and that cellular differentiation can be a two-way street with many intersections. These experiments also illustrated the sweeping potential of TFs to "read" genetically hardwired regulatory information even in cells where they are not normally expressed and to access and open up tightly packed chromatin to execute gene expression programs. Cellular reprogramming enables the modeling of diseases in a dish, to test the efficacy and toxicity of drugs in patient-derived cells and ultimately, could enable cell-based therapies to cure degenerative diseases. Yet, producing terminally differentiated cells that fully resemble their in vivocounterparts in sufficient quantities is still an unmet clinical need. While efforts are being made to reprogram cells nongenetically by using drug-like molecules, defined TF cocktails still dominate reprogramming protocols. Therefore, the optimization of TFs by protein engineering has emerged as a strategy to enhance reprogramming to produce functional, stable and safe cells for regenerative biomedicine. Engineering approaches focused on Oct4, MyoD, Sox17, Nanog and Mef2c and range from chimeric TFs with added transactivation domains, designer transcription activator-like effectors to activate endogenous TFs to reprogramming TFs with rationally engineered DNA recognition principles. Possibly, applying the complete toolkit of protein design to cellular reprogramming can help to remove the hurdles that, thus far, impeded the clinical use of cells derived from reprogramming technologies.

  11. Reprogramming cells with synthetic proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoxiao; Malik, Vikas; Jauch, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of one cell type into another cell type by forcibly expressing specific cocktails of transcription factors (TFs) has demonstrated that cell fates are not fixed and that cellular differentiation can be a two-way street with many intersections. These experiments also illustrated the sweeping potential of TFs to “read” genetically hardwired regulatory information even in cells where they are not normally expressed and to access and open up tightly packed chromatin to execute gene expression programs. Cellular reprogramming enables the modeling of diseases in a dish, to test the efficacy and toxicity of drugs in patient-derived cells and ultimately, could enable cell-based therapies to cure degenerative diseases. Yet, producing terminally differentiated cells that fully resemble their in vivo counterparts in sufficient quantities is still an unmet clinical need. While efforts are being made to reprogram cells nongenetically by using drug-like molecules, defined TF cocktails still dominate reprogramming protocols. Therefore, the optimization of TFs by protein engineering has emerged as a strategy to enhance reprogramming to produce functional, stable and safe cells for regenerative biomedicine. Engineering approaches focused on Oct4, MyoD, Sox17, Nanog and Mef2c and range from chimeric TFs with added transactivation domains, designer transcription activator-like effectors to activate endogenous TFs to reprogramming TFs with rationally engineered DNA recognition principles. Possibly, applying the complete toolkit of protein design to cellular reprogramming can help to remove the hurdles that, thus far, impeded the clinical use of cells derived from reprogramming technologies. PMID:25652623

  12. Novel influenza virus vectors expressing Brucella L7/L12 or Omp16 proteins in cattle induced a strong T-cell immune response, as well as high protectiveness against B. abortus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabynov, Kaissar; Kydyrbayev, Zhailaubay; Ryskeldinova, Sholpan; Yespembetov, Bolat; Zinina, Nadezhda; Assanzhanova, Nurika; Kozhamkulov, Yerken; Inkarbekov, Dulat; Gotskina, Tatyana; Sansyzbay, Abylai

    2014-04-11

    This paper presents the results of a study of the immunogenicity and protectiveness of new candidate vector vaccine against Brucella abortus - a bivalent vaccine formulation consisting of a mixture of recombinant influenza A subtype H5N1 or H1N1 (viral constructs vaccine formulation) viruses expressing Brucella ribosomal protein L7/L12 and Omp16, in cattle. To increase the effectiveness of the candidate vaccine, adjuvants such as Montanide Gel01 or chitosan were included in its composition. Immunization of cattle (heifers aged 1-1.5 years, 5 animals per group) with the viral constructs vaccine formulation only, or its combination with adjuvants Montanide Gel01 or chitosan, was conducted via the conjunctival method using cross prime (influenza virus subtype H5N1) and booster (influenza virus subtype H1N1) vaccination schedules at an interval of 28 days. Vaccine candidates were evaluated in comparison with the positive (B. abortus S19) and negative (PBS) controls. The viral constructs vaccine formulations, particularly in combination with Montanide Gel01 adjuvant promoted formation of IgG antibodies (with a predominance of antibodies of isotype IgG2a) against Brucella L7/L12 and Omp16 proteins in ELISA. Moreover, these vaccines in cattle induced a strong antigen-specific T-cell immune response, as indicated by a high number of CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells, as well as the concentration of IFN-γ, and most importantly provided a high level of protectiveness comparable to the commercial B. abortus S19 vaccine and superior to the B. abortus S19 vaccine in combination with Montanide Gel01 adjuvant. Based on these findings, we recommended the bivalent vaccine formulation containing the adjuvant Montanide Gel01 for practical use in cattle. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Nanoparticle-Fusion Protein Complexes Protect against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Peter; Copland, Alastair; Diogo, Gil Reynolds; Harris, Shane; Spallek, Ralf; Oehlmann, Wulf; Singh, Mahavir; Basile, Juan; Rottenberg, Martin; Paul, Matthew John; Reljic, Rajko

    2018-03-07

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death from infectious disease, and the current vaccine, Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), is inadequate. Nanoparticles (NPs) are an emerging vaccine technology, with recent successes in oncology and infectious diseases. NPs have been exploited as antigen delivery systems and also for their adjuvantic properties. However, the mechanisms underlying their immunological activity remain obscure. Here, we developed a novel mucosal TB vaccine (Nano-FP1) based upon yellow carnauba wax NPs (YC-NPs), coated with a fusion protein consisting of three Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigens: Acr, Ag85B, and HBHA. Mucosal immunization of BCG-primed mice with Nano-FP1 significantly enhanced protection in animals challenged with low-dose, aerosolized Mtb. Bacterial control by Nano-FP1 was associated with dramatically enhanced cellular immunity compared to BCG, including superior CD4 + and CD8 + T cell proliferation, tissue-resident memory T cell (Trm) seeding in the lungs, and cytokine polyfunctionality. Alongside these effects, we also observed potent humoral responses, such as the generation of Ag85B-specific serum IgG and respiratory IgA. Finally, we found that YC-NPs were able to activate antigen-presenting cells via an unconventional IRF-3-associated activation signature, without the production of potentially harmful inflammatory mediators, providing a mechanistic framework for vaccine efficacy and future development. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Sphingolipid trafficking and protein sorting in epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slimane, TA; Hoekstra, D

    2002-01-01

    Sphingolipids represent a minor, but highly dynamic subclass of lipids in all eukaryotic cells. They are involved in functions that range from structural protection to signal transduction and protein sorting, and participate in lipid raft assembly. In polarized epithelial cells, which display an

  15. Novel staphylococcal glycosyltransferases SdgA and SdgB mediate immunogenicity and protection of virulence-associated cell wall proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenbos, Wouter L. W.; Kajihara, Kimberly K.; Vandlen, Richard; Morisaki, J. Hiroshi; Lehar, Sophie M.; Kwakkenbos, Mark J.; Beaumont, Tim; Bakker, Arjen Q.; Phung, Qui; Swem, Lee R.; Ramakrishnan, Satish; Kim, Janice; Xu, Min; Shah, Ishita M.; Diep, Binh An; Sai, Tao; Sebrell, Andrew; Khalfin, Yana; Oh, Angela; Koth, Chris; Lin, S. Jack; Lee, Byoung-Chul; Strandh, Magnus; Koefoed, Klaus; Andersen, Peter S.; Spits, Hergen; Brown, Eric J.; Tan, Man-Wah; Mariathasan, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    Infection of host tissues by Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis requires an unusual family of staphylococcal adhesive proteins that contain long stretches of serine-aspartate dipeptide-repeats (SDR). The prototype member of this family is clumping factor A (ClfA), a key virulence factor that

  16. Protein tyrosine nitration in the cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Min; Mateoiu, Claudia; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Enrichment of 3-nitrotyrosine containing proteins from cells synchronized in different phases of the cell cycle. → Identification of 76 tyrosine nitrated proteins that change expression during the cell cycle. → Nineteen identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Nitration of tyrosine residues in proteins is associated with cell response to oxidative/nitrosative stress. Tyrosine nitration is relatively low abundant post-translational modification that may affect protein functions. Little is known about the extent of protein tyrosine nitration in cells during progression through the cell cycle. Here we report identification of proteins enriched for tyrosine nitration in cells synchronized in G0/G1, S or G2/M phases of the cell cycle. We identified 27 proteins in cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase, 37 proteins in S phase synchronized cells, and 12 proteins related to G2/M phase. Nineteen of the identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, our data indicate which tyrosine nitrated proteins may affect regulation of the cell cycle.

  17. Inhibition of protein geranylgeranylation and farnesylation protects against graft-versus-host disease via effects on CD4 effector T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechinger, Anne-Kathrin; Maas, Kristina; Dürr, Christoph; Leonhardt, Franziska; Prinz, Gabriele; Marks, Reinhard; Gerlach, Ulrike; Hofmann, Maike; Fisch, Paul; Finke, Jürgen; Pircher, Hanspeter; Zeiser, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in immunosuppressive regimens, acute graft-versus-host disease remains a frequent complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Pathogenic donor T cells are dependent on correct attachment of small GTPases to the cell membrane, mediated by farnesyl- or geranylgeranyl residues, which, therefore, constitute potential targets for graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis. A mouse model was used to study the impact of a farnesyl-transferase inhibitor and a geranylgeranyl-transferase inhibitor on acute graft-versus-host disease, anti-cytomegalovirus T-cell responses and graft-versus-leukemia activity. Treatment of mice undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation with farnesyl-transferase inhibitor and geranylgeranyl-transferase inhibitor reduced the histological severity of graft-versus-host disease and prolonged survival significantly. Mechanistically, farnesyl-transferase inhibitor and geranylgeranyl-transferase inhibitor treatment resulted in reduced alloantigen-driven expansion of CD4 T cells. In vivo treatment led to increased thymic cellularity and polyclonality of the T-cell receptor repertoire by reducing thymic graft-versus-host disease. These effects were absent when squalene production was blocked. The farnesyl-transferase inhibitor and geranylgeranyl-transferase inhibitor did not compromise CD8 function against leukemia cells or reconstitution of T cells that were subsequently responsible for anti-murine cytomegalovirus responses. In summary, we observed an immunomodulatory effect of inhibitors of farnesyl-transferase and geranylgeranyl-transferase on graft-versus-host disease, with enhanced functional immune reconstitution. In the light of the modest toxicity of farnesyl-transferase inhibitors such as tipifarnib in patients and the potent reduction of graft-versus-host disease in mice, farnesyl-transferase and geranylgeranyl-transferase inhibitors could help to reduce graft-versus-host disease significantly without

  18. Cooperation between Epstein-Barr Virus Immune Evasion Proteins Spreads Protection from CD8+ T Cell Recognition across All Three Phases of the Lytic Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Laura L.; Zuo, Jianmin; Abbott, Rachel J. M.; Shannon-Lowe, Claire; Tierney, Rosemary J.; Hislop, Andrew D.; Rowe, Martin

    2014-01-01

    CD8+ T cell responses to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic cycle expressed antigens display a hierarchy of immunodominance, in which responses to epitopes of immediate-early (IE) and some early (E) antigens are more frequently observed than responses to epitopes of late (L) expressed antigens. It has been proposed that this hierarchy, which correlates with the phase-specific efficiency of antigen presentation, may be due to the influence of viral immune-evasion genes. At least three EBV-encoded genes, BNLF2a, BGLF5 and BILF1, have the potential to inhibit processing and presentation of CD8+ T cell epitopes. Here we examined the relative contribution of these genes to modulation of CD8+ T cell recognition of EBV lytic antigens expressed at different phases of the replication cycle in EBV-transformed B-cells (LCLs) which spontaneously reactivate lytic cycle. Selective shRNA-mediated knockdown of BNLF2a expression led to more efficient recognition of immediate-early (IE)- and early (E)-derived epitopes by CD8+ T cells, while knock down of BILF1 increased recognition of epitopes from E and late (L)-expressed antigens. Contrary to what might have been predicted from previous ectopic expression studies in EBV-negative model cell lines, the shRNA-mediated inhibition of BGLF5 expression in LCLs showed only modest, if any, increase in recognition of epitopes expressed in any phase of lytic cycle. These data indicate that whilst BNLF2a interferes with antigen presentation with diminishing efficiency as lytic cycle progresses (IE>E>>L), interference by BILF1 increases with progression through lytic cycle (IEevasion functions are actually relevant in the context of lytic virus replication, and secondly identify lytic-cycle phase-specific effects that provide mechanistic insight into the immunodominance pattern seen for CD8+ T cell responses to EBV lytic antigens. PMID:25144360

  19. Companion Protease Inhibitors for the In Situ Protection of Recombinant Proteins in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Stéphanie; Jutras, Philippe V; Khalf, Moustafa; D'Aoust, Marc-André; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Sainsbury, Frank; Michaud, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    We previously described a procedure for the use of plant protease inhibitors as "companion" accessory proteins to prevent unwanted proteolysis of clinically useful recombinant proteins in leaf crude protein extracts (Benchabane et al. Methods Mol Biol 483:265-273, 2009). Here we describe the use of these inhibitors for the protection of recombinant proteins in planta, before their extraction from leaf tissues. A procedure is first described involving inhibitors co-expressed along-and co-migrating-with the protein of interest in host plant cells. An alternative, single transgene scheme is then described involving translational fusions of the recombinant protein and companion inhibitor. These approaches may allow for a significant improvement of protein steady-state levels in leaves, comparable to yield improvements observed with protease-deficient strains of less complex protein expression hosts such as E. coli or yeasts.

  20. Protein S Protects against Podocyte Injury in Diabetic Nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Fang; Chen, Haibing; Xie, Yifan; Azeloglu, Evren U; Wei, Chengguo; Zhang, Weijia; Li, Zhengzhe; Chuang, Peter Y; Jim, Belinda; Li, Hong; Elmastour, Firas; Riyad, Jalish M; Weber, Thomas; Chen, Hongyu; Wang, Yongjun; Zhang, Aihua; Jia, Weiping; Lee, Kyung; He, John C

    2018-05-01

    Background Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a leading cause of ESRD in the United States, but the molecular mechanisms mediating the early stages of DN are unclear. Methods To assess global changes that occur in early diabetic kidneys and to identify proteins potentially involved in pathogenic pathways in DN progression, we performed proteomic analysis of diabetic and nondiabetic rat glomeruli. Protein S (PS) among the highly upregulated proteins in the diabetic glomeruli. PS exerts multiple biologic effects through the Tyro3, Axl, and Mer (TAM) receptors. Because increased activation of Axl by the PS homolog Gas6 has been implicated in DN progression, we further examined the role of PS in DN. Results In human kidneys, glomerular PS expression was elevated in early DN but suppressed in advanced DN. However, plasma PS concentrations did not differ between patients with DN and healthy controls. A prominent increase of PS expression also colocalized with the expression of podocyte markers in early diabetic kidneys. In cultured podocytes, high-glucose treatment elevated PS expression, and PS knockdown further enhanced the high-glucose-induced apoptosis. Conversely, PS overexpression in cultured podocytes dampened the high-glucose- and TNF- α -induced expression of proinflammatory mediators. Tyro3 receptor was upregulated in response to high glucose and mediated the anti-inflammatory response of PS. Podocyte-specific PS loss resulted in accelerated DN in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, whereas the transient induction of PS expression in glomerular cells in vivo attenuated albuminuria and podocyte loss in diabetic OVE26 mice. Conclusions Our results support a protective role of PS against glomerular injury in DN progression. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  1. Cooperation between Epstein-Barr virus immune evasion proteins spreads protection from CD8+ T cell recognition across all three phases of the lytic cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura L Quinn

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available CD8+ T cell responses to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV lytic cycle expressed antigens display a hierarchy of immunodominance, in which responses to epitopes of immediate-early (IE and some early (E antigens are more frequently observed than responses to epitopes of late (L expressed antigens. It has been proposed that this hierarchy, which correlates with the phase-specific efficiency of antigen presentation, may be due to the influence of viral immune-evasion genes. At least three EBV-encoded genes, BNLF2a, BGLF5 and BILF1, have the potential to inhibit processing and presentation of CD8+ T cell epitopes. Here we examined the relative contribution of these genes to modulation of CD8+ T cell recognition of EBV lytic antigens expressed at different phases of the replication cycle in EBV-transformed B-cells (LCLs which spontaneously reactivate lytic cycle. Selective shRNA-mediated knockdown of BNLF2a expression led to more efficient recognition of immediate-early (IE- and early (E-derived epitopes by CD8+ T cells, while knock down of BILF1 increased recognition of epitopes from E and late (L-expressed antigens. Contrary to what might have been predicted from previous ectopic expression studies in EBV-negative model cell lines, the shRNA-mediated inhibition of BGLF5 expression in LCLs showed only modest, if any, increase in recognition of epitopes expressed in any phase of lytic cycle. These data indicate that whilst BNLF2a interferes with antigen presentation with diminishing efficiency as lytic cycle progresses (IE>E>>L, interference by BILF1 increases with progression through lytic cycle (IE

  2. Protection of cultured mammalian cells by rebamipide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoku, Shigetoshi; Aramaki, Ryoji [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Tanaka, Hisashi; Kusumoto, Naotoshi

    1997-06-01

    Rebamipide which is used as a drug for gastritis and stomach ulcer has large capability for OH radical scavenging. It is expected that rebamipide has protective effect against ionizing radiations. The present paper deals with protective effect of rebamipide for cultured mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiations. As rebamipide is insoluble in water, three solvents were used to dissolve. Rebamipide dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl formamide (DMFA) and 0.02 N NaOH was added to the cells in Eagle`s minimum essential medium (MEM) supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and the cells were irradiated with X-rays. After irradiation, the cells were trypsinized, plated in MEM with 10% fetal calf serum and incubated for 7 days in a CO{sub 2} incubator to form colonies. Rebamipide dissolved in 0.02 N NaOH exhibited the protective effect expected its OH radical scavenging capability. However, the protective effect of rebamipide dissolved in DMSO was about half of that expected by its radical scavenging capability and that of rebamipide dissolved in DMFA was not observed. Uptake of rebamipide labeled with {sup 14}C increased with increasing contact time with rebamipide. These rebamipide mainly distributed in nucleus rather than cytoplasm. (author)

  3. Protection of cultured mammalian cells by rebamipide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoku, Shigetoshi; Aramaki, Ryoji; Tanaka, Hisashi; Kusumoto, Naotoshi.

    1997-01-01

    Rebamipide which is used as a drug for gastritis and stomach ulcer has large capability for OH radical scavenging. It is expected that rebamipide has protective effect against ionizing radiations. The present paper deals with protective effect of rebamipide for cultured mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiations. As rebamipide is insoluble in water, three solvents were used to dissolve. Rebamipide dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl formamide (DMFA) and 0.02 N NaOH was added to the cells in Eagle's minimum essential medium (MEM) supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and the cells were irradiated with X-rays. After irradiation, the cells were trypsinized, plated in MEM with 10% fetal calf serum and incubated for 7 days in a CO 2 incubator to form colonies. Rebamipide dissolved in 0.02 N NaOH exhibited the protective effect expected its OH radical scavenging capability. However, the protective effect of rebamipide dissolved in DMSO was about half of that expected by its radical scavenging capability and that of rebamipide dissolved in DMFA was not observed. Uptake of rebamipide labeled with 14 C increased with increasing contact time with rebamipide. These rebamipide mainly distributed in nucleus rather than cytoplasm. (author)

  4. Protective effect of Nelumbo nucifera extracts on beta amyloid protein induced apoptosis in PC12 cells, in vitro model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaganandam Kumaran

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. β-Amyloid (Aβ has been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of AD. Deposits of insoluble Aβ are found in the brains of patients with AD and are one of the pathological hallmarks of the disease, but the underlying signaling pathways are poorly understood. In order to develop antidementia agents with potential therapeutic value, we examined the inhibitory effect of the Nelumbo nucifera seed embryo extracts on to the aggregated amyloid β peptide (agg Aβ1–40-induced damage of differentiated PC-12 cells (dPC-12, a well-known cell model for AD. In the present study, seed embryos of N. nucifera were extracted with 70% methanol in water and then separated into hexane, ethyl acetate, n-butanol, and water layers. Among them, only the n-butanol layer showed strong activity and was therefore subjected to separation on Sephadex LH-20 chromatography. Two fractions showing potent activity were found to significantly inhibit Aβ1–40 toxicity on dPC-12 cells in increasing order of concentration (10–50 μg/mL. Further purification and characterization of these active fractions identified them to be flavonoids such as rutin, orientin, isoorientin, isoquercetrin, and hyperoside. 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl hydrate scavenging activity of the extracts was also carried out to ascertain the possible mechanism of the activity.

  5. Characterization of culture supernatant proteins from Brucella abortus and its protection effects against murine brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Ju; Lim, Jeong Ju; Kim, Dae Geun; Simborio, Hannah Leah; Kim, Dong Hyeok; Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Min, WonGi; Lee, Hu Jang; Kim, Dong Hee; Chang, Hong Hee; Kim, Suk

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we characterized the secreted proteins of Brucella abortus into the enriched media under the bacterial laboratory growth condition and investigated the pathogenic importance of culture supernatant (CS) proteins to B. abortus infection. CS proteins from stationary phase were concentrated and analyzed using 2D electrophoresis. In MALDI TOF/TOF analysis, more than 27 proteins including CuZn SOD, Dps, Tat, OMPs, Adh, LivF, Tuf, SucC, GroEL and DnaK were identified. Cytotoxic effects of CS proteins were found to increase in a dose-dependent manner in RAW 264.7 cells. Upon B. abortus challenge into phagocytes, however, CS proteins pre-treated cells exhibited lower bacterial uptake and intracellular replication compared to untreated cells. Immunization with CS proteins induced a strong humoral and cell mediated immune responses and exhibited significant higher degree of protection against virulence of B. abortus infection compared to mice immunized with Brucella broth protein (BBP). Taken together, these results indicate that B. abortus secreted a number of soluble immunogenic proteins under laboratory culture condition, which can promote antibody production resulted in enhancing host defense against to subsequently bacterial infection. Moreover, further analysis of CS proteins may help to understand the pathogenic mechanism of B. abortus infection and host-pathogen interaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Role of heat shock proteins in cell apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arleta Kaźmierczuk

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is, apart from necrosis and autophagy, one of the possible cell death mechanisms eliminating needless, not normal or infected cells. This process ensures quantitative and qualitative cell control of organisms. Apoptosis is tightly regulated, it requires both activation of a large number of genes and energy input. Up-to-date two main apoptotic pathways have been recognized – external/receptor and internal, processed with the participation of mitochondria. Heat shock proteins HSPs, the molecules known from their chaperone activity and molecular conservatism, play essential functions in the course of apoptosis. Among that proteins family, i.e. HSP100, 90, 70, 60, 40 and small molecular (sHSP, there are agents mainly protective against programmed cell death. However, in some conditions some of these proteins may promote apoptosis. This review describes different key apoptotic proteins interacting with main members of HSP family and the consequence of these events for cell survival or apoptosis.

  7. Arraying proteins by cell-free synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingyue; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2007-10-01

    Recent advances in life science have led to great motivation for the development of protein arrays to study functions of genome-encoded proteins. While traditional cell-based methods have been commonly used for generating protein arrays, they are usually a time-consuming process with a number of technical challenges. Cell-free protein synthesis offers an attractive system for making protein arrays, not only does it rapidly converts the genetic information into functional proteins without the need for DNA cloning, but also presents a flexible environment amenable to production of folded proteins or proteins with defined modifications. Recent advancements have made it possible to rapidly generate protein arrays from PCR DNA templates through parallel on-chip protein synthesis. This article reviews current cell-free protein array technologies and their proteomic applications.

  8. Protection of Dentate Hilar Cells from Prolonged Stimulation by Intracellular Calcium Chelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfman, Helen E.; Schwartzkroin, Philip A.

    1989-10-01

    Prolonged afferent stimulation of the rat dentate gyrus in vivo leads to degeneration only of those cells that lack immunoreactivity for the calcium binding proteins parvalbumin and calbindin. In order to test the hypothesis that calcium binding proteins protect against the effects of prolonged stimulation, intracellular recordings were made in hippocampal slices from cells that lack immunoreactivity for calcium binding proteins. Calcium binding protein--negative cells showed electrophysiological signs of deterioration during prolonged stimulation; cells containing calcium binding protein did not. When neurons without calcium binding proteins were impaled with microelectrodes containing the calcium chelator BAPTA, and BAPTA was allowed to diffuse into the cells, these cells showed no deterioration. These results indicate that, in a complex tissue of the central nervous system, an activity-induced increase in intracellular calcium can trigger processes leading to cell deterioration, and that increasing the calcium binding capacity of a cell decreases its vulnerability to damage.

  9. α/β-hydrolase domain containing protein 15 (ABHD15--an adipogenic protein protecting from apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Walenta

    Full Text Available Our knowledge about adipocyte metabolism and development is steadily growing, yet many players are still undefined. Here, we show that α/β-hydrolase domain containing protein 15 (Abhd15 is a direct and functional target gene of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, the master regulator of adipogenesis. In line, Abhd15 is mainly expressed in brown and white adipose tissue and strongly upregulated during adipogenesis in various murine and human cell lines. Stable knockdown of Abhd15 in 3T3-L1 cells evokes a striking differentiation defect, as evidenced by low lipid accumulation and decreased expression of adipocyte marker genes. In preconfluent cells, knockdown of Abhd15 leads to impaired proliferation, which is caused by apoptosis, as we see an increased SubG1 peak, caspase 3/7 activity, and BAX protein expression as well as a reduction in anti-apoptotic BCL-2 protein. Furthermore, apoptosis-inducing amounts of palmitic acid evoke a massive increase of Abhd15 expression, proposing an apoptosis-protecting role for ABHD15. On the other hand, in mature adipocytes physiological (i.e. non-apoptotic concentrations of palmitic acid down-regulate Abhd15 expression. Accordingly, we found that the expression of Abhd15 in adipose tissue is reduced in physiological situations with high free fatty acid levels, like high-fat diet, fasting, and aging as well as in genetically obese mice. Collectively, our results position ABHD15 as an essential component in the development of adipocytes as well as in apoptosis, thereby connecting two substantial factors in the regulation of adipocyte number and size. Together with its intricate regulation by free fatty acids, ABHD15 might be an intriguing new target in obesity and diabetes research.

  10. How Egg Case Proteins Can Protect Cuttlefish Offspring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Valérie; Henry, Joël; Goux, Didier; Duval, Emilie; Bernay, Benoit; Le Corguillé, Gildas; Corre, Erwan; Zatylny-Gaudin, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Sepia officinalis egg protection is ensured by a complex capsule produced by the female accessory genital glands and the ink bag. Our study is focused on the proteins constituting the main egg case. De novo transcriptomes from female genital glands provided essential databases for protein identification. A proteomic approach in SDS-PAGE coupled with MS unveiled a new egg case protein family: SepECPs, for Sepia officinalis Egg Case Proteins. N-glycosylation was demonstrated by PAS staining SDS-PAGE gels. These glycoproteins are mainly produced in the main nidamental glands. SepECPs share high sequence homology, especially in the signal peptide and the three cysteine-rich domains. SepECPs have a high number of cysteines, with conserved motifs involved in 3D-structure. SDS-PAGE showed that SepECPs could form dimers; this result was confirmed by TEM observations, which also revealed a protein network. This network is similar to the capsule network, and it associates these structural proteins with polysaccharides, melanin and bacteria to form a tight mesh. Its hardness and elasticity provide physical protection to the embryo. In addition, SepECPs also have bacteriostatic antimicrobial activity on GRAM- bacteria. By observing the SepECP / Vibrio aestuarianus complex in SEM, we demonstrated the ability of these proteins to agglomerate bacteria and thus inhibit their growth. These original proteins identified from the outer egg case ensure the survival of the species by providing physical and chemical protection to the embryos released in the environment without any maternal protection. PMID:26168161

  11. How Egg Case Proteins Can Protect Cuttlefish Offspring?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Cornet

    Full Text Available Sepia officinalis egg protection is ensured by a complex capsule produced by the female accessory genital glands and the ink bag. Our study is focused on the proteins constituting the main egg case. De novo transcriptomes from female genital glands provided essential databases for protein identification. A proteomic approach in SDS-PAGE coupled with MS unveiled a new egg case protein family: SepECPs, for Sepia officinalis Egg Case Proteins. N-glycosylation was demonstrated by PAS staining SDS-PAGE gels. These glycoproteins are mainly produced in the main nidamental glands. SepECPs share high sequence homology, especially in the signal peptide and the three cysteine-rich domains. SepECPs have a high number of cysteines, with conserved motifs involved in 3D-structure. SDS-PAGE showed that SepECPs could form dimers; this result was confirmed by TEM observations, which also revealed a protein network. This network is similar to the capsule network, and it associates these structural proteins with polysaccharides, melanin and bacteria to form a tight mesh. Its hardness and elasticity provide physical protection to the embryo. In addition, SepECPs also have bacteriostatic antimicrobial activity on GRAM- bacteria. By observing the SepECP / Vibrio aestuarianus complex in SEM, we demonstrated the ability of these proteins to agglomerate bacteria and thus inhibit their growth. These original proteins identified from the outer egg case ensure the survival of the species by providing physical and chemical protection to the embryos released in the environment without any maternal protection.

  12. Imaging protein-protein interactions in living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.A.; Bisseling, T.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2002-01-01

    The complex organization of plant cells makes it likely that the molecular behaviour of proteins in the test tube and the cell is different. For this reason, it is essential though a challenge to study proteins in their natural environment. Several innovative microspectroscopic approaches provide

  13. Protecting genomic integrity in somatic cells and embryonic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Y.; Cervantes, R.B.; Tichy, E.; Tischfield, J.A.; Stambrook, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    Mutation frequencies at some loci in mammalian somatic cells in vivo approach 10 -4 . The majority of these events occur as a consequence of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) due to mitotic recombination. Such high levels of DNA damage in somatic cells, which can accumulate with age, will cause injury and, after a latency period, may lead to somatic disease and ultimately death. This high level of DNA damage is untenable for germ cells, and by extrapolation for embryonic stem (ES) cells, that must recreate the organism. ES cells cannot tolerate such a high frequency of damage since mutations will immediately impact the altered cell, and subsequently the entire organism. Most importantly, the mutations may be passed on to future generations. ES cells, therefore, must have robust mechanisms to protect the integrity of their genomes. We have examined two such mechanisms. Firstly, we have shown that mutation frequencies and frequencies of mitotic recombination in ES cells are about 100-fold lower than in adult somatic cells or in isogenic mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). A second complementary protective mechanism eliminates those ES cells that have acquired a mutational burden, thereby maintaining a pristine population. Consistent with this hypothesis, ES cells lack a G1 checkpoint, and the two known signaling pathways that mediate the checkpoint are compromised. The checkpoint kinase, Chk2, which participates in both pathways is sequestered at centrosomes in ES cells and does not phosphorylate its substrates (i.e. p53 and Cdc25A) that must be modified to produce a G1 arrest. Ectopic expression of Chk2 does not rescue the p53-mediated pathway, but does restore the pathway mediated by Cdc25A. Wild type ES cells exposed to ionizing radiation do not accumulate in G1 but do so in S-phase and in G2. ES cells that ectopically express Chk2 undergo cell cycle arrest in G1 as well as G2, and appear to be protected from apoptosis

  14. ABC-F Proteins Mediate Antibiotic Resistance through Ribosomal Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Liam K R; Edwards, Thomas A; O'Neill, Alex J

    2016-03-22

    Members of the ABC-F subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins mediate resistance to a broad array of clinically important antibiotic classes that target the ribosome of Gram-positive pathogens. The mechanism by which these proteins act has been a subject of long-standing controversy, with two competing hypotheses each having gained considerable support: antibiotic efflux versus ribosomal protection. Here, we report on studies employing a combination of bacteriological and biochemical techniques to unravel the mechanism of resistance of these proteins, and provide several lines of evidence that together offer clear support to the ribosomal protection hypothesis. Of particular note, we show that addition of purified ABC-F proteins to anin vitrotranslation assay prompts dose-dependent rescue of translation, and demonstrate that such proteins are capable of displacing antibiotic from the ribosomein vitro To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first direct evidence that ABC-F proteins mediate antibiotic resistance through ribosomal protection.IMPORTANCEAntimicrobial resistance ranks among the greatest threats currently facing human health. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which microorganisms resist the effect of antibiotics is central to understanding the biology of this phenomenon and has the potential to inform the development of new drugs capable of blocking or circumventing resistance. Members of the ABC-F family, which includelsa(A),msr(A),optr(A), andvga(A), collectively yield resistance to a broader range of clinically significant antibiotic classes than any other family of resistance determinants, although their mechanism of action has been controversial since their discovery 25 years ago. Here we present the first direct evidence that proteins of the ABC-F family act to protect the bacterial ribosome from antibiotic-mediated inhibition. Copyright © 2016 Sharkey et al.

  15. Detecting protein-protein interactions in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottschalk, Marie; Bach, Anders; Hansen, Jakob Lerche

    2009-01-01

    to the endogenous C-terminal peptide of the NMDA receptor, as evaluated by a cell-free protein-protein interaction assay. However, it is important to address both membrane permeability and effect in living cells. Therefore a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay was established, where the C......-terminal of the NMDA receptor and PDZ2 of PSD-95 were fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Renilla luciferase (Rluc) and expressed in COS7 cells. A robust and specific BRET signal was obtained by expression of the appropriate partner proteins and subsequently, the assay was used to evaluate a Tat......The PDZ domain mediated interaction between the NMDA receptor and its intracellular scaffolding protein, PSD-95, is a potential target for treatment of ischemic brain diseases. We have recently developed a number of peptide analogues with improved affinity for the PDZ domains of PSD-95 compared...

  16. Insect Cells as Hosts for Recombinat Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Murwani, Retno

    1997-01-01

    Since the development of recombinant baculovirus expression system, insect cell culture has rapidly gain popularity as the method of choice for production of a variety of biologically active proteins. Up to date tens of recombinant protein have been produced by this method commercially or non-commercially and have been widely used for research. This review describes the basic concept of baculovirus expression vector and the use of insect cells as host for recombinant proteins. Examples of the...

  17. Prion Protein Does Not Confer Resistance to Hippocampus-Derived Zpl Cells against the Toxic Effects of Cu2+, Mn2+, Zn2+ and Co2+ Not Supporting a General Protective Role for PrP in Transition Metal Induced Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cingaram, Pradeep Kumar Reddy; Nyeste, Antal; Dondapati, Divya Teja; Fodor, Elfrieda; Welker, Ervin

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of transition metals with the prion protein (PrP) are well-documented and characterized, however, there is no consensus on their role in either the physiology of PrP or PrP-related neurodegenerative disorders. PrP has been reported to protect cells from the toxic stimuli of metals. By employing a cell viability assay, we examined the effects of various concentrations of Cu2+, Zn2+, Mn2+, and Co2+ on Zpl (Prnp-/-) and ZW (Prnp+/+) hippocampus-derived mouse neuronal cells. Prnp-/- Zpl cells were more sensitive to all four metals than PrP-expressing Zw cells. However, when we introduced PrP or only the empty vector into Zpl cells, we could not discern any protective effect associated with the presence of PrP. This observation was further corroborated when assessing the toxic effect of metals by propidium-iodide staining and fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis. Thus, our results on this mouse cell culture model do not seem to support a strong protective role for PrP against transition metal toxicity and also emphasize the necessity of extreme care when comparing cells derived from PrP knock-out and wild type mice.

  18. Radiation protection measures for hot cell sanitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.U.; Burck, W.; Dilger, H.

    1983-01-01

    The cell 5 of the Hot Cell Facility of the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (KfK) was to be restored and reequipped after 12 years of operation. The decontamination work was first done remotely controlled and afterwards by 38 persons entering the cell, which took about 2 months. The radiation protection methods and personal dosimetry systems are described. At the beginning of the work the γ-dose rate amounted up to 900 mSv/h. After completion of the remotely controlled decontamination work the γ-dose rate decreased to 1.5 mSv/h. At that time the (α+β-contamination was 10 5 Bq/cm 2 . Till the end of the work the removable activity dropped to 10 2 - 10 3 Bq/cm 2 for β-radiation, to 0.3 - 30 Bq/cm 2 for α-radiation and the local dose rate to about 0.03 mSv/h. During the work the accumulated collective doses were listed for breast, hand, head, gonads and foot. In the figure the development with the time of the doses for breast and hand is shown. During restoration work of the cell the accumulated collective whole-body dose amounted to 30 mSv. (orig.) [de

  19. Cultivating Insect Cells To Produce Recombinant Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Glenn; Goodwin, Thomas; Prewett, Tacey; Andrews, Angela; Francis, Karen; O'Connor, Kim

    1996-01-01

    Method of producing recombinant proteins involves growth of insect cells in nutrient solution in cylindrical bioreactor rotating about cylindrical axis, oriented horizontally and infecting cells with viruses into which genes of selected type cloned. Genes in question those encoding production of desired proteins. Horizontal rotating bioreactor preferred for use in method, denoted by acronym "HARV", described in "High-Aspect-Ratio Rotating Cell-Culture Vessel" (MSC-21662).

  20. Metabolic behavior of cell surface biotinylated proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hare, J.F.; Lee, E.

    1989-01-01

    The turnover of proteins on the surface of cultured mammalian cells was measured by a new approach. Reactive free amino or sulfhydryl groups on surface-accessible proteins were derivatized with biotinyl reagents and the proteins solubilized from culture dishes with detergent. Solubilized, biotinylated proteins were then adsorbed onto streptavidin-agarose, released with sodium dodecyl sulfate and mercaptoethanol, and separated on polyacrylamide gels. Biotin-epsilon-aminocaproic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (BNHS) or N-biotinoyl-N'-(maleimidohexanoyl)hydrazine (BM) were the derivatizing agents. Only 10-12 bands were adsorbed onto streptavidin-agarose from undervatized cells or from derivatized cells treated with free avidin at 4 degrees C. Two-dimensional isoelectric focusing-sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis resolved greater than 100 BNHS-derivatized proteins and greater than 40 BM-derivatized proteins. There appeared to be little overlap between the two groups of derivatized proteins. Short-term pulse-chase studies showed an accumulation of label into both groups of biotinylated proteins up until 1-2 h of chase and a rapid decrease over the next 1-5 h. Delayed appearance of labeled protein at the cell surface was attributed to transit time from site of synthesis. The unexpected and unexplained rapid disappearance of pulse-labeled proteins from the cell surface was invariant for all two-dimensionally resolved proteins and was sensitive to temperature reduction to 18 degrees C. Long-term pulse-chase experiments beginning 4-8 h after the initiation of chase showed the disappearance of derivatized proteins to be a simple first-order process having a half-life of 115 h in the case of BNHS-derivatized proteins and 30 h in the case of BM-derivatized proteins

  1. Thermodynamics of protein destabilization in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson, Jens; Mu, Xin; Lang, Lisa; Wang, Huabing; Binolfi, Andres; Theillet, François-Xavier; Bekei, Beata; Logan, Derek T; Selenko, Philipp; Wennerström, Håkan; Oliveberg, Mikael

    2015-10-06

    Although protein folding and stability have been well explored under simplified conditions in vitro, it is yet unclear how these basic self-organization events are modulated by the crowded interior of live cells. To find out, we use here in-cell NMR to follow at atomic resolution the thermal unfolding of a β-barrel protein inside mammalian and bacterial cells. Challenging the view from in vitro crowding effects, we find that the cells destabilize the protein at 37 °C but with a conspicuous twist: While the melting temperature goes down the cold unfolding moves into the physiological regime, coupled to an augmented heat-capacity change. The effect seems induced by transient, sequence-specific, interactions with the cellular components, acting preferentially on the unfolded ensemble. This points to a model where the in vivo influence on protein behavior is case specific, determined by the individual protein's interplay with the functionally optimized "interaction landscape" of the cellular interior.

  2. Functional dynamics of cell surface membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Noritaka; Osawa, Masanori; Takeuchi, Koh; Imai, Shunsuke; Stampoulis, Pavlos; Kofuku, Yutaka; Ueda, Takumi; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-04-01

    Cell surface receptors are integral membrane proteins that receive external stimuli, and transmit signals across plasma membranes. In the conventional view of receptor activation, ligand binding to the extracellular side of the receptor induces conformational changes, which convert the structure of the receptor into an active conformation. However, recent NMR studies of cell surface membrane proteins have revealed that their structures are more dynamic than previously envisioned, and they fluctuate between multiple conformations in an equilibrium on various timescales. In addition, NMR analyses, along with biochemical and cell biological experiments indicated that such dynamical properties are critical for the proper functions of the receptors. In this review, we will describe several NMR studies that revealed direct linkage between the structural dynamics and the functions of the cell surface membrane proteins, such as G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), ion channels, membrane transporters, and cell adhesion molecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A protein-truncating R179X variant in RNF186 confers protection against ulcerative colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivas, Manuel A.; Graham, Daniel; Sulem, Patrick; Stevens, Christine; Desch, A. Nicole; Goyette, Philippe; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Degenhardt, Frauke; Mucha, Soeren; Kurki, Mitja I.; Li, Dalin; D'Amato, Mauro; Annese, Vito; Vermeire, Severine; Weersma, Rinse K.; Halfvarson, Jonas; Paavola-Sakki, Paulina; Lappalainen, Maarit; Lek, Monkol; Cummings, Beryl; Tukiainen, Taru; Haritunians, Talin; Halme, Leena; Koskinen, Lotta L. E.; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N.; Luo, Yang; Heap, Graham A.; Visschedijk, Marijn C.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Ahmad, Tariq; Anderson, Carl A.; Brant, Steven R.; Duerr, Richard H.; Silverberg, Mark S.; Cho, Judy H.; Palotie, Aarno; Saavalainen, Paivi; Kontula, Kimmo; Farkkila, Martti; McGovern, Dermot P. B.; Franke, Andre; Stefansson, Kari; Rioux, John D.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Daly, Mark J.

    Protein-truncating variants protective against human disease provide in vivo validation of therapeutic targets. Here we used targeted sequencing to conduct a search for protein-truncating variants conferring protection against inflammatory bowel disease exploiting knowledge of common variants

  4. Protective effect of the poly(ADP-ribose polymerase inhibitor PJ34 on mitochondrial depolarization-mediated cell death in hepatocellular carcinoma cells involves attenuation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase-2 and protein kinase B/Akt activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radnai Balazs

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 2,4-Dimethoxyphenyl-E-4-arylidene-3-isochromanone (IK11 was previously described to induce apoptotic death of A431 tumor cells. In this report, we investigated the molecular action of IK11 in the HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line to increase our knowledge of the role of poly (ADP-ribose-polymerase (PARP, protein kinase B/Akt and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK activation in the survival and death of tumor cells and to highlight the possible role of PARP-inhibitors in co-treatments with different cytotoxic agents in cancer therapy. Results We found that sublethal concentrations of IK11 prevented proliferation, migration and entry of the cells into their G2 phase. At higher concentrations, IK11 induced reactive oxygen species (ROS production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 (JNK2, and substantial loss of HepG2 cells. ROS production appeared marginal in mediating the cytotoxicity of IK11 since N-acetyl cysteine was unable to prevent it. However, the PARP inhibitor PJ34, although not a ROS scavenger, strongly inhibited both IK11-induced ROS production and cell death. JNK2 activation seemed to be a major mediator of the effect of IK11 since inhibition of JNK resulted in a substantial cytoprotection while inhibitors of the other kinases failed to do so. Inhibition of Akt slightly diminished the effect of IK11, while the JNK and Akt inhibitor and ROS scavenger trans-resveratrol completely protected against it. Conclusions These results indicate significant involvement of PARP, a marginal role of ROS and a pro-apoptotic role of Akt in this system, and raise attention to a novel mechanism that should be considered when cancer therapy is augmented with PARP-inhibition, namely the cytoprotection by inhibition of JNK2.

  5. Baculovirus virions displaying Plasmodium berghei circumsporozoite protein protect mice against malaria sporozoite infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Shigeto; Kondoh, Daisuke; Arai, Eriko; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Seki, Chisato; Tanaka, Takao; Okada, Masaji; Ishii, Akira

    2003-01-01

    The display of foreign proteins on the surface of baculovirus virions has provided a tool for the analysis of protein-protein interactions and for cell-specific targeting in gene transfer applications. To evaluate the baculovirus display system as a vaccine vehicle, we have generated a recombinant baculovirus (AcNPV-CSPsurf) that displays rodent malaria Plasmodium berghei circumsporozoite protein (PbCSP) on the virion surface as a fusion protein with the major baculovirus envelope glycoprotein gp64. The PbCSP-gp64 fusion protein was incorporated and oligomerized on the virion surface and led to a 12-fold increase in the binding activity of AcNPV-CSPsurf virions to HepG2 cells. Immunization with adjuvant-free AcNPV-CSPsurf virions induced high levels of antibodies and gamma interferon-secreting cells against PbCSP and protected 60% of mice against sporozoite challenge. These data demonstrate that AcNPV-CSPsurf displays sporozoite-like PbCSP on the virion surface and possesses dual potentials as a malaria vaccine candidate and a liver-directed gene delivery vehicle

  6. Magnetic capture of polydopamine-encapsulated Hela cells for the analysis of cell surface proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiying; Yan, Guoquan; Gao, Mingxia; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2018-02-10

    A novel method to characterize cell surface proteins and complexes has been developed. Polydopamine (PDA)-encapsulated Hela cells were prepared for plasma membrane proteome research. Since the PDA protection, the encapsulated cells could be maintained for more than two weeks. Amino groups functionalized magnetic nanoparticles were also used for cell capture by the reaction with the PDA coatings. Plasma membrane fragments were isolated and enriched with assistance of an external magnetic field after disruption of the coated cells by ultrasonic treatment. Plasma membrane proteins (PMPs) and complexes were well preserved on the fragments and identified by shot-gun proteomic analytical strategy. 385 PMPs and 1411 non-PMPs were identified using the method. 85.2% of these PMPs were lipid-raft associated proteins. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis was employed for bio-information extraction from the identified proteins. It was found that 653 non-PMPs had interactions with 140 PMPs. Among them, epidermal growth factor receptor and its complexes, and a series of important pathways including STAT3 pathway were observed. All these results demonstrated that the new approach is of great importance in applying to the research of physiological function and mechanism of the plasma membrane proteins. This work developed a novel strategy for the proteomic analysis of cell surface proteins. According to the results, 73.3% of total identified proteins were lipid-raft associated proteins, which imply that the proposed method is of great potential in the identification of lipid-raft associated proteins. In addition, a series of protein-protein interactions and pathways related to Hela cells were pointed out. All these results demonstrated that our proposed approach is of great importance and could well be applied to the physiological function and mechanism research of plasma membrane proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Vaccination with recombinant heat shock protein 60 from Histoplasma capsulatum protects mice against pulmonary histoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, F J; Allendoerfer, R; Deepe, G S

    1995-07-01

    HIS-62 is a glycoprotein that has been isolated from the cell wall and cell membrane fraction of the pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. It is a target of the cellular immune response to this fungus, and it protects mice against a lethal intravenous inoculum of H. capsulatum yeast cells. In this study, we cloned the gene encoding this antigen to reveal its biological nature and studied the immunological activity of recombinant antigen. The amino acid sequences of the NH2 terminus and internal peptides were obtained by Edman degradation. Degenerate oligonucleotides were used to isolate a gene fragment of HIS-62 by PCR. One 680-bp segment that corresponded to the known peptide sequence was amplified from H. capsulatum DNA. This DNA was used to screen a genomic library, and the full-length gene was isolated and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of the gene demonstrated approximately 70 and approximately 50% identity to heat shock protein 60 (hsp 60) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and hsp 60 from Escherichia coli, respectively. A cDNA was synthesized by reverse transcription PCR and was expressed in E. coli. Recombinant protein reacted with a monospecific polyclonal rabbit antiserum raised against native HIS-62, with monoclonal HIS-62-reactive T cells, and with splenocytes from mice immunized with viable yeast cells. Moreover, vaccination with the recombinant protein conferred protection in mice against a lethal intranasal inoculation with yeast cells. Thus, HIS-62 is a member of the hsp 60 family, and the recombinant hsp 60 is protective against pulmonary histoplasmosis in mice.

  8. Cell penetrating peptides to dissect host-pathogen protein-protein interactions in Theileria -transformed leukocytes

    KAUST Repository

    Haidar, Malak; de Laté , Perle Latré ; Kennedy, Eileen J.; Langsley, Gordon

    2017-01-01

    One powerful application of cell penetrating peptides is the delivery into cells of molecules that function as specific competitors or inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. Ablating defined protein-protein interactions is a refined way

  9. Aspirin-Mediated Acetylation Protects Against Multiple Neurodegenerative Pathologies by Impeding Protein Aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Balasubramaniam, Meenakshisundaram; Kakraba, Samuel; Alla, Ramani; Mehta, Jawahar L; Shmookler Reis, Robert J

    2017-12-10

    Many progressive neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease, and Parkinson's disease (PD), are characterized by accumulation of insoluble protein aggregates. In prospective trials, the cyclooxygenase inhibitor aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) reduced the risk of AD and PD, as well as cardiovascular events and many late-onset cancers. Considering the role played by protein hyperphosphorylation in aggregation and neurodegenerative diseases, and aspirin's known ability to donate acetyl groups, we asked whether aspirin might reduce both phosphorylation and aggregation by acetylating protein targets. Aspirin was substantially more effective than salicylate in reducing or delaying aggregation in human neuroblastoma cells grown in vitro, and in Caenorhabditis elegans models of human neurodegenerative diseases in vivo. Aspirin acetylates many proteins, while reducing phosphorylation, suggesting that acetylation may oppose phosphorylation. Surprisingly, acetylated proteins were largely excluded from compact aggregates. Molecular-dynamic simulations indicate that acetylation of amyloid peptide energetically disfavors its association into dimers and octamers, and oligomers that do form are less compact and stable than those comprising unacetylated peptides. Hyperphosphorylation predisposes certain proteins to aggregate (e.g., tau, α-synuclein, and transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 [TDP-43]), and it is a critical pathogenic marker in both cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. We present novel evidence that acetylated proteins are underrepresented in protein aggregates, and that aggregation varies inversely with acetylation propensity after diverse genetic and pharmacologic interventions. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that aspirin inhibits protein aggregation and the ensuing toxicity of aggregates through its acetyl-donating activity. This mechanism may contribute to the neuro-protective, cardio-protective

  10. Vanillin protects human keratinocyte stem cells against ultraviolet B irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jienny; Cho, Jae Youl; Lee, Sang Yeol; Lee, Kyung-Woo; Lee, Jongsung; Song, Jae-Young

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiation is one of major factors which induce cellular damages in the epidermis. We investigated protective effects and mechanisms of vanillin, a main constituent of vanilla beans, against UVB-induced cellular damages in keratinocyte stem cells (KSC). Here, vanillin significantly attenuated UVB irradiation-induced cytotoxicity. The vanillin effects were also demonstrated by the results of the senescence-associated β-galactosidase and alkaline comet assays. In addition, vanillin induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Attempts to elucidate a possible mechanism underlying the vanillin-mediated effects revealed that vanillin significantly reduced UVB-induced phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), serine threonine kinase checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2), tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53), p38/mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38), c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK), S6 ribosomal protein (S6RP), and histone 2A family member X (H2A.X). UVB-induced activation of p53 luciferase reporter was also significantly inhibited by vanillin. In addition, while ATM inhibitor had no effect on the vanillin effects, mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2) inhibitor significantly attenuated suppressive effects of vanillin on UVB-induced activation of p53 reporter in KSC. Taken together, these findings suggest that vanillin protects KSC from UVB irradiation and its effects may occur through the suppression of downstream step of MDM2 in UVB irradiation-induced p53 activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Protective effect of a non specific inflammation on bone marrow protein synthesis in irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herodin, F.; Roques, P.; Court, L.

