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Sample records for protein band showed

  1. Patients with polymyositis show changes in muscle protein charges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, E M; Jacobsen, Søren; Rasmussen, L

    1989-01-01

    Polymyositis (PM) appears with indolent proximal muscle weakness and is an inflammatory disease with breakdown of muscle cells. In our study the protein charge concentrations of the contractile proteins in the A and I bands were determined, applying a microelectrode technique. Patients with PM sh...

  2. Mitochondrial Band-7 family proteins: scaffolds for respiratory chain assembly?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadette eGehl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The band-7 protein family comprises a diverse set of membrane-bound proteins characterised by the presence of a conserved domain. The exact function of this band-7 domain remains elusive, but examples from animal and bacterial stomatin-type proteins demonstrate binding to lipids and the ability to assemble into membrane-bound oligomers that form putative scaffolds. Some members, such as prohibitins and human stomatin-like protein 2 (HsSLP2, localise to the mitochondrial inner membrane where they function in cristae formation and hyperfusion. In Arabidopsis, the band-7 protein family has diversified and includes plant-specific members. Mitochondrial-localised members include prohibitins (AtPHBs and two stomatin-like proteins (AtSLP1 and -2. Studies into PHB function in plants have demonstrated an involvement in root meristem proliferation and putative scaffold formation for mAAA proteases, but it remains unknown how these roles are achieved at the molecular level. In this minireview we summarise the current status of band-7 protein functions in Arabidopsis, and speculate how the mitochondrial members might recruit specific lipids to form microdomains that could shape the organisation and functioning of the respiratory chain.

  3. Variation of morphology, karyotype and protein band pattern of adenium (Adenium obesum varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PRABANG SETYONO

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Hastuti D, Suranto, Setyono P. 2009. Variation of morphology, karyotype and protein band pattern of adenium (Adenium obesum varieties. Nusantara Bioscience 1: 78-83. The aim of this research to find out the Adenium obesum variation from six varieties, namely: obesum, cery, red lucas, red fanta , white bigben and harry potter based on morphology, karyotype, as well as protein banding pattern. The chromosome preparation was made using semi-permanent squash method from the tip of root plant; while protein banding pattern was made using SDS-PAGE method. Qualitative data included shape and color of the leave and flower described from each variety. Data were presented in morphometry and analyzed using ANOVA and then followed by DMRT with 5% of confidence levels, indicated significance difference. Protein banding pattern, the root, stem, leave and all organs were analyzed using Hierarchical Cluster Analysis method with Average Linkage (between Groups using SPSS 10.0. The result of research shows that the six A. obesum varieties have morphological character with no variation of light green to dark green leave, not hairy, smooth leave bone, meanwhile for light red to dark red flower crown color although some of them are white and the same funnel color, yellow. All varieties of A. obesum have same number of chromosome, 2n = 22 and shows the difference ranging from 2.56 to 5.13 um. In the banding pattern formed qualitatively, there is variation among the six varieties.

  4. Major urinary protein (MUP) profiles show dynamic changes rather than individual ‘barcode’ signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoß, M.; Luzynski, K.C.; Ante, M.; Miller, I.; Penn, D.J.

    2016-01-01

    House mice (Mus musculus) produce a variable number of major urinary proteins (MUPs), and studies suggest that each individual produces a unique MUP profile that provides a distinctive odor signature controlling individual and kin recognition. This ‘barcode hypothesis’ requires that MUP urinary profiles show high individual variability within populations and also high individual consistency over time, but tests of these assumptions are lacking. We analyzed urinary MUP profiles of 66 wild-caught house mice from eight populations using isoelectric focusing. We found that MUP profiles of wild male house mice are not individually unique, and though they were highly variable, closer inspection revealed that the variation strongly depended on MUP band type. The prominent (‘major) bands were surprisingly homogenous (and hence most MUPs are not polymorphic), but we also found inconspicuous (‘minor’) bands that were highly variable and therefore potential candidates for individual fingerprints. We also examined changes in urinary MUP profiles of 58 males over time (from 6 to 24 weeks of age), and found that individual MUP profiles and MUP concentration were surprisingly dynamic, and showed significant changes after puberty and during adulthood. Contrary to what we expected, however, the minor bands were the most variable over time, thus no good candidates for individual fingerprints. Although MUP profiles do not provide individual fingerprints, we found that MUP profiles were more similar among siblings than non-kin despite considerable fluctuation. Our findings show that MUP profiles are not highly stable over time, they do not show strong individual clustering, and thus challenge the barcode hypothesis. Within-individual dynamics of MUP profiles indicate a different function of MUPs in individual recognition than previously assumed and advocate an alternative hypothesis (‘dynamic changes’ hypothesis). PMID:26973837

  5. Major urinary protein (MUP) profiles show dynamic changes rather than individual 'barcode' signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoß, M; Luzynski, K C; Ante, M; Miller, I; Penn, D J

    2015-06-30

    House mice ( Mus musculus) produce a variable number of major urinary proteins (MUPs), and studies suggest that each individual produces a unique MUP profile that provides a distinctive odor signature controlling individual and kin recognition. This 'barcode hypothesis' requires that MUP urinary profiles show high individual variability within populations and also high individual consistency over time, but tests of these assumptions are lacking. We analyzed urinary MUP profiles of 66 wild-caught house mice from eight populations using isoelectric focusing. We found that MUP profiles of wild male house mice are not individually unique, and though they were highly variable, closer inspection revealed that the variation strongly depended on MUP band type. The prominent ('major) bands were surprisingly homogenous (and hence most MUPs are not polymorphic), but we also found inconspicuous ('minor') bands that were highly variable and therefore potential candidates for individual fingerprints. We also examined changes in urinary MUP profiles of 58 males over time (from 6 to 24 weeks of age), and found that individual MUP profiles and MUP concentration were surprisingly dynamic, and showed significant changes after puberty and during adulthood. Contrary to what we expected, however, the minor bands were the most variable over time, thus no good candidates for individual fingerprints. Although MUP profiles do not provide individual fingerprints, we found that MUP profiles were more similar among siblings than non-kin despite considerable fluctuation. Our findings show that MUP profiles are not highly stable over time, they do not show strong individual clustering, and thus challenge the barcode hypothesis. Within-individual dynamics of MUP profiles indicate a different function of MUPs in individual recognition than previously assumed and advocate an alternative hypothesis ('dynamic changes' hypothesis).

  6. Droplet networks with incorporated protein diodes show collective properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglia, Giovanni; Heron, Andrew J.; Hwang, William L.; Holden, Matthew A.; Mikhailova, Ellina; Li, Qiuhong; Cheley, Stephen; Bayley, Hagan

    2009-07-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that submicrolitre aqueous droplets submerged in an apolar liquid containing lipid can be tightly connected by means of lipid bilayers to form networks. Droplet interface bilayers have been used for rapid screening of membrane proteins and to form asymmetric bilayers with which to examine the fundamental properties of channels and pores. Networks, meanwhile, have been used to form microscale batteries and to detect light. Here, we develop an engineered protein pore with diode-like properties that can be incorporated into droplet interface bilayers in droplet networks to form devices with electrical properties including those of a current limiter, a half-wave rectifier and a full-wave rectifier. The droplet approach, which uses unsophisticated components (oil, lipid, salt water and a simple pore), can therefore be used to create multidroplet networks with collective properties that cannot be produced by droplet pairs.

  7. Band 3 Erythrocyte Membrane Protein Acts as Redox Stress Sensor Leading to Its Phosphorylation by p72 Syk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Pantaleo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In erythrocytes, the regulation of the redox sensitive Tyr phosphorylation of band 3 and its functions are still partially defined. A role of band 3 oxidation in regulating its own phosphorylation has been previously suggested. The current study provides evidences to support this hypothesis: (i in intact erythrocytes, at 2 mM concentration of GSH, band 3 oxidation, and phosphorylation, Syk translocation to the membrane and Syk phosphorylation responded to the same micromolar concentrations of oxidants showing identical temporal variations; (ii the Cys residues located in the band 3 cytoplasmic domain are 20-fold more reactive than GSH; (iii disulfide linked band 3 cytoplasmic domain docks Syk kinase; (iv protein Tyr phosphatases are poorly inhibited at oxidant concentrations leading to massive band 3 oxidation and phosphorylation. We also observed that hemichromes binding to band 3 determined its irreversible oxidation and phosphorylation, progressive hemolysis, and serine hyperphosphorylation of different cytoskeleton proteins. Syk inhibitor suppressed the phosphorylation of band 3 also preventing serine phosphorylation changes and hemolysis. Our data suggest that band 3 acts as redox sensor regulating its own phosphorylation and that hemichromes leading to the protracted phosphorylation of band 3 may trigger a cascade of events finally leading to hemolysis.

  8. Characterization of white grub (Melolonthidae; Coleoptera in salak plantation based on morphology and protein banding pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUGIYARTO

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Maryati KT, Sugiyarto. 2010. Characterization of white grub (Melolonthidae; Coleoptera in salak plantation based on morphology and protein banding pattern. Nusantara Bioscience 1: 72-77. This research aims to find out the white grub (Melolonthidae; Coleoptera variability based on the morphological characteristic and protein banding pattern found in ”salak pondoh” farm in Regencies of Sleman, Yogyakarta and Magelang, Central Java. Each area has five sampling points. Morphological analysis on white grub was conducted using descriptive method and analysis on protein banding pattern was conducted using qualitative analysis based on the presence or absent of band pattern on the gel, and qualitatively based on the relative mobility value (Rf of protein. The result indicated that the white grub in Sleman and Magelang, based on morphology characteristic is only one species, namely Holothricia sp. Based on the protein banding pattern, the white grub sample have differences of protein band number and protein molecular weight. Key words: Salacca zalacca, white grub, morphology, protein banding pattern.Abstrak. Maryati KT, Sugiyarto. 2010. Karakterisasi lundi putih (Melolonthidae: Coleoptera pada pertanaman salak berdasarkan ciri morfologi dan pola pita protein. Nusantara Bioscience 1: 72-77. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui keanekaragaman lundi putih (Melolonthidae; Coleoptera berdasarkan ciri morfologi dan pola pita protein yang ditemukan di lahan pertanaman salak pondoh di Kabupaten Sleman, Yogyakarta dan Kabupaten Magelang, Jawa Tengah. Pada masing-masing wilayah diambil lima titik sampling. Analisis morfologi lundi putih digunakan metode deskriptif, dan analisis pola pita protein digunakan analisis kualitatif berdasarkan muncul tidaknya pola pita pada gel, dan secara kuantitatif berdasarkan nilai mobilitas relatif protein (RF. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa sampel lundi putih di Kabupaten Sleman dan Magelang, berdasar karakter

  9. [Colon adenoma detection using Kubelka-Munk spectral function of DNA and protein bands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hua-Jiang; Guo, Zhou-Yi; Xie, Shu-Sen; He, Bo-Hua; Li, Li-Bo; Chen, Xue-Mei; Wu, Guo-Yong; Lu, Jian-Jun

    2009-06-01

    Differential diagnosis of human colon adenoma was studied using the Kubelka-Munk spectral function of the DNA and protein absorption bands at 260 and 280 nm in vitro. Diffuse reflectance spectra of tissue were measured using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere attachment. The results of measurement showed that for the spectral range from 590 to 1 064 nm pathological changes of colon epithelial tissues were induced so that there were significant differences in the averaged values of the Kubelka-Munk function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log [f(r infinity)] of the DNA absorption bands at 260 nm between normal and adenomatous colon epithelial tissues, and the differences were 218% (p function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log [f(r infinity)] of the protein absorption bands at 280 nm between normal and adenomatous colon epithelial tissues, and the differences were 208% (p function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log [f(r infinity)] of the beta-carotene absorption bands at 480 nm between normal and adenomatous colon epithelial tissues, and the differences were 41.7% (p < 0.05) and 32.9% (p < 0.05) respectively. Obviously, pathological changes of colon epithelial tissues were induced so that there were significant changes in the contents of the DNA, protein and beta-carotene of colon epithelial tissues. The conclusion can be applied to rapid, low-cost and noninvasive optical biopsy of colon adenoma, and provides a useful reference.

  10. Laser-activated protein bands for peripheral nerve repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauto, Antonio; Trickett, Rodney I.; Malik, Richard; Dawes, Judith M.; Owen, Earl R.

    1996-01-01

    A 100 micrometer core optical fiber-coupled 75 mW diode laser operating at a wavelength of 800 nm has been used in conjunction with a protein solder to stripe weld severed rat tibial nerves, reducing the long operating time required for microsurgical nerve repair. Welding is produced by selective laser denaturation of the protein based solder which contains the dye indocyanine green. Operating time for laser soldering was 10 plus or minus 5 min. (n equals 24) compared to 23 plus or minus 9 min (n equals 13) for microsuturing. The laser solder technique resulted in patent welds with a tensile strength of 15 plus or minus 5 g, while microsutured nerves had a tensile strength of 40 plus or minus 10 g. Histopathology of the laser soldered nerves, conducted immediately after surgery, displayed solder adhesion to the outer membrane with minimal damage to the inner axons of the nerves. An in vivo study, with a total of fifty-seven adult male wistar rats, compared laser solder repaired tibial nerves to conventional microsuture repair. Twenty-four laser soldered nerves and thirteen sutured nerves were characterized at three months and showed successful regeneration with average compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) of 2.4 plus or minus 0.7 mV and 2.7 plus or minus 0.8 mV respectively. Histopathology of the in vivo study, confirmed the comparable regeneration of axons in laser and suture operated nerves. A faster, less damaging and long lasting laser based anastomotic technique is presented.

  11. Identification of C5+ extraband of butyrylcholinesterase and two protein bands cathodic to it

    OpenAIRE

    F. D. Suyatna; R. Setiabudy; O. Tjandra; E. Herwana

    2001-01-01

    Electrophoresis of human plasma yields 4 butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) protein bands, i.e. C1, C2, C3, C4 and in some individuals also an extraband C5+. In addition to that other protein bands called "S" bands are also invariably detected. In order to know whether the C5+ and the "S" bands are related to the BChE protein, we have carried out immunological and peptide mapping studies on these proteins. The immunology approach was done by raising polyclonal antibodies against each protein bands ...

  12. Application of mid-infrared free-electron laser tuned to amide bands for dissociation of aggregate structure of protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Takayasu; Yaji, Toyonari; Ohta, Toshiaki; Tsukiyama, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    A mid-infrared free-electron laser (FEL) is a linearly polarized, high-peak powered pulse laser with tunable wavelength within the mid-infrared absorption region. It was recently found that pathogenic amyloid fibrils could be partially dissociated to the monomer form by the irradiation of the FEL targeting the amide I band (C=O stretching vibration), amide II band (N-H bending vibration) and amide III band (C-N stretching vibration). In this study, the irradiation effect of the FEL on keratin aggregate was tested as another model to demonstrate an applicability of the FEL for dissociation of protein aggregates. Synchrotron radiation infrared microscopy analysis showed that the α-helix content in the aggregate structure decreased to almost the same level as that in the monomer state after FEL irradiation tuned to 6.06 µm (amide I band). Both irradiations at 6.51 µm (amide II band) and 8.06 µm (amide III band) also decreased the content of the aggregate but to a lesser extent than for the irradiation at the amide I band. On the contrary, the irradiation tuned to 5.6 µm (non-absorbance region) changed little the secondary structure of the aggregate. Scanning-electron microscopy observation at the submicrometer order showed that the angular solid of the aggregate was converted to non-ordered fragments by the irradiation at each amide band, while the aggregate was hardly deformed by the irradiation at 5.6 µm. These results demonstrate that the amide-specific irradiation by the FEL was effective for dissociation of the protein aggregate to the monomer form.

  13. [Gastric cancer detection using kubelka-Munk spectral function of DNA and protein absorption bands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lan-quan; Wei, Hua-jiang; Guo, Zhou-yi; Yang, Hong-qin; Xie, Shu-sen; Chen, Xue-mei; Li, Li-bo; He, Bol-hua; Wu, Guo-yong; Lu, Jian-jun

    2009-09-01

    Differential diagnosis for epithelial tissues of normal human gastric, undifferentiation gastric adenocarcinoma, gastric squamous cell carcinomas, and poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma were studied using the Kubelka-Munk spectral function of the DNA and protein absorption bands at 260 and 280 nm in vitro. Diffuse reflectance spectra of tissue were measured using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere attachment. The results of measurement showed that for the spectral range from 250 to 650 nm, pathological changes of gastric epithelial tissues induced that there were significant differences in the averaged value of the Kubelka-Munk function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log[f(r infinity)] of the DNA absorption bands at 260 nm between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human undifferentiation gastric cancer, between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human gastric squamous cell carcinomas, and between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human poorly differentiated cancer. Their differences were 68.5% (p function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log[f(r infinity)] of the protein absorption bands at 280 nm between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human undifferentiation gastric cancer, between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human gastric squamous cell carcinomas, and between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human poorly differentiated cancer. Their differences were 86.8% (p function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log[f(r infinity)] of the carotene absorption bands at 480 nm between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human undifferentiation gastric cancer, between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human gastric squamous cell carcinomas, and between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human poorly differentiated cancer. Their differences were 59.5% (p < 0.05), 73% (p < 0

  14. Extraordinary Diversity of Immune Response Proteins among Sea Urchins: Nickel-Isolated Sp185/333 Proteins Show Broad Variations in Size and Charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Lauren S.; Schrankel, Catherine S.; Brown, Kristy J.; Smith, L. Courtney

    2015-01-01

    Effective protection against pathogens requires the host to produce a wide range of immune effector proteins. The Sp185/333 gene family, which is expressed by the California purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus in response to bacterial infection, encodes a highly diverse repertoire of anti-pathogen proteins. A subset of these proteins can be isolated by affinity to metal ions based on multiple histidines, resulting in one to four bands of unique molecular weight on standard Western blots, which vary depending on the individual sea urchin. Two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) of nickel-isolated protein samples followed by Western blot was employed to detect nickel-isolated Sp185/333 (Ni-Sp185/333) proteins and to evaluate protein diversity in animals before and after immune challenge with marine bacteria. Ni-Sp185/333 proteins of the same molecular weight on standard Western blots appear as a broad complex of variants that differ in pI on 2DE Western blots. The Ni-Sp185/333 protein repertoire is variable among animals, and shows a variety of changes among individual sea urchins in response to immune challenges with both the same and different species of bacteria. The extraordinary diversity of the Ni-Sp185/333 proteins may provide significant anti-pathogen capabilities for sea urchins that survive solely on innate immunity. PMID:26406912

  15. Functional properties of tropical banded cricket (Gryllodes sigillatus) protein hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Felicia G; Jones, Owen G; O'Haire, Marguerite E; Liceaga, Andrea M

    2017-06-01

    Recently, the benefits of entomophagy have been widely discussed. Due to western cultures' reluctance, entomophagy practices are leaning more towards incorporating insects into food products. In this study, whole crickets (Gryllodes sigillatus) were hydrolyzed with alcalase at 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0% (w/w) for 30, 60, and 90min. Degree of hydrolysis (DH), amino acid composition, solubility, emulsion and foaming properties were evaluated. Hydrolysis produced peptides with 26-52% DH compared to the control containing no enzyme (5% DH). Protein solubility of hydrolysates improved (p30% soluble protein at pH 3 and 7 and 50-90% at alkaline pH, compared with the control. Emulsion activity index ranged from 7 to 32m 2 /g, while foamability ranged from 100 to 155% for all hydrolysates. These improved functional properties demonstrate the potential to develop cricket protein hydrolysates as a source of functional alternative protein in food ingredient formulations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ectopic expression of the erythrocyte band 3 anion exchange protein, using a new avian retrovirus vector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuerstenberg, S; Beug, H; Introna, M

    1990-01-01

    into protein. Using the Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase gene cloned into the vector as a test construct, expression of enzyme activity could be detected in 90 to 95% of transfected target cells and in 80 to 85% of subsequently infected cells. In addition, a cDNA encoding the avian erythrocyte band 3 anion...... exchange protein has been expressed from the vector in both chicken embryo fibroblasts and QT6 cells and appears to function as an active, plasma membrane-based anion transporter. The ectopic expression of band 3 protein provides a visual marker for vector function in these cells....

  17. Temperature dependence of Q-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of nitrosyl heme proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, Marco; Wajnberg, Eliane; Bemski, George

    1997-11-01

    The Q-band (35 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of nitrosyl hemoglobin (Hb N O) and nitrosyl myoglobin (Mb NO) were studied as a function of temperature between 19 K and 200 K. The spectra of both heme proteins show classes of variations as a function of temperature. The first one has previously been associated with the existence of two paramagnetic species, one with rhombic and the other with axial symmetry. The second one manifests itself in changes in the g-factors and linewidths of each species. These changes are correlated with the conformational substates model and associate the variations of g-values with changes in the angle of the N(his)-Fe-N (NO) bond in the rhombic species and with changes in the distance between Fe and N of the proximal (F8) histidine in the axial species. (author) 24 refs., 6 figs.

  18. A human protein interaction network shows conservation of aging processes between human and invertebrate species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Bell

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We have mapped a protein interaction network of human homologs of proteins that modify longevity in invertebrate species. This network is derived from a proteome-scale human protein interaction Core Network generated through unbiased high-throughput yeast two-hybrid searches. The longevity network is composed of 175 human homologs of proteins known to confer increased longevity through loss of function in yeast, nematode, or fly, and 2,163 additional human proteins that interact with these homologs. Overall, the network consists of 3,271 binary interactions among 2,338 unique proteins. A comparison of the average node degree of the human longevity homologs with random sets of proteins in the Core Network indicates that human homologs of longevity proteins are highly connected hubs with a mean node degree of 18.8 partners. Shortest path length analysis shows that proteins in this network are significantly more connected than would be expected by chance. To examine the relationship of this network to human aging phenotypes, we compared the genes encoding longevity network proteins to genes known to be changed transcriptionally during aging in human muscle. In the case of both the longevity protein homologs and their interactors, we observed enrichments for differentially expressed genes in the network. To determine whether homologs of human longevity interacting proteins can modulate life span in invertebrates, homologs of 18 human FRAP1 interacting proteins showing significant changes in human aging muscle were tested for effects on nematode life span using RNAi. Of 18 genes tested, 33% extended life span when knocked-down in Caenorhabditis elegans. These observations indicate that a broad class of longevity genes identified in invertebrate models of aging have relevance to human aging. They also indicate that the longevity protein interaction network presented here is enriched for novel conserved longevity proteins.

  19. Characteristics of unexpected protein bands in multiple myeloma patients after autologous stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Kyung; Jeong, Tae-Dong; Kim, So Young; Lee, Woochang; Chun, Sail; Suh, Cheol Won; Min, Won-Ki

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the characteristics of unexpected protein bands (UPBs) in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Individuals diagnosed with MM (n=193) were enrolled. Their medical records and IFE patterns were reviewed. Of the patients that underwent ASCT, 54% developed UPBs. The median time for UPB appearance and duration was 1.8 and 5.7months, respectively. IFE revealed 74.1% of UPBs to be of the immunoglobulin G type and 72.2% to be of the κ-type. At UPB appearance, 42.6% of patients were defined as sCR or CR, and 50.0% of the patients satisfying the CR criteria had an abnormal FLC ratio. Of the patients who developed UPBs, five relapsed. Among these, four patients showed disappearance of the previous IFE oligoclonality and reappearance of the original paraprotein at relapse. Close follow-up of UPBs is critical for evaluating MM therapeutic response and disease progression. The presence of monoclonal bands may indicate relapse of disease, but in the vast majority of cases with UPBs, it does not; instead, it most likely represents a transient phenomenon caused by the immune response. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Highly increased detection of silver stained protein bands in polyacrylamide gels with thermo-optical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Giulia; Posnicek, Thomas; Brandl, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is a well-known technique to separate proteins by their molecular weight. After electrophoresis, the gels are commonly stained for protein band analysis with silver stain; this allows the detection of protein loads to about 1 ng. To increase the detection sensitivity of the protein bands down in the subnanogram level, a sensor has been developed based on the thermal lens effect to scan and quantify protein loads which would remain undetected using the standard imaging systems. The thermal lens sensor is equipped with a 450 nm diode pump laser modulated at 1 Hz and a HeNe probe laser mounted in collinear geometry. The sensor could detect protein bands of 0.05 ng when the gel was soaked in methanol/water and 0.1 ng in water. The limit of detection ranged from 8 to 20 pg, depending on the soaking medium and the staining efficiency. Thus, the detection of silver stain by thermal lens effect results 10 to 20 times more sensitive than the standard colorimetric method.

  1. Band 3 protein function in teleost fish erythrocytes: effect of oxygenation-deoxygenation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Russo, A.; Tellone, E.; Ficarra, S.; Giardina, B.; Bellocco, E.; Lagana, G.; Leuzzi, U.; Kotyk, Arnošt; Galtieri, A.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 1 (2008), s. 49-54 ISSN 0862-8408 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : erythrocytes * hemoglobin * band 3 protein Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.653, year: 2008

  2. Fibrillary glomerulonephritis associated with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance showing lambda-type Bence Jones protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Tomoaki; Okura, Takafumi; Miyoshi, Ken-Ichi; Watanabe, Sanae; Manabe, Seiko; Kurata, Mie; Irita, Jun; Fukuoka, Tomikazu; Higaki, Jitsuo

    2005-09-01

    A 79-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of leg edema due to a nephrotic syndrome. Urinary and serum immunoelectrophoresis showed positive for the lambda type of Bence Jones protein. A bone marrow aspiration test revealed mild plasmacytosis (6.4% of the total cells). These findings confirmed her diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). Her renal biopsy specimen revealed mild mesangial cell proliferation and an increase in the mesangial matrix. Immunofluorescence studies showed positive staining for IgG, IgA, C3, and kappa and lambda light chains in the capillary wall and mesangium area. Electron microscopy showed that the electron deposits in the thickened basement membrane were formed by randomly arranged 16- to 18-nm nonbranching fibrils. A Congo red stain for amyloid was negative. These findings corresponded with the diagnosis of fibrillary glomerulonephritis. Therefore, this case showed a rare combination of fibrillary glomerulonephritis and MGUS.

  3. Dioscorea alata tuber proteome analysis shows over thirty dioscorin isoforms and novel tuber proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shruti; Gupta, Ravi; Deswal, Renu

    2017-05-01

    In Dioscorea, dioscorin (31 kDa) is the major storage protein constituting 85% of the total tuber proteins. An integrated proteomic and biochemical approach was used to understand the physiological role of dioscorin in the two contrasting growth stages (germinating and mature tuber). HPLC analysis showed 3 fold reduction in mannitol and 12.88 and 1.24 fold increase in sucrose and maltose in the germinating tuber. A 1.8 and 3 fold increase in sucrose phosphate synthase and mannitol dehydrogenase activity respectively was observed in the germinating tuber while a 2 fold higher invertase probably lowers the sucrose accumulation in the mature tuber. SDS-PAGE and 2-D maps of the mature and germinating tubers confirmed depletion (more than 50%) of dioscorin on germination. Dioscorin was purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography with 43.32 fold purification and 38.16 yield. Out of a trail of 35 spots at 31 kDa only 12 spots (identified as dioscorin isoforms) were present in the 2D gel of the purified fraction. To search for other tuber proteins besides dioscorin, the unbound fractions of DEAE column were analysed by 2DGE. DREB 1A, caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferase and Rab-1 small GTP binding protein were identified perhaps for the first time in the Dioscorea proteome. The interactome analysis revealed these to be involved in oxidative stress, carotenoid synthesis and vesicular transport. This is perhaps the first attempt to identify tuber proteome (although limited) and to understand the physiological significance of these proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. A Robust Identification of the Protein Standard Bands in Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis Gel Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serackis Artūras

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation presented in this paper was to develop a software-based assistant for the protein analysis workflow. The prior characterization of the unknown protein in two-dimensional electrophoresis gel images is performed according to the molecular weight and isoelectric point of each protein spot estimated from the gel image before further sequence analysis by mass spectrometry. The paper presents a method for automatic and robust identification of the protein standard band in a two-dimensional gel image. In addition, the method introduces the identification of the positions of the markers, prepared by using pre-selected proteins with known molecular mass. The robustness of the method was achieved by using special validation rules in the proposed original algorithms. In addition, a self-organizing map-based decision support algorithm is proposed, which takes Gabor coefficients as image features and searches for the differences in preselected vertical image bars. The experimental investigation proved the good performance of the new algorithms included into the proposed method. The detection of the protein standard markers works without modification of algorithm parameters on two-dimensional gel images obtained by using different staining and destaining procedures, which results in different average levels of intensity in the images.

  5. Rubber particle proteins, HbREF and HbSRPP, show different interactions with model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Karine; Lecomte, Sophie; Estevez, Yannick; Zhendre, Vanessa; Henry, Sarah; Thévenot, Julie; Dufourc, Erick J; Alves, Isabel D; Peruch, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    The biomembrane surrounding rubber particles from the hevea latex is well known for its content of numerous allergen proteins. HbREF (Hevb1) and HbSRPP (Hevb3) are major components, linked on rubber particles, and they have been shown to be involved in rubber synthesis or quality (mass regulation), but their exact function is still to be determined. In this study we highlighted the different modes of interactions of both recombinant proteins with various membrane models (lipid monolayers, liposomes or supported bilayers, and multilamellar vesicles) to mimic the latex particle membrane. We combined various biophysical methods (polarization-modulation-infrared reflection-adsorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS)/ellipsometry, attenuated-total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR), solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), plasmon waveguide resonance (PWR), fluorescence spectroscopy) to elucidate their interactions. Small rubber particle protein (SRPP) shows less affinity than rubber elongation factor (REF) for the membranes but displays a kind of "covering" effect on the lipid headgroups without disturbing the membrane integrity. Its structure is conserved in the presence of lipids. Contrarily, REF demonstrates higher membrane affinity with changes in its aggregation properties, the amyloid nature of REF, which we previously reported, is not favored in the presence of lipids. REF binds and inserts into membranes. The membrane integrity is highly perturbed, and we suspect that REF is even able to remove lipids from the membrane leading to the formation of mixed micelles. These two homologous proteins show affinity to all membrane models tested but neatly differ in their interacting features. This could imply differential roles on the surface of rubber particles. © 2013.

  6. Motion of single MreB bacterial actin proteins in Caulobacter show treadmilling in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerner, W. E.; Kim, Soyeon; Gitai, Zemer; Kinkhabwala, Anika; McAdams, Harley; Shapiro, Lucy

    2006-03-01

    Ensemble imaging of a bacterial actin homologue, the MreB protein, suggests that the MreB proteins form a dynamic filamentous spiral along the long axis of the cell in Caulobacter crescentus. MreB contracts and expands along the cell axis and plays an important role in cell shape and polarity maintenance, as well as chromosome segregation and translocation of the origin of replication during cell division. In this study we investigated the real-time polymerization of MreB in Caulobacter crescentus using single-molecule fluorescence imaging. With time-lapse imaging, polymerized MreB could be distinguished from cytoplasmic MreB monomers, because single monomeric MreB showed fast motion characteristic of Brownian diffusion, while single polymerized MreB displayed slow, directed motion. This directional movement of labeled MreB in the growing polymer implies that treadmilling is the predominant mechanism in MreB filament formation. These single-molecule imaging experiments provide the first available information on the velocity of bacterial actin polymerization in a living cell.

  7. Substituted aminopyrimidine protein kinase B (PknB) inhibitors show activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Timothy M.; Bouloc, Nathalie; Buxton, Roger S.; Chugh, Jasveen; Lougheed, Kathryn E.A.; Osborne, Simon A.; Saxty, Barbara; Smerdon, Stephen J.; Taylor, Debra L.; Whalley, David

    2012-01-01

    A high-throughput screen against PknB, an essential serine–threonine protein kinase present in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), allowed the identification of an aminoquinazoline inhibitor which was used as a starting point for SAR investigations. Although a significant improvement in enzyme affinity was achieved, the aminoquinazolines showed little or no cellular activity against M. tuberculosis. However, switching to an aminopyrimidine core scaffold and the introduction of a basic amine side chain afforded compounds with nanomolar enzyme binding affinity and micromolar minimum inhibitory concentrations against M. tuberculosis. Replacement of the pyrazole head group with pyridine then allowed equipotent compounds with improved selectivity against a human kinase panel to be obtained. PMID:22469702

  8. Important mitochondrial proteins in human omental adipose tissue show reduced expression in obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W. Lindinger

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with impaired mitochondrial function. This study compares mitochondrial protein expression in omental fat in obese and non-obese humans. Omental adipose tissue was obtained by surgical biopsy, adipocytes were purified and mitochondria isolated. Using anion-exchange chromatography, SDS-PAGE and mass-spectrometry, 128 proteins with potentially different abundances in patient groups were identified, 62 of the 128 proteins are mainly localized in the mitochondria. Further quantification of 12 of these 62 proteins by immune dot blot analysis revealed four proteins citrate synthase, HADHA, LETM1 and mitofilin being inversely associated with BMI, and mitofilin being inversely correlated with gender.

  9. Important mitochondrial proteins in human omental adipose tissue show reduced expression in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindinger, Peter W; Christe, Martine; Eberle, Alex N; Kern, Beatrice; Peterli, Ralph; Peters, Thomas; Jayawardene, Kamburapola J I; Fearnley, Ian M; Walker, John E

    2015-09-01

    Obesity is associated with impaired mitochondrial function. This study compares mitochondrial protein expression in omental fat in obese and non-obese humans. Omental adipose tissue was obtained by surgical biopsy, adipocytes were purified and mitochondria isolated. Using anion-exchange chromatography, SDS-PAGE and mass-spectrometry, 128 proteins with potentially different abundances in patient groups were identified, 62 of the 128 proteins are mainly localized in the mitochondria. Further quantification of 12 of these 62 proteins by immune dot blot analysis revealed four proteins citrate synthase, HADHA, LETM1 and mitofilin being inversely associated with BMI, and mitofilin being inversely correlated with gender.

  10. An acid phosphatase in the plasma membranes of human astrocytoma showing marked specificity toward phosphotyrosine protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leis, J F; Kaplan, N O

    1982-11-01

    The plasma membrane from the human tumor astrocytoma contains an active acid phosphatase activity based on hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate. Other acid phosphatase substrates--beta-glycerophosphate, O-phosphorylcholine, and 5'-AMP--are not hydrolyzed significantly. The phosphatase activity is tartrate insensitive and is stimulated by Triton X-100 and EDTA. Of the three known phosphoamino acids, only free O-phosphotyrosine is hydrolyzed by the membrane phosphatase activity. Other acid phosphatases tested from potato, wheat germ, milk, and bovine prostate did not show this degree of specificity. The plasma membrane activity also dephosphorylated phosphotyrosine histone at a much greater rate than did the other acid phosphatases. pH profiles for free O-phosphotyrosine and phosphotyrosine histone showed a shift toward physiological pH, indicating possible physiological significance. Phosphotyrosine histone dephosphorylation activity was nearly 10 times greater than that seen for phosphoserine histone dephosphorylation, and Km values were much lower for phosphotyrosine histone dephosphorylation (0.5 microM vs. 10 microM). Fluoride and zinc significantly inhibited phosphoserine histone dephosphorylation. Vanadate, on the other hand, was a potent inhibitor of phosphotyrosine histone dephosphorylation (50% inhibition at 0.5 microM) but not of phosphoserine histone. ATP stimulated phosphotyrosine histone dephosphorylation (160-250%) but inhibited phosphoserine histone dephosphorylation (95%). These results suggest the existence of a highly specific phosphotyrosine protein phosphatase activity associated with the plasma membrane of human astrocytoma.

  11. Laser-activated solid protein bands for peripheral nerve repair: an vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauto, A; Trickett, R; Malik, R; Dawes, J M; Owen, E R

    1997-01-01

    Severed tibial nerves in rats were repaired using a novel technique, utilizing a semiconductor diode-laser-activated protein solder applied longitudinally across the join. Welding was produced by selective laser denaturation of solid solder bands containing the dye indocyanine green. An in vivo study, using 48 adult male Wistar rats, compared conventional microsuture-repaired tibial nerves with laser solder-repaired nerves. Nerve repairs were characterised immediately after surgery and after 3 months. Successful regeneration with average compound muscle action potentials of 2.5 +/- 0.5 mV and 2.7 +/- 0.3 mV (mean and standard deviation) was demonstrated for the laser-soldered nerves and the sutured nerves, respectively. Histopathology confirmed comparable regeneration of axons in laser- and suture-operated nerves. The laser-based nerve repair technique was easier and faster than microsuture repair, minimising manipulation damage to the nerve.

  12. An expanded evaluation of protein function prediction methods shows an improvement in accuracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Yuxiang; Oron, Tal Ronnen; Clark, Wyatt T.; Bankapur, Asma R.; Andrea, D' Daniel; Lepore, Rosalba; Funk, Christopher S.; Kahanda, Indika; Verspoor, Karin M.; Ben-Hur, Asa; Koo, Da Chen Emily; Penfold-Brown, Duncan; Shasha, Dennis; Youngs, Noah; Bonneau, Richard; Lin, Alexandra; Sahraeian, Sayed M.E.; Martelli, Pier Luigi; Profiti, Giuseppe; Casadio, Rita; Cao, Renzhi; Zhong, Zhaolong; Cheng, Jianlin; Altenhoff, Adrian; Skunca, Nives; Dessimoz, Christophe; Dogan, Tunca; Hakala, Kai; Kaewphan, Suwisa; Mehryary, Farrokh; Salakoski, Tapio; Ginter, Filip; Fang, Hai; Smithers, Ben; Oates, Matt; Gough, Julian; Törönen, Petri; Koskinen, Patrik; Holm, Liisa; Chen, Ching Tai; Hsu, Wen Lian; Bryson, Kevin; Cozzetto, Domenico; Minneci, Federico; Jones, David T.; Chapman, Samuel; BKC, Dukka; Khan, Ishita K.; Kihara, Daisuke; Ofer, Dan; Rappoport, Nadav; Stern, Amos; Cibrian-Uhalte, Elena; Denny, Paul; Foulger, Rebecca E.; Hieta, Reija; Legge, Duncan; Lovering, Ruth C.; Magrane, Michele; Melidoni, Anna N.; Mutowo-Meullenet, Prudence; Pichler, Klemens; Shypitsyna, Aleksandra; Li, Biao; Zakeri, Pooya; ElShal, Sarah; Tranchevent, Léon Charles; Das, Sayoni; Dawson, Natalie L.; Lee, David; Lees, Jonathan G.; Sillitoe, Ian; Bhat, Prajwal; Nepusz, Tamás; Romero, Alfonso E.; Sasidharan, Rajkumar; Yang, Haixuan; Paccanaro, Alberto; Gillis, Jesse; Sedeño-Cortés, Adriana E.; Pavlidis, Paul; Feng, Shou; Cejuela, Juan M.; Goldberg, Tatyana; Hamp, Tobias; Richter, Lothar; Salamov, Asaf; Gabaldon, Toni; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Supek, Fran; Gong, Qingtian; Ning, Wei; Zhou, Yuanpeng; Tian, Weidong; Falda, Marco; Fontana, Paolo; Lavezzo, Enrico; Toppo, Stefano; Ferrari, Carlo; Giollo, Manuel; Piovesan, Damiano; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.; Pozo, del Angela; Fernández, José M.; Maietta, Paolo; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L.; Benso, Alfredo; Carlo, Di Stefano; Politano, Gianfranco; Savino, Alessandro; Rehman, Hafeez Ur; Re, Matteo; Mesiti, Marco; Valentini, Giorgio; Bargsten, Joachim W.; Dijk, van Aalt-Jan; Gemovic, Branislava; Glisic, Sanja; Perovic, Vladmir; Veljkovic, Veljko; Veljkovic, Nevena; Almeida-e-Silva, Danillo C.; Vencio, Ricardo Z.N.; Sharan, Malvika; Vogel, Jörg; Kansakar, Lakesh; Zhang, Shanshan; Vucetic, Slobodan; Wang, Zheng; Sternberg, Michael J.E.; Wass, Mark N.; Huntley, Rachael P.; Martin, Maria J.; O'Donovan, Claire; Robinson, Peter N.; Moreau, Yves; Tramontano, Anna; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Brenner, Steven E.; Linial, Michal; Orengo, Christine A.; Rost, Burkhard; Greene, Casey S.; Mooney, Sean D.; Friedberg, Iddo; Radivojac, Predrag

    2016-01-01

    Background: A major bottleneck in our understanding of the molecular underpinnings of life is the assignment of function to proteins. While molecular experiments provide the most reliable annotation of proteins, their relatively low throughput and restricted purview have led to an increasing role

  13. CELLS OVEREXPRESSING HSP27 SHOW ACCELERATED RECOVERY FROM HEAT-INDUCED NUCLEAR-PROTEIN AGGREGATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KAMPINGA, HH; BRUNSTING, JF; STEGE, GJJ; KONINGS, AWT; LANDRY, J

    1994-01-01

    Protein denaturation/aggregation upon cell exposure to heat shock is a likely cause of cell death. in the nucleus, protein aggregation has often been correlated to inhibition of nuclear located processes and heat-induced cell killing. in Chinese hamster 023 cells made thermotolerant by a prior

  14. Innovative scattering analysis shows that hydrophobic disordered proteins are expanded in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riback, Joshua A.; Bowman, Micayla A.; Zmyslowski, Adam M.; Knoverek, Catherine R.; Jumper, John M.; Hinshaw, James R.; Kaye, Emily B.; Freed, Karl F.; Clark, Patricia L.; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2017-10-12

    A substantial fraction of the proteome is intrinsically disordered, and even well-folded proteins adopt non-native geometries during synthesis, folding, transport, and turnover. Characterization of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is challenging, in part because of a lack of accurate physical models and the difficulty of interpreting experimental results. We have developed a general method to extract the dimensions and solvent quality (self-interactions) of IDPs from a single small-angle x-ray scattering measurement. We applied this procedure to a variety of IDPs and found that even IDPs with low net charge and high hydrophobicity remain highly expanded in water, contrary to the general expectation that protein-like sequences collapse in water. Our results suggest that the unfolded state of most foldable sequences is expanded; we conjecture that this property was selected by evolution to minimize misfolding and aggregation.

  15. Whole Genome Shotgun Sequencing Shows Selection on Leptospira Regulatory Proteins during in vitro Culture Attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Jason S.; Corey, Victoria C.; Ricaldi, Jessica N.; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.; Matthias, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is the most common zoonotic disease worldwide with an estimated 500,000 severe cases reported annually, and case fatality rates of 12–25%, due primarily to acute kidney and lung injuries. Despite its prevalence, the molecular mechanisms underlying leptospirosis pathogenesis remain poorly understood. To identify virulence-related genes in Leptospira interrogans, we delineated cumulative genome changes that occurred during serial in vitro passage of a highly virulent strain of L. interrogans serovar Lai into a nearly avirulent isogenic derivative. Comparison of protein coding and computationally predicted noncoding RNA (ncRNA) genes between these two polyclonal strains identified 15 nonsynonymous single nucleotide variant (nsSNV) alleles that increased in frequency and 19 that decreased, whereas no changes in allelic frequency were observed among the ncRNA genes. Some of the nsSNV alleles were in six genes shown previously to be transcriptionally upregulated during exposure to in vivo-like conditions. Five of these nsSNVs were in evolutionarily conserved positions in genes related to signal transduction and metabolism. Frequency changes of minor nsSNV alleles identified in this study likely contributed to the loss of virulence during serial in vitro culture. The identification of new virulence-associated genes should spur additional experimental inquiry into their potential role in Leptospira pathogenesis. PMID:26711524

  16. A chimeric protein of aluminum-activated malate transporter generated from wheat and Arabidopsis shows enhanced response to trivalent cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Takayuki; Tsuchiya, Yoshiyuki; Ariyoshi, Michiyo; Ryan, Peter R; Yamamoto, Yoko

    2016-07-01

    TaALMT1 from wheat (Triticum aestivum) and AtALMT1 from Arabidopsis thaliana encode aluminum (Al)-activated malate transporters, which confer acid-soil tolerance by releasing malate from roots. Chimeric proteins from TaALMT1 and AtALMT1 (Ta::At, At::Ta) were previously analyzed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Those studies showed that Al could activate malate efflux from the Ta::At chimera but not from At::Ta. Here, functions of TaALMT1, AtALMT1 and the chimeric protein Ta::At were compared in cultured tobacco BY-2 cells. We focused on the sensitivity and specificity of their activation by trivalent cations. The activation of malate efflux by Al was at least two-fold greater in the chimera than the native proteins. All proteins were also activated by lanthanides (erbium, ytterbium, gadolinium, and lanthanum), but the chimera again released more malate than TaALMT1 or AtALMT1. In Xenopus oocytes, Al, ytterbium, and erbium activated inward currents from the native TaALMT1 and the chimeric protein, but gadolinium only activated currents from the chimera. Lanthanum inhibited currents from both proteins. These results demonstrated that function of the chimera protein was altered compared to the native proteins and was more responsive to a range of trivalent cations when expressed in plant cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Oligoclonal band phenotypes in MS differ in their HLA class II association, while specific KIR ligands at HLA class I show association to MS in general

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsen, Marte W; Viken, Marte K; Celius, Elisabeth G

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients have been reported to have different HLA class II allele profiles depending on oligoclonal bands (OCBs) in the cerebrospinal fluid, but HLA class I alleles and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) ligands have not been studied. We investigated the associ......Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients have been reported to have different HLA class II allele profiles depending on oligoclonal bands (OCBs) in the cerebrospinal fluid, but HLA class I alleles and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) ligands have not been studied. We investigated...

  18. Salt-soluble proteins from wheat-derived foodstuffs show lower allergenic potency than those from raw flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gregorio, Marta; Armentia, Alicia; Díaz-Perales, Araceli; Palacín, Arantxa; Dueñas-Laita, Antonio; Martín, Blanca; Salcedo, Gabriel; Sánchez-Monge, Rosa

    2009-04-22

    Salt-soluble proteins from wheat flour have been described as main allergens associated with both baker's asthma and food allergy. However, most studies have used raw flour as starting material, thus not considering potential changes in allergenic properties induced by the heat treatment and other industrial processing to produce wheat-derived foodstuffs. Salt extracts from different commercial wheat-derived products were obtained and their allergenic properties investigated by IgE-immunodetection, ELISA assays, and skin prick test. The IgE-binding capacity of salt-soluble proteins from commercial breads and cooked pastas was reduced around 50% compared with that of raw flour, the reduction being less dramatic in noncooked pastas and biscuits. Several wheat-derived foodstuffs showed major IgE-binding components of 20 and 35 kDa, identified as avenin-like and globulin proteins, respectively. These proteins, as well as most flour and bread salt-soluble proteins, were hydrolyzed when subjected to simulated gastrointestinal digestion. However, the digested products still exhibited a residual IgE-binding capacity. Therefore, processing of wheat flour to obtain derived foodstuffs decreases the IgE binding-capacity of the major salt-soluble wheat proteins. Moreover, simulated gastric fluid digestion further inactivates some heat-resistant IgE-binding proteins.

  19. Outer membrane targeting of Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteins shows variable dependence on the components of Bam and Lol machineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Hanh H; Nickerson, Nicholas N; Lee, Vincent T; Kazimirova, Anastasia; Chami, Mohamed; Pugsley, Anthony P; Lory, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, the Lol and Bam machineries direct the targeting of lipidated and nonlipidated proteins, respectively, to the outer membrane (OM). Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains with depleted levels of specific Bam and Lol proteins, we demonstrated a variable dependence of different OM proteins on these targeting pathways. Reduction in the level of BamA significantly affected the ability of the β-barrel membrane protein OprF to localize to the OM, while the targeting of three secretins that are functionally related OM proteins was less affected (PilQ and PscC) or not at all affected (XcpQ). Depletion of LolB affected all lipoproteins examined and had a variable effect on the nonlipidated proteins. While the levels of OprF, PilQ, and PscC were significantly reduced by LolB depletion, XcpQ was unaffected and was correctly localized to the OM. These results suggest that certain β-barrel proteins such as OprF primarily utilize the complete Bam machinery. The Lol machinery participates in the OM targeting of secretins to variable degrees, likely through its involvement in the assembly of lipidated Bam components. XcpQ, but not PilQ or PscC, was shown to assemble spontaneously into liposomes as multimers. This work raises the possibility that there is a gradient of utilization of Bam and Lol insertion and targeting machineries. Structural features of individual proteins, including their β-barrel content, may determine the propensity of these proteins for folding (or misfolding) during periplasmic transit and OM insertion, thereby influencing the extent of utilization of the Bam targeting machinery, respectively. Targeting of lipidated and nonlipidated proteins to the outer membrane (OM) compartment in Gram-negative bacteria involves the transfer across the periplasm utilizing the Lol and Bam machineries, respectively. We show that depletion of Bam and Lol components in Pseudomonas aeruginosa does not lead to a general OM protein translocation defect

  20. Smoke Priming, a Potent Protective Agent Against Salinity: Effect on Proline Accumulation, Elemental Uptake, Pigmental Attributes and Protein Banding Patterns of Rice (Oryza Sativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil, Muhammad

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The exogenous application of plant derived smoke solution through seed pre treatment is consider to create tolerance in the plant against salinity, for this purpose different dilution of plant derived smoke solution as 1:5000 Buhania, 1:1000 Buhania, 1:1000 Cymbopogon, 1:500 Cymbopogon were used against 0 mM, 50, 100 and 150mM NaCl solution in the medium. The effect was observed on total proline accumulation, heavy metals uptake, photosynthetic pigments and protein polypeptide bands intensity in two rice varieties as Basmati 385 (B-385 and Shaheen Basmati (S. Basmati. Proline concentration increases while chlorophyll “a” chlorophyll “b” and carotene level decreases with increasing salinity. On other hand zinc concentration increases while cadmium and lead concentration decrease in the crop under saline conditions. Intensity of protein polypeptides bands decreases gradually with increasing salinity level but plants from the seeds soaked with smoke solution alleviate the drastic affect of salinity, and intensity of bands is quite good by comparing with non primed seeds. It is concluded that seed priming with plant derived smoke solution show beneficial effect on crop to protect them from salinity.

  1. Free-Standing Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Superlattices Constructed with Engineered Protein Containers Show in Crystallo Catalytic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Marcel; Künzle, Matthias; Beck, Tobias

    2017-12-11

    The construction of defined nanostructured catalysts is challenging. In previous work, we established a strategy to assemble binary nanoparticle superlattices with oppositely charged protein containers as building blocks. Here, we show that these free-standing nanoparticle superlattices are catalytically active. The metal oxide nanoparticles inside the protein scaffold are accessible for a range of substrates and show oxidase-like and peroxidase-like activity. The stable superlattices can be reused for several reaction cycles. In contrast to bulk nanoparticle-based catalysts, which are prone to aggregation and difficult to characterize, nanoparticle superlattices based on engineered protein containers provide an innovative synthetic route to structurally defined heterogeneous catalysts with control over nanoparticle size and composition. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Evolution of plant cell wall: Arabinogalactan-proteins from three moss genera show structural differences compared to seed plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Desirée; Baumann, Alexander; Maeder, Malte; Geske, Thomas; Heise, Esther Marie; von Schwartzenberg, Klaus; Classen, Birgit

    2017-05-01

    Arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) are important proteoglycans of plant cell walls. They seem to be present in most, if not all seed plants, but their occurrence and structure in bryophytes is widely unknown and actually the focus of AGP research. With regard to evolution of plant cell wall, we isolated AGPs from the three mosses Sphagnum sp., Physcomitrella patens and Polytrichastrum formosum. The moss AGPs show structural characteristics common for AGPs of seed plants, but also unique features, especially 3-O-methyl-rhamnose (trivial name acofriose) as terminal monosaccharide not found in arabinogalactan-proteins of angiosperms and 1,2,3-linked galactose as branching point never found in arabinogalactan-proteins before. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Small Heat Shock Protein α-Crystallin B Shows Neuroprotective Properties in a Glaucoma Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Anders

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disease that leads to irreversible retinal ganglion cell (RGC loss and is one of the main causes of blindness worldwide. The pathogenesis of glaucoma remains unclear, and novel approaches for neuroprotective treatments are urgently needed. Previous studies have revealed significant down-regulation of α-crystallin B as an initial reaction to elevated intraocular pressure (IOP, followed by a clear but delayed up-regulation, suggesting that this small heat-shock protein plays a pathophysiological role in the disease. This study analyzed the neuroprotective effect of α-crystallin B in an experimental animal model of glaucoma. Significant IOP elevation induced by episcleral vein cauterization resulted in a considerable impairment of the RGCs and the retinal nerve fiber layer. An intravitreal injection of α-crystallin B at the time of the IOP increase was able to rescue the RGCs, as measured in a functional photopic electroretinogram, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, and RGC counts. Mass-spectrometry-based proteomics and antibody-microarray measurements indicated that a α-crystallin injection distinctly up-regulated all of the subclasses (α, β, and γ of the crystallin protein family. The creation of an interactive protein network revealed clear correlations between individual proteins, which showed a regulatory shift resulting from the crystallin injection. The neuroprotective properties of α-crystallin B further demonstrate the potential importance of crystallin proteins in developing therapeutic options for glaucoma.

  4. Endothelial Protein C–Targeting Liposomes Show Enhanced Uptake and Improved Therapeutic Efficacy in Human Retinal Endothelial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arta, Anthoula; Eriksen, Anne Z.; Melander, Fredrik

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE. To determine whether human retinal endothelial cells (HRECs) express the endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) and to realize its potential as a targeting moiety by developing novel single and dual corticosteroid–loaded functionalized liposomes that exhibit both enhanced uptake by H...... of cell tube formations in contrast to nontargeting liposomes. CONCLUSIONS. We show that HRECs express EPCR and this receptor could be a promising nanomedicine target in ocular diseases where the endothelial barrier of the retina is compromised....

  5. Thermostable trypsin conjugates immobilized to biogenic magnetite show a high operational stability and remarkable reusability for protein digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pečová, M.; Šebela, M.; Marková, Z.; Poláková, K.; Čuda, J.; Šafářová, K.; Zbořil, R.

    2013-03-01

    In this work, magnetosomes produced by microorganisms were chosen as a suitable magnetic carrier for covalent immobilization of thermostable trypsin conjugates with an expected applicability for efficient and rapid digestion of proteins at elevated temperatures. First, a biogenic magnetite was isolated from Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense and its free surface was coated with the natural polysaccharide chitosan containing free amino and hydroxy groups. Prior to covalent immobilization, bovine trypsin was modified by conjugating with α-, β- and γ-cyclodextrin. Modified trypsin was bound to the magnetic carriers via amino groups using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide as coupling reagents. The magnetic biomaterial was characterized by magnetometric analysis and electron microscopy. With regard to their biochemical properties, the immobilized trypsin conjugates showed an increased resistance to elevated temperatures, eliminated autolysis, had an unchanged pH optimum and a significant storage stability and reusability. Considering these parameters, the presented enzymatic system exhibits properties that are superior to those of trypsin forms obtained by other frequently used approaches. The proteolytic performance was demonstrated during in-solution digestion of model proteins (horseradish peroxidase, bovine serum albumin and hen egg white lysozyme) followed by mass spectrometry. It is shown that both magnetic immobilization and chemical modification enhance the characteristics of trypsin making it a promising tool for protein digestion.

  6. New sub-family of lysozyme-like proteins shows no catalytic activity: crystallographic and biochemical study of STM3605 protein from Salmonella Typhimurium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalska, Karolina; Brown, Roslyn N.; Li, Hui; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Niemann, George; Heffron, Fred; Cort, John R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2013-03-01

    Phage viruses that infect prokaryotes integrate their genome into the host chromosome; thus, microbial genomes typically contain genetic remnants of both recent and ancient phage infections. Often phage genes occur in clusters of atypical G+C content that reflect integration of the foreign DNA. However, some phage genes occur in isolation without other phage gene neighbors, probably resulting from horizontal gene transfer. In these cases, the phage gene product is unlikely to function as a component of a mature phage particle, and instead may have been co-opted by the host for its own benefit. The product of one such gene from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, STM3605, encodes a protein with modest sequence similarity to phage-like lysozyme (N-acetylmuramidase) but appears to lack essential catalytic residues that are strictly conserved in all lysozymes. Close homologs in other bacteria share this characteristic. The structure of the STM3605 protein was characterized by X-ray crystallography, and functional assays showed that it is a stable, folded protein whose structure closely resembles lysozyme. However, this protein is unlikely to hydrolyze peptidoglycan. Instead, STM3605 is presumed to have evolved an alternative function because it shows some lytic activity and partitions to micelles.

  7. Phylogenetic Reconstruction Shows Independent Evolutionary Origins of Mitochondrial Transcription Factors from an Ancient Family of RNA Methyltransferase Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aj Harris; Goldman, Aaron David

    2018-04-25

    Here, we generate a robust phylogenetic framework for the rRNA adenine N(6)-methyltransferase (RAMTase) protein family that shows a more ancient and complex evolutionary history within the family than previously reported. RAMTases occur universally by descent across the three domains of life, and typical orthologs within the family perform methylation of the small subunits of ribosomal RNA (rRNA). However, within the RAMTase family, two different groups of mitochondrial transcription factors, mtTFB1 and mtTFB2, have evolved in eukaryotes through neofunctionalization. Previous phylogenetic analyses have suggested that mtTFB1 and mtTFB2 comprise sister clades that arose via gene duplication, which occurred sometime following the endosymbiosis event that produced the mitochondrion. Through dense and taxonomically broad sampling of RAMTase family members especially within bacteria, we found that these eukaryotic mitochondrial transcription factors, mtTFB1 and mtTFB2, have independent origins in phylogenetically distant clades such that their divergence most likely predates the last universal common ancestor of life. The clade of mtTFB2s comprises orthologs in Opisthokonts and the clade of mtTFB1s includes orthologs in Amoebozoa and Metazoa. Thus, we clearly demonstrate that the neofunctionalization producing the transcription factor function evolved twice independently within the RAMTase family. These results are consistent with and help to elucidate outcomes from prior experimental studies, which found that some members of mtTFB1 still perform the ancestral rRNA methylation function, and the results have broader implications for understanding the evolution of new protein functions. Our phylogenetic reconstruction is also in agreement with prior studies showing two independent origins of plastid RAMTases in Viridiplantae and other photosynthetic autotrophs. We believe that this updated phylogeny of RAMTases should provide a robust evolutionary framework for ongoing

  8. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nef Proteins Show Distinct Patterns and Mechanisms of Src Kinase Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenway, Alison L.; Dutartre, Hélène; Allen, Kelly; McPhee, Dale A.; Olive, Daniel; Collette, Yves

    1999-01-01

    The nef gene from human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV) regulates cell function and viral replication, possibly through binding of the nef product to cellular proteins, including Src family tyrosine kinases. We show here that the Nef protein encoded by SIVmac239 interacts with and also activates the human Src kinases Lck and Hck. This is in direct contrast to the inhibitory effect of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) Nef on Lck catalytic activity. Unexpectedly, however, the interaction of SIV Nef with human Lck or Hck is not mediated via its consensus proline motif, which is known to mediate HIV-1 Nef binding to Src homology 3 (SH3) domains, and various experimental analyses failed to show significant interaction of SIV Nef with the SH3 domain of either kinase. Instead, SIV Nef can bind Lck and Hck SH2 domains, and its N-terminal 50 amino acid residues are sufficient for Src kinase binding and activation. Our results provide evidence for multiple mechanisms by which Nef binds to and regulates Src kinases. PMID:10364375

  9. A fasciclin-like arabinogalactan-protein (FLA mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, fla1, shows defects in shoot regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim L Johnson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The fasciclin-like arabinogalactan-proteins (FLAs are an enigmatic class of 21 members within the larger family of arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs in Arabidopsis thaliana. Located at the cell surface, in the cell wall/plasma membrane, they are implicated in many developmental roles yet their function remains largely undefined. Fasciclin (FAS domains are putative cell-adhesion domains found in extracellular matrix proteins of organisms from all kingdoms, but the juxtaposition of FAS domains with highly glycosylated AGP domains is unique to plants. Recent studies have started to elucidate the role of FLAs in Arabidopsis development. FLAs containing a single FAS domain are important for the integrity and elasticity of the plant cell wall matrix (FLA11 and FLA12 and FLA3 is involved in microspore development. FLA4/SOS5 with two FAS domains and two AGP domains has a role in maintaining proper cell expansion under salt stressed conditions. The role of other FLAs remains to be uncovered. METHOD/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe the characterisation of a T-DNA insertion mutant in the FLA1 gene (At5g55730. Under standard growth conditions fla1-1 mutants have no obvious phenotype. Based on gene expression studies, a putative role for FLA1 in callus induction was investigated and revealed that fla1-1 has a reduced ability to regenerate shoots in an in vitro shoot-induction assay. Analysis of FLA1p:GUS reporter lines show that FLA1 is expressed in several tissues including stomata, trichomes, the vasculature of leaves, the primary root tip and in lateral roots near the junction of the primary root. CONCLUSION: The results of the developmental expression of FLA1 and characterisation of the fla1 mutant support a role for FLA1 in the early events of lateral root development and shoot development in tissue culture, prior to cell-type specification.

  10. Betabaculovirus F proteins showed different efficiencies when rescuing the infectivity of gp64-null Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, F.; Wang, M.; Ying, T.; Deng, F.; Vlak, J.M.; Hu, Z.; Wang, H.

    2013-01-01

    The Agrotis segetum granulovirus (AgseGV) F protein was previously identified as the first betabaculovirus F protein with functional homology to Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) GP64. In the current study, F proteins from Xestia c-nigrum granulovirus (XecnGV), Cydia pomonella

  11. Dual RNAseq shows the human mucosal immunity protein, MUC13, is a hallmark of Plasmodium exoerythrocytic infection

    KAUST Repository

    LaMonte, Gregory; Orjuela-Sanchez, Pamela; Wang, Lawrence; Li, Shangzhong; Swann, Justine; Cowell, Annie; Zou, Bing Yu; Abdel- Haleem Mohamed, Alyaa; Villa-Galarce, Zaira; Moreno, Marta; Tong-Rios, Carlos; Vinetz, Joseph; Lewis, Nathan; Winzeler, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-01

    The exoerythrocytic stage of Plasmodium malaria infection is a critical window for prophylactic intervention. Using a genome-wide dual RNA sequencing of flow-sorted infected and uninfected hepatoma cells we identify the human mucosal immunity gene, Mucin13 (MUC13), as strongly upregulated during Plasmodium exoerythrocytic hepatic-stage infection. We confirm that MUC13 expression is upregulated in hepatoma cell lines and primary hepatocytes. In immunofluorescence assays, host MUC13 protein expression distinguishes infected cells from adjacent uninfected cells and shows similar colocalization with parasite biomarkers such as UIS4 and HSP70. We further show that localization patterns are species independent, distinguishing both P. berghei and P. vivax infected cells, and that MUC13 can be used to identify compounds that inhibit parasite replication in hepatocytes across all Human-infecting Plasmodium species. This data presents a novel interface of host-parasite interactions in Plasmodium, in that a component of host mucosal immunity is reprogrammed to assist the progression of infection.

  12. Dual RNAseq shows the human mucosal immunity protein, MUC13, is a hallmark of Plasmodium exoerythrocytic infection

    KAUST Repository

    LaMonte, Gregory

    2017-10-03

    The exoerythrocytic stage of Plasmodium malaria infection is a critical window for prophylactic intervention. Using a genome-wide dual RNA sequencing of flow-sorted infected and uninfected hepatoma cells we identify the human mucosal immunity gene, Mucin13 (MUC13), as strongly upregulated during Plasmodium exoerythrocytic hepatic-stage infection. We confirm that MUC13 expression is upregulated in hepatoma cell lines and primary hepatocytes. In immunofluorescence assays, host MUC13 protein expression distinguishes infected cells from adjacent uninfected cells and shows similar colocalization with parasite biomarkers such as UIS4 and HSP70. We further show that localization patterns are species independent, distinguishing both P. berghei and P. vivax infected cells, and that MUC13 can be used to identify compounds that inhibit parasite replication in hepatocytes across all Human-infecting Plasmodium species. This data presents a novel interface of host-parasite interactions in Plasmodium, in that a component of host mucosal immunity is reprogrammed to assist the progression of infection.

  13. Lactobacillus kefiri shows inter-strain variations in the amino acid sequence of the S-layer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamud, Mariano; Carasi, Paula; Bronsoms, Sílvia; Trejo, Sebastián A; Serradell, María de Los Angeles

    2017-04-01

    The S-layer is a proteinaceous envelope constituted by subunits that self-assemble to form a two-dimensional lattice that covers the surface of different species of Bacteria and Archaea, and it could be involved in cell recognition of microbes among other several distinct functions. In this work, both proteomic and genomic approaches were used to gain knowledge about the sequences of the S-layer protein (SLPs) encoding genes expressed by six aggregative and sixteen non-aggregative strains of potentially probiotic Lactobacillus kefiri. Peptide mass fingerprint (PMF) analysis confirmed the identity of SLPs extracted from L. kefiri, and based on the homology with phylogenetically related species, primers located outside and inside the SLP-genes were employed to amplify genomic DNA. The O-glycosylation site SASSAS was found in all L. kefiri SLPs. Ten strains were selected for sequencing of the complete genes. The total length of the mature proteins varies from 492 to 576 amino acids, and all SLPs have a calculated pI between 9.37 and 9.60. The N-terminal region is relatively conserved and shows a high percentage of positively charged amino acids. Major differences among strains are found in the C-terminal region. Different groups could be distinguished regarding the mature SLPs and the similarities observed in the PMF spectra. Interestingly, SLPs of the aggregative strains are 100% homologous, although these strains were isolated from different kefir grains. This knowledge provides relevant data for better understanding of the mechanisms involved in SLPs functionality and could contribute to the development of products of biotechnological interest from potentially probiotic bacteria.

  14. Sulfate influx on band 3 protein of equine erythrocyte membrane (Equus caballus) using different experimental temperatures and buffer solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, S; Piccione, D; Ielati, S; Bocchino, E G; Piccione, G

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the anion transport in equine erythrocytes through the measurement of the sulfate uptake operating from band 3 using different experimental temperatures and buffer solutions. Blood samples of six clinically healthy horses were collected via jugular vein puncture, and an emochrome-citometric examination was performed. The blood was divided into four aliquots and by centrifugation and aspiration the plasma and buffy coat were carefully discarded. The red blood cells were washed with an isosmotic medium and centrifuged. The obtained cell suspensions were incubated with two different experimental buffer solutions (buffer A: 115 mM Na2SO4, 10 mM NaCl, 20 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 30 mM glucose; and buffer B: 115 mM Na2SO4, 10 mM NaCl, 20 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 30 mM MgCl2) in a water bath for 1 h at 25 °C and 37 °C. Normal erythrocytes, suspended at 3% hematocrit, were used to measure the SO4= influx by absorption spectrophotometry at 425 nm wavelength. Unpaired Student's t-test showed a statistically significant decrease (P buffer solutions. Comparing the buffer A with buffer B unpaired Student's t-test showed statistically lower values (P < 0.0001) for A solution versus B solution both at 25 °C and at 37 °C. The greater inhibition of SO4 (=) influx measured in equine erythrocytes indicates the increased formation of the sulfydryl bonds in band 3 and the modulation of the sulfydryl groups, culminating in the conformational changes in band 3. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog from maize roots showing light-regulated gravitropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y. T.; Hidaka, H.; Feldman, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Roots of many species respond to gravity (gravitropism) and grow downward only if illuminated. This light-regulated root gravitropism is phytochrome-dependent, mediated by calcium, and inhibited by KN-93, a specific inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II). A cDNA encoding MCK1, a maize homolog of mammalian CaMK, has been isolated from roots of maize (Zea mays L.). The MCK1 gene is expressed in root tips, the site of perception for both light and gravity. Using the [35S]CaM gel-overlay assay we showed that calmodulin-binding activity of the MCK1 is abolished by 50 microM KN-93, but binding is not affected by 5 microM KN-93, paralleling physiological findings that light-regulated root gravitropism is inhibited by 50 microM KN-93, but not by 5 microM KN-93. KN-93 inhibits light-regulated gravitropism by interrupting transduction of the light signal, not light perception, suggesting that MCK1 may play a role in transducing light. This is the first report suggesting a physiological function for a CaMK homolog in light signal transduction.

  16. The Plasmodium falciparum exported protein PF3D7_0402000 binds to erythrocyte ankyrin and band 4.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakya, Bikash; Penn, Wesley D.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Lacount, Douglas J.

    2017-09-01

    Plasmodium falciparum extensively modifies the infected red blood cell (RBC), resulting in changes in deformability, shape and surface properties. These alterations suggest that the RBC cytoskeleton is a major target for modification during infection. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to these changes are largely unknown. To begin to address this question, we screened for exported P. falciparum proteins that bound to the erythrocyte cytoskeleton proteins ankyrin 1 (ANK1) and band 4.1 (4.1R), which form critical interactions with other cytoskeletal proteins that contribute to the deformability and stability of RBCs. Yeast two-hybrid screens with ANK1 and 4.1R identified eight interactions with P. falciparum exported proteins, including an interaction between 4.1R and PF3D7_0402000 (PFD0090c). This interaction was first identified in a large-scale screen (Vignali et al., Malaria J, 7:211, 2008), which also reported an interaction between PF3D7_0402000 and ANK1. We confirmed the interactions of PF3D7_0402000 with 4.1R and ANK1 in pair-wise yeast two-hybrid and co-precipitation assays. In both cases, an intact PHIST domain in PF3D7_0402000 was required for binding. Complex purification followed by mass spectrometry analysis provided additional support for the interaction of PF3D7_0402000 with ANK1 and 4.1R. RBC ghost cells loaded with maltose-binding protein (MBP)-PF3D7_0402000 passed through a metal microsphere column less efficiently than mock- or MBP-loaded controls, consistent with an effect of PF3D7_0402000 on RBC rigidity or membrane stability. This study confirmed the interaction of PF3D7_0402000 with 4.1R in multiple independent assays, provided the first evidence that PF3D7_0402000 also binds to ANK1, and suggested that PF3D7_0402000 affects deformability or membrane stability of uninfected RBC ghosts.

  17. Microsecond molecular dynamics simulation shows effect of slow loop dynamics on backbone amide order parameters of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maragakis, Paul; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Eastwood, Michael P

    2008-01-01

    . Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation provides a complementary approach to the study of protein dynamics on similar time scales. Comparisons between NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations can be used to interpret experimental results and to improve the quality of simulation-related force fields and integration......A molecular-level understanding of the function of a protein requires knowledge of both its structural and dynamic properties. NMR spectroscopy allows the measurement of generalized order parameters that provide an atomistic description of picosecond and nanosecond fluctuations in protein structure...... methods. However, apparent systematic discrepancies between order parameters extracted from simulations and experiments are common, particularly for elements of noncanonical secondary structure. In this paper, results from a 1.2 micros explicit solvent MD simulation of the protein ubiquitin are compared...

  18. Study in mice shows that an aggressive type of breast cancer is linked to an inflammatory protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberrant expression of an inflammatory protein, nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2), may enhance the progression and metastasis of an aggressive and less common form of breast cancer, known as the estrogen receptor-negative type of disease.

  19. Identification of Besnoitia besnoiti proteins that showed differences in abundance between tachyzoite and bradyzoite stages by difference gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-García, Aurora; Alvarez-García, Gema; Marugán-Hernández, Virginia; García-Lunar, Paula; Aguado-Martínez, Adriana; Risco-Castillo, Verónica; Ortega-Mora, Luis M

    2013-07-01

    Bovine besnoitiosis is a chronic and debilitating disease, caused by the apicomplexan parasite Besnoitia besnoiti. Infection of cattle by B. besnoiti is governed by the tachyzoite stage, which is related to acute infection, and the bradyzoite stage gathered into macroscopic cysts located in subcutaneous tissue in the skin, mucosal membranes and sclera conjunctiva and related to persistence and chronic infection. However, the entire life cycle of this parasite and the molecular mechanisms underlying tachyzoite-to-bradyzoite conversion remain unknown. In this context, a different antigenic pattern has been observed between tachyzoite and bradyzoite extracts. Thus, to identify stage-specific proteins, a difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) approach was used on tachyzoite and bradyzoite extracts followed by mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. A total of 130 and 132 spots were differentially expressed in bradyzoites and tachyzoites, respectively (average ratio ± 1.5, Presult, 5 up-regulated bradyzoite proteins (GAPDH, ENO1, LDH, SOD and RNA polymerase) and 5 up-regulated tachyzoite proteins (ENO2; LDH; ATP synthase; HSP70 and PDI) were identified. The present results set the basis for the identification of new proteins as drug targets. Moreover, the role of these proteins in tachyzoite-to-bradyzoite conversion and the role of the host cell environment should be a subject of further research.

  20. Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinases from Arabidopsis show substrate specificity differences in an analysis of 103 substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy eCurran

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The identification of substrates represents a critical challenge for understanding any protein kinase-based signal transduction pathway. In Arabidopsis, there are more than 1000 different protein kinases, 34 of which belong to a family of Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CPKs. While CPKs are implicated in regulating diverse aspects of plant biology, from ion transport to transcription, relatively little is known about isoform-specific differences in substrate specificity, or the number of phosphorylation targets. Here, in vitro kinase assays were used to compare phosphorylation targets of four CPKs from Arabidopsis (CPK1, 10, 16 and 34. Significant differences in substrate specificity for each kinase were revealed by assays using 103 different substrates. For example CPK16 phosphorylated Serine 109 in a peptide from the stress-regulated protein, Di19-2 with KM ~70 µM, but this site was not phosphorylated significantly by CPKs 1, 10, or 34. In contrast, CPKs 1, 10, and 34 phosphorylated 93 other peptide substrates not recognized by CPK16. Examples of substrate specificity differences among all four CPKs were verified by kinetic analyses. To test the correlation between in vivo phosphorylation events and in vitro kinase activities, assays were performed with 274 synthetic peptides that contained phosphorylation sites previously mapped in proteins isolated from plants (in vivo-mapped sites. Of these, 74 (27% were found to be phosphorylated by at least one of the four CPKs tested. This 27% success rate validates a robust strategy for linking the activities of specific kinases, such as CPKs, to the thousands of in planta phosphorylation sites that are being uncovered by emerging technologies.

  1. Reducing dietary protein in pond production of hybrid striped bass - study shows a significant reduction is possible in digestible protein level in commercial diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    In previous work, we demonstrated that diets containing 40% digestible protein (DP) (45% crude protein) and 18 %lipid supplemented with Met and Lys resulted in superior performance and nutrient retentions in hybrid striped bass compared to less energy-dense diets when rearing hybrid striped bass at ...

  2. TAILS N-Terminomics and Proteomics Show Protein Degradation Dominates over Proteolytic Processing by Cathepsins in Pancreatic Tumors

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    Anna Prudova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Deregulated cathepsin proteolysis occurs across numerous cancers, but in vivo substrates mediating tumorigenesis remain ill-defined. Applying 8-plex iTRAQ terminal amine isotopic labeling of substrates (TAILS, a systems-level N-terminome degradomics approach, we identified cathepsin B, H, L, S, and Z in vivo substrates and cleavage sites with the use of six different cathepsin knockout genotypes in the Rip1-Tag2 mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumorigenesis. Among 1,935 proteins and 1,114 N termini identified by TAILS, stable proteolytic products were identified in wild-type tumors compared with one or more different cathepsin knockouts (17%–44% of 139 cleavages. This suggests a lack of compensation at the substrate level by other cathepsins. The majority of neo-N termini (56%–83% for all cathepsins was consistent with protein degradation. We validated substrates, including the glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase M2 associated with the Warburg effect, the ER chaperone GRP78, and the oncoprotein prothymosin-alpha. Thus, the identification of cathepsin substrates in tumorigenesis improves the understanding of cathepsin functions in normal physiology and cancer.

  3. Determination of the secondary structure content of proteins in aqueous solutions from their amide I and amide II infrared bands. Comparison between classical and partial least-squares methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dousseau, F.; Pezolet, M.

    1990-01-01

    A method for estimating protein secondary structure from infrared spectra has been developed. The infrared spectra of H 2 O solutions of 13 proteins of known crystal structure have been recorded and corrected for the spectral contribution of water in the amide I and II region by using the algorithm of Dousseau et al. This calibration set of proteins has been analyzed by using either a classical least-squares (CLS) method or the partial least-squares (PLS) method. The pure-structure spectra calculated by the classical least-squares method are in good agreement with spectra of poly(L-lysine) in the α-helix, β-sheet, and undefined conformations. The results show that the best agreement between the secondary structure determined by X-ray crystal-lography and that predicted by infrared spectroscopy is obtained when both the amide I and II bands are used to generate the calibration set, when the PLS method is used, and when it is assumed that the secondary structure of proteins is composed of only four types of structure: ordered and disordered α-helices, β-sheet, and undefined conformation. Attempts to include turns in the secondary structure estimation have led to a loss of accuracy. The spectra of the calibration proteins were also recorded in 2 H 2 O solution. After correction for the contribution of the combination band of 2 H 2 O in the amide I' band region, the spectra were analyzed with PLS, but the results were not as good as for the spectra obtained in H 2 O, especially for the α-helical conformation

  4. Degradation of p53 by human Alphapapillomavirus E6 proteins shows a stronger correlation with phylogeny than oncogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leiping Fu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Human Papillomavirus (HPV E6 induced p53 degradation is thought to be an essential activity by which high-risk human Alphapapillomaviruses (alpha-HPVs contribute to cervical cancer development. However, most of our understanding is derived from the comparison of HPV16 and HPV11. These two viruses are relatively distinct viruses, making the extrapolation of these results difficult. In the present study, we expand the tested strains (types to include members of all known HPV species groups within the Alphapapillomavirus genus.We report the biochemical activity of E6 proteins from 27 HPV types representing all alpha-HPV species groups to degrade p53 in human cells. Expression of E6 from all HPV types epidemiologically classified as group 1 carcinogens significantly reduced p53 levels. However, several types not associated with cancer (e.g., HPV53, HPV70 and HPV71 were equally active in degrading p53. HPV types within species groups alpha 5, 6, 7, 9 and 11 share a most recent common ancestor (MRCA and all contain E6 ORFs that degrade p53. A unique exception, HPV71 E6 ORF that degraded p53 was outside this clade and is one of the most prevalent HPV types infecting the cervix in a population-based study of 10,000 women. Alignment of E6 ORFs identified an amino acid site that was highly correlated with the biochemical ability to degrade p53. Alteration of this amino acid in HPV71 E6 abrogated its ability to degrade p53, while alteration of this site in HPV71-related HPV90 and HPV106 E6s enhanced their capacity to degrade p53.These data suggest that the alpha-HPV E6 proteins' ability to degrade p53 is an evolved phenotype inherited from a most recent common ancestor of the high-risk species that does not always segregate with carcinogenicity. In addition, we identified an amino-acid residue strongly correlated with viral p53 degrading potential.

  5. Plasma proteomics shows an elevation of the anti-inflammatory protein APOA-IV in chronic equine laminitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steelman Samantha M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Equine laminitis is a devastating disease that causes severe pain in afflicted horses and places a major economic burden on the horse industry. In acute laminitis, the disintegration of the dermal-epidermal junction can cause the third phalanx to detach from the hoof wall, leaving the horse unable to bear weight on the affected limbs. Horses that survive the acute phase transition into a chronic form of laminitis, which is often termed “founder”. Some evidence suggests that chronic laminar inflammation might be associated with alterations in the endocrine and immune systems. We investigated this broad hypothesis by using DIGE to assess global differences in the plasma proteome between horses with chronic laminitis and controls. Results We identified 16 differentially expressed proteins; the majority of these were involved in the interrelated coagulation, clotting, and kininogen cascades. Clinical testing of functional coagulation parameters in foundered horses revealed a slight delay in prothrombin (PT clotting time, although most other indices were within normal ranges. Upregulation of the intestinal apolipoprotein APOA-IV in horses with chronic laminitis was confirmed by western blot. Conclusions Our results support the hypothesis that localized laminar inflammation may be linked to systemic alterations in immune regulation, particularly in the gastrointestinal system. Gastrointestinal inflammation has been implicated in the development of acute laminitis but has not previously been associated with chronic laminitis.

  6. A high-affinity inhibitor of yeast carboxypeptidase Y is encoded by TFS1 and shows homology to a family of lipid binding proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, A W; Svendsen, I; Sørensen, S O

    1998-01-01

    signals for transport into the endoplasmic reticulum. Surprisingly, Ic is encoded by TFS1, which has previously been isolated as a high-copy suppressor of cdc25-1. CDC25 encodes the putative GTP exchange factor for Ras1p/Ras2p in yeast. In an attempt to rationalize this finding, we looked...... degree of specificity, showing a 200-fold higher Ki toward a carboxypeptidase from Candida albicans which is highly homologous to carboxypeptidase Y. The TFS1 gene product shows extensive similarity to a class of proteins termed "21-23-kDa lipid binding proteins", members of which are found in several...

  7. The 3D protein of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 binds to a viral genomic 3' UTR and shows RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Cao, Qianda; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Chen, Shun; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Sun, Kunfeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Zhao, Xinxin; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2017-12-01

    To explore the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) function of the 3D protein of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 (DHAV-1), the gene was cloned into the pET-32a(+) vector for prokaryotic expression. The 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of DHAV-1 together with a T7 promoter was cloned into the pMD19-T vector for in vitro transcription of 3' UTR RNA, which was further used as a template in RNA-dependent RNA polymerization. In this study, three methods were applied to analyze the RdRP function of the 3D protein: (1) ammonium molybdate spectrophotometry to detect pyrophosphate produced during polymerization; (2) quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) to investigate the changes in RNA quantity during polymerization; and (3) electrophoresis mobility shift assay to examine the interaction between the 3D protein and 3' UTR. The results showed the 3D protein was successfully expressed in bacteria culture supernatant in a soluble form, which could be purified by affinity chromatography. In 3D enzymatic activity assays, pyrophosphate and RNA were produced, the amounts of which increased based on approximative kinetics, and binding of the 3D protein to the 3' UTR was observed. These results indicate that prokaryotically expressed soluble DHAV-13D protein can bind to a viral genomic 3' UTR and exhibit RdRP activity.

  8. Quantification of trace elements in protein bands by synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence after isoelectric focusing separation of human hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yuxi; Chen Chunying; Li Bai; He Wei; Huang Yuying; Chai Zhifang

    2005-01-01

    The role and effects of a trace element in a particular organism strongly depend on its particular chemical forms in which the element is present. Therefore, the bulk content or concentration of an element in the organism of interest is often meaningless in judging its biological significance. To understand bioavailability, transportation, cell uptake, metabolism, toxicity, and other biological behaviors of trace elements in the body, information is needed about speciation of trace element, especially about distribution of metal-containing proteins. Development of appropriate methods for speciation analysis is therefore required. Synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) is a sensitive method for multielemental analysis with detection limit of 10 ng/g. It has been successfully used for imaging and quantifying trace elements in various pathological and healthy tissues, even in a single cell, to help understand the mechanism of diseases and the biochemistry of elements. In our previous work, the technique was combined with electrophoresis to study distribution of metalloproteins in biological samples, but the quantitative analysis of trace elements in protein bands after electrophoresis was still unrealized. In this study, a procedure has been proposed for quantification of Fe, Cu, and Zn in protein bands with SRXRF analysis after isoelectric focusing (IEF) separation. Calibration standards were prepared by adding certain amounts of metal ions and free-metal proteins to electrophoresis gel. Human hemoglobin was separated with IEF, and Fe, Cu, and Zn in protein bands were analyzed by SRXRF. The calibration curves can be obtained in a range of 0-8 mg/kg metals and a linear relationship between dosage of metals and fluorescent intensity can be observed (r 2 > 0.99). The method provides the detection limits of 2.43, 1.12, and 0.96 mg/kg for Fe, Cu and Zn, and the recoveries of 90.4 and 115.7 % for Fe and Zn, respectively. The hyphenated technique of SRXRF and IEF

  9. A fusion protein containing a lepidopteran-specific toxin from the South Indian red scorpion (Mesobuthus tamulus and snowdrop lectin shows oral toxicity to target insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitches Elaine

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite evidence suggesting a role in plant defence, the use of plant lectins in crop protection has been hindered by their low and species-specific insecticidal activity. Snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA is transported to the haemolymph of insects after oral ingestion, and can be used as a basis for novel insecticides. Recombinant proteins containing GNA expressed as a fusion with a peptide or protein, normally only toxic when injected into the insect haemolymph, have the potential to show oral toxicity as a result of GNA-mediated uptake. Results A gene encoding a toxin, ButaIT, from the red scorpion (Mesobuthus tamulus was synthesised and assembled into expression constructs. One construct contained ButaIT alone, whereas the other contained ButaIT fused N-terminally to a GNA polypeptide (ButaIT/GNA. Both recombinant proteins were produced using the yeast Pichia pastoris as an expression host, and purified. Recombinant ButaIT and ButaIT/GNA were acutely toxic when injected into larvae of tomato moth (Lacanobia oleracea, causing slow paralysis, leading to mortality or decreased growth. ButaIT/GNA was chronically toxic when fed to L. oleracea larvae, causing decreased survival and weight gain under conditions where GNA alone was effectively non-toxic. Intact ButaIT/GNA was detected in larval haemolymph from insects fed the fusion protein orally, demonstrating transport of the linked polypeptide across the gut. Proteolysis of the fusion protein was also observed. ButaIT/GNA was significantly more toxic that GNA alone when fed to the homopteran Nilaparvata lugens (rice brown planthopper in liquid artificial diet. Conclusion The ButaIT/GNA recombinant fusion protein is toxic to lepidopteran larvae both when injected and when fed orally, showing the utility of GNA as a carrier to transport potentially toxic peptides and proteins across the insect gut. Although ButaIT has been claimed to be lepidopteran

  10. The Apoplastic Secretome of Trichoderma virens During Interaction With Maize Roots Shows an Inhibition of Plant Defence and Scavenging Oxidative Stress Secreted Proteins

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    Guillermo Nogueira-Lopez

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In Nature, almost every plant is colonized by fungi. Trichoderma virens is a biocontrol fungus which has the capacity to behave as an opportunistic plant endophyte. Even though many plants are colonized by this symbiont, the exact mechanisms by which Trichoderma masks its entrance into its plant host remain unknown, but likely involve the secretion of different families of proteins into the apoplast that may play crucial roles in the suppression of plant immune responses. In this study, we investigated T. virens colonization of maize roots under hydroponic conditions, evidencing inter- and intracellular colonization by the fungus and modifications in root morphology and coloration. Moreover, we show that upon host penetration, T. virens secretes into the apoplast an arsenal of proteins to facilitate inter- and intracellular colonization of maize root tissues. Using a gel-free shotgun proteomics approach, 95 and 43 secretory proteins were identified from maize and T. virens, respectively. A reduction in the maize secretome (36% was induced by T. virens, including two major groups, glycosyl hydrolases and peroxidases. Furthermore, T. virens secreted proteins were mainly involved in cell wall hydrolysis, scavenging of reactive oxygen species and secondary metabolism, as well as putative effector-like proteins. Levels of peroxidase activity were reduced in the inoculated roots, suggesting a strategy used by T. virens to manipulate host immune responses. The results provide an insight into the crosstalk in the apoplast which is essential to maintain the T. virens-plant interaction.

  11. Structures of Adenovirus Incomplete Particles Clarify Capsid Architecture and Show Maturation Changes of Packaging Protein L1 52/55k.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condezo, Gabriela N; Marabini, Roberto; Ayora, Silvia; Carazo, José M; Alba, Raúl; Chillón, Miguel; San Martín, Carmen

    2015-09-01

    Adenovirus is one of the most complex icosahedral, nonenveloped viruses. Even after its structure was solved at near-atomic resolution by both cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography, the location of minor coat proteins is still a subject of debate. The elaborated capsid architecture is the product of a correspondingly complex assembly process, about which many aspects remain unknown. Genome encapsidation involves the concerted action of five virus proteins, and proteolytic processing by the virus protease is needed to prime the virion for sequential uncoating. Protein L1 52/55k is required for packaging, and multiple cleavages by the maturation protease facilitate its release from the nascent virion. Light-density particles are routinely produced in adenovirus infections and are thought to represent assembly intermediates. Here, we present the molecular and structural characterization of two different types of human adenovirus light particles produced by a mutant with delayed packaging. We show that these particles lack core polypeptide V but do not lack the density corresponding to this protein in the X-ray structure, thereby adding support to the adenovirus cryo-electron microscopy model. The two types of light particles present different degrees of proteolytic processing. Their structures provide the first glimpse of the organization of L1 52/55k protein inside the capsid shell and of how this organization changes upon partial maturation. Immature, full-length L1 52/55k is poised beneath the vertices to engage the virus genome. Upon proteolytic processing, L1 52/55k disengages from the capsid shell, facilitating genome release during uncoating. Adenoviruses have been extensively characterized as experimental systems in molecular biology, as human pathogens, and as therapeutic vectors. However, a clear picture of many aspects of their basic biology is still lacking. Two of these aspects are the location of minor coat proteins in the capsid and the

  12. Extensive proteomic screening identifies the obesity-related NYGGF4 protein as a novel LRP1-interactor, showing reduced expression in early Alzheimer's disease

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    Taddei Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein 1 (LRP1 has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD but its signalling has not been fully evaluated. There is good evidence that the cytoplasmic domain of LRP1 is involved in protein-protein interactions, important in the cell biology of LRP1. Results We carried out three yeast two-hybrid screens to identify proteins that interact with the cytoplasmic domain of LRP1. The screens included both conventional screens as well as a novel, split-ubiquitin-based screen in which an LRP1 construct was expressed and screened as a transmembrane protein. The split-ubiquitin screen was validated in a screen using full-length amyloid protein precursor (APP, which successfully identified FE65 and FE65L2, as well as novel interactors (Rab3a, Napg, and ubiquitin b. Using both a conventional screen as well as the split-ubiquitin screen, we identified NYGGF4 as a novel LRP1 interactor. The interaction between LRP1 and NYGGF4 was validated using two-hybrid assays, coprecipitation and colocalization in mammalian cells. Mutation analysis demonstrated a specific interaction of NYGGF4 with an NPXY motif that required an intact tyrosine residue. Interestingly, while we confirmed that other LRP1 interactors we identified, including JIP1B and EB-1, were also able to bind to APP, NYGGF4 was unique in that it showed specific binding with LRP1. Expression of NYGGF4 decreased significantly in patients with AD as compared to age-matched controls, and showed decreasing expression with AD disease progression. Examination of Nyggf4 expression in mice with different alleles of the human APOE4 gene showed significant differences in Nyggf4 expression. Conclusions These results implicate NYGGF4 as a novel and specific interactor of LRP1. Decreased expression of LRP1 and NYGGF4 over disease, evident with the presence of even moderate numbers of neuritic plaques, suggests that LRP1-NYGGF4 is a system altered

  13. Western blot data using two distinct anti-O-GlcNAc monoclonal antibodies showing unique glycosylation status on cellular proteins under 2-deoxy-d-glucose treatment

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    Tetsuya Okuda

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein modification by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAcylation is one of the post transcriptional modifications occurring on cellular proteins. This paper provides a data set relating to the O-GlcNAcylation of cellular proteins detected by RL2 and CTD110.6 antibodies, which are commonly used for detection of protein O-GlcNAcylation, in 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2DG-treated human teratocarcinoma NCCIT cells in support of the research article entitled “A novel, promoter-based, target-specific assay identifies 2-deoxy-d-glucose as an inhibitor of globotriaosylceramide biosynthesis” (Okuda et al., 2009 [1]. The main article described a suppressive effect of 2DG on an Sp1 target gene in NCCIT cells and discussed the relationship between the effect of 2DG and O-GlcNAcylation status of Sp1. The data in this paper complements this relationship by Western blotting and clearly showed that the 2DG treatment increased O-GlcNAcylation of cellular proteins in NCCIT cells, whereas the RL2 and CTD110.6 epitopes were detected in a different manner. The RL2 epitope was detected on Sp1 during 2DG treatment, and the level was transiently increased at 24 h. In contrast, the CTD110.6 epitope became detectable on Sp1 over 72 h after 2DG treatment, and then the other proteins containing CTD110.6 epitopes also appeared in the cell lysates and the anti-Sp1 antibody precipitates.

  14. Novel ATPase activity of the polyprotein intermediate, Viral Protein genome-linked-Nuclear Inclusion-a protease, of Pepper vein banding potyvirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, Chhavi; Savithri, Handanahal S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Pepper vein banding potyvirus VPg harbors Walker motifs. ► VPg exhibits ATPase activity in the presence of NIa-Pro. ► Plausible structural and functional interplay between VPg and NIa-Pro. ► Functional relevance of prolonged presence of VPg-Pro during infection. -- Abstract: Potyviruses temporally regulate their protein function by polyprotein processing. Previous studies have shown that VPg (Viral Protein genome-linked) of Pepper vein banding virus interacts with the NIa-Pro (Nuclear Inclusion-a protease) domain, and modulates the kinetics of the protease. In the present study, we report for the first time that VPg harbors the Walker motifs A and B, and the presence of NIa-Pro, especially in cis (cleavage site (E191A) VPg-Pro mutant), is essential for manifestation of the ATPase activity. Mutation of Lys47 (Walker motif A) and Asp88:Glu89 (Walker motif B) to alanine in E191A VPg-Pro lead to reduced ATPase activity, confirming that this activity was inherent to VPg. We propose that potyviral VPg, established as an intrinsically disordered domain, undergoes plausible structural alterations upon interaction with globular NIa-Pro which induces the ATPase activity.

  15. Diffracted X-ray tracking for monitoring intramolecular motion in individual protein molecules using broad band X-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Sasaki, Yuji C. [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 609 Kiban Building 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kahiwashi, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, CREST, Sasaki-Team, 609 Kiban Building, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Masato; Kajiwara, Kentaro; Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Ohta, Noboru [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hoshisashi, Kentaro; Jae-won, Chang; Tokue, Maki; Matsushita, Yufuku [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 609 Kiban Building 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kahiwashi, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Nishijima, Masaki; Inoue, Yoshihisa [Department of Applied Chemistry and Office for University-Industry Collaboration, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yagi, Naoto [Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, CREST, Sasaki-Team, 609 Kiban Building, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    Diffracted X-ray tracking (DXT) enables the tilting and twisting motions of single protein molecules to be monitored with micro- to milliradian resolution using a highly brilliant X-ray source with a wide energy bandwidth. We have developed a technique to monitor single molecules using gold nanocrystals attached to individual protein molecules using the BL28B2 beamline at SPring-8. In this paper we present the installation of a single toroidal X-ray mirror at BL28B2 to focus X-rays in an energy range of 10–20 keV (△E/E = 82% for an X-ray with a wide energy bandwidth). With this beamline we tracked diffraction spots from gold nanocrystals over a wide angle range than that using quasi-monochromatic X-rays. Application of the wide angle DXT technique to biological systems enabled us to observe the on-site motions of single protein molecules that have been functionalized in vivo. We further extend the capability of DXT by observing the fractional tilting and twisting motions of inner proteins under various conditions. As a proof of this methodology and to determine instrumental performance the intramolecular motions of a human serum albumin complex with 2-anthracenecarboxylic acid was investigated using the BL28B2 beamline. The random tilting and twisting intramolecular motions are shown to be directly linked to the movement of individual protein molecules in the buffer solution.

  16. The hierarchically organized splitting of chromosome bands into sub-bands analyzed by multicolor banding (MCB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, H; Weise, A; Michel, S; Starke, H; Mrasek, K; Heller, A; Kuechler, A; Claussen, U; Liehr, T

    2004-01-01

    To clarify the nature of chromosome sub-bands in more detail, the multicolor banding (MCB) probe-set for chromosome 5 was hybridized to normal metaphase spreads of GTG band levels at approximately 850, approximately 550, approximately 400 and approximately 300. It could be observed that as the chromosomes became shorter, more of the initial 39 MCB pseudo-colors disappeared, ending with 18 MCB pseudo-colored bands at the approximately 300-band level. The hierarchically organized splitting of bands into sub-bands was analyzed by comparing the disappearance or appearance of pseudo-color bands of the four different band levels. The regions to split first are telomere-near, centromere-near and in 5q23-->q31, followed by 5p15, 5p14, and all GTG dark bands in 5q apart from 5q12 and 5q32 and finalized by sub-band building in 5p15.2, 5q21.2-->q21.3, 5q23.1 and 5q34. The direction of band splitting towards the centromere or the telomere could be assigned to each band separately. Pseudo-colors assigned to GTG-light bands were resistant to band splitting. These observations are in concordance with the recently proposed concept of chromosome region-specific protein swelling. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  17. Transgenic plants expressing the AaIT/GNA fusion protein show increased resistance and toxicity to both chewing and sucking pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Min; Li, Jie; Zhu, Jin-Qi; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Wang, Cheng-Shu; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Chen, Xue-Xin; Li, Sheng

    2016-04-01

    The adoption of pest-resistant transgenic plants to reduce yield losses and decrease pesticide use has been successful. To achieve the goal of controlling both chewing and sucking pests in a given transgenic plant, we generated transgenic tobacco, Arabidopsis, and rice plants expressing the fusion protein, AaIT/GNA, in which an insecticidal scorpion venom neurotoxin (Androctonus australis toxin, AaIT) is fused to snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin, GNA). Compared with transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants expressing AaIT or GNA, transgenic plants expressing AaIT/GNA exhibited increased resistance and toxicity to one chewing pest, the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera. Transgenic tobacco and rice plants expressing AaIT/GNA showed increased resistance and toxicity to two sucking pests, the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, and the rice brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, respectively. Moreover, in the field, transgenic rice plants expressing AaIT/GNA exhibited a significant improvement in grain yield when infested with N. lugens. This study shows that expressing the AaIT/GNA fusion protein in transgenic plants can be a useful approach for controlling pests, particularly sucking pests which are not susceptible to the toxin in Bt crops. © 2015 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  18. Rapamycin and chloroquine: the in vitro and in vivo effects of autophagy-modifying drugs show promising results in valosin containing protein multisystem proteinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angèle Nalbandian

    Full Text Available Mutations in the valosin containing protein (VCP gene cause hereditary Inclusion body myopathy (hIBM associated with Paget disease of bone (PDB, frontotemporal dementia (FTD, more recently termed multisystem proteinopathy (MSP. Affected individuals exhibit scapular winging and die from progressive muscle weakness, and cardiac and respiratory failure, typically in their 40s to 50s. Histologically, patients show the presence of rimmed vacuoles and TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43-positive large ubiquitinated inclusion bodies in the muscles. We have generated a VCPR155H/+ mouse model which recapitulates the disease phenotype and impaired autophagy typically observed in patients with VCP disease. Autophagy-modifying agents, such as rapamycin and chloroquine, at pharmacological doses have previously shown to alter the autophagic flux. Herein, we report results of administration of rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway, and chloroquine, a lysosomal inhibitor which reverses autophagy by accumulating in lysosomes, responsible for blocking autophagy in 20-month old VCPR155H/+ mice. Rapamycin-treated mice demonstrated significant improvement in muscle performance, quadriceps histological analysis, and rescue of ubiquitin, and TDP-43 pathology and defective autophagy as indicated by decreased protein expression levels of LC3-I/II, p62/SQSTM1, optineurin and inhibiting the mTORC1 substrates. Conversely, chloroquine-treated VCPR155H/+ mice revealed progressive muscle weakness, cytoplasmic accumulation of TDP-43, ubiquitin-positive inclusion bodies and increased LC3-I/II, p62/SQSTM1, and optineurin expression levels. Our in vitro patient myoblasts studies treated with rapamycin demonstrated an overall improvement in the autophagy markers. Targeting the mTOR pathway ameliorates an increasing list of disorders, and these findings suggest that VCP disease and related neurodegenerative multisystem

  19. Generation of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitory peptides during the enzymatic hydrolysis of tropical banded cricket (Gryllodes sigillatus) proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nongonierma, Alice B; Lamoureux, Candice; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2018-01-24

    Tropical banded crickets (Gryllodes sigillatus) were studied for their ability to yield hydrolysates with dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitory properties. A cricket protein isolate (CPI) was prepared following extraction of the water soluble proteins from G. sigillatus powder (CP). The extraction yield and purity were 20.90 ± 0.35% and 57.0 ± 2.23%, respectively. Endogenous proteinase activities were detected in the CP, which were linked to the significant protein breakdown seen in this sample. Fifteen CPI hydrolysates (H1-H15) were generated with Protamex™ using a design of experiments (DOE) approach combining three parameters, temperature (40, 50 and 60 °C), enzyme to substrate ratio (E : S, 0.50, 1.25 and 2.00% (w/w)) and hydrolysis time (60, 150 and 240 min). The DPP-IV half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC 50 ) of the CPI hydrolysates ranged from 0.40 ± 0.03/0.40 ± 0.02 (H2/H3) to 1.01 ± 0.07 mg mL -1 (H7). Following simulated gastrointestinal digestion (SGID), the DPP-IV IC 50 of CPI decreased (>3.57 vs. 0.78 ± 0.04 mg mL -1 ) while that of H5 increased (0.47 ± 0.03 vs. 0.71 ± 0.06 mg mL -1 ). This study has demonstrated for the first time that G. sigillatus protein hydrolysates are able to inhibit DPP-IV. The study of these hydrolysates in vivo is needed to evaluate their potential role in glycaemic management.

  20. Xyloketal-derived small molecules show protective effect by decreasing mutant Huntingtin protein aggregates in Caenorhabditis elegans model of Huntington’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng YX

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Yixuan Zeng,1,2,* Wenyuan Guo,1,* Guangqing Xu,3 Qinmei Wang,4 Luyang Feng,1,2 Simei Long,1 Fengyin Liang,1 Yi Huang,1 Xilin Lu,1 Shichang Li,5 Jiebin Zhou,5 Jean-Marc Burgunder,6 Jiyan Pang,5 Zhong Pei1,2 1Department of Neurology, National Key Clinical Department and Key Discipline of Neurology, Guangdong Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Major Neurological Disease, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 2Guangzhou Center, Chinese Huntington’s Disease Network, 3Department of Rehabilitation, The First Affiliated Hospital, 4Key laboratory on Assisted Circulation, Ministry of Health, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine of the First Affiliated Hospital, 5School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China; 6Swiss Huntington’s Disease Center, Department of Neurology, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Huntington’s disease is an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder, with chorea as the most prominent manifestation. The disease is caused by abnormal expansion of CAG codon repeats in the IT15 gene, which leads to the expression of a glutamine-rich protein named mutant Huntingtin (Htt. Because of its devastating disease burden and lack of valid treatment, development of more effective therapeutics for Huntington’s disease is urgently required. Xyloketal B, a natural product from mangrove fungus, has shown protective effects against toxicity in other neurodegenerative disease models such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. To identify potential neuroprotective molecules for Huntington’s disease, six derivatives of xyloketal B were screened in a Caenorhabditis elegans Huntington’s disease model; all six compounds showed a protective effect. Molecular docking studies indicated that compound 1 could bind to residues GLN369 and GLN393 of the mutant Htt protein, forming a

  1. Overexpression of a Protein Phosphatase 2C from Beech Seeds in Arabidopsis Shows Phenotypes Related to Abscisic Acid Responses and Gibberellin Biosynthesis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, David; Rodríguez, Dolores; González-García, Mary Paz; Lorenzo, Oscar; Nicolás, Gregorio; García-Martínez, José Luis; Nicolás, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    A functional abscisic acid (ABA)-induced protein phosphatase type 2C (PP2C) was previously isolated from beech (Fagus sylvatica) seeds (FsPP2C2). Because transgenic work is not possible in beech, in this study we overexpressed this gene in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to provide genetic evidence on FsPP2C2 function in seed dormancy and other plant responses. In contrast with other PP2Cs described so far, constitutive expression of FsPP2C2 in Arabidopsis, under the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, produced enhanced sensitivity to ABA and abiotic stress in seeds and vegetative tissues, dwarf phenotype, and delayed flowering, and all these effects were reversed by gibberellic acid application. The levels of active gibberellins (GAs) were reduced in 35S:FsPP2C2 plants, although transcript levels of AtGA20ox1 and AtGA3ox1 increased, probably as a result of negative feedback regulation, whereas the expression of GASA1 was induced by GAs. Additionally, FsPP2C2-overexpressing plants showed a strong induction of the Responsive to ABA 18 (RAB18) gene. Interestingly, FsPP2C2 contains two nuclear targeting sequences, and transient expression assays revealed that ABA directed this protein to the nucleus. Whereas other plant PP2Cs have been shown to act as negative regulators, our results support the hypothesis that FsPP2C2 is a positive regulator of ABA. Moreover, our results indicate the existence of potential cross-talk between ABA signaling and GA biosynthesis. PMID:16815952

  2. Novel G Protein-Coupled Oestrogen Receptor GPR30 Shows Changes in mRNA Expression in the Rat Brain over the Oestrous Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma J. Spary

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Oestrogen influences autonomic function via actions at classical nuclear oestrogen receptors α and β in the brain, and recent evidence suggests the orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR30 may also function as a cytoplasmic oestrogen receptor. We investigated the expression of GPR30 in female rat brains throughout the oestrous cycle and after ovariectomy to determine whether GPR30 expression in central autonomic nuclei is correlated with circulating oestrogen levels. In the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS, ventrolateral medulla (VLM and periaqueductal gray (PAG GPR30 mRNA, quantified by real-time PCR, was increased in proestrus and oestrus. In ovariectomised (OVX rats, expression in NTS and VLM appeared increased compared to metoestrus, but in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and PAG lower mRNA levels were seen in OVX. GPR30-like immunoreactivity (GPR30-LI colocalised with Golgi in neurones in many brain areas associated with autonomic pathways, and analysis of numbers of immunoreactive neurones showed differences consistent with the PCR data. GPR30-LI was found in a variety of transmitter phenotypes, including cholinergic, serotonergic, catecholaminergic and nitrergic neurones in different neuronal groups. These observations support the view that GPR30 could act as a rapid transducer responding to oestrogen levels and thus modulate the activity of central autonomic pathways.

  3. A pseudotype baculovirus expressing the capsid protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus and a T-Cell immunogen shows enhanced immunogenicity in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xiangtao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD is a highly contagious disease of livestock which causes severe economic loss in cloven-hoofed animals. Vaccination is still a major strategy in developing countries to control FMD. Currently, inactivated vaccine of FMDV has been used in many countries with limited success and safety concerns. Development of a novel effective vaccine is must. Methods In the present study, two recombinant pseudotype baculoviruses, one expressing the capsid of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV under the control of a cytomegalovirus immediate early enhancer/promoter (CMV-IE, and the other the caspid plus a T-cell immunogen coding region under a CAG promoter were constructed, and their expression was characterized in mammalian cells. In addition, their immunogenicity in a mouse model was investigated. The humoral and cell-mediated immune responses induced by pseudotype baculovirus were compared with those of inactivated vaccine. Results Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA and indirect sandwich-ELISA (IS-ELISA showed both recombinant baculoviruses (with or without T-cell epitopes were transduced efficiently and expressed target proteins in BHK-21 cells. In mice, intramuscular inoculation of recombinants with 1 × 109 or 1 × 1010 PFU/mouse induced the production of FMDV-specific neutralizing antibodies and gamma interferon (IFN-γ. Furthermore, recombinant baculovirus with T-cell epitopes had better immunogenicity than the recombinant without T-cell epitopes as demonstrated by significantly enhanced IFN-γ production (P P Conclusions These results indicate that pseudotype baculovirus-mediated gene delivery could be a alternative strategy to develop a new generation of vaccines against FMDV infection.

  4. The crystal structure of Erwinia amylovora AmyR, a member of the YbjN protein family, shows similarity to type III secretion chaperones but suggests different cellular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartho, Joseph D; Bellini, Dom; Wuerges, Jochen; Demitri, Nicola; Toccafondi, Mirco; Schmitt, Armin O; Zhao, Youfu; Walsh, Martin A; Benini, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    AmyR is a stress and virulence associated protein from the plant pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae species Erwinia amylovora, and is a functionally conserved ortholog of YbjN from Escherichia coli. The crystal structure of E. amylovora AmyR reveals a class I type III secretion chaperone-like fold, despite the lack of sequence similarity between these two classes of protein and lacking any evidence of a secretion-associated role. The results indicate that AmyR, and YbjN proteins in general, function through protein-protein interactions without any enzymatic action. The YbjN proteins of Enterobacteriaceae show remarkably low sequence similarity with other members of the YbjN protein family in Eubacteria, yet a high level of structural conservation is observed. Across the YbjN protein family sequence conservation is limited to residues stabilising the protein core and dimerization interface, while interacting regions are only conserved between closely related species. This study presents the first structure of a YbjN protein from Enterobacteriaceae, the most highly divergent and well-studied subgroup of YbjN proteins, and an in-depth sequence and structural analysis of this important but poorly understood protein family.

  5. STRO-1 selected rat dental pulp stem cells transfected with adenoviral-mediated human bone morphogenetic protein 2 gene show enhanced odontogenic differentiation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, X.; Kraan, P.M. van der; Dolder, J. van den; Walboomers, X.F.; Bian, Z.; Fan, M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells harbor great potential for tissue-engineering purposes. However, previous studies have shown variable results, and some have reported only limited osteogenic and odontogenic potential.Because bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are well-established agents to induce bone and

  6. An analysis of partial efficiencies of energy utilisation of different macronutrients by barramundi (Lates calcarifer) shows that starch restricts protein utilisation in carnivorous fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glencross, Brett D; Blyth, David; Bourne, Nicholas; Cheers, Susan; Irvin, Simon; Wade, Nicholas M

    2017-02-01

    This study examined the effect of including different dietary proportions of starch, protein and lipid, in diets balanced for digestible energy, on the utilisation efficiencies of dietary energy by barramundi (Lates calcarifer). Each diet was fed at one of three ration levels (satiety, 80 % of initial satiety and 60 % of initial satiety) for a 42-d period. Fish performance measures (weight gain, feed intake and feed conversion ratio) were all affected by dietary energy source. The efficiency of energy utilisation was significantly reduced in fish fed the starch diet relative to the other diets, but there were no significant effects between the other macronutrients. This reduction in efficiency of utilisation was derived from a multifactorial change in both protein and lipid utilisation. The rate of protein utilisation deteriorated as the amount of starch included in the diet increased. Lipid utilisation was most dramatically affected by inclusion levels of lipid in the diet, with diets low in lipid producing component lipid utilisation rates well above 1·3, which indicates substantial lipid synthesis from other energy sources. However, the energetic cost of lipid gain was as low as 0·65 kJ per kJ of lipid deposited, indicating that barramundi very efficiently store energy in the form of lipid, particularly from dietary starch energy. This study defines how the utilisation efficiency of dietary digestible energy by barramundi is influenced by the macronutrient source providing that energy, and that the inclusion of starch causes problems with protein utilisation in this species.

  7. Fusion proteins of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 with CD4-induced antibodies showed enhanced binding to CD4 and CD4 binding site antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Weizao, E-mail: chenw3@mail.nih.gov [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Feng, Yang [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Wang, Yanping [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); The Basic Research Program, Science Applications International Corporation-Frederick, Inc., National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Zhu, Zhongyu; Dimitrov, Dimiter S. [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some recombinant HIV-1 gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We hypothesize that CD4i antibodies could induce conformational changes in gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibodies enhance binding of CD4 and CD4bs antibodies to gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibody-gp120 fusion proteins could have potential as vaccine immunogens. -- Abstract: Development of successful AIDS vaccine immunogens continues to be a major challenge. One of the mechanisms by which HIV-1 evades antibody-mediated neutralizing responses is the remarkable conformational flexibility of its envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120. Some recombinant gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s and functional viral spikes, and exhibit decreased recognition by CD4 and neutralizing antibodies. CD4 binding induces conformational changes in gp120 leading to exposure of the coreceptor-binding site (CoRbs). In this study, we test our hypothesis that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which target the CoRbs, could also induce conformational changes in gp120 leading to better exposed conserved neutralizing antibody epitopes including the CD4-binding site (CD4bs). We found that a mixture of CD4i antibodies with gp120 only weakly enhanced CD4 binding. However, such interactions in single-chain fusion proteins resulted in gp120 conformations which bound to CD4 and CD4bs antibodies better than the original or mutagenically stabilized gp120s. Moreover, the two molecules in the fusion proteins synergized with each other in neutralizing HIV-1. Therefore, fusion proteins of gp120 with CD4i antibodies could have potential as components of HIV-1 vaccines and inhibitors of HIV-1 entry, and could be used as reagents to explore the conformational flexibility of gp120 and mechanisms of entry and immune evasion.

  8. Characterization of Sendai virus persistently infected L929 cells and Sendai virus pi strain: recombinant Sendai viruses having Mpi protein shows lower cytotoxicity and are incapable of establishing persistent infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Machiko; Tsurudome, Masato; Ito, Morihiro; Kawano, Mitsuo; Komada, Hiroshi; Ito, Yasuhiko

    2003-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that the temperature-sensitive phenotype of Sendai virus (SeV) persistently infected cells is caused by the M and/or HN proteins. Expression level of the L, M, HN, and V proteins is extremely low in L929 cells persistently infected with SeVpi (L929/SeVpi cells) incubated at 38 deg. C. The HN protein quickly disappears in L929/SeVpi cells following a temperature shift up to 38 deg. C, and pulse-chase experiments show that the Lpi, HNpi, and Mpi proteins are unstable at 38 deg. C. Following a temperature shift either upward or downward, M protein is translocated into the nucleus and then localizes to the perinuclear region. None of virus-specific polypeptides are detected in the cells primarily infected with SeVpi and incubated at 38 deg. C and virus proteins are not pulse-labeled at 38 deg. C, indicating that temperature-sensitive step is at an early stage of infection. The Mpi protein is transiently located in the nucleus of the SeVpi primarily infected cells. Recombinant SeVs possessing the HNpi or/and Mpi proteins are not temperature-sensitive. The HN protein is expressed at very low levels and the F protein localizes to the perinuclear region in rSeV(Mpi)-infected cells incubated at 38 deg. C for 18 h. rSeVs having the Mpi protein exhibit lower cytotoxicity and are incapable of establishing persistent infection. Amino acid 116 of the Mpi protein is related to the nuclear translocation and lower cytopathogenesis, whereas aa183 is involved in the interaction between M protein and viral glycoproteins

  9. Crystal Structure of the Full-Length Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Capsid Protein Shows an N-Terminal β-Hairpin in the Absence of N-Terminal Proline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Folio

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV is a member of the Retroviridae family. It is the causative agent of an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS in cats and wild felines. Its capsid protein (CA drives the assembly of the viral particle, which is a critical step in the viral replication cycle. Here, the first atomic structure of full-length FIV CA to 1.67 Å resolution is determined. The crystallized protein exhibits an original tetrameric assembly, composed of dimers which are stabilized by an intermolecular disulfide bridge induced by the crystallogenesis conditions. The FIV CA displays a standard α-helical CA topology with two domains, separated by a linker shorter than other retroviral CAs. The β-hairpin motif at its amino terminal end, which interacts with nucleotides in HIV-1, is unusually long in FIV CA. Interestingly, this functional β-motif is formed in this construct in the absence of the conserved N-terminal proline. The FIV CA exhibits a cis Arg–Pro bond in the CypA-binding loop, which is absent in known structures of lentiviral CAs. This structure represents the first tri-dimensional structure of a functional, full-length FIV CA.

  10. The PDZ and band 4.1 containing protein Frmpd1 regulates the subcellular location of activator of G-protein signaling 3 and its interaction with G-proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ningfei; Blumer, Joe B; Bernard, Michael L; Lanier, Stephen M

    2008-09-05

    Activator of G-protein signaling 3 (AGS3) is one of nine mammalian proteins containing one or more G-protein regulatory (GPR) motifs that stabilize the GDP-bound conformation of Galphai. Such proteins have revealed unexpected functional diversity for the "G-switch" in the control of events within the cell independent of the role of heterotrimeric G-proteins as transducers for G-protein-coupled receptors at the cell surface. A key question regarding this class of proteins is what controls their subcellular positioning and interaction with G-proteins. We conducted a series of yeast two-hybrid screens to identify proteins interacting with the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) of AGS3, which plays an important role in subcellular positioning of the protein. We report the identification of Frmpd1 (FERM and PDZ domain containing 1) as a regulatory binding partner of AGS3. Frmpd1 binds to the TPR domain of AGS3 and coimmunoprecipitates with AGS3 from cell lysates. Cell fractionation indicated that Frmpd1 stabilizes AGS3 in a membrane fraction. Upon cotransfection of COS7 cells with Frmpd1-GFP and AGS3-mRFP, AGS3-mRFP is observed in regions of the cell cortex and also in membrane extensions or processes where it appears to be colocalized with Frmpd1-GFP based upon the merged fluorescent signals. Frmpd1 knockdown (siRNA) in Cath.a-differentiated neuronal cells decreased the level of endogenous AGS3 in membrane fractions by approximately 50% and enhanced the alpha2-adrenergic receptor-mediated inhibition of forskolin-induced increases in cAMP. The coimmunoprecipitation of Frmpd1 with AGS3 is lost as the amount of Galphai3 in the cell is increased and AGS3 apparently switches its binding partner from Frmpd1 to Galphai3 indicating that the interaction of AGS3 with Frmpd1 and Galphai3 is mutually exclusive. Mechanistically, Frmpd1 may position AGS3 in a membrane environment where it then interacts with Galphai in a regulated manner.

  11. 15N NMR relaxation studies of calcium-loaded parvalbumin show tight dynamics compared to those of other EF-hand proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldellon, C; Alattia, J R; Strub, M P

    1998-01-01

    Dynamics of the rat alpha-parvalbumin calcium-loaded form have been determined by measurement of 15N nuclear relaxation using proton-detected heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. The relaxation data were analyzed using spectral density functions and the Lipari-Szabo formalism. The major dynamic features...... for the rat alpha-parvalbumin calcium-loaded form are (1) the extreme rigidity of the helix-loop-helix EF-hand motifs and the linker segment connecting them, (2) the N and C termini of the protein being restricted in their mobility, (3) a conformational exchange occurring at the kink of helix D, and (4...... properties which are conserved in the EF-hand domains from different members of this superfamily: (1) a tendency toward higher mobility of NH vectors at relative position 2 in the Ca2+-binding loop, (2) a restricted mobility for the other residues in the binding loop, and (3) an overall rigidity...

  12. Affinity of hemoglobin for the cytoplasmic fragment of human erythrocyte membrane band 3. Equilibrium measurements at physiological pH using matrix-bound proteins: the effects of ionic strength, deoxygenation and of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chétrite, G; Cassoly, R

    1985-10-05

    The cytoplasmic fragment of band 3 protein isolated from the human erythrocyte membrane was linked to a CNBr-activated Sepharose matrix in an attempt to measure, in batch experiments, its equilibrium binding constant with oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin at physiological pH and ionic strength values and in the presence or the absence of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. All the experiments were done at pH 7.2, and equilibrium constants were computed on the basis of one hemoglobin tetramer bound per monomer of fragment. In 10 mM-phosphate buffer, a dissociation constant KD = 2 X 10(-4)M was measured for oxyhemoglobin and was shown to increase to 8 X 10(-4)M in the presence of 50 mM-NaCl. Association could not be demonstrated at higher salt concentrations. Diphosphoglycerate-stripped deoxyhemoglobin was shown to associate more strongly with the cytoplasmic fragment of band 3. In 10 mM-bis-Tris (pH 7.2) and in the presence of 120 mM-NaCl, a dissociation constant KD = 4 X 10(-4)M was measured. Upon addition of increasing amounts of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, the complex formed between deoxyhemoglobin and the cytoplasmic fragment of band 3 was dissociated. On the reasonable assumption that the hemoglobin binding site present on band 3 fragment was not modified upon linking the protein to the Sepharose matrix, the results indicated that diphosphoglycerate-stripped deoxyhemoglobin or partially liganded hemoglobin tetramers in the T state could bind band 3 inside the intact human red blood cell.