    1988-01-01

    Gamma radiations exert a decrease in mouse bone marrow total protein synthesis. A non-specific inflammatory process induced with polyacrylamide microbeads stimulates spleen and marrow protein synthesis and protects the medullar protein synthesis in irradiated mice [fr

  12. Sirtuin1 and autophagy protect cells from fluoride-induced cell stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Maiko; Bartlett, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) is an (NAD+)-dependent deacetylase functioning in the regulation of metabolism, cell survival and organismal lifespan. Active SIRT1 regulates autophagy during cell stress, including calorie restriction, endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress. Previously, we reported that fluoride induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in ameloblasts responsible for enamel formation, suggesting that ER-stress plays a role in dental fluorosis. However, the molecular mechanism of how cells respond to fluoride-induced cell stress is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that fluoride activates SIRT1 and initiates autophagy to protect cells from fluoride exposure. Fluoride treatment of ameloblast-derived cells (LS8) significantly increased Sirt1 expression and induced SIRT1 phosphorylation resulting in the augmentation of SIRT1 deacetylase activity. To demonstrate that fluoride exposure initiates autophagy, we characterized the expression of autophagy related genes (Atg); Atg5, Atg7 and Atg8/LC3 and showed that both their transcript and protein levels were significantly increased following fluoride treatment. To confirm that SIRT1 plays a protective role in fluoride toxicity, we used resveratrol (RES) to augmented SIRT1 activity in fluoride treated LS8 cells. RES increased autophagy, inhibited apoptosis, and decreased fluoride cytotoxicity. Rats treated with fluoride (0, 50 and 100 ppm) in drinking water for 6 weeks had significantly elevated expression levels of Sirt1, Atg5, Atg7 and Atg8/LC3 in their maturation stage enamel organs. Increased protein levels of p-SIRT1, ATG5 and ATG8/LC3 were present in fluoride-treated rat maturation stage ameloblasts. Therefore, the SIRT1/autophagy pathway may play a critical role as a protective response to help prevent dental fluorosis. PMID:24296261

  13. Sirtuin1 and autophagy protect cells from fluoride-induced cell stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Maiko; Bartlett, John D

    2014-02-01

    Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent deacetylase functioning in the regulation of metabolism, cell survival and organismal lifespan. Active SIRT1 regulates autophagy during cell stress, including calorie restriction, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and oxidative stress. Previously, we reported that fluoride induces ER-stress in ameloblasts responsible for enamel formation, suggesting that ER-stress plays a role in dental fluorosis. However, the molecular mechanism of how cells respond to fluoride-induced cell stress is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that fluoride activates SIRT1 and initiates autophagy to protect cells from fluoride exposure. Fluoride treatment of ameloblast-derived cells (LS8) significantly increased Sirt1 expression and induced SIRT1 phosphorylation resulting in the augmentation of SIRT1 deacetylase activity. To demonstrate that fluoride exposure initiates autophagy, we characterized the expression of autophagy related genes (Atg); Atg5, Atg7 and Atg8/LC3 and showed that both their transcript and protein levels were significantly increased following fluoride treatment. To confirm that SIRT1 plays a protective role in fluoride toxicity, we used resveratrol (RES) to augment SIRT1 activity in fluoride treated LS8 cells. RES increased autophagy, inhibited apoptosis, and decreased fluoride cytotoxicity. Rats treated with fluoride (0, 50, 100 and 125ppm) in drinking water for 6weeks had significantly elevated expression levels of Sirt1, Atg5, Atg7 and Atg8/LC3 in their maturation stage enamel organs. Increased protein levels of p-SIRT1, ATG5 and ATG8/LC3 were present in fluoride-treated rat maturation stage ameloblasts. Therefore, the SIRT1/autophagy pathway may play a critical role as a protective response to help prevent dental fluorosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. ASIC PROTEINS REGULATE SMOOTH MUSCLE CELL MIGRATION

    OpenAIRE

    Grifoni, Samira C.; Jernigan, Nikki L.; Hamilton, Gina; Drummond, Heather A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate Acid Sensing Ion Channel (ASIC) protein expression and importance in cellular migration. We recently demonstrated Epithelial Na+ Channel (ENaC) proteins are required for vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration, however the role of the closely related ASIC proteins has not been addressed. We used RT-PCR and immunolabeling to determine expression of ASIC1, ASIC2, ASIC3 and ASIC4 in A10 cells. We used small interference RNA to silence indi...

  15. Reaction of carnosine with aged proteins: another protective process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipkiss, Alan R; Brownson, Carol; Bertani, Mariana F; Ruiz, Emilio; Ferro, Albert

    2002-04-01

    Cellular aging is often associated with an increase in protein carbonyl groups arising from oxidation- and glycation-related phenomena and suppressed proteasome activity. These "aged" polypeptides may either be degraded by 20S proteasomes or cross-link to form structures intractable to proteolysis and inhibitory to proteasome activity. Carnosine (beta-alanyl-l-histidine) is present at surprisingly high levels (up to 20 mM) in muscle and nervous tissues in many animals, especially long-lived species. Carnosine can delay senescence in cultured human fibroblasts and reverse the senescent phenotype, restoring a more juvenile appearance. As better antioxidants/free-radical scavengers than carnosine do not demonstrate these antisenescent effects, additional properties of carnosine must contribute to its antisenescent activity. Having shown that carnosine can react with protein carbonyls, thereby generating "carnosinylated" polypeptides using model systems, we propose that similar adducts are generated in senescent cells exposed to carnosine. Polypeptide-carnosine adducts have been recently detected in beef products that are relatively rich in carnosine, and carnosine's reaction with carbonyl functions generated during amino acid deamidation has also been described. Growth of cultured human fibroblasts with carnosine stimulated proteolysis of long-labeled proteins as the cells approached their "Hayflick limit," consistent with the idea that carnosine ameliorates the senescence-associated proteolytic decline. We also find that carnosine suppresses induction of heme-oxygenase-1 activity following exposure of human endothelial cells to a glycated protein. The antisenescent activity of the spin-trap agent alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN) towards cultured human fibroblasts resides in N-t-butyl-hydroxylamine, its hydrolysis product. As hydroxylamines are reactive towards aldehydes and ketones, the antisenescent activity of N-t-butyl-hydroxylamine and other hydroxylamines may

  16. Osteoblasts Protect AML Cells from SDF-1-Induced Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Kimberly N.; Dudakovic, Amel; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Philips, Rachael L.; Hess, Allan D.; Smith, B. Douglas; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Karp, Judith E.; Kaufmann, Scott H.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.; Hedin, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    The bone marrow provides a protective environment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells that often allows leukemic stem cells to survive standard chemotherapeutic regimens. Targeting these leukemic stem cells within the bone marrow is critical for preventing relapse. We recently demonstrated that SDF-1, a chemokine abundant in the bone marrow, induces apoptosis in AML cell lines and in patient samples expressing high levels of its receptor, CXCR4. Here we show that a subset of osteoblast lineage cells within the bone marrow can protect AML cells from undergoing apoptosis in response to the SDF-1 naturally present in that location. In co-culture systems, osteoblasts at various stages of differentiation protected AML cell lines and patient isolates from SDF-1-induced apoptosis. The differentiation of the osteoblast cell lines, MC3T3 and W-20-17, mediated this protection via a cell contact-independent mechanism. In contrast, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, the precursors of osteoblasts, induced apoptosis in AML cells via a CXCR4-dependent mechanism and failed to protect AML cells from exogenously added SDF-1. These results indicate that osteoblasts in the process of differentiation potently inhibit the SDF-1-driven apoptotic pathway of CXCR4-expressing AML cells residing in the bone marrow. Drugs targeting this protective mechanism could potentially provide a new approach to treating AML by enhancing the SDF-1-induced apoptosis of AML cells residing within the bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:24851270

  17. Protective effect of atorvastatin on radiation-induced vascular endothelial cell injury in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ran Xinze; Zong Zhaowen; Liu Dengqun; Su Yongping; Zheng Huaien; Ran Xi; Xiang Guiming

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are very sensitive to ionizing radiation, and it is important to develop effective prevent agents and measures in radiation exposure protection. In the present study, the protective effects of atorvastatin on irradiated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and the possible mechanisms were explored. Cultured HUVEC were treated by atorvastatin at a final concentration of 10 μmol/ml for 10 minutes, and then irradiated at a dose of 2 Gy or 25 Gy. Twenty-four hours after irradiation, apoptosis of HUVEC was monitored by flow cytometry, and the expression of thrombomodulin (TM) and protein C activation in HUVEC was respectively assessed by flow cytometry and spectrophotometry. After treatment with atorvastatin for 24 h, the rate of cell apoptosis decreased by 6% and 16% in cells irradiated with 2 Gy and 25 Gy, respectively. TM expression increased by 77%, 59%, and 61% in untreated cells, 2 Gy irradiation-treated cells, and 25 Gy irradiation-treated cells, respectively. The protein C levels in 2 Gy and 25 Gy irradiation-treated cells were reduced by 23% and 34% when compared with untreated cells, but up-regulated by 79% and 76% when compared with cells which were irradiated and treated with atorvastatin. In conclusion, these data indicate that atorvastatin exerts protective effects on irradiated HUVEC by reducing apoptosis by up-regulating TM expression and enhancing protein C activation in irradiated HUVEC. (author)

  18. Protective effect of atorvastatin on radiation-induced vascular endothelial cell injury in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xinze, Ran; Zhaowen, Zong; Dengqun, Liu; Yongping, Su; Huaien, Zheng [College of Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical Univ., Chongqing (China); Xi, Ran; Guiming, Xiang [Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical Univ., Chongqing (China)

    2010-09-15

    Vascular endothelial cells are very sensitive to ionizing radiation, and it is important to develop effective prevent agents and measures in radiation exposure protection. In the present study, the protective effects of atorvastatin on irradiated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and the possible mechanisms were explored. Cultured HUVEC were treated by atorvastatin at a final concentration of 10 {mu}mol/ml for 10 minutes, and then irradiated at a dose of 2 Gy or 25 Gy. Twenty-four hours after irradiation, apoptosis of HUVEC was monitored by flow cytometry, and the expression of thrombomodulin (TM) and protein C activation in HUVEC was respectively assessed by flow cytometry and spectrophotometry. After treatment with atorvastatin for 24 h, the rate of cell apoptosis decreased by 6% and 16% in cells irradiated with 2 Gy and 25 Gy, respectively. TM expression increased by 77%, 59%, and 61% in untreated cells, 2 Gy irradiation-treated cells, and 25 Gy irradiation-treated cells, respectively. The protein C levels in 2 Gy and 25 Gy irradiation-treated cells were reduced by 23% and 34% when compared with untreated cells, but up-regulated by 79% and 76% when compared with cells which were irradiated and treated with atorvastatin. In conclusion, these data indicate that atorvastatin exerts protective effects on irradiated HUVEC by reducing apoptosis by up-regulating TM expression and enhancing protein C activation in irradiated HUVEC. (author)

  19. Vaccination with Recombinant Microneme Proteins Confers Protection against Experimental Toxoplasmosis in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Figueiredo Pinzan

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis, a zoonotic disease caused by Toxoplasma gondii, is an important public health problem and veterinary concern. Although there is no vaccine for human toxoplasmosis, many attempts have been made to develop one. Promising vaccine candidates utilize proteins, or their genes, from microneme organelle of T. gondii that are involved in the initial stages of host cell invasion by the parasite. In the present study, we used different recombinant microneme proteins (TgMIC1, TgMIC4, or TgMIC6 or combinations of these proteins (TgMIC1-4 and TgMIC1-4-6 to evaluate the immune response and protection against experimental toxoplasmosis in C57BL/6 mice. Vaccination with recombinant TgMIC1, TgMIC4, or TgMIC6 alone conferred partial protection, as demonstrated by reduced brain cyst burden and mortality rates after challenge. Immunization with TgMIC1-4 or TgMIC1-4-6 vaccines provided the most effective protection, since 70% and 80% of mice, respectively, survived to the acute phase of infection. In addition, these vaccinated mice, in comparison to non-vaccinated ones, showed reduced parasite burden by 59% and 68%, respectively. The protective effect was related to the cellular and humoral immune responses induced by vaccination and included the release of Th1 cytokines IFN-γ and IL-12, antigen-stimulated spleen cell proliferation, and production of antigen-specific serum antibodies. Our results demonstrate that microneme proteins are potential vaccines against T. gondii, since their inoculation prevents or decreases the deleterious effects of the infection.

  20. Vaccination with Recombinant Microneme Proteins Confers Protection against Experimental Toxoplasmosis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzan, Camila Figueiredo; Sardinha-Silva, Aline; Almeida, Fausto; Lai, Livia; Lopes, Carla Duque; Lourenço, Elaine Vicente; Panunto-Castelo, Ademilson; Matthews, Stephen; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis, a zoonotic disease caused by Toxoplasma gondii, is an important public health problem and veterinary concern. Although there is no vaccine for human toxoplasmosis, many attempts have been made to develop one. Promising vaccine candidates utilize proteins, or their genes, from microneme organelle of T. gondii that are involved in the initial stages of host cell invasion by the parasite. In the present study, we used different recombinant microneme proteins (TgMIC1, TgMIC4, or TgMIC6) or combinations of these proteins (TgMIC1-4 and TgMIC1-4-6) to evaluate the immune response and protection against experimental toxoplasmosis in C57BL/6 mice. Vaccination with recombinant TgMIC1, TgMIC4, or TgMIC6 alone conferred partial protection, as demonstrated by reduced brain cyst burden and mortality rates after challenge. Immunization with TgMIC1-4 or TgMIC1-4-6 vaccines provided the most effective protection, since 70% and 80% of mice, respectively, survived to the acute phase of infection. In addition, these vaccinated mice, in comparison to non-vaccinated ones, showed reduced parasite burden by 59% and 68%, respectively. The protective effect was related to the cellular and humoral immune responses induced by vaccination and included the release of Th1 cytokines IFN-γ and IL-12, antigen-stimulated spleen cell proliferation, and production of antigen-specific serum antibodies. Our results demonstrate that microneme proteins are potential vaccines against T. gondii, since their inoculation prevents or decreases the deleterious effects of the infection.

  1. Origins of Protein Functions in Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelig, Burchard; Pohorille, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    In modern organisms proteins perform a majority of cellular functions, such as chemical catalysis, energy transduction and transport of material across cell walls. Although great strides have been made towards understanding protein evolution, a meaningful extrapolation from contemporary proteins to their earliest ancestors is virtually impossible. In an alternative approach, the origin of water-soluble proteins was probed through the synthesis and in vitro evolution of very large libraries of random amino acid sequences. In combination with computer modeling and simulations, these experiments allow us to address a number of fundamental questions about the origins of proteins. Can functionality emerge from random sequences of proteins? How did the initial repertoire of functional proteins diversify to facilitate new functions? Did this diversification proceed primarily through drawing novel functionalities from random sequences or through evolution of already existing proto-enzymes? Did protein evolution start from a pool of proteins defined by a frozen accident and other collections of proteins could start a different evolutionary pathway? Although we do not have definitive answers to these questions yet, important clues have been uncovered. In one example (Keefe and Szostak, 2001), novel ATP binding proteins were identified that appear to be unrelated in both sequence and structure to any known ATP binding proteins. One of these proteins was subsequently redesigned computationally to bind GTP through introducing several mutations that introduce targeted structural changes to the protein, improve its binding to guanine and prevent water from accessing the active center. This study facilitates further investigations of individual evolutionary steps that lead to a change of function in primordial proteins. In a second study (Seelig and Szostak, 2007), novel enzymes were generated that can join two pieces of RNA in a reaction for which no natural enzymes are known

  2. Dendritic cells and hepatocytes use distinct pathways to process protective antigen from plasmodium in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian A Cockburn

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Malaria-protective CD8+ T cells specific for the circumsporozoite (CS protein are primed by dendritic cells (DCs after sporozoite injection by infected mosquitoes. The primed cells then eliminate parasite liver stages after recognizing the CS epitopes presented by hepatocytes. To define the in vivo processing of CS by DCs and hepatocytes, we generated parasites carrying a mutant CS protein containing the H-2K(b epitope SIINFEKL, and evaluated the T cell response using transgenic and mutant mice. We determined that in both DCs and hepatocytes CS epitopes must reach the cytosol and use the TAP transporters to access the ER. Furthermore, we used endosomal mutant (3d and cytochrome c treated mice to address the role of cross-presentation in the priming and effector phases of the T cell response. We determined that in DCs, CS is cross-presented via endosomes while, conversely, in hepatocytes protein must be secreted directly into the cytosol. This suggests that the main targets of protective CD8+ T cells are parasite proteins exported to the hepatocyte cytosol. Surprisingly, however, secretion of the CS protein into hepatocytes was not dependent upon parasite-export (Pexel/VTS motifs in this protein. Together, these results indicate that the presentation of epitopes to CD8+ T cells follows distinct pathways in DCs when the immune response is induced and in hepatocytes during the effector phase.

  3. Protective mechanism against cancer found in progeria patient cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have studied cells of patients with an extremely rare genetic disease that is characterized by drastic premature aging and discovered a new protective cellular mechanism against cancer. They found that cells from patients with Hutchinson Gi

  4. A Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic) Acid Nanovaccine Based on Chimeric Peptides from Different Leishmania infantum Proteins Induces Dendritic Cells Maturation and Promotes Peptide-Specific IFNγ-Producing CD8+ T Cells Essential for the Protection against Experimental Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Evita; Agallou, Maria; Tastsoglou, Spyros; Kammona, Olga; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis; Kiparissides, Costas; Karagouni, Evdokia

    2017-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis, caused by Leishmania ( L .) donovani and L. infantum protozoan parasites, can provoke overwhelming and protracted epidemics, with high case-fatality rates. An effective vaccine against the disease must rely on the generation of a strong and long-lasting T cell immunity, mediated by CD4 + T H1 and CD8 + T cells. Multi-epitope peptide-based vaccine development is manifesting as the new era of vaccination strategies against Leishmania infection. In this study, we designed chimeric peptides containing HLA-restricted epitopes from three immunogenic L. infantum proteins (cysteine peptidase A, histone H1, and kinetoplastid membrane protein 11), in order to be encapsulated in poly(lactic- co -glycolic) acid nanoparticles with or without the adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) or surface modification with an octapeptide targeting the tumor necrosis factor receptor II. We aimed to construct differentially functionalized peptide-based nanovaccine candidates and investigate their capacity to stimulate the immunomodulatory properties of dendritic cells (DCs), which are critical regulators of adaptive immunity generated upon vaccination. According to our results, DCs stimulation with the peptide-based nanovaccine candidates with MPLA incorporation or surface modification induced an enhanced maturation profile with prominent IL-12 production, promoting allogeneic T cell proliferation and intracellular production of IFNγ by CD4 + and CD8 + T cell subsets. In addition, DCs stimulated with the peptide-based nanovaccine candidate with MPLA incorporation exhibited a robust transcriptional activation, characterized by upregulated genes indicative of vaccine-driven DCs differentiation toward type 1 phenotype. Immunization of HLA A2.1 transgenic mice with this peptide-based nanovaccine candidate induced peptide-specific IFNγ-producing CD8 + T cells and conferred significant protection against L. infantum infection. Concluding, our findings supported that

  5. Anti-apoptotic peptides protect against radiation-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, Kevin W.; Muenzer, Jared T.; Chang, Kathy C.; Davis, Chris G.; McDunn, Jonathan E.; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Hilliard, Carolyn A.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Grigsby, Perry W.; Hunt, Clayton R.

    2007-01-01

    The risk of terrorist attacks utilizing either nuclear or radiological weapons has raised concerns about the current lack of effective radioprotectants. Here it is demonstrated that the BH4 peptide domain of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL can be delivered to cells by covalent attachment to the TAT peptide transduction domain (TAT-BH4) and provide protection in vitro and in vivo from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Isolated human lymphocytes treated with TAT-BH4 were protected against apoptosis following exposure to 15 Gy radiation. In mice exposed to 5 Gy radiation, TAT-BH4 treatment protected splenocytes and thymocytes from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Most importantly, in vivo radiation protection was observed in mice whether TAT-BH4 treatment was given prior to or after irradiation. Thus, by targeting steps within the apoptosis signaling pathway it is possible to develop post-exposure treatments to protect radio-sensitive tissues

  6. Endolysosomal pathway activity protects cells from neurotoxic TDP-43

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Leibiger

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of protein aggregates in neurons is a typical pathological hallmark of the motor neuron disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and of frontotemporal dementia (FTD. In many cases, these aggregates are composed of the 43 kDa TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP‑43. Using a yeast model for TDP‑43 proteinopathies, we observed that the vacuole (the yeast equivalent of lysosomes markedly contributed to the degradation of TDP‑43. This clearance occurred via TDP‑43-containing vesicles fusing with the vacuole through the concerted action of the endosomal-vacuolar (or endolysosomal pathway and autophagy. In line with its dominant role in the clearance of TDP‑43, endosomal-vacuolar pathway activity protected cells from the detrimental effects of TDP‑43. In contrast, enhanced autophagy contributed to TDP‑43 cytotoxicity, despite being involved in TDP‑43 degradation. TDP‑43’s interference with endosomal-vacuolar pathway activity may have two deleterious consequences. First, it interferes with its own degradation via this pathway, resulting in TDP‑43 accumulation. Second, it affects vacuolar proteolytic activity, which requires endosomal-vacuolar trafficking. We speculate that the latter contributes to aberrant autophagy. In sum, we propose that ameliorating endolysosomal pathway activity enhances cell survival in TDP‑43-associated diseases.

  7. TAT-Mediated Delivery of Tousled Protein to Salivary Glands Protects Against Radiation-Induced Hypofunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunavala-Dossabhoy, Gulshan, E-mail: gsunav@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Palaniyandi, Senthilnathan; Richardson, Charles; De Benedetti, Arrigo [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Schrott, Lisa [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Neuroscience, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Caldito, Gloria [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Patients treated with radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer invariably suffer its deleterious side effect, xerostomia. Salivary hypofunction ensuing from the irreversible destruction of glands is the most common and debilitating oral complication affecting patients undergoing regional radiotherapy. Given that the current management of xerostomia is palliative and ineffective, efforts are now directed toward preventive measures to preserve gland function. The human homolog of Tousled protein, TLK1B, facilitates chromatin remodeling at DNA repair sites and improves cell survival against ionizing radiation (IR). Therefore, we wanted to determine whether a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to rat salivary glands could protect against IR-induced salivary hypofunction. Methods: The cell-permeable TAT-TLK1B fusion protein was generated. Rat acinar cell line and rat salivary glands were pretreated with TAT peptide or TAT-TLK1B before IR. The acinar cell survival in vitro and salivary function in vivo were assessed after radiation. Results: We demonstrated that rat acinar cells transduced with TAT-TLK1B were more resistant to radiation (D{sub 0} = 4.13 {+-} 1.0 Gy; {alpha}/{beta} = 0 Gy) compared with cells transduced with the TAT peptide (D{sub 0} = 4.91 {+-} 1.0 Gy; {alpha}/{beta} = 20.2 Gy). Correspondingly, retroductal instillation of TAT-TLK1B in rat submandibular glands better preserved salivary flow after IR (89%) compared with animals pretreated with Opti-MEM or TAT peptide (31% and 39%, respectively; p < 0.01). Conclusions: The results demonstrate that a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to the salivary glands effectively attenuates radiation-mediated gland dysfunction. Prophylactic TLK1B-protein therapy could benefit patients undergoing radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer.

  8. Selective blockade of protein kinase B protects the rat and human myocardium against ischaemic injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares-Palomino, José; Husainy, Muhammad A; Lai, Vien K; Dickenson, John M; Galiñanes, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) plays a critical role in cell survival but the investigation of its involvement has been limited by the lack of specific pharmacological agents. In this study, using novel PKB inhibitors (VIII and XI), we investigated the role of PKB in cardioprotection of the rat and human myocardium, the location of PKB in relation to mitoKATP channels and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), and whether the manipulation of PKB can overcome the unresponsiveness to protection of the diabetic myocardium. Myocardial slices from rat left ventricle and from the right atrial appendage of patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery were subjected to 90 min ischaemia/120 min reoxygenation at 37°C. Tissue injury was assessed by creatine kinase (CK) released and determination of cell necrosis and apoptosis. The results showed that blockade of PKB activity caused significant reduction of CK release and cell death, a benefit that was as potent as ischaemic preconditioning and could be reproduced by blockade of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3K) with wortmannin and LY 294002. The protection was time dependent with maximal benefit seen when PKB and PI-3K were inhibited before ischaemia or during both ischaemia and reoxygenation. In addition, it was revealed that PKB is located downstream of mitoKATP channels but upstream of p38 MAPK. PKB inhibition induced a similar degree of protection in the human and rat myocardium and, importantly, it reversed the unresponsiveness to protection of the diabetic myocardium. In conclusion, inhibition of PKB plays a critical role in protection of the mammalian myocardium and may represent a clinical target for the reduction of ischaemic injury. PMID:20403980

  9. Parkinson Disease Protein DJ-1 Binds Metals and Protects against Metal-induced Cytotoxicity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkblom, Benny; Adilbayeva, Altynai; Maple-Grødem, Jodi; Piston, Dominik; Ökvist, Mats; Xu, Xiang Ming; Brede, Cato; Larsen, Jan Petter; Møller, Simon Geir

    2013-01-01

    The progressive loss of motor control due to reduction of dopamine-producing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and decreased striatal dopamine levels are the classically described features of Parkinson disease (PD). Neuronal damage also progresses to other regions of the brain, and additional non-motor dysfunctions are common. Accumulation of environmental toxins, such as pesticides and metals, are suggested risk factors for the development of typical late onset PD, although genetic factors seem to be substantial in early onset cases. Mutations of DJ-1 are known to cause a form of recessive early onset Parkinson disease, highlighting an important functional role for DJ-1 in early disease prevention. This study identifies human DJ-1 as a metal-binding protein able to evidently bind copper as well as toxic mercury ions in vitro. The study further characterizes the cytoprotective function of DJ-1 and PD-mutated variants of DJ-1 with respect to induced metal cytotoxicity. The results show that expression of DJ-1 enhances the cells' protective mechanisms against induced metal toxicity and that this protection is lost for DJ-1 PD mutations A104T and D149A. The study also shows that oxidation site-mutated DJ-1 C106A retains its ability to protect cells. We also show that concomitant addition of dopamine exposure sensitizes cells to metal-induced cytotoxicity. We also confirm that redox-active dopamine adducts enhance metal-catalyzed oxidation of intracellular proteins in vivo by use of live cell imaging of redox-sensitive S3roGFP. The study indicates that even a small genetic alteration can sensitize cells to metal-induced cell death, a finding that may revive the interest in exogenous factors in the etiology of PD. PMID:23792957

  10. Exogenous cathepsin V protein protects human cardiomyocytes HCM from angiotensin Ⅱ-Induced hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kun; Gao, Lu; Yang, Ming; Wang, Jiliang; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Lin; Wang, Guobin; Li, Huili

    2017-08-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) Ⅱ-induced cardiac hypertrophy can deteriorate to heart failure, a leading cause of mortality. Endogenous Cathepsin V (CTSV) has been reported to be cardioprotective against hypertrophy. However, little is known about the effect of exogenous CTSV on cardiac hypertrophy. We used the human cardiomyocytes HCM as a cell model to investigate the effects of exogenous CTSV on Ang Ⅱ-induced cardiac cell hypertrophy. Cell surface area and expression of classical markers of hypertrophy were analyzed. We further explored the mechanism of CTSV cardioprotective by assessing the levels and activities of PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MAPK signaling pathway proteins. We found that pre-treating cardiomyocytes with CTSV could significantly inhibit Ang Ⅱ-induced hypertrophy. The mRNA expression of hypertrophy markers ANP, BNP and β-MHC was obviously elevated in Ang Ⅱ-treated cardiac cells. Whereas, exogenous CTSV effectively halted this elevation. Further study revealed that the protective effects of exogenous CTSV might be mediated by repressing the phosphorylation of proteins in the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MAPK pathways. Based on our results, we concluded that exogenous CTSV inhibited Ang Ⅱ-induced hypertrophy in HCM cells by inhibiting PI3K/Akt/mTOR. This study provides experimental evidence for the application of CTSV protein for the treatment of cardiac hypertrophy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitor Roflumilast Protects against Cigarette Smoke Extract-Induced Mitophagy-Dependent Cell Death in Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyung, Sun Young; Kim, Yu Jin; Son, Eun Suk; Jeong, Sung Hwan; Park, Jeong Woong

    2018-04-01

    Recent studies show that mitophagy, the autophagy-dependent turnover of mitochondria, mediates pulmonary epithelial cell death in response to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) exposure and contributes to the development of emphysema in vivo during chronic cigarette smoke (CS) exposure, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of mitophagy in the regulation of CSE-exposed lung bronchial epithelial cell (Beas-2B) death. We also investigated the role of a phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, roflumilast, in CSE-induced mitophagy-dependent cell death. Our results demonstrated that CSE induces mitophagy in Beas-2B cells through mitochondrial dysfunction and increased the expression levels of the mitophagy regulator protein, PTEN-induced putative kinase-1 (PINK1), and the mitochondrial fission protein, dynamin-1-like protein (DRP1). CSE-induced epithelial cell death was significantly increased in Beas-2B cells exposed to CSE but was decreased by small interfering RNA-dependent knockdown of DRP1. Treatment with roflumilast in Beas-2B cells inhibited CSE-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and mitophagy by inhibiting the expression of phospho-DRP1 and -PINK1. Roflumilast protected against cell death and increased cell viability, as determined by the lactate dehydrogenase release test and the MTT assay, respectively, in Beas-2B cells exposed to CSE. These findings suggest that roflumilast plays a protective role in CS-induced mitophagy-dependent cell death. Copyright©2018. The Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.

  12. Cell wall proteins of Sporothrix schenckii as immunoprotective agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba-Fierro, Carlos A; Pérez-Torres, Armando; López-Romero, Everardo; Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra; Ruiz-Baca, Estela

    2014-01-01

    Sporothrix schenckii is the etiological agent of sporotrichosis, an endemic subcutaneous mycosis in Latin America. Cell wall (CW) proteins located on the cell surface are inducers of cellular and humoral immune responses, potential candidates for diagnosis purposes and to generate vaccines to prevent fungal infections. This mini-review emphasizes the potential use of S. schenckii CW proteins as protective and therapeutic immune response inducers against sporotrichosis. A number of pathogenic fungi display CW components that have been characterized as inducers of protective cellular and humoral immune responses against the whole pathogen from which they were originally purified. The isolation and characterization of immunodominant protein components of the CW of S. schenckii have become relevant because of their potential in the development of protective and therapeutic immune responses against sporotrichosis. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Human Asymptomatic Epitopes Identified from the Herpes Simplex Virus Tegument Protein VP13/14 (UL47) Preferentially Recall Polyfunctional Effector Memory CD44high CD62Llow CD8+ TEM Cells and Protect Humanized HLA-A*02:01 Transgenic Mice against Ocular Herpesvirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A; Garg, Sumit; Syed, Sabrina A; Furness, Julie N; Vahed, Hawa; Pham, Tiffany; Yu, Howard T; Nesburn, Anthony B; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2017-01-15

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection is widespread among humans. The HSV-1 virion protein 13/14 (VP13/14), also known as UL47, is a tegument antigen targeted by CD8 + T cells from HSV-seropositive individuals. However, whether VP13/14-specific CD8 + T cells play a role in the natural protection seen in asymptomatic (ASYMP) individuals (individuals who have never had a clinical herpetic disease) has not been elucidated. Using predictive computer-assisted algorithms, we identified 10 potential HLA-A*02:01-restricted CD8 + T-cell epitopes from the 693-amino-acid sequence of the VP13/14 protein. Three out of 10 epitopes exhibited a high to moderate affinity of binding to soluble HLA-A*02:01 molecules. The phenotype and function of CD8 + T cells specific for each epitope were compared in HLA-A*02:01-positive ASYMP individuals and symptomatic (SYMP) individuals (individuals who have frequent clinical herpetic diseases) using determination of a combination of tetramer frequency and the levels of granzyme B, granzyme K, perforin, gamma interferon, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-2 production and CD107 a/b cytotoxic degranulation. High frequencies of multifunctional CD8 + T cells directed against three epitopes, VP13/14 from amino acids 286 to 294 (VP13/14 286-294 ), VP13/14 from amino acids 504 to 512 (VP13/14 504-512 ), and VP13/14 from amino acids 544 to 552 (VP13/14 544-552 ), were detected in ASYMP individuals, while only low frequencies were detected in SYMP individuals. The three epitopes also predominantly recalled more CD45RA low CD44 high CCR7 low CD62L low CD8 + effector memory T cells (T EM cells) in ASYMP individuals than SYMP individuals. Moreover, immunization of HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mice with the three CD8 + T EM -cell epitopes from ASYMP individuals induced robust and polyfunctional HSV-specific CD8 + T EM cells associated with strong protective immunity against ocular herpesvirus infection and disease. Our findings outline the phenotypic

  14. ASIC proteins regulate smooth muscle cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grifoni, Samira C; Jernigan, Nikki L; Hamilton, Gina; Drummond, Heather A

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate Acid Sensing Ion Channel (ASIC) protein expression and importance in cellular migration. We recently demonstrated that Epithelial Na(+)Channel (ENaC) proteins are required for vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration; however, the role of the closely related ASIC proteins has not been addressed. We used RT-PCR and immunolabeling to determine expression of ASIC1, ASIC2, ASIC3 and ASIC4 in A10 cells. We used small interference RNA to silence individual ASIC expression and determine the importance of ASIC proteins in wound healing and chemotaxis (PDGF-bb)-initiated migration. We found ASIC1, ASIC2, and ASIC3, but not ASIC4, expression in A10 cells. ASIC1, ASIC2, and ASIC3 siRNA molecules significantly suppressed expression of their respective proteins compared to non-targeting siRNA (RISC) transfected controls by 63%, 44%, and 55%, respectively. Wound healing was inhibited by 10, 20, and 26% compared to RISC controls following suppression of ASIC1, ASIC2, and ASIC3, respectively. Chemotactic migration was inhibited by 30% and 45%, respectively, following suppression of ASIC1 and ASIC3. ASIC2 suppression produced a small, but significant, increase in chemotactic migration (4%). Our data indicate that ASIC expression is required for normal migration and may suggest a novel role for ASIC proteins in cellular migration.

  15. Cyanobacterial Oxygenic Photosynthesis is Protected by Flavodiiron Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagut Allahverdiyeva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Flavodiiron proteins (FDPs, also called flavoproteins, Flvs are modular enzymes widely present in Bacteria and Archaea. The evolution of cyanobacteria and oxygenic photosynthesis occurred in concert with the modulation of typical bacterial FDPs. Present cyanobacterial FDPs are composed of three domains, the β-lactamase-like, flavodoxin-like and flavin-reductase like domains. Cyanobacterial FDPs function as hetero- and homodimers and are involved in the regulation of photosynthetic electron transport. Whilst Flv2 and Flv4 proteins are limited to specific cyanobacterial species (β-cyanobacteria and function in photoprotection of Photosystem II, Flv1 and Flv3 proteins, functioning in the “Mehler-like” reaction and safeguarding Photosystem I under fluctuating light conditions, occur in nearly all cyanobacteria and additionally in green algae, mosses and lycophytes. Filamentous cyanobacteria have additional FDPs in heterocyst cells, ensuring a microaerobic environment for the function of the nitrogenase enzyme under the light. Here, the evolution, occurrence and functional mechanisms of various FDPs in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms are discussed.

  16. Role of natural killer cells in innate protection against lethal ebola virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warfield, Kelly L; Perkins, Jeremy G; Swenson, Dana L; Deal, Emily M; Bosio, Catharine M; Aman, M Javad; Yokoyama, Wayne M; Young, Howard A; Bavari, Sina

    2004-07-19

    Ebola virus is a highly lethal human pathogen and is rapidly driving many wild primate populations toward extinction. Several lines of evidence suggest that innate, nonspecific host factors are potentially critical for survival after Ebola virus infection. Here, we show that nonreplicating Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs), containing the glycoprotein (GP) and matrix protein virus protein (VP)40, administered 1-3 d before Ebola virus infection rapidly induced protective immunity. VLP injection enhanced the numbers of natural killer (NK) cells in lymphoid tissues. In contrast to live Ebola virus, VLP treatment of NK cells enhanced cytokine secretion and cytolytic activity against NK-sensitive targets. Unlike wild-type mice, treatment of NK-deficient or -depleted mice with VLPs had no protective effect against Ebola virus infection and NK cells treated with VLPs protected against Ebola virus infection when adoptively transferred to naive mice. The mechanism of NK cell-mediated protection clearly depended on perforin, but not interferon-gamma secretion. Particles containing only VP40 were sufficient to induce NK cell responses and provide protection from infection in the absence of the viral GP. These findings revealed a decisive role for NK cells during lethal Ebola virus infection. This work should open new doors for better understanding of Ebola virus pathogenesis and direct the development of immunotherapeutics, which target the innate immune system, for treatment of Ebola virus infection.

  17. Protection by recombinant viral proteins against a respiratory challenge with virulent avian metapneumovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chary, Parag; Njenga, M Kariuki; Sharma, Jagdev M

    2005-12-15

    Protection by recombinant avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) N or M proteins against a respiratory challenge with virulent aMPV was examined. N, M or N+M proteins were administered intramuscularly (IM) with incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) or by the oculonasal (ON) route with cholera toxin-B (CTB). Each turkey received 40 or 80 microg of each recombinant protein. Birds were considered protected against challenge if the challenge virus was not detectable in the choanal swabs by RT-PCR. At a dose of 40 microg/bird, N protein given with IFA by the IM route protected eight out of nine birds. M protein at the same dose protected three out of seven birds, while a combination of N+M proteins (40 microg each) protected three out of four birds. At a dose of 80 microg of each of N and M proteins per bird given with IFA by the IM route, 100% protection was achieved. ON immunization with a mixture of N and M proteins induced partial protection when the proteins were given with CTB; no detectable protection was noted without CTB. N and M proteins induced anti-aMPV antibodies, although protection against virulent virus challenge did not appear to be associated with the level or presence of antibodies.

  18. A histone-like protein of mycobacteria possesses ferritin superfamily protein-like activity and protects against DNA damage by Fenton reaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Takatsuka

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential metal for living organisms but its level must be strictly controlled in cells, because ferrous ion induces toxicity by generating highly active reactive oxygen, hydroxyl radicals, through the Fenton reaction. In addition, ferric ion shows low solubility under physiological conditions. To overcome these obstacles living organisms possess Ferritin superfamily proteins that are distributed in all three domains of life: bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. These proteins minimize hydroxyl radical formation by ferroxidase activity that converts Fe(2+ into Fe(3+ and sequesters iron by storing it as a mineral inside a protein cage. In this study, we discovered that mycobacterial DNA-binding protein 1 (MDP1, a histone-like protein, has similar activity to ferritin superfamily proteins. MDP1 prevented the Fenton reaction and protects DNA by the ferroxidase activity. The K(m values of the ferroxidase activity by MDP1 of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG-3007c, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Rv2986c, and Mycobacterium leprae (ML1683; ML-LBP were 0.292, 0.252, and 0.129 mM, respectively. Furthermore, one MDP1 molecule directly captured 81.4±19.1 iron atoms, suggesting the role of this protein in iron storage. This study describes for the first time a ferroxidase-iron storage protein outside of the ferritin superfamily proteins and the protective role of this bacterial protein from DNA damage.

  19. Life span extension and neuronal cell protection by Drosophila nicotinamidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Vitaly; Miller, Gregory S; Kaplun, Ludmila; Balan, Karina; Chong, Zhao-Zhong; Li, Faqi; Kaplun, Alexander; VanBerkum, Mark F A; Arking, Robert; Freeman, D Carl; Maiese, Kenneth; Tzivion, Guri

    2008-10-10

    The life span of model organisms can be modulated by environmental conditions that influence cellular metabolism, oxidation, or DNA integrity. The yeast nicotinamidase gene pnc1 was identified as a key transcriptional target and mediator of calorie restriction and stress-induced life span extension. PNC1 is thought to exert its effect on yeast life span by modulating cellular nicotinamide and NAD levels, resulting in increased activity of Sir2 family class III histone deacetylases. In Caenorhabditis elegans, knockdown of a pnc1 homolog was shown recently to shorten the worm life span, whereas its overexpression increased survival under conditions of oxidative stress. The function and regulation of nicotinamidases in higher organisms has not been determined. Here, we report the identification and biochemical characterization of the Drosophila nicotinamidase, D-NAAM, and demonstrate that its overexpression significantly increases median and maximal fly life span. The life span extension was reversed in Sir2 mutant flies, suggesting Sir2 dependence. Testing for physiological effectors of D-NAAM in Drosophila S2 cells, we identified oxidative stress as a primary regulator, both at the transcription level and protein activity. In contrast to the yeast model, stress factors such as high osmolarity and heat shock, calorie restriction, or inhibitors of TOR and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways do not appear to regulate D-NAAM in S2 cells. Interestingly, the expression of D-NAAM in human neuronal cells conferred protection from oxidative stress-induced cell death in a sirtuin-dependent manner. Together, our findings establish a life span extending the ability of nicotinamidase in flies and offer a role for nicotinamide-modulating genes in oxidative stress regulated pathways influencing longevity and neuronal cell survival.

  20. Protective layer formation on magnesium in cell culture medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagener, V.; Virtanen, S., E-mail: virtanen@ww.uni-erlangen.de

    2016-06-01

    In the past, different studies showed that hydroxyapatite (HA) or similar calcium phosphates can be precipitated on Mg during immersion in simulated body fluids. However, at the same time, in most cases a dark grey or black layer is built under the white HA crystals. This layer seems to consist as well of calcium phosphates. Until now, neither the morphology nor its influence on Mg corrosion have been investigated in detail. In this work commercially pure magnesium (cp) was immersed in cell culture medium for one, three and five days at room temperature and in the incubator (37 °C, 5% CO{sub 2}). In addition, the influence of proteins on the formation of a corrosion layer was investigated by adding 20% of fetal calf serum (FCS) to the cell culture medium in the incubator. In order to analyze the formed layers, SEM images of cross sections, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) and Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements were carried out. Characterization of the corrosion behavior was achieved by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and by potentio-dynamic polarization in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) at 37 °C. Surface analysis showed that all formed layers consist mainly of amorphous calcium phosphate compounds. For the immersion at room temperature the Ca/P ratio indicates the formation of HA, while in the incubator probably pre-stages to HA are formed. The different immersion conditions lead to a variation in layer thicknesses. However, electrochemical characterization shows that the layer thickness does not influence the corrosion resistance of magnesium. The main influencing factor for the corrosion behavior is the layer morphology. Thus, immersion at room temperature leads to the highest corrosion protection due to the formation of a compact outer layer. Layers formed in the incubator show much worse performances due to completely porous

  1. Protective layer formation on magnesium in cell culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, V; Virtanen, S

    2016-06-01

    In the past, different studies showed that hydroxyapatite (HA) or similar calcium phosphates can be precipitated on Mg during immersion in simulated body fluids. However, at the same time, in most cases a dark grey or black layer is built under the white HA crystals. This layer seems to consist as well of calcium phosphates. Until now, neither the morphology nor its influence on Mg corrosion have been investigated in detail. In this work commercially pure magnesium (cp) was immersed in cell culture medium for one, three and five days at room temperature and in the incubator (37 °C, 5% CO2). In addition, the influence of proteins on the formation of a corrosion layer was investigated by adding 20% of fetal calf serum (FCS) to the cell culture medium in the incubator. In order to analyze the formed layers, SEM images of cross sections, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) and Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements were carried out. Characterization of the corrosion behavior was achieved by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and by potentio-dynamic polarization in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) at 37°C. Surface analysis showed that all formed layers consist mainly of amorphous calcium phosphate compounds. For the immersion at room temperature the Ca/P ratio indicates the formation of HA, while in the incubator probably pre-stages to HA are formed. The different immersion conditions lead to a variation in layer thicknesses. However, electrochemical characterization shows that the layer thickness does not influence the corrosion resistance of magnesium. The main influencing factor for the corrosion behavior is the layer morphology. Thus, immersion at room temperature leads to the highest corrosion protection due to the formation of a compact outer layer. Layers formed in the incubator show much worse performances due to completely porous structures. The

  2. Protective layer formation on magnesium in cell culture medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagener, V.; Virtanen, S.

    2016-01-01

    In the past, different studies showed that hydroxyapatite (HA) or similar calcium phosphates can be precipitated on Mg during immersion in simulated body fluids. However, at the same time, in most cases a dark grey or black layer is built under the white HA crystals. This layer seems to consist as well of calcium phosphates. Until now, neither the morphology nor its influence on Mg corrosion have been investigated in detail. In this work commercially pure magnesium (cp) was immersed in cell culture medium for one, three and five days at room temperature and in the incubator (37 °C, 5% CO_2). In addition, the influence of proteins on the formation of a corrosion layer was investigated by adding 20% of fetal calf serum (FCS) to the cell culture medium in the incubator. In order to analyze the formed layers, SEM images of cross sections, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) and Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements were carried out. Characterization of the corrosion behavior was achieved by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and by potentio-dynamic polarization in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) at 37 °C. Surface analysis showed that all formed layers consist mainly of amorphous calcium phosphate compounds. For the immersion at room temperature the Ca/P ratio indicates the formation of HA, while in the incubator probably pre-stages to HA are formed. The different immersion conditions lead to a variation in layer thicknesses. However, electrochemical characterization shows that the layer thickness does not influence the corrosion resistance of magnesium. The main influencing factor for the corrosion behavior is the layer morphology. Thus, immersion at room temperature leads to the highest corrosion protection due to the formation of a compact outer layer. Layers formed in the incubator show much worse performances due to completely porous structures. The

  3. Possibility of the postirradiation protection of L cells by mexamin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Val'ter, S.N.; Martynchik, Yu.F.; Sverdlov, A.G.

    1977-01-01

    Preinjection of mexamin increased by 10 per cent the survival of L cells in the cell culture exposed to a dose of 600 R, and decreased the number of the aberrant cells after a dose of 300 R, during every course of fixation. Administration of mexamin after irradiation did not influence the survival of cells and somewhat decreased the number of the aberrant cells as late as 18 hours after irradiation. Caffeine did not affect the protective action of mexamin

  4. Durable protection of rhesus macaques immunized with a replicating adenovirus-SIV multigene prime/protein boost vaccine regimen against a second SIVmac251 rectal challenge: role of SIV-specific CD8+ T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkevitch, Nina V; Patterson, L Jean; Aldrich, M Kristine; Wu, Yichen; Venzon, David; Florese, Ruth H; Kalyanaraman, V S; Pal, Ranajit; Lee, Eun Mi; Zhao, Jun; Cristillo, Anthony; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2006-09-15

    Previously, priming with replication-competent adenovirus-SIV multigenic vaccines and boosting with envelope subunits strongly protected 39% of rhesus macaques against rectal SIV(mac251) challenge. To evaluate protection durability, eleven of the protected and two SIV-infected unimmunized macaques that controlled viremia were re-challenged rectally with SIV(mac251). Strong protection was observed in 8/11 vaccinees, including two exhibiting protected macaques. Durable protection was associated with significantly increased SIV-specific ELISPOT responses and lymphoproliferative responses to p27 at re-challenge. After CD8 depletion, 2 of 8 re-challenged, protected vaccinees maintained protection against re-challenge.

  5. A DNA Vaccine Protects Human Immune Cells against Zika Virus Infection in Humanized Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Yi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A DNA vaccine encoding prM and E protein has been shown to induce protection against Zika virus (ZIKV infection in mice and monkeys. However, its effectiveness in humans remains undefined. Moreover, identification of which immune cell types are specifically infected in humans is unclear. We show that human myeloid cells and B cells are primary targets of ZIKV in humanized mice. We also show that a DNA vaccine encoding full length prM and E protein protects humanized mice from ZIKV infection. Following administration of the DNA vaccine, humanized DRAG mice developed antibodies targeting ZIKV as measured by ELISA and neutralization assays. Moreover, following ZIKV challenge, vaccinated animals presented virtually no detectable virus in human cells and in serum, whereas unvaccinated animals displayed robust infection, as measured by qRT-PCR. Our results utilizing humanized mice show potential efficacy for a targeted DNA vaccine against ZIKV in humans.

  6. Hemidesmosomal linker proteins regulate cell motility, invasion and tumorigenicity in oral squamous cell carcinoma derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Pratik Rajeev; Charles, Silvania Emlit; D'Souza, Zinia Charlotte; Vaidya, Milind Murlidhar

    2017-11-15

    BPAG1e and Plectin are hemidesmosomal linker proteins which anchor intermediate filament proteins to the cell surface through β4 integrin. Recent reports indicate that these proteins play a role in various cellular processes apart from their known anchoring function. However, the available literature is inconsistent. Further, the previous study from our laboratory suggested that Keratin8/18 pair promotes cell motility and tumor progression by deregulating β4 integrin signaling in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) derived cells. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that linker proteins may have a role in neoplastic progression of OSCC. Downregulation of hemidesmosomal linker proteins in OSCC derived cells resulted in reduced cell migration accompanied by alterations in actin organization. Further, decreased MMP9 activity led to reduced cell invasion in linker proteins knockdown cells. Moreover, loss of these proteins resulted in reduced tumorigenic potential. SWATH analysis demonstrated upregulation of N-Myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) in linker proteins downregulated cells as compared to vector control cells. Further, the defects in phenotype upon linker proteins ablation were rescued upon loss of NDRG1 in linker proteins knockdown background. These data together indicate that hemidesmosomal linker proteins regulate cell motility, invasion and tumorigenicity possibly through NDRG1 in OSCC derived cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Improved Short-Circuit Protection for Power Cells in Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Francis

    2008-01-01

    A scheme for protection against short circuits has been devised for series strings of lithium electrochemical cells that contain built-in short-circuit protection devices, which go into a high-resistance, current-limiting state when heated by excessive current. If cells are simply connected in a long series string to obtain a high voltage and a short circuit occurs, whichever short-circuit protection device trips first is exposed to nearly the full string voltage, which, typically, is large enough to damage the device. Depending on the specific cell design, the damage can defeat the protective function, cause a dangerous internal short circuit in the affected cell, and/or cascade to other cells. In the present scheme, reverse diodes rated at a suitably high current are connected across short series sub-strings, the lengths of which are chosen so that when a short-circuit protection device is tripped, the voltage across it does not exceed its rated voltage. This scheme preserves the resetting properties of the protective devices. It provides for bypassing of cells that fail open and limits cell reversal, though not as well as does the more-expensive scheme of connecting a diode across every cell.

  8. Human T-cell leukemia virus types I and II exhibit different DNase I protection patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altman, R.; Harrich, D.; Garcia, J.A.; Gaynor, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus types I (HTLV-I) and II (HTLV-II) are human retroviruses which normally infect T-lymphoid cells. HTLV-I infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma, and HTLV-II is associated with an indolent form of hairy-cell leukemia. To identify potential transcriptional regulatory elements of these two related human retroviruses, the authors performed DNase I footprinting of both the HTLV-I and HTLV-II long terminal repeats (LTRs) by using extracts prepared from uninfected T cells, HTLV-I and HTLV-II transformed T cells, and HeLa cells. Five regions of the HTLV-I LTR and three regions of the HTLV-II LTR showed protection by DNase I footprinting. All three of the 21-base-pair repeats previously shown to be important in HTLV transcriptional regulation were protected in the HTLV-I LTR, whereas only one of these repeats was protected in the HTLV-II LTR. Several regions exhibited altered protection in extracts prepared from lymphoid cells as compared with HeLa cells, but there were minimal differences in the protection patterns between HTLV-infected and uninfected lymphoid extracts. A number of HTLV-I and HTLV-II LTR fragments which contained regions showing protection in DNase I footprinting were able to function as inducible enhancer elements in transient CAT gene expression assays in the presence of the HTLV-II tat protein. The alterations in the pattern of the cellular proteins which bind to the HTLV-I and HTLV-II LTRs may in part be responsible for differences in the transcriptional regulation of these two related viruses

  9. EGCG Protects against 6-OHDA-Induced Neurotoxicity in a Cell Culture Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Parkinson’s disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that causes severe brain dopamine depletion. Disruption of iron metabolism may be involved in the PD progression. Objective. To test the protective effect of (−-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG against 6-hydroxydopamine- (6-OHDA- induced neurotoxicity by regulating iron metabolism in N27 cells. Methods. Protection by EGCG in N27 cells was assessed by SYTOX green assay, MTT, and caspase-3 activity. Iron regulatory gene and protein expression were measured by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Intracellular iron uptake was measured using 55Fe. The EGCG protection was further tested in primary mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons by immunocytochemistry. Results. EGCG protected against 6-OHDA-induced cell toxicity. 6-OHDA treatment significantly (p<0.05 increased divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1 and hepcidin and decreased ferroportin 1 (Fpn1 level, whereas pretreatment with EGCG counteracted the effects. The increased 55Fe (by 96%, p<0.01 cell uptake confirmed the iron burden by 6-OHDA and was reduced by EGCG by 27% (p<0.05, supporting the DMT1 results. Pretreatment with EGCG and 6-OHDA significantly increased (p<0.0001 TH+ cell count (~3-fold and neurite length (~12-fold compared to 6-OHDA alone in primary mesencephalic neurons. Conclusions. Pretreatment with EGCG protected against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity by regulating genes and proteins involved in brain iron homeostasis, especially modulating hepcidin levels.

  10. Protective immunity induced by 67 K outer membrane protein of phase I Coxiella burnetii in mice and guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.X.; Zhi, N.; Yu, S.R.; Li, Q.J.; Yu, G.Q.; Zhang, X.

    1994-01-01

    A 67 K outer membrane protein (OMP) isolated from phase I Coxiella burnetii QiYi strain was purified with monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) coupled to CNBr-Sepharose 4B. Chemical analyses of the 67 K protein showed that it contained seventeen kids of amino acids and no lipopolysaccharides. The immunogenicity and protectivity of the 67 K protein against C. burnetii was evaluated in mice and guinea pigs bi in vitro lymphocyte proliferation assay, delayed-type skin test, antibody conversion rate, and immunization and challenge tests. Intraperitoneal injection of the 67 K protein resulted in antibody production against phase I and II whole cell antigens. The anti-67 K antibody conversion rate was found to be 100% in mice and guinea pigs as well. Lymphocytes were responses in vitro to specific antigen. In addition, delayed-type hypersensitivity appeared two weeks after immunization with the 67 K protein. Moreover, 199% of mice and guinea pigs inoculated with the 67 K protein were protected against a challenge with 10 3 ID 50 virulent C. burnetii. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that the 67 K OMP elicits in vivo and in vitro both B cell-mediated and T cell-mediated immunity in mice and guinea pigs. Thus the 67 K protein is a candidate for an effective subunit vaccine against Q fever. (author)

  11. The protein DIIIC-2, aggregated with a specific oligodeoxynucleotide and adjuvanted in alum, protects mice and monkeys against DENV-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Lázaro; Marcos, Ernesto; Izquierdo, Alienys; Lazo, Laura; Valdés, Iris; Ambala, Peris; Ochola, Lucy; Hitler, Rikoi; Suzarte, Edith; Álvarez, Mayling; Kimiti, Prisilla; Ndung'u, James; Kariuki, Thomas; Guzmán, María Guadalupe; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported the ability of the chimeric protein DIIIC-2 (domain III of the dengue envelope protein fused to the capsid protein of dengue-2 virus), to induce immunity and protection in mice, when it is highly aggregated with a non-defined oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) and adjuvanted in alum. In this work, three different defined ODNs were studied as aggregating agents. Our results suggest that the nature of the ODN influences the capacity of protein DIIIC-2 to activate cell-mediated immunity in mice. Consequently, the ODN 39M was selected to perform further experiments in mice and nonhuman primates. Mice receiving the preparation 39M-DIIIC-2 were solidly protected against dengue virus (DENV) challenge. Moreover, monkeys immunized with the same preparation developed neutralizing antibodies, as measured by four different neutralization tests varying the virus strains and the cell lines used. Two of the immunized monkeys were completely protected against challenge, whereas the third animal had a single day of low-titer viremia. This is the first work describing the induction of short-term protection in monkeys by a formulation that is suitable for human use combining a recombinant protein from DENV with alum.

  12. ERK1/2 signalling protects against apoptosis following endoplasmic reticulum stress but cannot provide long-term protection against BAX/BAK-independent cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Nicola J; Balmanno, Kathryn; Cook, Simon J

    2017-01-01

    Disruption of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress. Activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) acts to restore protein homeostasis or, if ER stress is severe or persistent, drive apoptosis, which is thought to proceed through the cell intrinsic, mitochondrial pathway. Indeed, cells that lack the key executioner proteins BAX and BAK are protected from ER stress-induced apoptosis. Here we show that chronic ER stress causes the progressive inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) signalling pathway. This is causally related to ER stress since reactivation of ERK1/2 can protect cells from ER stress-induced apoptosis whilst ERK1/2 pathway inhibition sensitises cells to ER stress. Furthermore, cancer cell lines harbouring constitutively active BRAFV600E are addicted to ERK1/2 signalling for protection against ER stress-induced cell death. ERK1/2 signalling normally represses the pro-death proteins BIM, BMF and PUMA and it has been proposed that ER stress induces BIM-dependent cell death. We found no evidence that ER stress increased the expression of these proteins; furthermore, BIM was not required for ER stress-induced death. Rather, ER stress caused the PERK-dependent inhibition of cap-dependent mRNA translation and the progressive loss of pro-survival proteins including BCL2, BCLXL and MCL1. Despite these observations, neither ERK1/2 activation nor loss of BAX/BAK could confer long-term clonogenic survival to cells exposed to ER stress. Thus, ER stress induces cell death by at least two biochemically and genetically distinct pathways: a classical BAX/BAK-dependent apoptotic response that can be inhibited by ERK1/2 signalling and an alternative ERK1/2- and BAX/BAK-independent cell death pathway.

  13. ERK1/2 signalling protects against apoptosis following endoplasmic reticulum stress but cannot provide long-term protection against BAX/BAK-independent cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola J Darling

    Full Text Available Disruption of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER causes ER stress. Activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR acts to restore protein homeostasis or, if ER stress is severe or persistent, drive apoptosis, which is thought to proceed through the cell intrinsic, mitochondrial pathway. Indeed, cells that lack the key executioner proteins BAX and BAK are protected from ER stress-induced apoptosis. Here we show that chronic ER stress causes the progressive inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2 signalling pathway. This is causally related to ER stress since reactivation of ERK1/2 can protect cells from ER stress-induced apoptosis whilst ERK1/2 pathway inhibition sensitises cells to ER stress. Furthermore, cancer cell lines harbouring constitutively active BRAFV600E are addicted to ERK1/2 signalling for protection against ER stress-induced cell death. ERK1/2 signalling normally represses the pro-death proteins BIM, BMF and PUMA and it has been proposed that ER stress induces BIM-dependent cell death. We found no evidence that ER stress increased the expression of these proteins; furthermore, BIM was not required for ER stress-induced death. Rather, ER stress caused the PERK-dependent inhibition of cap-dependent mRNA translation and the progressive loss of pro-survival proteins including BCL2, BCLXL and MCL1. Despite these observations, neither ERK1/2 activation nor loss of BAX/BAK could confer long-term clonogenic survival to cells exposed to ER stress. Thus, ER stress induces cell death by at least two biochemically and genetically distinct pathways: a classical BAX/BAK-dependent apoptotic response that can be inhibited by ERK1/2 signalling and an alternative ERK1/2- and BAX/BAK-independent cell death pathway.

  14. Fractalkine (CX3CL1, a new factor protecting β-cells against TNFα

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Rutti

    2014-10-01

    Conclusions: We demonstrate for the first time that human islets express and secrete CX3CL1 and CX3CL1 impacts them by decreasing glucagon secretion without affecting insulin secretion. Moreover, CX3CL1 decreases basal apoptosis of human β-cells. We further demonstrate that CX3CL1 protects β-cells from the adverse effects of TNFα on their function by restoring the expression and phosphorylation of key proteins of the insulin secretion pathway.

  15. Culture media from hypoxia conditioned endothelial cells protect human intestinal cells from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummitzsch, Lars; Zitta, Karina; Bein, Berthold; Steinfath, Markus; Albrecht, Martin

    2014-03-10

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is a phenomenon, whereby short episodes of non-lethal ischemia to an organ or tissue exert protection against ischemia/reperfusion injury in a distant organ. However, there is still an apparent lack of knowledge concerning the RIPC-mediated mechanisms within the target organ and the released factors. Here we established a human cell culture model to investigate cellular and molecular effects of RIPC and to identify factors responsible for RIPC-mediated intestinal protection. Human umbilical vein cells (HUVEC) were exposed to repeated episodes of hypoxia (3 × 15 min) and conditioned culture media (CM) were collected after 24h. Human intestinal cells (CaCo-2) were cultured with or without CM and subjected to 90 min of hypoxia/reoxygenation injury. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, gelatin zymography, hydrogen peroxide measurements and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays were performed. In HUVEC cultures hypoxic conditioning did not influence the profile of secreted proteins but led to an increased gelatinase activity (Pcultures 90 min of hypoxia/reoxygenation resulted in morphological signs of cell damage, increased LDH levels (Pculture model may help to unravel RIPC-mediated cellular events and to identify molecules released by RIPC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Human immune cell targeting of protein nanoparticles - caveospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Joshua J.; Yuen, Daniel; Rae, James; Johnston, Angus P. R.; Parton, Robert G.; Kent, Stephen J.; de Rose, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Nanotechnology has the power to transform vaccine and drug delivery through protection of payloads from both metabolism and off-target effects, while facilitating specific delivery of cargo to immune cells. However, evaluation of immune cell nanoparticle targeting is conventionally restricted to monocultured cell line models. We generated human caveolin-1 nanoparticles, termed caveospheres, which were efficiently functionalized with monoclonal antibodies. Using this platform, we investigated CD4+ T cell and CD20+ B cell targeting within physiological mixtures of primary human blood immune cells using flow cytometry, imaging flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Antibody-functionalization enhanced caveosphere binding to targeted immune cells (6.6 to 43.9-fold) within mixed populations and in the presence of protein-containing fluids. Moreover, targeting caveospheres to CCR5 enabled caveosphere internalization by non-phagocytic CD4+ T cells--an important therapeutic target for HIV treatment. This efficient and flexible system of immune cell-targeted caveosphere nanoparticles holds promise for the development of advanced immunotherapeutics and vaccines.

  17. Oral Delivery of Protein Drugs Bioencapsulated in Plant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Daniell, Henry

    2016-08-01

    Plants cells are now approved by the FDA for cost-effective production of protein drugs (PDs) in large-scale current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) hydroponic growth facilities. In lyophilized plant cells, PDs are stable at ambient temperature for several years, maintaining their folding and efficacy. Upon oral delivery, PDs bioencapsulated in plant cells are protected in the stomach from acids and enzymes but are subsequently released into the gut lumen by microbes that digest the plant cell wall. The large mucosal area of the human intestine offers an ideal system for oral drug delivery. When tags (receptor-binding proteins or cell-penetrating peptides) are fused to PDs, they efficiently cross the intestinal epithelium and are delivered to the circulatory or immune system. Unique tags to deliver PDs to human immune or nonimmune cells have been developed recently. After crossing the epithelium, ubiquitous proteases cleave off tags at engineered sites. PDs are also delivered to the brain or retina by crossing the blood-brain or retinal barriers. This review highlights recent advances in PD delivery to treat Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, hypertension, Gaucher's or ocular diseases, as well as the development of affordable drugs by eliminating prohibitively expensive purification, cold chain and sterile delivery.

  18. Antioxidant Effects of Sheep Whey Protein on Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efthalia Kerasioti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS may cause endothelial dysfunction and consequently vascular disease. In the present study, the possible protective effects of sheep whey protein (SWP from tert-butyl hydroperoxide- (tBHP- induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells (EA.hy926 were assessed using oxidative stress biomarkers. These oxidative stress biomarkers were glutathione (GSH and ROS levels determined by flow cytometry. Moreover, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS, protein carbonyls (CARB, and oxidized glutathione (GSSG were determined spectrophotometrically. The results showed that SWP at 0.78, 1.56, 3.12, and 6.24 mg of protein mL−1 increased GSH up to 141%, while it decreased GSSG to 46.7%, ROS to 58.5%, TBARS to 52.5%, and CARB to 49.0%. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated for the first time that SWP protected endothelial cells from oxidative stress. Thus, SWP may be used for developing food supplements or biofunctional foods to attenuate vascular disturbances associated with oxidative stress.

  19. Osteocalcin protects pancreatic beta cell function and survival under high glucose conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kover, Karen, E-mail: kkover@cmh.edu [Division of Endocrine/Diabetes, Children' s Mercy Hospital & Clinics, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); Yan, Yun; Tong, Pei Ying; Watkins, Dara; Li, Xiaoyu [Division of Endocrine/Diabetes, Children' s Mercy Hospital & Clinics, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); Tasch, James; Hager, Melissa [Kansas City University Medical Biosciences, Kansas City, MO (United States); Clements, Mark; Moore, Wayne V. [Division of Endocrine/Diabetes, Children' s Mercy Hospital & Clinics, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States)

    2015-06-19

    Diabetes is characterized by progressive beta cell dysfunction and loss due in part to oxidative stress that occurs from gluco/lipotoxicity. Treatments that directly protect beta cell function and survival in the diabetic milieu are of particular interest. A growing body of evidence suggests that osteocalcin, an abundant non-collagenous protein of bone, supports beta cell function and proliferation. Based on previous gene expression data by microarray, we hypothesized that osteocalcin protects beta cells from glucose-induced oxidative stress. To test our hypothesis we cultured isolated rat islets and INS-1E cells in the presence of normal, high, or high glucose ± osteocalcin for up to 72 h. Oxidative stress and viability/mitochondrial function were measured by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} assay and Alamar Blue assay, respectively. Caspase 3/7 activity was also measured as a marker of apoptosis. A functional test, glucose stimulated insulin release, was conducted and expression of genes/protein was measured by qRT-PCR/western blot/ELISA. Osteocalcin treatment significantly reduced high glucose-induced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels while maintaining viability/mitochondrial function. Osteocalcin also significantly improved glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin content in rat islets after 48 h of high glucose exposure compared to untreated islets. As expected sustained high glucose down-regulated gene/protein expression of INS1 and BCL2 while increasing TXNIP expression. Interestingly, osteocalcin treatment reversed the effects of high glucose on gene/protein expression. We conclude that osteocalcin can protect beta cells from the negative effects of glucose-induced oxidative stress, in part, by reducing TXNIP expression, thereby preserving beta cell function and survival. - Highlights: • Osteocalcin reduces glucose-induced oxidative stress in beta cells. • Osteocalcin preserves beta cell function and survival under stress conditions. • Osteocalcin reduces glucose

  20. Osteocalcin protects pancreatic beta cell function and survival under high glucose conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kover, Karen; Yan, Yun; Tong, Pei Ying; Watkins, Dara; Li, Xiaoyu; Tasch, James; Hager, Melissa; Clements, Mark; Moore, Wayne V.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is characterized by progressive beta cell dysfunction and loss due in part to oxidative stress that occurs from gluco/lipotoxicity. Treatments that directly protect beta cell function and survival in the diabetic milieu are of particular interest. A growing body of evidence suggests that osteocalcin, an abundant non-collagenous protein of bone, supports beta cell function and proliferation. Based on previous gene expression data by microarray, we hypothesized that osteocalcin protects beta cells from glucose-induced oxidative stress. To test our hypothesis we cultured isolated rat islets and INS-1E cells in the presence of normal, high, or high glucose ± osteocalcin for up to 72 h. Oxidative stress and viability/mitochondrial function were measured by H 2 O 2 assay and Alamar Blue assay, respectively. Caspase 3/7 activity was also measured as a marker of apoptosis. A functional test, glucose stimulated insulin release, was conducted and expression of genes/protein was measured by qRT-PCR/western blot/ELISA. Osteocalcin treatment significantly reduced high glucose-induced H 2 O 2 levels while maintaining viability/mitochondrial function. Osteocalcin also significantly improved glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin content in rat islets after 48 h of high glucose exposure compared to untreated islets. As expected sustained high glucose down-regulated gene/protein expression of INS1 and BCL2 while increasing TXNIP expression. Interestingly, osteocalcin treatment reversed the effects of high glucose on gene/protein expression. We conclude that osteocalcin can protect beta cells from the negative effects of glucose-induced oxidative stress, in part, by reducing TXNIP expression, thereby preserving beta cell function and survival. - Highlights: • Osteocalcin reduces glucose-induced oxidative stress in beta cells. • Osteocalcin preserves beta cell function and survival under stress conditions. • Osteocalcin reduces glucose-induced TXNIP

  1. DNA Protection Protein, a Novel Mechanism of Radiation Tolerance: Lessons from Tardigrades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Takuma; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2017-06-15

    Genomic DNA stores all genetic information and is indispensable for maintenance of normal cellular activity and propagation. Radiation causes severe DNA lesions, including double-strand breaks, and leads to genome instability and even lethality. Regardless of the toxicity of radiation, some organisms exhibit extraordinary tolerance against radiation. These organisms are supposed to possess special mechanisms to mitigate radiation-induced DNA damages. Extensive study using radiotolerant bacteria suggested that effective protection of proteins and enhanced DNA repair system play important roles in tolerability against high-dose radiation. Recent studies using an extremotolerant animal, the tardigrade, provides new evidence that a tardigrade-unique DNA-associating protein, termed Dsup, suppresses the occurrence of DNA breaks by radiation in human-cultured cells. In this review, we provide a brief summary of the current knowledge on extremely radiotolerant animals, and present novel insights from the tardigrade research, which expand our understanding on molecular mechanism of exceptional radio-tolerability.

  2. Engineered mammalian cells for production of recombinant proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention relates to mammalian cells modified to provide for improved expression of a recombinant protein of interest. In particular, the invention relates to CHO cells and other host cells in which the expression of one or more endogenous secreted proteins has been disrupted, as well...... as to the preparation, identification and use of such cells in the production of recombinant proteins....

  3. Unconventional Protein Secretion in Animal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Fanny; Tang, Bor Luen

    2016-01-01

    All eukaryotic cells secrete a range of proteins in a constitutive or regulated manner through the conventional or canonical exocytic/secretory pathway characterized by vesicular traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum, through the Golgi apparatus, and towards the plasma membrane. However, a number of proteins are secreted in an unconventional manner, which are insensitive to inhibitors of conventional exocytosis and use a route that bypasses the Golgi apparatus. These include cytosolic proteins such as fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and membrane proteins that are known to also traverse to the plasma membrane by a conventional process of exocytosis, such as α integrin and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductor (CFTR). Mechanisms underlying unconventional protein secretion (UPS) are actively being analyzed and deciphered, and these range from an unusual form of plasma membrane translocation to vesicular processes involving the generation of exosomes and other extracellular microvesicles. In this chapter, we provide an overview on what is currently known about UPS in animal cells.

  4. Passive acquisition of leukocyte proteins is associated with changes in phosphorylation of cellular proteins and cell-cell adhesion properties.

    OpenAIRE

    Tabibzadeh, S. S.; Kong, Q. F.; Kapur, S.

    1994-01-01

    In this report, we show that interaction of neoplastic epithelial cells with vesicles derived from leukocytes results in passive acquisition by tumor cells of a diverse group of leukocyte proteins. Vesicles shed from leukocytes were heterogeneous and exhibited the specific proteins expressed on leukocyte subsets. Accordingly, epithelial cells differentially acquired leukocyte proteins associated with vesicles. Ultrastructural localization demonstrated that acquired proteins were associated wi...

  5. Anti-idiotypic antibodies that protect cells against the action of diphtheria toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolf, J.M.; Gaudin, H.M.; Tirrell, S.M.; MacDonald, A.B.; Eidels, L.

    1989-01-01

    An anti-idiotypic serum prepared against the combining site (idiotype) of specific anti-diphtheria toxoid antibodies was characterized with respect to its interaction with highly diphtheria toxin-sensitive Vero cells. Although the anti-idiotypic serum protected Vero cells against the cytotoxic action of diphtheria toxin, it did not prevent the binding of 125 I-labeled diphtheria toxin to the cells but did inhibit the internalization and degradation of 125 I-labeled toxin. This anti-idiotypic serum immunoprecipitated a cell-surface protein from radiolabeled Vero cells with an apparent Mr of approximately 15,000. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the anti-idiotypic serum contains antibodies that carry an internal image of an internalization site on the toxin and that a cell-surface protein involved in toxin internalization possesses a complementary site recognized by both the toxin and the anti-idiotypic antibodies

  6. Anti-idiotypic antibodies that protect cells against the action of diphtheria toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolf, J.M.; Gaudin, H.M.; Tirrell, S.M.; MacDonald, A.B.; Eidels, L.

    1989-03-01

    An anti-idiotypic serum prepared against the combining site (idiotype) of specific anti-diphtheria toxoid antibodies was characterized with respect to its interaction with highly diphtheria toxin-sensitive Vero cells. Although the anti-idiotypic serum protected Vero cells against the cytotoxic action of diphtheria toxin, it did not prevent the binding of /sup 125/I-labeled diphtheria toxin to the cells but did inhibit the internalization and degradation of /sup 125/I-labeled toxin. This anti-idiotypic serum immunoprecipitated a cell-surface protein from radiolabeled Vero cells with an apparent Mr of approximately 15,000. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the anti-idiotypic serum contains antibodies that carry an internal image of an internalization site on the toxin and that a cell-surface protein involved in toxin internalization possesses a complementary site recognized by both the toxin and the anti-idiotypic antibodies.

  7. Engineering hot-cell windows for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, K.R.; Courtney, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation protection considerations in the design and construction of hot-cell windows are discussed. The importance of evaluating the potential gamma spectra and neutron source terms is stressed. 11 references

  8. Wallerian degeneration slow mouse neurons are protected against cell death caused by mechanisms involving mitochondrial electron transport dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Shinji; Araki, Toshiyuki

    2012-03-01

    Ischemia elicits a variety of stress responses in neuronal cells, which result in cell death. wld(S) Mice bear a mutation that significantly delays Wallerian degeneration. This mutation also protects all neuronal cells against other types of stresses resulting in cell death, including ischemia. To clarify the types of stresses that neuronal cell bodies derived from wld(S) mice are protected from, we exposed primary cultured neurons derived from wld(S) mice to various components of hypoxic stress. We found that wld(S) mouse neurons are protected against cellular injury induced by reoxygenation following hypoxic stress. Furthermore, we found that wld(S) mouse neurons are protected against functional impairment of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. These data suggest that Wld(S) protein expression may provide protection against neuronal cell death caused by mechanisms involving mitochondrial electron transport dysfunction. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Biological Evaluation of Single Cell Protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, I.A.; Mohamed, N.E.; El-Sayed, E.A.; Younis, N.A.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the nutritional value of single cell protein (SCP) was evaluated as a non conventional protein source produced by fermenting fungal local strains of Trichoderma longibrachiatum, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus terreus and Penicillium funiculosum with alkali treated sugar cane bagasse. Amino acid analysis revealed that the produced SCP contains essential and non essential amino acids. Male mice were fed on normal (basal) diet which contains 18% conventional protein and served as control group. In the second (T1) and the third (T2) group, the animals were fed on a diet in which 15% and 30% of conventional protein source were replaced by SCP, respectively. At intervals of 15, 30, 45 and 60 days, mice were sacrificed and the blood samples were collected for the biochemical evaluation. The daily averages of body weight were significantly higher with group T2 than group T1. Where as, the kidney weights in groups (T1) and (T2) were significantly increased as compared with control. A non significant difference between the tested groups in the enzyme activities of AST, ALT and GSH content of liver tissue were recorded. While, cholesterol and triglycerides contents showed a significant decrease in both (T1) and (T2) groups as compared with control. The recorded values of the serum hormone (T4), ALP activities, albumin and A/G ratio did not changed by the previous treatments. Serum levels of total protein, urea, creatinine and uric acid were higher for groups (T1) and (T2) than the control group. In conclusion, partial substitution of soy bean protein in mice diet with single cell protein (15%) improved the mice growth without any adverse effects on some of the physiological functions tested

  10. Aldose Reductase Inhibitor Protects against Hyperglycemic Stress by Activating Nrf2-Dependent Antioxidant Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirtikar Shukla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We have shown earlier that pretreatment of cultured cells with aldose reductase (AR inhibitors prevents hyperglycemia-induced mitogenic and proinflammatory responses. However, the effects of AR inhibitors on Nrf2-mediated anti-inflammatory responses have not been elucidated yet. We have investigated how AR inhibitor fidarestat protects high glucose- (HG- induced cell viability changes by increasing the expression of Nrf2 and its dependent phase II antioxidant enzymes. Fidarestat pretreatment prevents HG (25 mM-induced Thp1 monocyte viability. Further, treatment of Thp1 monocytes with fidarestat caused a time-dependent increase in the expression as well as the DNA-binding activity of Nrf2. In addition, fidarestat augmented the HG-induced Nrf2 expression and activity and also upregulated the expression of Nrf2-dependent proteins such as hemeoxygenase-1 (HO1 and NQO1 in Thp1 cells. Similarly, treatment with AR inhibitor also induced the expression of Nrf2 and HO1 in STZ-induced diabetic mice heart and kidney tissues. Further, AR inhibition increased the HG-induced expression of antioxidant enzymes such as SOD and catalase and activation of AMPK-α1 in Thp1 cells. Our results thus suggest that pretreatment with AR inhibitor prepares the monocytes against hyperglycemic stress by overexpressing the Nrf2-dependent antioxidative proteins.

  11. Aldose Reductase Inhibitor Protects against Hyperglycemic Stress by Activating Nrf2-Dependent Antioxidant Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Kirtikar; Pal, Pabitra Bikash; Sonowal, Himangshu; Srivastava, Satish K; Ramana, Kota V

    2017-01-01

    We have shown earlier that pretreatment of cultured cells with aldose reductase (AR) inhibitors prevents hyperglycemia-induced mitogenic and proinflammatory responses. However, the effects of AR inhibitors on Nrf2-mediated anti-inflammatory responses have not been elucidated yet. We have investigated how AR inhibitor fidarestat protects high glucose- (HG-) induced cell viability changes by increasing the expression of Nrf2 and its dependent phase II antioxidant enzymes. Fidarestat pretreatment prevents HG (25 mM)-induced Thp1 monocyte viability. Further, treatment of Thp1 monocytes with fidarestat caused a time-dependent increase in the expression as well as the DNA-binding activity of Nrf2. In addition, fidarestat augmented the HG-induced Nrf2 expression and activity and also upregulated the expression of Nrf2-dependent proteins such as hemeoxygenase-1 (HO1) and NQO1 in Thp1 cells. Similarly, treatment with AR inhibitor also induced the expression of Nrf2 and HO1 in STZ-induced diabetic mice heart and kidney tissues. Further, AR inhibition increased the HG-induced expression of antioxidant enzymes such as SOD and catalase and activation of AMPK- α 1 in Thp1 cells. Our results thus suggest that pretreatment with AR inhibitor prepares the monocytes against hyperglycemic stress by overexpressing the Nrf2-dependent antioxidative proteins.

  12. Small Molecule Protection of Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    human CD34+ cells Determine formaldehyde dose-dependent survival on FANCG-deficient/control CD34+ cells in culture 9 - 15 Dr. Monnat – 4...molecule provides aldehyde dose-dependent protection in human cells in culture . Next steps: In the next award period we will: - extend above...U2-OS human osteosarcoma cells (Expt. 2) that were either untransduced (untx), transduced with and expressing a scrambled shRNA (shCTR), or

  13. Transduction proteins of olfactory receptor cells: identification of guanine nucleotide binding proteins and protein kinase C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anholt, R.R.H.; Mumby, S.M.; Stoffers, D.A.; Girard, P.R.; Kuo, J.F.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have analyzed guanine nucleotide binding proteins (G-proteins) in the olfactory epithelium of Rana catesbeiana using subunit-specific antisera. The olfactory epithelium contained the α subunits of three G-proteins, migrating on polyacrylamide gels in SDS with apparent molecular weights of 45,000, 42,000, and 40,000, corresponding to G/sub s/, G/sub i/, and G/sub o/, respectively. A single β subunit with an apparent molecular weight of 36,000 was detected. An antiserum against the α subunit of retinal transducin failed to detect immunoreactive proteins in olfactory cilia detached from the epithelium. The olfactory cilia appeared to be enriched in immunoreactive G/sub sα/ relative to G/sub ichemical bond/ and G/sub ochemical bond/ when compared to membranes prepared from the olfactory epithelium after detachment of the cilia. Bound antibody was detected by autoradiography after incubation with [ 125 I]protein. Immunohistochemical studies using an antiserum against the β subunit of G-proteins revealed intense staining of the ciliary surface of the olfactory epithelium and of the axon bundles in the lamina propria. In contrast, an antiserum against a common sequence of the α subunits preferentially stained the cell membranes of the olfactory receptor cells and the acinar cells of Bowman's glands and the deep submucosal glands. In addition to G-proteins, they have identified protein kinase C in olfactory cilia via a protein kinase C specific antiserum and via phorbol ester binding. However, in contrast to the G-proteins, protein kinase C occurred also in cilia isolated from respiratory epithelium

  14. Exercise-Dependent Regulation of NK Cells in Cancer Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Manja; Hojman, Pernille

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the most responsive immune cells to exercise, displaying an acute mobilization to the circulation during physical exertion. Recently, exercise-dependent mobilization of NK cells was found to play a central role in exercise-mediated protection against cancer. Here, we...... a mechanistic explanation for the protective effect of exercise on cancer, and we propose that exercise represents a potential strategy as adjuvant therapy in cancer, by improving NK cell recruitment and infiltration in solid tumors....... review the link between exercise and NK cell function, focusing on circulating exercise factors and additional effects, including vascularization, hypoxia, and body temperature in mediating the effects on NK cell functionality. Exercise-dependent mobilization and activation of NK cells provides...

  15. Cell-free protein synthesis: applications in proteomics and biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingyue

    2008-01-01

    Protein production is one of the key steps in biotechnology and functional proteomics. Expression of proteins in heterologous hosts (such as in E. coli) is generally lengthy and costly. Cell-free protein synthesis is thus emerging as an attractive alternative. In addition to the simplicity and speed for protein production, cell-free expression allows generation of functional proteins that are difficult to produce by in vivo systems. Recent exploitation of cell-free systems enables novel development of technologies for rapid discovery of proteins with desirable properties from very large libraries. This article reviews the recent development in cell-free systems and their application in the large scale protein analysis.

  16. Evaluation of immunogenicity and protective efficacy of recombinant outer membrane proteins of Haemophilus parasuis serovar 5 in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miao; Cai, Ru-Jian; Song, Shuai; Jiang, Zhi-Yong; Li, Yan; Gou, Hong-Chao; Chu, Pin-Pin; Li, Chun-Ling; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2017-01-01

    Glässer's disease is an economically important infectious disease of pigs caused by Haemophilus parasuis. Few vaccines are currently available that could provide effective cross-protection against various serovars of H. parasuis. In this study, five OMPs (OppA, TolC, HxuC, LppC, and HAPS_0926) identified by bioinformatic approaches, were cloned and expressed as recombinant proteins. Antigenicity of the purified proteins was verified through Western blotting, and primary screening for protective potential was evaluated in vivo. Recombinant TolC (rTolC), rLppC, and rHAPS_0926 proteins showing marked protection of mice against H. parasuis infection, and were further evaluated individually or in combination. Mice treated with these three OMPs produced humoral and host cell-mediated responses, with a significant rise in antigen-specific IgG titer and lymphoproliferative response in contrast with the mock-immunized group. Significant increases were noted in CD4+, CD8+ T cells, and three cytokines (IL-2, IL-4, and IFN-γ) in vaccinated animals. The antisera against candidate antigens could efficiently impede bacterial survival in whole blood bactericidal assay against H. parasuis infection. The multi-protein vaccine induced more pronounced immune responses and offered better protection than individual vaccines. Our findings indicate that these three OMPs are promising antigens for the development of multi-component subunit vaccines against Glässer's disease.

  17. Cytotoxicity of Sambucus ebulus on cancer cell lines and protective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. TONUKARI NYEROVWO

    2013-05-22

    May 22, 2013 ... andSaeediSaravi,2008;Jafarian-Dehkordi,2004;Prasain,. *Corresponding ... inhibit protein synthesis and cause cell necrosis (Benitez et al., 2005; De ... Fruits of S. ebulus were collected from 15th km of Farah Abad road,.

  18. Overexpression of Insig-1 protects β cell against glucolipotoxicity via SREBP-1c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ke

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High glucose induced lipid synthesis leads to β cell glucolipotoxicity. Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c is reported to be partially involved in this process. Insulin induced gene-1 (Insig-1 is an important upstream regulator of Insig-1-SREBPs cleavage activating protein (SCAP-SREBP-1c pathway. Insig-1 effectively blocks the transcription of SREBP-1c, preventing the activation of the genes for lipid biosynthesis. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether Insig-1 protects β cells against glucolipotoxicity. Methods An Insig-1 stable cell line was generated by overexpression of Insig-1 in INS-1 cells. The expression of Insig-1 was evaluated by RT-PCR and Western blotting, then, cells were then treated with standard (11.2 mM or high (25.0 mM glucose for 0 h, 24 h and 72 h. Cell viability, apoptosis, glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS, lipid metabolism and mRNA expression of insulin secretion relevant genes such as IRS-2, PDX-1, GLUT-2, Insulin and UCP-2 were evaluated. Results We found that Insig-1 suppressed the high glucose induced SREBP-1c mRNA and protein expression. Our results also showed that Insig-1 overexpression protected β cells from ER stress-induced apoptosis by regulating the proteins expressed in the IRE1α pathway, such as p-IRE1α, p-JNK, CHOP and BCL-2. In addition, Insig-1 up-regulated the expression of IRS-2, PDX-1, GLUT-2 and Insulin, down-regulated the expression of UCP-2 and improved glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS. Finally, we found that Insig-1 inhibited the lipid accumulation and free fatty acid (FFA synthesis in a time-dependent manner. Conclusions There results suggest that Insig-1 may play a critical role in protecting β cells against glucolipotoxicity by regulating the expression of SREBP-1c.

  19. A Breast Tissue Protein Expression Profile Contributing to Early Parity-Induced Protection Against Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Marie Gutierrez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Early parity reduces breast cancer risk, whereas, late parity and nulliparity increase breast cancer risk. Despite substantial efforts to understand the protective effects of early parity, the precise molecular circuitry responsible for these changes is not yet fully defined. Methods: Here, we have conducted the first study assessing protein expression profiles in normal breast tissue of healthy early parous, late parous, and nulliparous women. Breast tissue biopsies were obtained from 132 healthy parous and nulliparous volunteers. These samples were subjected to global protein expression profiling and immunohistochemistry. GeneSpring and MetaCore bioinformatics analysis software were used to identify protein expression profiles associated with early parity (low risk versus late/nulliparity (high risk. Results: Early parity reduces expression of key proteins involved in mitogenic signaling pathways in breast tissue through down regulation of EGFR1/3, ESR1, AKT1, ATF, Fos, and SRC. Early parity is also characterized by greater genomic stability and reduced tissue inflammation based on differential expression of aurora kinases, p53, RAD52, BRCA1, MAPKAPK-2, ATF-1, ICAM1, and NF-kappaB compared to late and nulli parity. Conclusions: Early parity reduces basal cell proliferation in breast tissue, which translates to enhanced genomic stability, reduced cellular stress/inflammation, and thus reduced breast cancer risk.

  20. Arsenal of elevated defense proteins fails to protect tomato against Verticillium dahliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Jane; Shittu, Hakeem; Soman, Kizhake V; Kurosky, Alexander; Nazar, Ross N

    2012-08-01

    Although the hypersensitive reaction in foliar plant diseases has been extensively described, little is clear regarding plant defense strategies in vascular wilt diseases affecting numerous economically important crops and trees. We have examined global genetic responses to Verticillium wilt in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) plants differing in Ve1 resistance alleles. Unexpectedly, mRNA analyses in the susceptible plant (Ve1-) based on the microarrays revealed a very heroic but unsuccessful systemic response involving many known plant defense genes. In contrast, the response is surprisingly low in plants expressing the Ve1+ R-gene and successfully resisting the pathogen. Similarly, whole-cell protein analyses, based on 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, demonstrate large systemic increases in a variety of known plant defense proteins in the stems of susceptible plants but only modest changes in the resistant plant. Taken together, the results indicate that the large systemic increases in plant defense proteins do not protect the susceptible plant. Indeed, since a number of the highly elevated proteins are known to participate in the plant hypersensitive response as well as natural senescence, the results suggest that some or all of the disease symptoms, including ultimate plant death, actually may be the result of this exaggerated plant response.

  1. Cytotoxicity of Sambucus ebulus on cancer cell lines and protective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Regarding the traditional utilization of Sambucus ebulus, Iranian native botany and its active ingredients (e.g. ebulitin and ebulin 1), cytotoxicity of ethyl acetate ... cytotoxic agent on liver and colon cancer cells and suggest that vitamins C and E may protect normal cells, when SEE were used in cancer therapy in future.

  2. Reduced endothelial thioredoxin-interacting protein protects arteries from damage induced by metabolic stress in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedarida, Tatiana; Domingues, Alison; Baron, Stephanie; Ferreira, Chrystophe; Vibert, Francoise; Cottart, Charles-Henry; Paul, Jean-Louis; Escriou, Virginie; Bigey, Pascal; Gaussem, Pascale; Leguillier, Teddy; Nivet-Antoine, Valerie

    2018-06-01

    Although thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) is involved in a variety of biologic functions, the contribution of endothelial TXNIP has not been well defined. To investigate the endothelial function of TXNIP, we generated a TXNIP knockout mouse on the Cdh5-cre background (TXNIP fl/fl cdh5 cre ). Control (TXNIP fl/fl ) and TXNIP fl/fl cdh5 cre mice were fed a high protein-low carbohydrate (HP-LC) diet for 3 mo to induce metabolic stress. We found that TXNIP fl/fl and TXNIP fl/fl cdh5 cre mice on an HP-LC diet displayed impaired glucose tolerance and dyslipidemia concretizing the metabolic stress induced. We evaluated the impact of this metabolic stress on mice with reduced endothelial TXNIP expression with regard to arterial structure and function. TXNIP fl/fl cdh5 cre mice on an HP-LC diet exhibited less endothelial dysfunction than littermate mice on an HP-LC diet. These mice were protected from decreased aortic medial cell content, impaired aortic distensibility, and increased plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 secretion. This protective effect came with lower oxidative stress and lower inflammation, with a reduced NLRP3 inflammasome expression, leading to a decrease in cleaved IL-1β. We also show the major role of TXNIP in inflammation with a knockdown model, using a TXNIP-specific, small interfering RNA included in a lipoplex. These findings demonstrate a key role for endothelial TXNIP in arterial impairments induced by metabolic stress, making endothelial TXNIP a potential therapeutic target.-Bedarida, T., Domingues, A., Baron, S., Ferreira, C., Vibert, F., Cottart, C.-H., Paul, J.-L., Escriou, V., Bigey, P., Gaussem, P., Leguillier, T., Nivet-Antoine, V. Reduced endothelial thioredoxin-interacting protein protects arteries from damage induced by metabolic stress in vivo.

  3. Phospho-BAD BH3 Mimicry Protects β Cells and Restores Functional β Cell Mass in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda Ljubicic

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Strategies that simultaneously enhance the survival and glucose responsiveness of insulin-producing β cells will greatly augment β cell replacement therapies in type 1 diabetes (T1D. We show that genetic and pharmacologic mimetics of the phosphorylated BCL-2 homology 3 (BH3 domain of BAD impart β-cell-autonomous protective effects in the face of stress stimuli relevant to β cell demise in T1D. Importantly, these benefits translate into improved engraftment of donor islets in transplanted diabetic mice, increased β cell viability in islet grafts, restoration of insulin release, and diabetes reversal. Survival of β cells in this setting is not merely due to the inability of phospho-BAD to suppress prosurvival BCL-2 proteins but requires its activation of the glucose-metabolizing enzyme glucokinase. Thus, BAD phospho-BH3 mimetics may prove useful in the restoration of functional β cell mass in diabetes.

  4. Protection against gamma-radiation injury by protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Mojena

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B is widely expressed in mammalian tissues, in particular in immune cells, and plays a pleiotropic role in dephosphorylating many substrates. Moreover, PTP1B expression is enhanced in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli and to different cell stressors. Taking advantage of the use of mice deficient in PTP1B we have investigated the effect of γ-radiation in these animals and found enhanced lethality and decreased respiratory exchange ratio vs. the corresponding wild type animals. Using bone-marrow derived macrophages and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs from wild-type and PTP1B-deficient mice, we observed a differential response to various cell stressors. PTP1B-deficient macrophages exhibited an enhanced response to γ-radiation, UV-light, LPS and S-nitroso-glutathione. Macrophages exposed to γ-radiation show DNA damage and fragmentation, increased ROS production, a lack in GSH elevation and enhanced acidic β-galactosidase activity. Interestingly, these differences were not observed in MEFs. Differential gene expression analysis of WT and KO macrophages revealed that the main pathways affected after irradiation were an up-regulation of protein secretion, TGF-β signaling and angiogenesis among other, and downregulation of Myc targets and Hedgehog signaling. These results demonstrate a key role for PTP1B in the protection against the cytotoxicity of irradiation in intact animal and in macrophages, which might be therapeutically relevant. Keywords: Protein tyrosine phosphatase, Cell viability, Irradiation sensitivity, Lethality, p53

  5. Ghrelin protects against depleted uranium-induced apoptosis of MC3T3-E1 cells through oxidative stress-mediated p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Yuhui; Liu, Cong; Huang, Jiawei; Gu, Ying; Li, Hong; Yang, Zhangyou; Liu, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burns and Combined Injury, Institute of Combined Injury, Chongqing Engineering Research Center for Nanomedicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, No. 30 Gaotanyan Street, Shapingba District, Chongqing 400038 (China); Wang, Weidong, E-mail: wwdwyl@sina.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China); Li, Rong, E-mail: yuhui_hao@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burns and Combined Injury, Institute of Combined Injury, Chongqing Engineering Research Center for Nanomedicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, No. 30 Gaotanyan Street, Shapingba District, Chongqing 400038 (China)

    2016-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) mainly accumulates in the bone over the long term. Osteoblast cells are responsible for the formation of bone, and they are sensitive to DU damage. However, studies investigating methods of reducing DU damage in osteoblasts are rarely reported. Ghrelin is a stomach hormone that stimulates growth hormones released from the hypothalamic–pituitary axis, and it is believed to play an important physiological role in bone metabolism. This study evaluates the impact of ghrelin on DU-induced apoptosis of the osteoblast MC3T3-E1 and investigates its underlying mechanisms. The results show that ghrelin relieved the intracellular oxidative stress induced by DU, eliminated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reduced lipid peroxidation by increasing intracellular GSH levels; in addition, ghrelin effectively suppressed apoptosis, enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibited cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation after DU exposure. Moreover, ghrelin significantly reduced the expression of DU-induced phosphorylated p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). A specific inhibitor (SB203580) or specific siRNA of p38-MAPK could significantly suppress DU-induced apoptosis and related signals, whereas ROS production was not affected. In addition, ghrelin receptor inhibition could reduce the anti-apoptosis effect of ghrelin on DU and reverse the effect of ghrelin on intracellular ROS and p38-MAPK after DU exposure. These results suggest that ghrelin can suppress DU-induced apoptosis of MC3T3-E1 cells, reduce DU-induced oxidative stress by interacting with its receptor, and inhibit downstream p38-MAPK activation, thereby suppressing the mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis pathway. - Highlights: • Ghrelin suppressed DU-induced apoptosis of MC3T3-E1 cells. • Ghrelin inhibited DU-induced oxidative stress and further p38-MAPK activation. • Ghrelin further suppressed mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis pathway. • The anti-oxidation effect of

  6. Identification of protective pneumococcal T(H17 antigens from the soluble fraction of a killed whole cell vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin L Moffitt

    Full Text Available Mucosal or parenteral immunization with a killed unencapsulated pneumococcal whole cell antigen (WCA with an adjuvant protects mice from colonization by a T(H17 CD4+ cell-mediated mechanism. Using preparative SDS gels, we separated the soluble proteins that compose the WCA in order to identify fractions that were immunogenic and protective. We screened these fractions for their ability to stimulate IL-17A secretion from splenocytes obtained from mice immunized with WCA and adjuvant. We identified 12 proteins within the stimulatory fractions by mass spectrometry; these proteins were then cloned, recombinantly expressed and purified using an Escherichia coli expression system. The ability of these proteins to induce IL-17A secretion was then evaluated by stimulation of mouse splenocytes. Of the four most stimulatory proteins, three were protective in a mouse pneumococcal serotype 6B colonization model. This work thus describes a method for identifying immunogenic proteins from the soluble fraction of pneumococcus and shows that several of the proteins identified protect mice from colonization when used as mucosal vaccines. We propose that, by providing protection against pneumococcal colonization, one or more of these proteins may serve as components of a multivalent pneumococcal vaccine.

  7. Protective effect of atorvastatin on radiation-induced endothelial cell injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xinze, Ran; Huaien, Zheng; Fengchao, Wang; Xi, Ran; Aiping, Wang; Jing, Han; Yanqi, Zhang; Jun, Chen [Institute of Combined Injury, State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burns and Combined Injury, College of Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2009-04-15

    Objective: To explore the protective effect of atorvastatin on irradiated endothelium and the thrombomodulin (TM) expression. Methods: Cultured human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were treated by atorvastatin at the final concentration of 10 {mu}mol/ml for 10 min, and then irradiated with 2 and 25 Gy. Cell cycles status and TM expression were quantitatively measured by flow cytometry 24 hours after irradiation. Protein C activation in endothelial cells was also assessod. Results: After administration with atorvastatin for 24 h, the TM expression increased by 77%, 59% and 61% in normal control group, 2 Gy group and 25 Gy group, respectively (t=27.395, 26.420, 58.065; P=0.000). The protein C levels decreased by 23% and 34% compared with the normal group post-irradiation to 2 and 25 Gy, but increased by 79% and 76% compared with the irradiated control group after administration with atorvastatin. The rates of cell apoptosis decreased by 6% and 16% in 2 Gy and 25 Gy groups, respectively after administration with atorvastatin for 24 h (t=4.178, 17.863; P=0.000). Conclusions: Atorva statin can protect endothelia cell from irradiation-induced apeptosis by increasing TM expression and protein C activation. (authors)

  8. Protective effect of atorvastatin on radiation-induced endothelial cell injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ran Xinze; Zheng Huaien; Wang Fengchao; Ran Xi; Wang Aiping; Han Jing; Zhang Yanqi; Chen Jun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the protective effect of atorvastatin on irradiated endothelium and the thrombomodulin (TM) expression. Methods: Cultured human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were treated by atorvastatin at the final concentration of 10 μmol/ml for 10 min, and then irradiated with 2 and 25 Gy. Cell cycles status and TM expression were quantitatively measured by flow cytometry 24 hours after irradiation. Protein C activation in endothelial cells was also assessod. Results: After administration with atorvastatin for 24 h, the TM expression increased by 77%, 59% and 61% in normal control group, 2 Gy group and 25 Gy group, respectively (t=27.395, 26.420, 58.065; P=0.000). The protein C levels decreased by 23% and 34% compared with the normal group post-irradiation to 2 and 25 Gy, but increased by 79% and 76% compared with the irradiated control group after administration with atorvastatin. The rates of cell apoptosis decreased by 6% and 16% in 2 Gy and 25 Gy groups, respectively after administration with atorvastatin for 24 h (t=4.178, 17.863; P=0.000). Conclusions: Atorva statin can protect endothelia cell from irradiation-induced apeptosis by increasing TM expression and protein C activation. (authors)

  9. Geldanamycin induces heat shock protein 70 and protects against MPTP-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hai-Ying; He, Jin-Cai; Wang, Yumei; Huang, Qing-Yuan; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2005-12-02

    As key molecular chaperone proteins, heat shock proteins (HSPs) represent an important cellular protective mechanism against neuronal cell death in various models of neurological disorders. In this study, we investigated the effect as well as the molecular mechanism of geldanamycin (GA), an inhibitor of Hsp90, on 1-methyl-4-pheny-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity, a mouse model of Parkinson disease. Neurochemical analysis showed that pretreatment with GA (via intracerebral ventricular injection 24 h prior to MPTP treatment) increased residual dopamine content and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the striatum 24 h after MPTP treatment. To dissect out the molecular mechanism underlying this neuroprotection, we showed that the GA-mediated protection against MPTP was associated with a reduction of cytosolic Hsp90 and an increase in Hsp70, with no significant changes in Hsp40 and Hsp25 levels. Furthermore, in parallel with the induction of Hsp70, striatal nuclear HSF1 levels and HSF1 binding to heat shock element sites in the Hsp70 promoter were significantly enhanced by the GA pretreatment. Together these results suggested that the molecular cascade leading to the induction of Hsp70 is critical to the neuroprotection afforded by GA against MPTP-induced neurotoxicity in the brain and that pharmacological inhibition of Hsp90 may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for Parkinson disease.

  10. Single cell protein from mandarin orange peel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishio, M.; Magai, J.

    1981-01-01

    As the hydrolysis of mandarin orange peel with macerating enzyme (40 degrees C, 24 h) produced 0.59 g g-1 reducing sugar per dry peel compared to 0.36 by acid-hydrolysis (15 min at 120 degrees C with 0.8 N H2S04), the production of single cell protein (SCP) from orange peel was studied mostly using enzymatically hydrolyzed orange peel. When the enzymatically hydrolyzed peel media were used, the utilization efficiency of reducing sugars (%) and the growth yield from reducing sugars (g g-1) were: 63 and 0.51 for Saccharomyces cerevisiae; 56 and 0.48 for Candida utilis; 74 and 0.69 for Debaryomyces hansenii and 64 and 0.70 for Rhodotorula glutinis. SCP production from orange peel by D. hansenii and R. glutinis were further studied. Batch cultures for 24 h at 30 degrees C using 100g dried orange peel produced 45 g of dried cultivated peel (protein content, 33%) with D. hansenii and 34 g (protein content, 50%) with R. glutinis, and 38 g (protein content, 44%) with a mixture of both yeasts. (Refs. 12).

  11. Engineered Trx2p industrial yeast strain protects glycolysis and fermentation proteins from oxidative carbonylation during biomass propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Pastor Rocío

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the yeast biomass production process, protein carbonylation has severe adverse effects since it diminishes biomass yield and profitability of industrial production plants. However, this significant detriment of yeast performance can be alleviated by increasing thioredoxins levels. Thioredoxins are important antioxidant defenses implicated in many functions in cells, and their primordial functions include scavenging of reactive oxygen species that produce dramatic and irreversible alterations such as protein carbonylation. Results In this work we have found several proteins specifically protected by yeast Thioredoxin 2 (Trx2p. Bidimensional electrophoresis and carbonylated protein identification from TRX-deficient and TRX-overexpressing cells revealed that glycolysis and fermentation-related proteins are specific targets of Trx2p protection. Indeed, the TRX2 overexpressing strain presented increased activity of the central carbon metabolism enzymes. Interestingly, Trx2p specifically preserved alcohol dehydrogenase I (Adh1p from carbonylation, decreased oligomer aggregates and increased its enzymatic activity. Conclusions The identified proteins suggest that the fermentative capacity detriment observed under industrial conditions in T73 wine commercial strain results from the oxidative carbonylation of specific glycolytic and fermentation enzymes. Indeed, increased thioredoxin levels enhance the performance of key fermentation enzymes such as Adh1p, which consequently increases fermentative capacity.