  13. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in response to temperature elevation shows seasonal variation in the zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Jennifer A; Keshwani, Sarah S; Abou-Hanna, Jacob J

    2015-04-01

    Global climate change is affecting ectothermic species, and a variety of studies are needed on thermal tolerances, especially from cellular and physiological perspectives. This study utilized AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key regulator of cellular energy levels, to examine the effects of high water temperatures on zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) physiology. During heating, AMPK activity increased as water temperature increased to a point, and maximum AMPK activity was detected at high, but sublethal, water temperatures. This pattern varied with season, suggesting that cellular mechanisms of seasonal thermal acclimatization affect basic metabolic processes during sublethal heat stress. There was a greater seasonal variation in the water temperature at which maximum AMPK activity was measured than in lethal water temperature. Furthermore, baseline AMPK activity varied significantly across seasons, most likely reflecting altered metabolic states during times of growth and reproduction. In addition, when summer-collected mussels were lab-acclimated to winter and spring water temperatures, patterns of heat stress mirrored those of field-collected animals. These data suggest that water temperature is the main driver of the seasonal variation in physiology. This study concluded that AMPK activity, which reflects changes in energy supply and demand during heat stress, can serve as a sensitive and early indicator of temperature stress in mussels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Duffy binding protein (PkDBPαII) of Plasmodium knowlesi from Peninsular Malaysia and Malaysian Borneo show different binding activity level to human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Khai Lone; Amir, Amirah; Lau, Yee Ling; Fong, Mun Yik

    2017-08-11

    The zoonotic Plasmodium knowlesi is a major cause of human malaria in Malaysia. This parasite uses the Duffy binding protein (PkDBPαII) to interact with the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) receptor on human and macaque erythrocytes to initiate invasion. Previous studies on P. knowlesi have reported distinct Peninsular Malaysia and Malaysian Borneo PkDBPαII haplotypes. In the present study, the differential binding activity of these haplotypes with human and macaque (Macaca fascicularis) erythrocytes was investigated. The PkDBPαII of Peninsular Malaysia and Malaysian Borneo were expressed on the surface of COS-7 cells and tested with human and monkey erythrocytes, with and without anti-Fy6 (anti-Duffy) monoclonal antibody treatment. Binding activity level was determined by counting the number of rosettes formed between the transfected COS-7 cells and the erythrocytes. Anti-Fy6 treatment was shown to completely block the binding of human erythrocytes with the transfected COS-7 cells, thus verifying the specific binding of human DARC with PkDBPαII. Interestingly, the PkDBPαII of Peninsular Malaysia displayed a higher binding activity with human erythrocytes when compared with the Malaysian Borneo PkDBPαII haplotype (mean number of rosettes formed = 156.89 ± 6.62 and 46.00 ± 3.57, respectively; P < 0.0001). However, no difference in binding activity level was seen in the binding assay using M. fascicularis erythrocytes. This study is the first report of phenotypic difference between PkDBPαII haplotypes. The biological implication of this finding is yet to be determined. Therefore, further studies need to be carried out to determine whether this differential binding level can be associated with severity of knowlesi malaria in human.

  15. Macrophage inflammatory protein-1α shows predictive value as a risk marker for subjects and sites vulnerable to bone loss in a longitudinal model of aggressive periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Daniel H; Markowitz, Kenneth; Fairlie, Karen; Tischio-Bereski, Debbie; Ferrandiz, Javier; Godboley, Dipti; Furgang, David; Gunsolley, John; Best, Al

    2014-01-01

    Improved diagnostics remains a fundamental goal of biomedical research. This study was designed to assess cytokine biomarkers that could predict bone loss (BL) in localized aggressive periodontitis. 2,058 adolescents were screened. Two groups of 50 periodontally healthy adolescents were enrolled in the longitudinal study. One group had Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), the putative pathogen, while the matched cohort did not. Cytokine levels were assessed in saliva and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). Participants were sampled, examined, and radiographed every 6 months for 2-3 years. Disease was defined as radiographic evidence of BL. Saliva and GCF was collected at each visit, frozen, and then tested retrospectively after detection of BL. Sixteen subjects with Aa developed BL. Saliva from Aa-positive and Aa-negative healthy subjects was compared to subjects who developed BL. GCF was collected from 16 subjects with BL and from another 38 subjects who remained healthy. GCF from BL sites in the 16 subjects was compared to healthy sites in these same subjects and to healthy sites in subjects who remained healthy. Results showed that cytokines in saliva associated with acute inflammation were elevated in subjects who developed BL (i.e., MIP-1α MIP-1β IL-α, IL-1β and IL-8; p<0.01). MIP-1α was elevated 13-fold, 6 months prior to BL. When MIP-1α levels were set at 40 pg/ml, 98% of healthy sites were below that level (Specificity); whereas, 93% of sites with BL were higher (Sensitivity), with comparable Predictive Values of 98%; p<0.0001; 95% C.I. = 42.5-52.7). MIP-1α consistently showed elevated levels as a biomarker for BL in both saliva and GCF, 6 months prior to BL. MIP-1α continues to demonstrate its strong candidacy as a diagnostic biomarker for both subject and site vulnerability to BL.

  16. Macrophage inflammatory protein-1α shows predictive value as a risk marker for subjects and sites vulnerable to bone loss in a longitudinal model of aggressive periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Fine

    Full Text Available Improved diagnostics remains a fundamental goal of biomedical research. This study was designed to assess cytokine biomarkers that could predict bone loss (BL in localized aggressive periodontitis. 2,058 adolescents were screened. Two groups of 50 periodontally healthy adolescents were enrolled in the longitudinal study. One group had Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa, the putative pathogen, while the matched cohort did not. Cytokine levels were assessed in saliva and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF. Participants were sampled, examined, and radiographed every 6 months for 2-3 years. Disease was defined as radiographic evidence of BL. Saliva and GCF was collected at each visit, frozen, and then tested retrospectively after detection of BL. Sixteen subjects with Aa developed BL. Saliva from Aa-positive and Aa-negative healthy subjects was compared to subjects who developed BL. GCF was collected from 16 subjects with BL and from another 38 subjects who remained healthy. GCF from BL sites in the 16 subjects was compared to healthy sites in these same subjects and to healthy sites in subjects who remained healthy. Results showed that cytokines in saliva associated with acute inflammation were elevated in subjects who developed BL (i.e., MIP-1α MIP-1β IL-α, IL-1β and IL-8; p<0.01. MIP-1α was elevated 13-fold, 6 months prior to BL. When MIP-1α levels were set at 40 pg/ml, 98% of healthy sites were below that level (Specificity; whereas, 93% of sites with BL were higher (Sensitivity, with comparable Predictive Values of 98%; p<0.0001; 95% C.I. = 42.5-52.7. MIP-1α consistently showed elevated levels as a biomarker for BL in both saliva and GCF, 6 months prior to BL. MIP-1α continues to demonstrate its strong candidacy as a diagnostic biomarker for both subject and site vulnerability to BL.

  17. Band 3 in aging and neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, M M

    1991-01-01

    Senescent cell antigen appears on old cells and marks them for death by initiating the binding of IgG autoantibody and subsequent removal by phagocytes in mammals and other vertebrates. We have created a synthetic aging antigen that blocks binding of IgG to senescent cells in vitro. Synthetic senescent cell antigen might be effective in preventing cellular destruction in vivo in certain diseases, and can be used to manipulate cellular life span in situ. Senescent cell antigen is generated by the modification of an important structural and transport membrane molecule, protein band 3. Band 3 is present in cellular, nuclear, Golgi, and mitochondrial membranes as well as in cell membranes. Band 3 proteins in nucleated cells participate in cell surface patching and capping. Band 3 maintains acid-base balance by mediating the exchange of anions (e.g., chloride, bicarbonate), and is the binding site for glycolytic enzymes. It is responsible for CO2 exchange in all tissues and organs. Thus, it is the most heavily used anion transport system in the body. Band 3 is a major transmembrane structural protein which attaches the plasma membrane to the internal cell cytoskeleton by binding to band 2.1 (ankyrin). Oxidation generates senescent cell antigen in situ. Band 3 is present in the central nervous system, and differences have been described in band 3 between young and aging brain tissue. One autosomal recessive neurological disease, choreoacanthocytosis, is associated with band 3 abnormalities. The 150 residues of the carboxyl terminus segment of band 3 appear to be altered. In brains from Alzheimer's disease patients, antibodies to aged band 3 label the amyloid core of classical plaques and the microglial cells located in the middle of the plaque in tissue sections, and an abnormal band 3 in immunoblots. Band 3 protein(s) in mammalian brain performs the same functions as that of erythroid band 3. These functions is anion transport, ankyrin binding, and generation of

  18. The use of protein patterns in genetic diversity analysis in some Brassica napus cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Razavizadeh

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, protein variations of seeds and five-day old cotyledonal leaves of four selected Brassica napus cultivars including Elite, Ocapy, Tasilo and Zarfam were analyzed by SDS-PAGE to identify protein markers. The amount of total soluble protein of seed storage proteins did not show significant differences in all cultivars whereas it was different in cotyledonal leaves. Protein patterns of seeds and cotyledonal leaves showed significant differences using SDS-PAGE and consequence analysis of bands by ImageJ program. Relative expression of six protein bands in seeds and five-day old cotyledonal leaves were significantly different. Three protein markers were identified by protein patterns of seed and cotyledonal leaves. The results of relationship analysis based on presence and absence of the specific protein bands in protein pattern of seed storage proteins showed that Tasilo and Elite cultivars had the highest similarities.

  19. Congenital Constriction Band Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh Gupta, Fareed Malik, Rishabh Gupta, M.A.Basit, Dara Singh

    2008-01-01

    Congenital constriction bands are anomalous bands that encircle a digit or an extremity. Congenitalconstriction band syndrome is rare condition and is mostly associated with other musculoskeletaldisorders.We report such a rare experience.

  20. Dual-band infrared camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, H.; Schlemmer, H.

    2005-10-01

    Every year, numerous accidents happen on European roads due to bad visibility (fog, night, heavy rain). Similarly, the dramatic aviation accidents of year 2001 in Milan and Zurich have reminded us that aviation safety is equally affected by reduced visibility. A dual-band thermal imager was developed in order to raise human situation awareness under conditions of reduced visibility especially in the automotive and aeronautical context but also for all transportation or surveillance tasks. The chosen wavelength bands are the Short Wave Infrared SWIR and the Long Wave Infrared LWIR band which are less obscured by reduced visibility conditions than the visible band. Furthermore, our field tests clearly show that the two different spectral bands very often contain complementary information. Pyramidal fusion is used to integrate complementary and redundant features of the multi-spectral images into a fused image which can be displayed on a monitor to provide more and better information for the driver or pilot.

  1. PTPN13, a Fas-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase, is located on the long arm of chromosome 4 at band q21.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inazawa, Johji; Ariyama, Takeshi; Abe, Tatsuo [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)] [and others

    1996-01-15

    PTPN13 is a protein tyrosine phosphatase that associates with the C-terminal negative regulatory domain in the Fas (APO-1/CD95) receptor. The PTPN13 protein contains six GLGF repeats that have been found in the rat postsynaptic density protein (PSD-95) and the Drosophila tumor suppressor protein, lethal-(1)-disclarge-1 (dlg-1). The localization of the PTPN13 gene to human chromosome 4q21.3 was determined by both FISH and PCR analysis of somatic cell hybrids. This 4q21.3 chromosomal region contains a gene for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease as well as the region frequently deleted in liver and ovarian cancers, suggesting that PTPN13 is a candidate for one of the putative tumor suppressor genes on the long arm of chromosome 4. 21 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Identification of proteins from 4200-year-old skin and muscle tissue biopsies from ancient Egyptian mummies of the first intermediate period shows evidence of acute inflammation and severe immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jana; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Ravishankar, Prathiba; Xavier, Dylan; Lim, Do Seon; Shin, Dong Hoon; Bianucci, Raffaella; Haynes, Paul A

    2016-10-28

    We performed proteomics analysis on four skin and one muscle tissue samples taken from three ancient Egyptian mummies of the first intermediate period, approximately 4200 years old. The mummies were first dated by radiocarbon dating of the accompany-\\break ing textiles, and morphologically examined by scanning electron microscopy of additional skin samples. Proteins were extracted, separated on SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) gels, and in-gel digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were analysed using nanoflow high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We identified a total of 230 unique proteins from the five samples, which consisted of 132 unique protein identifications. We found a large number of collagens, which was confirmed by our microscopy data, and is in agreement with previous studies showing that collagens are very long-lived. As expected, we also found a large number of keratins. We identified numerous proteins that provide evidence of activation of the innate immunity system in two of the mummies, one of which also contained proteins indicating severe tissue inflammation, possibly indicative of an infection that we can speculate may have been related to the cause of death.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  3. PROFIL PROTEIN SUSU DAN PRODUK OLAHANNYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Susanti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menganalisis kadar protein dan profil protein pada beberapa susu (susu kedelai, susu kambing dan olahannya (yogurt, tofu. Kadar protein diukur dengan metode Lowry, sedangkan profil protein dianalisis menggunakan SDS PAGE. Data yang diperoleh dianalisis secara deskriptif. Kadar protein tertinggi pada sampel yang dianalisis terdapat pada produk yogurt A (579,5 mg/ml, disusul susu kedelai (289,99 mg/ml dan susu kambing (133,1 mg/ml. Analisis profil protein terlihat pita protein dengan mobilitas terendah sampai tertinggi terletak pada berat molekul 14-150 KDa. Pita protein khas yang hanya dimiliki susu kambing adalah pita 150kDa. Sementara pita protein khas yang hanya dimiliki susu kedelai adalah pita 44 kDa dan 55kDa. Pita protein yang khas hanya dimiliki yogurt A (dengan bakteri Lactobacillus bulgaricus dan Streptococcus thermophillus adalah pita 65Da. Semua jenis susu dan olahannya memiliki pita 70kDa, kecuali susu kedelai. Profil protein susu kedelai dan tofu menunjukkan profil protein yang sangat berbeda, namun keduanya memiliki pita 18kDa.This study aimed to observe protein level and profiles on some milks (soy milk, goat's milk and dairy (yogurt, tofu product. Protein content was observed by Lowry method, whereas the protein profiles were analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Data were analyzed descriptively. The highest protein content of the observed sample was in yogurt A products (579,5 mg/ml, followed by soy milk (289,99 mg/ml and goat's milk (133,1 mg/ml. Analysis of protein profiles showed protein bands with lowest to highest mobility lies in the molecular weight of 14-150 KDa. Typical protein band of goat's milk was a 150kDa band. While the typical protein bands of soy milk were 44 kDa and 55kDa band. The typical protein band of yogurt A (with Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophillus bacterium was 65Da. All types of milks and dairy had 70kDa band, except for soy milk. Protein

  4. Site-directed Mutagenesis Shows the Significance of Interactions with Phospholipids and the G-protein OsYchF1 for the Physiological Functions of the Rice GTPase-activating Protein 1 (OsGAP1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Yuk-Lin; Cheung, Ming-Yan; Miao, Rui; Fong, Yu-Hang; Li, Kwan-Pok; Yu, Mei-Hui; Chye, Mee-Len; Wong, Kam-Bo; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2015-09-25

    The C2 domain is one of the most diverse phospholipid-binding domains mediating cellular signaling. One group of C2-domain proteins are plant-specific and are characterized by their small sizes and simple structures. We have previously reported that a member of this group, OsGAP1, is able to alleviate salt stress and stimulate defense responses, and bind to both phospholipids and an unconventional G-protein, OsYchF1. Here we solved the crystal structure of OsGAP1 to a resolution of 1.63 Å. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we successfully differentiated between the clusters of surface residues that are required for binding to phospholipids versus OsYchF1, which, in turn, is critical for its role in stimulating defense responses. On the other hand, the ability to alleviate salt stress by OsGAP1 is dependent only on its ability to bind OsYchF1 and is independent of its phospholipid-binding activity. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Proteins from Erwinia asparaginase Erwinase ® and E. coli asparaginase 2 MEDAC ® for treatment of human leukemia, show a multitude of modifications for which the consequences are completely unclear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Narkhyun; Pollak, Arnold; Lubec, Gert

    2011-07-01

    L-Asparaginase from Erwinia chrysanthemi (ASPG_ERWCH; UniProtKB accession number P06608 (Erwinase(®))) and L-asparaginase 2 from Escherichia coli (ASPG2_ECOLI; UniProtKB accession number P00805 (Medac(®))), both L-asparagine amidohydrolases, are widely used for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A series of serious side effects have been reported and this warrants studies into the protein chemistry of the medical products sold. Mass spectrometry (MS) data on ASPG_ERWCH and ASPG2_ECOLI have not been published so far and herein a gel-based proteomics study was performed to provide information about sequence and modifications of the commercially available medical products. ASPG_ERWCH and ASPG2_ECOLI were applied onto two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, spots were in-gel digested with several proteases and resulting peptides and protein modifications were analysed by nano-ESI-LC-MS/MS. Four spots were observed for ASPG_ERWCH, six spots were observed for ASPG2_ECOLI and the identified proteins showed high sequence coverage without sequence conflicts. Several protein modifications including technical and posttranslational modifications were demonstrated. Protein modifications are known to change physicochemical, immunochemical, biological and pharmacological properties and results from this work may challenge re-designing of the product including possible removal of the modifications by the manufacturer because it is not known whether they are contributing to the serious adverse effects of the protein drug. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. A genetic electrophoretic variant of high-sulfur hair proteins for forensic hair comparisons. I. Characterization of variant high-sulfur proteins of human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, B

    1989-02-01

    In a survey of the proteins from human hair, a genetic electrophoretic variant has been observed in the high-sulfur protein region. S-carboxymethylated proteins were examined by 15% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at pH 8.9. Out of 150 unrelated samples of Japanese head hairs analyzed, 107 showed 6 major high-sulfur protein bands (normal) and the remaining 43 samples showed an additional high-sulfur protein band (variant). Of 21 Caucasian samples analyzed only one variant sample was found. Characterization of the proteins by two-dimensional electrophoresis evidenced a variant protein spot which showed an apparent molecular weight of 30 k Da. Isoelectric points of the high-sulfur proteins ranged from 3.25-3.55 and that of variant protein band from 3.3-3.4. Family studies of 21 matings resulting in 49 children indicated that this variant was inherited in an autosomal fashion.

  7. Seed protein electrophoresis for identification of fine fibre cotton line in Gossypium hirsutum L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Guoqiang; Lv Tiexin; Su Xuehe; Liu Xiaoyong; Wu Defang; Zhu Doubei

    2003-01-01

    Gel electrophoresis was conducted to test seed ethanol resolvable protein in cotton. 13 lines were used, including a fine fibre cotton line (98301) in G. hirsutum L., 4 varieties in G. barbadense L. and 8 varieties in G. hirsutum L.. In results of the 98301 line, Zhongmiansuo 12 and Shiyuan 321, no different protein electro-phoresis band pattern was shown among different seeds belong to the same variety, respectively. In comparison among the 98301 seeds sampled from seven different growth sets in Shandong province, their protein band patterns were the same. On the gel plate, three special bands were distinctive to all the varieties in G. hirsutum L. and other three special bands were distinctive to all the varieties in G. barbadense L.. The three characteristic bands of G. hirsutum L. appeared in the protein band pattern of the 98301 line. It showed that the seed protein composition of the line was inclined to G. hirsutum L. mainly. And, a characteristic band of G. Barbadense L. in the band pattern of the 98301 line proved that the fine fibre cotton line derived from a hybrid between G. barbadense and G. hirsutum L.. The 98301 line was easily distinguished from other varieties in G. hirsutum L. by its distinctive band, i.e. band No.1, and another island cotton band, i.e. band No.10

  8. Mutation in cyclophilin B that causes hyperelastosis cutis in American Quarter Horse does not affect peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase activity but shows altered cyclophilin B-protein interactions and affects collagen folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Vranka, Janice A; Boudko, Sergei P; Pokidysheva, Elena; Mizuno, Kazunori; Zientek, Keith; Keene, Douglas R; Rashmir-Raven, Ann M; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Winand, Nena J; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2012-06-22

    The rate-limiting step of folding of the collagen triple helix is catalyzed by cyclophilin B (CypB). The G6R mutation in cyclophilin B found in the American Quarter Horse leads to autosomal recessive hyperelastosis cutis, also known as hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia. The mutant protein shows small structural changes in the region of the mutation at the side opposite the catalytic domain of CypB. The peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase activity of the mutant CypB is normal when analyzed in vitro. However, the biosynthesis of type I collagen in affected horse fibroblasts shows a delay in folding and secretion and a decrease in hydroxylysine and glucosyl-galactosyl hydroxylysine. This leads to changes in the structure of collagen fibrils in tendon, similar to those observed in P3H1 null mice. In contrast to cyclophilin B null mice, where little 3-hydroxylation was found in type I collagen, 3-hydroxylation of type I collagen in affected horses is normal. The mutation disrupts the interaction of cyclophilin B with the P-domain of calreticulin, with lysyl hydroxylase 1, and probably other proteins, such as the formation of the P3H1·CypB·cartilage-associated protein complex, resulting in less effective catalysis of the rate-limiting step in collagen folding in the rough endoplasmic reticulum.

  9. Mutation in Cyclophilin B That Causes Hyperelastosis Cutis in American Quarter Horse Does Not Affect Peptidylprolyl cis-trans Isomerase Activity but Shows Altered Cyclophilin B-Protein Interactions and Affects Collagen Folding*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Vranka, Janice A.; Boudko, Sergei P.; Pokidysheva, Elena; Mizuno, Kazunori; Zientek, Keith; Keene, Douglas R.; Rashmir-Raven, Ann M.; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Winand, Nena J.; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2012-01-01

    The rate-limiting step of folding of the collagen triple helix is catalyzed by cyclophilin B (CypB). The G6R mutation in cyclophilin B found in the American Quarter Horse leads to autosomal recessive hyperelastosis cutis, also known as hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia. The mutant protein shows small structural changes in the region of the mutation at the side opposite the catalytic domain of CypB. The peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase activity of the mutant CypB is normal when analyzed in vitro. However, the biosynthesis of type I collagen in affected horse fibroblasts shows a delay in folding and secretion and a decrease in hydroxylysine and glucosyl-galactosyl hydroxylysine. This leads to changes in the structure of collagen fibrils in tendon, similar to those observed in P3H1 null mice. In contrast to cyclophilin B null mice, where little 3-hydroxylation was found in type I collagen, 3-hydroxylation of type I collagen in affected horses is normal. The mutation disrupts the interaction of cyclophilin B with the P-domain of calreticulin, with lysyl hydroxylase 1, and probably other proteins, such as the formation of the P3H1·CypB·cartilage-associated protein complex, resulting in less effective catalysis of the rate-limiting step in collagen folding in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:22556420

  10. Band structure of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Tsidilkovski, I M

    2013-01-01

    Band Structure of Semiconductors provides a review of the theoretical and experimental methods of investigating band structure and an analysis of the results of the developments in this field. The book presents the problems, methods, and applications in the study of band structure. Topics on the computational methods of band structure; band structures of important semiconducting materials; behavior of an electron in a perturbed periodic field; effective masses and g-factors for the most commonly encountered band structures; and the treatment of cyclotron resonance, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillatio

  11. Thematic mapper studies band correlation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, S. G.; Kiang, R.

    1976-01-01

    Spectral data representative of thematic mapper candidate bands 1 and 3 to 7 were obtained by selecting appropriate combinations of bands from the JSC 24 channel multispectral scanner. Of all the bands assigned, only candidate bands 4 (.74 mu to .80 mu) and 5 (.80 mu to .91 mu) showed consistently high intercorrelation from region to region and time to time. This extremely high correlation persisted when looking at the composite data set in a multitemporal, multilocation domain. The GISS investigations lend positive confirmation to the hypothesis, that TM bands 4 and 5 are redundant.

  12. Reward banding to determine reporting rate of recovered mourning dove bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, R.E.

    1968-01-01

    Reward bands placed on the other leg of certain regularly banded immature mourning doves (Zenaidura macroura) were used to develop information on reporting rates of recovered dove bands. Reports from 15 widely separated sections of the United States showed considerable variation in recovery rate of doves both with and without reward bands. The overall percentages of banded doves that were reported as recovered were 9.69% for those with reward bands and 3.83% for controls. The bandreporting rate for states influenced by publicity was 66%; that for states not influenced was 32%.

  13. Alternative splicing of the human gene SYBL1 modulates protein domain architecture of longin VAMP7/TI-VAMP, showing both non-SNARE and synaptobrevin-like isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Franceschi Nicola

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The control of intracellular vesicle trafficking is an ideal target to weigh the role of alternative splicing in shaping genomes to make cells. Alternative splicing has been reported for several Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor Attachment protein REceptors of the vesicle (v-SNAREs or of the target membrane (t-SNARES, which are crucial to intracellular membrane fusion and protein and lipid traffic in Eukaryotes. However, splicing has not yet been investigated in Longins, i.e. the most widespread v-SNAREs. Longins are essential in Eukaryotes and prototyped by VAMP7, Sec22b and Ykt6, sharing a conserved N-terminal Longin domain which regulates membrane fusion and subcellular targeting. Human VAMP7/TI-VAMP, encoded by gene SYBL1, is involved in multiple cell pathways, including control of neurite outgrowth. Results Alternative splicing of SYBL1 by exon skipping events results in the production of a number of VAMP7 isoforms. In-frame or frameshift coding sequence modifications modulate domain architecture of VAMP7 isoforms, which can lack whole domains or domain fragments and show variant or extra domains. Intriguingly, two main types of VAMP7 isoforms either share the inhibitory Longin domain and lack the fusion-promoting SNARE motif, or vice versa. Expression analysis in different tissues and cell lines, quantitative real time RT-PCR and confocal microscopy analysis of fluorescent protein-tagged isoforms demonstrate that VAMP7 variants have different tissue specificities and subcellular localizations. Moreover, design and use of isoform-specific antibodies provided preliminary evidence for the existence of splice variants at the protein level. Conclusions Previous evidence on VAMP7 suggests inhibitory functions for the Longin domain and fusion/growth promoting activity for the Δ-longin molecule. Thus, non-SNARE isoforms with Longin domain and non-longin SNARE isoforms might have somehow opposite regulatory functions

  14. Degenerate band edge laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veysi, Mehdi; Othman, Mohamed A. K.; Figotin, Alexander; Capolino, Filippo

    2018-05-01

    We propose a class of lasers based on a fourth-order exceptional point of degeneracy (EPD) referred to as the degenerate band edge (DBE). EPDs have been found in parity-time-symmetric photonic structures that require loss and/or gain; here we show that the DBE is a different kind of EPD since it occurs in periodic structures that are lossless and gainless. Because of this property, a small level of gain is sufficient to induce single-frequency lasing based on a synchronous operation of four degenerate Floquet-Bloch eigenwaves. This lasing scheme constitutes a light-matter interaction mechanism that leads also to a unique scaling law of the laser threshold with the inverse of the fifth power of the laser-cavity length. The DBE laser has the lowest lasing threshold in comparison to a regular band edge laser and to a conventional laser in cavities with the same loaded quality (Q ) factor and length. In particular, even without mirror reflectors the DBE laser exhibits a lasing threshold which is an order of magnitude lower than that of a uniform cavity laser of the same length and with very high mirror reflectivity. Importantly, this novel DBE lasing regime enforces mode selectivity and coherent single-frequency operation even for pumping rates well beyond the lasing threshold, in contrast to the multifrequency nature of conventional uniform cavity lasers.

  15. L-band brightness temperature disaggregation for use with S-band and C-band radiometer data for WCOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, P.; Shi, J.; Zhao, T.; Cosh, M. H.; Bindlish, R.

    2017-12-01

    There are two passive microwave sensors onboard the Water Cycle Observation Mission (WCOM), which includes a synthetic aperture radiometer operating at L-S-C bands and a scanning microwave radiometer operating from C- to W-bands. It provides a unique opportunity to disaggregate L-band brightness temperature (soil moisture) with S-band C-bands radiometer data. In this study, passive-only downscaling methodologies are developed and evaluated. Based on the radiative transfer modeling, it was found that the TBs (brightness temperature) between the L-band and S-band exhibit a linear relationship, and there is an exponential relationship between L-band and C-band. We carried out the downscaling results by two methods: (1) downscaling with L-S-C band passive measurements with the same incidence angle from payload IMI; (2) downscaling with L-C band passive measurements with different incidence angle from payloads IMI and PMI. The downscaling method with L-S bands with the same incident angle was first evaluated using SMEX02 data. The RMSE are 2.69 K and 1.52 K for H and V polarization respectively. The downscaling method with L-C bands is developed with different incident angles using SMEX03 data. The RMSE are 2.97 K and 2.68 K for H and V polarization respectively. These results showed that high-resolution L-band brightness temperature and soil moisture products could be generated from the future WCOM passive-only observations.

  16. Show-Bix &

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The anti-reenactment 'Show-Bix &' consists of 5 dias projectors, a dial phone, quintophonic sound, and interactive elements. A responsive interface will enable the Dias projectors to show copies of original dias slides from the Show-Bix piece ”March på Stedet”, 265 images in total. The copies are...

  17. Fine structure of the amide i band in acetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Careri, G.; Gratton, E.; Shyamsunder, E.

    1988-05-01

    Their absorption spectrum of both single crystals and powdered samples of acetanilide (a model system for proteins) has been studied in the amide i region, where a narrow band has been identified as a highly trapped soliton state. The powder-sample spectra have been decomposed using four Lorentzian bands. A strong temperature dependence has been found for the intensity of two of the subbands, which also show a complementary behavior. Polarization studies performed on thin crystals have shown that the subbands have the same polarization. Low-temperature spectra of partially deuterated samples show the presence of the subbands at the same absorption frequencies found using the fitting procedure in the spectra of nondeuterated samples. The soliton model currently proposed to explain the origin of the anomalous amide i component at 1650 cm-1 still holds, but some modification of the model is required to account for the new features revealed by this study.

  18. Ionizing radiation target groups of band 3 inserted into egg lecithin liposomes as determined by Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, S.P.; Sonwalkar, N.

    1993-01-01

    The purified integral membrane protein, band 3, from human erythrocytes was inserted into egg lecithin liposomes. The insertion of band 3 was determined from thermal transition data from the analysis of the C-H stretching region bands recorded at temperatures from 25 to -22 o C. Raman spectra show that band 3 considerably broadens and lowers the thermal transition of egg lecithin liposomes, suggesting the insertion of band 3. The band 3-inserted liposomes were irradiated with gamma-rays (40 Gy) and the radiation target groups were determined by the analysis of the structural sensitive Raman bands in the 1600-1700 cm -1 (amide I), 1200-1300 cm -1 (amide III) and 550-1030 cm -1 (side chain amino groups) regions. The radiation-sensitive groups as identified from Raman spectra in the region 550-1030 cm -1 are tyrosines and cysteines. The radiation-induced changes in the secondary structure were determined from amide I and III bands. Quantitative estimation using the curve fitting method shows that ban 3 contains 44% total helix, 48% beta strand and 8% undefined plus turns (error + or - 4%). The secondary structure changes to 35% total helix, 42% total beta-strand and 23% turned and undefined upon irradiating band 3 containing liposomes. (Author)

  19. Wide Band to ''Double Band'' upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasper, P.; Currier, R.; Garbincius, P.; Butler, J.

    1988-06-01

    The Wide Band beam currently uses electrons obtained from secondary photon conversions to produce the photon beam incident on the experimental targets. By transporting the positrons produced in these conversions as well as the electrons it is possible to almost double the number of photons delivered to the experiments per primary beam proton. 11 figs

  20. Amniotic constriction bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Amniotic band sequence URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/ ... birth. The baby should be delivered in a medical center that has specialists experienced in caring for babies ... or partial loss of function of a body part. Congenital bands affecting large parts of the body cause the ...

  1. How narrow-band and broad-band uvb irradiation influences the immunohistochemistry analyses of experimental animals’ skin – a comparative study. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Borowska

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This is the second part of the artcle series impact narrow-band UVB radiation (NB-UVB and broad-band UVB radiation (BB-UVB on experimental animals’ skin (white Wistar female rats. The aim of this comparative study was immunohistochemistry analyses containing expression of p53 protein. Expression of p53 protein was performed on two experimental groups. One – exposed to NB-UVB; the other – exposed to BB-UVB radiation. The results indicate that p53 protein takes an active part in the process of apoptosis that is induced by both NB-UVB and BB-UVB. The results showed an increase in p53 expressing cells following BB-UVB than NB-UVB phototherapy.

  2. Talking with TV shows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil; Laursen, Ditte

    2014-01-01

    User interaction with radio and television programmes is not a new thing. However, with new cross-media production concepts such as X Factor and Voice, this is changing dramatically. The second-screen logic of these productions encourages viewers, along with TV’s traditional one-way communication...... mode, to communicate on interactive (dialogue-enabling) devices such as laptops, smartphones and tablets. Using the TV show Voice as our example, this article shows how the technological and situational set-up of the production invites viewers to engage in new ways of interaction and communication...

  3. Talk Show Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Mitzi Ruth

    1992-01-01

    Proposes having students perform skits in which they play the roles of the science concepts they are trying to understand. Provides the dialog for a skit in which hot and cold gas molecules are interviewed on a talk show to study how these properties affect wind, rain, and other weather phenomena. (MDH)

  4. Obesity in show cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbee, R J

    2014-12-01

    Obesity is an important disease with a high prevalence in cats. Because obesity is related to several other diseases, it is important to identify the population at risk. Several risk factors for obesity have been described in the literature. A higher incidence of obesity in certain cat breeds has been suggested. The aim of this study was to determine whether obesity occurs more often in certain breeds. The second aim was to relate the increased prevalence of obesity in certain breeds to the official standards of that breed. To this end, 268 cats of 22 different breeds investigated by determining their body condition score (BCS) on a nine-point scale by inspection and palpation, at two different cat shows. Overall, 45.5% of the show cats had a BCS > 5, and 4.5% of the show cats had a BCS > 7. There were significant differences between breeds, which could be related to the breed standards. Most overweight and obese cats were in the neutered group. It warrants firm discussions with breeders and cat show judges to come to different interpretations of the standards in order to prevent overweight conditions in certain breeds from being the standard of beauty. Neutering predisposes for obesity and requires early nutritional intervention to prevent obese conditions. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Honored Teacher Shows Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratte, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    Part of the acceptance speech of the 1985 National Council for the Social Studies Teacher of the Year, this article describes the censorship experience of this honored social studies teacher. The incident involved the showing of a videotape version of the feature film entitled "The Seduction of Joe Tynan." (JDH)

  6. Soluble lens protein polymorphism in flying fishes from the central Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menezes, M.R.

    Soluble eye lens nuclei proteins of flying-fishes were studied by cellogel electrophoresis. Three distinct patterns characterized by the number of bands, mobility and staining intensity were observed. Morphological studies of these fishes showed...

  7. Inter-specific and intraspecific eye lens protein differences in some sciaenid fishes from Goa coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menezes, M.R.

    Soluble eye lens nuclei proteins of sciaenid fishes were studied by cellogel electrophoresis. Four distinct patterns characterized by the number of bands, mobility and staining intensity were observed. Morphological studies of these fishes showed...

  8. The energy show

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Energy Show is a new look at the problems of world energy, where our supplies come from, now and in the future. The programme looks at how we need energy to maintain our standards of living. Energy supply is shown as the complicated set of problems it is - that Fossil Fuels are both raw materials and energy sources, that some 'alternatives' so readily suggested as practical options are in reality a long way from being effective. (author)

  9. Band parameters of phosphorene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lew Yan Voon, L C; Wang, J; Zhang, Y; Willatzen, M

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene is a two-dimensional nanomaterial with a direct band-gap at the Brillouin zone center. In this paper, we present a recently derived effective-mass theory of the band structure in the presence of strain and electric field, based upon group theory. Band parameters for this theory are computed using a first-principles theory based upon the generalized-gradient approximation to the density-functional theory. These parameters and Hamiltonian will be useful for modeling physical properties of phosphorene. (paper)

  10. Infrared diffuse interstellar bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galazutdinov, G. A.; Lee, Jae-Joon; Han, Inwoo; Lee, Byeong-Cheol; Valyavin, G.; Krełowski, J.

    2017-05-01

    We present high-resolution (R ˜ 45 000) profiles of 14 diffuse interstellar bands in the ˜1.45 to ˜2.45 μm range based on spectra obtained with the Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrograph at the McDonald Observatory. The revised list of diffuse bands with accurately estimated rest wavelengths includes six new features. The diffuse band at 15 268.2 Å demonstrates a very symmetric profile shape and thus can serve as a reference for finding the 'interstellar correction' to the rest wavelength frame in the H range, which suffers from a lack of known atomic/molecular lines.

  11. Band parameters of phosphorene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene is a two-dimensional nanomaterial with a direct band-gap at the Brillouin zone center. In this paper, we present a recently derived effective-mass theory of the band structure in the presence of strain and electric field, based upon group theory. Band parameters for this theory...... are computed using a first-principles theory based upon the generalized-gradient approximation to the density-functional theory. These parameters and Hamiltonian will be useful for modeling physical properties of phosphorene....

  12. CSF oligoclonal banding - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100145.htm CSF oligoclonal banding - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... 5 out of 5 Overview The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) serves to supply nutrients to the central nervous ...

  13. Decay of superdeformed bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, M.P.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.

    1995-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the study of superdeformation is to directly connect the large number of superdeformed bands now known to the yrast states. In this way, excitation energies, spins and parities can be assigned to the levels in the second well which is essential to establish the collective and single-particle components of these bands. This paper will review some of the progress which has been made to understand the decay of superdeformed bands using the new arrays including the measurement of the total decay spectrum and the establishment of direct one-step decays from the superdeformed band to the yrast line in 194 Hg. 42 refs., 5 figs

  14. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eat by making you feel full after eating small amounts of food. After surgery, your doctor can adjust the band ... You will feel full after eating just a small amount of food. The food in the small upper pouch will ...

  15. Showing Value (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available When Su Cleyle and I first decided to start Evidence Based Library and Information Practice, one of the things we agreed upon immediately was that the journal be open access. We knew that a major obstacle to librarians using the research literature was that they did not have access to the research literature. Although Su and I are both academic librarians who can access a wide variety of library and information literature from our institutions, we belong to a profession where not everyone has equal access to the research in our field. Without such access to our own body of literature, how can we ever hope for practitioners to use research evidence in their decision making? It would have been contradictory to the principles of evidence based library and information practice to do otherwise.One of the specific groups we thought could use such an open access venue for discovering research literature was school librarians. School librarians are often isolated and lacking access to the research literature that may help them prove to stakeholders the importance of their libraries and their role within schools. Certainly, school libraries have been in decline and the use of evidence to show value is needed. As Ken Haycock noted in his 2003 report, The Crisis in Canada’s School Libraries: The Case for Reform and Reinvestment, “Across the country, teacher-librarians are losing their jobs or being reassigned. Collections are becoming depleted owing to budget cuts. Some principals believe that in the age of the Internet and the classroom workstation, the school library is an artifact” (9. Within this context, school librarians are looking to our research literature for evidence of the impact that school library programs have on learning outcomes and student success. They are integrating that evidence into their practice, and reflecting upon what can be improved locally. They are focusing on students and showing the impact of school libraries and

  16. Urine protein electrophoresis test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urine protein electrophoresis; UPEP; Multiple myeloma - UPEP; Waldenström macroglobulinemia - UPEP; Amyloidosis - UPEP ... special paper and apply an electric current. The proteins move and form visible bands. These reveal the ...

  17. Anti-leucine rich glioma inactivated 1 protein and anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis show distinct patterns of brain glucose metabolism in 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Florian; Wilke, Florian; Raab, Peter; Tayeb, Said Ben; Boeck, Anna-Lena; Haense, Cathleen; Trebst, Corinna; Voss, Elke; Schrader, Christoph; Logemann, Frank; Ahrens, Jörg; Leffler, Andreas; Rodriguez-Raecke, Rea; Dengler, Reinhard; Geworski, Lilli; Bengel, Frank M; Berding, Georg; Stangel, Martin; Nabavi, Elham

    2014-06-20

    Pathogenic autoantibodies targeting the recently identified leucine rich glioma inactivated 1 protein and the subunit 1 of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor induce autoimmune encephalitis. A comparison of brain metabolic patterns in 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography of anti-leucine rich glioma inactivated 1 protein and anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis patients has not been performed yet and shall be helpful in differentiating these two most common forms of autoimmune encephalitis. The brain 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose uptake from whole-body positron emission tomography of six anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis patients and four patients with anti-leucine rich glioma inactivated 1 protein encephalitis admitted to Hannover Medical School between 2008 and 2012 was retrospectively analyzed and compared to matched controls. Group analysis of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate encephalitis patients demonstrated regionally limited hypermetabolism in frontotemporal areas contrasting an extensive hypometabolism in parietal lobes, whereas the anti-leucine rich glioma inactivated 1 protein syndrome was characterized by hypermetabolism in cerebellar, basal ganglia, occipital and precentral areas and minor frontomesial hypometabolism. This retrospective 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography study provides novel evidence for distinct brain metabolic patterns in patients with anti-leucine rich glioma inactivated 1 protein and anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis.

  18. Does the chromatic Mach bands effect exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsofe, Avital; Spitzer, Hedva; Einav, Shmuel

    2009-06-30

    The achromatic Mach bands effect is a well-known visual illusion, discovered over a hundred years ago. This effect has been investigated thoroughly, mainly for its brightness aspect. The existence of Chromatic Mach bands, however, has been disputed. In recent years it has been reported that Chromatic Mach bands are not perceived under controlled iso-luminance conditions. However, here we show that a variety of Chromatic Mach bands, consisting of chromatic and achromatic regions, separated by a saturation ramp, can be clearly perceived under iso-luminance and iso-brightness conditions. In this study, observers' eye movements were recorded under iso-brightness conditions. Several observers were tested for their ability to perceive the Chromatic Mach bands effect and its magnitude, across different cardinal and non-cardinal Chromatic Mach bands stimuli. A computational model of color adaptation, which predicted color induction and color constancy, successfully predicts this variation of Chromatic Mach bands. This has been tested by measuring the distance of the data points from the "achromatic point" and by calculating the shift of the data points from predicted complementary lines. The results suggest that the Chromatic Mach bands effect is a specific chromatic induction effect.

  19. Convex Banding of the Covariance Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien, Jacob; Bunea, Florentina; Xiao, Luo

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new sparse estimator of the covariance matrix for high-dimensional models in which the variables have a known ordering. Our estimator, which is the solution to a convex optimization problem, is equivalently expressed as an estimator which tapers the sample covariance matrix by a Toeplitz, sparsely-banded, data-adaptive matrix. As a result of this adaptivity, the convex banding estimator enjoys theoretical optimality properties not attained by previous banding or tapered estimators. In particular, our convex banding estimator is minimax rate adaptive in Frobenius and operator norms, up to log factors, over commonly-studied classes of covariance matrices, and over more general classes. Furthermore, it correctly recovers the bandwidth when the true covariance is exactly banded. Our convex formulation admits a simple and efficient algorithm. Empirical studies demonstrate its practical effectiveness and illustrate that our exactly-banded estimator works well even when the true covariance matrix is only close to a banded matrix, confirming our theoretical results. Our method compares favorably with all existing methods, in terms of accuracy and speed. We illustrate the practical merits of the convex banding estimator by showing that it can be used to improve the performance of discriminant analysis for classifying sound recordings.

  20. Ferritin associates with marginal band microtubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infante, Anthony A.; Infante, Dzintra; Chan, M.-C.; How, P.-C.; Kutschera, Waltraud; Linhartova, Irena; Muellner, Ernst W.; Wiche, Gerhard; Propst, Friedrich

    2007-01-01

    We characterized chicken erythrocyte and human platelet ferritin by biochemical studies and immunofluorescence. Erythrocyte ferritin was found to be a homopolymer of H-ferritin subunits, resistant to proteinase K digestion, heat stable, and contained iron. In mature chicken erythrocytes and human platelets, ferritin was localized at the marginal band, a ring-shaped peripheral microtubule bundle, and displayed properties of bona fide microtubule-associated proteins such as tau. Red blood cell ferritin association with the marginal band was confirmed by temperature-induced disassembly-reassembly of microtubules. During erythrocyte differentiation, ferritin co-localized with coalescing microtubules during marginal band formation. In addition, ferritin was found in the nuclei of mature erythrocytes, but was not detectable in those of bone marrow erythrocyte precursors. These results suggest that ferritin has a function in marginal band formation and possibly in protection of the marginal band from damaging effects of reactive oxygen species by sequestering iron in the mature erythrocyte. Moreover, our data suggest that ferritin and syncolin, a previously identified erythrocyte microtubule-associated protein, are identical. Nuclear ferritin might contribute to transcriptional silencing or, alternatively, constitute a ferritin reservoir

  1. Cross-linking of L5 protein to 5 S RNA in rat liver 60-S subunits by ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terao, K.; Uchiumi, T.; Ogata, K.

    1980-01-01

    After rat liver 60-S ribosomal subunits were irradiated with ultraviolet light at 254 nm, they were treated with EDTA and then subjected to sucrose density-gradient centrifugation to isolate 5 S RNA-protein complex. When 5 S RNA-protein was analyzed by SDS-acrylamide gel electrophoresis which dissociated noncovalent 5 S RNA-protein, two protein bands were observed. The one showed a slower mobility than the protein band (L5) of 5 S RNA-protein from non-irradiated 60 S subunit and the other showed the same mobility as L5 protein. Since the former band was shown to be specific to ultraviolet-irradiation, it was considered as cross-linked 5 S RNA-protein. After the two protein bands were iodinated with 125 I, labeled protein was extracted and treated with RNAase. Thereafter, it was analyzed by two-dimensional acrylamide gel electrophoresis, followed by autoradiography. The results indicate that the protein component of cross-linked 5 S RNA-protein is L5 protein (ribosomal protein); these proteins are designated according to the proposed uniform nomenclature. (Auth.)

  2. Spectral band selection for classification of soil organic matter content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Tracey L.; Szilagyi, Andrea; Baumgardner, Marion F.; Chen, Chih-Chien Thomas; Landgrebe, David A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the spectral-band-selection (SBS) algorithm of Chen and Landgrebe (1987, 1988, and 1989) and uses the algorithm to classify the organic matter content in the earth's surface soil. The effectiveness of the algorithm was evaluated comparing the results of classification of the soil organic matter using SBS bands with those obtained using Landsat MSS bands and TM bands, showing that the algorithm was successful in finding important spectral bands for classification of organic matter content. Using the calculated bands, the probabilities of correct classification for climate-stratified data were found to range from 0.910 to 0.980.

  3. Ultra wide band antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Begaud, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Ultra Wide Band Technology (UWB) has reached a level of maturity that allows us to offer wireless links with either high or low data rates. These wireless links are frequently associated with a location capability for which ultimate accuracy varies with the inverse of the frequency bandwidth. Using time or frequency domain waveforms, they are currently the subject of international standards facilitating their commercial implementation. Drawing up a complete state of the art, Ultra Wide Band Antennas is aimed at students, engineers and researchers and presents a summary of internationally recog

  4. Spectrin-like proteins in plant nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, de N.C.A.; Ketelaar, T.; Blumenthal, S.S.D.; Emons, A.M.C.; Schel, J.H.N.

    2000-01-01

    We analysed the presence and localization of spectrin-like proteins in nuclei of various plant tissues, using several anti-erythrocyte spectrin antibodies on isolated pea nuclei and nuclei in cells. Western blots of extracted purified pea nuclei show a cross-reactive pair of bands at 220–240 kDa,

  5. Modelling band-to-band tunneling current in InP-based heterostructure photonic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Engelen, J.P.; Shen, L.; van der Tol, J.J.G.M.; Smit, M.K.; Kockaert, P.; Emplit, P.; Gorza, S.-P.; Massar, S.

    2015-01-01

    Some semiconductor photonic devices show large discontinuities in the band structure. Short tunnel paths caused by this band structure may lead to an excessive tunneling current, especially in highly doped layers. Modelling of this tunnelling current is therefore important when designing photonic

  6. Paranodal reorganization results in the depletion of transverse bands in the aged central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Mark N.; Pomicter, Anthony D.; Velazco, Cristine S.; Henderson, Scott C.; Dupree, Jeffrey L.

    2012-01-01

    Paranodal axo-glial junctional complexes anchor the myelin sheath to the axon and breakdown of these complexes presumably facilitates demyelination. Myelin deterioration is also prominent in the aging central nervous system (CNS); however, the stability of the paranodal complexes in the aged CNS has not been examined. Here, we show that transverse bands, prominent components of paranodal junctions, are significantly reduced in the aged CNS; however, the number of paired clusters of both myelin and axonal paranodal proteins is not altered. Ultrastructural analyses also reveal that thicker myelin sheaths display a “piling” of paranodal loops, the cytoplasm-containing sacs that demarcate the paranode. Loops involved in piling are observed throughout the paranode and are not limited to loops positioned in either the nodal- or juxtanodal-most regions. Here, we propose that as myelination continues, previously anchored loops lose their transverse bands and recede away from the axolemma. Newly juxtaposed loops then lose their transverse bands, move laterally to fill in the gap left by the receded loops and finally reform their transverse bands. This paranodal reorganization results in conservation of paranodal length, which may be important in maintaining ion channel spacing and axonal function. Furthermore, we propose that transverse band reformation is less efficient in the aged CNS, resulting in the significant reduction of these junctional components. Although demyelination was not observed, we propose that loss of transverse bands facilitates myelin degeneration and may predispose the aged CNS to a poorer prognosis following a secondary insult. PMID:20888080

  7. Band-type microelectrodes for amperometric immunoassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ga-Yeon; Chang, Young Wook; Ko, Hyuk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Min-Jung [Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Pyun, Jae-Chul, E-mail: jcpyun@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-20

    A band-type microelectrode was made using a parylene-N film as a passivation layer. A circular-type, mm-scale electrode with the same diameter as the band-type microelectrode was also made with an electrode area that was 5000 times larger than the band-type microelectrode. By comparing the amperometric signals of 3,5,3′,5′-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) samples at different optical density (OD) values, the band-type microelectrode was determined to be 9 times more sensitive than the circular-type electrode. The properties of the circular-type and the band-type electrodes (e.g., the shape of their cyclic voltammograms, the type of diffusion layer used, and the diffusion layer thickness per unit electrode area) were characterized according to their electrode area using the COMSOL Multiphysics software. From these simulations, the band-type electrode was estimated to have the conventional microelectrode properties, even when the electrode area was 100 times larger than a conventional circular-type electrode. These results show that both the geometry and the area of an electrode can influence the properties of the electrode. Finally, amperometric analysis based on a band-type electrode was applied to commercial ELISA kits to analyze human hepatitis B surface antigen (hHBsAg) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibodies. - Highlights: • A band-type microelectrode was made using a parylene-N film as a passivation layer. • The band-type microelectrode was 14-times more sensitive than circular-type electrode. • The influence of geometry on microelectrode properties was simulated using COMSOL. • The band-type electrode was applied to ELISA kits for hHBsAg and hHIV-antibodies.

  8. Individual members of the light-harvesting complex II chlorophyll a/b-binding protein gene family in pea (Pisum sativum) show differential responses to ultraviolet-B radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackerness, A.H.S.; Liu, L.; Thomas, B.; Thompson, W.F.; Jordan, B.R.; White, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    In the present work, UV-B-repressible and UV-B-inducible genes were identified in the pea, Pisum sativum L., by rapid amplification of 3′ cDNA ends through use of the polymerase chain reaction. Of the UV-B-repressible clones, psUVRub and psUVDeh represent genes encoding Rubisco activase and dehydrin, respectively. A third clone, psUVZinc, did not correspond closely in overall nucleotide sequence to any gene registered in GenBank; however, a short deduced peptide shared similarity with the photosystem-II reaction center X protein of the chlorophyll a+c-containing alga, Odontella sinensis. The UV-B-inducible clones, psUVGluc, psUVAux and psUVRib, were related to genes encoding β-1, 3-glucanase, auxin-repressed protein, and a 40S ribosomal protein, respectively. The modulation of these pea genes indicates how UV-B, through its actions as a physical stressor, affects several important physiological processes in plants. (author)

  9. Development of softcopy environment for primary color banding visibility assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Byungseok; Pizlo, Zygmunt; Allebach, Jan P.

    2008-01-01

    , we perform haploscopic matching experiments that allow each eye to independently adapt to different viewing conditions; and we find an appearance mapping function in the adapted XYZ space. Finally, to validate the accuracy of the softcopy environment, we conduct a banding matching experiment at three different banding levels by the memory matching method, and confirm that our softcopy environment produces the same banding perception as the hardcopy. In addition, we perform two more separate psychophysical experiments to measure the differential threshold of the intrinsic banding in both the hardcopy and softcopy environments, and confirm that the two thresholds are statistically identical. The results show that with our target printer, human subjects can see a just noticeable difference with a 9% reduction in the banding magnitude for the cyan colorant.

  10. Band-notched spiral antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jae; Chang, John

    2018-03-13

    A band-notched spiral antenna having one or more spiral arms extending from a radially inner end to a radially outer end for transmitting or receiving electromagnetic radiation over a frequency range, and one or more resonance structures positioned adjacent one or more segments of the spiral arm associated with a notch frequency band or bands of the frequency range so as to resonate and suppress the transmission or reception of electromagnetic radiation over said notch frequency band or bands.

  11. Modification in band gap of zirconium complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Mayank, E-mail: mayank30134@gmail.com; Singh, J.; Chouhan, S. [Department of Physics, ISLE, IPS Academy, Indore (M.P.) (India); Mishra, A. [School of Physics, Devi Ahilya Vishwavidyalaya, Indore (M.P.) (India); Shrivastava, B. D. [Govt. P. G. College, Biora (M.P.) (India)

    2016-05-06

    The optical properties of zirconium complexes with amino acid based Schiff bases are reported here. The zirconium complexes show interesting stereo chemical features, which are applicable in organometallic and organic synthesis as well as in catalysis. The band gaps of both Schiff bases and zirconium complexes were obtained by UV-Visible spectroscopy. It was found that the band gap of zirconium complexes has been modified after adding zirconium compound to the Schiff bases.

  12. Home-use cancer detecting band aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalevsky, Zeev; Rudnitsky, Arkady; Sheinman, Victor; Tzoy, Andrey; Toktosunov, Aitmamat; Adashov, Arkady

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present a novel concept in which special band aid is developed for early detection of cancer. The band aid contains an array of micro needles with small detection array connected to each needle which inspects the color of the surface of the skin versus time after being pinched with the needles. We were able to show in pre-clinical trials that the color varies differently if the skin is close to tumor tissue.

  13. A 23-kDa protein as a substrate for protein kinase C in bovine neutrophils. Purification and partial characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasia, M.J.; Dianoux, A.C.; Vignais, P.V.

    1989-01-01

    In 32 P i -loaded bovine neutrophils stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), radioactivity was preferentially incorporated into a protein of low molecular mass, suggesting a PKC-dependent phosphorylation. This protein, termed 23-kDa protein, was predominantly localized in the cytosol. The apparent molecular mass of the purified protein range between 20 and 23 kDa. In the absence of mercaptoethanol, a dimer accumulated. Homogeneity of the 23-kDa protein was verified by 2D-PAGE analysis. Gel isoelectric focusing (IEF) of the purified 23-kDa protein followed by Coomassie blue staining allowed the visualization of our discrete protein bands with isoelectric points ranging between pH 6.3 and 6.7. Phosphorylation of the 23-kDa protein by [γ- 32 P]ATP in the presence of bovine neutrophil PKC supplemented with Ca 2+ , phosphatidylserine, and diacylglycerol or with PMA occurred on serine and required the presence of mercaptoethanol. IEF of the 32 P-labeled 23-kDa protein followed by autoradiography revealed for discrete bands with distinct isoelectric points similar to those of the bands stained by Coomassie blue after IEF on nonlabeled 23-kDa protein. The bands of the 23-kDa protein resolved by IEF and transfered to nitrocellulose showed ability to bind [ 35 S]GTP-γ-S. The immunoreactivity of antibodies raised in rabbits against the bovine neutrophil 23-kDa protein was demonstrated on immunoblots after SDS-PAGE. The 23-kDa protein differed also from several other proteins of similar molecular mass that have been identified in neutrophils, namely, calmodulin, the small subunit of the low-potential cytochrome b, and a low molecular weight protein which is ADP-ribosylated by the botulinum toxin

  14. Experimental study on the adiabatic shear bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affouard, J.

    1984-07-01

    Four martensitic steels (Z50CDV5 steel, 28CND8 steel, 35NCDV16 steel and 4340 steel) with different hardness between 190 and 600 Hsub(B) (Brinell hardness), have been studied by means of dynamic compressive tests on split Hopkinson pressure bar. Microscopic observations show that the fracture are associated to the development of adiabatic shear bands (except 4340 steel with 190 Hsub(B) hardness). By means of tests for which the deformation is stopped at predetermined levels, the measurement of shear and hardness inside the band and the matrix indicates the chronology of this phenomenon: first the localization of shear, followed by the formation of adiabatic shear band and ultimatly crack initiation and propagation. These results correlated with few simulations by finite elements have permitted to suggest two mecanisms of deformation leading to the formation of adiabatic shear bands in this specific test [fr

  15. Confidence bands for inverse regression models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birke, Melanie; Bissantz, Nicolai; Holzmann, Hajo

    2010-01-01

    We construct uniform confidence bands for the regression function in inverse, homoscedastic regression models with convolution-type operators. Here, the convolution is between two non-periodic functions on the whole real line rather than between two periodic functions on a compact interval, since the former situation arguably arises more often in applications. First, following Bickel and Rosenblatt (1973 Ann. Stat. 1 1071–95) we construct asymptotic confidence bands which are based on strong approximations and on a limit theorem for the supremum of a stationary Gaussian process. Further, we propose bootstrap confidence bands based on the residual bootstrap and prove consistency of the bootstrap procedure. A simulation study shows that the bootstrap confidence bands perform reasonably well for moderate sample sizes. Finally, we apply our method to data from a gel electrophoresis experiment with genetically engineered neuronal receptor subunits incubated with rat brain extract

  16. Treatment of Patellar Lower Pole Fracture with Modified Titanium Cable Tension Band Plus Patellar Tibial Tunnel Steel "8" Reduction Band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaming; Wang, Decheng; He, Zhiliang; Shi, Hao

    2018-01-08

    To determine the efficacy of modified titanium tension band plus patellar tendon tunnel steel 8 "reduction band" versus titanium cable tension band fixation for the treatment of patellar lower pole fracture. 58 patients with lower patella fracture were enrolled in this study, including 30 patients treated with modified titanium cable tension band plus patellar tibial tunnel wire "8" tension band internal fixation (modified group), and 28 patients with titanium cable tension band fixation. All patients were followed up for 9∼15 months with an average of 11.6 months. Knee flexion was significantly improved in the modified group than in the titanium cable tension band group (111.33 ± 13 degrees versus 98.21 ± 21.70 degrees, P = 0.004). The fracture healing time showed no significant difference. At the end of the follow-up, the improvement excellent rate was 93.33% in the modified group, and 82.14% in the titanium cable tension band group. Titanium cable tension band internal fixation loosening was found in 2 cases, including 1 case of treatment by two surgeries without loose internal fixation. The modified titanium cable tension band with "8" tension band fixation showed better efficacy for lower patella fractures than titanium cable tension band fixation.