  12. Yeast Surface Display of Two Proteins Previously Shown to Be Protective Against White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) in Shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananphongmanee, Vorawit; Srisala, Jiraporn; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya; Boonchird, Chuenchit

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface display using the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris has been extensively developed for application in bioindustrial processes. Due to the rigid structure of their cell walls, a number of proteins have been successfully displayed on their cell surfaces. It was previously reported that the viral binding protein Rab7 from the giant tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon (PmRab7) and its binding partner envelope protein VP28 of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) could independently protect shrimp against WSSV infection. Thus, we aimed to display these two proteins independently on the cell surfaces of 2 yeast clones with the ultimate goal of using a mixture of the two clones as an orally deliverable, antiviral agent to protect shrimp against WSSV infection. PmRab7 and VP28 were modified by N-terminal tagging to the C-terminal half of S. cerevisiae α-agglutinin. DNA fragments, harboring fused-gene expression cassettes under control of an alcohol oxidase I (AOX1) promoter were constructed and used to transform the yeast cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy with antibodies specific to both proteins demonstrated that mutated PmRab7 (mPmRab7) and partial VP28 (pVP28) were localized on the cell surfaces of the respective clones, and fluorescence intensity for each was significantly higher than that of control cells by flow cytometry. Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) using cells displaying mPmRab7 or pVP28 revealed that the binding of specific antibodies for each was dose-dependent, and could be saturated. In addition, the binding of mPmRab7-expressing cells with free VP28, and vice versa was dose dependent. Binding between the two surface-expressed proteins was confirmed by an assay showing agglutination between cells expressing complementary mPmRab7 and pVP28. In summary, our genetically engineered P. pastoris can display biologically active mPmRab7 and pVP28 and is now ready for evaluation of efficacy in protecting shrimp against WSSV by oral

  13. Yeast Surface Display of Two Proteins Previously Shown to Be Protective Against White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV in Shrimp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorawit Ananphongmanee

    Full Text Available Cell surface display using the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris has been extensively developed for application in bioindustrial processes. Due to the rigid structure of their cell walls, a number of proteins have been successfully displayed on their cell surfaces. It was previously reported that the viral binding protein Rab7 from the giant tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon (PmRab7 and its binding partner envelope protein VP28 of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV could independently protect shrimp against WSSV infection. Thus, we aimed to display these two proteins independently on the cell surfaces of 2 yeast clones with the ultimate goal of using a mixture of the two clones as an orally deliverable, antiviral agent to protect shrimp against WSSV infection. PmRab7 and VP28 were modified by N-terminal tagging to the C-terminal half of S. cerevisiae α-agglutinin. DNA fragments, harboring fused-gene expression cassettes under control of an alcohol oxidase I (AOX1 promoter were constructed and used to transform the yeast cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy with antibodies specific to both proteins demonstrated that mutated PmRab7 (mPmRab7 and partial VP28 (pVP28 were localized on the cell surfaces of the respective clones, and fluorescence intensity for each was significantly higher than that of control cells by flow cytometry. Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA using cells displaying mPmRab7 or pVP28 revealed that the binding of specific antibodies for each was dose-dependent, and could be saturated. In addition, the binding of mPmRab7-expressing cells with free VP28, and vice versa was dose dependent. Binding between the two surface-expressed proteins was confirmed by an assay showing agglutination between cells expressing complementary mPmRab7 and pVP28. In summary, our genetically engineered P. pastoris can display biologically active mPmRab7 and pVP28 and is now ready for evaluation of efficacy in protecting shrimp against

  14. Snail/beta-catenin signaling protects breast cancer cells from hypoxia attack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherbakov, Alexander M., E-mail: alex.scherbakov@gmail.com [Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Institute of Clinical Oncology, N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye sh. 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Stefanova, Lidia B.; Sorokin, Danila V.; Semina, Svetlana E. [Laboratory of Molecular Endocrinology, Institute of Carcinogenesis, N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye sh. 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Berstein, Lev M. [Laboratory of Oncoendocrinology, N.N. Petrov Research Institute of Oncology, St. Petersburg 197758 (Russian Federation); Krasil’nikov, Mikhail A. [Laboratory of Molecular Endocrinology, Institute of Carcinogenesis, N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye sh. 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-10

    The tolerance of cancer cells to hypoxia depends on the combination of different factors – from increase of glycolysis (Warburg Effect) to activation of intracellular growth/apoptotic pathways. Less is known about the influence of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and EMT-associated pathways on the cell sensitivity to hypoxia. The aim of this study was to explore the role of Snail signaling, one of the key EMT pathways, in the mediating of hypoxia response and regulation of cell sensitivity to hypoxia, using as a model in vitro cultured breast cancer cells. Earlier we have shown that estrogen-independent HBL-100 breast cancer cells differ from estrogen-dependent MCF-7 cells with increased expression of Snail1, and demonstrated Snail1 involvement into formation of hormone-resistant phenotype. Because Snail1 belongs to hypoxia-activated proteins, here we studied the influence of Snail1 signaling on the cell tolerance to hypoxia. We found that Snail1-enriched HBL-100 cells were less sensitive to hypoxia-induced growth suppression if compared with MCF-7 line (31% MCF-7 vs. 71% HBL-100 cell viability after 1% O{sub 2} atmosphere for 3 days). Snail1 knock-down enhanced the hypoxia-induced inhibition of cell proliferation giving the direct evidence of Snail1 involvement into cell protection from hypoxia attack. The protective effect of Snail1 was shown to be mediated, at least in a part, via beta-catenin which positively regulated expression of HIF-1-dependent genes. Finally, we found that cell tolerance to hypoxia was accompanied with the failure in the phosphorylation of AMPK – the key energy sensor, and demonstrated an inverse relationship between AMPK and Snail/beta-catenin signaling. Totally, our data show that Snail1 and beta-catenin, besides association with loss of hormone dependence, protect cancer cells from hypoxia and may serve as an important target in the treatment of breast cancer. Moreover, we suggest that the level of these proteins as well

  15. In Vitro Ruminal Degradability of Soybean Meal Protein Protected with Natural Tannin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetiyono, B. W. H. E.; Subrata, A.; Tampoebolon, B. I. M.; Surono; Widiyanto

    2018-02-01

    The influence of tannin from tea waste and gambier as natural tannin sources on ruminal protein degradability was studied in this investigation. The soybean meal was used as protein source in this investigation. There were three treatments in this investigation mainly without protection (NT); protection with tea waste (Tt); and protection with gambier (Tg). The measured parameters consisted of in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD), in vitro organic matter digestibility (IVOMD), and the ruminal fermentation characteristics. Results of this experiment showed that protection with tannin from tea waste as well as gambier increased (pRUP) in Tt and Tg group was higher than that in NT group (66.29 and 69.20 vs 51.10%). The ruminal protozoa population decreased (pRUP. The ruminal protozoa population and ammonia concentration, on the other hand, were decreased by tannin protection from those tannin natural sources. The natural tannin from gambier was the most effective protection agent for soybean meal protein.

  16. Biosynthesis and release of proteins by isolated pulmonary Clara cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patton, S.E.; Gilmore, L.B.; Jetten, A.M.; Nettesheim, P.; Hook, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    The major proteins synthesized and released by Clara cells were identified and compared with those synthesized and released by mixed lung cells. Highly purified Clara cells (85.9 +/- 2.4%) and mixed lung cells (Clara cells 4%, Type II cells 33%, granulocytes 18%, macrophages 2.7%, ciliated cells 1.2%) were isolated from rabbit lungs, incubated with Ham's F12 medium in collagen/fibronectin-coated plastic culture dishes in the presence of 35 S-methionine for periods of 4 and 18 hrs. Radiolabelled proteins were isolated from the cells and from the culture medium, electrophoresed on polyacrylamide gels in the presence of SDS under reducing conditions, and then autoradiographed. After 4 and 18 hr of incubation of the Clara cells the major radiolabelled cell-associated proteins were those with molecular weights of 6, 48, and 180 Kd. The major radiolabelled proteins released by Clara cells into the medium after 4 hrs of incubation had molecular weights of 6, 48, and 180 Kd, accounting for 42, 16, and 10%, respectively, of the total extracellular protein-associated radioactivity. After 18 hr of incubation the 6 and 48 Kd proteins represented 30 and 18% of the total released radioactivity, and the relative amount of the 180 Kd protein had decreased to 3%. With the mixed lung cells, the major proteins released into the medium had molecular weights of 6 and 48 Kd. Under nonreducing conditions the 6 Kd protein released by Clara cells had an apparent molecular weight of 12 Kd. Labelling isolated Clara cells with a mixture of 14 C-amino acids also identified this low molecular weight protein as the major secretory product of the Clara cell. The 6 Kd protein did not label when the cells were incubated with 14 C-glucosamine indicating that it was not a glycoprotein. Data demonstrate the release of several proteins from isolated Clara cells but the major protein had a M.W. of 6 Kd

  17. The pretective effects of heat shock protein 70 on radiation injury of V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Yongchun; Zhang Baoguo; Hong Chengjiao

    2008-01-01

    Westem blot was used to detect the expression of heat shock protein 70 in V79 cells after heat shock pretreatment; V79 cells were irradiated using γ-ray after heat shock pretreatment, survival rate was observed using Colony formation assay. Our study shows that 1) the overexpression of heat shock protein 70 was observed in cells recovering for 1 hour after heat shock pretreatment, with peak expression in cells recovering for 4 hours, and could last for 24 hours; 2) heat shock pretreatment was able to elevate survival rate of V79 cells after irradiation by 60 Co γ ray (when the irradiation dose was less than 6 Gy). The results indicate that heat shock protein 70 has protective effect on radiation induced cell death of V79 cells (when the irradiation dose was less than 6 Gy). (authors)

  18. Cocoa Phenolic Extract Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells against Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bravo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is associated with reductions in glutathione, supporting the critical role of oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. Antioxidant food components such as flavonoids have a protective role against oxidative stress-induced degenerative and age-related diseases. Flavonoids constitute an important part of the human diet; they can be found in most plant foods, including green tea, grapes or cocoa and possess multiple biological activities. This study investigates the chemo-protective effect of a cocoa phenolic extract (CPE containing mainly flavonoids against oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH on Ins-1E pancreatic beta cells. Cell viability and oxidative status were evaluated. Ins-1E cells treatment with 5–20 μg/mL CPE for 20 h evoked no cell damage and did not alter ROS production. Addition of 50 μM t-BOOH for 2 h increased ROS and carbonyl groups content and decreased reduced glutathione level. Pre-treatment of cells with CPE significantly prevented the t-BOOH-induced ROS and carbonyl groups and returned antioxidant defences to adequate levels. Thus, Ins-1E cells treated with CPE showed a remarkable recovery of cell viability damaged by t-BOOH, indicating that integrity of surviving machineries in the CPE-treated cells was notably protected against the oxidative insult.

  19. System in biology leading to cell pathology: stable protein-protein interactions after covalent modifications by small molecules or in transgenic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, Halina Z

    2011-01-19

    The physiological processes in the cell are regulated by reversible, electrostatic protein-protein interactions. Apoptosis is such a regulated process, which is critically important in tissue homeostasis and development and leads to complete disintegration of the cell. Pathological apoptosis, a process similar to apoptosis, is associated with aging and infection. The current study shows that pathological apoptosis is a process caused by the covalent interactions between the signaling proteins, and a characteristic of this pathological network is the covalent binding of calmodulin to regulatory sequences. Small molecules able to bind covalently to the amino group of lysine, histidine, arginine, or glutamine modify the regulatory sequences of the proteins. The present study analyzed the interaction of calmodulin with the BH3 sequence of Bax, and the calmodulin-binding sequence of myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate in the presence of xanthurenic acid in primary retinal epithelium cell cultures and murine epithelial fibroblast cell lines transformed with SV40 (wild type [WT], Bid knockout [Bid-/-], and Bax-/-/Bak-/- double knockout [DKO]). Cell death was observed to be associated with the covalent binding of calmodulin, in parallel, to the regulatory sequences of proteins. Xanthurenic acid is known to activate caspase-3 in primary cell cultures, and the results showed that this activation is also observed in WT and Bid-/- cells, but not in DKO cells. However, DKO cells were not protected against death, but high rates of cell death occurred by detachment. The results showed that small molecules modify the basic amino acids in the regulatory sequences of proteins leading to covalent interactions between the modified sequences (e.g., calmodulin to calmodulin-binding sites). The formation of these polymers (aggregates) leads to an unregulated and, consequently, pathological protein network. The results suggest a mechanism for the involvement of small molecules

  20. Protective material for solar cell; Taiyo denchiyo hyomen hogozai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iimura, M.; Domoto, T. [Nitto Denko Corp., Osaka (Japan)

    1998-02-03

    The protective material for the solar cell of this invention consists of fluororesin containing from 1 to 20wt% titanium oxide particles with the particle size range from 1 to 1,000nm. Surface contamination of the protective material for the solar cell and deterioration of the adhesive are prevented when titanium oxide with particular particle size is contained in the fluororesin in a particular range as mentioned above. Titanium oxide has photocatalytic performance to decompose organic substances, and the surface protective material for the solar cell containing titanium oxide can decompose and remove dirt such as dust adhering the surface for preventing surface contamination. In addition, total light permeability can be maintained at high rate and the permeability of less than 350nm ultraviolet rays causing deterioration of the adhesive can be decreased if the particle size and content of titanium oxide are specified. Titanium dioxide of anatase type crystal structure is ideal as the titanium oxide. 1 tab.

  1. Targeting cytokine signaling checkpoint CIS activates NK cells to protect from tumor initiation and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putz, Eva M.; Guillerey, Camille; Kos, Kevin; Stannard, Kimberley; Miles, Kim; Delconte, Rebecca B.; Nicholson, Sandra E.; Huntington, Nicholas D.; Smyth, Mark J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cytokine-induced SH2-containing protein CIS belongs to the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) protein family. Here, we show the critical role of CIS in suppressing natural killer (NK) cell control of tumor initiation and metastasis. Cish-deficient mice were highly resistant to methylcholanthrene-induced sarcoma formation and protected from lung metastasis of B16F10 melanoma and RM-1 prostate carcinoma cells. In contrast, the growth of primary subcutaneous tumors, including those expressing the foreign antigen OVA, was unchanged in Cish-deficient mice. The combination of Cish deficiency and relevant targeted and immuno-therapies such as combined BRAF and MEK inhibitors, immune checkpoint blockade antibodies, IL-2 and type I interferon revealed further improved control of metastasis. The data clearly indicate that targeting CIS promotes NK cell antitumor functions and CIS holds great promise as a novel target in NK cell immunotherapy. PMID:28344878

  2. Errors in macromolecular synthesis after stress. A study of the possible protective role of the small heat shock proteinsBiochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marin Vinader, L.

    2006-01-01

    The general goal of this thesis was to gain insight in what small heat shock proteins (sHsps) do with respect to macromolecular synthesis during a stressful situation in the cell. It is known that after a non-lethal heat shock, cells are better protected against a subsequent more severe heat shock,

  3. A specific role for the ZipA protein in cell division: stabilization of the FtsZ protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Manuel; Natale, Paolo; Vicente, Miguel

    2013-02-01

    In Escherichia coli, the cell division protein FtsZ is anchored to the cytoplasmic membrane by the action of the bitopic membrane protein ZipA and the cytoplasmic protein FtsA. Although the presence of both ZipA and FtsA is strictly indispensable for cell division, an FtsA gain-of-function mutant FtsA* (R286W) can bypass the ZipA requirement for cell division. This observation casts doubts on the role of ZipA and its need for cell division. Maxicells are nucleoid-free bacterial cells used as a whole cell in vitro system to probe protein-protein interactions without the need of protein purification. We show that ZipA protects FtsZ from the ClpXP-directed degradation observed in E. coli maxicells and that ZipA-stabilized FtsZ forms membrane-attached spiral-like structures in the bacterial cytoplasm. The overproduction of the FtsZ-binding ZipA domain is sufficient to protect FtsZ from degradation, whereas other C-terminal ZipA partial deletions lacking it are not. Individual overproduction of the proto-ring component FtsA or its gain-of-function mutant FtsA* does not result in FtsZ protection. Overproduction of FtsA or FtsA* together with ZipA does not interfere with the FtsZ protection. Moreover, neither FtsA nor FtsA* protects FtsZ when overproduced together with ZipA mutants lacking the FZB domain. We propose that ZipA protects FtsZ from degradation by ClpP by making the FtsZ site of interaction unavailable to the ClpX moiety of the ClpXP protease. This role cannot be replaced by either FtsA or FtsA*, suggesting a unique function for ZipA in proto-ring stability.

  4. Protective effects of the thioredoxin and glutaredoxin systems in dopamine-induced cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Arodin, Lisa; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio; Swoboda, Peter; Fernandes, Aristi P.

    2014-01-01

    Although the etiology of sporadic Parkinson disease (PD) is unknown, it is well established that oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenic mechanism. The thioredoxin (Trx) and glutaredoxin (Grx) systems are two central systems upholding the sulfhydryl homeostasis by reducing disulfides and mixed disulfides within the cell and thereby protecting against oxidative stress. By examining the expression of redox proteins in human postmortem PD brains, we found the levels of Trx1 an...

  5. Simultaneous Multiplexed Measurement of RNA and Proteins in Single Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyros Darmanis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant advances have been made in methods to analyze genomes and transcriptomes of single cells, but to fully define cell states, proteins must also be accessed as central actors defining a cell’s phenotype. Methods currently used to analyze endogenous protein expression in single cells are limited in specificity, throughput, or multiplex capability. Here, we present an approach to simultaneously and specifically interrogate large sets of protein and RNA targets in lysates from individual cells, enabling investigations of cell functions and responses. We applied our method to investigate the effects of BMP4, an experimental therapeutic agent, on early-passage glioblastoma cell cultures. We uncovered significant heterogeneity in responses to treatment at levels of RNA and protein, with a subset of cells reacting in a distinct manner to BMP4. Moreover, we found overall poor correlation between protein and RNA at the level of single cells, with proteins more accurately defining responses to treatment.

  6. Class I and II Small Heat Shock Proteins Together with HSP101 Protect Protein Translation Factors during Heat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoughlin, Fionn; Basha, Eman; Fowler, Mary E; Kim, Minsoo; Bordowitz, Juliana; Katiyar-Agarwal, Surekha; Vierling, Elizabeth

    2016-10-01

    The ubiquitous small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are well documented to act in vitro as molecular chaperones to prevent the irreversible aggregation of heat-sensitive proteins. However, the in vivo activities of sHSPs remain unclear. To investigate the two most abundant classes of plant cytosolic sHSPs (class I [CI] and class II [CII]), RNA interference (RNAi) and overexpression lines were created in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and shown to have reduced and enhanced tolerance, respectively, to extreme heat stress. Affinity purification of CI and CII sHSPs from heat-stressed seedlings recovered eukaryotic translation elongation factor (eEF) 1B (α-, β-, and γ-subunits) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4A (three isoforms), although the association with CI sHSPs was stronger and additional proteins involved in translation were recovered with CI sHSPs. eEF1B subunits became partially insoluble during heat stress and, in the CI and CII RNAi lines, showed reduced recovery to the soluble cell fraction after heat stress, which was also dependent on HSP101. Furthermore, after heat stress, CI sHSPs showed increased retention in the insoluble fraction in the CII RNAi line and vice versa. Immunolocalization revealed that both CI and CII sHSPs were present in cytosolic foci, some of which colocalized with HSP101 and with eEF1Bγ and eEF1Bβ. Thus, CI and CII sHSPs have both unique and overlapping functions and act either directly or indirectly to protect specific translation factors in cytosolic stress granules. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Curcumin Protects β-Lactoglobulin Fibril Formation and Fibril-Induced Neurotoxicity in PC12 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansooreh Mazaheri

    Full Text Available In this study the β-lactoglobulin fibrillation, in the presence or absence of lead ions, aflatoxin M1 and curcumin, was evaluated using ThT fluorescence, Circular dichroism spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. To investigate the toxicity of the different form of β-Lg fibrils, in the presence or absence of above toxins and curcumin, we monitored changes in the level of reactive oxygen species and morphology of the differentiated neuron-like PC12 cells. The cell viability, cell body area, average neurite length, neurite width, number of primary neurites, percent of bipolar cells and node/primary neurite ratios were used to assess the growth and complexity of PC12 cells exposed to different form of β-Lg fibrils. Incubation of β-Lg with curcumin resulted in a significant decrease in ROS levels even in the presence of lead ions and aflatoxin M1. The β-Lg fibrils formed in the presence of lead ions and aflatoxin M1 attenuated the growth and complexity of PC12 cells compared with other form of β-Lg fibrils. However, the adverse effects of these toxins and protein fibrils were negated in the presence of curcumin. Furthermore, the antioxidant and inhibitory effects of curcumin protected PC12 cells against fibril neurotoxicity and enhanced their survival. Thus, curcumin may provide a protective effect toward β-Lg, and perhaps other protein, fibrils mediated neurotoxicity.

  8. Coenzyme Q10 protects hair cells against aminoglycoside.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuma Sugahara

    Full Text Available It is well known that the production of free radicals is associated with sensory cell death induced by an aminoglycoside. Many researchers have reported that antioxidant reagents protect sensory cells in the inner ear, and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 is an antioxidant that is consumed as a health food in many countries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of CoQ10 in mammalian vestibular hair cell death induced by aminoglycoside. Cultured utricles of CBA/CaN mice were divided into three groups (control group, neomycin group, and neomycin + CoQ10 group. In the neomycin group, utricles were cultured with neomycin (1 mM to induce hair cell death. In the neomycin + CoQ10 group, utricles were cultured with neomycin and water-soluble CoQ10 (30-0.3 µM. Twenty-four hours after exposure to neomycin, the cultured tissues were fixed, and vestibular hair cells were labeled using an anti-calmodulin antibody. Significantly more hair cells survived in the neomycin + CoQ10 group than in the neomycin group. These data indicate that CoQ10 protects sensory hair cells against neomycin-induced death in the mammalian vestibular epithelium; therefore, CoQ10 may be useful as a protective drug in the inner ear.

  9. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles protect cells against oxidative stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbakov, Alexander B.; Zholobak, Nadezhda M.; Baranchikov, Alexander E.; Ryabova, Anastasia V.; Ivanov, Vladimir K.

    2015-01-01

    A novel facile method of non-doped and fluorescent terbium-doped cerium fluoride stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. Intense green luminescence of CeF 3 :Tb nanoparticles can be used to visualize these nanoparticles' accumulation in cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles are shown for the first time to protect both organic molecules and living cells from the oxidative action of hydrogen peroxide. Both non-doped and terbium-doped CeF 3 nanoparticles are shown to provide noteworthy protection to cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus. - Highlights: • Facile method of CeF 3 and CeF 3 :Tb stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. • Naked CeF 3 nanoparticles are shown to be non-toxic and to protect cells from the action of H 2 O 2 . • CeF 3 and CeF 3 :Tb nanoparticles are shown to protect living cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus

  10. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles protect cells against oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shcherbakov, Alexander B.; Zholobak, Nadezhda M. [Zabolotny Institute of Microbiology and Virology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv D0368 (Ukraine); Baranchikov, Alexander E. [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Ryabova, Anastasia V. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, Vladimir K., E-mail: van@igic.ras.ru [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-01

    A novel facile method of non-doped and fluorescent terbium-doped cerium fluoride stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. Intense green luminescence of CeF{sub 3}:Tb nanoparticles can be used to visualize these nanoparticles' accumulation in cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles are shown for the first time to protect both organic molecules and living cells from the oxidative action of hydrogen peroxide. Both non-doped and terbium-doped CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles are shown to provide noteworthy protection to cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus. - Highlights: • Facile method of CeF{sub 3} and CeF{sub 3}:Tb stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. • Naked CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles are shown to be non-toxic and to protect cells from the action of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • CeF{sub 3} and CeF{sub 3}:Tb nanoparticles are shown to protect living cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus.

  11. Functional transcriptomics of wild-caught Lutzomyia intermedia salivary glands: identification of a protective salivary protein against Leishmania braziliensis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moura, Tatiana R; Oliveira, Fabiano; Carneiro, Marcia W; Miranda, José Carlos; Clarêncio, Jorge; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Brodskyn, Cláudia; Barral, Aldina; Ribeiro, José M C; Valenzuela, Jesus G; de Oliveira, Camila I

    2013-01-01

    Leishmania parasites are transmitted in the presence of sand fly saliva. Together with the parasite, the sand fly injects salivary components that change the environment at the feeding site. Mice immunized with Phlebotomus papatasi salivary gland (SG) homogenate are protected against Leishmania major infection, while immunity to Lutzomyia intermedia SG homogenate exacerbated experimental Leishmania braziliensis infection. In humans, antibodies to Lu. intermedia saliva are associated with risk of acquiring L. braziliensis infection. Despite these important findings, there is no information regarding the repertoire of Lu. intermedia salivary proteins. A cDNA library from the Salivary Glands (SGs) of wild-caught Lu. intermedia was constructed, sequenced, and complemented by a proteomic approach based on 1D SDS PAGE and mass/mass spectrometry to validate the transcripts present in this cDNA library. We identified the most abundant transcripts and proteins reported in other sand fly species as well as novel proteins such as neurotoxin-like proteins, peptides with ML domain, and three small peptides found so far only in this sand fly species. DNA plasmids coding for ten selected transcripts were constructed and used to immunize BALB/c mice to study their immunogenicity. Plasmid Linb-11--coding for a 4.5-kDa protein--induced a cellular immune response and conferred protection against L. braziliensis infection. This protection correlated with a decreased parasite load and an increased frequency of IFN-γ-producing cells. We identified the most abundant and novel proteins present in the SGs of Lu. intermedia, a vector of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the Americas. We also show for the first time that immunity to a single salivary protein from Lu. intermedia can protect against cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. braziliensis.

  12. Protective effect of NSA on intestinal epithelial cells in a necroptosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wei; Zhang, Min; Zhu, Yaxi; Chen, Yuanhan; Zhao, Xingchen; Li, Ruizhao; Zhang, Li; Ye, Zhiming; Liang, Xingling

    2017-10-17

    This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of the necroptosis inhibitor necrosulfonamide (NSA) on intestinal epithelial cells using a novel in vitro necroptosis model that mimics inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) was perfused into the rectum of BALB/c mice to established a colitis model. Pathologic injury and cell death were evaluated. A novel in vitro model of necroptosis was established in Caco-2 cells using TNF- α and Z-VAD-fmk, and the cells were treated with or without NSA. Morphologic changes, manner of cell death and the levels of phosphorylation of receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (p-RIPK3) and mixed-lineage kinase domain-like (p-MLKL) were detected. In the TNBS-induced colitis in mice, TUNEL-positive and caspase-3-negative cells were observed in the intestinal mucosa, and p-RIPK3 was found to be elevated. Under the stimulation of TNF- α and Z-VAD-fmk, the morphologic damage in the Caco-2 cells was aggravated, the proportion of necrosis was increased, and the level of p-RIPK3 and p-MLKL were increased, confirming that the regulated cell death was necroptosis. NSA reversed the morphological abnormalities and reduced necrotic cell death induced by TNF- α and Z-VAD-fmk. NSA can inhibit necroptosis in intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and might confer a potential protective effect against IBD.

  13. Activation of glutathione peroxidase via Nrf1 mediates genistein's protection against oxidative endothelial cell injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Montes, Eva; Pollard, Susan E.; Vauzour, David; Jofre-Montseny, Laia; Rota, Cristina; Rimbach, Gerald; Weinberg, Peter D.; Spencer, Jeremy P.E.

    2006-01-01

    Cellular actions of isoflavones may mediate the beneficial health effects associated with high soy consumption. We have investigated protection by genistein and daidzein against oxidative stress-induced endothelial injury. Genistein but not daidzein protected endothelial cells from damage induced by oxidative stress. This protection was accompanied by decreases in intracellular glutathione levels that could be explained by the generation of glutathionyl conjugates of the oxidised genistein metabolite, 5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyisoflavone. Both isoflavones evoked increased protein expression of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase-heavy subunit (γ-GCS-HS) and increased cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. However, only genistein led to increases in the cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf1 and the increased expression of and activity of glutathione peroxidase. These results suggest that genistein-induced protective effects depend primarily on the activation of glutathione peroxidase mediated by Nrf1 activation, and not on Nrf2 activation or increases in glutathione synthesis

  14. Oral or parenteral administration of replication-deficient adenoviruses expressing the measles virus haemagglutinin and fusion proteins: protective immune responses in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fooks, A R; Jeevarajah, D; Lee, J; Warnes, A; Niewiesk, S; ter Meulen, V; Stephenson, J R; Clegg, J C

    1998-05-01

    The genes encoding the measles virus (MV) haemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins were placed under the control of the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter in a replication-deficient adenovirus vector. Immunofluorescence and radioimmune precipitation demonstrated the synthesis of each protein and biological activity was confirmed by the detection of haemadsorption and fusion activities in infected cells. Oral as well as parenteral administration of the H-expressing recombinant adenovirus elicited a significant protective response in mice challenged with MV. While the F-expressing adenovirus failed to protect mice, cotton rats immunized with either the H- or F-expressing recombinant showed reduced MV replication in the lungs. Antibodies elicited in mice following immunization with either recombinant had no in vitro neutralizing activity, suggesting a protective mechanism involving a cell-mediated immune response. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using oral administration of adenovirus recombinants to induce protective responses to heterologous proteins.

  15. Cytoplasmic PELP1 and ERRgamma protect human mammary epithelial cells from Tam-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Brian J; Regan Anderson, Tarah M; Welch, Siya Lem; Nicely, Julie; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Ostrander, Julie H

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen (Tam) is the only FDA-approved chemoprevention agent for pre-menopausal women at high risk for developing breast cancer. While Tam reduces a woman's risk of developing estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer, the molecular mechanisms associated with risk reduction are poorly understood. Prior studies have shown that cytoplasmic proline, glutamic acid and leucine rich protein 1 (PELP1) promotes Tam resistance in breast cancer cell lines. Herein, we tested for PELP1 localization in breast epithelial cells from women at high risk for developing breast cancer and found that PELP1 was localized to the cytoplasm in 36% of samples. In vitro, immortalized HMECs expressing a nuclear localization signal (NLS) mutant of PELP1 (PELP1-cyto) were resistant to Tam-induced death. Furthermore, PELP1-cyto signaling through estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) promoted cell survival in the presence of Tam. Overexpression of ERRγ in immortalized HMECs protected cells from Tam-induced death, while knockdown of ERRγ sensitized PELP1-cyto expressing HMECs to Tam. Moreover, Tam-induced HMEC cell death was independent of apoptosis and involved accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II. Expression of PELP1-cyto and ERRγ reduced Tam-induced LC3-II accumulation, and knockdown of ERRγ increased LC3-II levels in response to Tam. Additionally, PELP1-cyto expression led to the upregulation of MMP-3 and MAOB, known PELP1 and ERRγ target genes, respectively. Our data indicate that cytoplasmic PELP1 induces signaling pathways that converge on ERRγ to promote cell survival in the presence of Tam. These data suggest that PELP1 localization and/or ERRγ activation could be developed as tissue biomarkers for Tam responsiveness.

  16. Concerted action of p62 and Nrf2 protects cells from palmitic acid-induced lipotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Su [Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei Biomedical Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dong Hoon [Department of Life Science and Ewha Research Center for Systems Biology (Korea, Republic of); The Research Center for Cell Homeostasis, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 127-750 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Da Hyun [Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei Biomedical Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Soo Han, E-mail: soohanbae@yuhs.ac [Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei Biomedical Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-09

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), frequently associated with obesity and diabetes mellitus, is caused by the accumulation of excess fatty acids within liver cells. Palmitic acid (PA), a common saturated fatty acid found in mammals, induces the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and elicits apoptotic cell death, known as lipotoxicity. However, protective mechanisms against PA-induced lipotoxicity have not been elucidated. In this study, we aimed to clarify the role of p62, an adapter protein in the autophagic process, as well as the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) pathway, in protecting cells from PA-induced lipotoxicity. The Nrf2-Keap1 pathway is essential for the protection of cells from oxidative stress. p62 enhances its binding to Keap1 and leads to Nrf2 activation. Here, we show that PA potentiates Keap1 degradation and thereby activates the transcription of Nrf2 target genes partially through autophagy. Furthermore, this PA-mediated Keap1 degradation depends on p62. Correspondingly, a lack of p62 attenuates the PA-mediated Nrf2 activation and increases the susceptibility of cells to oxidative stress. These results indicate that p62 plays an important role in protecting cells against lipotoxicity through Keap1 degradation-mediated Nrf2 activation. - Highlights: • PA induces Keap1 downregulation and activates Nrf2 target gene transcription. • PA-induced Keap1 degradation is partly mediated by the autophagic pathway. • PA-induced Keap1 degradation depends on p62. • Ablation of p62 exacerbates PA-mediated apoptotic cell death.

  17. Concerted action of p62 and Nrf2 protects cells from palmitic acid-induced lipotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Su; Kang, Dong Hoon; Lee, Da Hyun; Bae, Soo Han

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), frequently associated with obesity and diabetes mellitus, is caused by the accumulation of excess fatty acids within liver cells. Palmitic acid (PA), a common saturated fatty acid found in mammals, induces the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and elicits apoptotic cell death, known as lipotoxicity. However, protective mechanisms against PA-induced lipotoxicity have not been elucidated. In this study, we aimed to clarify the role of p62, an adapter protein in the autophagic process, as well as the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) pathway, in protecting cells from PA-induced lipotoxicity. The Nrf2-Keap1 pathway is essential for the protection of cells from oxidative stress. p62 enhances its binding to Keap1 and leads to Nrf2 activation. Here, we show that PA potentiates Keap1 degradation and thereby activates the transcription of Nrf2 target genes partially through autophagy. Furthermore, this PA-mediated Keap1 degradation depends on p62. Correspondingly, a lack of p62 attenuates the PA-mediated Nrf2 activation and increases the susceptibility of cells to oxidative stress. These results indicate that p62 plays an important role in protecting cells against lipotoxicity through Keap1 degradation-mediated Nrf2 activation. - Highlights: • PA induces Keap1 downregulation and activates Nrf2 target gene transcription. • PA-induced Keap1 degradation is partly mediated by the autophagic pathway. • PA-induced Keap1 degradation depends on p62. • Ablation of p62 exacerbates PA-mediated apoptotic cell death.

  18. Methods for production of proteins in host cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Mark; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2004-01-13

    The present invention provides methods for the production of proteins, particularly toxic proteins, in host cells. The invention provides methods which use a fusion protein comprising a chaperonin binding domain in host cells induced or regulated to have increased levels of chaperonin which binds the chaperonin binding domain.

  19. C2-Ceramide Induces Cell Death and Protective Autophagy in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyuan Zhu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramides are second messengers involved in several intracellular processes in cancer cells, amongst others. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of C2-ceramide (C2-Cer; N-acetyl-D-sphingosine by investigating cell death and autophagy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC cells. C2-Cer showed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity in HN4 and HN30 cell lines. It simultaneously induced caspase-3-independent apoptosis and programmed necrosis. C2-Cer markedly increased the expression level of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B (LC3B type II associated with protective autophagy. An autophagy inhibitor enhanced C2-Cer-mediated cytotoxicity, while a programmed-necrosis inhibitor produced the opposite effect. Furthermore, C2-Cer up-regulated the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, but down-regulated its downstream substrate phospho-mammalian target of rapamycin (p-mTOR during the autophagy process. These results suggested that C2-Cer exerts anti-tumor effects by inducing programmed apoptosis and necrosis in HNSCC, and these cytotoxic effects are enhanced by an autophagy inhibitor.

  20. VP22 herpes simplex virus protein can transduce proteins into stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabanyi, I.; Lojudice, F.H.; Kossugue, P.M. [Centro de Terapia Celular e Molecular, Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rebelato, E. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofísica, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Demasi, M.A.; Sogayar, M.C. [Centro de Terapia Celular e Molecular, Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-02-01

    The type I herpes simplex virus VP22 tegument protein is abundant and well known for its ability to translocate proteins from one cell to the other. In spite of some reports questioning its ability to translocate proteins by attributing the results observed to fixation artifacts or simple attachment to the cell membrane, VP22 has been used to deliver several proteins into different cell types, triggering the expected cell response. However, the question of the ability of VP22 to enter stem cells has not been addressed. We investigated whether VP22 could be used as a tool to be applied in stem cell research and differentiation due to its capacity to internalize other proteins without altering the cell genome. We generated a VP22.eGFP construct to evaluate whether VP22 could be internalized and carry another protein with it into two different types of stem cells, namely adult human dental pulp stem cells and mouse embryonic stem cells. We generated a VP22.eGFP fusion protein and demonstrated that, in fact, it enters stem cells. Therefore, this system may be used as a tool to deliver various proteins into stem cells, allowing stem cell research, differentiation and the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells in the absence of genome alterations.

  1. VP22 herpes simplex virus protein can transduce proteins into stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabanyi, I.; Lojudice, F.H.; Kossugue, P.M.; Rebelato, E.; Demasi, M.A.; Sogayar, M.C.

    2013-01-01

    The type I herpes simplex virus VP22 tegument protein is abundant and well known for its ability to translocate proteins from one cell to the other. In spite of some reports questioning its ability to translocate proteins by attributing the results observed to fixation artifacts or simple attachment to the cell membrane, VP22 has been used to deliver several proteins into different cell types, triggering the expected cell response. However, the question of the ability of VP22 to enter stem cells has not been addressed. We investigated whether VP22 could be used as a tool to be applied in stem cell research and differentiation due to its capacity to internalize other proteins without altering the cell genome. We generated a VP22.eGFP construct to evaluate whether VP22 could be internalized and carry another protein with it into two different types of stem cells, namely adult human dental pulp stem cells and mouse embryonic stem cells. We generated a VP22.eGFP fusion protein and demonstrated that, in fact, it enters stem cells. Therefore, this system may be used as a tool to deliver various proteins into stem cells, allowing stem cell research, differentiation and the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells in the absence of genome alterations

  2. Immunization with LJM11 salivary protein protects against infection with Leishmania braziliensis in the presence of Lutzomyia longipalpis saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Jurema M; Abbehusen, Melissa; Suarez, Martha; Valenzuela, Jesus; Teixeira, Clarissa R; Brodskyn, Cláudia I

    2018-01-01

    Leishmania is transmitted in the presence of sand fly saliva. Protective immunity generated by saliva has encouraged identification of a vector salivary-based vaccine. Previous studies have shown that immunization with LJM11, a salivary protein from Lutzomyia longipalpis, is able to induce a Th1 immune response and protect mice against bites of Leishmania major-infected Lutzomyia longipalpis. Here, we further investigate if immunization with LJM11 recombinant protein is able to confer cross-protection against infection with Leishmania braziliensis associated with salivary gland sonicate (SGS) from Lutzomyia intermedia or Lu. longipalpis. Mice immunized with LJM11 protein exhibited an increased production of anti-LJM11 IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a and a DTH response characterized by an inflammatory infiltrate with the presence of CD4 + IFN-γ + T cells. LJM11-immunized mice were intradermally infected in the ear with L. braziliensis in the presence of Lu. longipalpis or Lu. intermedia SGS. A significant reduction of parasite numbers in the ear and lymph node in the group challenged with L. braziliensis plus Lu. longipalpis SGS was observed, but not when the challenge was performed with L. braziliensis plus Lu. intermedia SGS. A higher specific production of IFN-γ and absence of IL-10 by lymph node cells were only observed in LJM11 immunized mice after infection. After two weeks, a similar frequency of CD4 + IFN-γ + T cells was detected in LJM11 and BSA groups challenged with L. braziliensis plus Lu. longipalpis SGS, suggesting that early events possibly triggered by immunization are essential for protection against Leishmania infection. Our findings support the specificity of saliva-mediated immune responses and reinforce the importance of identifying cross-protective salivary antigens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Hydroxytyrosol Protects against Oxidative DNA Damage in Human Breast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José J. Gaforio

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Over recent years, several studies have related olive oil ingestion to a low incidence of several diseases, including breast cancer. Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol are two of the major phenols present in virgin olive oils. Despite the fact that they have been linked to cancer prevention, there is no evidence that clarifies their effect in human breast tumor and non-tumor cells. In the present work, we present hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol’s effects in human breast cell lines. Our results show that hydroxytyrosol acts as a more efficient free radical scavenger than tyrosol, but both fail to affect cell proliferation rates, cell cycle profile or cell apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A or breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7. We found that hydroxytyrosol decreases the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level in MCF10A cells but not in MCF7 or MDA-MB-231 cells while very high amounts of tyrosol is needed to decrease the ROS level in MCF10A cells. Interestingly, hydroxytyrosol prevents oxidative DNA damage in the three breast cell lines. Therefore, our data suggest that simple phenol hydroxytyrosol could contribute to a lower incidence of breast cancer in populations that consume virgin olive oil due to its antioxidant activity and its protection against oxidative DNA damage in mammary cells.

  4. Roles of Werner syndrome protein in protection of genome integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, Marie L; Ghosh, Avik K; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2010-01-01

    Werner syndrome protein (WRN) is one of a family of five human RecQ helicases implicated in the maintenance of genome stability. The conserved RecQ family also includes RecQ1, Bloom syndrome protein (BLM), RecQ4, and RecQ5 in humans, as well as Sgs1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rqh1...... in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and homologs in Caenorhabditis elegans, Xenopus laevis, and Drosophila melanogaster. Defects in three of the RecQ helicases, RecQ4, BLM, and WRN, cause human pathologies linked with cancer predisposition and premature aging. Mutations in the WRN gene are the causative factor of Werner...

  5. Protective efficacy of six immunogenic recombinant proteins of Vibrio anguillarum and evaluation them as vaccine candidate for flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jing; Xu, Hongsen; Wang, Yang; Tang, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Zhan, Wenbin

    2017-06-01

    Vibrio anguillarum is a severe bacterium that causes terminal haemorrhagic septicaemia in freshwater and marine fish. Virulence-associated proteins play an important role in bacterial pathogenicity and could be applied for immunoprophylaxis. In this study, six antigenic proteins from V. anguillarum were selected and the immune protective efficacy of their recombinant proteins was investigated. VirA, CheR, FlaC, OmpK, OmpR and Hsp33 were recombinantly produced and the reactions of recombinant proteins to flounder-anti-V. anguillarum antibodies (fV-ab) were detected, respectively. Then the recombinant proteins were injected to fish, after immunization, the percentages of surface membrane immunoglobulin-positive (sIg+) cell in lymphocytes, total antibodies, antibodies against V. anguillarum, antibodies against recombinant proteins and relative percent survival (RPS) were analyzed, respectively. The results showed that all the recombinant proteins could react to fV-ab, proliferate sIg + cells in lymphocytes and induce production of total antibodies, specific antibodies against V. anguillarum or the recombinant proteins; the RPS of rVirA, rCheR, rFlaC, rOmpK, rOmpR and rHsp33 against V. anguillarum was 70.27%, 27.03%, 16.22%, 62.16%, 45.95% and 81.08%, respectively. The results revealed that rHsp33, rVirA and rOmpK have good protections against V. anguillarum and could be vaccine candidates against V. anguillarum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Low temperature protects mammalian cells from apoptosis initiated by various stimuli in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Toshiharu; Itoh, Katsuhiko; Liu Yu; Higashitsuji, Hiroaki; Sumitomo, Yasuhiko; Sakamaki, Kazuhiro; Fujita, Jun

    2005-01-01

    Mild hypothermia shows protective effects on patients with brain damage and cardiac arrest. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects, we examined the effects of low temperature (32 deg. C) on cells exposed to a variety of stress in vitro. We found that 32 deg. C suppressed induction of apoptosis by cytotoxic stimuli such as adriamycin, etoposide, thapsigargin, NaCl, H 2 O 2 , and anti-Fas antibody. In adriamycin-treated BALB/3T3 cells, the down-shift in temperature from 37 deg. C to 32 deg. C increased the Bcl-xL protein level and decreased the mRNA level of Puma and mitochondrial translocation of Bax, suppressing caspase-9-mediated apoptosis. Furthermore, the protein level and stability of p53 were decreased, and its nuclear export was increased concomitant with Mdm2 mRNA upregulation. The low temperature effect was not observed in p53 -/- /Mdm2 -/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts, suggesting that the effect is mediated by suppression of the p53 pathway. In contrast, while thapsigargin-induced apoptosis was suppressed by the low temperature, no effect on the p53 protein level was observed. Furthermore, the survival rate of p53 -/- /Mdm2 -/- cells exposed to thapsigargin was increased when cultured at 32 deg. C compared with 37 deg. C. In conclusion, mild hypothermia protects cells from a variety of stress by p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms

  7. Agmatine protects retinal ganglion cells from hypoxia-induced apoptosis in transformed rat retinal ganglion cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Chan

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Agmatine is an endogenous polyamine formed by the decarboxylation of L-arginine. We investigated the protective effects of agmatine against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of immortalized rat retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5. RGC-5 cells were cultured in a closed hypoxic chamber (5% O2 with or without agmatine. Cell viability was determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH assay and apoptosis was examined by annexin V and caspase-3 assays. Expression and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs; JNK, ERK p44/42, and p38 and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB were investigated by Western immunoblot analysis. The effects of agmatine were compared to those of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a well-known protective neurotrophin for retinal ganglion cells. Results After 48 hours of hypoxic culture, the LDH assay showed 52.3% cell loss, which was reduced to 25.6% and 30.1% when agmatine and BDNF were administered, respectively. This observed cell loss was due to apoptotic cell death, as established by annexin V and caspase-3 assays. Although total expression of MAPKs and NF-κB was not influenced by hypoxic injury, phosphorylation of these two proteins was increased. Agmatine reduced phosphorylation of JNK and NF-κB, while BDNF suppressed phosphorylation of ERK and p38. Conclusion Our results show that agmatine has neuroprotective effects against hypoxia-induced retinal ganglion cell damage in RGC-5 cells and that its effects may act through the JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways. Our data suggest that agmatine may lead to a novel therapeutic strategy to reduce retinal ganglion cell injury related to hypoxia.

  8. Agmatine protects retinal ganglion cells from hypoxia-induced apoptosis in transformed rat retinal ganglion cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Samin; Lee, Jong Eun; Kim, Chan Yun; Seong, Gong Je

    2007-01-01

    Background Agmatine is an endogenous polyamine formed by the decarboxylation of L-arginine. We investigated the protective effects of agmatine against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of immortalized rat retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5). RGC-5 cells were cultured in a closed hypoxic chamber (5% O2) with or without agmatine. Cell viability was determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay and apoptosis was examined by annexin V and caspase-3 assays. Expression and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs; JNK, ERK p44/42, and p38) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) were investigated by Western immunoblot analysis. The effects of agmatine were compared to those of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a well-known protective neurotrophin for retinal ganglion cells. Results After 48 hours of hypoxic culture, the LDH assay showed 52.3% cell loss, which was reduced to 25.6% and 30.1% when agmatine and BDNF were administered, respectively. This observed cell loss was due to apoptotic cell death, as established by annexin V and caspase-3 assays. Although total expression of MAPKs and NF-κB was not influenced by hypoxic injury, phosphorylation of these two proteins was increased. Agmatine reduced phosphorylation of JNK and NF-κB, while BDNF suppressed phosphorylation of ERK and p38. Conclusion Our results show that agmatine has neuroprotective effects against hypoxia-induced retinal ganglion cell damage in RGC-5 cells and that its effects may act through the JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways. Our data suggest that agmatine may lead to a novel therapeutic strategy to reduce retinal ganglion cell injury related to hypoxia. PMID:17908330

  9. Cyclodextrins as Protective Agents of Protein Aggregation: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveri, Valentina; Vecchio, Graziella

    2016-06-06

    Cyclodextrins are extensively used in different fields (e.g., catalysis, chromatography, pharma, supramolecular chemistry, bioorganic chemistry, and bioinorganic chemistry), and their applications have been widely reviewed. Their main application in the field of pharmaceutical is as a drug carrier. This review overviews, for the first time, the use of cyclodextrins and their derivatives as antiaggregant agents in a number of proteins (e.g., amyloid-β, insulin, recombinant human growth hormone, prion protein, transthyretin, and α-synuclein) and some multimeric enzymes. There are many diseases that are correlated to protein misfolding and amyloid formation processes affecting numerous organs and tissues. There are over 30 different amyloid proteins and a number of corresponding diseases. Alzheimer's disease is the most common neurodegenerative disease. Treatment of these diseases is still a goal to reach, and many molecules are studied in this perspective. Cyclodextrins have also been studied, and they show great potential; as such, further studies could be very promising. This review aims to be a stimulus for the design of new cyclodextrin derivatives to obtain multifunctional systems with antiaggregant activity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Interaction of Proteins Identified in Human Thyroid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Jessica; Riwaldt, Stefan; Bauer, Johann; Sickmann, Albert; Weber, Gerhard; Grosse, Jirka; Infanger, Manfred; Eilles, Christoph; Grimm, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Influence of gravity forces on the regulation of protein expression by healthy and malignant thyroid cells was studied with the aim to identify protein interactions. Western blot analyses of a limited number of proteins suggested a time-dependent regulation of protein expression by simulated microgravity. After applying free flow isoelectric focusing and mass spectrometry to search for differently expressed proteins by thyroid cells exposed to simulated microgravity for three days, a considerable number of candidates for gravi-sensitive proteins were detected. In order to show how proteins sensitive to microgravity could directly influence other proteins, we investigated all polypeptide chains identified with Mascot scores above 100, looking for groups of interacting proteins. Hence, UniProtKB entry numbers of all detected proteins were entered into the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins (STRING) and processed. The program indicated that we had detected various groups of interacting proteins in each of the three cell lines studied. The major groups of interacting proteins play a role in pathways of carbohydrate and protein metabolism, regulation of cell growth and cell membrane structuring. Analyzing these groups, networks of interaction could be established which show how a punctual influence of simulated microgravity may propagate via various members of interaction chains. PMID:23303277

  11. Interaction of Proteins Identified in Human Thyroid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Pietsch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of gravity forces on the regulation of protein expression by healthy and malignant thyroid cells was studied with the aim to identify protein interactions. Western blot analyses of a limited number of proteins suggested a time-dependent regulation of protein expression by simulated microgravity. After applying free flow isoelectric focusing and mass spectrometry to search for differently expressed proteins by thyroid cells exposed to simulated microgravity for three days, a considerable number of candidates for gravi-sensitive proteins were detected. In order to show how proteins sensitive to microgravity could directly influence other proteins, we investigated all polypeptide chains identified with Mascot scores above 100, looking for groups of interacting proteins. Hence, UniProtKB entry numbers of all detected proteins were entered into the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins (STRING and processed. The program indicated that we had detected various groups of interacting proteins in each of the three cell lines studied. The major groups of interacting proteins play a role in pathways of carbohydrate and protein metabolism, regulation of cell growth and cell membrane structuring. Analyzing these groups, networks of interaction could be established which show how a punctual influence of simulated microgravity may propagate via various members of interaction chains.

  12. Human Cells as Platform to Produce Gamma-Carboxylated Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa Bomfim, Aline; de Freitas, Marcela Cristina Corrêa; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; de Sousa Russo, Elisa Maria

    2018-01-01

    The gamma-carboxylated proteins belong to a family of proteins that depend on vitamin K for normal biosynthesis. The major representative gamma-carboxylated proteins are the coagulation system proteins, for example, factor VII, factor IX, factor X, prothrombin, and proteins C, S, and Z. These molecules have harbored posttranslational modifications, such as glycosylation and gamma-carboxylation, and for this reason they need to be produced in mammalian cell lines. Human cells lines have emerged as the most promising alternative to the production of gamma-carboxylated proteins. In this chapter, the methods to generate human cells as a platform to produce gamma-carboxylated proteins, for example the coagulation factors VII and IX, are presented. From the cell line modification up to the vitamin K adaptation of the produced cells is described in the protocols presented in this chapter.

  13. Dose selenomethionine have radio-protective effect on cell lines with wild type p53?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, K.; Hagihira, T.; Ohnishi, K.; Ohnishi, T.; Matsumoto, H.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Selenium compounds are known to have cancer preventive effects. It is reported recently that selenium in the form of selenomethionine (SeMet) can protect cells with wild type p53 from UV-induced cell killing by activating the DNA repair mechanism of p53 tumor suppressor protein via redox factor Ref1 by reducing p53 cysteine residue 275 and 277. In contrast, SeMet has no protective effect on UV-induced cell killing in p53-null cells. If SeMet also has protective effect in cells with wild type p53 on cell killing by photon irradiation, SeMet can be used as normal tissue radio-protector. We examined the effect of SeMet on cell killing by X-ray irradiation in several cell lines with different p53 status at exponentially growing phase. Cell lines used in this experiment were as follows: H1299/neo; human lung cancer cell line of p53 null type tranfected with control vector with no p53, H1299/wp53; wild type p53 transfected counterpart. A172/neo; human glioblastoma cell line with wild type p53, A172/mp53-248; mp53-248 (248-mutant, ARG >TRP) transfected counterpart. SAS/neo; human tongue cancer cell line with wild type p53, and SAS/mp53-248; mp53-248 transfected counterpart. Cells were subcultured at monolayer in D-MEM containing 10% FBS. Survivals of the cells were determined by colony forming ability. Ten-MV linac X-ray was used to irradiate the cells. Exponentially growing cells were incubated with 20μM of SeMet for 15 hours before irradiation. After 24 hours exposure of SeMet, cells were incubated up to two weeks in growth medium for colony formation. Twenty-four hours exposure of 20μM of SeMet had no cytotoxicity on these cell lines. SeMet had no modification effect on cell killing by photon irradiation in H1299/neo, H1299/wp53, SAS/neo, SAS/mp53-248, and A172/mp53-248. On the other hand, SeMet sensitized A172/neo in radiation cell killing. The effects of p53 on interaction of SeMet and photon irradiation differ according to cell lines

  14. Protein dynamics in individual human cells: experiment and theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Aharon Cohen

    Full Text Available A current challenge in biology is to understand the dynamics of protein circuits in living human cells. Can one define and test equations for the dynamics and variability of a protein over time? Here, we address this experimentally and theoretically, by means of accurate time-resolved measurements of endogenously tagged proteins in individual human cells. As a model system, we choose three stable proteins displaying cell-cycle-dependant dynamics. We find that protein accumulation with time per cell is quadratic for proteins with long mRNA life times and approximately linear for a protein with short mRNA lifetime. Both behaviors correspond to a classical model of transcription and translation. A stochastic model, in which genes slowly switch between ON and OFF states, captures measured cell-cell variability. The data suggests, in accordance with the model, that switching to the gene ON state is exponentially distributed and that the cell-cell distribution of protein levels can be approximated by a Gamma distribution throughout the cell cycle. These results suggest that relatively simple models may describe protein dynamics in individual human cells.

  15. Chemical synthesis of dual labeled proteins via differently protected alkynes enables intramolecular FRET analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Gosuke; Kamo, Naoki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2017-05-30

    We report a novel method for multisite protein conjugation by setting differently silyl-protected alkynes as conjugation handles, which can remain intact through the whole synthetic procedure and provide sequential and orthogonal conjugation. This strategy enables efficient preparation of a dual dye-labeled protein and structural analysis via an intramolecular FRET mechanism.

  16. Cholinergic regulation of protein phosphorylation in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haycock, J.W.; Browning, M.D.; Greengard, P.

    1988-01-01

    Chromaffin cells were isolated from bovine adrenal medullae and maintained in primary culture. After prelabeling with 32 PO 4 , exposure of the chromaffin cells to acetylcholine increased the phosphorylation of a M/sub r/ ≅ 100,000 protein and a M/sub r/ ≅ 60,000 protein (tyrosine hydroxylase), visualized after separation of total cellular proteins in NaDodSO 4 /polyacrylamide gels. Immunoprecipitation with antibodies to three known phosphoproteins (100-kDa, 87-kDa, and protein III) revealed an acetylcholine-dependent phosphorylation of these proteins. These three proteins were also shown to be present in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells by immunolabeling techniques. 100-kDa is a M/sub r/ ≅ 100,000 protein selectively phosphorylated by calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase III, 87-kDa is a M/sub r/ ≅ 87,000 protein selectively phosphorylated by protein kinase C, and protein III is a phosphoprotein doublet of M/sub r/ ≅ 74,000 (IIIa) and M/sub r/ ≅ 55,000 (IIIb) phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I. The data demonstrate that cholinergic activation of chromaffin cells increases the phosphorylation of several proteins and that several protein kinase systems may be involved in these effects

  17. Overexpression of Cdk5 or non-phosphorylatable retinoblastoma protein protects septal neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panickar, Kiran S; Nonner, Doris; White, Michael G; Barrett, John N

    2008-09-01

    Activation of cyclin dependent kinases (Cdks) contributes to neuronal death following ischemia. We used oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in septal neuronal cultures to test for possible roles of cell cycle proteins in neuronal survival. Increased cdc2-immunoreactive neurons were observed at 24 h after the end of 5 h OGD. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) or GFP along with a wild type or dominant negative form of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb), or cyclin-dependent kinase5 (Cdk5), were overexpressed using plasmid constructs. Following OGD, when compared to controls, neurons expressing both GFP and dominant negative Rb, RbDeltaK11, showed significantly less damage using microscopy imaging. Overexpression of Rb-wt did not affect survival. Surprisingly, overexpression of Cdk5-wild type significantly protected neurons from process disintegration but Cdk5T33, a dominant negative Cdk5, gave little or no protection. Thus phosphorylation of the cell cycle regulator, Rb, contributes to death in OGD in septal neurons but Cdk5 can have a protective role.

  18. Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis and isotope labeling of mammalian proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Takaho; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the cell-free protein synthesis method, using an Escherichia coli cell extract. This is a cost-effective method for milligram-scale protein production and is particularly useful for the production of mammalian proteins, protein complexes, and membrane proteins that are difficult to synthesize by recombinant expression methods, using E. coli and eukaryotic cells. By adjusting the conditions of the cell-free method, zinc-binding proteins, disulfide-bonded proteins, ligand-bound proteins, etc., may also be produced. Stable isotope labeling of proteins can be accomplished by the cell-free method, simply by using stable isotope-labeled amino acid(s) in the cell-free reaction. Moreover, the cell-free protein synthesis method facilitates the avoidance of stable isotope scrambling and dilution over the recombinant expression methods and is therefore advantageous for amino acid-selective stable isotope labeling. Site-specific stable isotope labeling is also possible with a tRNA molecule specific to the UAG codon. By the cell-free protein synthesis method, coupled transcription-translation is performed from a plasmid vector or a PCR-amplified DNA fragment encoding the protein. A milligram quantity of protein can be produced with a milliliter-scale reaction solution in the dialysis mode. More than a thousand solution structures have been determined by NMR spectroscopy for uniformly labeled samples of human and mouse functional domain proteins, produced by the cell-free method. Here, we describe the practical aspects of mammalian protein production by the cell-free method for NMR spectroscopy. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1-infected cells secrete exosomes that contain Tax protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Elizabeth; Narayanan, Aarthi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Shabbeer-Meyering, Shabana; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Das, Ravi; Afonso, Philippe V; Sampey, Gavin C; Chung, Myung; Popratiloff, Anastas; Shrestha, Bindesh; Sehgal, Mohit; Jain, Pooja; Vertes, Akos; Mahieux, Renaud; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2014-08-08

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. The HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax controls many critical cellular pathways, including host cell DNA damage response mechanisms, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Extracellular vesicles called exosomes play critical roles during pathogenic viral infections as delivery vehicles for host and viral components, including proteins, mRNA, and microRNA. We hypothesized that exosomes derived from HTLV-1-infected cells contain unique host and viral proteins that may contribute to HTLV-1-induced pathogenesis. We found exosomes derived from infected cells to contain Tax protein and proinflammatory mediators as well as viral mRNA transcripts, including Tax, HBZ, and Env. Furthermore, we observed that exosomes released from HTLV-1-infected Tax-expressing cells contributed to enhanced survival of exosome-recipient cells when treated with Fas antibody. This survival was cFLIP-dependent, with Tax showing induction of NF-κB in exosome-recipient cells. Finally, IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cells that received Tax-containing exosomes were protected from apoptosis through activation of AKT. Similar experiments with primary cultures showed protection and survival of peripheral blood mononuclear cells even in the absence of phytohemagglutinin/IL-2. Surviving cells contained more phosphorylated Rb, consistent with the role of Tax in regulation of the cell cycle. Collectively, these results suggest that exosomes may play an important role in extracellular delivery of functional HTLV-1 proteins and mRNA to recipient cells. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Human T-lymphotropic Virus Type 1-infected Cells Secrete Exosomes That Contain Tax Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Elizabeth; Narayanan, Aarthi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Shabbeer-Meyering, Shabana; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Das, Ravi; Afonso, Philippe V.; Sampey, Gavin C.; Chung, Myung; Popratiloff, Anastas; Shrestha, Bindesh; Sehgal, Mohit; Jain, Pooja; Vertes, Akos; Mahieux, Renaud; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2014-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. The HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax controls many critical cellular pathways, including host cell DNA damage response mechanisms, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Extracellular vesicles called exosomes play critical roles during pathogenic viral infections as delivery vehicles for host and viral components, including proteins, mRNA, and microRNA. We hypothesized that exosomes derived from HTLV-1-infected cells contain unique host and viral proteins that may contribute to HTLV-1-induced pathogenesis. We found exosomes derived from infected cells to contain Tax protein and proinflammatory mediators as well as viral mRNA transcripts, including Tax, HBZ, and Env. Furthermore, we observed that exosomes released from HTLV-1-infected Tax-expressing cells contributed to enhanced survival of exosome-recipient cells when treated with Fas antibody. This survival was cFLIP-dependent, with Tax showing induction of NF-κB in exosome-recipient cells. Finally, IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cells that received Tax-containing exosomes were protected from apoptosis through activation of AKT. Similar experiments with primary cultures showed protection and survival of peripheral blood mononuclear cells even in the absence of phytohemagglutinin/IL-2. Surviving cells contained more phosphorylated Rb, consistent with the role of Tax in regulation of the cell cycle. Collectively, these results suggest that exosomes may play an important role in extracellular delivery of functional HTLV-1 proteins and mRNA to recipient cells. PMID:24939845

  1. Protection against inflammatory β-cell damage by lysine deacetylase inhibition and microRNA expression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Anna Lindeløv; Pallesen, Emil Marek Heymans; Novotny, Guy Wayne

    Background and aims: Pro-inflammatory cytokines contribute to pancreatic β-cell apoptosis in type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus. The detrimental effects resulting from cytokine-induced signaling in the β cell can be reduced by inhibition of class I classical lysine deacetylases (KDACi), especially HDAC...... of oxidative stress proteins responsible for β-cell death. The aim of the study is to identify novel and specific therapeutic targets for β-cell protection by mapping the miR profile of β cells rescued from inflammatory assault by inhibition of lysine deacetylation, thereby identifying miR that repress....... The perspective of this study is to develop novel anti-diabetic drugs targeting HDAC1 and/or associated miR....

  2. Prion protein protects mice from lethal infection with influenza A viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Chida

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The cellular prion protein, designated PrPC, is a membrane glycoprotein expressed abundantly in brains and to a lesser extent in other tissues. Conformational conversion of PrPC into the amyloidogenic isoform is a key pathogenic event in prion diseases. However, the physiological functions of PrPC remain largely unknown, particularly in non-neuronal tissues. Here, we show that PrPC is expressed in lung epithelial cells, including alveolar type 1 and 2 cells and bronchiolar Clara cells. Compared with wild-type (WT mice, PrPC-null mice (Prnp0/0 were highly susceptible to influenza A viruses (IAVs, with higher mortality. Infected Prnp0/0 lungs were severely injured, with higher inflammation and higher apoptosis of epithelial cells, and contained higher reactive oxygen species (ROS than control WT lungs. Treatment with a ROS scavenger or an inhibitor of xanthine oxidase (XO, a major ROS-generating enzyme in IAV-infected lungs, rescued Prnp0/0 mice from the lethal infection with IAV. Moreover, Prnp0/0 mice transgenic for PrP with a deletion of the Cu-binding octapeptide repeat (OR region, Tg(PrPΔOR/Prnp0/0 mice, were also highly susceptible to IAV infection. These results indicate that PrPC has a protective role against lethal infection with IAVs through the Cu-binding OR region by reducing ROS in infected lungs. Cu content and the activity of anti-oxidant enzyme Cu/Zn-dependent superoxide dismutase, SOD1, were lower in Prnp0/0 and Tg(PrPΔOR/Prnp0/0 lungs than in WT lungs. It is thus conceivable that PrPC functions to maintain Cu content and regulate SOD1 through the OR region in lungs, thereby reducing ROS in IAV-infected lungs and eventually protecting them from lethal infection with IAVs. Our current results highlight the role of PrPC in protection against IAV infection, and suggest that PrPC might be a novel target molecule for anti-influenza therapeutics.

  3. Low cost delivery of proteins bioencapsulated in plant cells to human non-immune or immune modulatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yuhong; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Hoffman, Brad E; Kamesh, Aditya; Jones, Noah T; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2016-02-01

    Targeted oral delivery of GFP fused with a GM1 receptor binding protein (CTB) or human cell penetrating peptide (PTD) or dendritic cell peptide (DCpep) was investigated. Presence of GFP(+) intact plant cells between villi of ileum confirm their protection in the digestive system from acids/enzymes. Efficient delivery of GFP to gut-epithelial cells by PTD or CTB and to M cells by all these fusion tags confirm uptake of GFP in the small intestine. PTD fusion delivered GFP more efficiently to most tissues or organs than the other two tags. GFP was efficiently delivered to the liver by all fusion tags, likely through the gut-liver axis. In confocal imaging studies of human cell lines using purified GFP fused with different tags, GFP signal of DCpep-GFP was only detected within dendritic cells. PTD-GFP was only detected within kidney or pancreatic cells but not in immune modulatory cells (macrophages, dendritic, T, B, or mast cells). In contrast, CTB-GFP was detected in all tested cell types, confirming ubiquitous presence of GM1 receptors. Such low-cost oral delivery of protein drugs to sera, immune system or non-immune cells should dramatically lower their cost by elimination of prohibitively expensive fermentation, protein purification cold storage/transportation and increase patient compliance. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. MHC molecules protect T cell epitopes against proteolytic destruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, S; Meldal, M; Werdelin, O

    1992-01-01

    There is a subtle duality in the role of proteolytic enzymes in Ag processing. They are required to fragment protein Ag ingested by APC. However, prolonged exposure to proteolytic enzymes may lead to a complete degradation of the Ag, leaving nothing for the T cell system to recognize. What ensures...

  5. β-Elemene-induced autophagy protects human gastric cancer cells from undergoing apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jing; Zhang, Ye; Qu, Jinglei; Xu, Ling; Hou, Kezuo; Zhang, Jingdong; Qu, Xiujuan; Liu, Yunpeng

    2011-01-01

    β-Elemene, a compound found in an herb used in traditional Chinese medicine, has shown promising anti-cancer effects against a broad spectrum of tumors. The mechanism by which β-elemene kills cells remains unclear. The aim of the present study is to investigate the anti-tumor effect of β-elemene on human gastric cancer cells and the molecular mechanism involved. β-Elemene inhibited the viability of human gastric cancer MGC803 and SGC7901 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The suppression of cell viability was due to the induction of apoptosis. A robust autophagy was observed in the cells treated with β-elemene; it was characterized by the increase of punctate LC3 dots, the cellular morphology, and the increased levels of LC3-II protein. Further study showed that β-elemene treatment up-regulated Atg5-Atg12 conjugated protein but had little effect on other autophagy-related proteins. PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K1 activity was inhibited by β-elemene. Knockdown of Beclin 1 with small interfering RNA, or co-treatment with the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine or chlorochine enhanced significantly the antitumor effects of β-elemene. Our data provides the first evidence that β-elemene induces protective autophagy and prevents human gastric cancer cells from undergoing apoptosis. A combination of β-elemene with autophagy inhibitor might thus be a useful therapeutic option for advanced gastric cancer

  6. Design guides for cell atmosphere controls, utilities and fire protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, A.J. Jr.; Peishel, F.L.; Slattery, E.F.

    1981-01-01

    Facilities for handling radioactive and toxic materials must be designed not only for efficient operation, but also for protection of the operating personnel and the public. The ventilation system is of primary importance in maintaining containment of any airborne radioactivity. The type, number, and location of in-cell services must be adequate for planned operations, but also must allow flexibility to accommodate expansion in the scope of operations or changes in programs. Fire protection systems and operational controls are mandatory to maintain containment of radioactivity in the event of an operating error or process accident that may result in a fire

  7. Immunization of Mice with Recombinant Brucella abortus Organic Hydroperoxide Resistance (Ohr) Protein Protects Against a Virulent Brucella abortus 544 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hop, Huynh Tan; Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Simborio, Hannah Leah Tadeja; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Min, Won Gi; Lee, Hu Jang; Lee, Jin Ju; Chang, Hong Hee; Kim, Suk

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the Brucella abortus ohr gene coding for an organic hydroperoxide resistance protein (Ohr) was cloned into a maltose fusion protein expression system (pMAL), inserted into Escherichia coli, and purified, and its immunogenicity was evaluated by western blot analysis using Brucella-positive mouse sera. The purified recombinant Ohr (rOhr) was treated with adjuvant and injected intraperitoneally into BALB/c mice. A protective immune response analysis revealed that rOhr induced a significant increase in both the IgG1 and IgG2a titers, and IgG2a reached a higher level than IgG1 after the second and third immunizations. Additionally, immunization with rOhr induced high production of IFN-γ as well as proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF, MCP-1, IL-12p70, and IL-6, but a lesser amount of IL-10, suggesting that rOhr predominantly elicited a cell-mediated immune response. In addition, immunization with rOhr caused a significantly higher degree of protection against a virulent B. abortus infection compared with a positive control group consisting of mice immunized with maltose-binding protein. These findings showed that B. abortus rOhr was able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immunity in mice, which suggested that this recombinant protein could be a potential vaccine candidate for animal brucellosis.

  8. Protective immunity provided by HLA-A2 epitopes for fusion and hemagglutinin proteins of measles virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Sang Kon; Stegman, Brian; Pendleton, C. David; Ota, Martin O.; Pan, C.-H.; Griffin, Diane E.; Burke, Donald S.; Berzofsky, Jay A.

    2006-01-01

    Natural infection and vaccination with a live-attenuated measles virus (MV) induce CD8 + T-cell-mediated immune responses that may play a central role in controlling MV infection. In this study, we show that newly identified human HLA-A2 epitopes from MV hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins induced protective immunity in HLA-A2 transgenic mice challenged with recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing F or H protein. HLA-A2 epitopes were predicted and synthesized. Five and four peptides from H and F, respectively, bound to HLA-A2 molecules in a T2-binding assay, and four from H and two from F could induce peptide-specific CD8 + T cell responses in HLA-A2 transgenic mice. Further experiments proved that three peptides from H (H9-567, H10-250, and H10-516) and one from F protein (F9-57) were endogenously processed and presented on HLA-A2 molecules. All peptides tested in this study are common to 5 different strains of MV including Edmonston. In both A2K b and HHD-2 mice, the identified peptide epitopes induced protective immunity against recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing H or F. Because F and H proteins induce neutralizing antibodies, they are major components of new vaccine strategies, and therefore data from this study will contribute to the development of new vaccines against MV infection

  9. Construction of Lactococcus lactis expressing secreted and anchored Eimeria tenella 3-1E protein and comparison of protective immunity against homologous challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chunli; Zhang, Lili; Gao, Mingyang; Ma, Dexing

    2017-07-01

    Two novel plasmids pTX8048-SP-Δ3-1E and pTX8048-SP-NAΔ3-1E-CWA were constructed. The plasmids were respectively electrotransformed into L. lactis NZ9000 to generate strain of L. lactis/pTX8048-SP-Δ3-1E in which 3-1E protein was expressed in secretion, and L. lactis/pTX8048-SP-NAΔ3-1E-CWA on which 3-1E protein was covalently anchored to the surface of bacteria cells. The expression of target proteins were examined by Western blot. The live lactococci expressing secreted 3-1E protein, anchored 3-1E protein, and cytoplasmic 3-1E protein was administered orally to chickens respectively, and the protective immunity and efficacy were compared by animal experiment. The results showed oral immunization to chickens with recombinant lactococci expressing anchored 3-1E protein elicited high 3-1E-specific serum IgG, increased high proportion of CD4 + and CD8α + cells in spleen, alleviated average lesion score in cecum, decreased the oocyst output per chicken compared to lactococci expressing cytoplasmic or secreted 3-1E protein. Taken together, these findings indicated the surface anchored Eimeria protein displayed by L. lacits can induce protective immunity and partial protection against homologous infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Protein energy malnutrition impairs homeostatic proliferation of memory CD8 T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Smita S; Chatraw, Janel Hart; Tan, Wendy G; Wherry, E John; Becker, Todd C; Ahmed, Rafi; Kapasi, Zoher F

    2012-01-01

    Nutrition is a critical but poorly understood determinant of immunity. There is abundant epidemiological evidence linking protein malnutrition to impaired vaccine efficacy and increased susceptibility to infections; yet, the role of dietary protein in immune memory homeostasis remains poorly understood. In this study, we show that protein-energy malnutrition induced in mice by low-protein (LP) feeding has a detrimental impact on CD8 memory. Relative to adequate protein (AP)-fed controls, LP feeding in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-immune mice resulted in a 2-fold decrease in LCMV-specific CD8 memory T cells. Adoptive transfer of memory cells, labeled with a division tracking dye, from AP mice into naive LP or AP mice demonstrated that protein-energy malnutrition caused profound defects in homeostatic proliferation. Remarkably, this defect occurred despite the lymphopenic environment in LP hosts. Whereas Ag-specific memory cells in LP and AP hosts were phenotypically similar, memory cells in LP hosts were markedly less responsive to polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid-induced acute proliferative signals. Furthermore, upon recall, memory cells in LP hosts displayed reduced proliferation and protection from challenge with LCMV-clone 13, resulting in impaired viral clearance in the liver. The findings show a metabolic requirement of dietary protein in sustaining functional CD8 memory and suggest that interventions to optimize dietary protein intake may improve vaccine efficacy in malnourished individuals.

  11. Vochysia rufa Stem Bark Extract Protects Endothelial Cells against High Glucose Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neire Moura de Gouveia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Increased oxidative stress by persistent hyperglycemia is a widely accepted factor in vascular damage responsible for type 2 diabetes complications. The plant Vochysia rufa (Vr has been used in folk medicine in Brazil for the treatment of diabetes. Thus; the protective effect of a Vr stem bark extract against a challenge by a high glucose concentration on EA.hy926 (EA endothelial cells is evaluated. Methods: Vegetal material is extracted with distilled water by maceration and evaporated until dryness under vacuum. Then; it is isolated by capillary electrophoresis–tandem mass spectrometry. Cell viability is evaluated on EA cells treated with 0.5–100 µg/mL of the Vr extract for 24 h. The extract is diluted at concentrations of 5, 10 and 25 µg/mL and maintained for 24 h along with 30 mM of glucose to evaluate its protective effect on reduced glutathione (GSH; glutathione peroxidase (GPx and reductase (GR and protein carbonyl groups. Results: V. rufa stem bark is composed mainly of sugars; such as inositol; galactose; glucose; mannose; sacarose; arabinose and ribose. Treatment with Vr up to 100 µg/mL for 24 h did not affect cell viability. Treatment of EA cells with 30 mM of glucose for 24 h significantly increased the cell damage. EA cells treated with 30 mM of glucose showed a decrease of GSH concentration and increased Radical Oxygen Species (ROS and activity of antioxidant enzymes and protein carbonyl levels; compared to control. Co-treatment of EA with 30 mM glucose plus 1–10 μg/mL Vr significantly reduced cell damage while 5–25 μg/mL Vr evoked a significant protection against the glucose insult; recovering ROS; GSH; antioxidant enzymes and carbonyls to baseline levels. Conclusion: V. rufa extract protects endothelial cells against oxidative damage by modulating ROS; GSH concentration; antioxidant enzyme activity and protein carbonyl levels.

  12. Perlindungan Protein Menggunakan Tanin dan Saponin Terhadap Daya Fermentasi Rumen dan Sintesis Protein Mikrob (PROTECTION OFPROTEINUSINGTANNINS AND SAPONINS OF RUMEN DIGESTIBILITYAND MICROBESSYNTHESISPROTEIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Shofi Ani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this experiment was to examine protection of protein using tannins and saponins toimprove rumen digestibility and microb-mediated protein synthesis in vitro. Rumen fluids used as inoculumwas collected from a composite of two female adult fistulatedongole cattle weighed of ±300 kg with theage of five years old. The experimental design used in this study was a completely randomized design withsix treatments and three replication of each treatment. The six treatments consisted of T0: Proteinconcentrates without protection, T1: protein concentrates protected with 1.2% saponin, T2: proteinconcentrates protected with 0.5% tannin and 0.9% saponin , T3: protein concentrates protected with 1.0%tannin and 0.6% saponin, T4: protein concentrates protected with 1.5 % tannin and 0.3% saponin and T5:protein concentrates protected with 2.0% tannins. The result showed that treatment with tannin, saponinand their combination had a significantly affect (P<0,05 on the level of ammonia (NH3, the total volatilefatty acids (VFA, and total protein. Protection of proteins with combination of 1,0% tannin and 0.6%saponin resulted in best effect on feed protein as shown by its NH3 concentration, total VFA and totalprotein. This indicates the level of protection of feed protein can improve rumen digestibility and microbesmediatedprotein synthesis, as showed in the concentration of N-NH3, total VFA and total protein.

  13. Yeast CUP1 protects HeLa cells against copper-induced stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, X.X. [Department of Animal Sciences, School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Shanghai (China); College of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou (China); Ma, Y.F.; Wang, Q.S.; Chen, Z.L.; Liao, R.R.; Pan, Y.C. [Department of Animal Sciences, School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Shanghai (China)

    2015-06-12

    As an essential trace element, copper can be toxic in mammalian cells when present in excess. Metallothioneins (MTs) are small, cysteine-rich proteins that avidly bind copper and thus play an important role in detoxification. YeastCUP1 is a member of the MT gene family. The aim of this study was to determine whether yeast CUP1 could bind copper effectively and protect cells against copper stress. In this study,CUP1 expression was determined by quantitative real-time PCR, and copper content was detected by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was evaluated using the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay. Cellular viability was detected using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, and the cell cycle distribution of CUP1 was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The data indicated that overexpression of yeast CUP1 in HeLa cells played a protective role against copper-induced stress, leading to increased cellular viability (P<0.05) and decreased ROS production (P<0.05). It was also observed that overexpression of yeast CUP1 reduced the percentage of G1 cells and increased the percentage of S cells, which suggested that it contributed to cell viability. We found that overexpression of yeast CUP1 protected HeLa cells against copper stress. These results offer useful data to elucidate the mechanism of the MT gene on copper metabolism in mammalian cells.

  14. Protective effect of catechin in type I Gaucher disease cells by reducing endoplasmic reticulum stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yea-Jin; Kim, Sung-Jo; Heo, Tae-Hwe

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Catechin reduces the expression level of ER stress marker protein in type I Gaucher disease cells. → Catechin induces the proliferation rate of GD cells similar levels to normal cells. → Catechin improves wound healing activity. → Catechin-mediated reductions in ER stress may be associated with enhanced cell survival. → We identified catechin as a protective agent against ER stress in GD cells. -- Abstract: Gaucher disease (GD) is the most common lysosomal storage disorder (LSD) and is divided into three phenotypes, I, II, and III. Type I is the most prevalent form and has its onset in adulthood. The degree of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is one of the factors that determine GD severity. It has recently been reported that antioxidants reduce ER stress and apoptosis by scavenging the oxidants that cause oxidative stress. For this report, we investigated the possibility that catechin can act on type I GD patient cells to alleviate the pathogenic conditions of GD. We treated GD cells with catechin and examined the expression level of GRP78/BiP (an ER stress marker) by western blots and fluorescence microscopy, the proliferation rate of GD cells, and scratch-induced wound healing activity. Our results show that catechin reduces the expression level of GRP78/BiP, leads to cell proliferation rates of GD cells similar levels to normal cells, and improves wound healing activity. We conclude that catechin protects against ER stress in GD cells and catechin-mediated reductions in ER stress may be associated with enhanced cell survival.

  15. Protective effect of catechin in type I Gaucher disease cells by reducing endoplasmic reticulum stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yea-Jin [Department of Biotechnology, Hoseo University, Baebang, Asan, Chungnam, 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Jo, E-mail: sungjo@hoseo.edu [Department of Biotechnology, Hoseo University, Baebang, Asan, Chungnam, 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Tae-Hwe, E-mail: thhur92@catholic.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon 420-743 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Catechin reduces the expression level of ER stress marker protein in type I Gaucher disease cells. {yields} Catechin induces the proliferation rate of GD cells similar levels to normal cells. {yields} Catechin improves wound healing activity. {yields} Catechin-mediated reductions in ER stress may be associated with enhanced cell survival. {yields} We identified catechin as a protective agent against ER stress in GD cells. -- Abstract: Gaucher disease (GD) is the most common lysosomal storage disorder (LSD) and is divided into three phenotypes, I, II, and III. Type I is the most prevalent form and has its onset in adulthood. The degree of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is one of the factors that determine GD severity. It has recently been reported that antioxidants reduce ER stress and apoptosis by scavenging the oxidants that cause oxidative stress. For this report, we investigated the possibility that catechin can act on type I GD patient cells to alleviate the pathogenic conditions of GD. We treated GD cells with catechin and examined the expression level of GRP78/BiP (an ER stress marker) by western blots and fluorescence microscopy, the proliferation rate of GD cells, and scratch-induced wound healing activity. Our results show that catechin reduces the expression level of GRP78/BiP, leads to cell proliferation rates of GD cells similar levels to normal cells, and improves wound healing activity. We conclude that catechin protects against ER stress in GD cells and catechin-mediated reductions in ER stress may be associated with enhanced cell survival.

  16. Extracellular vesicles from human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hiPSC-MSCs) protect against renal ischemia/reperfusion injury via delivering specificity protein (SP1) and transcriptional activating of sphingosine kinase 1 and inhibiting necroptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaodong; Li, Dawei; Chen, Xiaosong; Han, Conghui; Xu, Longmei; Huang, Tao; Dong, Zhen; Zhang, Ming

    2017-12-11

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion is a main cause of acute kidney injury (AKI), which is associated with high mortality. Here we show that extracellular vesicles (EVs) secreted from hiPSC-MSCs play a critical role in protection against renal I/R injury. hiPSC-MSCs-EVs can fuse with renal cells and deliver SP1 into target cells, subsequently active SK1 expression and increase S1P formation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses and luciferase assay were used to confirm SP1 binds directly to the SK1 promoter region and promote promoter activity. Moreover, SP1 inhibition (MIT) or SK1 inhibition (SKI-II) completely abolished the renal protective effect of hiPSC-MSCs-EVs in rat I/R injury mode. However, pre-treatment of necroptosis inhibitor Nec-1 showed no difference with the administration of hiPSC-MSCs-EVs only. We then generated an SP1 knockout hiPSC-MSC cell line by CRISPR/Cas9 system and found that SP1 knockout failed to show the protective effect of hiPSC-MSCs-EVs unless restoring the level of SP1 by Ad-SP1 in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, this study describes an anti-necroptosis effect of hiPSC-MSCs-EVs against renal I/R injury via delivering SP1 into target renal cells and intracellular activating the expression of SK1 and the generation of S1P. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for renal protection against I/R injury, and indicate a potential therapeutic approach for a variety of renal diseases and renal transplantation.

  17. Type I collagen gel protects murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells from TNFα-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hong-Ju; He, Wen-Qi; Chen, Ling; Liu, Wei-Wei; Xu, Qian; Xia, Ming-Yu; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Fujisaki, Hitomi; Hattori, Shunji; Tashiro, Shin-ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Ikejima, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells have been used to test efficacy of proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. In the present study, we reported on protective effect of type I collagen gel used as L929 cell culture. L929 cell grew and proliferated well on collagen gel. However, the L929 cells exhibited cobblestone-like morphology which was much different from the spread fusiform shape when cultured on conventional cell dishes as well as the cells tended to aggregate. On conventional cell culture dishes, the cells treated with TNFα became round in shape and eventually died in a necroptotic manner. The cells cultured on collagen gel, however, were completely unaffected. TNFα treatment was reported to induce autophagy in L929 cells on the plastic dish, and therefore we investigated the effect of collagen gel on induction of autophagy. The results indicated that autophagy induced by TNFα treatment was much reduced when the cells were cultured on collagen gel. In conclusion, type I collagen gel protected L929 cell from TNFα-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Collagen gel culture changed the morphology of L929 cells. • L929 cell cultured on collagen gel were resistant to TNFα-induced cell death. • Collagen gel culture inhibited TNFα-induced autophagy in L929 cells

  18. Type I collagen gel protects murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells from TNFα-induced cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong-Ju; He, Wen-Qi; Chen, Ling; Liu, Wei-Wei; Xu, Qian; Xia, Ming-Yu; Hayashi, Toshihiko [China-Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China); Fujisaki, Hitomi; Hattori, Shunji [Nippi Research Institute of Biomatrix, Toride, Ibaraki 302-0017 (Japan); Tashiro, Shin-ichi [Institute for Clinical and Biomedical Sciences, Kyoto 603-8072 (Japan); Onodera, Satoshi [Department of Clinical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa Pharmaceutical University, Tokyo 194-8543 (Japan); Ikejima, Takashi, E-mail: ikejimat@vip.sina.com [China-Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2015-02-20

    Murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells have been used to test efficacy of proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. In the present study, we reported on protective effect of type I collagen gel used as L929 cell culture. L929 cell grew and proliferated well on collagen gel. However, the L929 cells exhibited cobblestone-like morphology which was much different from the spread fusiform shape when cultured on conventional cell dishes as well as the cells tended to aggregate. On conventional cell culture dishes, the cells treated with TNFα became round in shape and eventually died in a necroptotic manner. The cells cultured on collagen gel, however, were completely unaffected. TNFα treatment was reported to induce autophagy in L929 cells on the plastic dish, and therefore we investigated the effect of collagen gel on induction of autophagy. The results indicated that autophagy induced by TNFα treatment was much reduced when the cells were cultured on collagen gel. In conclusion, type I collagen gel protected L929 cell from TNFα-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Collagen gel culture changed the morphology of L929 cells. • L929 cell cultured on collagen gel were resistant to TNFα-induced cell death. • Collagen gel culture inhibited TNFα-induced autophagy in L929 cells.

  19. ASP53, a thermostable protein from Acacia erioloba seeds that protects target proteins against thermal denaturation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mtwisha, L

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available ) and the Typha pollen D7 protein was found to stabilise sugar glasses in an in vitro system (Wolkers et al. 2001). The cupin family of proteins comprises a wide variety of proteins from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes and includes the seed storage proteins...–268. Garay-Arroyo A, Colmenero-Flores JM, Garciarrubio A, Covarrubias AA (2000) Highly hydrophilic proteins in prokaryotes and eukaryotes are common during conditions of water deficit. Journal of Biological Chemistry 275, 5668–5674. doi: 10.1074/jbc.275...

  20. Human Anti-Oxidation Protein A1M—A Potential Kidney Protection Agent in Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Ahlstedt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT has been in clinical use for 15 years to treat metastatic neuroendocrine tumors. PRRT is limited by reabsorption and retention of the administered radiolabeled somatostatin analogues in the proximal tubule. Consequently, it is essential to develop and employ methods to protect the kidneys during PRRT. Today, infusion of positively charged amino acids is the standard method of kidney protection. Other methods, such as administration of amifostine, are still under evaluation and show promising results. α1-microglobulin (A1M is a reductase and radical scavenging protein ubiquitously present in plasma and extravascular tissue. Human A1M has antioxidation properties and has been shown to prevent radiation-induced in vitro cell damage and protect non-irradiated surrounding cells. It has recently been shown in mice that exogenously infused A1M and the somatostatin analogue octreotide are co-localized in proximal tubules of the kidney after intravenous infusion. In this review we describe the current situation of kidney protection during PRRT, discuss the necessity and implications of more precise dosimetry and present A1M as a new, potential candidate for renal protection during PRRT and related targeted radionuclide therapies.

  1. Adaptive aneuploidy protects against thiol peroxidase deficiency by increasing respiration via key mitochondrial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Alaattin; Gerashchenko, Maxim V; Seim, Inge; Labarre, Jean; Toledano, Michel B; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2015-08-25

    Aerobic respiration is a fundamental energy-generating process; however, there is cost associated with living in an oxygen-rich environment, because partially reduced oxygen species can damage cellular components. Organisms evolved enzymes that alleviate this damage and protect the intracellular milieu, most notably thiol peroxidases, which are abundant and conserved enzymes that mediate hydrogen peroxide signaling and act as the first line of defense against oxidants in nearly all living organisms. Deletion of all eight thiol peroxidase genes in yeast (∆8 strain) is not lethal, but results in slow growth and a high mutation rate. Here we characterized mechanisms that allow yeast cells to survive under conditions of thiol peroxidase deficiency. Two independent ∆8 strains increased mitochondrial content, altered mitochondrial distribution, and became dependent on respiration for growth but they were not hypersensitive to H2O2. In addition, both strains independently acquired a second copy of chromosome XI and increased expression of genes encoded by it. Survival of ∆8 cells was dependent on mitochondrial cytochrome-c peroxidase (CCP1) and UTH1, present on chromosome XI. Coexpression of these genes in ∆8 cells led to the elimination of the extra copy of chromosome XI and improved cell growth, whereas deletion of either gene was lethal. Thus, thiol peroxidase deficiency requires dosage compensation of CCP1 and UTH1 via chromosome XI aneuploidy, wherein these proteins support hydroperoxide removal with the reducing equivalents generated by the electron transport chain. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of adaptive aneuploidy counteracting oxidative stress.

  2. Human alpha-defensin-1 protects cells from intoxication with Clostridium perfringens iota toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Stephan; Popoff, Michel R; Barth, Holger

    2018-03-01

    Iota toxin is produced by Clostridium perfringens type E strains and associated with diarrhea in cattle and lambs. This binary protein toxin comprises the enzyme component iota a (Ia), which ADP-ribosylates G-actin, and the separate transport component iota b (Ib), which delivers Ia into the cytosol of target cells. Ib binds to cell receptors and forms biologically active toxin complexes with Ia, which cause rounding of adherent cells due to the destruction of the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we report that the human peptide α-defensin-1 protects cultured cells including human colon cells from intoxication with iota toxin. In contrast, the related ß-defensin-1 had no effect, indicating a specific mode of action. The α-defensin-1 did not inhibit ADP-ribosylation of actin by Ia in vitro. Pretreatment of Ib with α-defensin-1 prior to addition of Ia prevented intoxication. Additionally, α-defensin-1 protected cells from cytotoxic effects mediated by Ib in the absence of Ia, implicating that α-defensin-1 interacts with Ib to prevent the formation of biologically active iota toxin on cells. In conclusion, the findings contribute to a better understanding of the functions of α-defensin-1 and suggest that this human peptide might be an attractive starting point to develop novel pharmacological options to treat/prevent diseases associated with iota toxin-producing Clostridium perfringens strains.

  3. Surveillance and radiological protection in the Hot Cell laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, J.M.; Torre, J. De la; Garcia C, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The Hot Cells Laboratory (LCC) located in the National Institute of Nuclear Research are an installation that was designed for the management at distance of 10,000 Curies of Co-60 or other radioactive materials with different values in activity. The management of such materials in the installation, implies to analyze and to determine the doses that the POE will receive as well as the implementation of protection measures and appropriate radiological safety so that is completed the specified by the ALARA concept. In this work it is carried out an evaluation of the doses to receive for the POE when managing radionuclides with maximum activities that can be allowed in function of the current conditions of the cells and an evaluation of results is made with the program of surveillance and radiological protection implemented for the development of the works that carried out in the installation. (Author)

  4. Cell-Permeable Parkin Proteins Suppress Parkinson Disease-Associated Phenotypes in Cultured Cells and Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Tam; Kim, Jaetaek; Ruley, H. Earl; Jo, Daewoong

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder of complex etiology characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons, particularly in the substantia nigra. Parkin, a tightly regulated E3 ubiquitin ligase, promotes the survival of dopaminergic neurons in both PD and Parkinsonian syndromes induced by acute exposures to neurotoxic agents. The present study assessed the potential of cell-permeable parkin (CP-Parkin) as a neuroprotective agent. Cellular uptake and tissue penetration of recombinant, enzymatically active parkin was markedly enhanced by the addition of a hydrophobic macromolecule transduction domain (MTD). The resulting CP-Parkin proteins (HPM13 and PM10) suppressed dopaminergic neuronal toxicity in cells and mice exposed to 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDH) and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). These included enhanced survival and dopamine expression in cultured CATH.a and SH-SY5Y neuronal cells; and protection against MPTP-induced damage in mice, notably preservation of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells with enhanced dopamine expression in the striatum and midbrain, and preservation of gross motor function. These results demonstrate that CP-Parkin proteins can compensate for intrinsic limitations in the parkin response and provide a therapeutic strategy to augment parkin activity in vivo. PMID:25019626

  5. ABI domain-containing proteins contribute to surface protein display and cell division in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Matthew B; Wojcik, Brandon M; DeDent, Andrea C; Missiakas, Dominique M; Schneewind, Olaf

    2010-10-01

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus requires cell wall anchored surface proteins to cause disease. During cell division, surface proteins with YSIRK signal peptides are secreted into the cross-wall, a layer of newly synthesized peptidoglycan between separating daughter cells. The molecular determinants for the trafficking of surface proteins are, however, still unknown. We screened mutants with non-redundant transposon insertions by fluorescence-activated cell sorting for reduced deposition of protein A (SpA) into the staphylococcal envelope. Three mutants, each of which harboured transposon insertions in genes for transmembrane proteins, displayed greatly reduced envelope abundance of SpA and surface proteins with YSIRK signal peptides. Characterization of the corresponding mutations identified three transmembrane proteins with abortive infectivity (ABI) domains, elements first described in lactococci for their role in phage exclusion. Mutations in genes for ABI domain proteins, designated spdA, spdB and spdC (surface protein display), diminish the expression of surface proteins with YSIRK signal peptides, but not of precursor proteins with conventional signal peptides. spdA, spdB and spdC mutants display an increase in the thickness of cross-walls and in the relative abundance of staphylococci with cross-walls, suggesting that spd mutations may represent a possible link between staphylococcal cell division and protein secretion. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Zinc supplementation protects against cadmium accumulation and cytotoxicity in Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Zhang

    Full Text Available Cadmium ions (Cd2+ have been reported to accumulate in bovine tissues, although Cd2+ cytotoxicity has not been investigated thoroughly in this species. Zinc ions (Zn2+ have been shown to antagonize the toxic effects of heavy metals such as Cd2+ in some systems. The present study investigated Cd2+ cytotoxicity in Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK epithelial cells, and explored whether this was modified by Zn2+. Exposure to Cd2+ led to a dose- and time-dependent increase in apoptotic cell death, with increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial damage. Zn2+ supplementation alleviated Cd2+-induced cytotoxicity and this protective effect was more obvious when cells were exposed to a lower concentration of Cd2+ (10 μM, as compared to 50 μM Cd2+. This indicated that high levels of Cd2+ accumulation might induce irreversible damage in bovine kidney cells. Metallothioneins (MTs are metal-binding proteins that play an essential role in heavy metal ion detoxification. We found that co-exposure to Zn2+ and Cd2+ synergistically enhanced RNA and protein expression of MT-1, MT-2, and the metal-regulatory transcription factor 1 in MDBK cells. Notably, addition of Zn2+ reduced the amounts of cytosolic Cd2+ detected following MDBK exposure to 10 μM Cd2+. These findings revealed a protective role of Zn2+ in counteracting Cd2+ uptake and toxicity in MDBK cells, indicating that this approach may provide a means to protect livestock from excessive Cd2+ accumulation.

  7. The Unfolded Protein Response in Homeostasis and Modulation of Mammalian Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Ana Sofia; Alves, Inês; Helguero, Luisa; Domingues, Maria Rosário; Neves, Bruno Miguel

    2016-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays important roles in eukaryotic protein folding and lipid biosynthesis. Several exogenous and endogenous cellular sources of stress can perturb ER homeostasis leading to the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the lumen. Unfolded protein accumulation triggers a signal-transduction cascade known as the unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptive mechanism which aims to protect cells from protein aggregates and to restore ER functions. Further to this protective mechanism, in immune cells, UPR molecular effectors have been shown to participate in a wide range of biological processes such as cell differentiation, survival and immunoglobulin and cytokine production. Recent findings also highlight the involvement of the UPR machinery in the maturational program and antigen presentation capacities of dendritic cells. UPR is therefore a key element in immune system homeostasis with direct implications on both adaptive and innate immune responses. The present review summarizes the knowledge on the emerging roles of UPR signaling cascades in mammalian immune cells as well as the consequences of their dysregulation in relation to the pathogenesis of several diseases.

  8. Gallic Acid Protects 6-OHDA Induced Neurotoxicity by Attenuating Oxidative Stress in Human Dopaminergic Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Y; Phani Kumar, G; Ramya, E M; Anilakumar, K R

    2018-04-18

    Gallic acid is one of the most important polyphenolic compounds, which is considered an excellent free radical scavenger. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is a neurotoxin, which has been implicated in mainly Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of the neuroprotective effects of gallic acid on 6-OHDA induced apoptosis in human dopaminergic cells, SH-SY5Y. Our results showed that 6-OHDA induced cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells was suppressed by pre-treatment with gallic acid. The percentage of live cells (90%) was high in the pre-treatment of gallic acid when compared with 6-OHDA alone treated cell line. Moreover, gallic acid was very effective in attenuating the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, elevated levels of intracellular ROS and apoptotic cell death induced by 6-OHDA. Gallic acid also lowered the ratio of the pro-apoptotic Bax protein and the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein in SH-SY5Y cells. 6-OHDA exposure was up-regulated caspase-3 and Keap-1 and, down-regulated Nrf2, BDNF and p-CREB, which were sufficiently reverted by gallic acid pre-treatment. These findings indicate that gallic acid is able to protect the neuronal cells against 6-OHDA induced injury and proved that gallic acid might potentially serve as an agent for prevention of several human neurodegenerative diseases caused by oxidative stress and apoptosis.

  9. Protection against RAGE-mediated neuronal cell death by sRAGE-secreting human mesenchymal stem cells in 5xFAD transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Myeongjoo; Oh, Seyeon; Park, Hyunjin; Ahn, Hyosang; Choi, Junwon; Kim, Hyungho; Lee, Hye Sun; Lee, Sojung; Park, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Seung U; Lee, Bonghee; Byun, Kyunghee

    2017-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is the most commonly encountered neurodegenerative disease, causes synaptic dysfunction and neuronal loss due to various pathological processes that include tau abnormality and amyloid beta (Aβ) accumulation. Aβ stimulates the secretion and the synthesis of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End products (RAGE) ligand by activating microglial cells, and has been reported to cause neuronal cell death in Aβ 1-42 treated rats and in mice with neurotoxin-induced Parkinson's disease. The soluble form of RAGE (sRAGE) is known to reduce inflammation, and to decrease microglial cell activation and Aβ deposition, and thus, it protects from neuronal cell death in AD. However, sRAGE protein has too a short half-life for therapeutic purposes. We developed sRAGE-secreting umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells (sRAGE-MSCs) to enhance the inhibitory effects of sRAGE on Aβ deposition and to reduce the secretion and synthesis of RAGE ligands in 5xFAD mice. In addition, these cells improved the viability of injected MSCs, and enhanced the protective effects of sRAGE by inhibiting the binding of RAGE and RAGE ligands in 5xFAD mice. These findings suggest sRAGE protein from sRAGE-MSCs has better protection against neuronal cell death than sRAGE protein or single MSC treatment by inhibiting the RAGE cell death cascade and RAGE-induce inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Melatonin protects bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells against iron overload-induced aberrant differentiation and senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Yang, Lei; Li, Yuan; Yan, Gege; Feng, Chao; Liu, Tianyi; Gong, Rui; Yuan, Ye; Wang, Ning; Idiiatullina, Elina; Bikkuzin, Timur; Pavlov, Valentin; Li, Yang; Dong, Chaorun; Wang, Dawei; Cao, Yang; Han, Zhenbo; Zhang, Lai; Huang, Qi; Ding, Fengzhi; Bi, Zhengang; Cai, Benzhi

    2017-10-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are an expandable population of stem cells which can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Dysfunction of BMSCs in response to pathological stimuli contributes to bone diseases. Melatonin, a hormone secreted from pineal gland, has been proved to be an important mediator in bone formation and mineralization. The aim of this study was to investigate whether melatonin protected against iron overload-induced dysfunction of BMSCs and its underlying mechanisms. Here, we found that iron overload induced by ferric ammonium citrate (FAC) caused irregularly morphological changes and markedly reduced the viability in BMSCs. Consistently, osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs was significantly inhibited by iron overload, but melatonin treatment rescued osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs. Furthermore, exposure to FAC led to the senescence in BMSCs, which was attenuated by melatonin as well. Meanwhile, melatonin was able to counter the reduction in cell proliferation by iron overload in BMSCs. In addition, protective effects of melatonin on iron overload-induced dysfunction of BMSCs were abolished by its inhibitor luzindole. Also, melatonin protected BMSCs against iron overload-induced ROS accumulation and membrane potential depolarization. Further study uncovered that melatonin inhibited the upregulation of p53, ERK and p38 protein expressions in BMSCs with iron overload. Collectively, melatonin plays a protective role in iron overload-induced osteogenic differentiation dysfunction and senescence through blocking ROS accumulation and p53/ERK/p38 activation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. In Vitro Digestibilities of Six Rumen Protected Fat-Protein Supplement Formulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilis Hartati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of the research was to evaluate the efficacy of protection method of rumen protected fat-protein supplements. In vitro digestibility test was carried out to examine nutrients digestibility of different supplement formula based on the sources of protein and oil. The research used two sources of fat namely crude palm oil (CPO and fish oil (FO and three sources of protein namely milk skim, soy flour, and soybean meal. Thus there were 6 combinations that subjected in the in vitro digestibility test. The observed variables were the digestibility of dry matter (DM, organic matter (OM, crude fat (CF, and crude protein (CP. Results indicated that the method for protecting protein and fat was effective. This was showed by low nutrients digestibility in the rumen and high nutrients digestibility in the post rumen. In conclusion the combination between skim milk and CPO gave the best results among the other supplement formula. Keywords: rumen protected nutrient, fat-protein supplement, rumen digestibility, in vitro Animal Production 14(1:1-5, January 2012

  12. HIV-1 Tat protein induces glial cell autophagy through enhancement of BAG3 protein levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Anna Paola; De Simone, Francesca Isabella; Iorio, Vittoria; De Marco, Margot; Khalili, Kamel; Sariyer, Ilker Kudret; Capunzo, Mario; Nori, Stefania Lucia; Rosati, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    BAG3 protein has been described as an anti-apoptotic and pro-autophagic factor in several neoplastic and normal cells. We previously demonstrated that BAG3 expression is elevated upon HIV-1 infection of glial and T lymphocyte cells. Among HIV-1 proteins, Tat is highly involved in regulating host cell response to viral infection. Therefore, we investigated the possible role of Tat protein in modulating BAG3 protein levels and the autophagic process itself. In this report, we show that transfection with Tat raises BAG3 levels in glioblastoma cells. Moreover, BAG3 silencing results in highly reducing Tat- induced levels of LC3-II and increasing the appearance of sub G0/G1 apoptotic cells, in keeping with the reported role of BAG3 in modulating the autophagy/apoptosis balance. These results demonstrate for the first time that Tat protein is able to stimulate autophagy through increasing BAG3 levels in human glial cells.