  17. Thermoelectric band engineering: The role of carrier scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkoske, Evan; Wang, Xufeng; Lundstrom, Mark; Askarpour, Vahid; Maassen, Jesse

    2017-11-01

    Complex electronic band structures, with multiple valleys or bands at the same or similar energies, can be beneficial for thermoelectric performance, but the advantages can be offset by inter-valley and inter-band scattering. In this paper, we demonstrate how first-principles band structures coupled with recently developed techniques for rigorous simulation of electron-phonon scattering provide the capabilities to realistically assess the benefits and trade-offs associated with these materials. We illustrate the approach using n-type silicon as a model material and show that intervalley scattering is strong. This example shows that the convergence of valleys and bands can improve thermoelectric performance, but the magnitude of the improvement depends sensitively on the relative strengths of intra- and inter-valley electron scattering. Because anisotropy of the band structure also plays an important role, a measure of the benefit of band anisotropy in the presence of strong intervalley scattering is presented.

  18. Band gap and band offset of (GaIn)(PSb) lattice matched to InP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, F.; Böhm, G.; Meyer, R.; Amann, M.-C.

    2005-07-01

    Metastable (GaxIn1-x)(PySb1-y) layers were grown on (001) InP substrates by gas source molecular beam epitaxy. Low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy was applied to these heterostructures and revealed spatially indirect band-to-band recombination of electrons localized in the InP with holes in the (GaxIn1-x)(PySb1-y). In addition, samples with layer thicknesses larger than 100nm showed direct PL across the band gap of (GaxIn1-x)(PySb1-y). Band-gap energies and band offset energies of (GaxIn1-x)(PySb1-y) relative to InP were derived from these PL data. A strong bowing parameter was observed.

  19. Ex vivo detection of adenovirus specific CD4+ T-cell responses to HLA-DR-epitopes of the Hexon protein show a contracted specificity of THELPER cells following stem cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serangeli, Celine; Bicanic, Oliver; Scheible, Michael H.; Wernet, Dorothee; Lang, Peter; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanovic, Stefan; Handgretinger, Rupert; Feuchtinger, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients, especially after stem cell transplantation (SCT). Viral clearance has been attributed to CD4 + T-cell responses against the Hexon-protein, but the frequency of specific T HELPER cells is extremely low or not detectable ex vivo and preference for different CD4 + T-cell epitopes is variable among individuals. We therefore analyzed 44 healthy donors and 6 SCT-recipients for Hexon-specific CD4 + -responses ex vivo, to identify epitopes which would be broadly applicable. We selected 19 candidate epitopes with predicted restriction to HLA-DR1/DR3/DR4/DR7; 16 were located within the highly conserved regions, indicating cross-reactivity of T cells among HAdV-subspecies. Ten epitopes induced CD4 + -proliferation in >50% of individuals, confirmed by intracellular IFN-γ detection. Three SCT recipients who recovered from an infection with HAdV displayed reactivity towards only a single hexon epitope, whereas healthy individuals were responsive to two to eight epitopes (median 3). The ex vivo detection of Hexon-specific CD4 + T-cells, without any long-term culture in vitro, enables the detection and generation of HAdV-specific CD4 + T cells for adoptive T-cell transfer against HAdV-infection post SCT.

  20. Band structures in fractal grading porous phononic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Ying; Liang, Tianshu; Wang, Bin

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, a new grading porous structure is introduced based on a Sierpinski triangle routine, and wave propagation in this fractal grading porous phononic crystal is investigated. The influences of fractal hierarchy and porosity on the band structures in fractal graidng porous phononic crystals are clarified. Vibration modes of unit cell at absolute band gap edges are given to manifest formation mechanism of absolute band gaps. The results show that absolute band gaps are easy to form in fractal structures comparatively to the normal ones with the same porosity. Structures with higher fractal hierarchies benefit multiple wider absolute band gaps. This work provides useful guidance in design of fractal porous phononic crystals.

  1. High macro rubber band ligature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Reis Neto

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The goal of a rubber band ligature is to promote fibrosis of the submucosa with subsequent fixation of the anal epithelium to the underlying sphincter. Following this principle, a new technique of ligature was developed based on two aspects: 1. macro banding: to have a better fibrosis and fixation by banding a bigger volume of mucosa and 2. higher ligature: to have this fixation at the origin of the hemorrhoidal cushion displacement. Methods: 1634 patients with internal hemorrhoidal disease grade II or III were treated by the technique called high macro rubber band. There was no distinction as to age, gender or race. To perform this technique a new hemorrhoidal device was specially designed with a larger diameter and a bigger capacity for mucosal volume aspiration. It is recommended to utilize a longer and wider anoscope to obtain a better view of the anal canal, which will facilitate the injection of submucosa higher in the anal canal and the insertion of the rubber band device. The hemorrhoidal cushion must be banded higher in the anal canal (4 cm above the pectinate line. It is preferable to treat all the hemorrhoids in one single session (maximum of three areas banded. Results: The analysis was retrospective without any comparison with conventional banding. The period of evaluation extended from one to twelve years. The analysis of the results showed perianal edema in 1.6% of the patients, immediate tenesmus in 0.8%, intense pain (need for parenteral analgesia in 1.6%, urinary retention in 0.1% of the patients and a symptomatic recurrence rate of 4.2%. All patients with symptomatic recurrence were treated with a new session of macro rubber banding. None of the patients developed anal or rectal sepsis. Small post-ligature bleeding was observed only in 0.8% of the patients. Conclusions: The high macro rubber banding technique represents an alternative method for the treatment of hemorrhoidal disease grades II or III, with good

  2. Noise exposure in marching bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Joseph

    2005-09-01

    Previous studies involving orchestras have shown that music ensembles can produce hazardous noise levels. There are no similar data for marching bands and pep bands. In order to evaluate the noise levels produced by marching and pep bands, 1/3-octave-band sound-pressure levels were measured while these groups rehearsed and performed. Data were collected while marching with the bands to ensure a realistic environment. Comparing these data to OSHA and NIOSH criteria, marching and pep band exposures often exceed safe values. For typical exposures, OSHA doses range from 11% to 295%, while NIOSH doses range from 35% to 3055%. Exposures that would be considered hazardous in the workplace are common in marching and pep bands; students and band directors should take steps to recognize the risk posed by various instruments and various locations, and should implement hearing conservation efforts.

  3. Semiconductors bonds and bands

    CERN Document Server

    Ferry, David K

    2013-01-01

    As we settle into this second decade of the twenty-first century, it is evident that the advances in micro-electronics have truly revolutionized our day-to-day lifestyle. The technology is built upon semiconductors, materials in which the band gap has been engineered for special values suitable to the particular application. This book, written specifically for a one semester course for graduate students, provides a thorough understanding of the key solid state physics of semiconductors. It describes how quantum mechanics gives semiconductors unique properties that enabled the micro-electronics revolution, and sustain the ever-growing importance of this revolution.

  4. Electron correlations in narrow band systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishore, R.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of the electron correlations in narrow bands, such as d(f) bands in the transition (rare earth) metals and their compounds and the impurity bands in doped semiconductors is studied. The narrow band systems is described, by the Hubbard Hamiltonian. By proposing a local self-energy for the interacting electron, it is found that the results are exact in both atomic and band limits and reduce to the Hartree Fock results for U/Δ → 0, where U is the intra-atomic Coulomb interaction and Δ is the bandwidth of the noninteracting electrons. For the Lorentzian form of the density of states of the noninteracting electrons, this approximation turns out to be equivalent to the third Hubbard approximation. A simple argument, based on the mean free path obtained from the imaginary part of the self energy, shows how the electron correlations can give rise to a discontinous metal-nonmetal transition as proposed by Mott. The band narrowing and the existence of the satellite below the Fermi energy in Ni, found in photoemission experiments, can also be understood. (Author) [pt

  5. The cytoskeletal binding domain of band 3 is required for multiprotein complex formation and retention during erythropoiesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satchwell, Timothy J; Hawley, Bethan R; Bell, Amanda J; Ribeiro, M. Leticia; Toye, Ashley M

    2015-01-01

    Band 3 is the most abundant protein in the erythrocyte membrane and forms the core of a major multiprotein complex. The absence of band 3 in human erythrocytes has only been reported once, in the homozygous band 3 Coimbra patient. We used in vitro culture of erythroblasts derived from this patient, and separately short hairpin RNA-mediated depletion of band 3, to investigate the development of a band 3-deficient erythrocyte membrane and to specifically assess the stability and retention of band 3 dependent proteins in the absence of this core protein during terminal erythroid differentiation. Further, using lentiviral transduction of N-terminally green fluorescent protein-tagged band 3, we demonstrated the ability to restore expression of band 3 to normal levels and to rescue secondary deficiencies of key proteins including glycophorin A, protein 4.2, CD47 and Rh proteins arising from the absence of band 3 in this patient. By transducing band 3-deficient erythroblasts from this patient with band 3 mutants with absent or impaired ability to associate with the cytoskeleton we also demonstrated the importance of cytoskeletal connectivity for retention both of band 3 and of its associated dependent proteins within the reticulocyte membrane during the process of erythroblast enucleation. PMID:25344524

  6. Retinal shows its true colours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coughlan, N. J.A.; Adamson, B. D.; Gamon, L.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal is one of Nature's most important and widespread chromophores, exhibiting remarkable versatility in its function and spectral response, depending on its protein environment. Reliable spectroscopic and photochemical data for the isolated retinal molecule are essential for calibrating theor...

  7. Role of dietary supplementation in the protein content of bovine milk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Feed back response of the caseins and whey proteins was observed in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) profile by resolving these proteins upon 15% SDS PAGE which showed remarkable variation in the banding pattern of all caseins i.e., α-caseins, β-caseins, κ-casein and whey ...

  8. Blood proteins analysis by Raman spectroscopy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, D. N.; Bratchenko, I. A.; Khristoforova, Yu. A.; Lykina, A. A.; Myakinin, O. O.; Kuzmina, T. P.; Davydkin, I. L.; Zakharov, V. P.

    2016-04-01

    This work is devoted to study the possibility of plasma proteins (albumin, globulins) concentration measurement using Raman spectroscopy setup. The blood plasma and whole blood were studied in this research. The obtained Raman spectra showed significant variation of intensities of certain spectral bands 940, 1005, 1330, 1450 and 1650 cm-1 for different protein fractions. Partial least squares regression analysis was used for determination of correlation coefficients. We have shown that the proposed method represents the structure and biochemical composition of major blood proteins.

  9. Change in optimum genetic algorithm solution with changing band discontinuities and band widths of electrically conducting copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Avneet; Bakhshi, A. K.

    2010-04-01

    The interest in copolymers stems from the fact that they present interesting electronic and optical properties leading to a variety of technological applications. In order to get a suitable copolymer for a specific application, genetic algorithm (GA) along with negative factor counting (NFC) method has recently been used. In this paper, we study the effect of change in the ratio of conduction band discontinuity to valence band discontinuity (Δ Ec/Δ Ev) on the optimum solution obtained from GA for model binary copolymers. The effect of varying bandwidths on the optimum GA solution is also investigated. The obtained results show that the optimum solution changes with varying parameters like band discontinuity and band width of constituent homopolymers. As the ratio Δ Ec/Δ Ev increases, band gap of optimum solution decreases. With increasing band widths of constituent homopolymers, the optimum solution tends to be dependent on the component with higher band gap.

  10. Wide band ENDOR spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca Filho, C.

    1973-01-01

    The construction of an ENDOR spectrometer operating from 0,5 to 75 MHz within a single band, with ore Klystron and homodine detection, and no fundamental changes on the electron spin resonance spectrometer was described. The ENDOR signal can be detected both by amplitude modulation of the frequency field, or direct detection of the ESR output, which is taken to a signal analyser. The signal-to-noise ratio is raised by averaging rather than filtering avoiding the use of long time constants, providing natural line widths. The experimental apparatus and the spectra obtained are described. A discussion, relating the ENDOR line amplitudes with the experimental conditions is done and ENDOR mechanism, in which there is a relevant presence of cross relaxation is proposed

  11. Electronic band structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosso, G.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to present, in detail, some theoretical methods used to calculate electronic band structures in crystals. The basic strategies employed to attack the problem of electronic-structure calculations are presented. Successive sections present the basic formulations of the tight-binding, orthogonalized-plane-wave, Green'sfunction, and pseudopotential methods with a discussion of their application to perfect solids. Exemplifications in the case of a few selected problems provide further insight by the author into the physical aspects of the different methods and are a guide to the use of their mathematical techniques. A discussion is offered of completely a priori Hartree-Fock calculations and attempts to extend them. Special aspects of the different methods are also discussed in light of recently published related work

  12. [Better performance of Western blotting: quick vs slow protein transfer, blotting membranes and the visualization methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ling-Quan; Pu, Ying-Hui; Ma, Shi-Kun

    2008-01-01

    To study how the choices of the quick vs slow protein transfer, the blotting membranes and the visualization methods influence the performance of Western blotting. The cellular proteins were abstracted from human breast cell line MDA-MB-231 for analysis with Western blotting using quick (2 h) and slow (overnight) protein transfer, different blotting membranes (nitrocellulose, PVDF and nylon membranes) and different visualization methods (ECL and DAB). In Western blotting with slow and quick protein transfer, the prestained marker presented more distinct bands on nitrocellulose membrane than on the nylon and PVDF membranes, and the latter also showed clear bands on the back of the membrane to very likely cause confusion, which did not occur with nitrocellulose membrane. PVDF membrane allowed slightly clearer visualization of the proteins with DAB method as compared with nitrocellulose and nylon membranes, and on the latter two membranes, quick protein transfer was likely to result in somehow irregular bands in comparison with slow protein transfer. With slow protein transfer and chemiluminescence for visualization, all the 3 membranes showed clear background, while with quick protein transfer, nylon membrane gave rise to obvious background noise but the other two membranes did not. Different membranes should be selected for immunoblotting according to the actual needs of the experiment. Slow transfer of the proteins onto the membranes often has better effect than quick transfer, and enhanced chemiluminescence is superior to DAB for protein visualization and allows highly specific and sensitive analysis of the protein expressions.

  13. Proximal iliotibial band syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Guadagnini Falotico

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The overuse injuries in the hip joint occur commonly in sports practitioners and currently due to technical advances in diagnostic imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, are often misdiagnosed. Recently, a group of people were reported, all female, with pain and swelling in the pelvic region.T2-weighted MRI showed increased signal in the enthesis of the iliotibial band (ITB along the lower border of the iliac tubercle. We report a case of a 34 year old woman, non-professional runner, with pain at the iliac crest with no history of trauma and whose MRI was compatible with the proximal iliotibial band syndrome.

  14. Simplicial band depth for multivariate functional data

    KAUST Repository

    López-Pintado, Sara

    2014-03-05

    We propose notions of simplicial band depth for multivariate functional data that extend the univariate functional band depth. The proposed simplicial band depths provide simple and natural criteria to measure the centrality of a trajectory within a sample of curves. Based on these depths, a sample of multivariate curves can be ordered from the center outward and order statistics can be defined. Properties of the proposed depths, such as invariance and consistency, can be established. A simulation study shows the robustness of this new definition of depth and the advantages of using a multivariate depth versus the marginal depths for detecting outliers. Real data examples from growth curves and signature data are used to illustrate the performance and usefulness of the proposed depths. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  15. Kπ=0+ band moment of inertia anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, J.Y.; Wu, C.S.; Cheng, L.; Lin, C.Z.; China Center of Advanced Science and Technology

    1990-01-01

    The moments of inertia of K π =0 + bands in the well-deformed nuclei are calculated by a particle-number-conserving treatment for the cranked shell model. The very accurate solutions to the low-lying K π =0 + bands are obtained by making use of an effective K truncation. Calculations show that the main contribution to the moments of inertia comes from the nucleons in the intruding high-j orbits. Considering the fact that no free parameter is involved in the calculation and no extra inert core contribution is added, the agreement between the calculated and the observed moments of inertia of 0 + bands in 168 Er is very satisfactory

  16. A UWB Band-Pass Antenna with Triple-Notched Band Using Common Direction Rectangular Complementary Split-Ring Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel ultrawideband (UWB antenna which has a triple-band notch function is presented. The proposed antenna can block interfering signals from C-band satellite communication systems, IEEE802.11a, and HIPERLAN/2 WLAN systems for example. The antenna is excited by using novel common direction rectangular complementary split-ring resonators (CSRR fabricated on radiating patch of the dielectric substrate with coplanar waveguide (CPW feed strip line. The voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR of the proposed antenna is less than 2.0 in the frequency band from 2.8 to 12 GHz, while showing a very sharp band-rejection performance at 3.9 GHz, 5.2 GHz, and 5.9 GHz. The measurement results show that the proposed antenna provides good omnidirectional field pattern over its whole frequency band excluding the rejected band, which is suitable for UWB applications.

  17. Band connectivity for topological quantum chemistry: Band structures as a graph theory problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradlyn, Barry; Elcoro, L.; Vergniory, M. G.; Cano, Jennifer; Wang, Zhijun; Felser, C.; Aroyo, M. I.; Bernevig, B. Andrei

    2018-01-01

    The conventional theory of solids is well suited to describing band structures locally near isolated points in momentum space, but struggles to capture the full, global picture necessary for understanding topological phenomena. In part of a recent paper [B. Bradlyn et al., Nature (London) 547, 298 (2017), 10.1038/nature23268], we have introduced the way to overcome this difficulty by formulating the problem of sewing together many disconnected local k .p band structures across the Brillouin zone in terms of graph theory. In this paper, we give the details of our full theoretical construction. We show that crystal symmetries strongly constrain the allowed connectivities of energy bands, and we employ graph theoretic techniques such as graph connectivity to enumerate all the solutions to these constraints. The tools of graph theory allow us to identify disconnected groups of bands in these solutions, and so identify topologically distinct insulating phases.

  18. Protein Replacement Therapy Shows Promise in Treating Rare Skin Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ther. 2013 Jul:21(7):135-44. doi:10.1038/mt.2013.87. PMID:23670575. Intravenously Injected Recombinant ... Dermatol. 2013 Jul;133(7):1910-3. doi: 10.1038/jid.2013.10. PMID: 23321924. The mission of ...

  19. Coat protein sequence shows that Cucumber mosaic virus isolate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A viral disease was identified on geraniums (Pelargonium spp.) grown in a greenhouse at the Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology (IHBT), Palampur, exhibiting mild mottling and stunting. The causal virus (Cucumber mosaic virus, CMV) was identified and characterized on the basis of host range, aphid ...

  20. Coat protein sequence shows that Cucumber mosaic virus isolate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    crop is reported to be infecetd by a number of pests and dis- eases (Rao et al 2000) including a ... Plant Virus Lab, Floriculture Division, Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology, Palampur 176 061, India. *Corresponding author (Fax ..... ELISA test used in testing the plants (either mechanical- ly inoculated or naturally ...

  1. Coat protein sequence shows that Cucumber mosaic virus isolate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    A viral disease was identified on geraniums (Pelargonium spp.) grown in a greenhouse at the .... DNA was cloned in p-GEM Teasy vector (Promega, USA) as per the ... M. persicae and A. gossypii transmitted the virus in non persistent manner ...

  2. Genetic organization of interphase chromosome bands and interbands in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhimulev, Igor F; Zykova, Tatyana Yu; Goncharov, Fyodor P; Khoroshko, Varvara A; Demakova, Olga V; Semeshin, Valeriy F; Pokholkova, Galina V; Boldyreva, Lidiya V; Demidova, Darya S; Babenko, Vladimir N; Demakov, Sergey A; Belyaeva, Elena S

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster polytene chromosomes display specific banding pattern; the underlying genetic organization of this pattern has remained elusive for many years. In the present paper, we analyze 32 cytology-mapped polytene chromosome interbands. We estimated molecular locations of these interbands, described their molecular and genetic organization and demonstrate that polytene chromosome interbands contain the 5' ends of housekeeping genes. As a rule, interbands display preferential "head-to-head" orientation of genes. They are enriched for "broad" class promoters characteristic of housekeeping genes and associate with open chromatin proteins and Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) components. In two regions, 10A and 100B, coding sequences of genes whose 5'-ends reside in interbands map to constantly loosely compacted, early-replicating, so-called "grey" bands. Comparison of expression patterns of genes mapping to late-replicating dense bands vs genes whose promoter regions map to interbands shows that the former are generally tissue-specific, whereas the latter are represented by ubiquitously active genes. Analysis of RNA-seq data (modENCODE-FlyBase) indicates that transcripts from interband-mapping genes are present in most tissues and cell lines studied, across most developmental stages and upon various treatment conditions. We developed a special algorithm to computationally process protein localization data generated by the modENCODE project and show that Drosophila genome has about 5700 sites that demonstrate all the features shared by the interbands cytologically mapped to date.

  3. Genetic organization of interphase chromosome bands and interbands in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor F Zhimulev

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster polytene chromosomes display specific banding pattern; the underlying genetic organization of this pattern has remained elusive for many years. In the present paper, we analyze 32 cytology-mapped polytene chromosome interbands. We estimated molecular locations of these interbands, described their molecular and genetic organization and demonstrate that polytene chromosome interbands contain the 5' ends of housekeeping genes. As a rule, interbands display preferential "head-to-head" orientation of genes. They are enriched for "broad" class promoters characteristic of housekeeping genes and associate with open chromatin proteins and Origin Recognition Complex (ORC components. In two regions, 10A and 100B, coding sequences of genes whose 5'-ends reside in interbands map to constantly loosely compacted, early-replicating, so-called "grey" bands. Comparison of expression patterns of genes mapping to late-replicating dense bands vs genes whose promoter regions map to interbands shows that the former are generally tissue-specific, whereas the latter are represented by ubiquitously active genes. Analysis of RNA-seq data (modENCODE-FlyBase indicates that transcripts from interband-mapping genes are present in most tissues and cell lines studied, across most developmental stages and upon various treatment conditions. We developed a special algorithm to computationally process protein localization data generated by the modENCODE project and show that Drosophila genome has about 5700 sites that demonstrate all the features shared by the interbands cytologically mapped to date.

  4. What band rocks the MTB? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kind, J.; García-Rubio, I.; Gehring, A. U.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are a polyphyletic group of bacteria that have been found in marine and lacustrine environments and soils [e.g. 1]. The hallmark of MTB is their intracellular formation of magnetosomes, single-domain ferrimagnetic particles that are aligned in chains. The chain configuration generates a strong magnetic dipole, which is used as magnetic compass to move the MTB into their favorable habit. The term band corresponds to a frequency window of microwaves in the gigahertz (GHz) range. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectroscopy uses the microwave absorption in a magnetic field to analyze the anisotropy properties and the domain state of magnetic materials. Specific microwave frequency causes absorption in a characteristic magnetic field range. For the investigation of MTB we use S-band (4.02 GHz), X-band (9.47 GHz), and Q-band (34.16 GHz). Experiments on cultured MTB and on sediment samples of Holocene age showed that absorption in X- and Q-band occurs when the sample is in a saturated or nearly saturated state [2, 3]. By contrast, absorption in the S-band appears in lower magnetic fields, where the sample is far from saturation. All FMR spectra show two distinct low-field features that can be assigned to magnetite particles in chains, aligned parallel and perpendicular to the external magnetic field. The detailed separation of the parallel and perpendicular components in the bulk samples is hampered, because of the random orientation of the chains in the sample. The comparison of S-, X-, and Q-band shows that the lower the frequency the better the separation of the components. In the S-band FMR spectroscopy, the separation of chains parallel to the external magnetic field is supported by the internal field of the sample. This field is caused by the remanence that contributes to the external magnetic field to fulfill the resonance condition [3,4]. Considering the different FMR responses, it can be postulated that a lower microwave frequency

  5. Diffusion properties of band 3 in human erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Jeffrey O.

    The plasma membrane of the human erythrocyte (RBC) is a six fold symmetric network held together at various pinning points by several multi-protein complexes. This unique architecture is what gives the RBC its remarkable material properties and any disruptions to the network can have severe consequences for the cell. Band 3 is a major transmembrane protein that plays the role of linking the fluid lipid bilayer to the cytoskeletal network. To interrogate the structural integrity of the RBC membrane we have tracked individual band 3 molecules in RBCs displaying a variety of pathologies that are all a consequence of membrane or network related defects. These diseases are spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, and pyropokilocytosis. We have also investigated the protein related diseases sickle cell, and south east asian ovalocytosis. To assess the impact that the network has on the dynamic organization of the cell we have also studied the mobility of band 3 in RBC progenitor cells. Individual band 3 molecules were imaged at 120 frames/second and their diffusion coefficients and compartment sizes recorded. The distributions of the compartment sizes combined with the information about the short and long time diffusion of band 3 has given us insight into the architecture of the membrane in normal and diseased cells. The observation that different membrane pathologies can be distinguished, even to the point of different molecular origins of the same disease, implies that the mobility of transmembrane proteins may be a useful tool for characterizing the "health" of the membrane.

  6. New Kronig-Penney equation emphasizing the band edge conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szmulowicz, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The Kronig-Penney problem is a textbook example for discussing band dispersions and band gap formation in periodic layered media. For example, in photonic crystals, the behaviour of bands next to the band edges is important for further discussions of such effects as inhibited light emission, slow light and negative index of refraction. However, the standard Kronig-Penney equation does not explicitly state the band edge conditions. This paper derives a new solution for the Kronig-Penney problem that explicitly displays the band edge conditions as well as contains all other essential physics of band formation. Therefore, the present exposition should show the student that the band edge conditions are not simply special cases of the familiar Kronig-Penney equation but, instead, are an integral part of the band theory. For the computationally minded student, the new equation is particularly convenient for calculating the positions of closely spaced band edges. The present results can be taught alongside the Kronig-Penney equation in advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate quantum mechanics, solid state theory and photonics courses dealing with wave propagation through periodic layered media

  7. Extraction and characterization of proteins from banana (Musa Sapientum L) flower and evaluation of antimicrobial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitthiya, Kewalee; Devkota, Lavaraj; Sadiq, Muhammad Bilal; Anal, Anil Kumar

    2018-02-01

    Ultrasonic assisted alkaline extraction of protein from banana flower was optimized using response surface methodology. The extracted proteins were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and molecular weight distribution was determined by gel electrophoresis. The maximum protein yield of 252.25 mg/g was obtained under optimized extraction conditions: temperature 50 °C, 30 min extraction time and 1 M NaOH concentration. The alkaline extraction produced a significantly high protein yield compared to enzymatic extraction of banana flower. Chemical finger printing of proteins showed the presence of tyrosine, tryptophan and amide bonds in extracted protein. Alkaline and pepsin assisted extracted banana flower proteins showed characteristic bands at 40 and 10 kDA, respectively. The extracted proteins showed antibacterial effects against both gram positive and gram negative bacteria. The high protein content and antimicrobial activity indicate the potential applications of banana flower in the food and feed industry.

  8. Picosecond thermometer in the amide I band of myoglobin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, R.H.; Xie, A.; Meer, L. van der

    2005-01-01

    The amide I and II bands in myoglobin show a heterogeneous temperature dependence, with bands at 6.17 and 6.43 mu m which are more intense at low temperatures. The amide I band temperature dependence is on the long wavelength edge of the band, while the short wavelength side has almost...... can be used to determine the time it takes vibrational energy to flow into the hydration shell. We determine that vibrational energy flow to the hydration shell from the amide I takes approximately 20 ps to occur....

  9. Report from the banding lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tautin, J.

    1995-01-01

    Mr. Tautin reported on the seemingly everchanging structure of biological science units within the Interior Department. Current Congressional proposals would either change the name of the Bird Banding Lab's parent agency or make it part of the Geological Survey. The current Congress has not looked favorably on science budgets within the Interior Department, and the Banding Lab's budget is being squeezed ever tighter.

  10. Leaf Protein Electrophoresis and Taxonomy of Species of Jatropha L. (Euphorbiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaniran Temitope OLADIPO

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The systematic relationship existing among members of the all important genus Jatropha was studied using leaf protein electrophoresis. The aim was to identify possible taxonomic importance of the protein profile in the estimation and elucidation of the taxonomic affinity of the six species of Jatropha (Jatropha curcas Linn., J. podagrica Hook., J. gossypifolia Linn., J. mutifida Linn., J. tanjorensis Ellis & Saroja and J. integerrima Linn. found in Nigeria. The species were screened for total protein banding patterns using gel electrophoresis. Young leaves (0.8 g of the plants were washed with distilled water and macerated with sterile mortar and pestle in 0.8% Phosphate Buffer-Saline (PBS containing 0.4 M NaCl at pH 8.0. Results reveal that protein banding pattern was taxon specific. Generic band occurs at 8.3. The highest number of interspecific bands (4 exists between J. podagrica and J. multifida. Variations exist not only in the number of bands but also in the intensity of the bands. Sokal and Sneath coefficient of similarity ranges between 11.1-44.4 %. Single linkage Cluster Analysis (SLCA of the relative mobility values of the protein in the taxa shows partial agreement with current sub generic and sectional delimitation of the species based on morphology and anatomy of the species.

  11. Study of positive-parity yrast band in 83Rb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, S.; Banerjee, P.; Ray, I.; Kshetri, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Saha Sarkar, M.; Goswami, A.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R.P.; Kumar, R.; Bhowmik, R.K.

    2005-01-01

    The properties of the positive-parity yrast band in the odd-A 81,83,85 Rb (Z=37) isotopes show remarkable changes as N increases. The objective of the present work is to study the structure of the lowest positive-parity band in 83 Rb from lifetime studies

  12. Large area modules based on low band gap polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Eva; Krebs, Frederik C

    2010-01-01

    The use of three low band gap polymers in large area roll-to-roll coated modules is demonstrated. The polymers were prepared by a Stille cross coupling polymerization and all had a band gap around 1.6 eV. The polymers were first tested in small area organic photovoltaic devices which showed...

  13. Gastroscopic treatment of gastric band penetrating the gastric wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jess, Per; Fonnest, G

    1999-01-01

    Gastric wall penetration of a gastric band after operation for morbid obesity is a well known late complication. The treatment is usually reoperation. In this case report we show that a band penetrating the gastric wall can be successfully treated by gastroscopic operation. This technique is more...

  14. Deformation bands in porous carbonate grainstones: Field and laboratory observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cilona, A.; Baud, P.; Tondi, E.; Agosta, F.; Vinciguerra, S.; Rustichelli, A.; Spiers, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent field-based studies documented deformation bands in porous carbonates; these structures accommodate volumetric and/or shear strain by means of pore collapse, grain rotation and/or sliding. Microstructural observations of natural deformation bands in carbonates showed that, at advanced stages

  15. Transport in bilayer and trilayer graphene: band gap engineering and band structure tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Controlling the stacking order of atomically thin 2D materials offers a powerful tool to control their properties. Linearly dispersed bands become hyperbolic in Bernal (AB) stacked bilayer graphene (BLG). Both Bernal (ABA) and rhombohedral (ABC) stacking occur in trilayer graphene (TLG), producing distinct band structures and electronic properties. A symmetry-breaking electric field perpendicular to the sample plane can further modify the band structures of BLG and TLG. In this talk, I will describe our experimental effort in these directions using dual-gated devices. Using thin HfO2 film deposited by ALD as gate dielectric, we are able to apply large displacement fields D > 6 V/nm and observe the opening and saturation of the field-induced band gap Eg in bilayer and ABC-stacked trilayer graphene, where the conduction in the mid gap changes by more than six decades. Its field and temperature dependence highlights the crucial role played by Coulomb disorder in facilitating hopping conduction and suppressing the effect of Eg in the tens of meV regime. In contrast, mid-gap conduction decreases with increasing D much more rapidly in clean h-BN dual-gated devices. Our studies also show the evolution of the band structure in ABA-stacked TLG, in particular the splitting of the Dirac-like bands in large D field and the signatures of two-band transport at high carrier densities. Comparison to theory reveals the need for more sophisticated treatment of electronic screening beyond self-consistent Hartree calculations to accurately predict the band structures of trilayer graphene and graphenic materials in general.

  16. The proteins of the grape (Vitis vinifera L.) seed endosperm: fractionation and identification of the major components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzola, Diana; Vincenzi, Simone; Gastaldon, Luca; Tolin, Serena; Pasini, Gabriella; Curioni, Andrea

    2014-07-15

    In the present study, grape (Vitis vinifera L.) seed endosperm proteins were characterized after sequential fractionation, according to a modified Osborne procedure. The salt-soluble fraction (albumins and globulins) comprised the majority (58.4%) of the total extracted protein. The protein fractions analysed by SDS-PAGE showed similar bands, indicating different solubility of the same protein components. SDS-PAGE in non-reducing and reducing conditions revealed the polypeptide composition of the protein bands. The main polypeptides, which were similar in all the grape varieties analysed, were identified by LC-MS/MS as homologous to the 11S globulin-like seed storage proteins of other plant species, while a monomeric 43 kDa protein presented high homology with the 7S globulins of legume seeds. The results provide new insights about the identity, structure and polypeptide composition of the grape seed storage proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis on Protein Profile and Amino Acid of Edible Bird's Nest (Collocalia Fuchiphaga) From Painan

    OpenAIRE

    Elfita, Lina

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed to analyze protein profile and amino acid composition of bird nest from Painan, Pesisir Selatan Distric, West Sumatra. Protein analysis was performed by Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate Polyacrilamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), meanwhile High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) was used for analysis of amino acid. Analysis on water extract of bird nest by SDS-PAGE showed six bands which correspond to molecular protein which had molecular weight of 147.2; 142.6; 133.4; 73...

  18. Bioactive proteins from pipefishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Rethna Priya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To screen antimicrobial potence of some pipefish species collected from Tuticorin coastal environment. Methods: Antimicrobial activity of pipefishes in methanol extract was investigated against 10 bacterial and 10 fungal human pathogenic strains. Results: Among the tested strains, in Centriscus scutatus, pipefish showed maximum zone of inhibition against Vibrio cholerae (8 mm and minimum in the sample of Hippichthys cyanospilos against Klebseilla pneumoniae (2 mm. In positive control, maximum zone of inhibition was recorded in Vibrio cholerae (9 mm and minimum in Klebseilla pneumoniae, and Salmonella paratyphi (5 mm. Chemical investigation indicated the presence of peptides as evidenced by ninhydrin positive spots on thin layer chromatography and presence of peptide. In SDS PAGE, in Centriscus scutatus, four bands were detected in the gel that represented the presence of proteins in the range nearly 25.8-75 kDa. In Hippichthys cyanospilos, five bands were detected in the gel that represented the presence of proteins in the range nearly 20.5-78 kDa. The result of FT-IR spectrum revealed that the pipe fishes extracts compriseed to have peptide derivatives as their predominant chemical groups. Conclusions: It can be conclude that this present investigation suggests the tested pipe fishes will be a potential source of natural bioactive compounds.

  19. Bioactive proteins from pipefishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Rethna Priya

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To screen antimicrobial potence of some pipefish species collected from Tuticorin coastal environment. Methods: Antimicrobial activity of pipefishes in methanol extract was investigated against 10 bacterial and 10 fungal human pathogenic strains. Results: Among the tested strains, in Centriscus scutatus, pipefish showed maximum zone of inhibition against Vibrio cholerae (8 mm and minimum in the sample of Hippichthys cyanospilos against Klebseilla pneumoniae (2 mm. In positive control, maximum zone of inhibition was recorded in Vibrio cholerae (9 mm and minimum in Klebseilla pneumoniae, and Salmonella paratyphi (5 mm. Chemical investigation indicated the presence of peptides as evidenced by ninhydrin positive spots on thin layer chromatography and presence of peptide. In SDS PAGE, in Centriscus scutatus, four bands were detected in the gel that represented the presence of proteins in the range nearly 25.8-75 kDa. In Hippichthys cyanospilos, five bands were detected in the gel that represented the presence of proteins in the range nearly 20.5-78 kDa. The result of FT-IR spectrum revealed that the pipe fishes extracts compriseed to have peptide derivatives as their predominant chemical groups. Conclusions: It can be conclude that this present investigation suggests the tested pipe fishes will be a potential source of natural bioactive compounds.

  20. SINGLE-BAND, TRIPLE-BAND, OR MULTIPLE-BAND HUBBARD MODELS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ESKES, H; SAWATZKY, GA

    1991-01-01

    The relevance of different models, such as the one-band t-J model and the three-band Emery model, as a realistic description of the electronic structure of high-T(c) materials is discussed. Starting from a multiband approach using cluster calculations and an impurity approach, the following

  1. Electronic transport properties of Ti-impurity band in Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olea, J; Gonzalez-Diaz, G; Pastor, D; Martil, I [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada III (Electricidad y Electronica), Facultad de Ciencias, Fisicas, Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-04-21

    In this paper we show that pulsed laser melted high dose implantation of Ti in Si, above the Mott transition, produces an impurity band (IB) in this semiconductor. Using the van der Pauw method and Hall effect measurements we find strong laminated conductivity at the implanted layer and a temperature dependent decoupling between the Ti implanted layer (TIL) and the substrate. The conduction mechanism from the TIL to the substrate shows blocking characteristics that could be well explained through IB theory. Using the ATLAS code we can estimate the energetic position of the IB at 0.36 eV from the conduction band, the density of holes in this band which is closely related to the Ti atomic density and the hole mobility in this band. Band diagrams of the structure at low and high temperatures are also simulated in the ATLAS framework. The simulation obtained is fully coherent with experimental results.

  2. Electronic transport properties of Ti-impurity band in Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olea, J; Gonzalez-Diaz, G; Pastor, D; Martil, I

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we show that pulsed laser melted high dose implantation of Ti in Si, above the Mott transition, produces an impurity band (IB) in this semiconductor. Using the van der Pauw method and Hall effect measurements we find strong laminated conductivity at the implanted layer and a temperature dependent decoupling between the Ti implanted layer (TIL) and the substrate. The conduction mechanism from the TIL to the substrate shows blocking characteristics that could be well explained through IB theory. Using the ATLAS code we can estimate the energetic position of the IB at 0.36 eV from the conduction band, the density of holes in this band which is closely related to the Ti atomic density and the hole mobility in this band. Band diagrams of the structure at low and high temperatures are also simulated in the ATLAS framework. The simulation obtained is fully coherent with experimental results.

  3. Observations of banding in first-year Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, David M.; Eicken, Hajo; Frey, Karoline; Shapiro, Lewis H.

    2004-08-01

    Horizontal banding features, alternating dark and bright horizontal bands apparent in ice cores and stratigraphic cross sections have long been observed in first-year sea ice and are frequently associated with bands of high and low brine or gas porosity. Observations on the land-fast ice near Barrow, Alaska, in recent years have revealed particularly striking banding patterns and prompted a study of their macroscopic and microscopic characteristics. The banding patterns are quantified from photographs of full-depth sections of the ice, and examples are presented from the Chukchi Sea and Elson Lagoon. Statistics on band spacing are presented, and the growth records for three seasons are employed to estimate their time of formation. These data provide insight into the periodicity of the underlying phenomena. Micrographs are used to examine the microstructural variations associated with various banding features and to quantify the geometry of the constituent brine inclusions associated with high- and low-porosity bands. The micrography revealed that the area fraction of brine inclusions varied by a factor of nearly 3 through the more pronounced high- and low-porosity bands. Vertical micrographs obtained shortly after the materials' removal from the ice sheet showed that significantly larger inclusions form abruptly at the start of the high-porosity bands and frequently terminate abruptly at the end of the band. Crystallographic observations indicated that the high-porosity bands supported the nucleation and growth of crystals having substantially different orientations from the very well aligned columnar structure that characterized the bulk of the sheet.

  4. Risk Aversion in Game Shows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten I.

    2008-01-01

    We review the use of behavior from television game shows to infer risk attitudes. These shows provide evidence when contestants are making decisions over very large stakes, and in a replicated, structured way. Inferences are generally confounded by the subjective assessment of skill in some games......, and the dynamic nature of the task in most games. We consider the game shows Card Sharks, Jeopardy!, Lingo, and finally Deal Or No Deal. We provide a detailed case study of the analyses of Deal Or No Deal, since it is suitable for inference about risk attitudes and has attracted considerable attention....

  5. Measuring performance at trade shows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kåre

    2004-01-01

    Trade shows is an increasingly important marketing activity to many companies, but current measures of trade show performance do not adequately capture dimensions important to exhibitors. Based on the marketing literature's outcome and behavior-based control system taxonomy, a model is built...... that captures a outcome-based sales dimension and four behavior-based dimensions (i.e. information-gathering, relationship building, image building, and motivation activities). A 16-item instrument is developed for assessing exhibitors perceptions of their trade show performance. The paper presents evidence...

  6. Bands and chromosome arrangement in interphase nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, N.O.; Bianchi, M.A.; Matayoshi, T.

    1977-01-01

    Chromosomes from the vole mouse Akodon dolores and from laboratory mouse showed the presence of G-bands after 3 minutes digestion with trypsin and Giemsa stain. Simultaneously, 30- to 40% of the interphase nuclei exhibited a dark ring parallel to the nuclear contour and a radial array of the chromatin in the internal and external regions of the ring. The origin and meaning of this ring image was analyzed by combining progressive trypsinizations with other methods such as C-banding procedures, autoradiography with 3 HTdR, staining with quinacrine mustard and 33258 Hoechst fluorochromes. Moreover, the presence of the dark ring was also investigated in cells treated with actinomycin and in control cells not subjected to any treatment. The results obtained allowed to assume that in interphase nuclei the chromosomes have chromatin bridges which connect the dark G-bands and that these bridges are probably involved in maintaining an ordered architecture of the nucleus with fixed chromosome positions in regard to the nuclear envelope and in regard to other chromosomes. Trypsinization produces a disruption of the interphase chromatin arrangement and the subsequent appearance of a dark ring formed by the combination of constitutive heterochromatin and dark G-bands. (auth.)

  7. Electron band theory 1952-1962

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomer, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Work undertaken by the Theoretical Physics Division between 1952 and 1965 to obtain an understanding of electrons in metals, with uranium and the actinides and the structurally-important transition metals as the main targets is examined. A main result of that period was a conviction that the majority of the physical properties of all metals, except the 4f rare-earth series and the actinides beyond uranium, were dominated by band effects which could be described well enough for most purposes by simple one-electron calculations with simple self-consistent fields. The period from 1960 on showed increasingly clearly the necessity of incorporating relativistic spin-orbit coupling terms in the heavy metals, and some 'local exchange field' correction to the fields close to nuclei. The problems of the non-local interaction of spins - highly important for alloy theory and for antiferromagnetic instability -required the evolution of computers large enough to produce wave-functions at all wave-vectors for all bands so that the susceptibility at arbitrary wave-vector could be computed. This work has not proved to be very illuminating so far, and much interest again focusses today on heuristic arguments that give qualitative descriptions of band structures, such as canonical d-bands to account for crystal structure. (UK)

  8. Actinides, the narrowwest bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.L.; Riseborough, P.S.

    1984-01-01

    A table of elements is shown that demonstrates the crossover from superconductivity to magnetism as well as regions of mixed valence. In particular, the actinides must eventually show 4f-electron like mixed valence, after the 5f-electrons become localized. There also seems to be an adiabatic continuation between heavy fermion and mixed valence behavior

  9. Terra MODIS Band 27 Electronic Crosstalk Effect and Its Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junqiang; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Madhavan, Sriharsha; Wenny, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is one of the primary instruments in the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS). The first MODIS instrument was launched in December, 1999 on-board the Terra spacecraft. MODIS has 36 bands, covering a wavelength range from 0.4 micron to 14.4 micron. MODIS band 27 (6.72 micron) is a water vapor band, which is designed to be insensitive to Earth surface features. In recent Earth View (EV) images of Terra band 27, surface feature contamination is clearly seen and striping has become very pronounced. In this paper, it is shown that band 27 is impacted by electronic crosstalk from bands 28-30. An algorithm using a linear approximation is developed to correct the crosstalk effect. The crosstalk coefficients are derived from Terra MODIS lunar observations. They show that the crosstalk is strongly detector dependent and the crosstalk pattern has changed dramatically since launch. The crosstalk contributions are positive to the instrument response of band 27 early in the mission but became negative and much larger in magnitude at later stages of the mission for most detectors of the band. The algorithm is applied to both Black Body (BB) calibration and MODIS L1B products. With the crosstalk effect removed, the calibration coefficients of Terra MODIS band 27 derived from the BB show that the detector differences become smaller. With the algorithm applied to MODIS L1B products, the Earth surface features are significantly removed and the striping is substantially reduced in the images of the band. The approach developed in this report for removal of the electronic crosstalk effect can be applied to other MODIS bands if similar crosstalk behaviors occur.

  10. The Cutoff Level for Urine Protein in Urine Immunofixation Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellidag, Hamit Yasar; Curek, Gulten; Eren, Esin; Aydin, Ozgur; Yilmaz, Necat

    2015-01-01

    Immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) maintains its importance in diagnosing monoclonal gammopathies. In particular, urine IFE detects free light chains (FLC) in urine samples even at low concentrations and offers higher sensitivity compared to serum electrophoresis and serum IFE. The aim of the present study was to determine the place and significance of quantitative urinary protein measurement before IFE in interpreting the results of subsequent IFE and to determine the most appropriate protein concentrations for the appearance of bands. The records of a total of 600 patients, who underwent screening for Bence Jones proteinuria using IFE on 24-hour urine, were retrospectively reviewed. Urine IFE was performed using Helena SAS-I and SAS-I devices. The total protein concentration in the urine was quantitatively determined by the Pyrogallol red method, and the urine albumin level was determined using the immunoturbidimetric method. These analyses were measured on an Olympus/Beckmann AU5800. The evaluation of IFE results revealed that 311 patients had normal results, 108 patients had monoclonal bands, five patients had biclonal bands, 28 had polyclonal bands, and 148 patients had various degrees of proteinuria. ROC curves were created in order to determine the most appropriate urinary protein and albumin levels to observe bands in IFE. Accordingly, urine baseline protein level (mg/dL) showed the highest AUC value (cutoff value: 19.4 mg/dL, sensitivity: 92%, specificity: 98.2%, AUC: 0.972). The present study showed that quantitative protein measurement before IFE eliminated the disadvantages associated with the IFE method and its interpretation.

  11. The 3 micron ice band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, J.M.; Bult, C.E.P.M. van de

    1984-01-01

    Ever since it was proposed that H 2 O could be a dominant constituent of interstellar grains, its detection, or lack thereof, has played a large role in theories of grains and their evolution. It now appears possible to provide a basic theoretical structure for the evolution of grains in molecular clouds based on current observational evidence and laboratory experiments on the ice band. Both band strengths and shapes can be reasonably predicted by grain models. (U.K.)

  12. Superdeformed bands in 130Ce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, E.S.; Semple, A.T.; Boston, A.J.; Joss, D.T.; Nolan, P.J.; Shepherd, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    Four superdeformed bands have been assigned to 130 Ce following a high-statistics γ-ray study using the EUROGAM II spectrometer. The strongest band exhibits two distinct backbends which, in one scenario, may be interpreted as crossings between high-j N = 6 neutron orbitals (νi 13/2 ) and low-j N = 4 orbitals (νd 3/2 ) in an unpaired system. (author)

  13. Dipole Bands in 196Hg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrie, J. J.; Lawrie, E. A.; Newman, R. T.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Smit, F. D.; Msezane, B.; Benatar, M.; Mabala, G. K.; Mutshena, K. P.; Federke, M.; Mullins, S. M.; Ncapayi, N. J.; Vymers, P.

    2011-01-01

    High spin states in 196 Hg have been populated in the 198 Pt(α,6n) reaction at 65 MeV and the level scheme has been extended. A new dipole band has been observed and a previously observed dipole has been confirmed. Excitation energies, spins and parities of these bands were determined from DCO ratio and linear polarization measurements. Possible quasiparticle excitations responsible for these structures are discussed.

  14. Identifying chiral bands in real nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirinda, O.; Lawrie, E.A.

    2012-01-01

    The application of the presently used fingerprints of chiral bands (originally derived for strongly broken chirality) is investigated for real chiral systems. In particular the chiral fingerprints concerning the B(M1) staggering patterns and the energy staggering are studied. It is found that both fingerprints show considerable changes for real chiral systems, a behaviour that creates a significant risk for misinterpretation of the experimental data and can lead to a failure to identify real chiral systems. (orig.)

  15. Retrospective biodosimetry with small tooth enamel samples using K-Band and X-Band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Jorge A.; Kinoshita, Angela; Leonor, Sergio J.; Belmonte, Gustavo C.; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2011-01-01

    In an attempt to make the in vitro electron spin resonance (ESR) retrospective dosimetry of the tooth enamel a lesser invasive method, experiments using X-Band and K-Band were performed, aiming to determine conditions that could be used in cases of accidental exposures. First, a small prism from the enamel was removed and ground with an agate mortar and pestle until particles reach a diameter of approximately less than 0.5 mm. This enamel extraction process resulted in lower signal artifact compared with the direct enamel extraction performed with a diamond burr abrasion. The manual grinding of the enamel does not lead to any induced ESR signal artifact, whereas the use of a diamond burr at low speed produces a signal artifact equivalent to the dosimetric signal induced by a dose of 500 mGy of gamma irradiation. A mass of 25 mg of enamel was removed from a sound molar tooth previously irradiated in vitro with a dose of 100 mGy. This amount of enamel was enough to detect the dosimetric signal in a standard X-Band spectrometer. However using a K-Band spectrometer, samples mass between 5 and 10 mg were sufficient to obtain the same sensitivity. An overall evaluation of the uncertainties involved in the process in this and other dosimetric assessments performed at our laboratory indicates that it is possible at K-Band to estimate a 100 mGy dose with 25% accuracy. In addition, the use of K-Band also presented higher sensitivity and allowed the use of smaller sample mass in comparison with X-Band. Finally, the restoration process performed on a tooth after extraction of the 25 mg of enamel is described. This was conducted by dental treatment using photopolymerizable resin which enabled complete recovery of the tooth from the functional and aesthetic viewpoint showing that this procedure can be minimally invasive.

  16. Retrospective biodosimetry with small tooth enamel samples using K-Band and X-Band

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Jorge A. [Departamento de Fisica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Kinoshita, Angela [Departamento de Fisica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Universidade Sagrado Coracao - USC, 17011-160 Bauru, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Leonor, Sergio J. [Departamento de Fisica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Belmonte, Gustavo C. [Universidade Sagrado Coracao - USC, 17011-160 Bauru, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Baffa, Oswaldo, E-mail: baffa@usp.br [Departamento de Fisica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    In an attempt to make the in vitro electron spin resonance (ESR) retrospective dosimetry of the tooth enamel a lesser invasive method, experiments using X-Band and K-Band were performed, aiming to determine conditions that could be used in cases of accidental exposures. First, a small prism from the enamel was removed and ground with an agate mortar and pestle until particles reach a diameter of approximately less than 0.5 mm. This enamel extraction process resulted in lower signal artifact compared with the direct enamel extraction performed with a diamond burr abrasion. The manual grinding of the enamel does not lead to any induced ESR signal artifact, whereas the use of a diamond burr at low speed produces a signal artifact equivalent to the dosimetric signal induced by a dose of 500 mGy of gamma irradiation. A mass of 25 mg of enamel was removed from a sound molar tooth previously irradiated in vitro with a dose of 100 mGy. This amount of enamel was enough to detect the dosimetric signal in a standard X-Band spectrometer. However using a K-Band spectrometer, samples mass between 5 and 10 mg were sufficient to obtain the same sensitivity. An overall evaluation of the uncertainties involved in the process in this and other dosimetric assessments performed at our laboratory indicates that it is possible at K-Band to estimate a 100 mGy dose with 25% accuracy. In addition, the use of K-Band also presented higher sensitivity and allowed the use of smaller sample mass in comparison with X-Band. Finally, the restoration process performed on a tooth after extraction of the 25 mg of enamel is described. This was conducted by dental treatment using photopolymerizable resin which enabled complete recovery of the tooth from the functional and aesthetic viewpoint showing that this procedure can be minimally invasive.

  17. Tokyo Motor Show 2003; Tokyo Motor Show 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joly, E.

    2004-01-01

    The text which follows present the different techniques exposed during the 37. Tokyo Motor Show. The report points out the great tendencies of developments of the Japanese automobile industry. The hybrid electric-powered vehicles or those equipped with fuel cells have been highlighted by the Japanese manufacturers which allow considerable budgets in the research of less polluting vehicles. The exposed models, although being all different according to the manufacturer, use always a hybrid system: fuel cell/battery. The manufacturers have stressed too on the intelligent systems for navigation and safety as well as on the design and comfort. (O.M.)

  18. Metabolic behavior of cell surface biotinylated proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hare, J.F.; Lee, E.

    1989-01-01

    The turnover of proteins on the surface of cultured mammalian cells was measured by a new approach. Reactive free amino or sulfhydryl groups on surface-accessible proteins were derivatized with biotinyl reagents and the proteins solubilized from culture dishes with detergent. Solubilized, biotinylated proteins were then adsorbed onto streptavidin-agarose, released with sodium dodecyl sulfate and mercaptoethanol, and separated on polyacrylamide gels. Biotin-epsilon-aminocaproic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (BNHS) or N-biotinoyl-N'-(maleimidohexanoyl)hydrazine (BM) were the derivatizing agents. Only 10-12 bands were adsorbed onto streptavidin-agarose from undervatized cells or from derivatized cells treated with free avidin at 4 degrees C. Two-dimensional isoelectric focusing-sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis resolved greater than 100 BNHS-derivatized proteins and greater than 40 BM-derivatized proteins. There appeared to be little overlap between the two groups of derivatized proteins. Short-term pulse-chase studies showed an accumulation of label into both groups of biotinylated proteins up until 1-2 h of chase and a rapid decrease over the next 1-5 h. Delayed appearance of labeled protein at the cell surface was attributed to transit time from site of synthesis. The unexpected and unexplained rapid disappearance of pulse-labeled proteins from the cell surface was invariant for all two-dimensionally resolved proteins and was sensitive to temperature reduction to 18 degrees C. Long-term pulse-chase experiments beginning 4-8 h after the initiation of chase showed the disappearance of derivatized proteins to be a simple first-order process having a half-life of 115 h in the case of BNHS-derivatized proteins and 30 h in the case of BM-derivatized proteins

  19. Building blocks of topological quantum chemistry: Elementary band representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Jennifer; Bradlyn, Barry; Wang, Zhijun; Elcoro, L.; Vergniory, M. G.; Felser, C.; Aroyo, M. I.; Bernevig, B. Andrei

    2018-01-01

    The link between chemical orbitals described by local degrees of freedom and band theory, which is defined in momentum space, was proposed by Zak several decades ago for spinless systems with and without time reversal in his theory of "elementary" band representations. In a recent paper [Bradlyn et al., Nature (London) 547, 298 (2017), 10.1038/nature23268] we introduced the generalization of this theory to the experimentally relevant situation of spin-orbit coupled systems with time-reversal symmetry and proved that all bands that do not transform as band representations are topological. Here we give the full details of this construction. We prove that elementary band representations are either connected as bands in the Brillouin zone and are described by localized Wannier orbitals respecting the symmetries of the lattice (including time reversal when applicable), or, if disconnected, describe topological insulators. We then show how to generate a band representation from a particular Wyckoff position and determine which Wyckoff positions generate elementary band representations for all space groups. This theory applies to spinful and spinless systems, in all dimensions, with and without time reversal. We introduce a homotopic notion of equivalence and show that it results in a finer classification of topological phases than approaches based only on the symmetry of wave functions at special points in the Brillouin zone. Utilizing a mapping of the band connectivity into a graph theory problem, we show in companion papers which Wyckoff positions can generate disconnected elementary band representations, furnishing a natural avenue for a systematic materials search.

  20. Hydroxychloroquine binding to cytoplasmic domain of Band 3 in human erythrocytes: Novel mechanistic insights into drug structure, efficacy and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Mizuki; Sugawara, Kotomi; Goto, Tatsufumi; Wakui, Hideki; Nunomura, Wataru

    2016-05-13

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is a widely used drug in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, such as arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. It has also been prescribed for the treatment of malaria owing to its lower toxicity compared to its closely related compound chloroquine (CQ). However, the mechanisms of action of HCQ in erythrocytes (which bind preferentially this drug) have not been documented and the reasons underlying the lower side effects of HCQ compared to CQ remain unclear. Here we show that, although the activity of erythrocyte lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), but not GAPDH, was inhibited by both HCQ and CQ in vitro, LDH activity in erythrocytes incubated with 20 mM HCQ was not significantly reduced within 5 h in contrast to CQ did. Using HCQ coupled Sepharose chromatography (HCQ-Sepharose), we identified Band 3, spectrin, ankyrin, protein 4.1R and protein 4.2 as HCQ binding proteins in human erythrocyte plasma membrane. Recombinant cytoplasmic N-terminal 43 kDa domain of Band 3 bound to HCQ-Sepharose and was eluted with 40 mM (but not 20 mM) HCQ. Band 3 transport activity was reduced by only 23% in the presence of 20 mM HCQ. Taken together, these data demonstrate that HCQ binds to the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain of Band 3 in human erythrocytes but does not inhibit dramatically its transport activity. We hypothesize that the trapping of HCQ on Band 3 contributes to the lower side effects of the drug on energy production in erythrocytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Reality show: um paradoxo nietzschiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Feldman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    O fenômeno dos reality shows - e a subseqüente relação entre imagem e verdade - assenta-se sobre uma série de paradoxos. Tais paradoxos podem ser compreendidos à luz do pensamento do filósofo alemão Friedrich Nietzsche, que, através dos usos de formulações paradoxais, concebia a realidade como um mundo de pura aparência e a verdade como um acréscimo ficcional, como um efeito. A ficção é então tomada, na filosofia de Nietzsche, não em seu aspecto falsificante e desrealizador - como sempre pleiteou nossa tradição metafísica -, mas como condição necessária para que certa espécie de invenção possa operar como verdade. Sendo assim, a própria expressão reality show, através de sua formulação paradoxal, engendra explicitamente um mundo de pura aparência, em que a verdade, a parte reality da proposição, é da ordem do suplemento, daquilo que se acrescenta ficcionalmente - como um adjetivo - a show. O ornamento, nesse caso, passa a ocupar o lugar central, apontando para o efeito produzido: o efeito-de-verdade. Seguindo, então, o pensamento nietzschiano e sua atualização na contemporaneidade, investigaremos de que forma os televisivos “shows de realidade” operam paradoxalmente, em consonância com nossas paradoxais práticas culturais.

  2. Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation during uptake by HeLa cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkelund, Svend; Johnsen, H; Christiansen, Gunna

    1994-01-01

    . By use of a monoclonal antibody against phosphotyrosine, we showed that three classes of proteins are tyrosine phosphorylated: a triple band of 68, 66, and 64 kDa, a 97-kDa band, and a 140-kDa band. The phosphorylation could be detected by immunoblotting from 15 min after infection of HeLa cells. We...... inactive. Attachment of EBs to host cells is medicated by a heparan sulfate-like glycosaminoglycan. Following attachment, the EB is internalized within a membrane-bound vesicle, and during the first 8 h of infection the vesicles are transported to a perinuclear location where they aggregate and fuse...

  3. Band-selective filter in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Kurihara, Susumu

    2009-02-13

    Electric transport of a zigzag graphene nanoribbon through a steplike potential and a barrier potential is investigated by using the recursive Green's function method. In the case of the steplike potential, we demonstrate numerically that scattering processes obey a selection rule for the band indices when the number of zigzag chains is even; the electrons belonging to the "even" ("odd") bands are scattered only into the even (odd) bands so that the parity of the wave functions is preserved. In the case of the barrier potential, by tuning the barrier height to be an appropriate value, we show that it can work as the "band-selective filter", which transmits electrons selectively with respect to the indices of the bands to which the incident electrons belong. Finally, we suggest that this selection rule can be observed in the conductance by applying two barrier potentials.

  4. Band structures in Sierpinski triangle fractal porous phononic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Ying; Liang, Tianshu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the band structures in Sierpinski triangle fractal porous phononic crystals (FPPCs) are studied with the aim to clarify the effect of fractal hierarchy on the band structures. Firstly, one kind of FPPCs based on Sierpinski triangle routine is proposed. Then the influence of the porosity on the elastic wave dispersion in Sierpinski triangle FPPCs is investigated. The sensitivity of the band structures to the fractal hierarchy is discussed in detail. The results show that the increase of the hierarchy increases the sensitivity of ABG (Absolute band gap) central frequency to the porosity. But further increase of the fractal hierarchy weakens this sensitivity. On the same hierarchy, wider ABGs could be opened in Sierpinski equilateral triangle FPPC; whilst, a lower ABG could be opened at lower porosity in Sierpinski right-angled isosceles FPPCs. These results will provide a meaningful guidance in tuning band structures in porous phononic crystals by fractal design.

  5. Band structures in Sierpinski triangle fractal porous phononic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Ying, E-mail: yliu5@bjtu.edu.cn; Liang, Tianshu

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the band structures in Sierpinski triangle fractal porous phononic crystals (FPPCs) are studied with the aim to clarify the effect of fractal hierarchy on the band structures. Firstly, one kind of FPPCs based on Sierpinski triangle routine is proposed. Then the influence of the porosity on the elastic wave dispersion in Sierpinski triangle FPPCs is investigated. The sensitivity of the band structures to the fractal hierarchy is discussed in detail. The results show that the increase of the hierarchy increases the sensitivity of ABG (Absolute band gap) central frequency to the porosity. But further increase of the fractal hierarchy weakens this sensitivity. On the same hierarchy, wider ABGs could be opened in Sierpinski equilateral triangle FPPC; whilst, a lower ABG could be opened at lower porosity in Sierpinski right-angled isosceles FPPCs. These results will provide a meaningful guidance in tuning band structures in porous phononic crystals by fractal design.

  6. Tunable band structures in digital oxides with layered crystal habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yongjin; Rondinelli, James M.

    2017-11-01

    We use density functional calculations to show that heterovalent cation-order sequences enable control over band-gap variations up to several eV and band-gap closure in the bulk band insulator LaSrAlO4. The band-gap control originates from the internal electric fields induced by the digital chemical order, which induces picoscale band bending; the electric-field magnitude is mainly governed by the inequivalent charged monoxide layers afforded by the layered crystal habit. Charge transfer and ionic relaxations across these layers play secondary roles. This understanding is used to construct and validate a descriptor that captures the layer-charge variation and to predict changes in the electronic gap in layered oxides exhibiting antisite defects and in other chemistries.

  7. Drosophila polytene chromosome bands formed by gene introns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhimulev, I F; Boldyreva, L V; Demakova, O V; Poholkova, G V; Khoroshko, V A; Zykova, T Yu; Lavrov, S A; Belyaeva, E S

    2016-01-01

    Genetic organization of bands and interbands in polytene chromosomes has long remained a puzzle for geneticists. It has been recently demonstrated that interbands typically correspond to the 5'-ends of house-keeping genes, whereas adjacent loose bands tend to be composed of coding sequences of the genes. In the present work, we made one important step further and mapped two large introns of ubiquitously active genes on the polytene chromosome map. We show that alternative promoter regions of these genes map to interbands, whereas introns and coding sequences found between those promoters correspond to loose grey bands. Thus, a gene having its long intron "sandwiched" between to alternative promoters and a common coding sequence may occupy two interbands and one band in the context of polytene chromosomes. Loose, partially decompacted bands appear to host large introns.

  8. Vibrational spectroscopy of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwaighofer, A.

    2013-01-01

    Two important steps for the development of a biosensor are the immobilization of the biological component (e.g. protein) on a surface and the enhancement of the signal to improve the sensitivity of detection. To address these subjects, the present work describes Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) investigations of several proteins bound to the surface of an attenuated total reflection (ATR) crystal. Furthermore, new nanostructured surfaces for signal enhancement were developed for use in FTIR microscopy. The mitochondrial redox-protein cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) was incorporated into a protein-tethered bilayer lipid membrane (ptBLM) on an ATR crystal featuring a roughened two-layer gold surface for signal enhancement. Electrochemical excitation by periodic potential pulses at different modulation frequencies was followed by time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy. Phase sensitive detection was used for deconvolution of the IR spectra into vibrational components. A model based on protonation-dependent chemical reaction kinetics could be fitted to the time evolution of IR bands attributed to several different redox centers of the CcO. Further investigations involved the odorant binding protein 14 (OBP14) of the honey bee (Apis mellifera), which was studied using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and circular dichroism. OBP14 was found to be thermally stable up to 45 °C, thus permitting the potential application of this protein for the fabrication of biosensors. Thermal denaturation measurements showed that odorant binding increases the thermal stability of the OBP-odorant complex. In another project, plasmonic nanostructures were fabricated that enhance the absorbance in FTIR microscopy measurements. The nanostructures are composed of an array of round-shaped insulator and gold discs on top of a continuous gold layer. Enhancement factors of up to ⁓125 could be observed with self-assembled monolayers of dodecanethiol molecules immobilized on the gold surface (author) [de

  9. Single-Band and Dual-Band Infrared Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor); Nguyen, Jean (Inventor); Khoshakhlagh, Arezou (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Bias-switchable dual-band infrared detectors and methods of manufacturing such detectors are provided. The infrared detectors are based on a back-to-back heterojunction diode design, where the detector structure consists of, sequentially, a top contact layer, a unipolar hole barrier layer, an absorber layer, a unipolar electron barrier, a second absorber, a second unipolar hole barrier, and a bottom contact layer. In addition, by substantially reducing the width of one of the absorber layers, a single-band infrared detector can also be formed.

  10. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, Declan T; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Mattick, Rye Cr; Hickman, Joy; Mandall, Nicky A

    2016-10-25

    Orthodontic treatment involves using fixed or removable appliances (dental braces) to correct the positions of teeth. It has been shown that the quality of treatment result obtained with fixed appliances is much better than with removable appliances. Fixed appliances are, therefore, favoured by most orthodontists for treatment. The success of a fixed orthodontic appliance depends on the metal attachments (brackets and bands) being attached securely to the teeth so that they do not become loose during treatment. Brackets are usually attached to the front and side teeth, whereas bands (metal rings that go round the teeth) are more commonly used on the back teeth (molars). A number of adhesives are available to attach bands to teeth and it is important to understand which group of adhesives bond most reliably, as well as reducing or preventing dental decay during the treatment period. To evaluate the effectiveness of the adhesives used to attach bands to teeth during fixed appliance treatment, in terms of:(1) how often the bands come off during treatment; and(2) whether they protect the banded teeth against decay during fixed appliance treatment. The following electronic databases were searched: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (searched 2 June 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 5) in the Cochrane Library (searched 2 June 2016), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 2 June 2016) and EMBASE Ovid (1980 to 2 June 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised and controlled clinical trials (RCTs and CCTs) (including split-mouth studies) of adhesives used to attach orthodontic bands to molar teeth were selected. Patients with full arch fixed orthodontic appliance(s) who had bands attached to molars were included. All review authors

  11. Blue Emission in Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, Sohini; Sengupta, Abhigyan; Hazra, Partha; Mandal, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Recent literatures reported blue-green emission from amyloid fibril as exclusive signature of fibril formation. This unusual visible luminescence is regularly used to monitor fibril growth. Blue-green emission has also been observed in crystalline protein and in solution. However, the origin of this emission is not known exactly. Our spectroscopic study of serum proteins reveals that the blue-green emission is a property of protein monomer. Evidences suggest that semiconductor-like band struc...

  12. Band Gap Engineering of Titania Systems Purposed for Photocatalytic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Cameron

    Ab initio computer aided design drastically increases candidate population for highly specified material discovery and selection. These simulations, carried out through a first-principles computational approach, accurately extrapolate material properties and behavior. Titanium Dioxide (TiO2 ) is one such material that stands to gain a great deal from the use of these simulations. In its anatase form, titania (TiO2 ) has been found to exhibit a band gap nearing 3.2 eV. If titania is to become a viable alternative to other contemporary photoactive materials exhibiting band gaps better suited for the solar spectrum, then the band gap must be subsequently reduced. To lower the energy needed for electronic excitation, both transition metals and non-metals have been extensively researched and are currently viable candidates for the continued reduction of titania's band gap. The introduction of multicomponent atomic doping introduces new energy bands which tend to both reduce the band gap and recombination loss. Ta-N, Nb-N, V-N, Cr-N, Mo-N, and W-N substitutions were studied in titania and subsequent energy and band gap calculations show a favorable band gap reduction in the case of passivated systems.

  13. Construct and Concurrent Validation of a New Resistance Intensity Scale for Exercise with Thera-Band® Elastic Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Colado, Xavier Garcia-Masso, N. Travis Triplett, Joaquin Calatayud, Jorge Flandez, David Behm, Michael E. Rogers

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The construct and concurrent validity of the Thera-Band Perceived Exertion Scale for Resistance Exercise with elastic bands (EB was examined. Twenty subjects performed two separate sets of 15 repetitions of both frontal and lateral raise exercise over two sessions. The criterion variables were myoelectric activity and heart rate. One set was performed with an elastic band grip width that permitted 15 maximum repetitions in the selected exercise, and another set was performed with a grip width 50% more than the 15RM grip. Following the final repetition of each set, active muscle (AM and overall body (O ratings of perceived exertion (RPE were collected from the Thera-Band® resistance exercise scale and the OMNI-Resistance Exercise Scale of perceived exertion with Thera-Band® resistance bands (OMNI-RES EB. Construct validity was established by correlating the RPE from the OMNI-RES EB with the Thera-Band RPE scale using regression analysis. The results showed significant differences (p ≤ 0.05 in myoelectric activity, heart rate, and RPE scores between the low- and high-intensity sets. The intraclass correlation coefficient for active muscles and overall RPE scale scores was 0.67 and 0.58, respectively. There was a positive linear relationship between the RPE from the OMNI-RES EB and the Thera-Band scale. Validity coefficients for the RPE AM were r2 = 0.87 and ranged from r2 = 0.76 to 0.85 for the RPE O. Therefore, the Thera-Band Perceived Exertion Scale for Resistance Exercise can be used for monitoring elastic band exercise intensity. This would allow the training dosage to be better controlled within and between sessions. Moreover, the construct and concurrent validity indicates that the OMNI-RES EB measures similar properties of exertion as the Thera-Band RPE scale during elastic resistance exercise.

  14. The potency of STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) 3 protein as growth promoter for chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma'ruf, Anwar; Iswati, Sri; Hidajati, Nove; Damayanti, Ratna

    2017-09-01

    The long-term objective of this study was to produce STAT synthetic protein in chicken during growth period resulting from the increase of growth hormone (GH) as growth promoter. This study used ten male chicken Lohman from PT. Multibreeder Indonesia. The chicken were kept within batteried cage, with a capacity of one chicken in each cage. The chickens were fed twice a day, at 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. with the amount of feed 10% less than standard. On day 21 the chicken were slaughtered to obtain the samples, i.e., adipose, liver and muscles for the following examinations (1) isolation of STAT-3 signaling protein from adipose, liver and muscles of the chicken, (2) analysis of STAT-3 signaling protein using SDS-PAGE method, and (3) identification of STAT-3 signaling protein using Western blot method by means of protein detection using electrophoresis with polyacrylamide gels. Results of examination on protein in hepatic, muscle and adipose of chickens in growth period revealed that STAT protein was positively present in those tissues. This finding was followed-up with SDS-PAGE examination, from which we found the presence of protein band between the markers of 116 kDa and 14.4 kDa. The protein band was supposedly the STAT-3 protein. To prove that protein band formed was the STAT-3, Western blot examination was conducted using rabbit polyclonal antibody STAT-3. The result showed the formation of the protein band, indicating the presence of reaction between antigen (STAT-3 protein) and STAT-3 protein antibody. In conclusion, STAT-3 protein is present in hepatic, muscular, and adipose tissues, with molecular weight of 59.4 kDa.

  15. Identification of an intracellular protein that specifically interacts with photoaffinity-labeled oncogenic p21 protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, G.; Ronai, Z.A.; Pincus, M.R.; Brandt-Rauf, P.W.; Weinstein, I.B.; Murphy, R.B.; Delohery, T.M.; Nishimura, S.; Yamaizumi, Z.

    1989-01-01

    An oncogenic 21-kDa (p21) protein (Harvey RAS protein with Val-12) has been covalently modified with a functional reagent that contains a photoactivatable aromatic azide group. This modified p21 protein has been introduced quantitatively into NIH 3T3 cells using an erythrocyte-mediated fusion technique. The introduced p21 protein was capable of inducing enhanced pinocytosis and DNA synthesis in the recipient cells. To identify the putative intracellular protein(s) that specifically interact with modified p21 protein, the cells were pulsed with [ 35 S]methionine at selected times after fusion and then UV-irradiated to activate the azide group. The resulting nitrene covalently binds to amino acid residues in adjacent proteins, thus linking the p21 protein to these proteins. The cells were then lysed, and the lysate was immunoprecipitated with the anti-p21 monoclonal antibody Y13-259. The immunoprecipitate was analyzed by SDS/PAGE to identify p21 - protein complexes. By using this technique, the authors found that three protein complexes of 51, 64, and 82 kDa were labeled specifically and reproducibly. The most prominent band is the 64-kDa protein complex that shows a time-dependent rise and fall, peaking within a 5-hr period after introduction of the p21 protein the cells. These studies provide evidence that in vitro the p21 protein becomes associated with a protein whose mass is about 43 kDa. They suggest that the formation of this complex may play a role in mediating early events involved with cell transformation induced by RAS oncogenes

  16. Identification of an intracellular protein that specifically interacts with photoaffinity-labeled oncogenic p21 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, G; Ronai, Z A; Pincus, M R; Brandt-Rauf, P W; Murphy, R B; Delohery, T M; Nishimura, S; Yamaizumi, Z; Weinstein, I B

    1989-11-01

    An oncogenic 21-kDa (p21) protein (Harvey RAS protein with Val-12) has been covalently modified with a functional reagent that contains a photoactivatable aromatic azide group. This modified p21 protein has been introduced quantitatively into NIH 3T3 cells using an erythrocyte-mediated fusion technique. The introduced p21 protein was capable of inducing enhanced pinocytosis and DNA synthesis in the recipient cells. To identify the putative intracellular protein(s) that specifically interact with the modified p21 protein, the cells were pulsed with [35S]methionine at selected times after fusion and then UV-irradiated to activate the azide group. The resulting nitrene covalently binds to amino acid residues in adjacent proteins, thus linking the p21 protein to these proteins. The cells were then lysed, and the lysate was immunoprecipitated with the anti-p21 monoclonal antibody Y13-259. The immunoprecipitate was analyzed by SDS/PAGE to identify p21-protein complexes. By using this technique, we found that three protein complexes of 51, 64, and 82 kDa were labeled specifically and reproducibly. The most prominent band is the 64-kDa protein complex that shows a time-dependent rise and fall, peaking within a 5-hr period after introduction of the p21 protein into the cells. These studies provide evidence that in vitro the p21 protein becomes associated with a protein whose mass is about 43 kDa. We suggest that the formation of this complex may play a role in mediating early events involved with cell transformation induced by RAS oncogenes.

  17. Band gap effects of hexagonal boron nitride using oxygen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevak Singh, Ram; Leong Chow, Wai [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Yingjie Tay, Roland [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Temasek Laboratories-NTU, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Hon Tsang, Siu [Temasek Laboratories-NTU, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Mallick, Govind [Temasek Laboratories-NTU, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 (United States); Tong Teo, Edwin Hang, E-mail: htteo@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2014-04-21

    Tuning of band gap of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has been a challenging problem due to its inherent chemical stability and inertness. In this work, we report the changes in band gaps in a few layers of chemical vapor deposition processed as-grown h-BN using a simple oxygen plasma treatment. Optical absorption spectra show a trend of band gap narrowing monotonically from 6 eV of pristine h-BN to 4.31 eV when exposed to oxygen plasma for 12 s. The narrowing of band gap causes the reduction in electrical resistance by ∼100 fold. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results of plasma treated hexagonal boron nitride surface show the predominant doping of oxygen for the nitrogen vacancy. Energy sub-band formations inside the band gap of h-BN, due to the incorporation of oxygen dopants, cause a red shift in absorption edge corresponding to the band gap narrowing.

  18. Band gap effects of hexagonal boron nitride using oxygen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevak Singh, Ram; Leong Chow, Wai; Yingjie Tay, Roland; Hon Tsang, Siu; Mallick, Govind; Tong Teo, Edwin Hang

    2014-01-01

    Tuning of band gap of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has been a challenging problem due to its inherent chemical stability and inertness. In this work, we report the changes in band gaps in a few layers of chemical vapor deposition processed as-grown h-BN using a simple oxygen plasma treatment. Optical absorption spectra show a trend of band gap narrowing monotonically from 6 eV of pristine h-BN to 4.31 eV when exposed to oxygen plasma for 12 s. The narrowing of band gap causes the reduction in electrical resistance by ∼100 fold. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results of plasma treated hexagonal boron nitride surface show the predominant doping of oxygen for the nitrogen vacancy. Energy sub-band formations inside the band gap of h-BN, due to the incorporation of oxygen dopants, cause a red shift in absorption edge corresponding to the band gap narrowing

  19. Secular trends in Cherokee cranial morphology: Eastern vs Western bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutphin, Rebecca; Ross, Ann H; Jantz, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    The research objective was to examine if secular trends can be identified for cranial data commissioned by Boas in 1892, specifically for cranial breadth and cranial length of the Eastern and Western band Cherokee who experienced environmental hardships. Multiple regression analysis was used to test the degree of relationship between each of the cranial measures: cranial length, cranial breadth and cephalic index, along with predictor variables (year-of-birth, location, sex, admixture); the model revealed a significant difference for all craniometric variables. Additional regression analysis was performed with smoothing Loess plots to observe cranial length and cranial breadth change over time (year-of-birth) separately for Eastern and Western Cherokee band females and males born between 1783-1874. This revealed the Western and Eastern bands show a decrease in cranial length over time. Eastern band individuals maintain a relatively constant head breadth, while Western Band individuals show a sharp decline beginning around 1860. These findings support negative secular trend occurring for both Cherokee bands where the environment made a detrimental impact; this is especially marked with the Western Cherokee band.

  20. Effect of hydrogenation on the band gap of graphene nano-flakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Iyama, Tetsuji; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The effects of hydrogenation on the band gap of graphene have been investigated by means of density functional theory method. It is generally considered that the band gap increases with increasing coverage of hydrogen atom on the graphene. However, the present study shows that the band gap decreases first with increasing hydrogen coverage and reaches the lowest value at finite coverage (γ = 0.3). Next, the band gap increases to that of insulator with coverage from 0.3 to 1.0. This specific feature of the band gap is reasonably explained by broken symmetry model and the decrease of pi-conjugation. The electronic states of hydrogenated graphene are discussed. - Highlights: • Density functional theory calculations were carried out for hydrogen on graphene • Effects of hydrogenation on the band gap of graphene were examined. • The band gap showed a minimum at a finite coverage. • Mechanism of specific band gap feature was discussed

  1. Application of far-infrared spectroscopy to the structural identification of protein materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yanchen; Ling, Shengjie; Qi, Zeming; Shao, Zhengzhong; Chen, Xin

    2018-05-03

    Although far-infrared (IR) spectroscopy has been shown to be a powerful tool to determine peptide structure and to detect structural transitions in peptides, it has been overlooked in the characterization of proteins. Herein, we used far-IR spectroscopy to monitor the structure of four abundant non-bioactive proteins, namely, soybean protein isolate (SPI), pea protein isolate (PPI) and two types of silk fibroins (SFs), domestic Bombyx mori and wild Antheraea pernyi. The two globular proteins SPI and PPI result in broad and weak far-IR bands (between 50 and 700 cm-1), in agreement with those of some other bioactive globular proteins previously studied (lysozyme, myoglobin, hemoglobin, etc.) that generally only have random amino acid sequences. Interestingly, the two SFs, which are characterized by a structure composed of highly repetitive motifs, show several sharp far-IR characteristic absorption peaks. Moreover, some of these characteristic peaks (such as the peaks at 260 and 428 cm-1 in B. mori, and the peaks at 245 and 448 cm-1 in A. pernyi) are sensitive to conformational changes; hence, they can be directly used to monitor conformational transitions in SFs. Furthermore, since SF absorption bands clearly differ from those of globular proteins and different SFs even show distinct adsorption bands, far-IR spectroscopy can be applied to distinguish and determine the specific SF component within protein blends.

  2. The orientation of eosin-5-maleimide on human erythrocyte band 3 measured by fluorescence polarization microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, S M; Cobb, C E; Beth, A H; Piston, D W

    1996-01-01

    The dominant motional mode for membrane proteins is uniaxial rotational diffusion about the membrane normal axis, and investigations of their rotational dynamics can yield insight into both the oligomeric state of the protein and its interactions with other proteins such as the cytoskeleton. However, results from the spectroscopic methods used to study these dynamics are dependent on the orientation of the probe relative to the axis of motion. We have employed polarized fluorescence confocal microscopy to measure the orientation of eosin-5-maleimide covalently reacted with Lys-430 of human erythrocyte band 3. Steady-state polarized fluorescence images showed distinct intensity patterns, which were fit to an orientation distribution of the eosin absorption and emission dipoles relative to the membrane normal axis. This orientation was found to be unchanged by trypsin treatment, which cleaves band 3 between the integral membrane domain and the cytoskeleton-attached domain. this result suggests that phosphorescence anisotropy changes observed after trypsin treatment are due to a rotational constraint change rather than a reorientation of eosin. By coupling time-resolved prompt fluorescence anisotropy with confocal microscopy, we calculated the expected amplitudes of the e-Dt and e-4Dt terms from the uniaxial rotational diffusion model and found that the e-4Dt term should dominate the anisotropy decay. Delayed fluorescence and phosphorescence anisotropy decays of control and trypsin-treated band 3 in ghosts, analyzed as multiple uniaxially rotating populations using the amplitudes predicted by confocal microscopy, were consistent with three motional species with uniaxial correlation times ranging from 7 microseconds to 1.4 ms. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 PMID:8804603

  3. Multi-band Image Registration Method Based on Fourier Transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庹红娅; 刘允才

    2004-01-01

    This paper presented a registration method based on Fourier transform for multi-band images which is involved in translation and small rotation. Although different band images differ a lot in the intensity and features,they contain certain common information which we can exploit. A model was given that the multi-band images have linear correlations under the least-square sense. It is proved that the coefficients have no effect on the registration progress if two images have linear correlations. Finally, the steps of the registration method were proposed. The experiments show that the model is reasonable and the results are satisfying.

  4. Dosimetry of narrow band UVB treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goode, D.H.; Mannering, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    narrow band treatment schedule has been developed which is based on the patient' s MED. Before commencing treatments the patient is given an MED test using untanned skin on the inner surface of the forearm. The initial dose is 70% of the MED and each subsequent exposure is increased by a constant increment, namely 21.4% of the initial dose. This progression continues until the dose reaches three times the MED at which time it is held constant. Treatments are given twice per week up to a maximum of 30 treatments or until the psoriasis clears. If mild erythema occurs the next treatment is held at the previous dose while for more severe erythema it is missed entirely. This schedule is similar to the one in use at The Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne, but with two minor exceptions. In Newcastle the increments are larger (on average 45% of the initial dose) but they only occur once a week. The transfer from broad band to narrow band was accomplished successfully without any incidence of erythema. After four months experience the 31 patients who were currently following the MED based protocol were reviewed. The lowest MED measured was 500 mJ/cm 2 while the highest (three in number) exceeded 1110 mJ/cm 2 . Eleven of the patients exhibited erythema at some point in their treatment but it was only necessary to reduce the dose increment in one case. Of the remaining 20 patients, 13 who showed poor clearing of their psoriasis were placed on a dose schedules in which the dose increments were increased by between 20 % to 33%. In view of the fact almost equal numbers of patients received too large or too small a dose the schedule can be considered to be a good compromise

  5. 47 CFR 90.531 - Band plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Band plan. 90.531 Section 90.531...-805 MHz Bands § 90.531 Band plan. This section sets forth the band plan for the 763-775 MHz and 793... and portables subject to Commission-approved regional planning committee regional plans. Transmitter...

  6. Effect of Spindle Parameters of Woodworking Band Saw on the AE Value of Crack Band Saw Blade in Compound Material Processing (1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jin-gui; Jiang, Zhao-fang; Luo, Lai-peng

    2017-04-01

    Taking the MJ3210A motion band saw as the research object, the AE value of the band saw blade vibration was obtained by analyzing the VIBSYS vibration signal acquisition and analysis software system in Beijing, and the change of the AE value of the band saw and the crack was found out. The experimental results show that in the MJ3210A sports car sawing machine, the band saw blade with width of 130 mm is used, and the AE value of the cracked band saw blade is well in the high band saw blade AE value. Under the best working condition of the band saw, the band saw blade AE If the value exceeds 104.7 dB (A) above, it means that the band saw blade has at least one crack length greater than 1.38 mm for the crack defect and the need to replace the band saw blade in time. Different species with saw blade of the AE value is different, white pine wood minimum, the largest oak wood; according to a variety of wood processing AE instrument value to determine the band saw blade crack to the situation; so as to fully rational use of band saw blade, The failure and the degree of development to find a new method.

  7. Metaphyseal bands in osteogenesis imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta are undergoing pamidronate therapy to prevent the incidence of fragility fractures. The authors herein report a child aged 3 years who received five cycles of pamidronate, resulting in metaphyseal bands, known as "zebra lines."

  8. Metaphyseal bands in osteogenesis imperfecta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh, SS; Thomas, John K

    2010-01-01

    An increasing number of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta are undergoing pamidronate therapy to prevent the incidence of fragility fractures. The authors herein report a child aged 3 years who received five cycles of pamidronate, resulting in metaphyseal bands, known as “zebra lines.”

  9. Quantitative analysis on electric dipole energy in Rashba band splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jisook; Rhim, Jun-Won; Kim, Changyoung; Ryong Park, Seung; Hoon Shim, Ji

    2015-09-01

    We report on quantitative comparison between the electric dipole energy and the Rashba band splitting in model systems of Bi and Sb triangular monolayers under a perpendicular electric field. We used both first-principles and tight binding calculations on p-orbitals with spin-orbit coupling. First-principles calculation shows Rashba band splitting in both systems. It also shows asymmetric charge distributions in the Rashba split bands which are induced by the orbital angular momentum. We calculated the electric dipole energies from coupling of the asymmetric charge distribution and external electric field, and compared it to the Rashba splitting. Remarkably, the total split energy is found to come mostly from the difference in the electric dipole energy for both Bi and Sb systems. A perturbative approach for long wave length limit starting from tight binding calculation also supports that the Rashba band splitting originates mostly from the electric dipole energy difference in the strong atomic spin-orbit coupling regime.

  10. A Compact UWB Band-Pass Filter Using Embedded Circular Slot Structures for Improved Upper Stop-band Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Ming; Ren, Jian; Mikkelsen, Jan Hvolgaard

    2016-01-01

    structures into the ring resonator. This is different from conventional designs using cascaded bandstop/low-pass filters for stop-band response suppression, which usually leads to big circuit sizes. And hence the proposed approach can reduce the circuit size significantly. A prototype filter with a compact...... size (13.6 mm×6.75 mm) has been implemented for experimental validation. The measured results show a −3 dB frequency band from 3.4 GHz to 11.7 GHz and > 20 dB upper stop-band suppression from 12.5 GHz to 20GHz....

  11. Band Gap Properties of Magnetoelectroelastic Grid Structures with Initial Stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yi-Ze; Li Feng-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The propagation of elastic waves in magnetoelectroelastic grid structures is studied. Band gap properties are presented and the effects of the magnetoelectroelastic coupling and initial stress are considered. Numerical calculations are performed using the plane-wave expansion method. The results show that the band gap width can be tuned by the initial stress. It is hoped that our results will be helpful for designing acoustic filters with magnetoelectroelastic materials and grid structures

  12. Prospective Identification of Oligoclonal/Abnormal Band of the Same Immunoglobulin Type as the Malignant Clone by Differential Location of M-Spike and Oligoclonal Band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Shikhar G; Singh, Gurmukh

    2017-10-01

    Serum and urine protein electrophoreses and immunofixation electrophoreses are the gold standards in diagnosing monoclonal gammopathy. Identification of oligoclonal bands in post-treatment patients has emerged as an important issue and recording the location of the malignant monoclonal peak may facilitate prospective identification of a new "monoclonal" spike as being distinct from the malignant peak. We recorded the locations of monoclonal spikes in descriptive terms, such as being in the cathodal region, mid-gamma region, anodal region, and beta region. The location of monoclonal or restricted heterogeneity bands in subsequent protein electrophoreses was compared to the location of the original malignant spike. In a patient with plasma cell myeloma, the original monoclonal IgG kappa band was located at the anodal end of gamma region. Post-treatment, an IgG kappa band was noted in mid-gamma region and the primary malignant clone was not detectable by serum protein immunofixation electrophoresis (SIFE) in post-treatment sample. Even though the κ/λ ratio remained abnormal, we were able to recognize stringent complete response by noting the different location of the new IgG kappa band as a benign regenerative process. Recording the location of the malignant monoclonal spike facilitates the identification of post-treatment oligoclonal bands, prospectively. Recognizing the regenerative, benign, bands in post-transplant patients facilitates the determination of stringent complete response despite an abnormal κ/λ ratio.

  13. An odorant-binding protein as a new allergen from Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, J A; Pastor-Vargas, C; de las Heras, M; Vivanco, F; Cuesta, Javier; Sastre, J

    2012-01-01

    A case of anaphylaxis following a bite from a Siberian hamster (SH; Phodopus sungorus) is described. Skin prick tests with hair, urine and salivary gland extracts from SH were positive, while the tests were negative for hair extracts from other rodents. IgE immunoblotting with the patient serum revealed 3 IgE-binding bands of about 18, 21 and 23 kDa. When the patient's serum was preincubated with rabbit, mouse and gerbil hair extracts, no inhibition of the 3 SH IgE-binding bands was demonstrated. Proteins extracted from the 3 bands were analyzed by N-terminal sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry, and peptides were sequenced. IgE-binding bands were identified as being an odorant-binding protein belonging to the lipocalin family. Analysis of the 3 IgE-binding bands found in the hair, urine and salivary glands of SH showed a new allergenic protein lacking cross-reactivity with allergens from other rodents. The 3 bands likely correspond to isoforms of a single allergen. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Advanced glycation end product (AGE) modified proteins in tears of diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhenjun; Liu, Jingfang; Shi, Bingyin; He, Shuixiang; Yao, Xiaoli; Willcox, Mark D P

    2010-08-11

    High glucose level in diabetic patients may lead to advanced glycation end product (AGE) modified proteins. This study investigated AGE modified proteins in tears and compared their levels in diabetic patients (DM) with non-diabetic controls (CTL). Basal tears were collected from DM with (DR) or without (DNR) retinopathy and CTL. Total AGE modified proteins were detected quantitatively by a dot immunobinding assay. The AGE modified proteins were separated in 1D- and 2D-SDS gels and detected by western-blotting. The individual AGE modified proteins were also compared between groups using densitometry. Compared with the CTL group, tear concentrations of AGE modified proteins were significantly elevated in DR and DNR groups. The concentration of AGE modified proteins in diabetic tears were positively correlated with AGE modified hemoglobin (HbA1c) and postprandial blood glucose level (PBG). Western blotting of AGE modified proteins from 1D-SDS gels showed several bands, the major one at around 60 kDa. The intensities of AGE modified protein bands were higher in DM tears than in CTL tears. Western blotting from 2D-SDS gels showed a strongly stained horizontal strip, which corresponded to the major band in 1D-SDS gels. Most of the other AGE modified protein species were within molecular weight of 30-60 kDa, PI 5.2-7.0. Densitometry analysis demonstrated several AGE modified proteins were elevated in DR or DNR tears. Total and some individual AGE modified proteins were elevated in DM tears. AGE modified proteins in tears may be used as biomarkers to diagnose diabetes and/or diabetic retinopathy.

  15. Band selection method based on spectrum difference in targets of interest in hyperspectral imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohan; Yang, Guang; Yang, Yongbo; Huang, Junhua

    2016-10-01

    While hyperspectral data shares rich spectrum information, it has numbers of bands with high correlation coefficients, causing great data redundancy. A reasonable band selection is important for subsequent processing. Bands with large amount of information and low correlation should be selected. On this basis, according to the needs of target detection applications, the spectral characteristics of the objects of interest are taken into consideration in this paper, and a new method based on spectrum difference is proposed. Firstly, according to the spectrum differences of targets of interest, a difference matrix which represents the different spectral reflectance of different targets in different bands is structured. By setting a threshold, the bands satisfying the conditions would be left, constituting a subset of bands. Then, the correlation coefficients between bands are calculated and correlation matrix is given. According to the size of the correlation coefficient, the bands can be set into several groups. At last, the conception of normalized variance is used on behalf of the information content of each band. The bands are sorted by the value of its normalized variance. Set needing number of bands, and the optimum band combination solution can be get by these three steps. This method retains the greatest degree of difference between the target of interest and is easy to achieve by computer automatically. Besides, false color image synthesis experiment is carried out using the bands selected by this method as well as other 3 methods to show the performance of method in this paper.

  16. Heat shock proteins of higher plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, J.L.; Lin, C.Y.; Chen, Y.M.

    1981-01-01

    The pattern of protein synthesis changes rapidly and dramatically when the growth temperture of soybean seedling tissue is increased from 28 0 C (normal) to about 40 0 C (heat shock). The synthesis of normal proteins is greatly decreased and a new set of proteins, heat shock proteins, is induced. The heat shock proteins of soybean consist of 10 new bands on one-dimensional NaDodSO 4 gels; a more complex pattern is observed on two-dimensional gels. when the tissue is returned to 28 0 C after 4 hr at 40 0 C, there is progressive decline in the synthesis of heat shock proteins and reappearance of a normal pattern of synthesis by 3 or 4 hr. In vitro translation of poly(A) + RNAs isolated from tissued grown at 28 and 40 0 C shows that the heat shock proteins are translated from a ndw set of mRNAs induced at 40 0 C; furthermore, the abundant class mRNAs for many of the normal proteins persist even though they are translated weakly (or not at all) in vivo at 40 or 42.5 0 C. The heat shock response in soybean appears similar to the much-studied heat shock phenomenon in Drosophila

  17. Identical and shifted identical bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodder, R.S; Jones, E.F.; Hamilton, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    Spontaneous fission of 252 Cm was studied with 72 large Compton suppressed Ge detectors in Gamma sphere. New isotopes 160 Sm and 162 Gd were identified. Through X-ray-γ and γ-γ-γ) coincidence measurements, level energies were established to spins 14 + to 20 + in 152 , 154 156 60 Nd 92 94 96 , 156 , 158 , 160 62 Sm 94 , 96 , 98 , and 160 , 162 64 Gd 96 , 98 . These nuclei exhibit a remarkable variety of identical bands and bands where the energies and moments of inertia are shifted by the same constant amount for every spin state from 2 + to 12 + for various combinations of nuclei differing by 2n, 4n, 2p, 4p, and α

  18. Dilatant shear band formation and diagenesis in calcareous, arkosic sandstones, Vienna Basin (Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommatzsch, Marco; Exner, Ulrike; Gier, Susanne; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The present study examines deformation bands in calcareous arkosic sands. The investigated units can be considered as an equivalent to the Matzen field in the Vienna Basin (Austria), which is one of the most productive oil reservoirs in central Europe. The outcrop exposes carbonate-free and carbonatic sediments of Badenian age separated by a normal fault. Carbonatic sediments in the hanging wall of the normal fault develop dilation bands with minor shear displacements (< 2 mm), whereas carbonate-free sediments in the footwall develop cataclastic shear bands with up to 70 cm displacement. The cataclastic shear bands show a permeability reduction up to 3 orders of magnitude and strong baffling effects in the vadose zone. Carbonatic dilation bands show a permeability reduction of 1-2 orders of magnitude and no baffling structures. We distinguished two types of deformation bands in the carbonatic units, which differ in deformation mechanisms, distribution and composition. Full-cemented bands form as dilation bands with an intense syn-kinematic calcite cementation, whereas the younger loose-cemented bands are dilatant shear bands cemented by patchy calcite and clay minerals. All analyzed bands are characterized by a porosity and permeability reduction caused by grain fracturing and cementation. The changed petrophysical properties and especially the porosity evolution are closely related to diagenetic processes driven by varying pore fluids in different diagenetic environments. The deformation band evolution and sealing capacity is controlled by the initial host rock composition. PMID:26300577

  19. NCenter wide band neutrino beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stutte, L.G.

    1985-01-01

    This memo describes the physical properties of the currently operating N-Center wide band neutrino beam---commonly called the triplet train, following a past tradition of a triplet lens configuration. In reality, in order to gain a larger momentum acceptance and to minimize the angular divergence of the beam, a quadruplet beam (4 lenses) employing point-to-parallel optics at a central momentum of 300 GeV was built. 6 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  20. Size measuring techniques as tool to monitor pea proteins intramolecular crosslinking by transglutaminase treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djoullah, Attaf; Krechiche, Ghali; Husson, Florence; Saurel, Rémi

    2016-01-01

    In this work, techniques for monitoring the intramolecular transglutaminase cross-links of pea proteins, based on protein size determination, were developed. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis profiles of transglutaminase-treated low concentration (0.01% w/w) pea albumin samples, compared to the untreated one (control), showed a higher electrophoretic migration of the major albumin fraction band (26 kDa), reflecting a decrease in protein size. This protein size decrease was confirmed, after DEAE column purification, by dynamic light scattering (DLS) where the hydrodynamic radius of treated samples appears to be reduced compared to the control one. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Gastric band erosion: Alternative management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echaverry-Navarrete, Denis José; Maldonado-Vázquez, Angélica; Cortes-Romano, Pablo; Cabrera-Jardines, Ricardo; Mondragón-Pinzón, Erwin Eduardo; Castillo-González, Federico Armando

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a public health problem, for which the prevalence has increased worldwide at an alarming rate, affecting 1.7 billion people in the world. To describe the technique employed in incomplete penetration of gastric band where endoscopic management and/or primary closure is not feasible. Laparoscopic removal of gastric band was performed in five patients with incomplete penetrance using Foley catheterization in the perforation site that could lead to the development of a gastro-cutaneous fistula. The cases presented include a leak that required surgical lavage with satisfactory outcome, and one patient developed stenosis 3 years after surgical management, which was resolved endoscopically. In all cases, the penetration site closed spontaneously. Gastric band erosion has been reported in 3.4% of cases. The reason for inserting a catheter is to create a controlled gastro-cutaneous fistula, allowing spontaneous closure. Various techniques have been described: the totally endoscopic, hybrid techniques (endoscopic/laparoscopic) and completely laparoscopic. A technique is described here that is useful and successful in cases where the above-described treatments are not viable. Copyright © 2015. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A.

  2. Chromophore Structure of Photochromic Fluorescent Protein Dronpa: Acid-Base Equilibrium of Two Cis Configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, Asuka; Mizuno, Misao; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2016-04-07

    Dronpa is a novel photochromic fluorescent protein that exhibits fast response to light. The present article is the first report of the resonance and preresonance Raman spectra of Dronpa. We used the intensity and frequency of Raman bands to determine the structure of the Dronpa chromophore in two thermally stable photochromic states. The acid-base equilibrium in one photochromic state was observed by spectroscopic pH titration. The Raman spectra revealed that the chromophore in this state shows a protonation/deprotonation transition with a pKa of 5.2 ± 0.3 and maintains the cis configuration. The observed resonance Raman bands showed that the other photochromic state of the chromophore is in a trans configuration. The results demonstrate that Raman bands selectively enhanced for the chromophore yield valuable information on the molecular structure of the chromophore in photochromic fluorescent proteins after careful elimination of the fluorescence background.

  3. Amino acid and protein changes in tilapia and spanish mackerel after irradiation and storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kahtani, Hassan A.; Abu-Tarboush, Hamza M.; Atia, Mohamed; Bajaber, Adnan S.; Ahmed, Mohamed A.; El-Mojaddidi, Mohamed A

    1998-01-01

    Some amino acids in tilapia decreased while some others increased when subjected to doses up to 10.0 kGy. However, 10 kGy contributed to a significant reduction in all amino acids of Spanish mackerel. Variations in amino acid contents continued during post-irradiation storage with no consistent trend of increase or decrease. SDS-PAGE of protein from both fish showed 27 bands of subunits with MW < 14.0-94.0 KD. Isoelectric focusing patterns of sarcoplasmic protein of unirradiated and irradiated fish showed no charge in the number of bands, while some changes were observed in the intensities of the anodic and cathodic bands depending on isoelectric points (pIs)

  4. Exciter For X-Band Transmitter And Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Carl E.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes developmental X-band exciter for X-band uplink subsystem of Deep Space Network. X-band transmitter-exciting signal expected to have fractional frequency stability of 5.2 X 10 to negative 15th power during 1,000-second integration period. Generates coherent test signals for S- and X-band Block III translator of Deep Space Network, Doppler-reference signal for associated Doppler-extractor system, first-local-oscillator signal for associated receiver, and reference signal for associated ranging subsystem. Tests of prototype exciter show controlling and monitoring and internal phase-correcting loops perform according to applicable design criteria. Measurements of stability of frequency and of single-sideband noise spectral density of transmitter-exciting signal made subsequently.

  5. Multiple triaxial bands and abnormal signature inversion in 7433As

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Shi-Peng; Ma, Hai-Liang; Cao, Xue-Peng; Wu, Xiao-Guang; Zhang, Huan-Qiao; Hua, Hui; Sun, Jun-Jie; Sun, Hui-Bin; He, Chuang-Ye; Zheng, Yun; Li, Guang-Sheng; Li, Cong-Bo; Yao, Shun-He; Yu, Bei-Bei; Wang, Jin-Long; Li, Hong-We; Wu, Yi-Heng; Liu, Jia-Jian; Luo, Peng-Wei; Xu, Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Excited states of the odd–odd nucleus 74 As have been investigated via heavy ion fusion evaporation reaction 70 Zn( 7 Li,3n) 74 As at beam energy of 30 MeV. The properties of the positive- and the negative- parity bands can be interpreted in terms of the Cranked Nilsson–Strutinsky (CNS) model calculations which show that the observed bands are built on the triaxial deformed shape. The inversion of the favored and unfavored signature branches observed in the positive-parity bands presents at high spins rather than normal signature inversion occurs at low spins. This phenomenon may be explained as the origin of unpaired band crossing in a highly rotating triaxial nucleus.

  6. Band magnetism due to f-electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, M.B.; Trainor, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    Specific heat data illustrate several types of itinerant or band magnetism in actinide intermetallic compounds. The results show ferromagnetic spin fluctuations in UAl 2 with T/sub sf/ equals 25K, itinerant antiferromagnetism in NpSn 3 with T/sub N/ equals 9.5K and itinerant ferromagnetism in NpOs 2 with T/sub C/ equals 7.9K. Specific heat studies of dilute U/sub 1-x/Th/sub x/Al 2 show the theoretically predicted modifications due to impurity scattering in a spin fluctuation system. For NpSn 3 it is possible to show the BCS nature of the transition due to the gap formation

  7. Detection Range Estimation of UV Spectral Band Laser Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Gorodnichev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, has come into existence an interest in the systems operating in the ultra-violet (UF band of wavelengths, which use other spectral information (coefficients of reflection or radiation in UF range about location objects, than laser systems in the visible, near or average infrared bands. Thus, a point is not only to receive additional (in another spectral range information on location objects. Laser radiation in the UF spectral band of 0.315 – 0.4 microns is safer than laser radiation with the wavelengths of 0.38 – 1.4 microns.The work presents a comparative estimation of the detection systems range of laser radars in the UV and visible spectral bands for the following wavelengths of radiation:- UF band: 0.266 microns (the fourth harmonic of YAG-laser activated by neodymium ions, 0.308 microns (the XeCl-excimer laser, 0.355 microns (the third harmonic of YAG-laser activated by neodymium ions;- visible band: 0.532 microns (the second harmonic of YAG-laser activated by neodymium ions.Results of calculations show that for the horizontal pathway in the terrestrial atmosphere at the selected radiation wavelengths a detection range is in the range of 2510m – 5690 m.The maximum range of detection corresponds to the visible spectral band. A sweep range decreases with transition to the UF band. This is caused by the fact that with transition to the UF band there is a rise of atmosphere attenuation (generally, because of absorption by ozone, this effect being smoothed by reducing background radiation.In the UF band a wavelength of 0.355 microns is the most acceptable. For this wavelength a detection range is about 1,5 times less (in comparison with the visible band of 0.532 microns. However, this is the much more eye-safe wavelength. With transition to the UV band a detection range decreases not that much and can be compensated by changing parameters of transmitting or receiving channels of laser radar.

  8. More on Estimation of Banded and Banded Toeplitz Covariance Matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Berntsson, Fredrik; Ohlson, Martin

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we consider two different linear covariance structures, e.g., banded and bended Toeplitz, and how to estimate them using different methods, e.g., by minimizing different norms. One way to estimate the parameters in a linear covariance structure is to use tapering, which has been shown to be the solution to a universal least squares problem. We know that tapering not always guarantee the positive definite constraints on the estimated covariance matrix and may not be a suitable me...

  9. Type 2 diabetes mellitus with early phase acute inflammatory protein on serum protein electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ET Tuladhar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The onset of Type 2 diabetes has been associated with low grade systemic inflammation. The inflammatory status has been studied by measuring acute phase reactant proteins like hsCRP, α1- antitrypsin, α1-acid glycoprotein, ceruloplasmin, fibrinogen. Most of these acute phase reactants form α1 and α2 bands on electropherogram of serum proteins. The aim of this study was to evaluate inflammatory status in controlled and uncontrolled type 2 diabetes using cellulose acetate electrophoresis and to find the impact of glycemic status as indicated by HbA1c on inflammation process. Materials and Methods: Serum protein electrophoresis was done on serum samples of 60 cases of Diabetes [controlled and uncontrolled] using cellulose acetate paper technique. The electropherogram obtained was stained with Ponseu S and then quantitated using densitometer. Glycemic status was studied by HbA1c analysis. The density of α1and α2 bands in electropherogram were correlated with HbA1c level. Result: A significant increase in the percentage of α1 and α2 band proteins (0.765 and 0.716, p<0.001 were found with the increasing level of HbA1c. With cutoff of HbA1c 7% (American Diabetic Association recommended, the α1 and α2 serum proteins concentration are significantly higher (p<0.001 in uncontrolled diabetes mellitus compared to controlled diabetes mellitus Conclusion: Cellulose acetate electrophoresis of serum proteins show early phase acute inflammatory status in uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus. The process of systemic inflammation worsens with uncontrolled glycemia as indicated by HbA1c. Inflammatory status should be studied adjunct to glycemic status. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v2i3.6024 JPN 2012; 2(3: 211-214

  10. Laser-optical investigation of the effect of diamond nanoparticles on the structure and functional properties of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perevedentseva, Elena V; Su, F.Y.; Su, T.H.; Lin, Y.C.; Cheng, C.L.; Karmenyan, A V; Priezzhev, A V; Lugovtsov, Andrei E

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption of such blood plasma proteins as albumin and g-globulin on diamond nanoparticles of size around 5 nm and around 100 nm is observed and studied using laser-optical methods. The adsorption of blood plasma proteins at physiological pH 7.4 is found weaker than that of enzyme protein lysozyme. The observed variations in the Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectra of proteins may be due to structural transformations of the adsorbed protein. Using the lysozyme as a test protein we show that the protein adsorption leading to observable changes in the FTIR spectrum (the band of Amide I) also induces a significant decrease in the protein functional activity. It is also found that the influence of ∼5-nm diamond nanoparticles on the protein structure and functions is more significant than that of ∼100-nm nanodiamonds. (application of lasers and laser-optical methods in life sciences)

  11. Partially filled intermediate band of Cr-doped GaN films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, S.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the band structure of sputtered Cr-doped GaN (GaCrN) films using optical absorption, photoelectron yield spectroscopy, and charge transport measurements. It was found that an additional energy band is formed in the intrinsic band gap of GaN upon Cr doping, and that charge carriers in the material move in the inserted band. Prototype solar cells showed enhanced short circuit current and open circuit voltage in the n-GaN/GaCrN/p-GaN structure compared to the GaCrN/p-GaN structure, which validates the proposed concept of an intermediate-band solar cell.

  12. Determination of Endosperm Protein Secondary Structure in Hard Wheat Breeding Lines using Synchrotron Infrared Microspectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonwell, E.; Fisher, T.; Fritz, A.; Wetzel, D.

    2008-01-01

    One molecular aspect of mature hard wheat protein quality for breadmaking is the relative amount of endosperm protein in the a-helix form compared with that in other secondary structure forms including β-sheet. Modeling of a-helix and β-sheet absorption bands that contribute to the amide I band at 1650 cm-1 was applied to more than 1500 spectra in this study. The microscopic view of wheat endosperm is dominated by many large starch granules with protein in between. The spectrum produced from in situ microspectroscopy of this mixture is dominated by carbohydrate bands from the large starch granules that fill up the field. The high spatial resolution achievable with synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy enables revealing good in situ spectra of the protein located interstitially. Synchrotron infrared microspectroscopic mapping of 4 μm thick frozen sections of endosperm in the subaleurone region provides spectra from a large number of pixels. Pixels with protein-dominated spectra are sorted out from among adjacent pixels to minimize the starch absorption and scattering contributions. Subsequent data treatment to extract information from the amide I band requires a high signal to noise ratio. Although spectral interference of the carbohydrate band on the amide band is not a problem, the scattering produced by the large starch granules diminishes the signal to noise ratio throughout the spectrum. High density mapping was done on beamlines U2B and U10B at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY. Mapping with a single masked spot size of 5.5 μm diameter or confocal 5 μm x 5 μm spot size, respectively, on the two beamlines used produced spectra for new breeding lines under current consideration. Appropriate data treatment allows calculation of a numerical estimate of the a-helix population relative to other secondary protein structures from the position and shape of the amide I absorption band. Current breeding lines show a

  13. Band Subset Selection for Hyperspectral Image Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Yu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a new approach to band subset selection (BSS for hyperspectral image classification (HSIC which selects multiple bands simultaneously as a band subset, referred to as simultaneous multiple band selection (SMMBS, rather than one band at a time sequentially, referred to as sequential multiple band selection (SQMBS, as most traditional band selection methods do. In doing so, a criterion is particularly developed for BSS that can be used for HSIC. It is a linearly constrained minimum variance (LCMV derived from adaptive beamforming in array signal processing which can be used to model misclassification errors as the minimum variance. To avoid an exhaustive search for all possible band subsets, two numerical algorithms, referred to as sequential (SQ and successive (SC algorithms are also developed for LCMV-based SMMBS, called SQ LCMV-BSS and SC LCMV-BSS. Experimental results demonstrate that LCMV-based BSS has advantages over SQMBS.

  14. The DSS-14 C-band exciter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, D. R.

    1989-01-01

    The development and implementation of a C-band exciter for use with the Block IV Receiver-Exciter Subsystem at Deep Space Station 14 (DSS-14) has been completed. The exciter supplements the standard capabilities of the Block IV system by providing a drive signal for the C-band transmitter while generating coherent translation frequencies for C-band (5-GHz) to S-band (2.2- to 2.3-GHz) Doppler extraction, C-band to L-band (1.6-GHz) zero delay measurements, and a level calibrated L-band test signal. Exciter functions are described, and a general explanation and description of the C-band uplink controller is presented.

  15. Can infrared spectroscopy provide information on protein-protein interactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haris, Parvez I

    2010-08-01

    For most biophysical techniques, characterization of protein-protein interactions is challenging; this is especially true with methods that rely on a physical phenomenon that is common to both of the interacting proteins. Thus, for example, in IR spectroscopy, the carbonyl vibration (1600-1700 cm(-1)) associated with the amide bonds from both of the interacting proteins will overlap extensively, making the interpretation of spectral changes very complicated. Isotope-edited infrared spectroscopy, where one of the interacting proteins is uniformly labelled with (13)C or (13)C,(15)N has been introduced as a solution to this problem, enabling the study of protein-protein interactions using IR spectroscopy. The large shift of the amide I band (approx. 45 cm(-1) towards lower frequency) upon (13)C labelling of one of the proteins reveals the amide I band of the unlabelled protein, enabling it to be used as a probe for monitoring conformational changes. With site-specific isotopic labelling, structural resolution at the level of individual amino acid residues can be achieved. Furthermore, the ability to record IR spectra of proteins in diverse environments means that isotope-edited IR spectroscopy can be used to structurally characterize difficult systems such as protein-protein complexes bound to membranes or large insoluble peptide/protein aggregates. In the present article, examples of application of isotope-edited IR spectroscopy for studying protein-protein interactions are provided.

  16. Radio-iodinated surface proteins of electrophoretically separated rat lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jilg, W.; Hannig, K.; Zeiller, K.

    1980-01-01

    Rat thymocytes and lymph node cells were separated into three T and one B subpopulation by means of free flow electrophoresis. The surface proteins of the separated cells were labelled by lactoperoxidase catalysed radioiodination. Most of the label was demonstrated to be at the cell surface. Although the surface protein patterns of the four lamphocyte subpopulations were rather similar, distinctive differences could be found. B cells had six labelled proteins which seemed to be absent in the other cells. In the T cell group three protein bands were identified, each with specificity for peripheral T cells, thymocytes and all T cells respectively. Four other proteins were found which showed quantitative differences between the four cell groups. (orig.) [de

  17. Characterization of band structure for transverse acoustic phonons in Fibonacci superlattices by a bandedge formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsueh, W J; Chen, R F; Tang, K Y

    2008-01-01

    We present a divergence-free method to determine the characteristics of band structures and projected band structures of transverse acoustic phonons in Fibonacci superlattices. A set of bandedge equations is formulated to solve the band structures for the phonon instead of using the traditional dispersion relation. Numerical calculations show band structures calculated by the present method for the Fibonacci superlattice without numerical instability, which may occur in traditional methods. Based on the present formalism, the band structure for the acoustic phonons has been characterized by closure points and the projected bandgaps of the forbidden bands. The projected bandgaps are determined by the projected band structure, which is characterized by the cross points of the projected bandedges. We observed that the band structure and projected band structure and their characteristics were quite different for different generation orders and the basic layers for the Fibonacci superlattice. In this study, concise rules to determine these characteristics of the band structure and the projected band structure, including the number and the location of closure points of forbidden bands and those of projected bandgaps, in Fibonacci superlattices with arbitrary generation order and basic layers are proposed.

  18. Study of rotational band in 111Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, S.; Banerjee, P.; Ray, I.; Kshetri, R.; Raut, R.; Goswami, A.; Saha Sarkar, M.; Bhattacharya, S.; Mukherjee, A.; Mukherjee, G.; Basu, S.K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2006-01-01

    The motivation of the present work is to study the negative-parity rotational band in 111 Sn. Study of the lifetimes of the states of the rotational band is expected to provide information on their structures as well as the band termination phenomenon

  19. Prenatal diagnosis of amniotic band syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmi Devi Padmanabhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amniotic band can cause a broad spectrum of anomalies ranging from simple band constrictions to major craniofacial and visceral defects. It can cause significant neonatal morbidity. Accurate diagnosis will help in the management of the present pregnancy and in counseling with regard to future pregnancies. Here we report three cases of amniotic band syndrome detected in the prenatal period.

  20. Complex band structure and electronic transmission eigenchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders; Strange, Mikkel; Smidstrup, Soren

    2017-01-01

    and complex band structure, in this case individual eigenchannel transmissions and different complex bands. We present calculations of decay constants for the two most conductive states as determined by complex band structure and standard DFT Landauer transport calculations for one semi-conductor and two...

  1. High-energy band structure of gold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, N. Egede

    1976-01-01

    The band structure of gold for energies far above the Fermi level has been calculated using the relativistic augmented-plane-wave method. The calculated f-band edge (Γ6-) lies 15.6 eV above the Fermi level is agreement with recent photoemission work. The band model is applied to interpret...

  2. Multi-band Modelling of Appearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Larsen, Rasmus

    2003-01-01

    the appearance of both derived feature bands and an intensity band. As a special case of feature-band augmented appearance modelling we propose a dedicated representation with applications to face segmentation. The representation addresses a major problem within face recognition by lowering the sensitivity...

  3. Multi-band Modelling of Appearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Larsen, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    the appearance of both derived feature bands and an intensity band. As a special case of feature-band augmented appearance modelling we propose a dedicated representation with applications to face segmentation. The representation addresses a major problem within face recognition by lowering the sensitivity...

  4. Migratory connectivity of american woodcock using band return data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Joseph D.; Krementz, David G.

    2017-01-01

    American woodcock (Scolopax minor) are managed as a Central and an Eastern population in the United States and Canada based on band return data showing little crossover between populations or management regions. The observed proportion of crossover between management regions, however, depends on the criteria used to subset the band return data. We analyzed the amount of crossover between management regions using only band return records that represent complete migrations between the breeding and wintering grounds by using only band return records in which the capture took place during the breeding season and the band recovery took place during the wintering season or vice versa (n = 224). Additionally, we applied spatial statistics and a clustering algorithm to investigate woodcock migratory connectivity using this subset of migratory woodcock band return records. Using raw counts, 17.9% of records showed crossover between management regions, a higher proportion than the <5% crossover reported in studies that did not use only migratory band returns. Our results showed woodcock from the breeding grounds in the Central Region largely migrate to destinations within the Central Region, whereas woodcock from the breeding grounds in the Eastern Region migrate to destinations across the entire wintering range and mix with individuals from the Central Region. Using the division coefficient, we estimated that 54% of woodcock from the breeding grounds of the Eastern Region migrate to the Central Region wintering grounds. Our result that many woodcock from separate regions of the breeding grounds mix on the wintering grounds has implications for the 2-region basis for woodcock management. Elucidating finer scale movement patterns among regions provides a basis for reassessing the need for separate management regions to ensure optimal conservation and management of the species.

  5. Designing Phononic Crystals with Wide and Robust Band Gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zian; Chen, Yanyu; Yang, Haoxiang; Wang, Lifeng

    2018-04-01

    Phononic crystals (PnCs) engineered to manipulate and control the propagation of mechanical waves have enabled the design of a range of novel devices, such as waveguides, frequency modulators, and acoustic cloaks, for which wide and robust phononic band gaps are highly preferable. While numerous PnCs have been designed in recent decades, to the best of our knowledge, PnCs that possess simultaneous wide and robust band gaps (to randomness and deformations) have not yet been reported. Here, we demonstrate that by combining the band-gap formation mechanisms of Bragg scattering and local resonances (the latter one is dominating), PnCs with wide and robust phononic band gaps can be established. The robustness of the phononic band gaps are then discussed from two aspects: robustness to geometric randomness (manufacture defects) and robustness to deformations (mechanical stimuli). Analytical formulations further predict the optimal design parameters, and an uncertainty analysis quantifies the randomness effect of each designing parameter. Moreover, we show that the deformation robustness originates from a local resonance-dominant mechanism together with the suppression of structural instability. Importantly, the proposed PnCs require only a small number of layers of elements (three unit cells) to obtain broad, robust, and strong attenuation bands, which offer great potential in designing flexible and deformable phononic devices.