  13. Sulforaphane induces cell cycle arrest by protecting RB-E2F-1 complex in epithelial ovarian cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Robert

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sulforaphane (SFN, an isothiocyanate phytochemical present predominantly in cruciferous vegetables such as brussels sprout and broccoli, is considered a promising chemo-preventive agent against cancer. In-vitro exposure to SFN appears to result in the induction of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in a variety of tumor types. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the inhibition of cell cycle progression by SFN are poorly understood in epithelial ovarian cancer cells (EOC. The aim of this study is to understand the signaling mechanisms through which SFN influences the cell growth and proliferation in EOC. Results SFN at concentrations of 5 - 20 μM induced a dose-dependent suppression of growth in cell lines MDAH 2774 and SkOV-3 with an IC50 of ~8 μM after a 3 day exposure. Combination treatment with chemotherapeutic agent, paclitaxel, resulted in additive growth suppression. SFN at ~8 μM decreased growth by 40% and 20% on day 1 in MDAH 2774 and SkOV-3, respectively. Cells treated with cytotoxic concentrations of SFN have reduced cell migration and increased apoptotic cell death via an increase in Bak/Bcl-2 ratio and cleavage of procaspase-9 and poly (ADP-ribose-polymerase (PARP. Gene expression profile analysis of cell cycle regulated proteins demonstrated increased levels of tumor suppressor retinoblastoma protein (RB and decreased levels of E2F-1 transcription factor. SFN treatment resulted in G1 cell cycle arrest through down modulation of RB phosphorylation and by protecting the RB-E2F-1 complex. Conclusions SFN induces growth arrest and apoptosis in EOC cells. Inhibition of retinoblastoma (RB phosphorylation and reduction in levels of free E2F-1 appear to play an important role in EOC growth arrest.

  14. Mitochondrial fission proteins regulate programmed cell death in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Fannjiang, Yihru; Cheng, Wen-Chih; Lee, Sarah J.; Qi, Bing; Pevsner, Jonathan; McCaffery, J. Michael; Hill, R. Blake; Basañez, Gorka; Hardwick, J. Marie

    2004-01-01

    The possibility that single-cell organisms undergo programmed cell death has been questioned in part because they lack several key components of the mammalian cell death machinery. However, yeast encode a homolog of human Drp1, a mitochondrial fission protein that was shown previously to promote mammalian cell death and the excessive mitochondrial fragmentation characteristic of apoptotic mammalian cells. In support of a primordial origin of programmed cell death involving mitochondria, we fo...

  15. Effects of somatic cell count on the gross composition, protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and >265,000 cells/ml) on ewe milk composition, protein fractions and ... 6.38, true protein, true whey protein, fat, lactose, dry matter, ash, phosphorus, ... management practices, and representative of the typical ewe herd .... pasteurised before being analysed. .... Mastitis detection: current trends and future perspectives.

  16. Evaluation of yeast single cell protein (SCP) diets on growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An investigation was carried out on the possibility of replacing fishmeal with graded levels of yeast single cell protein (SCP; 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50%) in isonitrogenous feed formulations (30% protein) in the diet of Oreochromis niloticus fingerlings for a period of 12 weeks. The control diet had fishmeal as the primary protein ...

  17. 1Protein Energy Malnutrition Impairs Homeostatic Proliferation of Memory CD8 T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Smita S.; Chatraw, Janel Hart; Tan, Wendy G.; Wherry, E. John; Becker, Todd C.; Ahmed, Rafi; Kapasi, Zoher F.

    2011-01-01

    Nutrition is a critical but poorly understood determinant of immunity. There is abundant epidemiological evidence linking protein malnutrition to impaired vaccine efficacy and increased susceptibility to infections; yet, the role of dietary protein in immune memory homeostasis remains poorly understood. Here we show that protein energy malnutrition (PEM) induced in mice by low-protein (LP) feeding has a detrimental impact on CD8 memory. Relative to adequate-protein (AP) fed controls, LP feeding in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) immune mice resulted in a 2-fold decrease in LCMV-specific CD8 memory T cells. Adoptive transfer of memory cells, labeled with a division tracking dye, from AP mice into naive LP or AP mice demonstrated that PEM caused profound defects in homeostatic proliferation. Remarkably, this defect occurred despite the lymphopenic environment in LP hosts. While antigen-specific memory cells in LP and AP hosts were phenotypically similar, memory cells in LP hosts were markedly less-responsive to poly(I:C)-induced acute proliferative signals. Furthermore, upon recall, memory cells in LP hosts displayed reduced proliferation and protection from challenge with LCMV-clone 13 resulting in impaired viral clearance in the liver. The findings show a metabolic requirement of dietary protein in sustaining functional CD8 memory and suggest that interventions to optimize dietary protein intake may improve vaccine efficacy in malnourished individuals. PMID:22116826

  18. Membrane Proteins : The Key Players of a Cancer Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, Kim R.

    Membrane proteins are involved in the prognosis of the most common forms of cancer. Membrane proteins are the hallmark of a cancer cell. The overexpressed membrane receptors are becoming increasingly important in cancer cell therapy. Current renewing therapy approaches based on receptor

  19. Production of membrane proteins without cells or detergents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Sundaresan; Knowles, Timothy; Overduin, Michael

    2011-04-30

    The production of membrane proteins in cellular systems is besieged by several problems due to their hydrophobic nature which often causes misfolding, protein aggregation and cytotoxicity, resulting in poor yields of stable proteins. Cell-free expression has emerged as one of the most versatile alternatives for circumventing these obstacles by producing membrane proteins directly into designed hydrophobic environments. Efficient optimisation of expression and solubilisation conditions using a variety of detergents, membrane mimetics and lipids has yielded structurally and functionally intact membrane proteins, with yields several fold above the levels possible from cell-based systems. Here we review recently developed techniques available to produce functional membrane proteins, and discuss amphipols, nanodisc and styrene maleic acid lipid particle (SMALP) technologies that can be exploited alongside cell-free expression of membrane proteins. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. MULTIFUNCTIONAL ADHESIN PROTEINS AND THEIR DISPLAY IN MICROBIAL CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    Recombinant cells expressing a multifunctional adhesin protein derived from a naturally occurring adhesin, containing a binding domain that is capable of binding to an organic receptor and a binding domain that is capable of binding to a compound to which the naturally occurring adhesin protein...... substantially does not bind. The cells or modified adhesin proteins, optionally in immobilized form, are useful for separating organic and inorganic compounds including toxic or precious metals from an environment....

  1. Usher protein functions in hair cells and photoreceptors

    OpenAIRE

    Cosgrove, Dominic; Zallocchi, Marisa

    2013-01-01

    The 10 different genes associated with the deaf/blind disorder, Usher syndrome, encode a number of structurally and functionally distinct proteins, most expressed as multiple isoforms/protein variants. Functional characterization of these proteins suggests a role in stereocilia development in cochlear hair cells, likely owing to adhesive interactions in hair bundles. In mature hair cells, homodimers of the Usher cadherins, cadherin 23 and protocadherin 15, interact to form a structural fiber,...

  2. Novel mitochondria-targeted heat-soluble proteins identified in the anhydrobiotic Tardigrade improve osmotic tolerance of human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae Tanaka

    Full Text Available Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration through transition to a metabolically inactive state, called "anhydrobiosis". Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA proteins are heat-soluble proteins involved in the desiccation tolerance of many anhydrobiotic organisms. Tardigrades, Ramazzottius varieornatus, however, express predominantly tardigrade-unique heat-soluble proteins: CAHS (Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble and SAHS (Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble proteins, which are secreted or localized in most intracellular compartments, except the mitochondria. Although mitochondrial integrity is crucial to ensure cellular survival, protective molecules for mitochondria have remained elusive. Here, we identified two novel mitochondrial heat-soluble proteins, RvLEAM and MAHS (Mitochondrial Abundant Heat Soluble, as potent mitochondrial protectants from Ramazzottius varieornatus. RvLEAM is a group3 LEA protein and immunohistochemistry confirmed its mitochondrial localization in tardigrade cells. MAHS-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized in human mitochondria and was heat-soluble in vitro, though no sequence similarity with other known proteins was found, and one region was conserved among tardigrades. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RvLEAM protein as well as MAHS protein improved the hyperosmotic tolerance of human cells. The findings of the present study revealed that tardigrade mitochondria contain at least two types of heat-soluble proteins that might have protective roles in water-deficient environments.

  3. Different Cells Make Different Proteins: A Laboratory Exercise Illustrating Tissue-Specific Protein Expression in Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarguren, Izaskun; Villamarín, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    All the cells of higher organisms have the same DNA but not the same proteins. Each type of specialised cell that forms a tissue has its own pattern of gene expression and, consequently, it contains a particular set of proteins that determine its function. Here, we describe a laboratory exercise addressed to undergraduate students that aims to…

  4. Anaplasma phagocytophilum MSP4 and HSP70 Proteins Are Involved in Interactions with Host Cells during Pathogen Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinela Contreras

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Anaplasma phagocytophilum transmembrane and surface proteins play a role during infection and multiplication in host neutrophils and tick vector cells. Recently, A. phagocytophilum Major surface protein 4 (MSP4 and Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70 were shown to be localized on the bacterial membrane, with a possible role during pathogen infection in ticks. In this study, we hypothesized that A. phagocytophilum MSP4 and HSP70 have similar functions in tick-pathogen and host-pathogen interactions. To address this hypothesis, herein we characterized the role of these bacterial proteins in interaction and infection of vertebrate host cells. The results showed that A. phagocytophilum MSP4 and HSP70 are involved in host-pathogen interactions, with a role for HSP70 during pathogen infection. The analysis of the potential protective capacity of MSP4 and MSP4-HSP70 antigens in immunized sheep showed that MSP4-HSP70 was only partially protective against pathogen infection. This limited protection may be associated with several factors, including the recognition of non-protective epitopes by IgG in immunized lambs. Nevertheless, these antigens may be combined with other candidate protective antigens for the development of vaccines for the control of human and animal granulocytic anaplasmosis. Focusing on the characterization of host protective immune mechanisms and protein-protein interactions at the host-pathogen interface may lead to the discovery and design of new effective protective antigens.

  5. Relative contributions of decay accelerating factor (DAF), membrane cofactor protein (MCP) and CD59 in the protection of melanocytes from homologous complement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venneker, G. T.; Vodegel, R. M.; Okada, N.; Westerhof, W.; Bos, J. D.; Asghar, S. S.

    1998-01-01

    Complement regulatory molecules, membrane cofactor protein (MCP), decay accelerating factor (DAF) and CD59, protect body cells from autologous complement. They have wide tissue distribution but nothing is known about the expression of these molecules on human melanocytes. Since melanocytes are lysed

  6. G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2-deficient mice are protected from dextran sodium sulfate-induced acute colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steury, Michael D; Kang, Ho Jun; Lee, Taehyung; Lucas, Peter C; McCabe, Laura R; Parameswaran, Narayanan

    2018-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a serine/threonine kinase and plays a key role in different disease processes. Previously, we showed that GRK2 knockdown enhances wound healing in colonic epithelial cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that ablation of GRK2 would protect mice from dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced acute colitis. To test this, we administered DSS to wild-type (GRK2 +/+ ) and GRK2 heterozygous (GRK +/- ) mice in their drinking water for 7 days. As predicted, GRK2 +/- mice were protected from colitis as demonstrated by decreased weight loss (20% loss in GRK2 +/+ vs. 11% loss in GRK2 +/- ). lower disease activity index (GRK2 +/+ 9.1 vs GRK2 +/- 4.1), and increased colon lengths (GRK2 +/+ 4.7 cm vs GRK2 +/- 5.3 cm). To examine the mechanisms by which GRK2 +/- mice are protected from colitis, we investigated expression of inflammatory genes in the colon as well as immune cell profiles in colonic lamina propria, mesenteric lymph node, and in bone marrow. Our results did not reveal differences in immune cell profiles between the two genotypes. However, expression of inflammatory genes was significantly decreased in DSS-treated GRK2 +/- mice compared with GRK2 +/+ . To understand the mechanisms, we generated myeloid-specific GRK2 knockout mice and subjected them to DSS-induced colitis. Similar to whole body GRK2 heterozygous knockout mice, myeloid-specific knockout of GRK2 was sufficient for the protection from DSS-induced colitis. Together our results indicate that deficiency of GRK2 protects mice from DSS-induced colitis and further suggests that the mechanism of this effect is likely via GRK2 regulation of inflammatory genes in the myeloid cells.

  7. Fluorescence microscopy visualization of halomucin, a secreted 927 kDa protein surrounding Haloquadratum walsbyi cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf eZenke

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available At the time of its first publication, halomucin from Haloquadratum walsbyi strain HBSQ001 was the largest archaeal protein known (9159 aa. It has a predicted signal sequence, making it likely to be an extracellular or secreted protein. Best BLAST matches were found to be mammalian mucins that protect tissues to dehydration and chemical stress. It was hypothesized that halomucin participates in protection against desiccation by retaining water in a hull around the halophilic organisms that live at the limits of water activity. We visualized Haloquadratum cells by staining their intracellular polyhydroxybutyrate granules using Nile Blue. Halomucin was stained by immunofluorescence with antibodies generated against synthetic peptides derived from the halomucin amino acid sequence. Polyhydroxybutyrate stained cells were reconstructed in 3D which highlights not only the highly regular square shape but also the extreme flatness of Haloquadratum. Double-staining proves halomucin to be extracellular but to be only loosely associated to cells in agreement with its hypothesized function.

  8. Antibodies against a tick protein, Salp15, protect mice from the Lyme disease agent

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Jianfeng; Wang, Penghua; Adusumilli, Sarojini; Booth, Carmen J.; Narasimhan, Sukanya; Anguita, Juan; Fikrig, Erol

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, vaccines directly target a pathogen or microbial toxin. Lyme disease, caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, is a tick-borne illness for which a human vaccine is not currently available. B. burgdorferi binds a tick salivary protein, Salp15, during transmission from the vector, and this interaction facilitates infection of mice. We now show that Salp15-antiserum significantly protected mice from B. burgdorferi infection. Salp15-antiserum also markedly enhanced the protective capacity o...

  9. Protective features of resveratrol on human spermatozoa cryopreservation may be mediated through 5' AMP-activated protein kinase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani Nashtaei, M; Amidi, F; Sedighi Gilani, M A; Aleyasin, A; Bakhshalizadeh, Sh; Naji, M; Nekoonam, S

    2017-03-01

    Biochemical and physical modifications during the freeze-thaw process adversely influence the restoration of energy-dependent sperm functions required for fertilization. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin, has been introduced to activate 5' AMP-activated protein kinase which is a cell energy sensor and a cell metabolism regulator. The cryoprotection of resveratrol on sperm cryoinjury via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase also remains to be elucidated. Our aim, thus, was to investigate: (i) the presence and intracellular localization of AMP-activated protein kinase protein; (ii) whether resveratrol may exert a protective effect on certain functional properties of fresh and post-thaw human spermatozoa through modulation of AMP-activated protein kinase. Spermatozoa from normozoospermic men were incubated with or without different concentrations of Compound C as an AMP-activated protein kinase inhibitor or resveratrol as an AMP-activated protein kinase activator for different lengths of time and were then cryopreserved. AMP-activated protein kinase is expressed essentially in the entire flagellum and the post-equatorial region. Viability of fresh spermatozoa was not significantly affected by the presence of Compound C or resveratrol. However, although Compound C caused a potent inhibition of spermatozoa motility parameters, resveratrol did not induce negative effect, except a significant reduction in motility at 25 μm for 1 h. Furthermore, resveratrol significantly increased AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation and mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased reactive oxygen species and apoptosis-like changes in frozen-thawed spermatozoa. Nevertheless, it was not able to compensate decreased sperm viability and motility parameters following cryopreservation. In contrast, Compound C showed opposite effects to resveratrol on AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis-like changes, mitochondrial membrane potential, and

  10. CDDO-Me protects normal lung and breast epithelial cells but not cancer cells from radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam El-Ashmawy

    Full Text Available Although radiation therapy is commonly used for treatment for many human diseases including cancer, ionizing radiation produces reactive oxygen species that can damage both cancer and healthy cells. Synthetic triterpenoids, including CDDO-Me, act as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant modulators primarily by inducing the transcription factor Nrf2 to activate downstream genes containing antioxidant response elements (AREs. In the present series of experiments, we determined if CDDO-Me can be used as a radioprotector in normal non-cancerous human lung and breast epithelial cells, in comparison to lung and breast cancer cell lines. A panel of normal non-cancerous, partially cancer progressed, and cancer cell lines from both lung and breast tissue was exposed to gamma radiation with and without pre-treatment with CDDO-Me. CDDO-Me was an effective radioprotector when given ∼18 hours before radiation in epithelial cells (average dose modifying factor (DMF = 1.3, and Nrf2 function was necessary for CDDO-Me to exert these radioprotective effects. CDDO-Me did not protect cancer lines tested from radiation-induced cytotoxicity, nor did it protect experimentally transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs with progressive oncogenic manipulations. CDDO-Me also protected human lymphocytes against radiation-induced DNA damage. A therapeutic window exists in which CDDO-Me protects normal cells from radiation by activating the Nrf2 pathway, but does not protect experimentally transformed or cancer cell lines. This suggests that use of this oral available, non-toxic class of drug can protect non-cancerous healthy cells during radiotherapy, resulting in better outcomes and less toxicity for patients.

  11. Porcine circovirus-2 capsid protein induces cell death in PK15 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walia, Rupali; Dardari, Rkia, E-mail: rdardari@ucalgary.ca; Chaiyakul, Mark; Czub, Markus

    2014-11-15

    Studies have shown that Porcine circovirus (PCV)-2 induces apoptosis in PK15 cells. Here we report that cell death is induced in PCV2b-infected PK15 cells that express Capsid (Cap) protein and this effect is enhanced in interferon gamma (IFN-γ)-treated cells. We further show that transient PCV2a and 2b-Cap protein expression induces cell death in PK15 cells at rate similar to PCV2 infection, regardless of Cap protein localization. These data suggest that Cap protein may have the capacity to trigger different signaling pathways involved in cell death. Although further investigation is needed to gain deeper insights into the nature of the pathways involved in Cap-induced cell death, this study provides evidence that PCV2-induced cell death in kidney epithelial PK15 cells can be mapped to the Cap protein and establishes the need for future research regarding the role of Cap-induced cell death in PCV2 pathogenesis. - Highlights: • IFN-γ enhances PCV2 replication that leads to cell death in PK15 cells. • IFN-γ enhances nuclear localization of the PCV2 Capsid protein. • Transient PCV2a and 2b-Capsid protein expression induces cell death. • Cell death is not dictated by specific Capsid protein sub-localization.

  12. Celastrol Protects against Antimycin A-Induced Insulin Resistance in Human Skeletal Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Hafizi Abu Bakar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation are widely accepted as key hallmarks of obesity-induced skeletal muscle insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the functional roles of an anti-inflammatory compound, celastrol, in mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance induced by antimycin A (AMA in human skeletal muscle cells. We found that celastrol treatment improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake activity of AMA-treated cells, apparently via PI3K/Akt pathways, with significant enhancement of mitochondrial activities. Furthermore, celastrol prevented increased levels of cellular oxidative damage where the production of several pro-inflammatory cytokines in cultures cells was greatly reduced. Celastrol significantly increased protein phosphorylation of insulin signaling cascades with amplified expression of AMPK protein and attenuated NF-κB and PKC θ activation in human skeletal muscle treated with AMA. The improvement of insulin signaling pathways by celastrol was also accompanied by augmented GLUT4 protein expression. Taken together, these results suggest that celastrol may be advocated for use as a potential therapeutic molecule to protect against mitochondrial dysfunction-induced insulin resistance in human skeletal muscle cells.

  13. Blimp-1 controls plasma cell function through regulation of immunoglobulin secretion and the unfolded protein response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellier, Julie; Shi, Wei; Minnich, Martina; Liao, Yang; Crawford, Simon; Smyth, Gordon K; Kallies, Axel; Busslinger, Meinrad; Nutt, Stephen L

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell differentiation requires silencing of B cell transcription, while establishing antibody-secretory function and long-term survival. The transcription factors Blimp-1 and IRF4 are essential for plasma cell generation, however their function in mature plasma cells has remained elusive. We have found that while IRF4 was essential for plasma cell survival, Blimp-1 was dispensable. Blimp-1-deficient plasma cells retained their transcriptional identity, but lost the ability to secrete antibody. Blimp-1 regulated many components of the unfolded protein response (UPR), including XBP-1 and ATF6. The overlap of Blimp-1 and XBP-1 function was restricted to the UPR, with Blimp-1 uniquely regulating mTOR activity and plasma cell size. Thus, Blimp-1 is required for the unique physiological capacity of plasma cells that enables the secretion of protective antibody. PMID:26779600

  14. Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus I Tax Protein Sensitizes p53-Mutant Cells to DNA Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaylova, Valia T.; Green, Allison M.; Khurgel, Moshe; Semmes, Oliver J.; Kupfer, Gary M.

    2018-01-01

    Mutations in p53 are a common cause of resistance of cancers to standard chemotherapy and, thus, treatment failure. Reports have shown that Tax, a human T-cell leukemia virus type I encoded protein that has been associated with genomic instability and perturbation of transcription and cell cycle, sensitizes HeLa cells to UV treatment. The extent to which Tax can sensitize cells and the mechanism by which it exerts its effect are unknown. In this study, we show that Tax sensitizes p53-mutant cells to a broad range of DNA-damaging agents, including mitomycin C, a bifunctional alkylator, etoposide, a topoisomerase II drug, and UV light, but not ionizing radiation, a double-strand break agent, or vinblastine, a tubulin poison. Tax caused hypersensitivity in all p53-deleted cell lines and several, but not all, mutant-expressed p53–containing cell lines, while unexpectedly being protective in p53 wild-type (wt) cells. The effect observed in p53-deleted lines could be reversed for this by transfection of wt p53. We also show that Tax activates a p53-independent proapoptotic program through decreased expression of the retinoblastoma protein and subsequent increased E2F1 expression. The expression of several proapoptotic proteins was also induced by Tax, including Puma and Noxa, culminating in a substantial increase in Bax dimerization. Our results show that Tax can sensitize p53-mutant cells to DNA damage while protecting p53 wt cells, a side benefit that might result in reduced toxicity in normal cells. Such studies hold the promise of a novel adjunctive therapy that could make cancer chemotherapy more effective. PMID:18559532

  15. Dying cells protect survivors from radiation-induced cell death in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Bilak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a phenomenon wherein induction of cell death by a variety of means in wing imaginal discs of Drosophila larvae resulted in the activation of an anti-apoptotic microRNA, bantam. Cells in the vicinity of dying cells also become harder to kill by ionizing radiation (IR-induced apoptosis. Both ban activation and increased protection from IR required receptor tyrosine kinase Tie, which we identified in a genetic screen for modifiers of ban. tie mutants were hypersensitive to radiation, and radiation sensitivity of tie mutants was rescued by increased ban gene dosage. We propose that dying cells activate ban in surviving cells through Tie to make the latter cells harder to kill, thereby preserving tissues and ensuring organism survival. The protective effect we report differs from classical radiation bystander effect in which neighbors of irradiated cells become more prone to death. The protective effect also differs from the previously described effect of dying cells that results in proliferation of nearby cells in Drosophila larval discs. If conserved in mammals, a phenomenon in which dying cells make the rest harder to kill by IR could have implications for treatments that involve the sequential use of cytotoxic agents and radiation therapy.

  16. Protective effects of andrographolide analogue AL-1 on ROS-induced RIN-mβ cell death by inducing ROS generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Rong Yan

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is considered to be a major factor contributing to pathogenesis and progression of many diseases. A novel andrographolide-lipoic acid conjugate (AL-1 could protect pancreatic β-cells from reactive oxygen species (ROS-induced oxidative injury. However, its protective mechanism is still unclear. In this work, we used proteomics to identify AL-1-regulated proteins in β-cells and found that 13 of the 71 proteins regulated by AL-1 were closely associated with antioxidation. These differential proteins were mainly involved in the ERK1/2 and AKT1 signaling pathways. Functional investigation demonstrated that AL-1 exerted its protective effects on H2O2-induced cell death of β-cells by generating NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS to activate ERK1/2 and AKT1 signaling pathways. As a consequence, the expressions of antioxidant proteins including Trx1, Prx1 and Prx5, and anti-apoptotic proteins including PDCD6IP, prohibitin, galectin-1 and HSP were upregulated. AL-1 probably worked as a "vaccinum" to activate the cellular antioxidant system by inducing the generation of low concentration ROS which then reciprocally protected β-cells from oxidative damage caused by high-level ROS from H2O2. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive proteomic analysis illustrating a novel molecular mechanism for the protective effects of antioxidants on β-cells from H2O2-induced cell death.

  17. Protective Effects of Resveratrol against UVA-Induced Damage in ARPE19 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Ming Chan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet radiation, especially UVA, can penetrate the lens, reach the retina, and induce oxidative stress to retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells. Even though it is weakly absorbed by protein and DNA, it may trigger the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and generate oxidative injury; oxidative injury to the retinal pigment epithelium has been implicated to play a contributory role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Studies showed that resveratrol, an abundant and active component of red grapes, can protect several cell types from oxidative stress. In this study, adult RPE cells being treated with different concentrations of resveratrol were used to evaluate the protective effect of resveratrol on RPE cells against UVA-induced damage. Cell viability assay showed that resveratrol reduced the UVA-induced decrease in RPE cell viability. Through flow cytometry analysis, we found that the generation of intracellular H2O2 induced by UVA irradiation in RPE cells could be suppressed by resveratrol in a concentration-dependent manner. Results of Western blot analysis demonstrated that resveratrol lowered the activation of UVA-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-jun-NH2 terminal kinase and p38 kinase in RPE cells. In addition, there was also a reduction in UVA-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 expression in RPE cells pretreated with resveratrol. Our observations suggest that resveratrol is effective in preventing RPE cells from being damaged by UVA radiation, and is worth considering for further development as a chemoprotective agent for the prevention of early AMD.

  18. Protective Effects of Resveratrol against UVA-Induced Damage in ARPE19 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chi-Ming; Huang, Cheng-Hua; Li, Hsin-Ju; Hsiao, Chien-Yu; Su, Ching-Chieh; Lee, Pei-Lan; Hung, Chi-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation, especially UVA, can penetrate the lens, reach the retina, and induce oxidative stress to retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Even though it is weakly absorbed by protein and DNA, it may trigger the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and generate oxidative injury; oxidative injury to the retinal pigment epithelium has been implicated to play a contributory role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Studies showed that resveratrol, an abundant and active component of red grapes, can protect several cell types from oxidative stress. In this study, adult RPE cells being treated with different concentrations of resveratrol were used to evaluate the protective effect of resveratrol on RPE cells against UVA-induced damage. Cell viability assay showed that resveratrol reduced the UVA-induced decrease in RPE cell viability. Through flow cytometry analysis, we found that the generation of intracellular H2O2 induced by UVA irradiation in RPE cells could be suppressed by resveratrol in a concentration-dependent manner. Results of Western blot analysis demonstrated that resveratrol lowered the activation of UVA-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-jun-NH2 terminal kinase and p38 kinase in RPE cells. In addition, there was also a reduction in UVA-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in RPE cells pretreated with resveratrol. Our observations suggest that resveratrol is effective in preventing RPE cells from being damaged by UVA radiation, and is worth considering for further development as a chemoprotective agent for the prevention of early AMD. PMID:25775159

  19. Simultaneous Multiplexed Measurement of RNA and Proteins in Single Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmanis, Spyros; Gallant, Caroline Julie; Marinescu, Voichita Dana; Niklasson, Mia; Segerman, Anna; Flamourakis, Georgios; Fredriksson, Simon; Assarsson, Erika; Lundberg, Martin; Nelander, Sven; Westermark, Bengt; Landegren, Ulf

    2016-01-12

    Significant advances have been made in methods to analyze genomes and transcriptomes of single cells, but to fully define cell states, proteins must also be accessed as central actors defining a cell's phenotype. Methods currently used to analyze endogenous protein expression in single cells are limited in specificity, throughput, or multiplex capability. Here, we present an approach to simultaneously and specifically interrogate large sets of protein and RNA targets in lysates from individual cells, enabling investigations of cell functions and responses. We applied our method to investigate the effects of BMP4, an experimental therapeutic agent, on early-passage glioblastoma cell cultures. We uncovered significant heterogeneity in responses to treatment at levels of RNA and protein, with a subset of cells reacting in a distinct manner to BMP4. Moreover, we found overall poor correlation between protein and RNA at the level of single cells, with proteins more accurately defining responses to treatment. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Global Conservation of Protein Status between Cell Lines and Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Biau

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Common preclinical models for testing anticancer treatment include cultured human tumor cell lines in monolayer, and xenografts derived from these cell lines in immunodeficient mice. Our goal was to determine how similar the xenografts are compared with their original cell line and to determine whether it is possible to predict the stability of a xenograft model beforehand. We studied a selection of 89 protein markers of interest in 14 human cell cultures and respective subcutaneous xenografts using the reverse-phase protein array technology. We specifically focused on proteins and posttranslational modifications involved in DNA repair, PI3K pathway, apoptosis, tyrosine kinase signaling, stress, cell cycle, MAPK/ERK signaling, SAPK/JNK signaling, NFκB signaling, and adhesion/cytoskeleton. Using hierarchical clustering, most cell culture-xenograft pairs cluster together, suggesting a global conservation of protein signature. Particularly, Akt, NFkB, EGFR, and Vimentin showed very stable protein expression and phosphorylation levels highlighting that 4 of 10 pathways were highly correlated whatever the model. Other proteins were heterogeneously conserved depending on the cell line. Finally, cell line models with low Akt pathway activation and low levels of Vimentin gave rise to more reliable xenograft models. These results may be useful for the extrapolation of cell culture experiments to in vivo models in novel targeted drug discovery.

  1. Protein kinase C signaling and cell cycle regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Black, Adrian R.; Black, Jennifer D.

    2013-01-01

    A link between T cell proliferation and the protein kinase C (PKC) family of serine/threonine kinases has been recognized for about thirty years. However, despite the wealth of information on PKC-mediated control of T cell activation, understanding of the effects of PKCs on the cell cycle machinery in this cell type remains limited. Studies in other systems have revealed important cell cycle-specific effects of PKC signaling that can either positively or negatively impact proliferation. Th...

  2. Adipophilin protein expression in muscle - a possible protective role against insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde, de J.; Smit, E.; Snepvangers, F.J.M.; Wit, de N.J.W.; Mohren, R.; Hulshof, M.F.M.; Mariman, E.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Adipophilin is a 50 kDa protein that belongs to the PAT family (perilipin, adipophilin, TIP47, S3-12 and OXPAT), which comprises proteins involved in the coating of lipid droplets. Little is known about the functional role of adipophilin in muscle. Using the C2C12 cell line as a model, we

  3. The protective layer of biofilm : A repellent function for a new class of amphiphilic proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovacs, Akos T.; van Gestel, Jordi; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    Bacteria can survive harsh conditions when growing in complex communities of cells known as biofilms. The matrix of the biofilm presents a scaffold where cells are attached to each other and to the surface. The biofilm matrix is also a protective barrier that confers tolerance against various

  4. Protein Expression Analyses at the Single Cell Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masae Ohno

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The central dogma of molecular biology explains how genetic information is converted into its end product, proteins, which are responsible for the phenotypic state of the cell. Along with the protein type, the phenotypic state depends on the protein copy number. Therefore, quantification of the protein expression in a single cell is critical for quantitative characterization of the phenotypic states. Protein expression is typically a dynamic and stochastic phenomenon that cannot be well described by standard experimental methods. As an alternative, fluorescence imaging is being explored for the study of protein expression, because of its high sensitivity and high throughput. Here we review key recent progresses in fluorescence imaging-based methods and discuss their application to proteome analysis at the single cell level.

  5. STAT3-Activated GM-CSFRα Translocates to the Nucleus and Protects CLL Cells from Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Harris, David; Liu, Zhiming; Rozovski, Uri; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Wang, Yongtao; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Grgurevic, Srdana; Wierda, William; Burger, Jan; O'Brien, Susan; Faderl, Stefan; Keating, Michael; Estrov, Zeev

    2014-01-01

    Here it was determined that Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) cells express the α-subunit but not the β-subunit of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (GM-CSFR/CSF3R). GM-CSFRα was detected on the surface, in the cytosol, and the nucleus of CLL cells via confocal microscopy, cell fractionation, and GM-CSFRα antibody epitope mapping. Because STAT3 is frequently activated in CLL and the GM-CSFRα promoter harbors putative STAT3 consensus binding sites, MM1 cells were transfected with truncated forms of the GM-CSFRα promoter, then stimulated with IL-6 to activate STAT3 to identify STAT3 binding sites. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and an electoromobility shift assay (EMSA) confirmed STAT3 occupancy to those promoter regions in both IL-6 stimulated MM1 and CLL cells. Transfection of MM1 cells with STAT3 siRNA or CLL cells with STAT3 shRNA significantly down-regulated GM-CSFRα mRNA and protein levels. RNA transcripts, involved in regulating cell-survival pathways, and the proteins KAP1 (TRIM28) and ISG15 co-immunoprecipitated with GM-CSFRα. GM-CSFRα-bound KAP1 enhanced the transcriptional activity of STAT3, whereas ISG15 inhibited the NF-κB pathway. Nevertheless, overexpression of GM-CSFRα protected MM1 cells from dexamethasone-induced apoptosis, and GM-CSFRα knockdown induced apoptosis in CLL cells, suggesting that GM-CSFRα provides a ligand-independent survival advantage. PMID:24836891

  6. Heat shock protein 70 inhibits shrinkage-induced programmed cell death via mechanisms independent of effects on cell volume-regulatory membrane transport proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nylandsted, J; Jäättelä, M; Hoffmann, E K

    2004-01-01

    Cell shrinkage is a ubiquitous feature of programmed cell death (PCD), but whether it is an obligatory signalling event in PCD is unclear. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) potently counteracts PCD in many cells, by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. In the present investigation, we found...... that severe hypertonic stress greatly diminished the viability of murine fibrosarcoma cells (WEHI-902) and immortalized murine embryonic fibroblasts (iMEFs). This effect was attenuated markedly by Hsp70 over-expression. To determine whether the protective effect of Hsp70 was mediated via an effect on volume...... regulatory ion transport, we compared regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and increase (RVI) in control WEHI-902 cells and after increasing Hsp70 levels by heat shock or over-expression (WEHI-912). Hsp70 levels affected neither RVD, RVI nor the relative contributions of the Na(+)/H(+)-exchanger (NHE1) and Na...

  7. Purification and characterization of a soybean cell wall protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San Francisco, S.; Tierney, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    Plant cell wall composition is thought to reflect cellular responses to developmental and environmental signals. We have purified a 33 kDa protein from cell wall extracts of soybean seedlings which is most abundant in extracts from the hook region of the hypocotyl and is rich in proline and hydroxypyroline. In vivo 3 H-proline labelling of hypocotyl tissues indicates that the hook tissue is the predominant site for synthesis of this protein. In unwounded hook, label is incorporated into a 33 kDa protein, while in wounded hook this and additional proteins rich in proline are synthesized. Similarly treated cell wall extracts analyzed by Western blot analysis, using a polyclonal antibody raised against this 33kD protein, showed that the 33 kDa protein is most abundant in cell wall extracts from the hook region of unwounded seedlings and does not increase upon wounding. An immunologically related 35kD protein is also apparent in extracts from wounded hooks and appears to co-migrate with one of the labelled proteins extractable from this tissue. These data indicate that there are two related, proline-rich cell wall proteins in the hook region of soybean seedlings, one of which (33 kDa) is prominent during seedling development and another (35 kDa) which is wound inducible

  8. Hypoglycemic and beta cell protective effects of andrographolide analogue for diabetes treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larrick James W

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While all anti-diabetic agents can decrease blood glucose level directly or indirectly, few are able to protect and preserve both pancreatic beta cell mass and their insulin-secreting functions. Thus, there is an urgent need to find an agent or combination of agents that can lower blood glucose and preserve pancreatic beta cells at the same time. Herein, we report a dual-functional andrographolide-lipoic acid conjugate (AL-1. The anti-diabetic and beta cell protective activities of this novel andrographolide-lipoic acid conjugate were investigated. Methods In alloxan-treated mice (a model of type 1 diabetes, drugs were administered orally once daily for 6 days post-alloxan treatment. Fasting blood glucose and serum insulin were determined. Pathologic and immunohistochemical analysis of pancreatic islets were performed. Translocation of glucose transporter subtype 4 in soleus muscle was detected by western blot. In RIN-m cells in vitro, the effect of AL-1 on H2O2-induced damage and reactive oxidative species production stimulated by high glucose and glibenclamide were measured. Inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB activation induced by IL-1β and IFN-γ was investigated. Results In alloxan-induced diabetic mouse model, AL-1 lowered blood glucose, increased insulin and prevented loss of beta cells and their dysfunction, stimulated glucose transport protein subtype 4 (GLUT4 membrane translocation in soleus muscles. Pretreatment of RIN-m cells with AL-1 prevented H2O2-induced cellular damage, quenched glucose and glibenclamide-stimulated reactive oxidative species production, and inhibited cytokine-stimulated NF-κB activation. Conclusion We have demonstrated that AL-1 had both hypoglycemic and beta cell protective effects which translated into antioxidant and NF-κB inhibitory activity. AL-1 is a potential new anti-diabetic agent.

  9. Fluorescent tags of protein function in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, M

    2000-02-01

    A cell's biochemistry is now known to be the biochemistry of molecular machines, that is, protein complexes that are assembled and dismantled in particular locations within the cell as needed. One important element in our understanding has been the ability to begin to see where proteins are in cells and what they are doing as they go about their business. Accordingly, there is now a strong impetus to discover new ways of looking at the workings of proteins in living cells. Although the use of fluorescent tags to track individual proteins in cells has a long history, the availability of laser-based confocal microscopes and the imaginative exploitation of the green fluorescent protein from jellyfish have provided new tools of great diversity and utility. It is now possible to watch a protein bind its substrate or its partners in real time and with submicron resolution within a single cell. The importance of processes of self-organisation represented by protein folding on the one hand and subcellular organelles on the other are well recognised. Self-organisation at the intermediate level of multimeric protein complexes is now open to inspection. BioEssays 22:180-187, 2000. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Cell-specific monitoring of protein synthesis in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Kourtis

    Full Text Available Analysis of general and specific protein synthesis provides important information, relevant to cellular physiology and function. However, existing methodologies, involving metabolic labelling by incorporation of radioactive amino acids into nascent polypeptides, cannot be applied to monitor protein synthesis in specific cells or tissues, in live specimens. We have developed a novel approach for monitoring protein synthesis in specific cells or tissues, in vivo. Fluorescent reporter proteins such as GFP are expressed in specific cells and tissues of interest or throughout animals using appropriate promoters. Protein synthesis rates are assessed by following fluorescence recovery after partial photobleaching of the fluorophore at targeted sites. We evaluate the method by examining protein synthesis rates in diverse cell types of live, wild type or mRNA translation-defective Caenorhabditis elegans animals. Because it is non-invasive, our approach allows monitoring of protein synthesis in single cells or tissues with intrinsically different protein synthesis rates. Furthermore, it can be readily implemented in other organisms or cell culture systems.

  11. Cerebrosides from Sea Cucumber Protect Against Oxidative Stress in SAMP8 Mice and PC12 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Hongxia; Du, Lei; Cong, Peixu; Tao, Suyuan; Ding, Ning; Wu, Fengjuan; Xue, Changhu; Xu, Jie; Wang, Yuming

    2017-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder. Emerging evidence implicates β-amyloid (Aβ) plays a critical role in the progression of AD. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of cerebrosides obtained from sea cucumber against senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice in vivo. We also studied the effect of cerebrosides on Aβ-induced cytotoxicity on the rat pheochromocytoma cell (PC12) and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Cerebrosides ameliorated learning and memory deficits and the Aβ accumulation in demented mice, decreased the content of malondialdehyde (MDA), 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-G), and nitric oxide (NO), and enhanced the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity significantly. The neuroprotective effect of sea cucumber cerebrosides (SCC) was also verified in vitro: the cerebrosides increased the survival rate of PC12 cells, recovered the cellular morphology, downregulated the protein levels of Caspase-9, cleaved Caspase-3, total Caspase-3, and Bax, and upregulated the protein level of Bcl-2, revealing that cerebrosides could inhibit Aβ-induced cell apoptosis. The results showed the protective effect of SCC was regulated by the mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway. Our results provide a new approach to developing the marine organisms as functional foods for neuroprotection.

  12. Analytical errors in measuring radioactivity in cell proteins and their effect on estimates of protein turnover in L cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, J.A.; Mehta, J.; Brocher, S.; Amenta, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies on protein turnover in 3 H-labelled L-cell cultures have shown recovery of total 3 H at the end of a three-day experiment to be always significantly in excess of the 3 H recovered at the beginning of the experiment. A number of possible sources for this error in measuring radioactivity in cell proteins has been reviewed. 3 H-labelled proteins, when dissolved in NaOH and counted for radioactivity in a liquid-scintillation spectrometer, showed losses of 30-40% of the radioactivity; neither external or internal standardization compensated for this loss. Hydrolysis of these proteins with either Pronase or concentrated HCl significantly increased the measured radioactivity. In addition, 5-10% of the cell protein is left on the plastic culture dish when cells are recovered in phosphate-buffered saline. Furthermore, this surface-adherent protein, after pulse labelling, contains proteins of high radioactivity that turn over rapidly and make a major contribution to the accumulating radioactivity in the medium. These combined errors can account for up to 60% of the total radioactivity in the cell culture. Similar analytical errors have been found in studies of other cell cultures. The effect of these analytical errors on estimates of protein turnover in cell cultures is discussed. (author)

  13. Cell age dependent variations in oxidative protective enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blakely, E.A.; Chang, P.Y.; Lommel, L.; Tobias, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Activity levels of antioxidant enzymes were correlated before and after heavy-ion exposures with cellular radiosensitivity. In preliminary feasibility experiments with human T-1 cells relatively high antioxidant enzyme levels were shown in the unirradiated G 1 phase prior to the normal DNA synthetic phase. Endogenous cellular levels of three antioxidant enzymes were measured at various times in the unirradiated human T-1 cell division cycle. The enzymes measured were: catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPX). Unlike the case in Chinese hamster V79 cells the early data with the synchronized human cell show that in very early G 1 phase (e.g., approximately 1.5 hours after mitotic selection) there are significant peaks in the levels (U/mg cell protein) of both CAT and SOD. Both enzymes show increases as the unirradiated cells progressed from mitosis into G 1 phase while the levels of GSHPX measured in duplicate samples were somewhat more variable than was the case for the other two enzymes. Studies were made in collaboration with the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute

  14. A natural human monoclonal antibody targeting Staphylococcus Protein A protects against Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Avanish K.; Sunley, Kevin M.; Bowling, Rodney A.; Kwan, Tzu-Yu; Mays, Heather R.; Rambhadran, Anu; Zhang, Yanfeng; Martin, Rebecca L.; Cavalier, Michael C.; Simard, John

    2018-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can cause devastating and life-threatening infections. With the increase in multidrug resistant strains, novel therapies are needed. Limited success with active and passive immunization strategies have been attributed to S. aureus immune evasion. Here, we report on a monoclonal antibody, 514G3, that circumvents a key S. aureus evasion mechanism by targeting the cell wall moiety Protein A (SpA). SpA tightly binds most subclasses of immunoglobulins via their Fc region, neutralizing effector function. The organism can thus shield itself with a protective coat of serum antibodies and render humoral immunity ineffective. The present antibody reactivity was derived from an individual with natural anti-SpA antibody titers. The monoclonal antibody is of an IgG3 subclass, which differs critically from other immunoglobulin subclasses since its Fc is not bound by SpA. Moreover, it targets a unique epitope on SpA that allows it to bind in the presence of serum antibodies. Consequently, the antibody opsonizes S. aureus and maintains effector function to enable natural immune mediated clearance. The data presented here provide evidence that 514G3 antibody is able to successfully rescue mice from S. aureus mediated bacteremia. PMID:29364906

  15. 14-3-3 Proteins in Guard Cell Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotelle, Valérie; Leonhardt, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Guard cells are specialized cells located at the leaf surface delimiting pores which control gas exchanges between the plant and the atmosphere. To optimize the CO2 uptake necessary for photosynthesis while minimizing water loss, guard cells integrate environmental signals to adjust stomatal aperture. The size of the stomatal pore is regulated by movements of the guard cells driven by variations in their volume and turgor. As guard cells perceive and transduce a wide array of environmental cues, they provide an ideal system to elucidate early events of plant signaling. Reversible protein phosphorylation events are known to play a crucial role in the regulation of stomatal movements. However, in some cases, phosphorylation alone is not sufficient to achieve complete protein regulation, but is necessary to mediate the binding of interactors that modulate protein function. Among the phosphopeptide-binding proteins, the 14-3-3 proteins are the best characterized in plants. The 14-3-3s are found as multiple isoforms in eukaryotes and have been shown to be involved in the regulation of stomatal movements. In this review, we describe the current knowledge about 14-3-3 roles in the regulation of their binding partners in guard cells: receptors, ion pumps, channels, protein kinases, and some of their substrates. Regulation of these targets by 14-3-3 proteins is discussed and related to their function in guard cells during stomatal movements in response to abiotic or biotic stresses.

  16. Cytoprotective dibenzoylmethane derivatives protect cells from oxidative stress-induced necrotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedűs, Csaba; Lakatos, Petra; Kiss-Szikszai, Attila; Patonay, Tamás; Gergely, Szabolcs; Gregus, Andrea; Bai, Péter; Haskó, György; Szabó, Éva; Virág, László

    2013-06-01

    Screening of a small in-house library of 1863 compounds identified 29 compounds that protected Jurkat cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity. From the cytoprotective compounds eleven proved to possess antioxidant activity (ABTS radical scavenger effect) and two were found to inhibit poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation), a cytotoxic pathway operating in severely injured cells. Four cytoprotective dibenzoylmethane (DBM) derivatives were investigated in more detail as they did not scavenge hydrogen peroxide nor did they inhibit PARylation. These compounds protected cells from necrotic cell death while caspase activation, a parameter of apoptotic cell death was not affected. Hydrogen peroxide activated extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and p38 MAP kinases but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). The cytoprotective DBMs suppressed the activation of Erk1/2 but not that of p38. Cytoprotection was confirmed in another cell type (A549 lung epithelial cells), indicating that the cytoprotective effect is not cell type specific. In conclusion we identified DBM analogs as a novel class of cytoprotective compounds inhibiting ERK1/2 kinase and protecting from necrotic cell death by a mechanism independent of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Protein thiophosphorylation associated with secretory inhibition in permeabilized chromaffin cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.C.; Brooks, M.

    1985-01-01

    Permeabilized cells treated with the adenosine triphosphate analog, ( 35 S)adenosine-5'-0-3(3-thiotriphosphate) ((γ- 35 S)ATP), showed thiophosphorylation of a small number of cellular proteins. A 54 kilodalton (kDa) protein was heavily thiophosphorylated in unstimulated control cells and a 43 kilodalton protein was more heavily thiophosphorylated in calcium stimulated cells. Intact cells incorporated 35 S into a series of higher molecular weight proteins. Stimulation of prelabelled, permeabilized cells resulted in a loss of 35 S from the cells over a 20 min period. Treatment of permeabilized cells with ATPγS inhibited secretion and 35 S incorporation into the cells. Pretreatment with ATPγS resulted in subsequent inhibition of both secretion and the ability of the cells to incorporate 35 S from (γ- 35 S)ATP. These results indicate that the sites normally available for phosphorylation were inactivated by thiophosphorylation and were unavailable to participate in the secretory process. The inhibition of secretion associated with thiophosphorylation of these proteins suggests that they may play a role in the control of secretion by chromaffin cells. 15 references, 1 figure, 3 tables

  18. Selenium hyperaccumulation offers protection from cell disruptor herbivores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinn Colin F

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperaccumulation, the rare capacity of certain plant species to accumulate toxic trace elements to levels several orders of magnitude higher than other species growing on the same site, is thought to be an elemental defense mechanism against herbivores and pathogens. Previous research has shown that selenium (Se hyperaccumulation protects plants from a variety of herbivores and pathogens. Selenium hyperaccumulating plants sequester Se in discrete locations in the leaf periphery, making them potentially more susceptible to some herbivore feeding modes than others. In this study we investigate the protective function of Se in the Se hyperaccumulators Stanleya pinnata and Astragalus bisulcatus against two cell disrupting herbivores, the western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis and the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae. Results Astragalus bisulcatus and S. pinnata with high Se concentrations (greater than 650 mg Se kg-1 were less subject to thrips herbivory than plants with low Se levels (less than 150 mg Se kg-1. Furthermore, in plants containing elevated Se levels, leaves with higher concentrations of Se suffered less herbivory than leaves with less Se. Spider mites also preferred to feed on low-Se A. bisulcatus and S. pinnata plants rather than high-Se plants. Spider mite populations on A. bisulcatus decreased after plants were given a higher concentration of Se. Interestingly, spider mites could colonize A. bisulcatus plants containing up to 200 mg Se kg-1 dry weight, concentrations which are toxic to many other herbivores. Selenium distribution and speciation studies using micro-focused X-ray fluorescence (μXRF mapping and Se K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that the spider mites accumulated primarily methylselenocysteine, the relatively non-toxic form of Se that is also the predominant form of Se in hyperaccumulators. Conclusions This is the first reported study investigating the

  19. Hepatocyte growth factor protects human endothelial cells against advanced glycation end products-induced apoposis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yijun; Wang Jiahe; Zhang Jin

    2006-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) form by a non-enzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and biological proteins, which play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, we assessed AGEs effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) growth, proliferation and apoptosis. Additionally, we investigated whether hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), an anti-apoptotic factor for endothelial cells, prevents AGEs-induced apoptosis of HUVECs. HUVECs were treated with AGEs in the presence or absence of HGF. Treatment of HUVECs with AGEs changed cell morphology, decreased cell viability, and induced DNA fragmentation, leading to apoptosis. Apoptosis was induced by AGEs in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. AGEs markedly elevated Bax and decreased NF-κB, but not Bcl-2 expression. Additionally, AGEs significantly inhibited cell growth through a pro-apoptotic action involving caspase-3 and -9 activations in HUVECs. Most importantly, pretreatment with HGF protected against AGEs-induced cytotoxicity in the endothelial cells. HGF significantly promoted the expression of Bcl-2 and NF-κB, while decreasing the activities of caspase-3 and -9 without affecting Bax level. Our data suggest that AGEs induce apoptosis in endothelial cells. HGF effectively attenuate AGEs-induced endothelial cell apoptosis. These findings provide new perspectives in the role of HGF in cardiovascular disease

  20. An SCFFBXO28 E3 Ligase Protects Pancreatic β-Cells from Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanaka Durga Devi Gorrepati

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Loss of pancreatic β-cell function and/or mass is a central hallmark of all forms of diabetes but its molecular basis is incompletely understood. β-cell apoptosis contributes to the reduced β-cell mass in diabetes. Therefore, the identification of important signaling molecules that promote β-cell survival in diabetes could lead to a promising therapeutic intervention to block β-cell decline during development and progression of diabetes. In the present study, we identified F-box protein 28 (FBXO28, a substrate-recruiting component of the Skp1-Cul1-F-box (SCF ligase complex, as a regulator of pancreatic β-cell survival. FBXO28 was down-regulated in β-cells and in isolated human islets under diabetic conditions. Consistently, genetic silencing of FBXO28 impaired β-cell survival, and restoration of FBXO28 protected β-cells from the harmful effects of the diabetic milieu. Although FBXO28 expression positively correlated with β-cell transcription factor NEUROD1 and FBXO28 depletion also reduced insulin mRNA expression, neither FBXO28 overexpression nor depletion had any significant impact on insulin content, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS or on other genes involved in glucose sensing and metabolism or on important β-cell transcription factors in isolated human islets. Consistently, FBXO28 overexpression did not further alter insulin content and GSIS in freshly isolated islets from patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D. Our data show that FBXO28 improves pancreatic β-cell survival under diabetogenic conditions without affecting insulin secretion, and its restoration may be a novel therapeutic tool to promote β-cell survival in diabetes.