  6. Reconfigurable dual-band metamaterial antenna based on liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Bang-Jun; Meng, Fan-Yi; Lyu, Yue-Long; Wu, Qun

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, a novel reconfigurable dual-band metamaterial antenna with a continuous beam that is electrically steered in backward to forward directions is first proposed by employing a liquid crystal (LC)-loaded tunable extended composite right-/left-handed (E-CRLH) transmission line (TL). The frequency-dependent property of the E-CRLH TL is analyzed and a compact unit cell based on the nematic LC is proposed to realize the tunable dual band characteristics. The phase constant of the proposed unit cell can be dynamically continuously tuned from negative to positive values in two operating bands by changing the bias voltage of the loaded LC material. A resulting dual band fixed-frequency beam steering property has been predicted by numerical simulations and experimentally verified. The measured results show that the fabricated reconfigurable antenna features an electrically controlled continuous beam steering from backward  ‑16° to forward  +13° at 7.2 GHz and backward  ‑9° to forward  +17° at 9.4 GHz, respectively. This electrically controlled beam steering range turns out to be competitive with the previously reported single band reconfigurable antennas. Besides, the measured and simulated results of the proposed reconfigurable dual-band metamaterial antenna are in good agreement.

  7. Designing Phononic Crystals with Wide and Robust Band Gaps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yanyu [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jia, Zian [State University of New York at Stony Brook; Yang, Haoxiang [State University of New York at Stony Brook; Wang, Lifeng [State University of New York at Stony Brook

    2018-04-16

    Phononic crystals (PnCs) engineered to manipulate and control the propagation of mechanical waves have enabled the design of a range of novel devices, such as waveguides, frequency modulators, and acoustic cloaks, for which wide and robust phononic band gaps are highly preferable. While numerous PnCs have been designed in recent decades, to the best of our knowledge, PnCs that possess simultaneous wide and robust band gaps (to randomness and deformations) have not yet been reported. Here, we demonstrate that by combining the band-gap formation mechanisms of Bragg scattering and local resonances (the latter one is dominating), PnCs with wide and robust phononic band gaps can be established. The robustness of the phononic band gaps are then discussed from two aspects: robustness to geometric randomness (manufacture defects) and robustness to deformations (mechanical stimuli). Analytical formulations further predict the optimal design parameters, and an uncertainty analysis quantifies the randomness effect of each designing parameter. Moreover, we show that the deformation robustness originates from a local resonance-dominant mechanism together with the suppression of structural instability. Importantly, the proposed PnCs require only a small number of layers of elements (three unit cells) to obtain broad, robust, and strong attenuation bands, which offer great potential in designing flexible and deformable phononic devices.

  8. Changes in the pattern of protein synthesis of prosopis chilensis induced by high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, C.; Cardemil, L. (Univ. de Chile, Santiago (USA))

    1989-04-01

    Seeds of Prosopis chilensis, a leguminous tree from semi-arid regions of Central Chile, were germinated at temperatures of 25-30-35-40-45 and 50{degree}C. Germination was 100% between 25 and 40{degree}C, being faster at 35{degree}C. The best temperature for root growth was also 35{degree}C. There was not germination at 50{degree}C. However, seedlings coming from seeds germinated at 35{degree}C were capable of growing at higher temperatures of 45 and 50{degree}C. Pattern of protein synthesis was followed in roots incubated with {sup 35}S-methionine at increasing temperatures between 35 and 50{degree}C. SDS-PAGE of the proteins followed by fluorography shows that at temperatures above 35{degree}C, new protein bands appear while others become thicker. Most of the protein bands have decreased at 50{degree}C, with the exception of the new bands. A band of 70 KD, that is present at 35{degree}C, is more prominent at 50{degree}C. These proteins may have an important role in the thermotolerance of Prosopis chilensis to stressing temperatures.

  9. Changes in the pattern of protein synthesis of prosopis chilensis induced by high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, C.; Cardemil, L.

    1989-01-01

    Seeds of Prosopis chilensis, a leguminous tree from semi-arid regions of Central Chile, were germinated at temperatures of 25-30-35-40-45 and 50 degree C. Germination was 100% between 25 and 40 degree C, being faster at 35 degree C. The best temperature for root growth was also 35 degree C. There was not germination at 50 degree C. However, seedlings coming from seeds germinated at 35 degree C were capable of growing at higher temperatures of 45 and 50 degree C. Pattern of protein synthesis was followed in roots incubated with 35 S-methionine at increasing temperatures between 35 and 50 degree C. SDS-PAGE of the proteins followed by fluorography shows that at temperatures above 35 degree C, new protein bands appear while others become thicker. Most of the protein bands have decreased at 50 degree C, with the exception of the new bands. A band of 70 KD, that is present at 35 degree C, is more prominent at 50 degree C. These proteins may have an important role in the thermotolerance of Prosopis chilensis to stressing temperatures

  10. Glycosylation in secreted proteins from yeast Kluyveromyces lactis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, A.V.; Passos, F.M.L. [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Microbiologia. Lab. de Fisiologia de Microrganismos; Azevedo, B.R.; Pimenta, A.M.C.; Santoro, M.M. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia. Lab. de Enzimologia e Fisico-Quimica de Proteina

    2008-07-01

    Full text: The nutritional status of a cell culture affects either the expression or the traffic of a number of proteins. The identification of the physiological conditions which favor protein secretion has important biotechnological consequences in designing systems for recombinant extracellular protein industrial production. Yeast Kluyvromyces lactis has been cultured in a continuous stirring tank bioreactor (CSTR) under nitrogen limitation at growth rates (0.03 h{sup -1} and 0.09 h{sup -1}) close to either exponential or stationary batch growth phases, respectively the objective was to investigate the extracellular glycoproteins at these two level of nitrogen limitation. Proteins from free cell extracts were separated by gradient SDS-PAGE (5-15%) and two-dimensional chromatography, and were analyzed by mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS). In SDS-PAGE analysis, differences in extracellular proteome were visualized: different proteins profiles at these two growth rates. The 0.09 h-1 growth rate showed larger number of bands using colloidal Coma ssie Blue staining. Different bands were detected at these two growth rates when the PAS assay for glycoprotein detection in polyacrylamide gel was used. The two-dimensional chromatogram profiles were comparatively distinguished between the 0.03 h{sup -1} and 0.09 h{sup -1} growth rate samples. Protein peaks from the second dimension, were subjected to mass spectrometry. The mass spectrums visualized showed glycosylated proteins with N-acetylglucosamine molecules and 8, 9 or 15 hexoses molecules. Comparisons between the proteins averaged mass values with the deduced proteins masses from K. lactis secreted proteins database indicated possible post-translational modifications, such as post-translational proteolysis, acetylation, deamidation and myristoylation.

  11. Glycosylation in secreted proteins from yeast Kluyveromyces lactis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A.V.; Passos, F.M.L.; Azevedo, B.R.; Pimenta, A.M.C.; Santoro, M.M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The nutritional status of a cell culture affects either the expression or the traffic of a number of proteins. The identification of the physiological conditions which favor protein secretion has important biotechnological consequences in designing systems for recombinant extracellular protein industrial production. Yeast Kluyvromyces lactis has been cultured in a continuous stirring tank bioreactor (CSTR) under nitrogen limitation at growth rates (0.03 h -1 and 0.09 h -1 ) close to either exponential or stationary batch growth phases, respectively the objective was to investigate the extracellular glycoproteins at these two level of nitrogen limitation. Proteins from free cell extracts were separated by gradient SDS-PAGE (5-15%) and two-dimensional chromatography, and were analyzed by mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS). In SDS-PAGE analysis, differences in extracellular proteome were visualized: different proteins profiles at these two growth rates. The 0.09 h-1 growth rate showed larger number of bands using colloidal Coma ssie Blue staining. Different bands were detected at these two growth rates when the PAS assay for glycoprotein detection in polyacrylamide gel was used. The two-dimensional chromatogram profiles were comparatively distinguished between the 0.03 h -1 and 0.09 h -1 growth rate samples. Protein peaks from the second dimension, were subjected to mass spectrometry. The mass spectrums visualized showed glycosylated proteins with N-acetylglucosamine molecules and 8, 9 or 15 hexoses molecules. Comparisons between the proteins averaged mass values with the deduced proteins masses from K. lactis secreted proteins database indicated possible post-translational modifications, such as post-translational proteolysis, acetylation, deamidation and myristoylation

  12. Thermodynamics of many-band superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waelte, A.

    2006-01-01

    In the present thesis the microscopical properties of the superconducting state of MgCNi 3 , MgB 2 , and some rare earth-transition metal borocarbides are studied by means of measurements of the specific heat. Furthermore the frequency spectrum of the lattice vibrations is estimated. The energy gap of the superconducting state can be determined from the specific heat of the superconducting state, which yields as like as the upper critical mafnetic field H c2 (0) hints on the electron-phonon coupling. From the analysis of these results and the comparison with results from transport measurements as well as the tunnel and point-contact spectroscopy can be concluded, how far the BCS model of superconductivity must be modified in order to be able to describe the superconducting state of the studied compounds. Studies on MgCNi 3 , which lies near a magnetic instability, show that occurring magnetic fluctuations have a bisection of the superconducting transition temperature T C as consequence. The under this aspect relatively high value of T C =7 K is a consequence of strong electron-phonon coupling, which is essentailly carried by nickel vibrations stabilized by carbon. A for the first time observed distinct anomaly in the specific heat of the classical many-band superconductor MgB 2 (here with pure 10 B) at about T c /4=10 K can be understood by means of a two-band model for the case of especially weak coupling between both bands. The analysis of the specific heat of the superconducting phase of the non-magnetic rare earth-nickel borocarbide YNi 2 B 2 C and LuNi 2 B 2 C leads to the conclusion thet visible effects of the many-band electron system are dependent on the mass on the position both of the rare earth and the transition metal. The signal of the superconducting phase transformation visible in the specific heat of the antiferromagnetic HoNi 2 B 2 C is smaller than expected

  13. Evanescent waves and deaf bands in sonic crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Romero-García

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The properties of sonic crystals (SC are theoretically investigated in this work by solving the inverse problem k(ω using the extended plane wave expansion (EPWE. The solution of the resulting eigenvalue problem gives the complex band structure which takes into account both the propagating and the evanescent modes. In this work we show the complete mathematical formulation of the EPWE for SC and the supercell approximation for its use in both a complete SC and a SC with defects. As an example we show a novel interpretation of the deaf bands in a complete SC in good agreement with multiple scattering simulations.

  14. Evanescent waves and deaf bands in sonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-García, V.; Garcia-Raffi, L. M.; Sánchez-Pérez, J. V.

    2011-12-01

    The properties of sonic crystals (SC) are theoretically investigated in this work by solving the inverse problem k(ω) using the extended plane wave expansion (EPWE). The solution of the resulting eigenvalue problem gives the complex band structure which takes into account both the propagating and the evanescent modes. In this work we show the complete mathematical formulation of the EPWE for SC and the supercell approximation for its use in both a complete SC and a SC with defects. As an example we show a novel interpretation of the deaf bands in a complete SC in good agreement with multiple scattering simulations.

  15. Deformation bands in porous sandstones their microstructure and petrophysical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torabi, Anita

    2007-12-15

    deformation bands are characterized by strain hardening, these new bands feature a central slip surface, which indicates late strain softening. They lack the characteristic compaction envelop, and are typified by higher porosity and lower permeability than previously-described cataclastic deformation bands. Intense background fracturing of the host rock and significant initial porosity are considered to be important in creating these newly-discovered deformation bands. In a related study, we investigate, for millimeter- wide deformation bands, the scale limitation inherent in laboratory measurements of porosity and permeability. The scale limitations imposed by the deformation band relative to the physical sample size motivated us to develop a new method for determining porosity and permeability based on image processing. While plug measurements measure the effective permeability across a 25.4 mm (1 inch) long sample, which includes both host rock and deformation band, the method presented here provides a means to estimate porosity and permeability of deformation band on microscale. This method utilizes low-order (one- and two orders) spatial correlation functions to analyze high-resolution, high-magnification backscatter images, to estimate the porosity and specific surface area of the pore-grain interface in the deformed sandstones. Further, this work demonstrates the use of a modified version of the Kozeny-Carmen relation to calculate permeability by using porosity and specific surface area obtained through the image processing. The result shows that permeability difference between the band and the host rock is up to four orders of magnitude. Moreover, the porosities and permeabilities estimated from image processing are lower than those obtained from their plug measurements; hence the traditional laboratory measurements have been overestimating permeability because of the previously-unrecognized scale problem. In addition, the image processing results clearly show that

  16. Changing optical band structure with single photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Andreas; Caneva, Tommaso; Chang, Darrick E.

    2017-11-01

    Achieving strong interactions between individual photons enables a wide variety of exciting possibilities in quantum information science and many-body physics. Cold atoms interfaced with nanophotonic structures have emerged as a platform to realize novel forms of nonlinear interactions. In particular, when atoms are coupled to a photonic crystal waveguide, long-range atomic interactions can arise that are mediated by localized atom-photon bound states. We theoretically show that in such a system, the absorption of a single photon can change the band structure for a subsequent photon. This occurs because the first photon affects the atoms in the chain in an alternating fashion, thus leading to an effective period doubling of the system and a new optical band structure for the composite atom-nanophotonic system. We demonstrate how this mechanism can be engineered to realize a single-photon switch, where the first incoming photon switches the system from being highly transmissive to highly reflective, and analyze how signatures can be observed via non-classical correlations of the outgoing photon field.

  17. Dust bands in the asteroid belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, M.V.; Greenberg, R.; Dermott, S.F.; Nicholson, P.D.; Burns, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the original IRAS observations leading to the discovery of the three dust bands in the asteroid belt and the analysis of data. Special attention is given to an analytical model of the dust band torus and to theories concerning the origin of the dust bands, with special attention given to the collisional equilibrium (asteroid family), the nonequilibrium (random collision), and the comet hypotheses of dust-band origin. It is noted that neither the equilibrium nor nonequilibrium models, as currently formulated, present a complete picture of the IRAS dust-band observations. 32 refs

  18. Tau protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup Battistini; Kristensen, Kim; Bahl, Jmc

    2011-01-01

    Background: Tau protein has been proposed as biomarker of axonal damage leading to irreversible neurological impairment in MS. CSF concentrations may be useful when determining risk of progression from ON to MS. Objective: To investigate the association between tau protein concentration and 14......-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with monosymptomatic optic neuritis (ON) versus patients with monosymptomatic onset who progressed to multiple sclerosis (MS). To evaluate results against data found in a complete literature review. Methods: A total of 66 patients with MS and/or ON from...... the Department of Neurology of Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, were included. CSF samples were analysed for tau protein and 14-3-3 protein, and clinical and paraclinical information was obtained from medical records. Results: The study shows a significantly increased concentration of tau...

  19. Gamma irradiation effect on soy protein modification, protein - phenolic interaction and antioxidant activity in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumari, Sweta; Dahuja, Anil; Vinutha, T.; Singh, Bhupinder

    2014-01-01

    Soy protein is one of the most important sources of protein to feed the world population in the future. Consumption of soybean quality protein and their texture is dependent on the protein modification. In the present study, four soybean genotypes PL5039 (black), EC 472143 (black), Pusa 9814 (yellow) and SL525 (yellow), differing in their seed coat colour were gamma irradiated at 0.5,1.0, 2.0 and 5.0 kGy and the extent of protein modification and parameters affecting it viz. free phenolics, bound phenolics, lip oxygenase and antioxidant activity were analysed. Modifications of soybean proteins were investigated by chemical analysis and electrophoresis. The irradiation dose of 1.0 kGy showed decreased turbidity, protein oxidation, surface hydrophobicity but increased solubility and sulfhydryl and disulfide contents in all the genotypes. Further, SDS PAGE profile of treated soybean seeds revealed remarkable difference in electrophoretic bands as compared to the untreated seeds. Lipoxygense activity in all the genotypes decreased with increased exposure of gamma irradiation, which produced peroxide products that changes the structural characteristics of soy protein. Free phenolics, bound phenolics and total antioxidant activity measured in terms of FRAP in all the genotypes increased significantly at a dose of 2.0 kGy and it declined at a dose of 5.0 kGy. Antioxidant potential measured in terms of 1,1-diphenyl-2- picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity showed an increasing trend with dose, indicating that radiation processing as a method of food preservation has a positive nutritional implication. Hence, it is suggested that, mild gamma irradiation upto 2.0 kGy may reduce the protein oxidation, enhance the antioxidant activity and improve the soybean protein quality compared to higher dose 5.0 kGy, which reduced the protein quality. (author)

  20. Table of members of quasi-bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Mitsuo.

    1984-04-01

    The probable members of the quasi-bands in even-even nuclei for Z between 6 and 100 are listed in this table. The terms quasi-bands have been introduced in the so-called spherical regions as the counter parts of the collective bands in the deformed regions. In the present compilation, the data for deformed nuclei are classified for convenience under the same titles, Quasi-Ground Band, Quasi-Beta Band and Quasi-Gamma Band, as are used for other nuclear regions. The present edition covers the literature through September, 1983. Fifteen newly discovered nuclides are included. The classification of energy level into quasi-bands is made on the basis of the systematic trend in the data over large groups of nuclei. (Kato, T.)

  1. A Novel Ku-Band/Ka-Band and Ka-Band/E-Band Multimode Waveguide Couplers for Power Measurement of Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Harmonic Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler, fabricated from two dissimilar frequency band waveguides, is capable of isolating power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT) amplifier. Test results from proof-of-concept demonstrations are presented for a Ku-band/Ka-band MDC and a Ka-band/E-band MDC. In addition to power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a satellite borne beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave (mm-wave) frequencies (Ka-band and E-band).

  2. Dual-band frequency selective surface with large band separation and stable performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hang; Qu, Shao-Bo; Peng, Wei-Dong; Lin, Bao-Qin; Wang, Jia-Fu; Ma, Hua; Zhang, Jie-Qiu; Bai, Peng; Wang, Xu-Hua; Xu, Zhuo

    2012-05-01

    A new technique of designing a dual-band frequency selective surface with large band separation is presented. This technique is based on a delicately designed topology of L- and Ku-band microwave filters. The two band-pass responses are generated by a capacitively-loaded square-loop frequency selective surface and an aperture-coupled frequency selective surface, respectively. A Faraday cage is located between the two frequency selective surface structures to eliminate undesired couplings. Based on this technique, a dual-band frequency selective surface with large band separation is designed, which possesses large band separation, high selectivity, and stable performance under various incident angles and different polarizations.

  3. Thermal evolution of the band edges of 6H-SiC: X-ray methods compared to the optical band gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miedema, P.S.; Beye, M.; Könnecke, R.; Schiwietz, G.; Föhlisch, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Conduction band minima (CBM) of 6H-SiC are estimated with Si 2p XAS. • Valence band maxima (VBM) of 6H-SiC are estimated with non-resonant Si 2p XES. • Temperature-dependent VBM and CBM of 6H-SiC show asymmetric band gap closing. • XAS, XES and RIXS band gap estimates are compared with the optical band gap. • XAS + XES versus optical band gap provides core-excitonic screening energies. - Abstract: The band gap of semiconductors like silicon and silicon carbide (SiC) is the key for their device properties. In this research, the band gap of 6H-SiC and its temperature dependence were analyzed with silicon 2p X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) allowing for a separate analysis of the conduction-band minimum (CBM) and valence-band maximum (VBM) components of the band gap. The temperature-dependent asymmetric band gap shrinking of 6H-SiC was determined with a valence-band slope of +2.45 × 10 −4 eV/K and a conduction-band slope of −1.334 × 10 −4 eV/K. The apparent asymmetry, e.g., that two thirds of the band-gap shrinking with increasing temperature is due to the VBM evolution in 6H-SiC, is similar to the asymmetry obtained for pure silicon before. The overall band gap temperature-dependence determined with XAS and non-resonant XES is compared to temperature-dependent optical studies. The core-excitonic binding energy appearing in the Si 2p XAS is extracted as the main difference. In addition, the energy loss of the onset of the first band in RIXS yields to values similar to the optical band gap over the tested temperature range

  4. Reliability of flipper-banded penguins as indicators of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraux, Claire; Le Bohec, Céline; Durant, Joël M; Viblanc, Vincent A; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel; Beaune, David; Park, Young-Hyang; Yoccoz, Nigel G; Stenseth, Nils C; Le Maho, Yvon

    2011-01-13

    In 2007, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change highlighted an urgent need to assess the responses of marine ecosystems to climate change. Because they lie in a high-latitude region, the Southern Ocean ecosystems are expected to be strongly affected by global warming. Using top predators of this highly productive ocean (such as penguins) as integrative indicators may help us assess the impacts of climate change on marine ecosystems. Yet most available information on penguin population dynamics is based on the controversial use of flipper banding. Although some reports have found the effects of flipper bands to be deleterious, some short-term (one-year) studies have concluded otherwise, resulting in the continuation of extensive banding schemes and the use of data sets thus collected to predict climate impact on natural populations. Here we show that banding of free-ranging king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) impairs both survival and reproduction, ultimately affecting population growth rate. Over the course of a 10-year longitudinal study, banded birds produced 41% [corrected] fewer chicks and had a survival rate 16 percentage points [corrected] lower than non-banded birds, demonstrating a massive long-term impact of banding and thus refuting the assumption that birds will ultimately adapt to being banded. Indeed, banded birds still arrived later for breeding at the study site and had longer foraging trips even after 10 years. One of our major findings is that responses of flipper-banded penguins to climate variability (that is, changes in sea surface temperature and in the Southern Oscillation index) differ from those of non-banded birds. We show that only long-term investigations may allow an evaluation of the impact of flipper bands and that every major life-history trait can be affected, calling into question the banding schemes still going on. In addition, our understanding of the effects of climate change on marine ecosystems based on flipper-band

  5. Low temperature intermediate band metallic behavior in Ti implanted Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olea, Javier, E-mail: oleaariza@fis.ucm.es; Pastor, David; Garcia-Hemme, Eric; Garcia-Hernansanz, Rodrigo; Prado, Alvaro del; Martil, Ignacio; Gonzalez-Diaz, German

    2012-08-31

    Si samples implanted with very high Ti doses and subjected to Pulsed-Laser Melting (PLM) have been electrically analyzed in the scope of a two-layer model previously reported based on the Intermediate Band (IB) theory. Conductivity and Hall effect measurements using the van der Pauw technique suggest that the insulator-metal transition takes place for implantation doses in the 10{sup 14}-10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} range. Results of the sample implanted with the 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} dose show a metallic behavior at low temperature that is explained by the formation of a p-type IB out of the Ti deep levels. This suggests that the IB would be semi-filled, which is essential for IB photovoltaic devices. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We fabricated high dose Ti implanted Si samples for intermediate band research. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We measured the electronic transport properties in the 7-300 K range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show an insulator to metallic transition when the intermediate band is formed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The intermediate band is semi-filled and populated by holes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We satisfactorily explain the electrical behavior by an intermediate band model.

  6. Apolipoprotein B is a calcium binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dashti, N.; Lee, D.M.; Mok, T.

    1986-01-01

    Human hepatocarcinoma Hep G2 cells were grown in culture medium containing [ 45 Ca 2+ ]. The secreted lipoproteins of d 45 Ca] from the gels showed that the peak of radioactivity corresponded to the apolipoprotein B band. The molar ratio of the incorporated [ 45 Ca 2+ ] and apolipoprotein B was close to unity. No radioactivity was found associated with any other secreted apolipoproteins. To confirm these findings, apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins were precipitated with anti-apolipoprotein B and high density lipoproteins were precipitated with anti-apolipoprotein A-I. Only the former precipitate was radioactive. These results suggest that apolipoprotein B is a calcium binding protein

  7. Photonic band gap structure simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiping; Shapiro, Michael A.; Smirnova, Evgenya I.; Temkin, Richard J.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.

    2006-10-03

    A system and method for designing photonic band gap structures. The system and method provide a user with the capability to produce a model of a two-dimensional array of conductors corresponding to a unit cell. The model involves a linear equation. Boundary conditions representative of conditions at the boundary of the unit cell are applied to a solution of the Helmholtz equation defined for the unit cell. The linear equation can be approximated by a Hermitian matrix. An eigenvalue of the Helmholtz equation is calculated. One computation approach involves calculating finite differences. The model can include a symmetry element, such as a center of inversion, a rotation axis, and a mirror plane. A graphical user interface is provided for the user's convenience. A display is provided to display to a user the calculated eigenvalue, corresponding to a photonic energy level in the Brilloin zone of the unit cell.

  8. Broad-band beam buncher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, D.A.; Flood, W.S.; Arthur, A.A.; Voelker, F.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a broad-band beam buncher. This beam buncher consists of: a housing adapted to be eacuated, an electron gun in the housing for producing a beam of electrons, buncher means in the housing forming a buncher cavity which has an entrance opening for receiving the electron beam and an exit opening through which the electron beam passes out of the buncher cavity, a drift tube electrode in the buncher cavity and disposed between the entrance opening and the exit opening with first and second gaps between the drift tube electrode and the entrance and exit openings, the drift tube electrode which has a first drift space through which the electron beam passes in traveling between the entrance and exit openings, modulating means for supplying an ultrahigh frequeny modulating signal to the drift tube electrode for producing velocity modulation of the electrons in the electron beam as the electrons pass through the buncher cavity and the drift tube electrode between the entrance opening and the exit opening, drift space means in the housing forming a second drift space for receiving the velocity modulated electron beam from the exit opening, the velocity modulated electron beam being bunched as it passes along the second drift space, the drift space means has a discharge opening through which the electron beam is discharged from the second drift space after being bunched therein, the modulating means containing a signal source for producing an ultrahigh frequency signal, a transmission line connected between the signal source and the drift tube electrode, and terminating means connected to the drift tube electrode for terminating the transmission line in approximately its characteristic impedance to afford a broad response band with minimum 6 variations therein

  9. The band gap variation of a two dimensional binary locally resonant structure in thermal environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the numerical investigation of thermal effect on band gap dynamical characteristic for a two-dimensional binary structure composed of aluminum plate periodically filled with nitrile rubber cylinder is presented. Initially, the band gap of the binary structure variation trend with increasing temperature is studied by taking the softening effect of thermal stress into account. A breakthrough is made which found the band gap being narrower and shifting to lower frequency in thermal environment. The complete band gap which in higher frequency is more sensitive to temperature that it disappears with temperature increasing. Then some new transformed models are created by changing the height of nitrile rubber cylinder from 1mm to 7mm. Simulations show that transformed model can produce a wider band gap (either flexure or complete band gap. A proper forbidden gap of elastic wave can be utilized in thermal environment although both flexure and complete band gaps become narrower with temperature. Besides that, there is a zero-frequency flat band appearing in the first flexure band, and it becomes broader with temperature increasing. The band gap width decreases trend in thermal environment, as well as the wider band gap induced by the transformed model with higher nitrile rubber cylinder is useful for the design and application of phononic crystal structures in thermal environment.

  10. Band-to-band tunneling distance analysis in the heterogate electron–hole bilayer tunnel field-effect transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, J. L., E-mail: jose.padilladelatorre@epfl.ch [Nanoelectronic Devices Laboratory, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne CH-1015 (Switzerland); Departamento de Electrónica y Tecnología de los Computadores, Universidad de Granada, Avda. Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain); Palomares, A. [Departamento de Matemática Aplicada, Universidad de Granada, Avda. Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain); Alper, C.; Ionescu, A. M. [Nanoelectronic Devices Laboratory, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne CH-1015 (Switzerland); Gámiz, F. [Departamento de Electrónica y Tecnología de los Computadores, Universidad de Granada, Avda. Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain)

    2016-01-28

    In this work, we analyze the behavior of the band-to-band tunneling distance between electron and hole subbands resulting from field-induced quantum confinement in the heterogate electron–hole bilayer tunnel field-effect transistor. We show that, analogously to the explicit formula for the tunneling distance that can be easily obtained in the semiclassical framework where the conduction and valence band edges are allowed states, an equivalent analytical expression can be derived in the presence of field-induced quantum confinement for describing the dependence of the tunneling distance on the body thickness and material properties of the channel. This explicit expression accounting for quantum confinement holds valid provided that the potential wells for electrons and holes at the top and bottom of the channel can be approximated by triangular profiles. Analytical predictions are compared to simulation results showing very accurate agreement.

  11. Proof of concept for a banding scheme to support risk assessments related to multi-product biologics manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, Jeffrey W; Fikree, Hana; Haighton, Lois A; Blackwell, James; Felice, Brian; Wright, Teresa L

    2015-11-01

    A banding scheme theory has been proposed to assess the potency/toxicity of biologics and assist with decisions regarding the introduction of new biologic products into existing manufacturing facilities. The current work was conducted to provide a practical example of how this scheme could be applied. Information was identified for representatives from the following four proposed bands: Band A (lethal toxins); Band B (toxins and apoptosis signals); Band C (cytokines and growth factors); and Band D (antibodies, antibody fragments, scaffold molecules, and insulins). The potency/toxicity of the representative substances was confirmed as follows: Band A, low nanogram quantities exert lethal effects; Band B, repeated administration of microgram quantities is tolerated in humans; Band C, endogenous substances and recombinant versions administered to patients in low (interferons), intermediate (growth factors), and high (interleukins) microgram doses, often on a chronic basis; and Band D, endogenous substances present or produced in the body in milligram quantities per day (insulin, collagen) or protein therapeutics administered in milligram quantities per dose (mAbs). This work confirms that substances in Bands A, B, C, and D represent very high, high, medium, and low concern with regard to risk of cross-contamination in manufacturing facilities, thus supporting the proposed banding scheme. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Majorana flat bands in anisotropic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendler, Daniel; Kotetes, Panagiotis; Schoen, Gerd [Institut fuer theoretische Festkoerperphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    It has been recently proposed that topologically protected Majorana flat bands (MFBs) emerge in superconductors with nodal energy spectrum. In this work we introduce a new class of gapful superconductors, in which MFBs can occur due to strong anisotropy. The prototype system exhibiting this kind of behavior is the nematic p{sub x}+p{sub y} spinless superconductor, which supports an edge MFB with controllable bandwidth. Our proposal can be for instance experimentally implemented in topological superconductors engineered from i. semiconductors with tunable spin-orbit coupling or ii. topological insulator surfaces with intrinsic magnetic order in proximity to a conventional SC. By investigating the topological properties of both setups, we show that their unique features render them feasible platforms for manipulating the Majorana fermion bandstructure and realizing MFBs.

  13. Photonic band gaps of porous solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, R.; Sigalas, M. M.; Subramania, G.; Soukoulis, C. M.; Ho, K.-M.

    2000-01-01

    Colloidal inverse photonic crystals composed of ordered lattices of air spheres in a high dielectric background are found to have three-dimensional photonic gaps for face-centered cubic, hexgaonal close-packed, and double hexagonal close-packed stacking sequences. Conditions for the occurrence of the complete gap are a sufficient dielectric contrast and a geometry near close packed. Although the lower pseudogaps of these stacking sequences differ, the lowest stop band in the stacking direction is insensitive to the stacking sequence; hence their experimental reflection should be similar. Transmission calculations with structural disorder show the lower pseudogap is relatively unaffected but the higher gap is very difficult to observe with moderate disorder. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  14. Molding of L band niobium superconductor cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Yoshisato; Saito, Kenji; Noguchi, Shuichi; Koizumi, Susumu [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    A cavity to produce high accelerating electron field was developed. The L-band (1.3 GHz) niobium superconductor unit cell cavity was ellipsoid with {phi}217.3 mm outer diameter and 2.5 mm thickness and consisted of two pieces of half cell, two beam pipes and flange. A deep drawing process was adapted. In spite of the first trial manufacture, each good cavity was obtained. Characteristic properties of niobium materials, molding method of cavity, extension of sheet after molding, production of beam pipe, accuracy and the cost were explained. Niobium materials. showed tensile strength 15.6 kg/mm{sup 2}, load-carrying capacity 4.1 kg/mm{sup 2}, density 8.57, extension 42.5% and RRR (resistance residual ratio){>=}200. (S.Y.)

  15. The dynamics of a shear band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarola, Diana; Capuani, Domenico; Bigoni, Davide

    2018-03-01

    A shear band of finite length, formed inside a ductile material at a certain stage of a continued homogeneous strain, provides a dynamic perturbation to an incident wave field, which strongly influences the dynamics of the material and affects its path to failure. The investigation of this perturbation is presented for a ductile metal, with reference to the incremental mechanics of a material obeying the J2-deformation theory of plasticity (a special form of prestressed, elastic, anisotropic, and incompressible solid). The treatment originates from the derivation of integral representations relating the incremental mechanical fields at every point of the medium to the incremental displacement jump across the shear band faces, generated by an impinging wave. The boundary integral equations (under the plane strain assumption) are numerically approached through a collocation technique, which keeps into account the singularity at the shear band tips and permits the analysis of an incident wave impinging a shear band. It is shown that the presence of the shear band induces a resonance, visible in the incremental displacement field and in the stress intensity factor at the shear band tips, which promotes shear band growth. Moreover, the waves scattered by the shear band are shown to generate a fine texture of vibrations, parallel to the shear band line and propagating at a long distance from it, but leaving a sort of conical shadow zone, which emanates from the tips of the shear band.

  16. The 14 mu m band of carbon stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamamura, [No Value; de Jong, T; Waters, LBFM; Cami, J; Justtanont, K; LeBertre, T; Lebre, A; Waelkens, C

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the absorption bands around 14 mum in the spectra of 11 carbon stars with mass-loss rates ranging from 10(-8) to 10(-4) M-circle dot yr(-1), based on data obtained with the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). All stars clearly show a

  17. Simulation study of the high intensity S-Band photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiongwei; Nakajima, Kazuhisa [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, we report the results of simulation study of the high intensity S-Band photoinjector. The aim of the simulation study is to transport high bunch charge with low emittance evolution. The simulation result shows that 7nC bunch with rms emittance 22.3 {pi} mm mrad can be outputted at the exit of photoinjector. (author)

  18. Optical verification of the valence band structure of cadmium arsenide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelten, M.J.; Es, van C.M.; Blom, F.A.P.; Jongeneelen, J.W.F.

    1980-01-01

    Optical absorption measurements were performed on thin single crystalline samples of Cd3As2 at temperatures of 300 K and 10 K. At low temperature the interband absorption coefficient shows clearly two steps due to direct transitions from the heavy hole and light hole valence bands to the conduction

  19. Simulation study of the high intensity S-Band photoinjector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Xiongwei; Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of simulation study of the high intensity S-Band photoinjector. The aim of the simulation study is to transport high bunch charge with low emittance evolution. The simulation result shows that 7nC bunch with rms emittance 22.3 π mm mrad can be outputted at the exit of photoinjector. (author)

  20. Effect of conduction band nonparabolicity on the optical properties in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the bulk conduction band edge, the correction due to nonparabolicity can be important. [9,10]. In a narrow QW under a strong magnetic field, the optical absorption coefficients calculated with the nonparabolicity correction shows remarkable deviation from results obtained using parabolic energy approximation [11].

  1. Vibrational lifetimes of protein amide modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, K.A.; Rella, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    Measurement of the lifetimes of vibrational modes in proteins has been achieved with a single frequency infrared pump-probe technique using the Stanford Picosecond Free-electron Laser, These are the first direct measurements of vibrational dynamics in the polyamide structure of proteins. In this study, modes associated with the protein backbone are investigated. Results for the amide I band, which consists mainly of the stretching motion of the carbonyl unit of the amide linkage, show that relaxation from the first vibrational excited level (v=1) to the vibrational ground state (v=0) occurs within 1.5 picoseconds with apparent first order kinetics. Comparison of lifetimes for myoglobin and azurin, which have differing secondary structures, show a small but significant difference. The lifetime for the amide I band of myoglobin is 300 femtoseconds shorter than for azurin. Further measurements are in progress on other backbone vibrational modes and on the temperature dependence of the lifetimes. Comparison of vibrational dynamics for proteins with differing secondary structure and for different vibrational modes within a protein will lead to a greater understanding of energy transfer and dissipation in biological systems. In addition, these results have relevance to tissue ablation studies which have been conducted with pulsed infrared lasers. Vibrational lifetimes are necessary for calculating the rate at which the energy from absorbed infrared photons is converted to equilibrium thermal energy within the irradiated volume. The very fast vibrational lifetimes measured here indicate that mechanisms which involve direct vibrational up-pumping of the amide modes with consecutive laser pulses, leading to bond breakage or weakening, are not valid

  2. Search for the characters of chiral rotation in excited bands for the idea chiral nuclei with A ∼ 130

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Qibo; Yao Jiangming; Meng Jie; Zhang Shuangquan; Qi Bin

    2010-01-01

    Since the occurrence of chirality was originally suggested in 1997 by Frauendorf and Meng [1] and experimentally observed in 2001 [2] , the investigation of chiral symmetry in atomic nuclei becomes one of the most important topics in nuclear physics. More and more chiral doublet bands [3-7] in atomic nuclei [8] have been reported. There are also many discussions about the fingerprints of chirality. In the pioneer paper [1] , the two lowest near degenerate bands given by the particle-rotor model (PRM) are interpreted as chiral doublet bands. If the nucleus has chiral geometry with proper configuration, the character of chiral rotation may appear not only in the two lowest bands, but also in the other bands. Therefore, it is interesting to search for the character of chiral rotation, Based on the PRM model with configuration corresponding to A ∼ 130 mass region, we examine the theoretical spectroscopy of higher excited bands (band3, band4, band5 and band6) beyond the two lowest bands (bandl and band2), including energies, spin-alignments, projection of total angular momentum and electromagnetic transition probabilities. The results show that band3 and band4 have characters of chirality in some spin region. (authors)

  3. Ultrastructural and biochemical investigations of protein mobilization of Mucuna pruriens (L.) DC. cotyledons and embryo axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muccifora, Simonetta; Guerranti, Roberto; Muzzi, Chiara; Hope-Onyekwere, Nnadozies S; Pagani, Roberto; Leoncini, Roberto; Bellani, Lorenza M

    2010-03-01

    The mobilization of storage reserves, with particular emphasis on storage proteins of Mucuna pruriens (L.) DC., cotyledons, and embryo was investigated from the ultrastructural and biochemical points of view. Proteins and starch were the two main storage substances in cotyledons, and proteins and lipids were the main ones in the embryo. Embryo protein bodies were smaller and fewer in number than those of cotyledons. Structural and ultrastructural data determined between 24 and 48 h after imbibition and between 48 and 72 h after imbibition, the end of significant embryo and cotyledon protein mobilization, respectively, indicating more precocious storage protein mobilization in the axis than cotyledons. Moreover, storage protein mobilization in embryo and cotyledons occurred before the end of germination. Water soluble proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, producing 29 bands with molecular weights from 14 to 90 KDa. Embryo extract contained more proteins than cotyledon extract, contained seven characteristic bands, and showed a higher variability of the optical density trend than cotyledon.

  4. Bunch monitor for an S-band electron linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otake, Yuji; Nakahara, Kazuo

    1991-01-01

    The measurement of bunch characteristics in an S-band electron linear accelerator is required in order to evaluate the quality of accelerated electron beams. A new-type bunch monitor has been developed which combines micro-stripline technology with an air insulator and wall-current monitoring technology. The obtained time resolution of the monitor was more than 150 ps. This result shows that the monitor can handle the bunch number of an S-band linac. The structure of the monitor is suitable for being installed in the vacuum area, since it is constructed of only metal and ceramic parts. It can therefore easily be employed in an actual machine

  5. Intruder bands in Z = 51 nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaFosse, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Recent investigations of h 11/2 proton intruder bands in odd 51 Sb nuclei are reported. In addition to experiments performed at SUNY Stony Brook and Chalk River, data from Early Implementation of GAMMASPHERE (analysis in progress) are presented. In particular, the nuclei 109 Sb and 111 Sb are discussed. Rotational bands based on the πh 11/2 orbital coupled to a 2p2h deformed state of the 50 Sn core have been observed. These bands have been observed to high spin, and in the case of 109 Sb to a rotational frequency of 1.4 MeV, the highest frequency observed in a heavy nucleus. The dynamic moments of inertia in these bands decrease slowly with frequency, suggesting a gradual band termination. The systematics of such bands in 109-119 Sb will be discussed

  6. Collective motions and band structures in A = 60 to 80, even--even nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, J.H.; Robinson, R.L.; Ramayya, A.V.

    1978-01-01

    Evidence for and the theoretical understanding of the richness of the collective band structures as illustrated by at least seven bands seen in levels of 68 Ge, 74 Se are reviewed. The experimental data on even-even nuclei in the A = 60 to 80 region have now revealed a wide variety of collective bands with different structures. The even parity yrast cascades alone are seen to involve multiple collective structures. In addition to the ground-state bands, strong evidence is presented for both neutron and proton rotation-aligned bands built on the same orbital, (g 9 / 2 ) 2 , in one nucleus. Several other nuclei also show the crossing of RAL bands around the 8 + level in this region. Evidence continues to be strong experimentally and supported theoretically that there is some type of shape transition and shape coexistence occurring now both in the Ge and Se isotopes around N = 40. Negative parity bands with odd and even spins with very collective nature are seen in several nuclei to high spin. These bands seem best understood in the RAL model. Very collective bands with ΔI = 1, extending from 2 + to 9 + are seen with no rotation-alignment. The purity of these bands and their persistence to such high spin establish them as an independent collective mode which is best described as a gamma-type vibration band in a deformed nucleus. In addition to all of the above bands, new bands are seen in 76 Kr and 74 Se. The nature of these bands is not presently known. 56 references

  7. CdSe/CdTe interface band gaps and band offsets calculated using spin-orbit and self-energy corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, M. [Centro de Pesquisas Avancadas Wernher von Braun, Av. Alice de Castro P.N. Mattosinho 301, CEP 13098-392 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ferreira, L.G. [Departamento de Fisica dos Materiais e Mecanica, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, L.R.C. [Center for Semiconductor Components, State University of Campinas, R. Pandia Calogeras 90, 13083-870 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ramprasad, R. [Department of Chemical, Materials and Biomolecular Engineering, Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, 97 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2012-09-20

    We performed ab initio calculations of the electronic structures of bulk CdSe and CdTe, and their interface band alignments on the CdSe in-plane lattice parameters. For this, we employed the LDA-1/2 self-energy correction scheme to obtain corrected band gaps and band offsets. Our calculations include the spin-orbit effects for the bulk cases, which have shown to be of importance for the equilibrium systems and are possibly degraded in these strained semiconductors. Therefore, the SO showed reduced importance for the band alignment of this particular system. Moreover, the electronic structure calculated along the transition region across the CdSe/CdTe interface shows an interesting non-monotonic variation of the band gap in the range 0.8-1.8 eV, which may enhance the absorption of light for corresponding frequencies at the interface between these two materials in photovoltaic applications.

  8. Amniotic band syndrome: A clinical brief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasaradha Ramireddy Malireddy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Amniotic band syndrome (ABS results from bands of amnion entangling fetal parts. They may manifest as constriction rings or complex congenital anomalies resulting in stillbirth. Karyotyping is important for exclusion of inherited disorders and proper counseling. Two case reports one stillbirth and the other with constriction ring of fingers and mild hydronephrosis are presented. The aim of this paper is to make awareness and stress the need for doing thorough work-up in all cases of constriction bands.

  9. Fade Mitigation Techniques at Ka-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Asoka (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    Rain fading is the dominant propagation impairment affecting Ka-band satellite links and rain fade mitigation is a key element in the design of Ka-band satellite networks. Some of the common fade mitigation techniques include: power control, diversity, adaptive coding, and resource sharing. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) provides an excellent opportunity to develop and test Ka-band rain impairment amelioration techniques. Up-link power control and diversity are discussed in this paper.

  10. A short note on dynamic programming in a band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibrat, Jean-François

    2018-06-15

    Third generation sequencing technologies generate long reads that exhibit high error rates, in particular for insertions and deletions which are usually the most difficult errors to cope with. The only exact algorithm capable of aligning sequences with insertions and deletions is a dynamic programming algorithm. In this note, for the sake of efficiency, we consider dynamic programming in a band. We show how to choose the band width in function of the long reads' error rates, thus obtaining an [Formula: see text] algorithm in space and time. We also propose a procedure to decide whether this algorithm, when applied to semi-global alignments, provides the optimal score. We suggest that dynamic programming in a band is well suited to the problem of aligning long reads between themselves and can be used as a core component of methods for obtaining a consensus sequence from the long reads alone. The function implementing the dynamic programming algorithm in a band is available, as a standalone program, at: https://forgemia.inra.fr/jean-francois.gibrat/BAND_DYN_PROG.git.

  11. Engineering flat electronic bands in quasiperiodic and fractal loop geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandy, Atanu, E-mail: atanunandy1989@gmail.com; Chakrabarti, Arunava, E-mail: arunava_chakrabarti@yahoo.co.in

    2015-11-06

    Exact construction of one electron eigenstates with flat, non-dispersive bands, and localized over clusters of various sizes is reported for a class of quasi-one-dimensional looped networks. Quasiperiodic Fibonacci and Berker fractal geometries are embedded in the arms of the loop threaded by a uniform magnetic flux. We work out an analytical scheme to unravel the localized single particle states pinned at various atomic sites or over clusters of them. The magnetic field is varied to control, in a subtle way, the extent of localization and the location of the flat band states in energy space. In addition to this we show that an appropriate tuning of the field can lead to a re-entrant behavior of the effective mass of the electron in a band, with a periodic flip in its sign. - Highlights: • Exact construction of eigenstates with flat and dispersive bands is reported. • Competition between translational order and growth of aperiodicity is discussed. • The effect of magnetic field on the location of flat band states is shown. • Flux tunable re-entrant behavior of the effective mass of electron is studied.

  12. Backbendings of superdeformed bands in 36;40Ar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xu-Hui; He, Xiao-Tao

    2018-05-01

    Experimentally observed superdeformed (SD) rotational bands in 36Ar and 40Ar are studied by the cranked shell model (CSM) with the pairing correlations treated by a particle-number-conserving (PNC) method. This is the first time that PNC-CSM calculations have been performed on the light nuclear mass region around A=40. The experimental kinematic moments of inertia J (1) versus rotational frequency are reproduced well. The backbending of the SD band at frequency around ℏω=1.5 MeV in 36Ar is attributed to the sharp rise of the simultaneous alignments of the neutron and proton 1d 5/2[202]5/2 pairs and 1f 7/2[321]3/2 pairs, which is a consequence of the band crossing between the 1d 5/2[202]5/2 and 1f 7/2[321]3/2 configuration states. The gentle upbending at low frequency of the SD band in 40Ar is mainly affected by the alignments of the neutron 1f 7/2[321]3/2 pairs and proton 1d 5/2[202]5/2 pairs. The PNC-CSM calculations show that besides the diagonal parts, the off-diagonal parts of the alignments play an important role in the rotational behavior of the SD bands. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11775112 and 11275098) and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions

  13. From lattice Hamiltonians to tunable band structures by lithographic design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadjine, Athmane; Allan, Guy; Delerue, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    Recently, new materials exhibiting exotic band structures characterized by Dirac cones, nontrivial flat bands, and band crossing points have been proposed on the basis of effective two-dimensional lattice Hamiltonians. Here, we show using atomistic tight-binding calculations that these theoretical predictions could be experimentally realized in the conduction band of superlattices nanolithographed in III-V and II-VI semiconductor ultrathin films. The lithographed patterns consist of periodic lattices of etched cylindrical holes that form potential barriers for the electrons in the quantum well. In the case of honeycomb lattices, the conduction minibands of the resulting artificial graphene host several Dirac cones and nontrivial flat bands. Similar features, but organized in different ways, in energy or in k -space are found in kagome, distorted honeycomb, and Lieb superlattices. Dirac cones extending over tens of meV could be obtained in superlattices with reasonable sizes of the lithographic patterns, for instance in InAs/AlSb heterostructures. Bilayer artificial graphene could be also realized by lithography of a double quantum-well heterostructure. These new materials should be interesting for the experimental exploration of Dirac-based quantum systems, for both fundamental and applied physics.

  14. Banded vs Bonded Space Maintainers: Finding Better Way Out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Vikas; Kumar Pandit, Inder; Srivastava, Nikhil; Gugnani, Neeraj; Gupta, Monika

    2014-05-01

    Of this in vivo study was to evaluate various space maintainers in terms of survival rate, gingival health and presence of caries. A total of 60 extraction sites in the age group of 4 to 9 years were divided into four groups and different space maintainers were placed in them viz (conventional band and loop, prefabricated band with custom made loop, Ribbond, Super splint). Prefabricated bands with custom made loop showed maximum success rates (84.6%), while super splint (33.33%) was found to be least successful. In terms of gingival health, prefabricated band with custom made loop reported minimum cases with poor gingival health (27.2%), while maximum cases with poor gingival health (50%) were reported with Super splint. None of the space maintainers developed caries at the end of 9 months. How to cite this article: Setia v, Pandit IK, Srivastava N, Gugnani N, Gupta M. Banded vs Bonded Space Maintainers: Finding Better Way Out. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):97-104.

  15. Band gap engineering of BC2N for nanoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Wei Hong; Hamzah, Afiq; Ahmadi, Mohammad Taghi; Ismail, Razali

    2017-12-01

    The BC2N as an example of boron-carbon-nitride (BCN), has the analogous structure as the graphene and boron nitride. It is predicted to have controllable electronic properties. Therefore, the analytical study on the engineer-able band gap of the BC2N is carried out based on the schematic structure of BC2N. The Nearest Neighbour Tight Binding (NNTB) model is employed with the dispersion relation and the density of state (DOS) as the main band gap analysing parameter. The results show that the hopping integrals having the significant effect on the band gap, band structure and DOS of BC2N nanowire (BC2NNW) need to be taken into consideration. The presented model indicates consistent trends with the published computational results around the Dirac points with the extracted band gap of 0.12 eV. Also, it is distinguished that wide energy gap of boron nitride (BN) is successfully narrowed by this carbon doped material which assures the application of BC2N on the nanoelectronics and optoelectronics in the near future.

  16. Dirac Cones, Topological Edge States, and Nontrivial Flat Bands in Two-Dimensional Semiconductors with a Honeycomb Nanogeometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kalesaki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study theoretically two-dimensional single-crystalline sheets of semiconductors that form a honeycomb lattice with a period below 10 nm. These systems could combine the usual semiconductor properties with Dirac bands. Using atomistic tight-binding calculations, we show that both the atomic lattice and the overall geometry influence the band structure, revealing materials with unusual electronic properties. In rocksalt Pb chalcogenides, the expected Dirac-type features are clouded by a complex band structure. However, in the case of zinc-blende Cd-chalcogenide semiconductors, the honeycomb nanogeometry leads to rich band structures, including, in the conduction band, Dirac cones at two distinct energies and nontrivial flat bands and, in the valence band, topological edge states. These edge states are present in several electronic gaps opened in the valence band by the spin-orbit coupling and the quantum confinement in the honeycomb geometry. The lowest Dirac conduction band has S-orbital character and is equivalent to the π-π^{⋆} band of graphene but with renormalized couplings. The conduction bands higher in energy have no counterpart in graphene; they combine a Dirac cone and flat bands because of their P-orbital character. We show that the width of the Dirac bands varies between tens and hundreds of meV. These systems emerge as remarkable platforms for studying complex electronic phases starting from conventional semiconductors. Recent advancements in colloidal chemistry indicate that these materials can be synthesized from semiconductor nanocrystals.

  17. Photo field emission spectroscopy of the tantalum band structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleint, Ch.; Radon, T.

    1978-01-01

    Photo field emission (PFE) currents of clean and barium covered tantalum tips have been measured with single lines of the mercury arc spectrum and phase-sensitive detection. Field strength and work function were determined from Fowler-Nordheim plots of the FE currents. Shoulders in the PFE current-voltage characteristics could be correlated to transitions in the band structure of tantalum according to a recently proposed two-step PFE model. A comparison with the relativistic calculations of Mattheiss and the nonrelativistic bands of Petroff and Viswanathan shows that Mattheiss' bands are more appropriate. Beside direct transitions several nondirect transitions from the different features composing the upper two density of states maxima below the Fermi edge of tantalum have been found. (Auth.)

  18. Pair Formation of Hard Core Bosons in Flat Band Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Andreas

    2018-05-01

    Hard core bosons in a large class of one or two dimensional flat band systems have an upper critical density, below which the ground states can be described completely. At the critical density, the ground states are Wigner crystals. If one adds a particle to the system at the critical density, the ground state and the low lying multi particle states of the system can be described as a Wigner crystal with an additional pair of particles. The energy band for the pair is separated from the rest of the multi-particle spectrum. The proofs use a Gerschgorin type of argument for block diagonally dominant matrices. In certain one-dimensional or tree-like structures one can show that the pair is localised, for example in the chequerboard chain. For this one-dimensional system with periodic boundary condition the energy band for the pair is flat, the pair is localised.

  19. Atmospheric solar heating rate in the water vapor bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ming-Dah

    1986-01-01

    The total absorption of solar radiation by water vapor in clear atmospheres is parameterized as a simple function of the scaled water vapor amount. For applications to cloudy and hazy atmospheres, the flux-weighted k-distribution functions are computed for individual absorption bands and for the total near-infrared region. The parameterization is based upon monochromatic calculations and follows essentially the scaling approximation of Chou and Arking, but the effect of temperature variation with height is taken into account in order to enhance the accuracy. Furthermore, the spectral range is extended to cover the two weak bands centered at 0.72 and 0.82 micron. Comparisons with monochromatic calculations show that the atmospheric heating rate and the surface radiation can be accurately computed from the parameterization. Comparisons are also made with other parameterizations. It is found that the absorption of solar radiation can be computed reasonably well using the Goody band model and the Curtis-Godson approximation.

  20. Topological Magnon Bands in a Kagome Lattice Ferromagnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisnell, R; Helton, J S; Freedman, D E; Singh, D K; Bewley, R I; Nocera, D G; Lee, Y S

    2015-10-02

    There is great interest in finding materials possessing quasiparticles with topological properties. Such materials may have novel excitations that exist on their boundaries which are protected against disorder. We report experimental evidence that magnons in an insulating kagome ferromagnet can have a topological band structure. Our neutron scattering measurements further reveal that one of the bands is flat due to the unique geometry of the kagome lattice. Spin wave calculations show that the measured band structure follows from a simple Heisenberg Hamiltonian with a Dzyaloshinkii-Moriya interaction. This serves as the first realization of an effectively two-dimensional topological magnon insulator--a new class of magnetic material that should display both a magnon Hall effect and protected chiral edge modes.

  1. Fractal Based Triple Band High Gain Monopole Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Shashi Kant; Pandey, Ganga Prasad; Sarun, P. M.

    2017-10-01

    A novel triple-band microstrip fed planar monopole antenna is proposed and investigated. A fractal antenna is created by iterating a narrow pulse (NP) generator model at upper side of modified ground plane, which has a rhombic patch, for enhancing the bandwidth and gain. Three iterations are carried out to study the effects of fractal geometry on the antenna performance. The proposed antenna can operate over three frequency ranges viz, 3.34-4.8 GHz, 5.5-10.6 GHz and 13-14.96 GHz suitable for WLAN 5.2/5.8 GHz, WiMAX 3.5/5.5 GHz and X band applications respectively. Simulated and measured results are in good agreements with each others. Results show that antenna provides wide/ultra wide bandwidths, monopole like radiation patterns and very high antenna gains over the operating frequency bands.

  2. Authentication of Whey Protein Powders by Portable Mid-Infrared Spectrometers Combined with Pattern Recognition Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Tan, Siow Ying; Mutilangi, William; Aykas, Didem P; Rodriguez-Saona, Luis E

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a simple and rapid method to differentiate whey protein types (WPC, WPI, and WPH) used for beverage manufacturing by combining the spectral signature collected from portable mid-infrared spectrometers and pattern recognition analysis. Whey protein powders from different suppliers are produced using a large number of processing and compositional variables, resulting in variation in composition, concentration, protein structure, and thus functionality. Whey protein powders including whey protein isolates, whey protein concentrates and whey protein hydrolysates were obtained from different suppliers and their spectra collected using portable mid-infrared spectrometers (single and triple reflection) by pressing the powder onto an Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) diamond crystal with a pressure clamp. Spectra were analyzed by soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) generating a classification model showing the ability to differentiate whey protein types by forming tight clusters with interclass distance values of >3, considered to be significantly different from each other. The major bands centered at 1640 and 1580 cm(-1) were responsible for separation and were associated with differences in amide I and amide II vibrations of proteins, respectively. Another important band in whey protein clustering was associated with carboxylate vibrations of acidic amino acids (∼1570 cm(-1)). The use of a portable mid-IR spectrometer combined with pattern recognition analysis showed potential for discriminating whey protein ingredients that can help to streamline the analytical procedure so that it is more applicable for field-based screening of ingredients. A rapid, simple and accurate method was developed to authenticate commercial whey protein products by using portable mid-infrared spectrometers combined with chemometrics, which could help ensure the functionality of whey protein ingredients in food applications. © 2015

  3. Computational Design of Flat-Band Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hase, I.; Yanagisawa, T.; Kawashima, K.

    2018-02-01

    Quantum mechanics states that hopping integral between local orbitals makes the energy band dispersive. However, in some special cases, there are bands with no dispersion due to quantum interference. These bands are called as flat band. Many models having flat band have been proposed, and many interesting physical properties are predicted. However, no real compound having flat band has been found yet despite the 25 years of vigorous researches. We have found that some pyrochlore oxides have quasi-flat band just below the Fermi level by first principles calculation. Moreover, their valence bands are well described by a tight-binding model of pyrochlore lattice with isotropic nearest neighbor hopping integral. This model belongs to a class of Mielke model, whose ground state is known to be ferromagnetic with appropriate carrier doping and on-site repulsive Coulomb interaction. We have also performed a spin-polarized band calculation for the hole-doped system from first principles and found that the ground state is ferromagnetic for some doping region. Interestingly, these compounds do not include magnetic element, such as transition metal and rare-earth elements.

  4. Effectiveness of various sterilization methods of contaminated post-fitted molar band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anggia Tridianti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molar band as anchoring device may be contaminated during the fitting process. Thus, decontamination process is essential to prevent cross-infection between patients. Purpose: The objective of this research was to determine the amount of bacteria in molar band post-fitted on the patient teeth, after previously undergone pre-sterilization using alcohol and ultrasonic cleaning bath followed by sterilization using dry heat oven and steam autoclave, in order to find the best method in decontamination of post-fitted molar band. Methods: Four molar bands which already fitted on one patient then divided evenly into two groups. The first group was pre-sterilized using alcohol. One of the bands then sterilized using dry heat oven, while the other one was sterilized using steam autoclave. The second group was pre-sterilized using ultrasonic cleaning bath. One band from this group then sterilized using dry heat oven and the other was sterilized using steam autoclave. The next step was to immerse all the bands in a phosphate-buffered saline solution. Using micropipette, the solution was retrieved and dropped upon a petri dish containing Brain Heart Infusion broth. The dish was then stored in an incubator for 24 hours, prior to counting the number of bacteria existed. The same methods were used to the rest of the patients, with total 128 molar bands from 32 patients. Results: There was a profound difference in numbers of bacteria found between those methods of sterilization. However, there was a non significant difference between the two groups which were at the alcohol-steam autoclave group and at the ultrasonic cleaning bath-steam autoclave group. Conclusion: This study showed that steam autoclave is better than for sterilizing molar band, as it left the minimal amount of bacteria in post-fitted molar band.Latar belakang: Molar band merupakan suatu alat penjangkaran yang dapat mengalami kontaminasi selama proses fitting band, sehingga perlu

  5. Inducible immune proteins in the dampwood termite Zootermopsis angusticollis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengaus, Rebeca B.; Cornelisse, Tara; Guschanski, Katerina; Traniello, James F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Dampwood termites, Zootermopsis angusticollis (Isoptera: Termopsidae), mount an immune response to resist microbial infection. Here we report on results of a novel analysis that allowed us to electrophoretically assess changes in hemolymph proteins in the same individual before and after exposure to a pathogen. We demonstrate that contact with a sublethal concentration of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae (Deuteromycotina:Hypomycetes) induces the production of protective proteins in nymphs, pseudergates (false workers), and soldiers. Termites exposed to an immunizing dosage of fungal conidia consistently showed an enhancement of constitutive proteins (62-85 kDa) in the hemolymph as well as an induction of novel proteins (28-48 kDa) relative to preimmunization levels. No significant differences in protein banding patterns relative to baseline levels in control and naïve termites were observed. Incubating excised and eluted induced proteins produced by immunized pseudergates or immunized soldiers with conidia significantly reduced the germination of the fungus. The fungistatic effect of eluted proteins differed significantly among five colonies examined. Our results show that the upregulation of protective proteins in the hemolymph underscores the in vivo immune response we previously recorded in Z. angusticollis.

  6. Increase in local protein concentration by field-inversion gel electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulus Aran

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins that migrate through cross-linked polyacrylamide gels (PAGs under the influence of a constant electric field experience negative factors, such as diffusion and non-specific trapping in the gel matrix. These negative factors reduce protein concentrations within a defined gel volume with increasing migration distance and, therefore, decrease protein separation efficiency. Enhancement of protein separation efficiency was investigated by implementing pulsed field-inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE. Results Separation of model protein species and large protein complexes was compared between FIGE and constant field electrophoresis (CFE in different percentages of PAGs. Band intensities of proteins in FIGE with appropriate ratios of forward and backward pulse times were superior to CFE despite longer running times. These results revealed an increase in band intensity per defined gel volume. A biphasic protein relative mobility shift was observed in percentages of PAGs up to 14%. However, the effect of FIGE on protein separation was stochastic at higher PAG percentage. Rat liver lysates subjected to FIGE in the second-dimension separation of two-dimensional polyarcylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE showed a 20% increase in the number of discernible spots compared with CFE. Nine common spots from both FIGE and CFE were selected for peptide sequencing by mass spectrometry (MS, which revealed higher final ion scores of all nine protein spots from FIGE. Native protein complexes ranging from 800 kDa to larger than 2000 kDa became apparent using FIGE compared with CFE. Conclusion The present investigation suggests that FIGE under appropriate conditions improves protein separation efficiency during PAGE as a result of increased local protein concentration. FIGE can be implemented with minimal additional instrumentation in any laboratory setting. Despite the tradeoff of longer running times, FIGE can be a powerful protein

  7. Increase in local protein concentration by field-inversion gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Henghang; Low, Teck Yew; Freeby, Steve; Paulus, Aran; Ramnarayanan, Kalpana; Cheng, Chung-Pui Paul; Leung, Hon-Chiu Eastwood

    2007-09-26

    Proteins that migrate through cross-linked polyacrylamide gels (PAGs) under the influence of a constant electric field experience negative factors, such as diffusion and non-specific trapping in the gel matrix. These negative factors reduce protein concentrations within a defined gel volume with increasing migration distance and, therefore, decrease protein separation efficiency. Enhancement of protein separation efficiency was investigated by implementing pulsed field-inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE). Separation of model protein species and large protein complexes was compared between FIGE and constant field electrophoresis (CFE) in different percentages of PAGs. Band intensities of proteins in FIGE with appropriate ratios of forward and backward pulse times were superior to CFE despite longer running times. These results revealed an increase in band intensity per defined gel volume. A biphasic protein relative mobility shift was observed in percentages of PAGs up to 14%. However, the effect of FIGE on protein separation was stochastic at higher PAG percentage. Rat liver lysates subjected to FIGE in the second-dimension separation of two-dimensional polyarcylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE) showed a 20% increase in the number of discernible spots compared with CFE. Nine common spots from both FIGE and CFE were selected for peptide sequencing by mass spectrometry (MS), which revealed higher final ion scores of all nine protein spots from FIGE. Native protein complexes ranging from 800 kDa to larger than 2000 kDa became apparent using FIGE compared with CFE. The present investigation suggests that FIGE under appropriate conditions improves protein separation efficiency during PAGE as a result of increased local protein concentration. FIGE can be implemented with minimal additional instrumentation in any laboratory setting. Despite the tradeoff of longer running times, FIGE can be a powerful protein separation tool.

  8. Theoretical evaluation of maximum electric field approximation of direct band-to-band tunneling Kane model for low bandgap semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang Chien, Nguyen; Shih, Chun-Hsing; Hoa, Phu Chi; Minh, Nguyen Hong; Thi Thanh Hien, Duong; Nhung, Le Hong

    2016-06-01

    The two-band Kane model has been popularly used to calculate the band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) current in tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET) which is currently considered as a promising candidate for low power applications. This study theoretically clarifies the maximum electric field approximation (MEFA) of direct BTBT Kane model and evaluates its appropriateness for low bandgap semiconductors. By analysing the physical origin of each electric field term in the Kane model, it has been elucidated in the MEFA that the local electric field term must be remained while the nonlocal electric field terms are assigned by the maximum value of electric field at the tunnel junction. Mathematical investigations have showed that the MEFA is more appropriate for low bandgap semiconductors compared to high bandgap materials because of enhanced tunneling probability in low field regions. The appropriateness of the MEFA is very useful for practical uses in quickly estimating the direct BTBT current in low bandgap TFET devices.

  9. Anomalies in the 1D Anderson model: Beyond the band-centre and band-edge cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessieri, L.; Izrailev, F. M.

    2018-03-01

    We consider the one-dimensional Anderson model with weak disorder. Using the Hamiltonian map approach, we analyse the validity of the random-phase approximation for resonant values of the energy, E = 2 cos(πr) , with r a rational number. We expand the invariant measure of the phase variable in powers of the disorder strength and we show that, contrary to what happens at the centre and at the edges of the band, for all other resonant energies the leading term of the invariant measure is uniform. When higher-order terms are taken into account, a modulation of the invariant measure appears for all resonant values of the energy. This implies that, when the localisation length is computed within the second-order approximation in the disorder strength, the Thouless formula is valid everywhere except at the band centre and at the band edges.

  10. Low-bias flat band-stop filter based on velocity modulated gaussian graphene superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattari-Esfahlan, S. M.; Shojaei, S.

    2018-05-01

    Transport properties of biased planar Gaussian graphene superlattice (PGGSL) with Fermi velocity barrier is investigated by transfer matrix method (TMM). It is observed that enlargement of bias voltage over miniband width breaks the miniband to WSLs leads to suppressing resonant tunneling. Transmission spectrum shows flat wide stop-band property controllable by external bias voltage with stop-band width of near 200 meV. The simulations demonstrate that strong velocity barriers prevent tunneling of Dirac electrons leading to controllable enhancement of stop-band width. By increasing ratio of Fermi velocity in barriers to wells υc stop-band width increase. As wide transmission stop-band width (BWT) of filter is tunable from 40 meV to 340 meV is obtained by enhancing ratio of υc from 0.2 to 1.5, respectively. Proposed structure suggests easy tunable wide band-stop electronic filter with a modulated flat stop-band characteristic by height of electrostatic barrier and structural parameters. Robust sensitivity of band width to velocity barrier intensity in certain bias voltages and flat band feature of proposed filter may be opens novel venue in GSL based flat band low noise filters and velocity modulation devices.

  11. Changes in Protein Content and Urease Activity Due to Soaking Treatment of gamma irradiated Soybean Seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamel, H.A.; Aly, M.A.S.; Afifi, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    The total protein measurement revealed that both soaking time and radiation affected protein content of soybean seeds. Amount of protein content increased gradually with time up to 6 h. The amount recorded 388, 396 and 465 mg/g.d.wt in control, 10, 25, 50 Gy, respectively. Then the amount decreased at and 24 h whereas, protein content of cotyledonary leaves (120 h) increased by 25 and 50 Gy reaching 7305 and 80.6 mg/g.d.wt as compared to 68.5 mg/g.d wt in case on control. On comparison with control samples, 10 Gy appeared to have no effect on protein content while 25 and 50 Gy increased protein in a dose dependant matter. Maximum increase in urease activity was recorded at 6 h of soaking (1110, 1162 and 1200 unit/g f.wt in control, 10, 25 and 50 Gy respectively) Moreover, the 25 and 50 Gy increased urease activity at all time intervals. After sodium dodecyl sulfate- polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was applied, bands could be segregated into high molecular weight bands they are represented from band No 1 with 200 KDa to band No 8 with 100 kDa. On the other hand low molecular weight are presented from band No 9 with 75 kDa to band No 14 with 10 kDa. Characteristic bands No 4 and 10 were common in all samples and several other bands were characteristic to the time or gamma-radiation applied. Calculated similarity index (SI) showed similarity between control and 25 Gy treated samples (except at 6 h). In contrast, the similarity index between control and 50 Gy decreased from zero up to 6 h then increased to 1 at 120 h (the same trend was also observed between 25 and 50 Gy). From similarity index study it could be concluded that at cotyledonary stage(120 h) there were no differences between different samples, thus indicating a recovery from the effect of gamma irradiation

  12. Direct and Indirect Electron Emission from the Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toker, Y.; Rahbek, D. B.; Klærke, B.; Bochenkova, A. V.; Andersen, L. H.

    2012-09-01

    Photoelectron spectra of the deprotonated green fluorescent protein chromophore have been measured in the gas phase at several wavelengths within and beyond the S0-S1 photoabsorption band of the molecule. The vertical detachment energy (VDE) was determined to be 2.68±0.1eV. The data show that the first electronically excited state is bound in the Franck-Condon region, and that electron emission proceeds through an indirect (resonant) electron-emission channel within the corresponding absorption band.

  13. Band-engineering of TiO2 as a wide-band gap semiconductor using organic chromophore dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyuningsih, S.; Kartini, I.; Ramelan, A. H.; Saputri, L. N. M. Z.; Munawaroh, H.

    2017-07-01

    Bond-engineering as applied to semiconductor materials refers to the manipulation of the energy bands in order to control charge transfer processes in a device. When the device in question is a photoelectrochemical cell, the charges affected by drift become the focus of the study. The ideal band gap of semiconductors for enhancement of photocatalyst activity can be lowered to match with visible light absorption and the location of conduction Band (CB) should be raised to meet the reducing capacity. Otherwise, by the addition of the chromofor organic dyes, the wide-band gab can be influences by interacation resulting between TiO2 surface and the dyes. We have done the impruvisation wide-band gap of TiO2 by the addition of organic chromophore dye, and the addition of transition metal dopand. The TiO2 morphology influence the light absorption as well as the surface modification. The organic chromophore dye was syntesized by formation complexes compound of Co(PAR)(SiPA)(PAR)= 4-(2-piridylazoresorcinol), SiPA = Silyl propil amine). The result showed that the chromophore groups adsorbed onto TiO2 surface can increase the visible light absorption of wide-band gab semiconductor. Initial absorption of a chromophore will affect light penetration into the material surfaces. The use of photonic material as a solar cell shows this phenomenon clearly from the IPCE (incident photon to current conversion efficiency) measurement data. Organic chromophore dyes of Co(PAR)(SiPA) exhibited the long wavelength absorption character compared to the N719 dye (from Dyesol).

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Mulberry Vein Banding Associated Virus, a New Tospovirus Infecting Mulberry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaorong Meng

    Full Text Available Mulberry vein banding associated virus (MVBaV that infects mulberry plants with typical vein banding symptoms had been identified as a tentative species of the genus Tospovirus based on the homology of N gene sequence to those of tospoviruses. In this study, the complete sequence of the tripartite RNA genome of MVBaV was determined and analyzed. The L RNA has 8905 nucleotides (nt and encodes the putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp of 2877 aa amino acids (aa in the viral complementary (vc strand. The RdRp of MVBaV shares the highest aa sequence identity (85.9% with that of Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV, and contains conserved motifs shared with those of the species of the genus Tospovirus. The M RNA contains 4731 nt and codes in ambisense arrangement for the NSm protein of 309 aa in the sense strand and the Gn/Gc glycoprotein precursor (GP of 1,124 aa in the vc strand. The NSm and GP of MVBaV share the highest aa sequence identities with those of Capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV and Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV (83.2% and 84.3%, respectively. The S RNA is 3294 nt in length and contains two open reading frames (ORFs in an ambisense coding strategy, encoding a 439-aa non-structural protein (NSs and the 277-aa nucleocapsid protein (N, respectively. The NSs and N also share the highest aa sequence identity (71.1% and 74.4%, respectively with those of CaCV. Phylogenetic analysis of the RdRp, NSm, GP, NSs, and N proteins showed that MVBaV is most closely related to CaCV and GBNV and that these proteins cluster with those of the WSMoV serogroup, and that MVBaV seems to be a species bridging the two subgroups within the WSMoV serogroup of tospoviruses in evolutionary aspect, suggesting that MVBaV represents a distinct tospovirus. Analysis of S RNA sequence uncovered the highly conserved 5'-/3'-ends and the coding regions, and the variable region of IGR with divergent patterns among MVBaV isolates.

  15. Solid State KA-Band, Solid State W-Band and TWT Amplifiers, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phase I of the proposal describes plans to develop a state of the art transmitter for the W-Band and KA -Band Cloud Radar system. Our focus will be concentrated in...

  16. Electrophoretic transfer protein zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Daniel; Hill, Adam P; Kashou, Anthony; Wilson, Karl A; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2011-04-15

    Zymography detects and characterizes proteolytic enzymes by electrophoresis of protease-containing samples into a nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gel containing a copolymerized protein substrate. The usefulness of zymography for molecular weight determination and proteomic analysis is hampered by the fact that some proteases exhibit slower migration through a gel that contains substrate protein. This article introduces electrophoretic transfer protein zymography as one solution to this problem. In this technique, samples containing proteolytic enzymes are first resolved in nonreducing SDS-PAGE on a gel without protein substrate. The proteins in the resolving gel are then electrophoretically transferred to a receiving gel previously prepared with a copolymerized protein substrate. The receiving gel is then developed as a zymogram to visualize clear or lightly stained bands in a dark background. Band intensities are linearly related to the amount of protease, extending the usefulness of the technique so long as conditions for transfer and development of the zymogram are kept constant. Conditions of transfer, such as the pore sizes of resolving and receiving gels and the transfer time relative to the molecular weight of the protease, are explored. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Systematic design of phononic band-gap materials and structures by topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2003-01-01

    Phononic band-gap materials prevent elastic waves in certain frequency ranges from propagating, and they may therefore be used to generate frequency filters, as beam splitters, as sound or vibration protection devices, or as waveguides. In this work we show how topology optimization can be used...... to design and optimize periodic materials and structures exhibiting phononic band gaps. Firstly, we optimize infinitely periodic band-gap materials by maximizing the relative size of the band gaps. Then, finite structures subjected to periodic loading are optimized in order to either minimize the structural...

  18. Hypersonic modulation of light in three-dimensional photonic and phononic band-gap materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimov, A V; Tanaka, Y; Pevtsov, A B; Kaplan, S F; Golubev, V G; Tamura, S; Yakovlev, D R; Bayer, M

    2008-07-18

    The elastic coupling between the a-SiO2 spheres composing opal films brings forth three-dimensional periodic structures which besides a photonic stop band are predicted to also exhibit complete phononic band gaps. The influence of elastic crystal vibrations on the photonic band structure has been studied by injection of coherent hypersonic wave packets generated in a metal transducer by subpicosecond laser pulses. These studies show that light with energies close to the photonic band gap can be efficiently modulated by hypersonic waves.

  19. The VLSI design of the sub-band filterbank in MP3 decoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Xin; Luo, Li

    2018-03-01

    The sub-band filterbank is one of the most important modules which has the largest amount of calculation in MP3 decoding. In order to save CPU resources and integrate the sub-band filterbank part into MP3 IP core, the hardware circuit of the sub-band filterbank module is designed in this paper. A fast algorithm suit for hardware implementation is proposed and achieved on FPGA development board. The results show that the sub-band filterbank function is correct in the case of using very few registers and the amount of calculation and ROM resources are reduced greatly.

  20. Banded all-optical OFDM super-channels with low-bandwidth receivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Binhuang; Zhu, Chen; Corcoran, Bill; Zhuang, Leimeng; Lowery, Arthur James

    2016-08-08

    We propose a banded all-optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (AO-OFDM) transmission system based on synthesising a number of truncated sinc-shaped subcarriers for each sub-band. This approach enables sub-band by sub-band reception and therefore each receiver's electrical bandwidth can be significantly reduced compared with a conventional AO-OFDM system. As a proof-of-concept experiment, we synthesise 6 × 10-Gbaud subcarriers in both conventional and banded AO-OFDM systems. With a limited receiver electrical bandwidth, the experimental banded AO-OFDM system shows 2-dB optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) benefit over conventional AO-OFDM at the 7%-overhead forward error correction (FEC) threshold. After transmission over 800-km of single-mode fiber, ≈3-dB improvement in Q-factor can be achieved at the optimal launch power at a cost of increasing the spectral width by 14%.

  1. Characterization of protein and carbohydrate mid-IR spectral features in crop residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hangshu; Zhang, Yonggen; Wang, Mingjun; Li, Zhongyu; Wang, Zhibo; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-08-01

    To the best of our knowledge, a few studies have been conducted on inherent structure spectral traits related to biopolymers of crop residues. The objective of this study was to characterize protein and carbohydrate structure spectral features of three field crop residues (rice straw, wheat straw and millet straw) in comparison with two crop vines (peanut vine and pea vine) by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) technique with attenuated total reflectance (ATR). Also, multivariate analyses were performed on spectral data sets within the regions mainly related to protein and carbohydrate in this study. The results showed that spectral differences existed in mid-IR peak intensities that are mainly related to protein and carbohydrate among these crop residue samples. With regard to protein spectral profile, peanut vine showed the greatest mid-IR band intensities that are related to protein amide and protein secondary structures, followed by pea vine and the rest three field crop straws. The crop vines had 48-134% higher spectral band intensity than the grain straws in spectral features associated with protein. Similar trends were also found in the bands that are mainly related to structural carbohydrates (such as cellulosic compounds). However, the field crop residues had higher peak intensity in total carbohydrates region than the crop vines. Furthermore, spectral ratios varied among the residue samples, indicating that these five crop residues had different internal structural conformation. However, multivariate spectral analyses showed that structural similarities still exhibited among crop residues in the regions associated with protein biopolymers and carbohydrate. Further study is needed to find out whether there is any relationship between spectroscopic information and nutrition supply in various kinds of crop residue when fed to animals.

  2. Multiple band structure in 156Er

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunyar, A.W.; Der Mateosian, E.; Kistner, O.C.; Johnson, A.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Thieberger, P.

    1976-01-01

    The 142 Nd( 18 O,4n) 156 Er reaction at 90-95 MeV was used to study 156 Er high-spin states to spin 24. In addition to the background ground-state band, two well developed off-spin side bands, one of each parity, were observed. (Auth.)

  3. 47 CFR 90.1213 - Band plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Band plan. 90.1213 Section 90.1213 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND... § 90.1213 Band plan. The following channel center frequencies are permitted to be aggregated for...

  4. Signature effects in 2-qp rotational bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, A.K.; Goel, A.

    1992-01-01

    The authors briefly review the progress in understanding the 2-qp rotational bands in odd-odd nuclei. Signature effects and the phenomenon of signature inversion are discussed. The Coriolis coupling appears to have all the ingredients to explain the inversion. Some recent work on signature dependence in 2-qp bands of even-even nuclei is also discussed; interesting features are pointed out

  5. Low band gap polymers for organic photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Eva; Krebs, Frederik C

    2007-01-01

    Low band gap polymer materials and their application in organic photovoltaics (OPV) are reviewed. We detail the synthetic approaches to low band gap polymer materials starting from the early methodologies employing quinoid homopolymer structures to the current state of the art that relies...

  6. Band mixing in /sup 160/Dy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasiza, M L; Singh, K; Sahota, H S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1982-11-01

    The intensities of the gamma transitions in /sup 160/Dy have been measured precisely by a 45 cc Ge(Li) detector. Unequal quadrupole moments for the ground and gamma vibrational bands have been proposed in order to remove the inconsistencies in the values of band mixing parameter Z sub(gamma) for this doubly even deformed nucleus of /sup 160/Dy.

  7. Metabolic labeling of cellular glycoproteins with glucosamine: potential for erroneous interpretations due to nonenzymatic radiolabeling of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briles, E.I.B.; Updyke, T.V.

    1986-01-01

    Proteins, including serum proteins of culture media, become nonenzymatically radiolabeled under conditions used for metabolic labeling of cultured cells with glucosamine. This occurs even under sterile conditions in the absence of cells. Various commercial lots of 3 H or 14 C glcN gave similar results: ∼ 0.7% of total label was incorporated into 20% serum (14 mg/ml protein) in 48 h at 37 0 C. By SDS-PAGE fluorography, labeled serum bands correspond to Coomassie stained bands. Incorporation is linear with protein concentration and label input, shows biphasic kinetics (initial rapid rate within first 3 hr, followed by slower linear rate with no sign of saturation through 120 hr), and is temperature-dependent (no reaction at 0 0 C; incorporation at 20 0 C is ∼ 45% of that at 37 0 C). Poly-D-lysine is a better acceptor than protein: 0.5 mg/ml PL accepts as much label as 7 mg/ml protein. Incorporation is inhibited by excess unlabeled glcN and ethanolamine, but not by man, gal or glucose. However, when proteins were incubated with 160 mM glcN, SDS-PAGE bands were yellow-brown, suggesting the occurrence of Maillard-type reactions. Although the chemical mechanism(s) responsible for nonmetabolic radiolabeling by glcN are not clear at this point, the fact that it occurs represents a serious artifact which may lead to erroneous interpretation of data

  8. Atomic-Monolayer MoS2 Band-to-Band Tunneling Field-Effect Transistor

    KAUST Repository

    Lan, Yann Wen

    2016-09-05

    The experimental observation of band-to-band tunneling in novel tunneling field-effect transistors utilizing a monolayer of MoS2 as the conducting channel is demonstrated. Our results indicate that the strong gate-coupling efficiency enabled by two-dimensional materials, such as monolayer MoS2, results in the direct manifestation of a band-to-band tunneling current and an ambipolar transport.

  9. An autoclave treatment reduces the solubility and antigenicity of an allergenic protein found in buckwheat flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomotake, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Rikio; Yamato, Masayuki

    2012-06-01

    The effects of an autoclave treatment of buckwheat flour on a 24-kDa allergenic protein were investigated by measuring reduction in solubility and antibody binding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis showed that the intensity of the major bands, including that of the 24-kDa allergen, was reduced by the autoclave treatment. The protein solubility in buckwheat flour was variably decreased by the autoclave treatment. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis using a monoclonal antibody specific for buckwheat 24-kDa protein showed that the reactivity of protein extracts (10 μg/ml) from buckwheat flour was lowered by the autoclave treatment. The autoclave treatment may reduce the major allergen content of buckwheat. Future studies will determine if autoclaving treatments affect the allergenicity of the 24-kDa buckwheat protein.

  10. Bio-solubilization of Chinese lignite II: extra-cellular protein analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Xiu-xiang; Pan, Lan-ying; Shi, Kai-yi; Chen-hui; Yin, Su-dong; Luo, Zhen-fu [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China). School of Chemical Engineering and Technology

    2009-05-15

    A white rot fungus strain, Trichoderma sp. AH, was isolated from rotten wood in Fushun and used to study the mechanism of lignite bio-solubilization. The results showed that nitric acid pretreated Fushun lignite was solubilized by T. sp. AH and that extracellular proteins from T. sp. AH were correlated with the lignite bio-solubilization results. In the presence of Fushun lignite the extracellular protein concentration from T. sp. AH was 4.5 g/L while the concentration was 3 g/L in the absence of Fushun lignite. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of the extracelular proteins detected at least four new protein bands after the T. sp. AH had solubilized the lignite. Enzyme color reactions showed that extracelular proteins from T. sp. AH mainly consisted of phenol-oxidases, but that lignin decomposition enzymes such as laccase, peroxidase and manganese peroxidases were not present. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Comparison of retention and demineralization inhibition potential of adhesive banding cements in primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, A R; Mahantesh, T; Ahuja, Vipin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of banding cements in terms of retentive capability and demineralization inhibition potential. We included 48 non-carious primary mandibular second molar teeth. Preformed stainless steel bands were adapted onto the teeth. All teeth were randomly assigned to four groups: Group I (Adaptation of bands without cementation), Group II (Cementation of bands using conventional Glass Ionomer Cement), Group III (Cementation of bands using Resin-modified Glass Ionomer Cement), Group IV (Cementation of bands using Resin cement), and placed in artificial saliva. Each day, specimens were taken from artificial saliva and suspended in an artificial caries solution for 35 minutes, every 8 hours. At the end of 3 months, retention of bands was estimated using an Instron Universal Testing Machine. The mode of failure was recorded and specimens were sectioned and examined under polarized microscope for demineralized lesions. The mean retention value was highest with resin cement, followed by RMGIC, GIC, and Control group respectively. The RMGIC group showed more favorable modes of failures. All the experimental groups showed significant demineralization inhibition potential. RMGIC is the preferable banding cement and can be used effectively to cement bands in primary dentition.

  12. The effect of density-of-state tails on band-to-band tunneling: Theory and application to tunnel field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant, S.; Schenk, A.

    2017-10-01

    It is demonstrated how band tail states in the semiconductor influence the performance of a Tunnel Field Effect Transistor (TFET). As a consequence of the smoothened density of states (DOS) around the band edges, the energetic overlap of conduction and valence band states occurs gradually at the onset of band-to-band tunneling (BTBT), thus degrading the sub-threshold swing (SS) of the TFET. The effect of the band tail states on the current-voltage characteristics is modelled quantum-mechanically based on the idea of zero-phonon trap-assisted tunneling between band and tail states. The latter are assumed to arise from a 3-dimensional pseudo-delta potential proposed by Vinogradov [1]. This model potential allows the derivation of analytical expressions for the generation rate covering the whole range from very strong to very weak localization of the tail states. Comparison with direct BTBT in the one-band effective mass approximation reveals the essential features of tail-to-band tunneling. Furthermore, an analytical solution for the problem of tunneling from continuum states of the disturbed DOS to states in the opposite band is found, and the differences to direct BTBT are worked out. Based on the analytical expressions, a semi-classical model is implemented in a commercial device simulator which involves numerical integration along the tunnel paths. The impact of the tail states on the device performance is analyzed for a nanowire Gate-All-Around TFET. The simulations show that tail states notably impact the transfer characteristics of a TFET. It is found that exponentially decaying band tails result in a stronger degradation of the SS than tail states with a Gaussian decay of their density. The developed model allows more realistic simulations of TFETs including their non-idealities.

  13. Energy correlations for mixed rotational bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doessing, T.

    1985-01-01

    A schematic model for the mixing of rotational bands above the yrast line in well deformed nuclei is considered. Many-particle configurations of a rotating mean field form basis bands, and these are subsequently mixed due to a two body residual interaction. The energy interval over which a basis band is spread out increases with increasing excitation energy above the yrast line. Conversely, the B(E2) matrix element for rotational decay out of one of the mixed band states is spread over an interval which is predicted to become more narrow with increasing excitation energy. Finally, the implication of band mixing for γ-ray energy correlations is briefly discussed. (orig.)

  14. Fluctuation diamagnetism in two-band superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kyosuke; Ikeda, Ryusuke

    2016-04-01

    Anomalously large fluctuation diamagnetism around the superconducting critical temperature has been recently observed in iron selenide (FeSe) [Kasahara et al. (unpublished)]. This indicates that superconducting fluctuations (SCFs) play a more significant role in FeSe, which supposedly has a two-band structure, than in the familiar single-band superconductors. Motivated by the data on FeSe, SCF-induced diamagnetism is examined in a two-band system, on the basis of a phenomenological approach with a Ginzburg-Landau functional. The obtained results indicate that the SCF-induced diamagnetism may be more enhanced than that in a single-band system due to the existence of two distinct fluctuation modes. Such enhancement of diamagnetism unique to a two-band system seems consistent with the large diamagnetism observed in FeSe, though still far from a quantitative agreement.

  15. Design of a side-band-separating heterodyne mixer for band 9 of ALMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baryshev, AM; Kooi, J; Mena, FR; Lodewijk, CRJ; Wild, W

    2005-01-01

    A side-band-separating (SBS) heterodyne mixer has been designed for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) 602-720 GHz band, as it will present a great improvement over the current double-side-band configuration under development at the moment. Here we present design details and the results of

  16. The infrared emission bands. III. Southern IRAS sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M; Tielens, A G; Bregman, J; Witteborn, F C; Rank, D M; Allamandola, L J; Wooden, D H; de Muizon, M

    1989-06-01

    We present airborne 5-8 micrometers spectra of southern IRAS sources which reveal strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features. The good correlation between the bands, in particular the dominant 6.2 and "7.7" micrometers features, strongly imply a common carrier, reinforcing the PAH hypothesis. However, small but detectable spectral variations exist. Planetaries have a distinctly different ratio of I(6.2)/I(7.7) than other nebulae, accompanied by a redward shift in the actual wavelength of the "7.7" micrometers peak. Further, we have detected a new feature, previously predicted from laboratory spectra of PAH molecules, at 5.2 micrometers in many of these sources. Spectra of two rare [WC 10] planetary nebular nuclei indicate a very prominent plateau of emission, linking the 6.2 and 7.7 micrometers bands. Several of our sources show definite evidence for emission structure between 14 and 23 micrometers in their IRAS Low-Resolution Spectral Atlas spectra: we attribute this structure to PAH bands. too. We have defined the "generic" spectrum of emission bands relating the mean intensities of each band to that of the strongest, near 7.7 micrometers. We have added three more planetary or protoplanetary nebulae to our correlation between 7.7 micrometers band intensity and nebular gas phase C/O ratio, namely NGC 6302, HR 4049, and the highly carbon-rich [WC 10] nucleus, CPD--56 degrees 8032. For the latter we have determined a ratio for C/O of approximately 4.8 from IUE observations. The good correlation between the intensity ratio of the "7.7" micrometers feature relative to the far-infrared dust continuum and nebular C/O also supports a carbonaceous carrier for these emission features.

  17. Airborn Ku-band polarimetric radar remote sensing of terrestrial snow cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon H. Yueh; Steve J. Dinardo; Ahmed Akgiray; Richard West; Donald W. Cline; Kelly Elder

    2009-01-01

    Characteristics of the Ku-band polarimetric scatterometer (POLSCAT) data acquired from five sets of aircraft flights in the winter months of 2006-2008 for the second Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX-II) in Colorado are described in this paper. The data showed the response of the Ku-band radar echoes to snowpack changes for various types of background vegetation in...

  18. Seasonally reversing current bands across 15 degrees N in the Arabian Sea and their implications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Antony, M.K.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Murty, C.S.; Rao, D.P.; Murty, V.S.N.; Sastry, J.S.

    Geostrophic currents computed from hydrographic data collected in different months from a section along 15 degrees N in the Arabian Sea show alternate N-S current bands. Flow directions of these bands are found to reverse with the change in season...

  19. Structure of the lowest excited 0/sup +/ rotational band of /sup 16/O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikebata, Yasuhiko; Suekane, Shota

    1983-10-01

    The structure of the lowest excited 0/sup +/ rotational band is investigated by using the extended Nilsson model wave functions with angular momentum projection and the B1 interaction, two-body LS-force of the Skyrme type and the Coulomb interaction. The results obtained show good agreement with energy interval in this band.

  20. Absorption band Q model for the earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.L.; Given, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    Body wave, surface wave, and normal mode data are used to place constraints on the frequency dependence of Q in the mantle. With a simple absorption band model it is possible to satisfy the shear sensitive data over a broad frequency range. The quality factor Q/sub s/(ω) is proportional to ω/sup α/ in the band and to ω and ω -1 at higher and lower frequencies, respectively, as appropriate for a relaxation mechanism with a spectrum of relaxation time. The parameters of the band are Q(min) = 80, α = 0.15, and width, 5 decades. The center of the band varies from 10 1 seconds in the upper mantle, to 1.6 x 10 3 seconds in the lower mantle. The shift of the band with depth is consistent with the expected effects of temperature, pressure and stress. High Q, regions of the mantle are attributed to a shift of the absorption band to longer periods. To satisfy the gravest fundamental spheroidal modes and the ScS data, the absorption band must shift back into the short-period seismic band at the base of the mantle. This may be due to a high temperature gradient or high shear stresses. A preliminary attempt is also made to specify bulk dissipation in the mantle and core. Specific features of the absorption band model are low Q in the body wave band at both the top and the base of the mantle, low Q for long-period body waves in the outer core, an inner core Q 2 that increases with period, and low Q/sub p//Q/sub s/ at short periods in the middle mantel. The short-period Q/sub s/ increases rapidly at 400 km and is relatively constant from this depth to 2400 km. The deformational Q of the earth at a period of 14 months is predicted to be 463

  1. Composition and Potency Characterization of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Purified Protein Derivatives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randal T Capsel

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP purified protein derivatives (PPDs are immunologic reagents prepared from cultured filtrates of the type strain. Traditional production consists of floating culture incubation at 37°C, organism inactivation by autoclaving, coarse filtration, and protein precipitation. Three traditional production PPDs were used in this study including lot 9801, which served as a reference and has been used in the field for decades. Alternative production PPDs (0902A and 0902B, in which the autoclaving step was removed, were also analyzed in this study. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed protein smearing in traditional PPDs, but distinct bands were observed in the alternative PPD preparations. Antibody bound distinct protein bands in the alternative PPDs by immunoblot analysis, whereas an immunoreactive smear was observed with the traditional PPDs. Mass spectrometry identified 194 proteins among three PPD lots representing the two different production methods, ten of which were present in all PPDs examined. Selected proteins identified by mass spectrometry were recombinantly expressed and purified from E. coli and evaluated by the guinea pig potency test. Seven recombinant proteins showed greater erythema as compared to the reference PPD lot 9801 in paired guinea pigs and were able to stimulate interferon-gamma production in blood from Johne's positive animals. These results suggest that autoclaving culture suspensions is not a necessary step in PPD production and specific proteins could supplant the PPD antigen for intradermal skin testing procedures and for use as in-vitro assay reagents.

  2. MR findings in iliotibial band syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, G.; Yamato, M.; Tamai, K.; Takahashi, J.; Uetani, M.

    1997-01-01

    Objective. To elucidate the MR findings in iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome. Design and patients. The subjects comprised four patients (five knees) with lateral knee pain: two athletes and two non-athletes. One non-athlete was engaged in work requiring repetitive knee movement, and the other suffered from Cushing syndrome and had bilateral abnormalities. All patients were suspected of having a lateral meniscal tear prior to MR examination, but physical examination following provisional MR diagnosis warranted the final diagnosis. MR studies included fast spin echo sagittal imaging, fat-saturated fast spin echo proton density coronal imaging, and T2* radial imaging. Twelve normal volunteers were examined. Results and conclusion. Fat-saturated coronal imaging demonstrated an ill-defined, high-intensity area deep to the ITB. T2* radial imaging showed an identical, but less conspicuous, abnormality. The MR finding suggested soft tissue inflammation and/or edema rather than focal fluid collection in the bursae. The signal alteration predominated in the region beneath the posterior fibers of the ITB, thus supporting the current opinion that the posterior fibers of the ITB are tighter against the lateral femoral epicondyle than the anterior fibers. The ITB itself did not show any signal alteration or increased thickness. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab

  3. Expression, purification, and functional analysis of the C-terminal domain of Herbaspirillum seropedicae NifA protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Rose A; Souza, Emanuel M; Geoffrey Yates, M; Steffens, M Berenice R; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Chubatsu, Leda S

    2003-02-01

    The Herbaspirillum seropedicae NifA protein is responsible for nif gene expression. The C-terminal domain of the H. seropedicae NifA protein, fused to a His-Tag sequence (His-Tag-C-terminal), was over-expressed and purified by metal-affinity chromatography to yield a highly purified and active protein. Band-shift assays showed that the NifA His-Tag-C-terminal bound specifically to the H. seropedicae nifB promoter region in vitro. In vivo analysis showed that this protein inhibited the Central + C-terminal domains of NifA protein from activating the nifH promoter of K. pneumoniae in Escherichia coli, indicating that the protein must be bound to the NifA-binding site (UAS site) at the nifH promoter region to activate transcription. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA)

  4. Partial characterization of a novel oestrogen-induced protein in the rat adenohypophysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casabiell, X; Zugaza, J L; Pombo, C M; Bokser, L; Mulet, N; Casanueva, F F

    1993-06-01

    In order to detect putative markers of prolactin-secreting pituitary tumours, adult rats were subjected to long-term oestrogenization with oestradiol benzoate (OE2) on a monthly basis. At 6 months, anterior pituitaries were dissected and incubated either as tissue fragments or as dispersed cells with a [35S]methionine mix for labelling. Proteins released into the incubation medium and from tissue extracts were further analysed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography. Oestrogen induced the appearance in the incubation medium of a protein (OE2 band) with an M(r) of 38,000 under reducing conditions, and high specific activity. Surprisingly, such a protein was not detected in tissue extracts. The OE2 band was detectable by 7 days after the first dose of oestrogen, and remained throughout 1 year of treatment. The tumour cell line GH3 showed a similar OE2 band which was further enhanced by oestrogens. The protein was observed similarly in both female and male pituitary donors, either intact or gonadectomized, and also in rats of different strains, suggesting that its appearance was independent of the strain of rat and gonadal status. Furthermore, the OE2 band was specific for pituitary cells and not produced by other oestrogenized tissues. No alteration in the rate of generation or the electrophoretic pattern of the OE2 band was observed when pituitary cells from oestrogenized rats were metabolically labelled while being incubated with tunicamycin. Furthermore, a system for glycan detection, adsorption to Concanavalin A or incubation with endoglycosidase F also failed to show a clear amount of glycosylation of the oestrogen-induced protein. Both immunoprecipitation experiments and time-limited proteolysis with V8 protease ruled out the possibility that the OE2 band could be structurally related to either GH or prolactin. In conclusion, oestrogens induce the generation of a new monocatenary protein with an apparent M(r) of 38

  5. Polarimetric and Structural Properties of a Boreal Forest at P-Band and L-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebaldini, S.; Rocca, F.

    2010-12-01

    allows to overcome this limitation, thus providing a way to obtain the vertical structures associated with volume-only contributions. Experimental results will be provided showing the following. At P-Band the most relevant scattering contributions are observed at the ground level, not only in the co-polar channels, but also in HV, consistently with he first BioSAR campaign. L-Band data have shown a remarkable difference, resulting in a more uniform distribution of the backscattered power along the vertical direction. Volume top height has been observed to be substantially invariant to the choice of the solution for volume-only scattering. These results underline the validity of modeling a forest scenario as being constituted by volume and ground (or rather ground-locked) scattering, and the importance of forest top height as the most robust indicator of the forest structure as imaged through microwaves measurements. Nevertheless, it has also been shown that different solutions for volume scattering correspond to dramatically different vertical structures. In this framework, tomography represents a powerful tool for investigating the potential solutions, as it allows to see what kind of vertical structure has been retrieved. On this basis, a solution has been proposed as a criterion to emphasize volume contributions at P-Band.

  6. [A case of IgA2-lambda type M-protein that IgA concentration differs from the values of M-protein by serum protein electrophoresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, M; Sugano, M; Ichikawa, T; Honda, T; Totsuka, M; Katsuyama, T; Fujita, K

    2001-07-01

    We report an IgA-lambda type M-protein in which the IgA concentration differed from the values of M-protein by serum protein electrophoresis found in a 53-year-old man with multiple myeloma. The M-protein value as determined by serum protein electrophoresis was 6,170 mg/dl. However, the serum IgA concentration was 3,052 mg/dl by turbidimetric immunoassay. Immuno-fixation electrophoresis using IgA subclass antisera revealed that this M-protein was the IgA2-lambda type. Western blotting analysis showed that the IgA2 molecules were composed of two approximately 68 kDa alpha 2 chains and two 28 kDa lambda chains. In addition the free lambda chain band was detected at the position of 28 kDa without 2-mercaptoethanol(2-ME) even though the patient IgA was purified. Since it is known that IgA2m(1) allotype easily release light chains from the IgA molecules in SDS-PAGE without 2-ME, we speculated that in this patient the IgA was the IgA2m(1) allotype. After peripheral blood stem cell transplantation(PBSCT), immunofixation electrophoresis of the patient serum revealed not only the bands of IgA2-lambda type M-protein, but also three bands of IgG1-kappa type M-protein in the gamma region.

  7. Evolution of pH buffers and water homeostasis in eukaryotes: homology between humans and Acanthamoeba proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Abdul M; Zohaib, R; Tariq, S; Ahmad, H R

    2018-02-01

    This study intended to trace the evolution of acid-base buffers and water homeostasis in eukaryotes. Acanthamoeba castellanii  was selected as a model unicellular eukaryote for this purpose. Homologies of proteins involved in pH and water regulatory mechanisms at cellular levels were compared between humans and A. castellanii. Amino acid sequence homology, structural homology, 3D modeling and docking prediction were done to show the extent of similarities between carbonic anhydrase 1 (CA1), aquaporin (AQP), band-3 protein and H + pump. Experimental assays were done with acetazolamide (AZM), brinzolamide and mannitol to observe their effects on the trophozoites of  A. castellanii.  The human CA1, AQP, band-3 protein and H + -transport proteins revealed similar proteins in Acanthamoeba. Docking showed the binding of AZM on amoebal AQP-like proteins.  Acanthamoeba showed transient shape changes and encystation at differential doses of brinzolamide, mannitol and AZM.  Conclusion: Water and pH regulating adapter proteins in Acanthamoeba and humans show significant homology, these mechanisms evolved early in the primitive unicellular eukaryotes and have remained conserved in multicellular eukaryotes.

  8. Allosteric Regulation of Proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    interactions with other proteins, or binding of small molecules. Covalent .... vealed through structural elucidation of the protein in free and oxygen-bound forms .... stance, molecular dynamic simulation of glutamine binding pro- tein shows that ...

  9. Nucleic acids digestion by enzymes in the stomach of snakehead (Channa argus) and banded grouper (Epinephelus awoara).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Yanfang; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Jing; Pan, Xiaoming; Wu, Wei; Cao, Minjie; Dong, Ping; Liang, Xingguo

    2017-02-01

    Dietary nucleic acids (NAs) were important nutrients. However, the digestion of NAs in stomach has not been studied. In this study, the digestion of NAs by enzymes from fish stomach was investigated. The snakehead pepsins (SP) which were the main enzymes in stomach were extracted and purified. The purity of SP was evaluated by SDS-PAGE and HPLC. The snakehead pepsin 2 (SP2) which was the main component in the extracts was used for investigating the protein and NAs digestion activity. SP2 could digest NAs, including λ DNA and salmon sperm DNA. Interestingly, the digestion could be inhibited by treatment of alkaline solution at pH 8.0 and pepstatin A, and the digestion could happen either in the presence or absence of hemoglobin (Hb) and BSA as the protein substrates. Similarly, the stomach enzymes of banded grouper also showed the NAs digestion activity. NAs could be digested by the stomach enzymes of snakehead and banded grouper. It may be helpful for understanding both animal nutrition and NAs metabolic pathway.

  10. Function of membrane protein in silica nanopores: incorporation of photosynthetic light-harvesting protein LH2 into FSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Ippei; Hirata, Kotaro; Watanabe, Syoko; Shibata, Yutaka; Kajino, Tsutomu; Fukushima, Yoshiaki; Iwai, Satoshi; Itoh, Shigeru

    2006-01-26

    A high amount of functional membrane protein complex was introduced into a folded-sheet silica mesoporous material (FSM) that has nanometer-size pores of honeycomb-like hexagonal cylindrical structure inside. The photosynthetic light-harvesting complex LH2, which is a typical membrane protein, has a cylindrical structure of 7.3 nm diameter and contains 27 bacteriochlorophyll a and nine carotenoid molecules. The complex captures light energy in the anoxygenic thermophilic purple photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum. The amount of LH2 adsorbed to FSM was determined optically and by the adsorption isotherms of N2. The FSM compounds with internal pore diameters of 7.9 and 2.7 nm adsorbed LH2 at 1.11 and 0.24 mg/mg FSM, respectively, suggesting the high specific affinity of LH2 to the interior of the hydrophobic nanopores with a diameter of 7.9 nm. The LH2 adsorbed to FSM showed almost intact absorption bands of bacteriochlorophylls, and was fully active in the capture and transfer of excitation energy. The LH2 complex inside the FSM showed increased heat stability of the exciton-type absorption band of bacteriochlorophylls (B850), suggesting higher circular symmetry. The environment inside the hydrophobic silica nanopores can be a new matrix for the membrane proteins to reveal their functions. The silica-membrane protein adduct will be useful for the construction of new probes and reaction systems.

  11. Archaea Signal Recognition Particle Shows the Way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Zwieb

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Archaea SRP is composed of an SRP RNA molecule and two bound proteins named SRP19 and SRP54. Regulated by the binding and hydrolysis of guanosine triphosphates, the RNA-bound SRP54 protein transiently associates not only with the hydrophobic signal sequence as it emerges from the ribosomal exit tunnel, but also interacts with the membrane-associated SRP receptor (FtsY. Comparative analyses of the archaea genomes and their SRP component sequences, combined with structural and biochemical data, support a prominent role of the SRP RNA in the assembly and function of the archaea SRP. The 5e motif, which in eukaryotes binds a 72 kilodalton protein, is preserved in most archaea SRP RNAs despite the lack of an archaea SRP72 homolog. The primary function of the 5e region may be to serve as a hinge, strategically positioned between the small and large SRP domain, allowing the elongated SRP to bind simultaneously to distant ribosomal sites. SRP19, required in eukaryotes for initiating SRP assembly, appears to play a subordinate role in the archaea SRP or may be defunct. The N-terminal A region and a novel C-terminal R region of the archaea SRP receptor (FtsY are strikingly diverse or absent even among the members of a taxonomic subgroup.

  12. Two-band superconductor magnesium diboride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi, X X

    2008-01-01

    This review focuses on the most important features of the 40 K superconductor MgB 2 -the weakly interacting multiple bands (the σ and π bands) and the distinct multiple superconducting energy gaps (the σ and π gaps). Even though the pairing mechanism of superconductor MgB 2 is the conventional electron-phonon coupling, the prominent influence of the two bands and two gaps on its properties sets it apart from other superconductors. It leads to markedly different behaviors in upper critical field, vortex structure, magnetoresistance and many other superconducting and normal-state properties in MgB 2 from single-band superconductors. Further, it gives rise to new physics that does not exist in single-band superconductors, such as the internal Josephson effects between the two order parameters. These unique phenomena depend sensitively on scattering inside and between the two bands, and the intraband and interband scattering can be modified by chemical substitution and irradiation. MgB 2 has brought unprecedented attention to two-band superconductivity, which has been found to exist in other old and new superconductors. The legacy of MgB 2 will be long lasting because of this, as well as the lessons it teaches in terms of the search for new phonon-mediated higher T c superconductors

  13. Identification of Ina proteins from Fusarium acuminatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheel, Jan Frederik; Kunert, Anna Theresa; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2015-04-01

    Freezing of water above -36° C is based on ice nucleation activity (INA) mediated by ice nucleators (IN) which can be of various origins. Beside mineral IN, biological particles are a potentially important source of atmospheric IN. The best-known biological IN are common plant-associated bacteria. The IN activity of these bacteria is induced by a surface protein on the outer cell membrane, which is fully characterized. In contrast, much less is known about the nature of fungal IN. The fungal genus Fusarium is widely spread throughout the earth. It belongs to the Ascomycota and is one of the most severe fungal pathogens. It can affect a variety of organisms from plants to animals including humans. INA of Fusarium was already described about 30 years ago and INA of Fusarium as well as other fungal genera is assumed to be mediated by proteins or at least to contain a proteinaceous compound. Although many efforts were made the precise INA machinery of Fusarium and other fungal species including the proteins and their corresponding genes remain unidentified. In this study preparations from living fungal samples of F. acuminatum were fractionated by liquid chromatography and IN active fractions were identified by freezing assays. SDS-page and de novo sequencing by mass spectrometry were used to identify the primary structure of the protein. Preliminary results show that the INA protein of F. acuminatum is contained in the early size exclusion chromatography fractions indicating a high molecular size. Moreover we could identify a single protein band from IN active fractions at 130-145 kDa corresponding to sizes of IN proteins from bacterial species. To our knowledge this is for the first time an isolation of a single protein from in vivo samples, which can be assigned as IN active from Fusarium.

  14. Dual-band frequency selective surface with large band separation and stable performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Hang; Qu Shao-Bo; Lin Bao-Qin; Wang Jia-Fu; Ma Hua; Zhang Jie-Qiu; Peng Wei-Dong; Bai Peng; Wang Xu-Hua; Xu Zhuo

    2012-01-01

    A new technique of designing a dual-band frequency selective surface with large band separation is presented. This technique is based on a delicately designed topology of L- and Ku-band microwave filters. The two band-pass responses are generated by a capacitively-loaded square-loop frequency selective surface and an aperture-coupled frequency selective surface, respectively. A Faraday cage is located between the two frequency selective surface structures to eliminate undesired couplings. Based on this technique, a dual-band frequency selective surface with large band separation is designed, which possesses large band separation, high selectivity, and stable performance under various incident angles and different polarizations. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  15. On the appearance of vorticity and gradient shear bands in wormlike micellar solutions of different CPCl/salt systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mütze, Annekathrin, E-mail: muetzea@ethz.ch; Heunemann, Peggy; Fischer, Peter [ETH Zürich, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, Schmelzbergstrasse 9, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-11-01

    Wormlike micellar salt/surfactant solutions (X-salicylate, cetylpyridinium chloride) are studied with respect to the applied shear stress, concentration, temperature, and composition of the counterions (X = lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium) of the salicylate salt solute to determine vorticity and gradient shear bands. A combination of rheological measurements, laser technique, video analysis, and rheo-small-angle neutron scattering allow for a detailed exploration of number and types of shear bands. Typical flow curves of the solutions show Newtonian, shear-thinning, and shear-thickening flow behavior. In the shear-thickening regime, the solutions show vorticity and gradient shear bands simultaneously, in which vorticity shear bands dominate the visual effect, while gradient shear bands always coexist and predominate the rheological response. It is shown that gradient shear bands change their phases (turbid, clear) with the same frequency as the shear rate oscillates, whereas vorticity shear bands change their phases with half the frequency of the shear rate. Furthermore, we show that with increasing molecular mass of the counterions the number of gradient shear bands increases, while the number of vorticity shear bands remains constant. The variation of temperature, shear stress, concentration, and counterions results in a predictable change in the rheological behavior and therefore allows adjustment of the number of vorticity shear bands in the shear band regime.

  16. Asymmetric acoustic transmission in multiple frequency bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hong-xiang, E-mail: jsdxshx@ujs.edu.cn [Research Center of Fluid Machinery Engineering and Technology, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); State Key Laboratory of Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Yuan, Shou-qi, E-mail: Shouqiy@ujs.edu.cn [Research Center of Fluid Machinery Engineering and Technology, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Zhang, Shu-yi [Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-11-23

    We report both experimentally and numerically that the multi-band device of the asymmetric acoustic transmission is realized by placing two periodic gratings with different periods on both sides of two brass plates immersed in water. The asymmetric acoustic transmission can exist in four frequency bands below 1500 kHz, which arises from the interaction between various diffractions from the two gratings and Lamb modes in the brass plates immersed in water. The results indicate that the device has the advantages of multiple band, broader bandwidth, and simpler structure. Our finding should have great potential applications in ultrasonic devices.

  17. Asymmetric acoustic transmission in multiple frequency bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Hong-xiang; Yuan, Shou-qi; Zhang, Shu-yi

    2015-01-01

    We report both experimentally and numerically that the multi-band device of the asymmetric acoustic transmission is realized by placing two periodic gratings with different periods on both sides of two brass plates immersed in water. The asymmetric acoustic transmission can exist in four frequency bands below 1500 kHz, which arises from the interaction between various diffractions from the two gratings and Lamb modes in the brass plates immersed in water. The results indicate that the device has the advantages of multiple band, broader bandwidth, and simpler structure. Our finding should have great potential applications in ultrasonic devices

  18. Coherent Protein Dynamics Explored at FELIX

    CERN Document Server

    Austin, Robert

    2004-01-01

    We have discovered that there exists a very narrow (less than 0.02 microns) wide resonance in the amide I band of myoglobin and photoactive yellow protein that can be driven to greater than 30% saturation using very narrow linewidth pump-probe spectroscopy at FELIX. The extraordinary narrowness of this transition and the extraordinary ease of saturation inplies that this band is highly anharmonic and decoupled from the other oscillators in the amide I band. We will present detailed measurments on this discovery and implications for energy flow in proteins.

  19. Real-space description of semiconducting band gaps in substitutional systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magri, R.; Zunger, A.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of ''band-gap engineering'' in substitutional lattices is to identify atomic configurations that would give rise to a desired value of the band gap. Yet, current theoretical approaches to the problems, based largely on compilations of band structures for various latice configurations, have not yielded simple rules relating structural motifs to band gaps. We show that the band gap of substitutional AlAs/GaAs lattices can be usefully expanded in terms of a hierarchy of contributions from real-space ''atomic figures'' (pairs, triplets, quadruplets) detemined from first-principles band-structure calculations. Pair figures (up to fourth neighbors) and three-body figures are dominant. In analogy with similar cluster expansions of the total energy, this permits a systematic search among all lattice configurations for those having ''special'' band gaps. This approach enables the design of substitutional systems with certain band-gap properties by assembling atomic figures. As an illustration, we predict that the [0 bar 12]-oriented (AlAs) 1 /(GaAs) 4 /(AlAs) 1 /(GaAs) 2 superlattice has the largest band gap among all Al 0.25 Ga 0.75 As lattices with a maximum of ten cations per unit cell

  20. Multiple bands characteristics of tree-ring and age of haloxylon ammodendron in gurbantunggut desert

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y.; Zhou, C.

    2015-01-01

    The characteristics of the multiple bands of Haloxylon ammodendron (C.A. Mey) Bunge tree-ring were studied in three edaphic types. Age equations were derived relating ground diameter and tree height, and the effects of irrigation on numbers and widths of growth bands at the longest radius were analyzed. Results showed that the number of growth bands ranged from 3.3 to 6.3 per year, the widths ranged between 0.181 mm and 0.473 mm. Multiple growth bands formed every growing season, leading to the conclusion that multiple growth bands in H. ammodendron tree-ring are a natural feature. A dark brown layer and a light brown one make up one growth band. The dark brown layers consists of fibres and vessels as well as some ray parenchyma, and each fibres layers with 22-35 cell layers; the light brown layers formed by vessels, fibres and abundant paratracheal axial parenchyma are 4-15 cell layers. The widths of growth bands at the longest radius increased significantly as the irrigation amount increased in three edaphic types (p<0.01). The numbers of growth bands at the longest radius had significant positive correlation with irrigation times. The ratio of dark brown layers to light brown layers of growth bands at the longest radius appeared to have a rising tendency with the increase in irrigation amount and times. (author)

  1. Line shape and thermal Kinetics analysis of the Fe2+ -band in Brazilian Green beryl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotani, S.; Furtado, W.; Antonini, R.; Dias, O.L.

    1988-03-01

    The optical absorption spectra study through isothermal treatments of the σ- and Π-polarized bands of Fe 2+ -band is reported. It was shown a linear correlation between these bands through thermal treatments. Irradiation with γ-rays from 60 Co, showed the decrease of this band. The line shape analysis and the discussions lend us to assign the Π- and σ-polarized bands to Fe 2+ ions in the structural channels with and without neighbour water molecules, respectively. The kinetics analysis through a ''bimolecular-like'' model gives untrapping parameter with Arrhenius behavior. The retrapping and recombination parameters showed a behavior proportional to T 1/2 - T 1/2 o which were explained from free electron distribution of velocities and minimum untrapped electron energy due to a potential barrier of the trap. The kinetics cut-off temperature, T 0 , agrees with the previous experimental observation. (author) [pt

  2. Demosaicking Based on Optimization and Projection in Different Frequency Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer OsamaA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A fast and effective iterative demosaicking algorithm is described for reconstructing a full-color image from single-color filter array data. The missing color values are interpolated on the basis of optimization and projection in different frequency bands. A filter bank is used to decompose an initially interpolated image into low-frequency and high-frequency bands. In the low-frequency band, a quadratic cost function is minimized in accordance with the observation that the low-frequency components of chrominance slowly vary within an object region. In the high-frequency bands, the high-frequency components of the unknown values are projected onto the high-frequency components of the known values. Comparison of the proposed algorithm with seven state-of-the-art demosaicking algorithms showed that it outperforms all of them for 20 images on average in terms of objective quality and that it is competitive with them from the subjective quality and complexity points of view.

  3. Spatially-protected Topology and Group Cohomology in Band Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandradinata, A.

    This thesis investigates band topologies which rely fundamentally on spatial symmetries. A basic geometric property that distinguishes spatial symmetry regards their transformation of the spatial origin. Point groups consist of spatial transformations that preserve the spatial origin, while un-split extensions of the point groups by spatial translations are referred to as nonsymmorphic space groups. The first part of the thesis addresses topological phases with discretely-robust surface properties: we introduce theories for the Cnv point groups, as well as certain nonsymmorphic groups that involve glide reflections. These band insulators admit a powerful characterization through the geometry of quasimomentum space; parallel transport in this space is represented by the Wilson loop. The non-symmorphic topology we study is naturally described by a further extension of the nonsymmorphic space group by quasimomentum translations (the Wilson loop), thus placing real and quasimomentum space on equal footing -- here, we introduce the language of group cohomology into the theory of band insulators. The second part of the thesis addresses topological phases without surface properties -- their only known physical consequences are discrete signatures in parallel transport. We provide two such case studies with spatial-inversion and discrete-rotational symmetries respectively. One lesson learned here regards the choice of parameter loops in which we carry out transport -- the loop must be chosen to exploit the symmetry that protects the topology. While straight loops are popular for their connection with the geometric theory of polarization, we show that bent loops also have utility in topological band theory.

  4. Ab-initio electronic band structure calculations for beryllium chalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalpana, G.; Pari, G.; Yousuf, Mohammad

    1997-01-01

    The first principle tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital method within the local density approximation (LDA) has been used to calculate the ground state properties, structural phase transition and pressure dependence of band gap of BeS, BeSe and BeTe. We have calculated the energy-volume relations for these compounds in the B3 and B8 phases. The calculated lattice parameters, bulk modulus and the pressure-volume relation were found to be in good agreement with the recent experimental results. The calculated B3→B8 structural transition pressure for BeS, BeSe and BeTe agree well with the recent experimental results. Our calculations show that these compounds are indirect band gap (Γ-X) semiconductors at ambient conditions. The calculated band gap values are found to be underestimated by 20-30% which is due to the usage of LDA. After the structural transition to the B8 phase, BeS continues to be indirect band gap semiconductors and ultimately above 100 GPa it metallises, BeSe and BeTe are metallic at the B3→B8 structural transition. (author)

  5. Edge-Induced Shear Banding in Entangled Polymeric Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Ewan J; Fielding, Suzanne M

    2018-03-30

    Despite decades of research, the question of whether solutions and melts of highly entangled polymers exhibit shear banding as their steady state response to a steadily imposed shear flow remains controversial. From a theoretical viewpoint, an important unanswered question is whether the underlying constitutive curve of shear stress σ as a function of shear rate γ[over ˙] (for states of homogeneous shear) is monotonic, or has a region of negative slope, dσ/dγ[over ˙]<0, which would trigger banding. Attempts to settle the question experimentally via velocimetry of the flow field inside the fluid are often confounded by an instability of the free surface where the sample meets the outside air, known as "edge fracture." Here we show by numerical simulation that in fact even only very modest edge disturbances-which are the precursor of full edge fracture but might well, in themselves, go unnoticed experimentally-can cause strong secondary flows in the form of shear bands that invade deep into the fluid bulk. Crucially, this is true even when the underlying constitutive curve is monotonically increasing, precluding true bulk shear banding in the absence of edge effects.