  1. Preparation of ubiquitin-conjugated proteins using an insect cell-free protein synthesis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takashi; Ezure, Toru; Ando, Eiji; Nishimura, Osamu; Utsumi, Toshihiko; Tsunasawa, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitination is one of the most significant posttranslational modifications (PTMs). To evaluate the ability of an insect cell-free protein synthesis system to carry out ubiquitin (Ub) conjugation to in vitro translated proteins, poly-Ub chain formation was studied in an insect cell-free protein synthesis system. Poly-Ub was generated in the presence of Ub aldehyde (UA), a de-ubiquitinating enzyme inhibitor. In vitro ubiquitination of the p53 tumor suppressor protein was also analyzed, and p53 was poly-ubiquitinated when Ub, UA, and Mdm2, an E3 Ub ligase (E3) for p53, were added to the in vitro reaction mixture. These results suggest that the insect cell-free protein synthesis system contains enzymatic activities capable of carrying out ubiquitination. CBB-detectable ubiquitinated p53 was easily purified from the insect cell-free protein synthesis system, allowing analysis of the Ub-conjugated proteins by mass spectrometry (MS). Lys 305 of p53 was identified as one of the Ub acceptor sites using this strategy. Thus, we conclude that the insect cell-free protein synthesis system is a powerful tool for studying various PTMs of eukaryotic proteins including ubiqutination presented here.

  2. Vaccination with recombinant heat shock protein 60 from Histoplasma capsulatum protects mice against pulmonary histoplasmosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez, F J; Allendoerfer, R; Deepe, G S

    1995-01-01

    HIS-62 is a glycoprotein that has been isolated from the cell wall and cell membrane fraction of the pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. It is a target of the cellular immune response to this fungus, and it protects mice against a lethal intravenous inoculum of H. capsulatum yeast cells. In this study, we cloned the gene encoding this antigen to reveal its biological nature and studied the immunological activity of recombinant antigen. The amino acid sequences of the NH2 terminus and in...

  3. Isolation of two biologically active cell surface proteins from Brucella abortus by chromatofocusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabatabai, L.B.; Deyoe, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    Brucella abortus contains a group of immunogenic cell surface proteins which have potential value as a vaccine or as a diagnostic reagent for the prevention and diagnosis of bovine brucellosis. Under nondenaturing conditions, these proteins range in molecular weight from 10,000-124,000, as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on TSK 3000sw. By analytical isoelectrofocusing, 6 major protein bands could be distinguished with pI's ranging from 4.0 to 6.0 and 3 additional major proteins with pI's of 7.5, 9.5, and 10. By chromatofocusing on Polybuffer Exchanger 94 with a pH gradient from 6-4, two of the six proteins from pI 4-6 were separated, a pI 4.9 and a pI 4.7 protein; a third fraction contained the high pI proteins. The former two proteins were homogeneous by analytical isoelectrofocusing, and a molecular weight of 54,000 daltons was found for both protein species by HPLC on TSK 3000sw. The pI 4-6 and not the pI 9.5 and 10 proteins, could be radiolabeled when intact cells were radioiodinated with diazotized ( 125 I)-iodosulfanilic acid. Biological activity of the proteins as assessed in lemmings indicated that immunization with the pI 4.7 and 4.9 proteins afforded better protection against experimental brucellosis than immunization with the high pI proteins. These results support our view that a single surface protein may be sufficient for the prevention of experimental brucellosis

  4. Isolation of two biologically active cell surface proteins from Brucella abortus by chromatofocusing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabatabai, L.B.; Deyoe, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    Brucella abortus contains a group of immunogenic cell surface proteins which have potential value as a vaccine or as a diagnostic reagent for the prevention and diagnosis of bovine brucellosis. Under nondenaturing conditions, these proteins range in molecular weight from 10,000-124,000, as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on TSK 3000sw. By analytical isoelectrofocusing, 6 major protein bands could be distinguished with pI's ranging from 4.0 to 6.0 and 3 additional major proteins with pI's of 7.5, 9.5, and 10. By chromatofocusing on Polybuffer Exchanger 94 with a pH gradient from 6-4, two of the six proteins from pI 4-6 were separated, a pI 4.9 and a pI 4.7 protein; a third fraction contained the high pI proteins. The former two proteins were homogeneous by analytical isoelectrofocusing, and a molecular weight of 54,000 daltons was found for both protein species by HPLC on TSK 3000sw. The pI 4-6 and not the pI 9.5 and 10 proteins, could be radiolabeled when intact cells were radioiodinated with diazotized (/sup 125/I)-iodosulfanilic acid. Biological activity of the proteins as assessed in lemmings indicated that immunization with the pI 4.7 and 4.9 proteins afforded better protection against experimental brucellosis than immunization with the high pI proteins. These results support our view that a single surface protein may be sufficient for the prevention of experimental brucellosis.

  5. Structural and functional analysis of lysosomal ss-galactosidase and its relation to the protective protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Morreau (Hans)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractLysosomal B-galactosidase is the glycosidase, that cleaves B-linked galactosyl mmenes from a variety of natural and synthetic substrates. In normal tissues of various species this enzyme appears to associate with two other hydrolases, N-acetyl-o:-neuraminidase and the protective protein.

  6. Dexamethasone protection from TNF-alpha-induced cell death in MCF-7 cells requires NF-kappaB and is independent from AKT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mejía Salvador

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biochemical bases for hormone dependence in breast cancer have been recognized as an important element in tumor resistance, proliferation and metastasis. On this respect, dexamethasone (Dex dependent protection against TNF-alpha-mediated cell death in the MCF-7 cell line has been demonstrated to be a useful model for the study of this type of cancer. Recently, cytoplasmic signaling induced by steroid receptors has been described, such as the activation of the PI3K/Akt and NF-kappaB pathways. We evaluated their possible participation in the Dex-dependent protection against TNF-alpha-mediated cell death. Results Cellular cultures of the MCF-7 cell line were exposed to either, TNF-alpha or TNF-alpha and Dex, and cell viability was evaluated. Next, negative dominants of PI3K and IkappaB-alpha, designed to block the PI3K/Akt and NF-kappaB pathways, respectively, were transfected and selection and evaluation of several clones overexpressing the mutants were examined. Also, correlation with inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs expression was examined. Independent inhibition of these two pathways allowed us to test their participation in Dex-dependent protection against TNF-alpha-cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells. Expression of the PI3K dominant negative mutant did not alter the protection conferred by Dex against TNF-alpha mediated cell death. Contrariwise, clones expressing the IkappaB-alpha dominant negative mutant lost the Dex-conferred protection against TNF-alpha. In these clones degradation of c-IAP was accelerated, while that of XIAP was remained unaffected. Conclusion NF-kappaB, but not PI3K/Akt activation, is required for the Dex protective effect against TNF-alpha-mediated cell death, and correlates with lack of degradation of the anti-apoptotic protein c-IAP1.

  7. Dexamethasone protection from TNF-alpha-induced cell death in MCF-7 cells requires NF-kappaB and is independent from AKT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machuca, Catalina; Mendoza-Milla, Criselda; Córdova, Emilio; Mejía, Salvador; Covarrubias, Luis; Ventura, José; Zentella, Alejandro

    2006-02-21

    The biochemical bases for hormone dependence in breast cancer have been recognized as an important element in tumor resistance, proliferation and metastasis. On this respect, dexamethasone (Dex) dependent protection against TNF-alpha-mediated cell death in the MCF-7 cell line has been demonstrated to be a useful model for the study of this type of cancer. Recently, cytoplasmic signaling induced by steroid receptors has been described, such as the activation of the PI3K/Akt and NF-kappaB pathways. We evaluated their possible participation in the Dex-dependent protection against TNF-alpha-mediated cell death. Cellular cultures of the MCF-7 cell line were exposed to either, TNF-alpha or TNF-alpha and Dex, and cell viability was evaluated. Next, negative dominants of PI3K and IkappaB-alpha, designed to block the PI3K/Akt and NF-kappaB pathways, respectively, were transfected and selection and evaluation of several clones overexpressing the mutants were examined. Also, correlation with inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) expression was examined. Independent inhibition of these two pathways allowed us to test their participation in Dex-dependent protection against TNF-alpha-cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells. Expression of the PI3K dominant negative mutant did not alter the protection conferred by Dex against TNF-alpha mediated cell death. Contrariwise, clones expressing the IkappaB-alpha dominant negative mutant lost the Dex-conferred protection against TNF-alpha. In these clones degradation of c-IAP was accelerated, while that of XIAP was remained unaffected. NF-kappaB, but not PI3K/Akt activation, is required for the Dex protective effect against TNF-alpha-mediated cell death, and correlates with lack of degradation of the anti-apoptotic protein c-IAP1.

  8. Shigella outer membrane protein PSSP-1 is broadly protective against Shigella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Ouk; Rho, Semi; Kim, Su Hee; Kim, Heejoo; Song, Hyo Jin; Kim, Eun Jin; Kim, Ryang Yeo; Kim, Eun Hye; Sinha, Anuradha; Dey, Ayan; Yang, Jae Seung; Song, Man Ki; Nandy, Ranjan Kumar; Czerkinsky, Cecil; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-04-01

    In developing countries, Shigella is a primary cause of diarrhea in infants and young children. Although antibiotic therapy is an effective treatment for shigellosis, therapeutic options are narrowing due to the emergence of antibiotic resistance. Thus, preventive vaccination could become the most efficacious approach for controlling shigellosis. We have identified several conserved protein antigens that are shared by multiple Shigella serotypes and species. Among these, one antigen induced cross-protection against experimental shigellosis, and we have named it pan-Shigella surface protein 1 (PSSP-1). PSSP-1-induced protection requires a mucosal administration route and coadministration of an adjuvant. When PSSP-1 was administered intranasally, it induced cross-protection against Shigella flexneri serotypes 2a, 5a, and 6, Shigella boydii, Shigella sonnei, and Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1. Intradermally administered PSSP-1 induced strong serum antibody responses but failed to induce protection in the mouse lung pneumonia model. In contrast, intranasal administration elicited efficient local and systemic antibody responses and production of interleukin 17A and gamma interferon. Interestingly, blood samples from patients with recent-onset shigellosis showed variable but significant mucosal antibody responses to other conserved Shigella protein antigens but not to PSSP-1. We suggest that PSSP-1 is a promising antigen for a broadly protective vaccine against Shigella. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. The Fanconi anemia proteins FAA and FAC function in different cellular compartments to protect against cross-linking agent cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruyt, F A; Youssoufian, H

    1998-10-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by chromosomal instability, bone marrow failure, and a high risk of developing malignancies. Although the disorder is genetically heterogeneous, all FA cells are defined by their sensitivity to the apoptosis-inducing effect of cross-linking agents, such as mitomycin C (MMC). The cloned FA disease genes, FAC and FAA, encode proteins with no homology to each other or to any known protein. We generated a highly specific antibody against FAA and found the protein in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of mammalian cells. By subcellular fractionation, FAA is also associated with intracellular membranes. To identify the subcellular compartment that is relevant for FAA activity, we appended nuclear export and nuclear localization signals to the carboxy terminus of FAA and enriched its localization in either the cytoplasm or the nucleus. Nuclear localization of FAA was both necessary and sufficient to correct MMC sensitivity in FA-A cells. In addition, we found no evidence for an interaction between FAA and FAC either in vivo or in vitro. Together with a previous finding that FAC is active in the cytoplasm but not in the nucleus, our results indicate that FAA and FAC function in separate subcellular compartments. Thus, FAA and FAC, if functionally linked, are more likely to be in a linear pathway rather than form a macromolecular complex to protect against cross-linker cytotoxicity.

  10. Systematic analysis of protein turnover in primary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieson, Toby; Franken, Holger; Kosinski, Jan; Kurzawa, Nils; Zinn, Nico; Sweetman, Gavain; Poeckel, Daniel; Ratnu, Vikram S; Schramm, Maike; Becher, Isabelle; Steidel, Michael; Noh, Kyung-Min; Bergamini, Giovanna; Beck, Martin; Bantscheff, Marcus; Savitski, Mikhail M

    2018-02-15

    A better understanding of proteostasis in health and disease requires robust methods to determine protein half-lives. Here we improve the precision and accuracy of peptide ion intensity-based quantification, enabling more accurate protein turnover determination in non-dividing cells by dynamic SILAC-based proteomics. This approach allows exact determination of protein half-lives ranging from 10 to >1000 h. We identified 4000-6000 proteins in several non-dividing cell types, corresponding to 9699 unique protein identifications over the entire data set. We observed similar protein half-lives in B-cells, natural killer cells and monocytes, whereas hepatocytes and mouse embryonic neurons show substantial differences. Our data set extends and statistically validates the previous observation that subunits of protein complexes tend to have coherent turnover. Moreover, analysis of different proteasome and nuclear pore complex assemblies suggests that their turnover rate is architecture dependent. These results illustrate that our approach allows investigating protein turnover and its implications in various cell types.

  11. Irradiation And Papillomavirus E2 Proteins On Hela Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abderrafi, B.

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to relatively high doses ionizing radiation activates cellular responses that impair cell survival. These responses, for which the p53 protein plays a central role, form the basis for cancer radiotherapy. However, the efficacy of radiation treatments on cell killing is often reduced as a consequence of the frequent inactivation of the p53 protein in cancer cells. Loss of p53 protein is associated with later stages of most human tumors and resistance to anticancer agents. Carcinomas are frequent malignant tumors in humans. The majority of cervical carcinomas are etiologically linked to the presence of HPV virus (Human Papillomavirus). In carcinoma tumor cells, as well as in their derived-cell lines such as HeLa cells, the p53 protein is generally not detected due to its degradation by the product of the HPV-associated oncogenic E6 gene. Another characteristic of HPV-positive cervical cancer cells is the loss of the regulatory viral E2 gene expression as a consequence of viral DNA integration into the cellular genome. Reintroduction of E2 expression in HeLa cells reactivates p53, due to a negative effect on the expression of E6 protein, with a concomitant arrest of cell proliferation at the phase G1 of the cell cycle and delay in cell division via the repression of E2F-target genes. To elucidate whether reactivation of p53 would improve the cell killing effect of ionizing radiation in cancer cells, we studied the combined effects of radiation and E2 expression on the cell cycle distribution in HeLa cells

  12. Usher protein functions in hair cells and photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Dominic; Zallocchi, Marisa

    2014-01-01

    The 10 different genes associated with the deaf/blind disorder, Usher syndrome, encode a number of structurally and functionally distinct proteins, most expressed as multiple isoforms/protein variants. Functional characterization of these proteins suggests a role in stereocilia development in cochlear hair cells, likely owing to adhesive interactions in hair bundles. In mature hair cells, homodimers of the Usher cadherins, cadherin 23 and protocadherin 15, interact to form a structural fiber, the tip link, and the linkages that anchor the taller stereocilia's actin cytoskeleton core to the shorter adjacent stereocilia and the elusive mechanotransduction channels, explaining the deafness phenotype when these molecular interactions are perturbed. The conundrum is that photoreceptors lack a synonymous mechanotransduction apparatus, and so a common theory for Usher protein function in the two neurosensory cell types affected in Usher syndrome is lacking. Recent evidence linking photoreceptor cell dysfunction in the shaker 1 mouse model for Usher syndrome to light-induced protein translocation defects, combined with localization of an Usher protein interactome at the periciliary region of the photoreceptors suggests Usher proteins might regulate protein trafficking between the inner and outer segments of photoreceptors. A distinct Usher protein complex is trafficked to the ribbon synapses of hair cells, and synaptic defects have been reported in Usher mutants in both hair cells and photoreceptors. This review aims to clarify what is known about Usher protein function at the synaptic and apical poles of hair cells and photoreceptors and the prospects for identifying a unifying pathobiological mechanism to explain deaf/blindness in Usher syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sun Ginseng Protects Endothelial Progenitor Cells From Senescence Associated Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Wooseok; Chung, Jin-Young; Bhan, Jaejun; Lim, Jiyeon; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Kim, Manho

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are a population of cells that circulate in the blood stream. They play a role in angiogenesis and, therefore, can be prognostic markers of vascular repair. Ginsenoside Rg3 prevents endothelial cell apoptosis through the inhibition of the mitochondrial caspase pathway. It also affects estrogen activity, which reduces EPC senescence. Sun ginseng (SG), which is heat-processed ginseng, has a high content of ginsenosides. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effects of SG on senescence-associated apoptosis in EPCs. In order to isolate EPCs, mononuclear cells of human blood buffy coats were cultured and characterized by their uptake of acetylated low-density lipoprotein (acLDL) and their binding of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (ulex-lectin). Flow cytometry with annexin-V staining was performed in order to assess early and late apoptosis. Senescence was determined by β-galactosidase (β-gal) staining. Staining with 4′-6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole verified that most adherent cells (93±2.7%) were acLDL-positive and ulex-lectin-positive. The percentage of β-gal-positive EPCs was decreased from 93.8±2.0% to 62.5±3.6% by SG treatment. A fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis showed that 4.9% of EPCs were late apoptotic in controls. Sun ginseng decreased the apoptotic cell population by 39% in the late stage of apoptosis from control baseline levels. In conclusion, these results show antisenescent and antiapoptotic effects of SG in human-derived EPCs, indicating that SG can enhance EPC-mediated repair mechanisms. PMID:23717107

  14. Protein-Mediated Interactions of Pancreatic Islet Cells

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    Paolo Meda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The islets of Langerhans collectively form the endocrine pancreas, the organ that is soley responsible for insulin secretion in mammals, and which plays a prominent role in the control of circulating glucose and metabolism. Normal function of these islets implies the coordination of different types of endocrine cells, noticeably of the beta cells which produce insulin. Given that an appropriate secretion of this hormone is vital to the organism, a number of mechanisms have been selected during evolution, which now converge to coordinate beta cell functions. Among these, several mechanisms depend on different families of integral membrane proteins, which ensure direct (cadherins, N-CAM, occludin, and claudins and paracrine communications (pannexins between beta cells, and between these cells and the other islet cell types. Also, other proteins (integrins provide communication of the different islet cell types with the materials that form the islet basal laminae and extracellular matrix. Here, we review what is known about these proteins and their signaling in pancreatic β-cells, with particular emphasis on the signaling provided by Cx36, given that this is the integral membrane protein involved in cell-to-cell communication, which has so far been mostly investigated for effects on beta cell functions.

  15. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors l-deprenyl and clorgyline protect nonmalignant human cells from ionising radiation and chemotherapy toxicity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Seymour, C B

    2003-11-17

    l-Deprenyl (R-(-)-deprenyl, selegiline) is an inhibitor of monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) that is known to protect nerve cells from a variety of chemical and physical insults. As apoptosis is a common mechanism of radiation-induced cell death, the effect of l-deprenyl on the survival of cultured cells and tissue explants was studied following exposure to gamma radiation. The results obtained were compared with the effects of the less-selective MAO-B inhibitor pargyline and the MAO-A inhibitor clorgyline. l-Deprenyl at a concentration of 10(-9) M protected the nontumorigenic cell line (HaCaT) and normal human urothelial explants from the effects of cobalt-60 gamma radiation, but did not protect tumorigenic human cell lines HaCaT-ras, HPV-transfected human keratinocytes (HPV-G cells), or PC3. Human bladder carcinoma explants were not protected. Clorgyline showed a smaller protective effect of normal cells, whereas pargyline had no effect. Radiation-induced delayed effects (genomic instability measured as delayed cell death) were prevented in normal cells by l-deprenyl but, interestingly, deprenyl appeared to increase the amount of delayed death in the tumorigenic cell lines. Studies using l-deprenyl prior to the exposure of nonmalignant cells to cisplatin showed that cell death due to this agent was also reduced. Treatment of cultures of nontumorigenic cells with l-deprenyl or clorgyline significantly increased the levels of the protein Bcl-2 following irradiation, but there was no such effect on the already-elevated levels of this protein in the tumour samples. Since the Bcl-2 has been shown to be an inhibitor of apoptosis or programmed cell death, this would imply that the protective effects of l-deprenyl and clorgyline involve activation of antiapoptotic pathways within the normal cell. This hypothesis is supported by data showing reduced levels of apoptosis in HaCAT cells and in normal bladder explant cultures following treatment with l-deprenyl.

  16. The unfolded protein response has a protective role in yeast models of classic galactosemia

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    Evandro A. De-Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Classic galactosemia is a human autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the GALT gene (GAL7 in yeast, which encodes the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase. Here we show that the unfolded protein response pathway is triggered by galactose in two yeast models of galactosemia: lithium-treated cells and the gal7Δ mutant. The synthesis of galactose-1-phosphate is essential to trigger the unfolded protein response under these conditions because the deletion of the galactokinase-encoding gene GAL1 completely abolishes unfolded protein response activation and galactose toxicity. Impairment of the unfolded protein response in both yeast models makes cells even more sensitive to galactose, unmasking its cytotoxic effect. These results indicate that endoplasmic reticulum stress is induced under galactosemic conditions and underscores the importance of the unfolded protein response pathway to cellular adaptation in these models of classic galactosemia.

  17. Protein Availability and Satellite Cell Dynamics in Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, Baubak; Hawley, John A; Camera, Donny M

    2018-06-01

    Human skeletal muscle satellite cells are activated in response to both resistance and endurance exercise. It was initially proposed that satellite cell proliferation and differentiation were only required to support resistance exercise-induced hypertrophy. However, satellite cells may also play a role in muscle fibre remodelling after endurance-based exercise and extracellular matrix regulation. Given the importance of dietary protein, particularly branched chain amino acids, in supporting myofibrillar and mitochondrial adaptations to both resistance and endurance-based training, a greater understanding of how protein intake impacts satellite cell activity would provide further insight into the mechanisms governing skeletal muscle remodelling with exercise. While many studies have investigated the capacity for protein ingestion to increase post-exercise rates of muscle protein synthesis, few investigations have examined the role for protein ingestion to modulate satellite cell activity. Here we review the molecular mechanisms controlling the activation of satellite cells in response to mechanical stress and protein intake in both in vitro and in vivo models. We provide a mechanistic framework that describes how protein ingestion may enhance satellite activity and promote exercise adaptations in human skeletal muscle.

  18. Recombinant protein production from stable mammalian cell lines and pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, David L; Balasubramanian, Sowmya

    2016-06-01

    We highlight recent developments for the production of recombinant proteins from suspension-adapted mammalian cell lines. We discuss the generation of stable cell lines using transposons and lentivirus vectors (non-targeted transgene integration) and site-specific recombinases (targeted transgene integration). Each of these methods results in the generation of cell lines with protein yields that are generally superior to those achievable through classical plasmid transfection that depends on the integration of the transfected DNA by non-homologous DNA end-joining. This is the main reason why these techniques can also be used for the generation of stable cell pools, heterogenous populations of recombinant cells generated by gene delivery and genetic selection without resorting to single cell cloning. This allows the time line from gene transfer to protein production to be reduced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. UV-induced DNA-binding proteins in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazer, P.M.; Greggio, N.A.; Metherall, J.E.; Summers, W.C.

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the response of human cells to DNA-damaging agents such as UV irradiation, the authors examined nuclear protein extracts of UV-irradiated HeLa cells for the presence of DNA-binding proteins. Electrophoretically separated proteins were transferred to a nitrocellulose filter that was subsequently immersed in a binding solution containing radioactively labeled DNA probes. Several DNA-binding proteins were induced in HeLa cells after UV irradiation. These included proteins that bind predominantly double-stranded DNA and proteins that bind both double-stranded and single-stranded DNA. The binding proteins were induced in a dose-dependent manner by UV light. Following a dose of 12 J/m 2 , the binding proteins in the nuclear extracts increased over time to a peak in the range of 18 hr after irradiation. Experiments with metabolic inhibitors (cycloheximide and actinomycin D) revealed that de novo synthesis of these proteins is not required for induction of the binding activities, suggesting that the induction is mediated by protein modification

  20. Nicotine affects protein complex rearrangement in Caenorhabditis elegans cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobkowiak, Robert; Zielezinski, Andrzej; Karlowski, Wojciech M; Lesicki, Andrzej

    2017-10-01

    Nicotine may affect cell function by rearranging protein complexes. We aimed to determine nicotine-induced alterations of protein complexes in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) cells, thereby revealing links between nicotine exposure and protein complex modulation. We compared the proteomic alterations induced by low and high nicotine concentrations (0.01 mM and 1 mM) with the control (no nicotine) in vivo by using mass spectrometry (MS)-based techniques, specifically the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) discontinuous gel electrophoresis coupled with liquid chromatography (LC)-MS/MS and spectral counting. As a result, we identified dozens of C. elegans proteins that are present exclusively or in higher abundance in either nicotine-treated or untreated worms. Based on these results, we report a possible network that captures the key protein components of nicotine-induced protein complexes and speculate how the different protein modules relate to their distinct physiological roles. Using functional annotation of detected proteins, we hypothesize that the identified complexes can modulate the energy metabolism and level of oxidative stress. These proteins can also be involved in modulation of gene expression and may be crucial in Alzheimer's disease. The findings reported in our study reveal putative intracellular interactions of many proteins with the cytoskeleton and may contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) signaling and trafficking in cells.

  1. Protecting Skeletal Muscle with Protein and Amino Acid during Periods of Disuse

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    Elfego Galvan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Habitual sedentary behavior increases risk of chronic disease, hospitalization and poor quality of life. Short-term bed rest or disuse accelerates the loss of muscle mass, function, and glucose tolerance. Optimizing nutritional practices and protein intake may reduce the consequences of disuse by preserving metabolic homeostasis and muscle mass and function. Most modes of physical inactivity have the potential to negatively impact the health of older adults more than their younger counterparts. Mechanistically, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 signaling and muscle protein synthesis are negatively affected by disuse. This contributes to reduced muscle quality and is accompanied by impaired glucose regulation. Simply encouraging increased protein and/or energy consumption is a well-intentioned, but often impractical strategy to protect muscle health. Emerging evidence suggests that leucine supplemented meals may partially and temporarily protect skeletal muscle during disuse by preserving anabolism and mitigating reductions in mass, function and metabolic homeostasis.

  2. Agmatine induces Nrf2 and protects against corticosterone effects in hippocampal neuronal cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Andiara E; Egea, Javier; Buendía, Izaskun; Navarro, Elisa; Rada, Patricia; Cuadrado, Antonio; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; López, Manuela G

    2015-01-01

    Hyperactivation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is a common finding in major depression; this may lead to increased levels of cortisol, which are known to cause oxidative stress imbalance and apoptotic neuronal cell death, particularly in the hippocampus, a key region implicated in mood regulation. Agmatine, an endogenous metabolite of L-arginine, has been proposed for the treatment of major depression. Corticosterone induced apoptotic cell death and increased ROS production in cultured hippocampal neuronal cells, effects that were abolished in a concentration- and time-dependent manner by agmatine. Interestingly, the combination of sub-effective concentrations of agmatine with fluoxetine or imipramine afforded synergic protection. The neuroprotective effect of agmatine was abolished by yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist), ketanserin (5-HT2A receptor antagonist), LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor), PD98059 (MEK1/2 inhibitor), SnPP (HO-1 inhibitor), and cycloheximide (protein synthesis inhibitor). Agmatine increased Akt and ERK phosphorylation and induced the transcription factor Nrf2 and the proteins HO-1 and GCLc; induction of these proteins was prevented by yohimbine, ketanserin, LY294002, and PD98059. In conclusion, agmatine affords neuroprotection against corticosterone effects by a mechanism that implicates Nrf2 induction via α2-adrenergic and 5-HT2A receptors, Akt and ERK pathways, and HO-1 and GCLc expression.

  3. Natural T Cell-mediated Protection against Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza. Results of the Flu Watch Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Andrew C; Wang, Lili; Goonetilleke, Nilu; Fragaszy, Ellen B; Bermingham, Alison; Copas, Andrew; Dukes, Oliver; Millett, Elizabeth R C; Nazareth, Irwin; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S; Watson, John M; Zambon, Maria; Johnson, Anne M; McMichael, Andrew J

    2015-06-15

    A high proportion of influenza infections are asymptomatic. Animal and human challenge studies and observational studies suggest T cells protect against disease among those infected, but the impact of T-cell immunity at the population level is unknown. To investigate whether naturally preexisting T-cell responses targeting highly conserved internal influenza proteins could provide cross-protective immunity against pandemic and seasonal influenza. We quantified influenza A(H3N2) virus-specific T cells in a population cohort during seasonal and pandemic periods between 2006 and 2010. Follow-up included paired serology, symptom reporting, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) investigation of symptomatic cases. A total of 1,414 unvaccinated individuals had baseline T-cell measurements (1,703 participant observation sets). T-cell responses to A(H3N2) virus nucleoprotein (NP) dominated and strongly cross-reacted with A(H1N1)pdm09 NP (P < 0.001) in participants lacking antibody to A(H1N1)pdm09. Comparison of paired preseason and post-season sera (1,431 sets) showed 205 (14%) had evidence of infection based on fourfold influenza antibody titer rises. The presence of NP-specific T cells before exposure to virus correlated with less symptomatic, PCR-positive influenza A (overall adjusted odds ratio, 0.27; 95% confidence interval, 0.11-0.68; P = 0.005, during pandemic [P = 0.047] and seasonal [P = 0.049] periods). Protection was independent of baseline antibodies. Influenza-specific T-cell responses were detected in 43%, indicating a substantial population impact. Naturally occurring cross-protective T-cell immunity protects against symptomatic PCR-confirmed disease in those with evidence of infection and helps to explain why many infections do not cause symptoms. Vaccines stimulating T cells may provide important cross-protective immunity.

  4. Role of mTOR, Bad, and Survivin in RasGAP Fragment N-Mediated Cell Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiang-Yan; Widmann, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Partial cleavage of p120 RasGAP by caspase-3 in stressed cells generates an N-terminal fragment, called fragment N, which activates an anti-apoptotic Akt-dependent survival response. Akt regulates several effectors but which of these mediate fragment N-dependent cell protection has not been defined yet. Here we have investigated the role of mTORC1, Bad, and survivin in the capacity of fragment N to protect cells from apoptosis. Neither rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1, nor silencing of raptor, a subunit of the mTORC1 complex, altered the ability of fragment N from inhibiting cisplatin- and Fas ligand-induced death. Cells lacking Bad, despite displaying a stronger resistance to apoptosis, were still protected by fragment N against cisplatin-induced death. Fragment N was also able to protect cells from Fas ligand-induced death in conditions where Bad plays no role in apoptosis regulation. Fragment N expression in cells did neither modulate survivin mRNA nor its protein expression. Moreover, the expression of cytoplasmic survivin, known to exert anti-apoptotic actions in cells, still occurred in UV-B-irradiated epidermis of mouse expressing a caspase-3-resistant RasGAP mutant that cannot produce fragment N. Additionally, survivin function in cell cycle progression was not affected by fragment N. These results indicate that, taken individually, mTOR, Bad, or Survivin are not required for fragment N to protect cells from cell death. We conclude that downstream targets of Akt other than mTORC1, Bad, or survivin mediate fragment N-induced protection or that several Akt effectors can compensate for each other to induce the pro-survival fragment N-dependent response. PMID:23826368

  5. Distribution of DNA replication proteins in Drosophila cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easwaran, Hariharan P; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Background DNA replication in higher eukaryotic cells is organized in discrete subnuclear sites called replication foci (RF). During the S phase, most replication proteins assemble at the RF by interacting with PCNA via a PCNA binding domain (PBD). This has been shown to occur for many mammalian replication proteins, but it is not known whether this mechanism is conserved in evolution. Results Fluorescent fusions of mammalian replication proteins, Dnmt1, HsDNA Lig I and HsPCNA were analyzed for their ability to target to RF in Drosophila cells. Except for HsPCNA, none of the other proteins and their deletions showed any accumulation at RF in Drosophila cells. We hypothesized that in Drosophila cells there might be some other peptide sequence responsible for targeting proteins to RF. To test this, we identified the DmDNA Lig I and compared the protein sequence with HsDNA Lig I. The two orthologs shared the PBD suggesting a functionally conserved role for this domain in the Drosophila counterpart. A series of deletions of DmDNA Lig I were analyzed for their ability to accumulate at RF in Drosophila and mammalian cells. Surprisingly, no accumulation at RF was observed in Drosophila cells, while in mammalian cells DmDNA Lig I accumulated at RF via its PBD. Further, GFP fusions with the PBD domains from Dnmt1, HsDNA Lig I and DmDNA Lig I, were able to target to RF only in mammalian cells but not in Drosophila cells. Conclusion We show that S phase in Drosophila cells is characterized by formation of RF marked by PCNA like in mammalian cells. However, other than PCNA none of the replication proteins and their deletions tested here showed accumulation at RF in Drosophila cells while the same proteins and deletions are capable of accumulating at RF in mammalian cells. We hypothesize that unlike mammalian cells, in Drosophila cells, replication proteins do not form long-lasting interactions with the replication machinery, and rather perform their functions via very

  6. 3D Protein Dynamics in the Cell Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anand P; Galland, Rémi; Finch-Edmondson, Megan L; Grenci, Gianluca; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Studer, Vincent; Viasnoff, Virgile; Saunders, Timothy E

    2017-01-10

    The three-dimensional (3D) architecture of the cell nucleus plays an important role in protein dynamics and in regulating gene expression. However, protein dynamics within the 3D nucleus are poorly understood. Here, we present, to our knowledge, a novel combination of 1) single-objective based light-sheet microscopy, 2) photoconvertible proteins, and 3) fluorescence correlation microscopy, to quantitatively measure 3D protein dynamics in the nucleus. We are able to acquire >3400 autocorrelation functions at multiple spatial positions within a nucleus, without significant photobleaching, allowing us to make reliable estimates of diffusion dynamics. Using this tool, we demonstrate spatial heterogeneity in Polymerase II dynamics in live U2OS cells. Further, we provide detailed measurements of human-Yes-associated protein diffusion dynamics in a human gastric cancer epithelial cell line. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hydrogen sulfide lowers proliferation and induces protective autophagy in colon epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya C Wu

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H(2S is a gaseous bacterial metabolite that reaches high levels in the large intestine. In the present study, the effect of H(2S on the proliferation of normal and cancerous colon epithelial cells was investigated. An immortalized colon epithelial cell line (YAMC and a panel of colon cancer cell lines (HT-29, SW1116, HCT116 were exposed to H(2S at concentrations similar to those found in the human colon. H(2S inhibited normal and cancerous colon epithelial cell proliferation as measured by MTT assay. The anti-mitogenic effect of H(2S was accompanied by G(1-phase cell cycle arrest and the induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(Cip. Moreover, exposure to H(2S led to features characteristic of autophagy, including increased formation of LC3B(+ autophagic vacuoles and acidic vesicular organelles as determined by immunofluorescence and acridine orange staining, respectively. Abolition of autophagy by RNA interference targeting Vps34 or Atg7 enhanced the anti-proliferative effect of H(2S. Further mechanistic investigation revealed that H(2S stimulated the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and inhibited the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and S6 kinase. Inhibition of AMPK significantly reversed H(2S-induced autophagy and inhibition of cell proliferation. Collectively, we demonstrate that H(2S inhibits colon epithelial cell proliferation and induces protective autophagy via the AMPK pathway.

  8. Autophagy protects against neural cell death induced by piperidine alkaloids present in Prosopis juliflora (Mesquite).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Victor D A; Cuevas, Carlos; Muñoz, Patricia; Villa, Monica; Ahumada-Castro, Ulises; Huenchuguala, Sandro; Santos, Cleonice C Dos; Araujo, Fillipe M DE; Ferreira, Rafael S; Silva, Vanessa B DA; Silva, Juliana H C E; Soares, Érica N; Velozo, Eudes S; Segura-Aguilar, Juan; Costa, Silvia L

    2017-01-01

    Prosopis juliflora is a shrub that has been used to feed animals and humans. However, a synergistic action of piperidine alkaloids has been suggested to be responsible for neurotoxic damage observed in animals. We investigated the involvement of programmed cell death (PCD) and autophagy on the mechanism of cell death induced by a total extract (TAE) of alkaloids and fraction (F32) from P. juliflora leaves composed majoritary of juliprosopine in a model of neuron/glial cell co-culture. We saw that TAE (30 µg/mL) and F32 (7.5 µg/mL) induced reduction in ATP levels and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential at 12 h exposure. Moreover, TAE and F32 induced caspase-9 activation, nuclear condensation and neuronal death at 16 h exposure. After 4 h, they induced autophagy characterized by decreases of P62 protein level, increase of LC3II expression and increase in number of GFP-LC3 cells. Interestingly, we demonstrated that inhibition of autophagy by bafilomycin and vinblastine increased the cell death induced by TAE and autophagy induced by serum deprivation and rapamycin reduced cell death induced by F32 at 24 h. These results indicate that the mechanism neural cell death induced by these alkaloids involves PCD via caspase-9 activation and autophagy, which seems to be an important protective mechanism.

  9. Autophagy protects against neural cell death induced by piperidine alkaloids present in Prosopis juliflora (Mesquite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VICTOR D.A. SILVA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Prosopis juliflora is a shrub that has been used to feed animals and humans. However, a synergistic action of piperidine alkaloids has been suggested to be responsible for neurotoxic damage observed in animals. We investigated the involvement of programmed cell death (PCD and autophagy on the mechanism of cell death induced by a total extract (TAE of alkaloids and fraction (F32 from P. juliflora leaves composed majoritary of juliprosopine in a model of neuron/glial cell co-culture. We saw that TAE (30 µg/mL and F32 (7.5 µg/mL induced reduction in ATP levels and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential at 12 h exposure. Moreover, TAE and F32 induced caspase-9 activation, nuclear condensation and neuronal death at 16 h exposure. After 4 h, they induced autophagy characterized by decreases of P62 protein level, increase of LC3II expression and increase in number of GFP-LC3 cells. Interestingly, we demonstrated that inhibition of autophagy by bafilomycin and vinblastine increased the cell death induced by TAE and autophagy induced by serum deprivation and rapamycin reduced cell death induced by F32 at 24 h. These results indicate that the mechanism neural cell death induced by these alkaloids involves PCD via caspase-9 activation and autophagy, which seems to be an important protective mechanism.

  10. Attenuation of iron-binding proteins in ARPE-19 cells reduces their resistance to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Markus; Kurz, Tino

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress-related damage to retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is an important feature in the development of age-related macular degeneration. Iron-catalysed intralysosomal production of hydroxyl radicals is considered a major pathogenic factor, leading to lipofuscin formation with ensuing depressed cellular autophagic capacity, lysosomal membrane permeabilization and apoptosis. Previously, we have shown that cultured immortalized human RPE (ARPE-19) cells are extremely resistant to exposure to bolus doses of hydrogen peroxide and contain considerable amounts of the iron-binding proteins metallothionein (MT), heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) and ferritin (FT). According to previous findings, autophagy of these proteins depresses lysosomal redox-active iron. The aim of this study was to investigate whether up- or downregulation of these proteins would affect the resistance of ARPE-19 cells to oxidative stress. The sensitivity of ARPE-19 cells to H2 O2 exposure was tested following upregulation of MT, HSP70 and/or FT by pretreatment with ZnSO4 , heat shock or FeCl3 , as well as siRNA-mediated downregulation of the same proteins. Upregulation of MT, HSP70 and FT did not improve survival following exposure to H2 O2 . This was interpreted as existence of an already maximal protection. Combined siRNA-mediated attenuation of both FT chains (H and L), or simultaneous downregulation of all three proteins, made the cells significantly more susceptible to oxidative stress confirming the importance of iron-binding proteins. The findings support our hypothesis that the oxidative stress resistance exhibited by RPE cells may be explained by a high autophagic influx of iron-binding proteins that would keep levels of redox-active lysosomal iron low. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Abnormal expression of leiomyoma cytoskeletal proteins involved in cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ura, Blendi; Scrimin, Federica; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Athanasakis, Emmanouil; Aloisio, Michelangelo; Monasta, Lorenzo; Ricci, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are monoclonal tumors. Several factors are involved in the neoplastic transformation of the myometrium. In our study we focused on dysregulated cytoskeletal proteins in the leiomyoma as compared to the myometrium. Paired tissue samples of ten leiomyomas and adjacent myometria were obtained and analyzed by two‑dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Mass spectrometry was used for protein identification, and western blotting for 2-DE data validation. The values of ten cytoskeletal proteins were found to be significantly different: eight proteins were upregulated in the leiomyoma and two proteins were downregulated. Three of the upregulated proteins (myosin regulatory light polypeptide 9, four and a half LIM domains protein 1 and LIM and SH3 domain protein 1) are involved in cell migration, while downregulated protein transgelin is involved in replicative senescence. Myosin regulatory light polypeptide 9 (MYL9) was further validated by western blotting because it is considered to be a cell migration marker in several cancers and could play a key role in leiomyoma development. Our data demonstrate significant alterations in the expression of cytoskeletal proteins involved in leiomyoma growth. A better understanding of the involvement of cytoskeletal proteins in leiomyoma pathogenesis may contribute to the identification of new therapeutic targets and the development of new pharmacological approaches.

  12. Subdominant Outer Membrane Antigens in Anaplasma marginale: Conservation, Antigenicity, and Protective Capacity Using Recombinant Protein.

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    Deirdre R Ducken

    Full Text Available Anaplasma marginale is a tick-borne rickettsial pathogen of cattle with a worldwide distribution. Currently a safe and efficacious vaccine is unavailable. Outer membrane protein (OMP extracts or a defined surface protein complex reproducibly induce protective immunity. However, there are several knowledge gaps limiting progress in vaccine development. First, are these OMPs conserved among the diversity of A. marginale strains circulating in endemic regions? Second, are the most highly conserved outer membrane proteins in the immunogens recognized by immunized and protected animals? Lastly, can this subset of OMPs recognized by antibody from protected vaccinates and conserved among strains recapitulate the protection of outer membrane vaccines? To address the first goal, genes encoding OMPs AM202, AM368, AM854, AM936, AM1041, and AM1096, major subdominant components of the outer membrane, were cloned and sequenced from geographically diverse strains and isolates. AM202, AM936, AM854, and AM1096 share 99.9 to 100% amino acid identity. AM1041 has 97.1 to 100% and AM368 has 98.3 to 99.9% amino acid identity. While all four of the most highly conserved OMPs were recognized by IgG from animals immunized with outer membranes, linked surface protein complexes, or unlinked surface protein complexes and shown to be protected from challenge, the highest titers and consistent recognition among vaccinates were to AM854 and AM936. Consequently, animals were immunized with recombinant AM854 and AM936 and challenged. Recombinant vaccinates and purified outer membrane vaccinates had similar IgG and IgG2 responses to both proteins. However, the recombinant vaccinates developed higher bacteremia after challenge as compared to adjuvant-only controls and outer membrane vaccinates. These results provide the first evidence that vaccination with specific antigens may exacerbate disease. Progressing from the protective capacity of outer membrane formulations to

  13. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of Brugia malayi Heavy Chain Myosin as Homologous DNA, Protein and Heterologous DNA/Protein Prime Boost Vaccine in Rodent Model.

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    Jyoti Gupta

    Full Text Available We earlier demonstrated the immunoprophylactic efficacy of recombinant heavy chain myosin (Bm-Myo of Brugia malayi (B. malayi in rodent models. In the current study, further attempts have been made to improve this efficacy by employing alternate approaches such as homologous DNA (pcD-Myo and heterologous DNA/protein prime boost (pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo in BALB/c mouse model. The gene bm-myo was cloned in a mammalian expression vector pcDNA 3.1(+ and protein expression was confirmed in mammalian Vero cell line. A significant degree of protection (79.2%±2.32 against L3 challenge in pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunized group was observed which was much higher than that exerted by Bm-Myo (66.6%±2.23 and pcD-Myo (41.6%±2.45. In the heterologous immunized group, the percentage of peritoneal leukocytes such as macrophages, neutrophils, B cells and T cells marginally increased and their population augmented further significantly following L3 challenge. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunization elicited robust cellular and humoral immune responses as compared to pcD-Myo and Bm-Myo groups as evidenced by an increased accumulation of CD4+, CD8+ T cells and CD19+ B cells in the mouse spleen and activation of peritoneal macrophages. Though immunized animals produced antigen-specific IgG antibodies and isotypes, sera of mice receiving pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo or Bm-Myo developed much higher antibody levels than other groups and there was profound antibody-dependent cellular adhesion and cytotoxicity (ADCC to B. malayi infective larvae (L3. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo as well as Bm-Myo mice generated a mixed T helper cell phenotype as evidenced by the production of both pro-inflammatory (IL-2, IFN-γ and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10 cytokines. Mice receiving pcD-Myo on contrary displayed a polarized pro-inflammatory immune response. The findings suggest that the priming of animals with DNA followed by protein booster generates heightened and mixed pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses that are capable of

  14. Human neuronal cell protein responses to Nipah virus infection

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    Hassan Sharifah

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nipah virus (NiV, a recently discovered zoonotic virus infects and replicates in several human cell types. Its replication in human neuronal cells, however, is less efficient in comparison to other fully susceptible cells. In the present study, the SK-N-MC human neuronal cell protein response to NiV infection is examined using proteomic approaches. Results Method for separation of the NiV-infected human neuronal cell proteins using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE was established. At least 800 protein spots were resolved of which seven were unique, six were significantly up-regulated and eight were significantly down-regulated. Six of these altered proteins were identified using mass spectrometry (MS and confirmed using MS/MS. The heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP F, guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein, voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2 and cytochrome bc1 were present in abundance in the NiV-infected SK-N-MC cells in contrast to hnRNPs H and H2 that were significantly down-regulated. Conclusion Several human neuronal cell proteins that are differentially expressed following NiV infection are identified. The proteins are associated with various cellular functions and their abundance reflects their significance in the cytopathologic responses to the infection and the regulation of NiV replication. The potential importance of the ratio of hnRNP F, and hnRNPs H and H2 in regulation of NiV replication, the association of the mitochondrial protein with the cytopathologic responses to the infection and induction of apoptosis are highlighted.

  15. Lysine demethylase inhibition protects pancreatic β cells from apoptosis and improves β-cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backe, Marie Balslev; Andersson, Jan Legaard; Bacos, Karl

    2018-01-01

    ) protects β cells from cytokine-induced apoptosis and reduces type 1 diabetes incidence in animals. We hypothesized that also lysine demethylases (KDMs) regulate β-cell fate in response to inflammatory stress. Expression of the demethylase Kdm6B was upregulated by proinflammatory cytokines suggesting......Transcriptional changes control β-cell survival in response to inflammatory stress. Posttranslational modifications of histone and non-histone transcriptional regulators activate or repress gene transcription, but the link to cell-fate signaling is unclear. Inhibition of lysine deacetylases (KDACs...

  16. Protection against UVA-induced photooxidative damage in mammalian cell lines expressing increased levels of metallothionein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudek, E.J.; Roth, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    Metallothionein (MT) is an endogenous low molecular weight protein that is inducible in a variety of eukaryotic cells and has the ability to selectivity bind heavy metal ions such as zinc and the cadmium. Although the exact physiological role of MT is still not understood, there is strong evidence that MT is involved in providing cellular resistance against the damaging effects of heavy metals and in the regulation of intracellular zinc and copper. Recently, it has been demonstrated that MT can scavenge radiation-induced reactive oxygen intermediates in vitro, specifically hydroxyl and superoxide radicals, and because of these observations it has been suggested that MT may provide protection against radiation-induced oxidative stress in vivo. Cell lines expressing increased levels of MT have demonstrated resistance to ionizing radiation, to ultraviolet radiation, and also to various DNA damaging agents including melphalan and cis-diaminedichloroplatinum. It is therefore important to gain some insight into the relationship between cellular MT content and cellular resistance to radiation and other DNA damaging agents. In this study we investigated the role of MT in providing protection against monochromatic 365-nm UVA radiation, which is known to generate intracellular reactive oxygen species that are involved in both DNA damage and cell killing. For this purpose, we used zinc acetate, a potent inducer of MT, to elevate MT levels in V79 Chinese hamster fibroblasts prior to UVA exposure and determined cell survival for uninduced and induced cultures. In order to eliminate any zinc effects other than MT induction, we also isolated and characterized cadmium chloride-resistant clones of V79 cells that have increased steady-state levels of both MT mRNA and protein, and we examined their survival characteristics against 365-nm radiation in the absence of zinc acetate. 14 refs., 3 figs

  17. RPE cell surface proteins in normal and dystrophic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, V.M.; Hall, M.O.

    1986-01-01

    Membrane-bound proteins in plasma membrane enriched fractions from cultured rat RPE were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Membrane proteins were characterized on three increasingly specific levels. Total protein was visualized by silver staining. A maximum of 102 separate proteins were counted in silver-stained gels. Glycoproteins were labeled with 3H-glucosamine or 3H-fucose and detected by autoradiography. Thirty-eight fucose-labeled and 61-71 glucosamine-labeled proteins were identified. All of the fucose-labeled proteins were labeled with glucosamine-derived radioactivity. Proteins exposed at the cell surface were labeled by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination prior to preparation of membranes for two-dimensional analysis. Forty separate 125I-labeled surface proteins were resolved by two-dimensional electrophoresis/autoradiography. Comparison with the glycoprotein map showed that a number of these surface labeled proteins were glycoproteins. Two-dimensional maps of total protein, fucose-labeled, and glucosamine-labeled glycoproteins, and 125I-labeled surface proteins of membranes from dystrophic (RCS rdy-p+) and normal (Long Evans or RCS rdy+p+) RPE were compared. No differences in the total protein or surface-labeled proteins were observed. However, the results suggest that a 183K glycoprotein is more heavily glycosylated with glucosamine and fucose in normal RPE membranes as compared to membranes from dystrophic RPE

  18. Expression and analysis of exogenous proteins in epidermal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnino, Lina; Ho, Ernest; Chang, Wing Y

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter we review protocols for transient transfection of primary keratinocytes. The ability to transfect primary epidermal cells regardless of their differentiation status allows the biochemical and molecular characterization of multiple proteins. We review methods to analyze exogenous protein abundance in transfected keratinocytes by immunoblot and immunoprecipitation. We also present protocols to determine the subcellular distribution of these proteins by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy approaches.

  19. Protective Effects of Costunolide against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Injury in PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong-Un Cheong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress-mediated cellular injury has been considered as a major cause of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. The scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS mediated by antioxidants may be a potential strategy for retarding the diseases’ progression. Costunolide (CS is a well-known sesquiterpene lactone, used as a popular herbal remedy, which possesses anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity. This study aimed to investigate the protective role of CS against the cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and to elucidate potential protective mechanisms in PC12 cells. The results showed that the treatment of PC12 cells with CS prior to H2O2 exposure effectively increased the cell viability. Furthermore, it decreased the intracellular ROS, stabilized the mitochondria membrane potential (MMP, and reduced apoptosis-related protein such as caspase 3. In addition, CS treatment attenuated the cell injury by H2O2 through the inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK. These results demonstrated that CS is promising as a potential therapeutic candidate for neurodegenerative diseases resulting from oxidative damage and further research on this topic should be encouraged.

  20. Conversion of Food waste to Single Cell Protein using Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The utilization of food waste into products like single cell protein is an alternative solution to global protein shortage and to alleviate pollution problems. This investigation was carried out with food wastes such as orange, pineapple, banana, watermelon and cucumber waste as growth media for A. niger using standard ...

  1. Small GTP-binding proteins in human endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, H. P.; Koster, P. M.; Calafat, J.; Janssen, H.; van Zonneveld, A. J.; van Mourik, J. A.; Voorberg, J.

    1998-01-01

    Small GTP-binding proteins of the Ras superfamily control an extensive number of intracellular events by alternating between GDP- and GTP-bound conformation. The presence of members of this protein family was examined in human umbilical vein endothelial cells employing RT-PCR. Sequence analysis of

  2. PRODt;CTION OF SINGLE CELL PROTEIN FROM BREWERY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    customary food and feed sources of protein (agriculnrre and fishery) to ocher sources like single cell protein (SCP); whose production from hydrocarbons is one ... origin is unicellular or simple multicellular organism such as bacteria, yeasts, fungi, algae. protozoa, mid even bacterinphagcs generally cultivated on substrates ...

  3. Covalent microcontact printing of proteins fro cell patterning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozkiewicz, D.I.; Kraan, Yvonne M.; Werten, Marc W.T.; de Wolf, Frits A.; Subramaniam, Vinod; Ravoo, B.J.; Reinhoudt, David

    2006-01-01

    We describe a straightforward approach to the covalent immobilization of cytophilic proteins by microcontact printing, which can be used to pattern cells on substrates. Cytophilic proteins are printed in micropatterns on reactive self-assembled monolayers by using imine chemistry. An

  4. Denaturation of membrane proteins and hyperthermic cell killing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgman, Paulus Wilhelmus Johannes Jozef

    1993-01-01

    Summarizing: heat induced denaturation of membrane proteins is probably related to hyperthermic cell killing. Induced resistance of heat sensitive proteins seems to be involved in the development of thermotolerance. Although many questions remain still to be answered, it appears that HSP72, when

  5. Understanding of Protein Synthesis in a Living Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Y.; Muhammad, S.

    2006-01-01

    The assembly of proteins takes place in the cytoplasm of a cell. There are three main steps. In initiation, far left, all the necessary parts of the process are brought together by a small molecule called a ribosome. During elongation, amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, are joined to one another in a long chain. The sequence in which…

  6. Oxidative stress due to radiation in CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells. Protection by IGF-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floratou, K.; Karakantza, M.; Giannopoulou, E.; Antonacopoulou, A.; Adonakis, G.; Kardamakis, D.; Matsouka, P.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exerts direct as well as indirect effects on DNA through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Irradiated hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) experience DNA strand breaks, favoring genetic instability, due to ROS generation. Our aim was to study the effect of a range of radiation doses in HPCs and the possible protective mechanisms activated by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). ROS generation was evaluated, in the presence or absence of IGF-1 in liquid cultures of human HPCs-CD34 + irradiated with 1-, 2- and 5-Gy X-rays, using a flow cytometry assay. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) expression was studied by western blot analysis and visualized by an immunofluorescence assay. Apoptosis was estimated using the following assays: Annexin-V assay, DNA degradation assay, BCL-2/BAX mRNA and protein levels and caspase-9 protein immunofluorescence visualization. Viability and clonogenic potential were studied in irradiated HPCs. The generation of superoxide anion radicals at an early and a late time point was increased, while the hydrogen peroxide generation at a late time point was stable. IGF-1 presence further enhanced the radiation-induced increase of MnSOD at 24 h post irradiation. IGF-1 inhibited the mitochondria-mediated pathway of apoptosis by regulating the m-RNA and protein expression of BAX, BCL-2 and the BCL-2/BAX ratio and by decreasing caspase-9 protein expression. IGF-1 presence in culture media of irradiated cells restored the clonogenic capacity and the viability of HPCs as well. In conclusion, IGF-1 protects HPCs-CD34 + from radiation effects, by eliminating the oxidative microenvironment through the enhancement of MnSOD activation and by regulating the mitochondria-mediated pathway of apoptosis. (author)

  7. Basal cell adhesion molecule/lutheran protein. The receptor critical for sickle cell adhesion to laminin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udani, M; Zen, Q; Cottman, M; Leonard, N; Jefferson, S; Daymont, C; Truskey, G; Telen, M J

    1998-01-01

    Sickle red cells bind significant amounts of soluble laminin, whereas normal red cells do not. Solid phase assays demonstrate that B-CAM/LU binds laminin on intact sickle red cells and that red cell B-CAM/LU binds immobilized laminin, whereas another putative laminin binding protein, CD44, does not. Ligand blots also identify B-CAM/LU as the only erythrocyte membrane protein(s) that binds laminin. Finally, transfection of murine erythroleukemia cells with human B-CAM cDNA induces binding of both soluble and immobilized laminin. Thus, B-CAM/LU appears to be the major laminin-binding protein of sickle red cells. Previously reported overexpression of B-CAM/LU by epithelial cancer cells suggests that this protein may also serve as a laminin receptor in malignant tumors. PMID:9616226

  8. Are natural killer cells protecting the metabolically healthy obese patient?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, Lydia A

    2012-02-01

    With the emerging obesity pandemic, identifying those who appear to be protected from adverse consequences such as type 2 diabetes and certain malignancies will become important. We propose that the circulating immune system plays a role in the development of these comorbidities. Clinical data and blood samples were collected from 52 patients with severe obesity attending a hospital weight-management clinic and 11 lean healthy controls. Patients were classified into metabolically "healthy obese" (n = 26; mean age 42.6 years, mean BMI 46.8 kg\\/m(2)) or "unhealthy obese" (n = 26; mean age 45 years, mean BMI 47.5 kg\\/m(2)) groups, based upon standard cutoff points for blood pressure, lipid profile, and fasting glucose. Circulating lymphoid populations and phenotypes were assessed by flow cytometry. Obese patients had significantly less circulating natural killer (NK) and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) compared to lean controls. There were significantly higher levels of NK cells and CTLs in the healthy obese group compared to the unhealthy obese group (NK: 11.7% vs. 6.5%, P < 0.0001, CD8 13.4% vs. 9.3%, P = 0.04), independent of age and BMI and these NK cells were also less activated in the healthy compared to the unhealthy group (CD69, 4.1% vs. 11.8%, P = 0.03). This is the first time that quantitative differences in the circulating immune system of obese patients with similar BMI but different metabolic profiles have been described. The significantly higher levels of CTLs and NK cells, which express fewer inhibitory molecules, could protect against malignancy, infection, and metabolic disease seen in obesity.

  9. Protein synthesis and sublethal damage repair in synchronized CHO cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yezzi, M.J.; Tobias, C.A.; Blakely, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that the split dose survival response to x-rays of asynchronous CHO-TSH1 cells is reduced if the cells are held at 40 0 C,a temperature that inhibits protein synthesis, for 2 hours before the first dose and during a 2-hour interval between doses. In conjunction with the survival experiments on asynchronous cells, the authors also examined the DNA rejoining ability in split dose studies with and without inhibition of protein synthesis. The results of these experiments suggest that inhibition of protein synthesis affects a pool of proteins that are necessary for the correct expression of the DNA, although they do not appear to be involved in rejoining DNA breaks. They have extended this work to the study of cells synchronized in G1 phase (2 hour post-mitosis) and S phase (10 hour post-mitosis). Autoradiographic analyses, using 3H-TdR pulse labeling, demonstrated that a delay in the progression of each synchronized cell population occurs after inhibition of protein synthesis. Data are reported on the effects of inhibition of protein synthesis on the ability of G1 and S phase cells to repair sublethal damage

  10. Recombinant fusion protein of albumin-retinol binding protein inactivates stellate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Soyoung; Park, Sangeun; Kim, Suhyun; Lim, Chaeseung; Kim, Jungho; Cha, Dae Ryong; Oh, Junseo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We designed novel recombinant albumin-RBP fusion proteins. ► Expression of fusion proteins inactivates pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). ► Fusion proteins are successfully internalized into and inactivate PSCs. ► RBP moiety mediates cell specific uptake of fusion protein. -- Abstract: Quiescent pancreatic- (PSCs) and hepatic- (HSCs) stellate cells store vitamin A (retinol) in lipid droplets via retinol binding protein (RBP) receptor and, when activated by profibrogenic stimuli, they transform into myofibroblast-like cells which play a key role in the fibrogenesis. Despite extensive investigations, there is, however, currently no appropriate therapy available for tissue fibrosis. We previously showed that the expression of albumin, composed of three homologous domains (I–III), inhibits stellate cell activation, which requires its high-affinity fatty acid-binding sites asymmetrically distributed in domain I and III. To attain stellate cell-specific uptake, albumin (domain I/III) was coupled to RBP; RBP-albumin domain III (R-III) and albumin domain I -RBP-albumin III (I-R-III). To assess the biological activity of fusion proteins, cultured PSCs were used. Like wild type albumin, expression of R-III or I-R-III in PSCs after passage 2 (activated PSCs) induced phenotypic reversal from activated to fat-storing cells. On the other hand, R-III and I-R-III, but not albumin, secreted from transfected 293 cells were successfully internalized into and inactivated PSCs. FPLC-purified R-III was found to be internalized into PSCs via caveolae-mediated endocytosis, and its efficient cellular uptake was also observed in HSCs and podocytes among several cell lines tested. Moreover, tissue distribution of intravenously injected R-III was closely similar to that of RBP. Therefore, our data suggest that albumin-RBP fusion protein comprises of stellate cell inactivation-inducing moiety and targeting moiety, which may lead to the development of effective anti

  11. Differential protective effects of immune lymphoid cells against transplanted line Ib leukemia and immune polioencephalomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, P.S.; Lukasewycz, O.A.; Olson, D.S.; Murphy, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    The capacity of immune cells obtained from the major lymphoid compartments to protect C58 mice from transplanted line Ib leukemia, and from an age-dependent autoimmune CNS disease (immune polioencephalomyelitis = IPE) elicited by immunizing old C58 mice with inactivated Ib cells was quantified. Cells used for comparative adoptive protection tests were harvested from the major lymphoid compartments 14 to 15 days after young C58 mice were immunized with inactivated Ib cell preparations. Regression curves were plotted from survival data and the log 10 PD 50 values were determined. Immune spleen (ISC) and peritoneal cells (IPEC) were significantly more protective against transplanted Ib cells than immune lymph node (ILNC), thymic (ITC), and marrow cells (IMC). In contrast, IPEC and IMC were not protective against IPE and ITC were only marginally protective. ILNC afforded significant protection to transplantable leukemia but were only marginally protective to IPE. When ISC were treated with anti-thy 1.2 serum and complement, protection against transplanted leukemia and IPE was reduced > 99%. When donors of immune lymphoid cells were treated with 12.5 mg of cortisone acetate daily for 2 days before lymphoid cells were harvested, protection against transplanted Ib cells by ISC was reduced by approximately 90% whereas protection against IPE was totally eliminated. Considered together, these results indicate that the protective mechanisms to transplantable leukemia and IPE differ significantly in the same indicator mouse strain

  12. Bee Venom Protects against Rotenone-Induced Cell Death in NSC34 Motor Neuron Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Jung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is known to elevate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and induce apoptosis via activation of the caspase-3 pathway. Bee venom (BV extracted from honey bees has been widely used in oriental medicine and contains melittin, apamin, adolapin, mast cell-degranulating peptide, and phospholipase A2. In this study, we tested the effects of BV on neuronal cell death by examining rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. NSC34 motor neuron cells were pretreated with 2.5 μg/mL BV and stimulated with 10 μM rotenone to induce cell toxicity. We assessed cell death by Western blotting using specific antibodies, such as phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, and cleaved capase-3 and performed an MTT assay for evaluation of cell death and mitochondria staining. Pretreatment with 2.5 μg/mL BV had a neuroprotective effect against 10 μM rotenone-induced cell death in NSC34 motor neuron cells. Pre-treatment with BV significantly enhanced cell viability and ameliorated mitochondrial impairment in rotenone-treated cellular model. Moreover, BV treatment inhibited the activation of JNK signaling and cleaved caspase-3 related to cell death and increased ERK phosphorylation involved in cell survival in rotenone-treated NSC34 motor neuron cells. Taken together, we suggest that BV treatment can be useful for protection of neurons against oxidative stress or neurotoxin-induced cell death.

  13. Protective effect of cannabidiol on hydrogen peroxide‑induced apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress in nucleus pulposus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Hou, Chen; Chen, Xin; Wang, Dong; Yang, Pinglin; He, Xijing; Zhou, Jinsong; Li, Haopeng

    2016-09-01

    Cannabidiol, a major component of marijuana, protects nerves, and exerts antispasmodic, anti-inflammatory and anti‑anxiety effects. In the current study, the protective effect of cannabidiol was observed to prevent hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)‑induced apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress in nucleus pulposus cells. Nucleus pulposus cells were isolated from rats and cultured in vitro, and H2O2 was used to construct the nucleus pulposus cell model. Cell viability of the nucleus pulposus cells was assessed using a 3‑(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The ratio of apoptotic cells, and caspase‑3 or cyclooxygenase‑2 (COX‑2) mRNA expression was analyzed by annexin V‑fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium‑iodide staining and reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The quantities of interleukin (IL)‑1β and interleukin‑6 were measured using a series of assay kits. B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression levels were analyzed using western blotting. The present study identified that cannabidiol enhanced cell viability and reduced apoptosis in H2O2‑treated nucleus pulposus cells in vitro using a lumbar disc herniation (LDH) model. In addition, cannabidiol reduced caspase‑3 gene expression and augmented the Bcl‑2 protein expression levels in the nucleus pulposus cells following H2O2 exposure. Pre‑treatment with cannabidiol suppressed the promotion of COX‑2, iNOS, IL‑1β and IL‑6 expression in the nucleus pulposus cells following H2O2 exposure. Taken together, these results suggest that cannabidiol potentially exerts its protective effect on LDH via the suppression of anti‑apoptosis, anti‑inflammation and anti‑oxidative activities in nucleus pulposus cells.

  14. In Cell Footprinting Coupled with Mass Spectrometry for the Structural Analysis of Proteins in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espino, Jessica A; Mali, Vishaal S; Jones, Lisa M

    2015-08-04

    Protein footprinting coupled with mass spectrometry has become a widely used tool for the study of protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions and protein conformational change. These methods provide residue-level analysis on protein interaction sites and have been successful in studying proteins in vitro. The extension of these methods for in cell footprinting would open an avenue to study proteins that are not amenable for in vitro studies and would probe proteins in their native environment. Here we describe the application of an oxidative-based footprinting approach inside cells in which hydroxyl radicals are used to oxidatively modify proteins. Mass spectrometry is used to detect modification sites and to calculate modification levels. The method is probing biologically relevant proteins in live cells, and proteins in various cellular compartments can be oxdiatively modified. Several different amino acid residues are modified making the method a general labeling strategy for the study of a variety of proteins. Further, comparison of the extent of oxidative modification with solvent accessible surface area reveals the method successfully probes solvent accessibility. This marks the first time protein footprinting has been performed in live cells.

  15. Cellular Reprogramming Using Protein and Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong Jong Seo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, stem cells have been suggested as invaluable tools for cell therapy because of their self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potential. Thus, scientists have developed a variety of methods to generate pluripotent stem cells, from nuclear transfer technology to direct reprogramming using defined factors, or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. Considering the ethical issues and efficiency, iPSCs are thought to be one of the most promising stem cells for cell therapy. Induced pluripotent stem cells can be generated by transduction with a virus, plasmid, RNA, or protein. Herein, we provide an overview of the current technology for iPSC generation and describe protein-based transduction technology in detail.

  16. Interactions involved in pH protection of the alphavirus fusion protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Whitney; Kielian, Margaret, E-mail: margaret.kielian@einstein.yu.edu

    2015-12-15

    The alphavirus membrane protein E1 mediates low pH-triggered fusion of the viral and endosome membranes during virus entry. During virus biogenesis E1 associates as a heterodimer with the transmembrane protein p62. Late in the secretory pathway, cellular furin cleaves p62 to the mature E2 protein and a peripheral protein E3. E3 remains bound to E2 at low pH, stabilizing the heterodimer and thus protecting E1 from the acidic pH of the secretory pathway. Release of E3 at neutral pH then primes the virus for fusion during entry. Here we used site-directed mutagenesis and revertant analysis to define residues important for the interactions at the E3–E2 interface. Our data identified a key residue, E2 W235, which was required for E1 pH protection and alphavirus production. Our data also suggest additional residues on E3 and E2 that affect their interacting surfaces and thus influence the pH protection of E1 during alphavirus exit.

  17. Single-cell protein secretomic signatures as potential correlates to tumor cell lineage evolution and cell-cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minsuk eKwak

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Secreted proteins including cytokines, chemokines and growth factors represent important functional regulators mediating a range of cellular behavior and cell-cell paracrine/autocrine signaling, e.g. in the immunological system, tumor microenvironment or stem cell niche. Detection of these proteins is of great value not only in basic cell biology but also for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of human diseases such as cancer. However, due to co-production of multiple effector proteins from a single cell, referred to as polyfunctionality, it is biologically informative to measure a panel of secreted proteins, or secretomic signature, at the level of single cells. Recent evidence further indicates that a genetically-identical cell population can give rise to diverse phenotypic differences. It is known that cytokines, for example, in the immune system define the effector functions and lineage differentiation of immune cells. In this Perspective Article, we hypothesize that protein secretion profile may represent a universal measure to identify the definitive correlate in the larger context of cellular functions to dissect cellular heterogeneity and evolutionary lineage relationship in human cancer.

  18. Gonadal cell surface receptor for plasma retinol-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna Bhat, M.; Cama, H.R.

    1979-01-01

    A specific membrane receptor for plasma retinol-binding protein has been demonstrated in testicular cells. Prealbumin-2 did not show any specific binding to the membrane. The affinity of retinol-binding protein for receptor drastically decreases upon delivery of retinol and the retinol-binding protein does not enter the cell. The mechanism of delivery of retinol to the target cell by plasma retinol-binding protein has been investigated. The process involves two steps; direct binding of retinol-binding protein to the receptor and uptake of retinol by the target cell with a concomitant drastic reduction in the affinity of the retinol-binding protein to the receptor. Probably the second step of the process needs a cytosolic factor, possibly the cellular retinol-binding protein or an enzyme. The binding of retinol-binding protein to the receptor is saturable and reversible. The interaction shows a Ksub(d) value of 2.1x10 -10 . The specific binding of a retinol-binding protein with great affinity has been employed in the development of a method for radioassay of the receptor. The receptor level of the gonadal cell has been found to vary with the stage of differentiation. The receptor concentrations in 11-week-old birds and adult birds are comparable. Testosterone treatment of 11-week-old birds produced a substantial increase in the receptor concentration over control, while the protein content increased marginally, indicating that, probably, synthesis of the receptor is specifcally induced by testosterone during spermatogenesis, and the concentration of receptor is relatively higher before the formation of the acrosome. (Auth.)

  19. Detecting Protein-Protein Interactions in the Intact Cell of Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633)

    OpenAIRE

    Winters, Michael S.; Day, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    The salt bridge, paired group-specific reagent cyanogen (ethanedinitrile; C2N2) converts naturally occurring pairs of functional groups into covalently linked products. Cyanogen readily permeates cell walls and membranes. When the paired groups are shared between associated proteins, isolation of the covalently linked proteins allows their identity to be assigned. Examination of organisms of known genome sequence permits identification of the linked proteins by mass spectrometric techniques a...

  20. BAG3: a multifaceted protein that regulates major cell pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, A; Graziano, V; De Laurenzi, V; Pascale, M; Turco, M C

    2011-01-01

    Bcl2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) protein is a member of BAG family of co-chaperones that interacts with the ATPase domain of the heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 through BAG domain (110–124 amino acids). BAG3 is the only member of the family to be induced by stressful stimuli, mainly through the activity of heat shock factor 1 on bag3 gene promoter. In addition to the BAG domain, BAG3 contains also a WW domain and a proline-rich (PXXP) repeat, that mediate binding to partners different from Hsp70. These multifaceted interactions underlie BAG3 ability to modulate major biological processes, that is, apoptosis, development, cytoskeleton organization and autophagy, thereby mediating cell adaptive responses to stressful stimuli. In normal cells, BAG3 is constitutively present in a very few cell types, including cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle cells, in which the protein appears to contribute to cell resistance to mechanical stress. A growing body of evidence indicate that BAG3 is instead expressed in several tumor types. In different tumor contexts, BAG3 protein was reported to sustain cell survival, resistance to therapy, and/or motility and metastatization. In some tumor types, down-modulation of BAG3 levels was shown, as a proof-of-principle, to inhibit neoplastic cell growth in animal models. This review attempts to outline the emerging mechanisms that can underlie some of the biological activities of the protein, focusing on implications in tumor progression. PMID:21472004

  1. Baculovirus IE2 Stimulates the Expression of Heat Shock Proteins in Insect and Mammalian Cells to Facilitate Its Proper Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Hsuan; Wei, Sung-Chan; Lo, Huei-Ru; Chao, Yu-Chan

    2016-01-01

    Baculoviruses have gained popularity as pest control agents and for protein production in insect systems. These viruses are also becoming popular for gene expression, tissue engineering and gene therapy in mammalian systems. Baculovirus infection triggers a heat shock response, and this response is crucial for its successful infection of host insect cells. However, the viral protein(s) or factor(s) that trigger this response are not yet clear. Previously, we revealed that IE2-an early gene product of the baculovirus-could form unique nuclear bodies for the strong trans-activation of various promoters in mammalian cells. Here, we purified IE2 nuclear bodies from Vero E6 cells and investigated the associated proteins by using mass spectrometry. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) were found to be one of the major IE2-associated proteins. Our experiments show that HSPs are greatly induced by IE2 and are crucial for the trans-activation function of IE2. Interestingly, blocking both heat shock protein expression and the proteasome pathway preserved the IE2 protein and its nuclear body structure, and revived its function. These observations reveal that HSPs do not function directly to assist the formation of the nuclear body structure, but may rather protect IE2 from proteasome degradation. Aside from functional studies in mammalian cells, we also show that HSPs were stimulated and required to determine IE2 protein levels, in insect cells infected with baculovirus. Upon inhibiting the expression of heat shock proteins, baculovirus IE2 was substantially suppressed, resulting in a significantly suppressed viral titer. Thus, we demonstrate a unique feature in that IE2 can function in both insect and non-host mammalian cells to stimulate HSPs, which may be associated with IE2 stabilization and lead to the protection of the its strong gene activation function in mammalian cells. On the other hand, during viral infection in insect cells, IE2 could also strongly stimulate HSPs and

  2. A bispecific protein capable of engaging CTLA-4 and MHCII protects non-obese diabetic mice from autoimmune diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Zhao

    Full Text Available Crosslinking ligand-engaged cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4 to the T cell receptor (TCR with a bispecific fusion protein (BsB comprised of a mutant mouse CD80 and lymphocyte activation antigen-3 (LAG-3 has been shown to attenuate TCR signaling and to direct T-cell differentiation toward Foxp3(+ regulatory T cells (Tregs in an allogenic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR. Here, we show that antigen-specific Tregs can also be induced in an antigen-specific setting in vitro. Treatment of non-obese diabetic (NOD female mice between 9-12 weeks of age with a short course of BsB elicited a transient increase of Tregs in the blood and moderately delayed the onset of autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D. However, a longer course of treatment (10 weeks of 4-13 weeks-old female NOD animals with BsB significantly delayed the onset of disease or protected animals from developing diabetes, with only 13% of treated animals developing diabetes by 35 weeks of age compared to 80% of the animals in the control group. Histopathological analysis of the pancreata of the BsB-treated mice that remained non-diabetic revealed the preservation of insulin-producing β-cells despite the presence of different degrees of insulitis. Thus, a bifunctional protein capable of engaging CTLA-4 and MHCII and indirectly co-ligating CTLA-4 to the TCR protected NOD mice from developing T1D.

  3. Trimetazidine Protects Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Against Hypoxia and Serum Deprivation Induced Apoptosis by Activation of Akt

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    Xuhe Gong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC transplantation is a promising therapy for cardiac repair. However, the efficacy is limited by the poor viability of MSCs in the infarcted heart. Recent findings have implicated that trimetazidine (TMZ enhanced the survival of the stem cells under various conditions. However, as the stem cells in these studies were animal-derived, little information is available about the effects of TMZ on human MSCs. Herein, we propose that TMZ may protect human MSCs against apoptosis induced by Hypoxia/Serum deprivation (H/SD. Methods: Human umbilical cord MSCs (UC-MSCs from Wharton's jelly were pretreated with 10µM TMZ of H/SD with or without the Akt inhibitor LY294002. The morphological changes were assessed using Hoechst 33342. Apoptosis was evaluated via Annexin V/PI staining; and apoptosis-related proteins were detected using Western-blot. Protein chip technology was used to screen for differences between the cell supernatants. Results: TMZ had a significant protective effect against H/SD-induced apoptosis, accompanied by an increase in Bcl-2 and p-Akt. The TMZ-mediated anti-apoptotic effect on MSCs could be attenuated by treatment with LY294002. Moreover, protein chip assays showed that TMZ treatment increased the paracrine functions of MSCs. Conclusion: Trimetazidine protects human UC-MSCs from H/SD-induced apoptosis via the Akt pathway and may therefore be a potentially useful therapeutic adjunct for transplanting MSCs into damaged heart after myocardial infarction.

  4. Studies on the transfer of protective immunity with lymphoid cells from mice immune to malaria sporozoites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhave, J.P.; Strickland, G.T.; Jaffe, H.A.; Ahmed, A.

    1978-01-01

    In an effort to understand the mechanisms involved in the protective immunity to malarial sporozoites, an A/J mouse/Plasmodium berghei model was studied. Protective immunity could consistently be adoptively transferred only by using sublethal irradiation of recipients (500 R); a spleen equivalent (100 x 10 6 ) of donor cells from immune syngeneic mice; and a small booster immunization (1 x 10 4 ) of recipients with irradiation-attenuated sporozoites. Recipient animals treated in this manner were protected from lethal challenge with 1 x 10 4 nonattenuated sporozoites. Immune and nonimmune serum and spleen cells from nonimmune animals did not protect recipient mice. Fewer immune spleen cells (50 x 10 6 ) protected some recipients. In vitro treatment of immune spleen cells with anti-theta sera and complement abolished their ability to transfer protection. This preliminary study suggests that protective sporozoite immunity can be transferred with cells, and that it is T cell dependent

  5. Proteomic analysis of the herpes simplex virus 1 virion protein 16 transactivator protein in infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Hyung; Knipe, David M

    2015-06-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 virion protein 16 (VP16) tegument protein forms a transactivation complex with the cellular proteins host cell factor 1 (HCF-1) and octamer-binding transcription factor 1 (Oct-1) upon entry into the host cell. VP16 has also been shown to interact with a number of virion tegument proteins and viral glycoprotein H to promote viral assembly, but no comprehensive study of the VP16 proteome has been performed at early times postinfection. We therefore performed a proteomic analysis of VP16-interacting proteins at 3 h postinfection. We confirmed the interaction of VP16 with HCF-1 and a large number of cellular Mediator complex proteins, but most surprisingly, we found that the major viral protein associating with VP16 is the infected cell protein 4 (ICP4) immediate-early (IE) transactivator protein. These results raise the potential for a new function for VP16 in associating with the IE ICP4 and playing a role in transactivation of early and late gene expression, in addition to its well-documented function in transactivation of IE gene expression. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Skin cell protection against UVA by Sideroxyl, a new antioxidant complementary to sunscreens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pygmalion, Marie-Jocelyne; Ruiz, Laetitia; Popovic, Evelyne; Gizard, Julie; Portes, Pascal; Marat, Xavier; Lucet-Levannier, Karine; Muller, Benoit; Galey, Jean-Baptiste

    2010-12-01

    Oxidative stress resulting from photosensitized ROS production in skin is widely accepted as the main contributor to the deleterious effects of UVA exposure. Among the mechanisms known to be involved in UVA-induced oxidative damage, iron plays a central role. UVA radiation of skin cells induces an immediate release of iron, which can then act as a catalyst for uncontrolled oxidation reactions of cell components. Such site-specific damage can scarcely be counteracted by classical antioxidants. In contrast, iron chelators potentially offer an effective way to protect skin against UVA insults. However, iron chelation is very difficult to achieve without disturbing iron homeostasis or inducing iron depletion. A novel compound was developed to avoid these potentially harmful side effects. Sideroxyl was designed to acquire its strong chelating capability only during oxidative stress according to an original process of intramolecular hydroxylation. Herein, we describe in vitro results demonstrating the protective efficiency of Sideroxyl against deleterious effects of UVA at the molecular, cellular, and tissular levels. First, the Sideroxyl diacid form protects a model protein against UVA-induced photosensitized carbonylation. Second, intracellular ROS are dose-dependently decreased in the presence of Sideroxyl in both human cultured fibroblasts and human keratinocytes. Third, Sideroxyl protects normal human fibroblasts against UVA-induced DNA damage as measured by the comet assay and MMP-1 production. Finally, Sideroxyl provides protection against UVA-induced alterations in human reconstructed skin. These results suggest that Sideroxyl may prevent UVA-induced damage in human skin as a complement to sunscreens, especially in the long-wavelength UVA range. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein diffusion in plant cell plasma membranes: The cell-wall corral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre eMartinière

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Studying protein diffusion informs us about how proteins interact with their environment. Work on protein diffusion over the last several decades has illustrated the complex nature of biological lipid bilayers. The plasma membrane contains an array of membrane-spanning proteins or proteins with peripheral membrane associations. Maintenance of plasma membrane microstructure can be via physical features that provide intrinsic ordering such as lipid microdomains, or from membrane-associated structures such as the cytoskeleton. Recent evidence indicates, that in the case of plant cells, the cell wall seems to be a major player in maintaining plasma membrane microstructure. This interconnection / interaction between cell-wall and plasma membrane proteins most likely plays an important role in signal transduction, cell growth, and cell physiological responses to the environment.

  8. Protein diffusion in plant cell plasma membranes: the cell-wall corral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinière, Alexandre; Runions, John

    2013-01-01

    Studying protein diffusion informs us about how proteins interact with their environment. Work on protein diffusion over the last several decades has illustrated the complex nature of biological lipid bilayers. The plasma membrane contains an array of membrane-spanning proteins or proteins with peripheral membrane associations. Maintenance of plasma membrane microstructure can be via physical features that provide intrinsic ordering such as lipid microdomains, or from membrane-associated structures such as the cytoskeleton. Recent evidence indicates, that in the case of plant cells, the cell wall seems to be a major player in maintaining plasma membrane microstructure. This interconnection / interaction between cell-wall and plasma membrane proteins most likely plays an important role in signal transduction, cell growth, and cell physiological responses to the environment.

  9. Virus-like particles vaccine containing Clonorchis sinensis tegumental protein induces partial protection against Clonorchis sinensis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Hun; Kim, Ah-Ra; Lee, Su-Hwa; Quan, Fu-Shi

    2017-12-29

    Human clonorchiasis, caused by the infection of Clonorchis sinensis, is one of the major health problems in Southeast Asia. However, vaccine efficacy against C. sinensis infection remains largely unknown. In this study, for the first time, we generated virus-like particles (VLPs) vaccine containing the C. sinensis tegumental protein 22.3 kDa (CsTP 22.3) and the influenza matrix protein (M1) as a core protein, and investigated the vaccine efficacy in Sprague-Dawley rats. Intranasal immunization of VLPs vaccine induced C. sinensis-specific IgG, IgG2a and IgG2c in the sera and IgA responses in the feces and intestines. Notably, upon challenge infection with C. sinensis metacercariae, significantly lower adult worm loads (70.2%) were measured in the liver of rats immunized with VLPs, compared to those of naïve rats. Furthermore, VLPs immunization induced antibody secreting cells (ASC) responses and CD4+/CD8+ T cell responses in the spleen. Our results indicated that VLPs vaccine containing C. sinensis CsTP 22.3 kDa provided partial protection against C. sisnensis infection. Thus, VLPs could be a potential vaccine candidate against C. sinensis.

  10. NSA2, a novel nucleolus protein regulates cell proliferation and cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Heyu; Ma, Xi; Shi, Taiping; Song, Quansheng; Zhao, Hongshan; Ma, Dalong

    2010-01-01

    NSA2 (Nop seven-associated 2) was previously identified in a high throughput screen of novel human genes associated with cell proliferation, and the NSA2 protein is evolutionarily conserved across different species. In this study, we revealed that NSA2 is broadly expressed in human tissues and cultured cell lines, and located in the nucleolus of the cell. Both of the putative nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of NSA2, also overlapped with nucleolar localization signals (NoLSs), are capable of directing nucleolar accumulation. Moreover, over-expression of the NSA2 protein promoted cell growth in different cell lines and regulated the G1/S transition in the cell cycle. SiRNA silencing of the NSA2 transcript attenuated the cell growth and dramatically blocked the cell cycle in G1/S transition. Our results demonstrated that NSA2 is a nucleolar protein involved in cell proliferation and cell cycle regulation.

  11. Vitreous Humor Changes Expression of Iron-Handling Proteins in Lens Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goralska, Malgorzata; Fleisher, Lloyd N.; McGahan, M. Christine

    2017-01-01

    Purpose In humans, vitrectomy is associated with development of nuclear cataracts. Iron catalyzes free radical formation causing oxidative damage, which is implicated in cataract formation. This study was designed to determine if vitreous humor, which can initiate differentiation of lens epithelial cells, would have an effect on iron-handling proteins. Methods Cultured canine lens epithelial cells were treated with collected canine vitreous humor. Lysates of treated and control cells were separated by SDS-PAGE. Ferritin H- and L-chains, transferrin receptor 1, and aquaporin 0 were immunodetected and quantitated with specific antibodies. Morphologic changes in treated cells were assessed. Results Treatment of lens epithelial cells with a 33% (vol/vol) solution of vitreous humor changed the morphology of lens cells and induced expression of aquaporin 0, a marker of fiber cell differentiation that was undetectable in control cells. Treatment did not modify the size of iron-handling proteins but significantly increased content of ferritin from 2.9- to 8.8-fold over control and decreased levels of transferrin receptor by 37% to 59%. Conclusions Vitreous humor may significantly limit iron uptake by transferrin/transferrin receptor pathway, and by increasing ferritin levels could profoundly increase the iron-storage capacity of ferritin in lens cells. Vitreous humor may play a significant protective role against iron-catalyzed oxidative damage of lens epithelial cells and therefore in the formation of cataracts. PMID:28245299

  12. CellMap visualizes protein-protein interactions and subcellular localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallago, Christian; Goldberg, Tatyana; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel Angel; Alanis-Lobato, Gregorio; Rost, Burkhard

    2018-01-01

    Many tools visualize protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. The tool introduced here, CellMap, adds one crucial novelty by visualizing PPI networks in the context of subcellular localization, i.e. the location in the cell or cellular component in which a PPI happens. Users can upload images of cells and define areas of interest against which PPIs for selected proteins are displayed (by default on a cartoon of a cell). Annotations of localization are provided by the user or through our in-house database. The visualizer and server are written in JavaScript, making CellMap easy to customize and to extend by researchers and developers. PMID:29497493

  13. Inhibition of ice recrystallization and cryoprotective activity of wheat proteins in liver and pancreatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow-Shi-Yée, Mélanie; Briard, Jennie G; Grondin, Mélanie; Averill-Bates, Diana A; Ben, Robert N; Ouellet, François

    2016-05-01

    Efficient cryopreservation of cells at ultralow temperatures requires the use of substances that help maintain viability and metabolic functions post-thaw. We are developing new technology where plant proteins are used to substitute the commonly-used, but relatively toxic chemical dimethyl sulfoxide. Recombinant forms of four structurally diverse wheat proteins, TaIRI-2 (ice recrystallization inhibition), TaBAS1 (2-Cys peroxiredoxin), WCS120 (dehydrin), and TaENO (enolase) can efficiently cryopreserve hepatocytes and insulin-secreting INS832/13 cells. This study shows that TaIRI-2 and TaENO are internalized during the freeze-thaw process, while TaBAS1 and WCS120 remain at the extracellular level. Possible antifreeze activity of the four proteins was assessed. The "splat cooling" method for quantifying ice recrystallization inhibition activity (a property that characterizes antifreeze proteins) revealed that TaIRI-2 and TaENO are more potent than TaBAS1 and WCS120. Because of their ability to inhibit ice recrystallization, the wheat recombinant proteins TaIRI-2 and TaENO are promising candidates and could prove useful to improve cryopreservation protocols for hepatocytes and insulin-secreting cells, and possibly other cell types. TaENO does not have typical ice-binding domains, and the TargetFreeze tool did not predict an antifreeze capacity, suggesting the existence of nontypical antifreeze domains. The fact that TaBAS1 is an efficient cryoprotectant but does not show antifreeze activity indicates a different mechanism of action. The cryoprotective properties conferred by WCS120 depend on biochemical properties that remain to be determined. Overall, our results show that the proteins' efficiencies vary between cell types, and confirm that a combination of different protection mechanisms is needed to successfully cryopreserve mammalian cells. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  14. Thematic minireview series: cell biology of G protein signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohlman, Henrik G

    2015-03-13

    This thematic series is on the topic of cell signaling from a cell biology perspective, with a particular focus on G proteins. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, also known as seven-transmembrane receptors) are typically found at the cell surface. Upon agonist binding, these receptors will activate a GTP-binding G protein at the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Additionally, there is growing evidence that G proteins can also be activated by non-receptor binding partners, and they can signal from non-plasma membrane compartments. The production of second messengers at multiple, spatially distinct locations represents a type of signal encoding that has been largely neglected. The first minireview in the series describes biosensors that are being used to monitor G protein signaling events in live cells. The second describes the implementation of antibody-based biosensors to dissect endosome signaling by G proteins and their receptors. The third describes the function of a non-receptor, cytoplasmic activator of G protein signaling, called GIV (Girdin). Collectively, the advances described in these articles provide a deeper understanding and emerging opportunities for new pharmacology. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Th17 cells are associated with protection from ventilator associated pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marika Orlov

    Full Text Available CD4+ T-helper 17 (Th17 cells and Interleukin (IL-17A play an important role in clearing pathogens in mouse models of pneumonia. We hypothesized that numbers of Th17 cells and levels of IL-17A are associated with risk for nosocomial pneumonia in humans.We collected bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid from mechanically ventilated (n = 25 patients undergoing quantitative bacterial culture to evaluate for ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP. We identified Th17 cells by positive selection of CD4+ cells, stimulation with ionomycin and PMA, then staining for CD4, CD45, CCR6, IL-17A, and IFN-γ followed by flow cytometric analysis (n = 21. We measured inflammatory cytokine levels, including IL-17A, in BAL fluid by immunoassay.VAP was detected in 13 of the 25 subjects. We identified a decreased percentage of IL-17A producing Th17 cells in BAL fluid from patients with VAP compared to those without (p = 0.02. However, we found no significant difference in levels of IL-17A in patients with VAP compared to those without (p = 0.07. Interestingly, IL-17A levels did not correlate with Th17 cell numbers. IL-17A levels did show strong positive correlations with alveolar neutrophil numbers and total protein levels.Th17 cells are found at lower percentages in BAL fluid from mechanically ventilated patients with VAP and IL-17A levels correlated with Th17 cell percentages in non-VAP subjects, but not those with VAP. These findings suggest that Th17 cells may be protective against development of nosocomial pneumonia in patients receiving mechanical ventilation and that alveolar IL-17A in VAP may be derived from sources other than alveolar Th17 cells.

  16. Mitochondrial fission proteins regulate programmed cell death in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fannjiang, Yihru; Cheng, Wen-Chih; Lee, Sarah J; Qi, Bing; Pevsner, Jonathan; McCaffery, J Michael; Hill, R Blake; Basañez, Gorka; Hardwick, J Marie

    2004-11-15

    The possibility that single-cell organisms undergo programmed cell death has been questioned in part because they lack several key components of the mammalian cell death machinery. However, yeast encode a homolog of human Drp1, a mitochondrial fission protein that was shown previously to promote mammalian cell death and the excessive mitochondrial fragmentation characteristic of apoptotic mammalian cells. In support of a primordial origin of programmed cell death involving mitochondria, we found that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of human Drp1, Dnm1, promotes mitochondrial fragmentation/degradation and cell death following treatment with several death stimuli. Two Dnm1-interacting factors also regulate yeast cell death. The WD40 repeat protein Mdv1/Net2 promotes cell death, consistent with its role in mitochondrial fission. In contrast to its fission function in healthy cells, Fis1 unexpectedly inhibits Dnm1-mediated mitochondrial fission and cysteine protease-dependent cell death in yeast. Furthermore, the ability of yeast Fis1 to inhibit mitochondrial fission and cell death can be functionally replaced by human Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Together, these findings indicate that yeast and mammalian cells have a conserved programmed death pathway regulated by a common molecular component, Drp1/Dnm1, that is inhibited by a Bcl-2-like function.

  17. Cell wall proteins in seedling cotyledons of Prosopis chilensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, J G; Cardemil, L

    1994-01-01

    Four cell wall proteins of cotyledons of Prosopis chilensis seedlings were characterized by PAGE and Western analyses using a polyclonal antibody, generated against soybean seed coat extensin. These proteins had M(r)s of 180,000, 126,000, 107,000 and 63,000, as determined by SDS-PAGE. The proteins exhibited a fluorescent positive reaction with dansylhydrazine suggesting that they are glycoproteins; they did not show peroxidase activity. The cell wall proteins were also characterized by their amino acid composition and by their amino-terminal sequence. These analyses revealed that there are two groups of related cell wall proteins in the cotyledons. The first group comprises the proteins of M(r)s 180,000, 126,000, 107,000 which are rich in glutamic acid/glutamine and aspartic acid/asparagine and they have almost identical NH2-terminal sequences. The second group comprises the M(r) 63,000 protein which is rich in proline, glycine, valine and tyrosine, with an NH2-terminal sequence which was very similar to that of soybean proline-rich proteins.

  18. Nanoparticles-cell association predicted by protein corona fingerprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchetti, S.; Digiacomo, L.; Pozzi, D.; Peruzzi, G.; Micarelli, E.; Mahmoudi, M.; Caracciolo, G.

    2016-06-01

    In a physiological environment (e.g., blood and interstitial fluids) nanoparticles (NPs) will bind proteins shaping a ``protein corona'' layer. The long-lived protein layer tightly bound to the NP surface is referred to as the hard corona (HC) and encodes information that controls NP bioactivity (e.g. cellular association, cellular signaling pathways, biodistribution, and toxicity). Decrypting this complex code has become a priority to predict the NP biological outcomes. Here, we use a library of 16 lipid NPs of varying size (Ø ~ 100-250 nm) and surface chemistry (unmodified and PEGylated) to investigate the relationships between NP physicochemical properties (nanoparticle size, aggregation state and surface charge), protein corona fingerprints (PCFs), and NP-cell association. We found out that none of the NPs' physicochemical properties alone was exclusively able to account for association with human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa). For the entire library of NPs, a total of 436 distinct serum proteins were detected. We developed a predictive-validation modeling that provides a means of assessing the relative significance of the identified corona proteins. Interestingly, a minor fraction of the HC, which consists of only 8 PCFs were identified as main promoters of NP association with HeLa cells. Remarkably, identified PCFs have several receptors with high level of expression on the plasma membrane of HeLa cells.In a physiological environment (e.g., blood and interstitial fluids) nanoparticles (NPs) will bind proteins shaping a ``protein corona'' layer. The long-lived protein layer tightly bound to the NP surface is referred to as the hard corona (HC) and encodes information that controls NP bioactivity (e.g. cellular association, cellular signaling pathways, biodistribution, and toxicity). Decrypting this complex code has become a priority to predict the NP biological outcomes. Here, we use a library of 16 lipid NPs of varying size (Ø ~ 100-250 nm) and surface

  19. Inhibition of host cell translation elongation by Legionella pneumophila blocks the host cell unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempstead, Andrew D; Isberg, Ralph R

    2015-12-08

    Cells of the innate immune system recognize bacterial pathogens by detecting common microbial patterns as well as pathogen-specific activities. One system that responds to these stimuli is the IRE1 branch of the unfolded protein response (UPR), a sensor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Activation of IRE1, in the context of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, induces strong proinflammatory cytokine induction. We show here that Legionella pneumophila, an intravacuolar pathogen that replicates in an ER-associated compartment, blocks activation of the IRE1 pathway despite presenting pathogen products that stimulate this response. L. pneumophila TLR ligands induced the splicing of mRNA encoding XBP1s, the main target of IRE1 activity. L. pneumophila was able to inhibit both chemical and bacterial induction of XBP1 splicing via bacterial translocated proteins that interfere with host protein translation. A strain lacking five translocated translation elongation inhibitors was unable to block XBP1 splicing, but this could be rescued by expression of a single such inhibitor, consistent with limitation of the response by translation elongation inhibitors. Chemical inhibition of translation elongation blocked pattern recognition receptor-mediated XBP1 splicing, mimicking the effects of the bacterial translation inhibitors. In contrast, host cell-promoted inhibition of translation initiation in response to the pathogen was ineffective in blocking XBP1 splicing, demonstrating the need for the elongation inhibitors for protection from the UPR. The inhibition of host translation elongation may be a common strategy used by pathogens to limit the innate immune response by interfering with signaling via the UPR.

  20. Myb proteins: angels and demons in normal and transformed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ye; Ness, Scott A

    2011-01-01

    A key regulator of proliferation, differentiation and cell fate, the c-Myb transcription factor regulates the expression of hundreds of genes and is in turn regulated by numerous pathways and protein interactions. However, the most unique feature of c-Myb is that it can be converted into an oncogenic transforming protein through a few mutations that completely change its activity and specificity. The c-Myb protein is a myriad of interactions and activities rolled up in a protein that controls proliferation and differentiation in many different cell types. Here we discuss the background and recent progress that have led to a better understanding of this complex protein, and outline the questions that have yet to be answered.

  1. Virus-producing cells determine the host protein profiles of HIV-1 virion cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Upon HIV entry into target cells, viral cores are released and rearranged into reverse transcription complexes (RTCs), which support reverse transcription and also protect and transport viral cDNA to the site of integration. RTCs are composed of viral and cellular proteins that originate from both target and producer cells, the latter entering the target cell within the viral core. However, the proteome of HIV-1 viral cores in the context of the type of producer cells has not yet been characterized. Results We examined the proteomic profiles of the cores purified from HIV-1 NL4-3 virions assembled in Sup-T1 cells (T lymphocytes), PMA and vitamin D3 activated THP1 (model of macrophages, mMΦ), and non-activated THP1 cells (model of monocytes, mMN) and assessed potential involvement of identified proteins in the early stages of infection using gene ontology information and data from genome-wide screens on proteins important for HIV-1 replication. We identified 202 cellular proteins incorporated in the viral cores (T cells: 125, mMΦ: 110, mMN: 90) with the overlap between these sets limited to 42 proteins. The groups of RNA binding (29), DNA binding (17), cytoskeleton (15), cytoskeleton regulation (21), chaperone (18), vesicular trafficking-associated (12) and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway-associated proteins (9) were most numerous. Cores of the virions from SupT1 cells contained twice as many RNA binding proteins as cores of THP1-derived virus, whereas cores of virions from mMΦ and mMN were enriched in components of cytoskeleton and vesicular transport machinery, most probably due to differences in virion assembly pathways between these cells. Spectra of chaperones, cytoskeletal proteins and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway components were similar between viral cores from different cell types, whereas DNA-binding and especially RNA-binding proteins were highly diverse. Western blot analysis showed that within the group of overlapping proteins, the level of

  2. Whey utilization for single-cell protein production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barraquio, V; Silverio, L G; Revilleza, R P; Fernadez, W L

    1980-01-01

    The production of single-cell protein by yeast assimilation of lactose in soft cheese whey was studied using Candida pseudotropicalis as a test organism. Under shake-flask cultivation conditions with deproteinized whey as the medium, lactose (initially 4.20%) was completely assimilated in 48h; cell mass was 5.56 mg/mL after 72h; and average protein content of the dried mass was approximately 11.8%. Batch cultivation using undeproteinized whey resulted in a faster lactose utilization rate from an initial 3.93% to a residual 0.56% in 12 h; cell mass was 8.41 mg/mL in 10 h; and average protein was approximately 37.7%. In a semicontinuous culture with 10 to the power of 7 viable cells/mL as initial cell concentration, 15.69 mg/mL cell mass with a mean protein content of approximately 21.4% could be produced and lactose could be considerably consumed (from an initial 4.75% to a residual 0.42%) within 13-14 h. Supplementation with (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/S0/sub 4/ and KH/sub 2/P0/sub 4/ did not increase cell mass (12.47 mg/mL in 12 h) and hasten lactose assimulation (from initial 4.49% to residual 0.3% in 12 h). Average protein content was approximately 31%. Cell mass yield was established as 0.29 mg yeast cell/mg lactose consumed. Factors that might have affected protein content are also discussed.

  3. Timing the Generation of Distinct Retinal Cells by Homeobox Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decembrini, Sarah; Andreazzoli, Massimiliano; Vignali, Robert; Barsacchi, Giuseppina; Cremisi, Federico

    2006-01-01

    The reason why different types of vertebrate nerve cells are generated in a particular sequence is still poorly understood. In the vertebrate retina, homeobox genes play a crucial role in establishing different cell identities. Here we provide evidence of a cellular clock that sequentially activates distinct homeobox genes in embryonic retinal cells, linking the identity of a retinal cell to its time of generation. By in situ expression analysis, we found that the three Xenopus homeobox genes Xotx5b, Xvsx1, and Xotx2 are initially transcribed but not translated in early retinal progenitors. Their translation requires cell cycle progression and is sequentially activated in photoreceptors (Xotx5b) and bipolar cells (Xvsx1 and Xotx2). Furthermore, by in vivo lipofection of “sensors” in which green fluorescent protein translation is under control of the 3′ untranslated region (UTR), we found that the 3′ UTRs of Xotx5b, Xvsx1, and Xotx2 are sufficient to drive a spatiotemporal pattern of translation matching that of the corresponding proteins and consistent with the time of generation of photoreceptors (Xotx5b) and bipolar cells (Xvsx1 and Xotx2). The block of cell cycle progression of single early retinal progenitors impairs their differentiation as photoreceptors and bipolar cells, but is rescued by the lipofection of Xotx5b and Xvsx1 coding sequences, respectively. This is the first evidence to our knowledge that vertebrate homeobox proteins can work as effectors of a cellular clock to establish distinct cell identities. PMID:16903786

  4. Timing the generation of distinct retinal cells by homeobox proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Decembrini

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The reason why different types of vertebrate nerve cells are generated in a particular sequence is still poorly understood. In the vertebrate retina, homeobox genes play a crucial role in establishing different cell identities. Here we provide evidence of a cellular clock that sequentially activates distinct homeobox genes in embryonic retinal cells, linking the identity of a retinal cell to its time of generation. By in situ expression analysis, we found that the three Xenopus homeobox genes Xotx5b, Xvsx1, and Xotx2 are initially transcribed but not translated in early retinal progenitors. Their translation requires cell cycle progression and is sequentially activated in photoreceptors (Xotx5b and bipolar cells (Xvsx1 and Xotx2. Furthermore, by in vivo lipofection of "sensors" in which green fluorescent protein translation is under control of the 3' untranslated region (UTR, we found that the 3' UTRs of Xotx5b, Xvsx1, and Xotx2 are sufficient to drive a spatiotemporal pattern of translation matching that of the corresponding proteins and consistent with the time of generation of photoreceptors (Xotx5b and bipolar cells (Xvsx1