  6. Electrophoresis characterisation of protein as a method to establish the entomological origin of stingless bee honeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramón-Sierra, Jesús Manuel; Ruiz-Ruiz, Jorge Carlos; de la Luz Ortiz-Vázquez, Elizabeth

    2015-09-15

    Increasing production of stingless-bee honey and the prospect of broader marker for natural and organic products indicate the need to establish parameters to determinate the entomological origin and authenticity of honey. In this research, honeys of Apis mellifera, Melipona beecheii and Trigona spp. were collected in Yucatan, Mexico. Stingless-bee honeys contained more water and less total sugars and reducing sugars. SDS-PAGE patterns show distinctive bands for each kind of honey. The SDS-PAGE pattern of A. mellifera proteins honey showed three bands with molecular weights between 10.2 and 74.8kDa, there were five proteins bands in M. beecheii honey with molecular weights between 6.1 and 97.0kDa and nine for Trigona spp. proteins between 9.3 and 86.7kDa. Conventional physicochemical parameters along with electrophoresis profiles of stingless-bee honeys proteins could be an alternative for determination of entomological origin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Relocation of the disulfonic stilbene sites of AE1 (band 3) on the basis of fluorescence energy transfer measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauf, Philip A; Law, Foon-Yee; Leung, Tze-Wah Vivian; Atherton, Stephen J

    2004-09-28

    Previous fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements, using BIDS (4-benzamido-4'-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate) as a label for the disulfonic stilbene site and FM (fluorescein-5-maleimide) as a label for the cytoplasmic SH groups on band 3 (AE1), combined with data showing that the cytoplasmic SH groups lie about 40 A from the cytoplasmic surface of the lipid bilayer, would place the BIDS sites very near the membrane's inner surface, a location that seems to be inconsistent with current models of AE1 structure and mechanism. We reinvestigated the BIDS-FM distance, using laser single photon counting techniques as well as steady-state fluorescence of AE1, in its native membrane environment. Both techniques agree that there is very little energy transfer from BIDS to FM. The mean energy transfer (E), based on three-exponential fits to the fluorescence decay data, is 2.5 +/- 0.7% (SEM, N = 12). Steady-state fluorescence measurements also indicate BIDS to FM. These data indicate that the BIDS sites are probably over 63 A from the cytoplasmic SH groups, placing them near the middle or the external half of the lipid bilayer. This relocation of the BIDS sites fits with other evidence that the disulfonic stilbene sites are located farther toward the external membrane surface than Glu-681, a residue near the inner membrane surface whose modification affects the pH dependence and anion selectivity of band 3. The involvement of two relatively distant parts of the AE1 protein in transport function suggests that the transport mechanism requires coordinated large-scale conformational changes in the band 3 protein.

  8. Severe neurological complication following adjustable gastric banding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martines, G; Musa, N; Aquilino, F; Capuano, P

    2018-01-01

    In the last years with the increase of bariatric surgery, first of all as a result of new indications, a rise in the incidence of nutrient-related complications has been observed. Currently little is known about the impact of post-bariatric malnutrition and neurological complications. Wernicke's encephalopathy is a severe neurological syndrome which occurs as a result of thiamine deficiency. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome must be considered a serious neurological complication of bariatric surgery with significant morbidity and mortality, with rapidly progressing neurological symptoms, and must be treated immediately. We report the case of a 35 years-old male patient, affected by morbid obesity, anxious-depressive syndrome and alcohol use disorder, who after adjustable gastric banding implanted in another hospital developed a severe malnutrition and neurological syndrome. The patient showed poor adherence to the follow-up and to the dietary indications and after all, we needed to place a PEG for enteral nutrition in order to resolve the malnutrition condition and the neurological syndrome. Our experience emphasizes that preoperative selection and assessment of a patient's nutritional status according to guidelines, is required to identify potential problems, and that bariatric surgeons or physicians caring for patient who have undergone bariatric surgery should be familiar with the constellation of nutritional and neurological disorder that may occur after surgery. We want to remark the importance of preoperative selection of the patients, the follow-up and the cooperation between patient and physician in order to obtain the best result and avoid severe complications.

  9. CHRISTIAN PRACTICAL PRAYING BAND (ACPPB)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    while false prophets change their words to fit the situation of the moment. Just like Prophet .... under divine constraints showing signs of ecstasy and abnormal behavior; they receive revelations from ... 12-15), and his appeal to the priests and people ..... Even when Hananiah used violence on him, he did not fear. K. Unegbu ...

  10. VIIRS Reflective Solar Band Radiometric and Stability Evaluation Using Deep Convective Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tiejun; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Mu, Qiaozhen

    2016-01-01

    This work takes advantage of the stable distribution of deep convective cloud (DCC) reflectance measurements to assess the calibration stability and detector difference in Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) reflective bands. VIIRS Sensor Data Records (SDRs) from February 2012 to June 2015 are utilized to analyze the long-term trending, detector difference, and half angle mirror (HAM) side difference. VIIRS has two thermal emissive bands with coverage crossing 11 microns for DCC pixel identification. The comparison of the results of these two processing bands is one of the indicators of analysis reliability. The long-term stability analysis shows downward trends (up to approximately 0.4 per year) for the visible and near-infrared bands and upward trends (up to 0.5per year) for the short- and mid-wave infrared bands. The detector difference for each band is calculated as the difference relative to the average reflectance overall detectors. Except for the slightly greater than 1 difference in the two bands at 1610 nm, the detector difference is less than1 for other solar reflective bands. The detector differences show increasing trends for some short-wave bands with center wavelengths from 400 to 600 nm and remain unchanged for the bands with longer center wavelengths. The HAM side difference is insignificant and stable. Those short-wave bands from 400 to 600 nm also have relatively larger HAM side difference, up to 0.25.Comparing the striped images from SDR and the smooth images after the correction validates the analyses of detector difference and HAM side difference. These analyses are very helpful for VIIRS calibration improvement and thus enhance product quality

  11. Band structure of germanium carbides for direct bandgap silicon photonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, C. A., E-mail: cstephe3@nd.edu; Stillwell, R. A.; Wistey, M. A. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); O' Brien, W. A. [Rigetti Quantum Computing, 775 Heinz Avenue, Berkeley, California 94710 (United States); Penninger, M. W. [Honeywell UOP, Des Plaines, Illinois 60016 (United States); Schneider, W. F. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Gillett-Kunnath, M. [Department of Chemistry, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244 (United States); Zajicek, J. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Yu, K. M. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Kudrawiec, R. [Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2016-08-07

    Compact optical interconnects require efficient lasers and modulators compatible with silicon. Ab initio modeling of Ge{sub 1−x}C{sub x} (x = 0.78%) using density functional theory with HSE06 hybrid functionals predicts a splitting of the conduction band at Γ and a strongly direct bandgap, consistent with band anticrossing. Photoreflectance of Ge{sub 0.998}C{sub 0.002} shows a bandgap reduction supporting these results. Growth of Ge{sub 0.998}C{sub 0.002} using tetrakis(germyl)methane as the C source shows no signs of C-C bonds, C clusters, or extended defects, suggesting highly substitutional incorporation of C. Optical gain and modulation are predicted to rival III–V materials due to a larger electron population in the direct valley, reduced intervalley scattering, suppressed Auger recombination, and increased overlap integral for a stronger fundamental optical transition.

  12. Rett Syndrome Mutant Neural Cells Lacks MeCP2 Immunoreactive Bands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Bueno

    Full Text Available Dysfunctions of MeCP2 protein lead to various neurological disorders such as Rett syndrome and Autism. The exact functions of MeCP2 protein is still far from clear. At a molecular level, there exist contradictory data. MeCP2 protein is considered a single immunoreactive band around 75 kDa by western-blot analysis but several reports have revealed the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands above and below the level where MeCP2 is expected. MeCP2 immunoreactive bands have been interpreted in different ways. Some researchers suggest that multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands are unidentified proteins that cross-react with the MeCP2 antibody or degradation product of MeCP2, while others suggest that MeCP2 post-transcriptional processing generates multiple molecular forms linked to cell signaling, but so far they have not been properly analyzed in relation to Rett syndrome experimental models. The purpose of this study is to advance understanding of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control neural cells and p.T158M MeCP2e1 mutant cells. We have generated stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Application of N- and C- terminal MeCP2 antibodies, and also, RFP antibody minimized concerns about nonspecific cross-reactivity, since they react with the same antigen at different epitopes. We report the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control cells, stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Also, MeCP2 immunoreactive bands differences were found between wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Slower migration phosphorylated band around 70kDa disappeared in p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. These data suggest that threonine 158 could represent an important phosphorylation site potentially involved in protein function. Our results clearly indicate that MeCP2 antibodies have no cross-reactivity with similar epitopes on others proteins, supporting the

  13. Observation of dipole bands in 144Sm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raut, R.; Ganguly, S.; Kshetri, R.; Banerjee, P.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dasmahapatra, B.; Mukherjee, A.; Sahasarkar, M.; Goswami, A.; Basu, S.K.; Bhattacharjee, T.; Mukherjee, G.; Chakraborty, A.; Ghughre, S.S.; Krishichayan; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Gangopadhyay, G.; Singh, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    The nucleus 144 Sm (Z=62, N=82), with its proximity to the shell closure and possibilities of particles and holes occupying high j orbitals, following appropriate excitations, is a suitable system for observation of dipole (MR) bands

  14. Silicone rubber band for laparoscopic tubal sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, A H; Sealey, R M; Gay, J W; Kang, I

    1977-12-01

    In 1974, Yoon and associates (Am J Obstet Gynecol 120:132, 1974) described a new approach in which laparoscopic tubal occlusion was accomplished by utilizing the silicone rubber band technique. Recognizing the great advantages of the new technique in eliminating potential thermal injury associated with electrocoagulation, the authors have utilized the Yoon silicone rubber band technique in these institutions over the past 20 months. Thus far the procedure has been performed in 304 patients without any major complications. In the hope of eliminating and/or reducing possible pregnancy-failure rates, in 110 cases. In addition to application of the silicone band, the tube within the band was transected with non-electrical Seigler biopsy forceps. This, we believe, should provide an interesting long-term comparative study.

  15. Microbial processes in banded iron formation deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posth, Nicole; Konhauser, Kurt; Kappler, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    , remains unresolved. Evidence of an anoxic Earth with only localized oxic areas until the Great Oxidation Event ca 2·45 to 2·32 Ga makes the investigation of O2-independent mechanisms for banded iron formation deposition relevant. Recent studies have explored the long-standing proposition that Archean......Banded iron formations have been studied for decades, particularly regarding their potential as archives of the Precambrian environment. In spite of this effort, the mechanism of their deposition and, specifically, the role that microbes played in the precipitation of banded iron formation minerals...... banded iron formations may have been formed, and diagenetically modified, by anaerobic microbial metabolisms. These efforts encompass a wide array of approaches including isotope, ecophysiological and phylogeny studies, molecular and mineral marker analysis, and sedimentological reconstructions. Herein...

  16. Simulating Precambrian banded iron formation diagenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posth, Nicole R.; K??hler, Inga; D. Swanner, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Post-depositional diagenetic alteration makes the accurate interpretation of key precipitation processes in ancient sediments, such as Precambrian banded iron formations (BIFs), difficult. While microorganisms are proposed as key contributors to BIF deposition, the diagenetic transformation...

  17. The Novel Microwave Stop-Band Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Chernobrovkin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The stop-band filter with the new band-rejection element is proposed. The element is a coaxial waveguide with the slot in the centre conductor. In the frame of this research, the numerical and experimental investigations of the amplitude-frequency characteristics of the filter are carried out. It is noted that according to the slot parameters the two typical resonances (half-wave and quarter-wave can be excited. The rejection band of the single element is defined by the width, depth, and dielectric filling of the slot. Fifth-order Chebyshev filter utilizing the aforementioned element is also synthesized, manufactured, and tested. The measured and simulated results are in good agreement. The experimental filter prototype exhibits the rejection band 0.86 GHz at the level −40 dB.

  18. The cellular approach to band structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verwoerd, W.S.

    1982-01-01

    A short introduction to the cellular approach in band structure calculations is given. The linear cellular approach and its potantial applicability in surface structure calculations is given some consideration in particular

  19. Full L-S Band Telemetry System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jensen, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Recent changes in spectrum availability as well as higher demands for spectrum have motivated the development of telemetry transmit systems capable of fully operating over both L and S telemetry bands...

  20. Full L-S Band Telemetry System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jensen, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Recent changes in spectrum availability as well as higher demands for spectrum have motivated the development of telemetry transmit systems capable of fully operating over both L and S telemetry bands...

  1. Full L-S Band Telemetry System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jensen, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Recent changes in spectrum availability as well as higher demands for spectrum have motivated the development of telemetry transmit systems capable of fully operating over both L and S telemetry bands...

  2. Deployable Ka-Band Reflectarray, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Tyvak, in collaboration with UCLA, proposes a novel approach to the challenge of creating a large reflector for Ka-band high data rate links. We propose to attach...

  3. Stability of the split-band solution and energy gap in the narrow-band region of the Hubbard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, T.; Cohen, M.H.

    1980-01-01

    By inserting quasielectron energies ω calculated from the fully renormalized Green's function of the Hubbard model obtained in the preceding paper into the exact expression of Galitskii and Migdal, the ground-state energy, the chemical potential, and the dynamic- and thermodynamic-stability conditions are calculated in the narrow-band region. The results show that as long as the interaction energy I is finite, electrons in the narrow-band region do not obey the Landau theory of Fermi liquids, and a gap appears between the lowest quasielectron energy ω and the chemical potential μ for any occupation n, regardless of whether the lower band is exactly filled or not. This unusual behavior is possible because, when an electron is added to the system of N electrons, the whole system relaxes due to the strong interaction, introducing a relaxation energy difference between the two quantities. We also show that all previous solutions which exhibit the split-band structure, including Hubbard's work, yield the same conclusion that electrons do not behave like Landau quasiparticles. However, the energy gap is calculated to be negative at least for some occupations n, demonstrating the dynamic instability of those solutions. They also exhibit thermodynamic instability for certain occupations, while the fully renormalized solution, having sufficient electron correlations built in, satisfies the dynamic and thermodynamic stability conditions for all occupations. When the lower band is nearly filled, the nature of the solution is shown to change, making the coherent motion of electrons with fixed k values more difficult. In the pathological limit where I=infinity, however, the gap vanishes, yielding a metallic state

  4. Control Banding and Nanotechnology Synergist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalk, D; Paik, S

    2009-12-15

    The average Industrial Hygienist (IH) loves a challenge, right? Okay, well here is one with more than a few twists. We start by going through the basics of a risk assessment. You have some chemical agents, a few workers, and the makings of your basic exposure characterization. However, you have no occupational exposure limit (OEL), essentially no toxicological basis, and no epidemiology. Now the real handicap is that you cannot use sampling pumps, cassettes, tubes, or any of the media in your toolbox, and the whole concept of mass-to-dose is out the window, even at high exposure levels. Of course, by the title, you knew we were talking about nanomaterials (NM). However, we wonder how many IHs know that this topic takes everything you know about your profession and turns it upside down. It takes the very foundations that you worked so hard in college and in the field to master and pulls it out from underneath you. It even takes the gold standard of our profession, the quantitative science of exposure assessment, and makes it look pretty darn rusty. Now with NM there is the potential to get some aspect of quantitative measurements, but the instruments are generally very expensive and getting an appropriate workplace personal exposure measurement can be very difficult if not impossible. The potential for workers getting exposures, however, is very real, as evidenced by a recent publication reporting worker exposures to polyacrylate nanoparticles in a Chinese factory (Song et al. 2009). With something this complex and challenging, how does a concept as simple as Control Banding (CB) save the day? Although many IHs have heard of CB, most of their knowledge comes from its application in the COSHH Essentials toolkit. While there is conflicting published research on COSHH Essentials and its value for risk assessments, almost all of the experts agree that it can be useful when no OELs are available (Zalk and Nelson 2008). It is this aspect of CB, its utility with

  5. Theoretical Prediction of the Forming Limit Band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banabic, D.; Paraianu, L.; Vos, M.; Jurco, P.

    2007-01-01

    Forming Limit Band (FLB) is a very useful tool to improve the sheet metal forming simulation robustness. Until now, the study of the FLB was only experimental. This paper presents the first attempt to model the FLB. The authors have established an original method for predicting the two margins of the limit band. The method was illustrated on the AA6111-T43 aluminum alloy. A good agreement with the experiments has been obtained

  6. Theoretical Prediction of the Forming Limit Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banabic, D.; Vos, M.; Paraianu, L.; Jurco, P.

    2007-04-01

    Forming Limit Band (FLB) is a very useful tool to improve the sheet metal forming simulation robustness. Until now, the study of the FLB was only experimental. This paper presents the first attempt to model the FLB. The authors have established an original method for predicting the two margins of the limit band. The method was illustrated on the AA6111-T43 aluminum alloy. A good agreement with the experiments has been obtained.

  7. A superdeformed band in {sup 142}Sm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackman, G; Mullins, J M; Kuehner, J A; Prevost, D; Waddington, J C [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Janzen, V P; Radford, D C; Schmeing, N; Ward, D [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.

    1992-08-01

    Observation of {gamma}-{gamma} coincidences from the reaction {sup 124}Sn({sup 24}Mg,6n){sup 142}Sm at 145 MeV indicates the existence of a rotational band with dynamic moment of inertia J{sup (2)} similar to that of the superdeformed band in the isotone {sup 143}Eu. This result is consistent with calculations predicting superdeformed structures in N = 80, Z {approx} 64 nuclei. (author). 8 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Comparing side chain packing in soluble proteins, protein-protein interfaces, and transmembrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, J C; Acebes, S; Virrueta, A; Butler, M; Regan, L; O'Hern, C S

    2018-05-01

    We compare side chain prediction and packing of core and non-core regions of soluble proteins, protein-protein interfaces, and transmembrane proteins. We first identified or created comparable databases of high-resolution crystal structures of these 3 protein classes. We show that the solvent-inaccessible cores of the 3 classes of proteins are equally densely packed. As a result, the side chains of core residues at protein-protein interfaces and in the membrane-exposed regions of transmembrane proteins can be predicted by the hard-sphere plus stereochemical constraint model with the same high prediction accuracies (>90%) as core residues in soluble proteins. We also find that for all 3 classes of proteins, as one moves away from the solvent-inaccessible core, the packing fraction decreases as the solvent accessibility increases. However, the side chain predictability remains high (80% within 30°) up to a relative solvent accessibility, rSASA≲0.3, for all 3 protein classes. Our results show that ≈40% of the interface regions in protein complexes are "core", that is, densely packed with side chain conformations that can be accurately predicted using the hard-sphere model. We propose packing fraction as a metric that can be used to distinguish real protein-protein interactions from designed, non-binding, decoys. Our results also show that cores of membrane proteins are the same as cores of soluble proteins. Thus, the computational methods we are developing for the analysis of the effect of hydrophobic core mutations in soluble proteins will be equally applicable to analyses of mutations in membrane proteins. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Visible bands of ammonia: band strengths, curves of growth, and the spatial distribution of ammonia on Jupiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, B.L.; Owen, T.

    1980-01-01

    We report room-temperature laboratory studies of the 5520 A (6ν 1 ) and 6475 A (5ν 1 ) bands of self-broadened ammonia at column densities ranging from 1.7--435.7 meter-amagats (m-am). Detailed equivalent-width measurements at 24 different pressure-pathlength combinations corresponding to four pressures between 44 and 689 torr and pathlengths between 32 and 512 m are used to determin curves of growth and integrated band strengths. The band strengths for the 6ν 1 and 5ν 1 overtones are 5520 A: S=0.096 +- 0.005 cm -1 (m-am) -1 and 6475 A: S=0.63 +- 0.03 cm -1 (m-am) -1 , respectively.Using these band strengths and curves of growth, we analyze new spatially resolved spectra of Jupiter showing a nonhomogeneous distribution of ammonia in the Jovian atmosphere. The observed variations in the CH 4 /NH 3 mixing ratio are interpreted as evidence of altitude-dependent depletion of ammonia in the atmosphere

  10. Band-to-Band Tunneling-Dominated Thermo-Enhanced Field Electron Emission from p-Si/ZnO Nanoemitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhizhen; Huang, Yifeng; Xu, Ningsheng; Chen, Jun; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi

    2018-06-13

    Thermo-enhancement is an effective way to achieve high performance field electron emitters, and enables the individually tuning on the emission current by temperature and the electron energy by voltage. The field emission current from metal or n-doped semiconductor emitter at a relatively lower temperature (i.e., current saturation was observed in the thermo-enhanced field emission measurements. The emission current density showed about ten-time enhancement (from 1.31 to 12.11 mA/cm 2 at 60.6 MV/m) by increasing the temperature from 323 to 623 K. The distinctive performance did not agree with the interband excitation mechanism but well-fit to the band-to-band tunneling model. The strong thermo-enhancement was proposed to be benefit from the increase of band-to-band tunneling probability at the surface portion of the p-Si/ZnO nanojunction. This work provides promising cathode for portable X-ray tubes/panel, ionization vacuum gauges and low energy electron beam lithography, in where electron-dose control at a fixed energy is needed.

  11. Twisted bilayer blue phosphorene: A direct band gap semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospina, D. A.; Duque, C. A.; Correa, J. D.; Suárez Morell, Eric

    2016-09-01

    We report that two rotated layers of blue phosphorene behave as a direct band gap semiconductor. The optical spectrum shows absorption peaks in the visible region of the spectrum and in addition the energy of these peaks can be tuned with the rotational angle. These findings makes twisted bilayer blue phosphorene a strong candidate as a solar cell or photodetection device. Our results are based on ab initio calculations of several rotated blue phosphorene layers.

  12. Band structures in near spherical 138Ce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, T.; Chanda, S.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Basu, S. K.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Das, J. J.; Pramanik, U. Datta; Ghugre, S. S.; Madhavan, N.; Mukherjee, A.; Mukherjee, G.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.

    2009-06-01

    The high spin states of N=80138Ce have been populated in the fusion evaporation reaction 130Te( 12C, 4n) 138Ce at E=65 MeV. The γ transitions belonging to various band structures were detected and characterized using an array of five Clover Germanium detectors. The level scheme has been established up to a maximum spin and excitation energy of 23 ℏ and 9511.3 keV, respectively, by including 53 new transitions. The negative parity ΔI=1 band, developed on the 6536.3 keV 15 level, has been conjectured to be a magnetic rotation band following a semiclassical analysis and comparing the systematics of similar bands in the neighboring nuclei. The said band is proposed to have a four quasiparticle configuration of [πgh]⊗[. Other band structures are interpreted in terms of multi-quasiparticle configurations, based on Total Routhian Surface (TRS) calculations. For the low and medium spin states, a shell model calculation using a realistic two body interaction has been performed using the code OXBASH.

  13. Compound complex enzymes and proteins of Stipa capillata from Semipalatinsk polygon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarsenbaev, K.N.; Esnazarov, U.; Sarsenbaeva, M.V.; Seisebaev, A.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of low and high doses of irradiation near Semipalatinsk Atomic lake on the compound complex of different enzymes and proteins of leaves from different population of Stipa capillata are considered. 36 samples of Stipa capillata were analyzed by the iso-electrofocusing methods, native and SDS-electrophoresis. Levels of radioactivity effect on compound complex of peroxidase, esterase, acid phosphates and soluble proteins were found. SDS-PAGE and IEF methods did not show difference in peptides spectra between 36 populations of examined species. It means, that difference between contaminated and non-contaminated populations not so big as was expected. Compound complex soluble protein of Stipa capillata leaves changes under chronic doses of radioactivity. The difference in spectra between control and contaminated leaves make up 3-6 bands. Control leaves have more high molecular weight proteins than contaminated ones. Appearance of new bands is one of ways of plant adaptation. New components of enzymes spectra and soluble proteins were found. It was suggested, that gene mutation or post-translation modification of these proteins are result of chronic irradiation. To prove exactly genetic nature of this alteration aminoacids sequence for these proteins the DNA sequence of different Stipa capillata populations genomes were compared

  14. Effect of radiographic contrast media on the spectrin/band3-network of the membrane skeleton of erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf-Peter Franke

    Full Text Available The membrane of red blood cells consists of a phospholipid bilayer with embedded membrane proteins and is associated on the cytoplasmatic side with a network of proteins, the membrane skeleton. Band3 has an important role as centre of the functional complexes e.g. gas exchange complex and as element of attachment for the membrane skeleton maintaining membrane stability and flexibility. Up to now it is unclear if band3 is involved in the morphology change of red blood cells after contact with radiographic contrast media. The study revealed for the first time that Iopromide induced markedly more severe alterations of the membrane skeleton compared to Iodixanol whose effects were similar to erythrocytes suspended in autologous plasma. A remarkable clustering of band3 was found associated with an accumulation of band3 in spicules and also a sequestration of band3 to the extracellular space. This was evidently accompanied by a gross reduction of functional band3 complexes combined with a dissociation of spectrin from band3 leading to a loss of homogeneity of the spectrin network. It could be demonstrated for the first time that RCM not only induced echinocyte formation but also exocytosis of particles at least coated with band3.

  15. Effect of Radiographic Contrast Media on the Spectrin/Band3-Network of the Membrane Skeleton of Erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Ralf-Peter; Scharnweber, Tim; Fuhrmann, Rosemarie; Wenzel, Folker; Krüger, Anne; Mrowietz, Christof; Jung, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    The membrane of red blood cells consists of a phospholipid bilayer with embedded membrane proteins and is associated on the cytoplasmatic side with a network of proteins, the membrane skeleton. Band3 has an important role as centre of the functional complexes e.g. gas exchange complex and as element of attachment for the membrane skeleton maintaining membrane stability and flexibility. Up to now it is unclear if band3 is involved in the morphology change of red blood cells after contact with radiographic contrast media. The study revealed for the first time that Iopromide induced markedly more severe alterations of the membrane skeleton compared to Iodixanol whose effects were similar to erythrocytes suspended in autologous plasma. A remarkable clustering of band3 was found associated with an accumulation of band3 in spicules and also a sequestration of band3 to the extracellular space. This was evidently accompanied by a gross reduction of functional band3 complexes combined with a dissociation of spectrin from band3 leading to a loss of homogeneity of the spectrin network. It could be demonstrated for the first time that RCM not only induced echinocyte formation but also exocytosis of particles at least coated with band3. PMID:24586837

  16. Protein docking prediction using predicted protein-protein interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many important cellular processes are carried out by protein complexes. To provide physical pictures of interacting proteins, many computational protein-protein prediction methods have been developed in the past. However, it is still difficult to identify the correct docking complex structure within top ranks among alternative conformations. Results We present a novel protein docking algorithm that utilizes imperfect protein-protein binding interface prediction for guiding protein docking. Since the accuracy of protein binding site prediction varies depending on cases, the challenge is to develop a method which does not deteriorate but improves docking results by using a binding site prediction which may not be 100% accurate. The algorithm, named PI-LZerD (using Predicted Interface with Local 3D Zernike descriptor-based Docking algorithm, is based on a pair wise protein docking prediction algorithm, LZerD, which we have developed earlier. PI-LZerD starts from performing docking prediction using the provided protein-protein binding interface prediction as constraints, which is followed by the second round of docking with updated docking interface information to further improve docking conformation. Benchmark results on bound and unbound cases show that PI-LZerD consistently improves the docking prediction accuracy as compared with docking without using binding site prediction or using the binding site prediction as post-filtering. Conclusion We have developed PI-LZerD, a pairwise docking algorithm, which uses imperfect protein-protein binding interface prediction to improve docking accuracy. PI-LZerD consistently showed better prediction accuracy over alternative methods in the series of benchmark experiments including docking using actual docking interface site predictions as well as unbound docking cases.

  17. Protein docking prediction using predicted protein-protein interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Kihara, Daisuke

    2012-01-10

    Many important cellular processes are carried out by protein complexes. To provide physical pictures of interacting proteins, many computational protein-protein prediction methods have been developed in the past. However, it is still difficult to identify the correct docking complex structure within top ranks among alternative conformations. We present a novel protein docking algorithm that utilizes imperfect protein-protein binding interface prediction for guiding protein docking. Since the accuracy of protein binding site prediction varies depending on cases, the challenge is to develop a method which does not deteriorate but improves docking results by using a binding site prediction which may not be 100% accurate. The algorithm, named PI-LZerD (using Predicted Interface with Local 3D Zernike descriptor-based Docking algorithm), is based on a pair wise protein docking prediction algorithm, LZerD, which we have developed earlier. PI-LZerD starts from performing docking prediction using the provided protein-protein binding interface prediction as constraints, which is followed by the second round of docking with updated docking interface information to further improve docking conformation. Benchmark results on bound and unbound cases show that PI-LZerD consistently improves the docking prediction accuracy as compared with docking without using binding site prediction or using the binding site prediction as post-filtering. We have developed PI-LZerD, a pairwise docking algorithm, which uses imperfect protein-protein binding interface prediction to improve docking accuracy. PI-LZerD consistently showed better prediction accuracy over alternative methods in the series of benchmark experiments including docking using actual docking interface site predictions as well as unbound docking cases.

  18. Modulation of EEG Theta Band Signal Complexity by Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Joydeep; Lee, Eun-Jeong

    The primary goal of this study was to investigate the impact of monochord (MC) sounds, a type of archaic sounds used in music therapy, on the neural complexity of EEG signals obtained from patients undergoing chemotherapy. The secondary goal was to compare the EEG signal complexity values for monochords with those for progressive muscle relaxation (PMR), an alternative therapy for relaxation. Forty cancer patients were randomly allocated to one of the two relaxation groups, MC and PMR, over a period of six months; continuous EEG signals were recorded during the first and last sessions. EEG signals were analyzed by applying signal mode complexity, a measure of complexity of neuronal oscillations. Across sessions, both groups showed a modulation of complexity of beta-2 band (20-29Hz) at midfrontal regions, but only MC group showed a modulation of complexity of theta band (3.5-7.5Hz) at posterior regions. Therefore, the neuronal complexity patterns showed different changes in EEG frequency band specific complexity resulting in two different types of interventions. Moreover, the different neural responses to listening to monochords and PMR were observed after regular relaxation interventions over a short time span.

  19. Expression, purification, and DNA-binding activity of the Herbaspirillum seropedicae RecX protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, Carolina W; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Souza, Emanuel M; Yates, M Geoffrey; Chubatsu, Leda S; Steffens, Maria Berenice R

    2004-06-01

    The Herbaspirillum seropedicae RecX protein participates in the SOS response: a process in which the RecA protein plays a central role. The RecX protein of the H. seropedicae, fused to a His-tag sequence (RecX His-tagged), was over-expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by metal-affinity chromatography to yield a highly purified and active protein. DNA band-shift assays showed that the RecX His-tagged protein bound to both circular and linear double-stranded DNA and also to circular single-stranded DNA. The apparent affinity of RecX for DNA decreased in the presence of Mg(2+) ions. The ability of RecX to bind DNA may be relevant to its function in the SOS response.

  20. Development of Personalized Urination Recognition Technology Using Smart Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Jong Eun

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose This study collected and analyzed activity data sensed through smart bands worn by patients in order to resolve the clinical issues posed by using voiding charts. By developing a smart band-based algorithm for recognizing urination activity in patients, this study aimed to explore the feasibility of urination monitoring systems. Methods This study aimed to develop an algorithm that recognizes urination based on a patient’s posture and changes in posture. Motion data was obtained from a smart band on the arm. An algorithm that recognizes the 3 stages of urination (forward movement, urination, backward movement was developed based on data collected from a 3-axis accelerometer and from tilt angle data. Real-time data were acquired from the smart band, and for data corresponding to a certain duration, the absolute value of the signals was calculated and then compared with the set threshold value to determine the occurrence of vibration signals. In feature extraction, the most essential information describing each pattern was identified after analyzing the characteristics of the data. The results of the feature extraction process were sorted using a classifier to detect urination. Results An experiment was carried out to assess the performance of the recognition technology proposed in this study. The final accuracy of the algorithm was calculated based on clinical guidelines for urologists. The experiment showed a high average accuracy of 90.4%, proving the robustness of the proposed algorithm. Conclusions The proposed urination recognition technology draws on acceleration data and tilt angle data collected via a smart band; these data were then analyzed using a classifier after comparative analyses with standardized feature patterns.

  1. An attenuation Layer for Electromagnetic Shielding in X- Band Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Zaroushani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled exposure to X-band frequency leads to health damage. One of the principles of radiation protection is shielding. But, conventional shielding materials have disadvantages. Therefore, studies of novel materials, as an alternative to conventional shielding materials, are required to obtain new electromagnetic shielding material. Therefore, this study investigated the electromagnetic shielding of two component epoxy thermosetting resin for the X - band frequency with workplace approach. Two components of epoxy resin mixed according to manufacturing instruction with the weight ratio that was 100:10 .Epoxy plates fabricated in three different thicknesses (2, 4 and 6mm and shielding effectiveness measured by Vector Network Analyzer. Then, shielding effectiveness measured by the scattering parameters.The results showed that 6mm thickness of epoxy had the highest and 2mm had the lowest average of shielding effectiveness in X-band frequency that is 4.48 and 1.9 dB, respectively. Also, shielding effectiveness increased by increasing the thickness. But this increasing is useful up to 4mm. Percentage shielding effectiveness of attenuation for 6, 4 and 2mm thicknesses is 64.35%, 63.31% and 35.40%. Also, attenuation values for 4mm and 6mm thicknesses at 8.53 GHz and 8.52 GHz frequency are 77.15% and 82.95%, respectively, and can be used as favourite shields for the above frequency. 4mm-Epoxy is a suitable candidate for shielding application in X-band frequency range but, in the lower section, 6mm thickness is recommended. Finely, the shielding matrix can be used for selecting the proper thickness for electromagnetic shielding in X- Band frequency.

  2. Unidentified bands lambda lambda 6830, 7088 in symbiotic stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, D A [Anglo-Australian Observatory, Epping (Australia)

    1980-01-01

    About 60 stars are known which show broad emission bands centred at wavelengths of 6830 and 7088 A. The stars are all classified as symbiotic, since they combine high-excitation emission and M-type absorption spectra. From the behaviour of the bands in the evolution of slow novae as they approach the symbiotic phase, and from the occurrence of the bands in stars of different excitation, it is concluded that the ions responsible have ionization potentials near 100 eV. The similarity of behaviour and profile of the two suggests that both arise in the same species. No suitable identification appears possible at this time, because of the lack of data on highly ionized species. Arguments are presented which narrow the range of possibilities, the most notable argument being the absence of O VI emission. It is suggested that Fe VII or Fe VI may be responsible. In particular, it is recommended that transitions from the z/sup 3/P/sup 0/ and z/sup 1/F/sup 0/ levels of Fe VII be examined in detail. The differing, and time-varying profiles of the 6830 and 7088 bands in the stars observed are best explained in terms of velocity broadening. Velocities in excess of 1000 km s/sup -1/ are present. Rotation is a more credible form of the mass motion than expansion, because of the tendency to double profiles in these bands. If rotation is responsible, these velocities imply that the objects central to the emission nebulae are more compact than main sequence stars.

  3. Chromosome Banding in Amphibia. XXXII. The Genus Xenopus (Anura, Pipidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Michael; Steinlein, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic chromosomes of 16 species of the frog genus Xenopus were prepared from kidney and lung cell cultures. In the chromosomes of 7 species, high-resolution replication banding patterns could be induced by treating the cultures with 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and deoxythymidine (dT) in succession, and in 6 of these species the BrdU/dT-banded chromosomes could be arranged into karyotypes. In the 3 species of the clade with 2n = 20 and 4n = 40 chromosomes (X. tropicalis, X. epitropicalis, X. new tetraploid 1), as well as in the 3 species with 4n = 36 chromosomes (X. laevis, X. borealis, X. muelleri), the BrdU/dT-banded karyotypes show a high degree of homoeology, though differences were detected between these groups. Translocations, inversions, insertions or sex-specific replication bands were not observed. Minor replication asynchronies found between chromosomes probably involve heterochromatic regions. BrdU/dT replication banding of Xenopus chromosomes provides the landmarks necessary for the exact physical mapping of genes and repetitive sequences. FISH with an X. laevis 5S rDNA probe detected multiple hybridization sites at or near the long-arm telomeric regions in most chromosomes of X. laevis and X. borealis, whereas in X. muelleri, the 5S rDNA sequences are located exclusively at the long-arm telomeres of a single chromosome pair. Staining with the AT base pair-specific fluorochrome quinacrine mustard revealed brightly fluorescing heterochromatic regions in the majority of X. borealis chromosomes which are absent in other Xenopus species.

  4. [Comparative investigation of the non-histone proteins of chromatin from pigeon erythroblasts and erythrocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedina, A B; Gazarian, G G

    1976-01-01

    Chromosomal non-histone proteins are obtained from nuclei of two types of pigeon erythroid cells: erythroblasts (cells active in RNA synthesis) and erythrocytes (cells with repressed RNA synthesis). They are well soluble in solutions of low ionic strength. Electrophoretic separation of the obtained non-histone proteins in polyacrylamide gels with urea and SDS shows the presence of qualitative differences in the pattern of non-histone proteins of chromatine from erythroblasts and erythrocytes. By electrophoresis in urea some protein bands of non-histone proteins of chromatine from erythroblasts were found which disappear with the aging of cells. At the same time two protein fractions were observed in chromatine from erythrocytes which were absent in that of erythroblasts. Disappearance of some high molecular weight protein fractions from erythrocyte chromatine as compared to erythroblasts was observed by separation of the non-histone proteins in the presence of SDS. These fractions of the non-histone proteins disappearing during aging of cells are well extractable from erythroblast chromatine by 0.35 M NaCl solution. In the in vitro system with E. coli RNA polymerase addition of non-histone proteins of chromatine from erythroblasts to chromatine from erythrocytes increases RNA synthesis 2--3 times. At the same time addition of non-histone proteins from erythrocytes is either without any influence on this process or somewhat inhibiting.

  5. Bolevenine, a toxic protein from the Japanese toadstool Boletus venenatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Masanori; Yamada, Mina; Saikawa, Yoko; Miyairi, Kazuo; Okuno, Toshikatsu; Konno, Katsuhiro; Uenishi, Jun'ichi; Hashimoto, Kimiko; Nakata, Masaya

    2007-03-01

    A toxic protein, called bolevenine, was isolated from the toxic mushroom Boletus venenatus based on its lethal effects on mice. On SDS-PAGE, in either the presence or absence of 2-mercaptoethanol, this protein showed a single band of approximately 12 kDa. In contrast, based on gel filtration and MALDI-TOFMS, its relative molecular mass was estimated to be approximately 30 kDa and approximately 33 kDa, respectively, indicating that the protein consists of three identical subunits. This toxin exhibited its lethal activity following injection at 10mg/kg into mice. The N-terminal amino acid sequence was determined up to 18, and found to be similar to the previously reported bolesatine, a toxic compound isolated from Boletus satanas.

  6. B(M1) values in the band-crossing of shears bands in 197Pb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krücken, R.; Cooper, J. R.; Beausang, C. W.; Novak, J. R.; Dewald, A.; Klug, T.; Kemper, G.; von Brentano, P.; Carpenter, M.; Wiedenhöver, I.

    We present details of the band crossing mechanism of shears bands using the example of 197Pb. Absolute reduced matrix elements B(M1) were determined by means of a RDM lifetime measurement in one of the shears bands in 197Pb. The experiment was performed using the New Yale Plunger Device (NYPD) in conjunction with the Gammasphere array. Band mixing calculations on the basis of the semi-classical model of the shears mechanism are used to describe the transition matrix elements B(M1) and energies throughout the band-crossing regions. Good agreement with the data was obtained and the detailed composition of the states in the shears band are discussed.

  7. ISM band to U-NII band frequency transverter and method of frequency transversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepp, Jeffrey David [Grandview, MO; Hensley, Dale [Grandview, MO

    2006-09-12

    A frequency transverter (10) and method for enabling bi-frequency dual-directional transfer of digitally encoded data on an RF carrier by translating between a crowded or otherwise undesirable first frequency band, such as the 2.4 GHz ISM band, and a less-crowded or otherwise desirable second frequency band, such as the 5.0 GHz 6.0 GHz U-NII band. In a preferred embodiment, the transverter (10) connects between an existing data radio (11) and its existing antenna (30), and comprises a bandswitch (12); an input RF isolating device (14); a transmuter (16); a converter (18); a dual output local oscillator (20); an output RF isolating device (22); and an antenna (24) tuned to the second frequency band. The bandswitch (12) allows for bypassing the transverter (10), thereby facilitating its use with legacy systems. The transmuter (14) and converter (16) are adapted to convert to and from, respectively, the second frequency band.

  8. Defect-band mediated ferromagnetism in Gd-doped ZnO thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Venkatesh, S.; Franklin, J. B.; Ryan, M. P.; Lee, J.-S.; Ohldag, Hendrik; McLachlan, M. A.; Alford, N. M.; Roqan, Iman S.

    2015-01-01

    . %) at low oxygen deposition pressure (<25 mTorr) were ferromagnetic at room temperature. Negative magnetoresistance, electric transport properties showed that the ferromagnetic exchange is mediated by a spin-split defect band formed due to oxygen deficiency

  9. Effect of thermal processing on estimated metabolizable protein supply to dairy cattle from camelina seeds: relationship with protein molecular structural changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Quanhui; Khan, Nazir A; Wang, Zhisheng; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-08-20

    This study evaluated the effect of thermal processing on the estimated metabolizable protein (MP) supply to dairy cattle from camelina seeds (Camelina sativa L. Crantz) and determined the relationship between heat-induced changes in protein molecular structural characteristics and the MP supply. Seeds from two camelina varieties were sampled in two consecutive years and were either kept raw or were heated in an autoclave (moist heating) or in an air-draft oven (dry heating) at 120 °C for 1 h. The MP supply to dairy cattle was modeled by three commonly used protein evaluation systems. The protein molecular structures were analyzed by Fourier transform/infrared-attenuated total reflectance molecular spectroscopy. The results showed that both the dry and moist heating increased the contents of truly absorbable rumen-undegraded protein (ARUP) and total MP and decreased the degraded protein balance (DPB). However, the moist-heated camelina seeds had a significantly higher (P seeds. The regression equations showed that intensities of the protein molecular structural bands can be used to estimate the contents of ARUP, MP, and DPB with high accuracy (R(2) > 0.70). These results show that protein molecular structural characteristics can be used to rapidly assess the MP supply to dairy cattle from raw and heat-treated camelina seeds.

  10. Controllable Absorption and Dispersion Properties of an RF-driven Five-Level Atom in a Double-Band Photonic-Band-Gap Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Chunling; Li Jiahua; Yang Xiaoxue

    2011-01-01

    The probe absorption-dispersion spectra of a radio-frequency (RF)-driven five-level atom embedded in a photonic crystal are investigated by considering the isotropic double-band photonic-band-gap (PBG) reservoir. In the model used, the two transitions are, respectively, coupled by the upper and lower bands in such a PBG material, thus leading to some curious phenomena. Numerical simulations are performed for the optical spectra. It is found that when one transition frequency is inside the band gap and the other is outside the gap, there emerge three peaks in the absorption spectra. However, for the case that two transition frequencies lie inside or outside the band gap, the spectra display four absorption profiles. Especially, there appear two sharp peaks in the spectra when both transition frequencies exist inside the band gap. The influences of the intensity and frequency of the RF-driven field on the absorptive and dispersive response are analyzed under different band-edge positions. It is found that a transparency window appears in the absorption spectra and is accompanied by a very steep variation of the dispersion profile by adjusting system parameters. These results show that the absorption-dispersion properties of the system depend strongly on the RF-induced quantum interference and the density of states (DOS) of the PBG reservoir. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  11. Theta band activity in response to emotional expressions and its relationship with gamma band activity as revealed by MEG and advanced beamformer source imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian eLuo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal oscillations in the theta and gamma bands have been shown to be important for cognition. Here we examined the temporal and spatial relationship between the two frequency bands in emotional processing using Magnetoencephalography and an advanced dynamic beamformer source imaging method called Synthetic Aperture Magnetometry. We found that areas including the amygdala, visual and frontal cortex showed significant event-related synchronization (ERS in both bands, suggesting a functional association of neuronal oscillations in the same areas in the two bands. However, while the temporal profile in both bands was similar in the amygdala, the peak in gamma band power was much earlier within both visual and frontal areas. Our results do not support a traditional view that the localizations of lower and higher frequencies are spatially distinct. Instead, they suggest that in emotional processing, neuronal oscillations in the gamma and theta bands may reflect, at least in visual and frontal cortex either different but related functional processes or, perhaps more probably, different computational components of the same functional process.

  12. Specificity and affinity quantification of protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Guo, Liyong; Hu, Liang; Wang, Jin

    2013-05-01

    Most biological processes are mediated by the protein-protein interactions. Determination of the protein-protein structures and insight into their interactions are vital to understand the mechanisms of protein functions. Currently, compared with the isolated protein structures, only a small fraction of protein-protein structures are experimentally solved. Therefore, the computational docking methods play an increasing role in predicting the structures and interactions of protein-protein complexes. The scoring function of protein-protein interactions is the key responsible for the accuracy of the computational docking. Previous scoring functions were mostly developed by optimizing the binding affinity which determines the stability of the protein-protein complex, but they are often lack of the consideration of specificity which determines the discrimination of native protein-protein complex against competitive ones. We developed a scoring function (named as SPA-PP, specificity and affinity of the protein-protein interactions) by incorporating both the specificity and affinity into the optimization strategy. The testing results and comparisons with other scoring functions show that SPA-PP performs remarkably on both predictions of binding pose and binding affinity. Thus, SPA-PP is a promising quantification of protein-protein interactions, which can be implemented into the protein docking tools and applied for the predictions of protein-protein structure and affinity. The algorithm is implemented in C language, and the code can be downloaded from http://dl.dropbox.com/u/1865642/Optimization.cpp.

  13. Characterization of changes in composition and function of erythrocyte membrane proteins in patients with bone marrow form of acute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jinying; Wei Shanjian; Hu Xiaojian

    1998-01-01

    Objective: The delayed effect of radiation on erythrocyte membrane protein, the composition and function of the membrane proteins in five patients with bone marrow form of acute radiation sickness (ARS) were follow up at six years after the Shanghai 60 Co irradiation accident. Methods: Percoll centrifugation, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and analysis of NO 2 - transport rate and DIDS inhibition rate were performed. Results: The injuries of the membrane proteins induced by radiation, characterized by reduced content of band 8 and declined anion transport function of band 3 protein remained the same as initially observed. The further study showed that the inhibition of DIDS on the anion transport of the ARS erythrocytes was decreased and the transport time for NO 2 - by band 3 was significantly prolonged in younger erythrocytes than those in middle-or old-aged cells. Conclusion: It is suggested that the radiation damage to erythrocyte membrane proteins might occur at the stage of erythropoiesis in bone marrow. The exo-facial site in band 3 may be changed after radiation, which could result in the abnormalities in anion transport. It is believed that the aging of erythrocytes might be present in advanced stage of ARS

  14. Design and experimental verification of a dual-band metamaterial filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong-Yang; Yao, Ai-Qin; Zhong, Min

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present the design, simulation, and experimental verification of a dual-band free-standing metamaterial filter operating in a frequency range of 1 THz-30 THz. The proposed structure consists of periodically arranged composite air holes, and exhibits two broad and flat transmission bands. To clarify the effects of the structural parameters on both resonant transmission bands, three sets of experiments are performed. The first resonant transmission band shows a shift towards higher frequency when the side width w 1 of the main air hole is increased. In contrast, the second resonant transmission band displays a shift towards lower frequency when the side width w 2 of the sub-holes is increased, while the first resonant transmission band is unchanged. The measured results indicate that these resonant bands can be modulated individually by simply optimizing the relevant structural parameters (w 1 or w 2) for the required band. In addition, these resonant bands merge into a single resonant band with a bandwidth of 7.7 THz when w 1 and w 2 are optimized simultaneously. The structure proposed in this paper adopts different resonant mechanisms for transmission at different frequencies and thus offers a method to achieve a dual-band and low-loss filter. Project supported by the Doctorate Scientific Research Foundation of Hezhou University, China (Grant No. HZUBS201503), the Promotion of the Basic Ability of Young and Middle-aged Teachers in Universities Project of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China (Grant No. KY2016YB453), the Guangxi Colleges and Universities Key Laboratory Symbolic Computation, China, Engineering Data Processing and Mathematical Support Autonomous Discipline Project of Hezhou University, China (Grant No. 2016HZXYSX01).

  15. Rapid changes in plasma membrane protein phosphorylation during initiation of cell wall digestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blowers, D.P.; Boss, W.F.; Trewavas, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma membrane vesicles from wild carrot cells grown in suspension culture were isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning, and ATP-dependent phosphorylation was measured with [γ- 32 P]ATP in the presence and absence of calcium. Treatment of the carrot cells with the cell wall digestion enzymes, driselase, in a sorbitol osmoticum for 1.5 min altered the protein phosphorylation pattern compared to that of cells treated with sorbitol alone. Driselase treatment resulted in decreased phosphorylation of a band of M r 80,000 which showed almost complete calcium dependence in the osmoticum treated cells; decreased phosphorylation of a band of M r 15,000 which showed little calcium activation, and appearance of a new band of calcium-dependent phosphorylation at M r 22,000. However, protein phosphorylation was decreased. Adding driselase to the in vitro reaction mixture caused a general decrease in the membrane protein phosphorylation either in the presence or absence of calcium which did not mimic the in vivo response. Cells labeled in vivo with inorganic 32 P also showed a response to the Driselase treatment. An enzymically active driselas preparation was required for the observed responses

  16. Global transformation of erythrocyte properties via engagement of an SH2-like sequence in band 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchulu-Campanella, Estela; Turrini, Francesco M; Li, Yen-Hsing; Low, Philip S

    2016-11-29

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domains are composed of weakly conserved sequences of ∼100 aa that bind phosphotyrosines in signaling proteins and thereby mediate intra- and intermolecular protein-protein interactions. In exploring the mechanism whereby tyrosine phosphorylation of the erythrocyte anion transporter, band 3, triggers membrane destabilization, vesiculation, and fragmentation, we discovered a SH2 signature motif positioned between membrane-spanning helices 4 and 5. Evidence that this exposed cytoplasmic sequence contributes to a functional SH2-like domain is provided by observations that: (i) it contains the most conserved sequence of SH2 domains, GSFLVR; (ii) it binds the tyrosine phosphorylated cytoplasmic domain of band 3 (cdb3-PO 4 ) with K d = 14 nM; (iii) binding of cdb3-PO 4 to erythrocyte membranes is inhibited both by antibodies against the SH2 signature sequence and dephosphorylation of cdb3-PO 4 ; (iv) label transfer experiments demonstrate the covalent transfer of photoactivatable biotin from isolated cdb3-PO 4 (but not cdb3) to band 3 in erythrocyte membranes; and (v) phosphorylation-induced binding of cdb3-PO 4 to the membrane-spanning domain of band 3 in intact cells causes global changes in membrane properties, including (i) displacement of a glycolytic enzyme complex from the membrane, (ii) inhibition of anion transport, and (iii) rupture of the band 3-ankyrin bridge connecting the spectrin-based cytoskeleton to the membrane. Because SH2-like motifs are not retrieved by normal homology searches for SH2 domains, but can be found in many tyrosine kinase-regulated transport proteins using modified search programs, we suggest that related cases of membrane transport proteins containing similar motifs are widespread in nature where they participate in regulation of cell properties.

  17. Quantitative surface studies of protein adsorption by infrared spectroscopy. II. Quantification of adsorbed and bulk proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, D.J.; Hutson, T.B.; Chittur, K.K.; Gendreau, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectra of surface-adsorbed proteins are correlated with concentration measurements determined by 125 I-labeled proteins. This paper demonstrates that linear correlations between the intensity of the major bands of proteins and the quantity of proteins can be obtained for human albumin and immunoglobulin G up to surface concentrations of approximately 0.25 microgram/cm2. A poorer correlation was observed for human fibrinogen. A linear correlation was also observed between the concentration in the bulk solution and the major bands of albumin up to a concentration of 60 mg/ml

  18. Gel-based phosphoproteomics analysis of sarcoplasmic proteins in postmortem porcine muscle with pH decline rate and time differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Honggang; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Karlsson, Anders H

    2011-01-01

    phosphorylation in sarcoplasmic proteins from three groups of pigs with different pH decline rates from PM 1 to 24¿h. Globally, the fast pH decline group had the highest phosphorylation level at PM 1¿h, but lowest at 24¿h, whereas the slow pH decline group showed the reverse case. The same pattern was also...... observed in most individual bands in 1-DE. The protein phosphorylation levels of 12 bands were significantly affected by the synergy effects of pH and time (p......Meat quality development is highly influenced by the pH decline caused by the postmortem (PM) glycolysis. Protein phosphorylation is an important mechanism in regulating the activity of glycometabolic enzymes. Here, a gel-based phosphoproteomic study was performed to analyze the protein...

  19. Development of banded microstructure in 34CrNiMo6 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nagode

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the development of a banded microstructure in hot-rolled 34CrNiMo6 steel which consisted of bainitic and martensitic bands is explained. The chemical compositions of the bands were measured with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS, which showed that the martensitic bands contained more alloying elements (Mn, Cr, Mo, Si than bainitic bands. By using Oberhoffer reagent, the segregations of phosphorus were also revealed. These phosphorus segregations coincided with the positive segregations of the alloying elements. The continuous cooling transformation (CCT diagrams of steel were calculated. They confirmed the formation of martensite in positive segregations and the formation of bainite in negative segregations.

  20. Empirical correction for PM7 band gaps of transition-metal oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Sohlberg, Karl

    2016-01-01

    A post-calculation correction is established for PM7 band gaps of transition-metal oxides. The correction is based on the charge on the metal cation of interest, as obtained from MOPAC PM7 calculations. Application of the correction reduces the average error in the PM7 band gap from ~3 eV to ~1 eV. The residual error after correction is shown to be uncorrelated to the Hartree-Fock method upon which PM7 is based. Graphical Abstract Comparison between calculated band gaps and experimental band gaps for binary oxides. The orange crosses are for corrected PM7 band gaps. Blue squares are uncorrected values. The orange crosses fall closer to the diagonal dashed line, showing an overall improvement of the accuracy of calculated values.

  1. Bands dispersion and charge transfer in β-BeH2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, D. K.; Galav, K. L.; Joshi, K. B.

    2018-04-01

    Predictive capabilities of ab-initio method are utilised to explore bands dispersion and charge transfer in β-BeH2. Investigations are carried out using the linear combination of atomic orbitals method at the level of density functional theory. The crystal structure and related parameters are settled by coupling total energy calculations with the Murnaghan equation of state. Electronic bands dispersion from PBE-GGA is reported. The PBE-GGA, and PBE0 hybrid functional, show that β-BeH2 is a direct gap semiconductor with 1.18 and 2.40 eV band gap. The band gap slowly decreases with pressure and beyond l00 GPa overlap of conduction and valence bands at the r point is observed. Charge transfer is studied by means of Mullikan population analysis.

  2. Implementation of Texture Based Image Retrieval Using M-band Wavelet Transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiaoYa-li; Yangyan; CaoYang

    2003-01-01

    Wavelet transform has attracted attention because it is a very useful tool for signal analyzing. As a fundamental characteristic of an image, texture traits play an important role in the human vision system for recognition and interpretation of images. The paper presents an approach to implement texture-based image retrieval using M-band wavelet transform. Firstly the traditional 2-band wavelet is extended to M-band wavelet transform. Then the wavelet moments are computed by M-band wavelet coefficients in the wavelet domain. The set of wavelet moments forms the feature vector related to the texture distribution of each wavelet images. The distances between the feature vectors describe the similarities of different images. The experimental result shows that the M-band wavelet moment features of the images are effective for image indexing.The retrieval method has lower computational complexity, yet it is capable of giving better retrieval performance for a given medical image database.

  3. Resolution of the 179W isomer anomaly: exposure of a fermi aligned s-band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, P.M.; Surrey Univ., Guildford; Dracoulis, G.D.; Byrne, A.P.; Fabricius, B.; Kibedi, T.; Stuchbery, A.E.

    1991-06-01

    The K Π = 35/2 - , five quasiparticle isomer in 179 W is shown to decay into the region of a backbend in the 7/2 - [514] band, allowing for the first time the identification of a full set of aligned-band states. Destructive interference results from level-mixing in the band-crossing region. The deduced γ-ray branching ratios are used to establish the mixing matrix elements and to show that the aligned band has a high value of the K-quantum number. The properties of well-defined alignment and yet also high-K, provided the first clear example of a Fermi Aligned s-band. The anomalous decay of the isomer itself is now explained. 11 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  4. Tunable band gaps in bio-inspired periodic composites with nacre-like microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanyu; Wang, Lifeng

    2014-08-01

    Periodic composite materials have many promising applications due to their unique ability to control the propagation of waves. Here, we report the existence and frequency tunability of complete elastic wave band gaps in bio-inspired periodic composites with nacre-like, brick-and-mortar microstructure. Numerical results show that complete band gaps in these periodic composites derive from local resonances or Bragg scattering, depending on the lattice angle and the volume fraction of each phase in the composites. The investigation of elastic wave propagation in finite periodic composites validates the simulated complete band gaps and further reveals the mechanisms leading to complete band gaps. Moreover, our results indicate that the topological arrangement of the mineral platelets and changes of material properties can be utilized to tune the evolution of complete band gaps. Our finding provides new opportunities to design mechanically robust periodic composite materials for wave absorption under hostile environments, such as for deep water applications.

  5. Clearer, Simpler and more Efficient LAPACK Routines for Symmetric Positive Definite Band Factorization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavson, Fred G.; Quintania-Orti, Enrique S.; Quintana-Orti, Gregorio

    We describe a minor format change for representing a symmetric band matrix AB using the same array space specified by LAPACK. In LAPACK, band codes operating on the lower part of a symmetric matrix reference matrix element (i, j) as AB1+i−j,j . The format change we propose allows LAPACK band codes...... to reference the (i, j) element as ABi,j . Doing this yields lower band codes that use standard matrix terminology so that they become clearer and hence easier to understand. As a second contribution, we simplify the LAPACK Cholesky Band Factorization routine pbtrf by reducing from six to three the number...... of subroutine calls one needs to invoke during a right-looking block factorization step. Our new routines perform exactly the same number of floating-point arithmetic operations as the current LAPACK routine pbtrf. Almost always they deliver higher performance. The experimental results show...

  6. Reducing support loss in micromechanical ring resonators using phononic band-gap structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Feng-Chia; Huang, Tsun-Che; Wang, Chin-Hung; Chang, Pin [Industrial Technology Research Institute-South, Tainan 709, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Jin-Chen, E-mail: fengchiahsu@itri.org.t, E-mail: hsujc@yuntech.edu.t [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliou, Yunlin 64002, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-21

    In micromechanical resonators, energy loss via supports into the substrates may lead to a low quality factor. To eliminate the support loss, in this paper a phononic band-gap structure is employed. We demonstrate a design of phononic-crystal (PC) strips used to support extensional wine-glass mode ring resonators to increase the quality factor. The PC strips are introduced to stop elastic-wave propagation by the band-gap and deaf-band effects. Analyses of resonant characteristics of the ring resonators and the dispersion relations, eigenmodes, and transmission properties of the PC strips are presented. With the proposed resonator architecture, the finite-element simulations show that the leaky power is effectively reduced and the stored energy inside the resonators is enhanced simultaneously as the operating frequencies of the resonators are within the band gap or deaf bands. Realization of a high quality factor micromechanical ring resonator with minimized support loss is expected.

  7. Application of energies of optimal frequency bands for fault diagnosis based on modified distance function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamanian, Amir Hosein [Southern Methodist University, Dallas (United States); Ohadi, Abdolreza [Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Low-dimensional relevant feature sets are ideal to avoid extra data mining for classification. The current work investigates the feasibility of utilizing energies of vibration signals in optimal frequency bands as features for machine fault diagnosis application. Energies in different frequency bands were derived based on Parseval's theorem. The optimal feature sets were extracted by optimization of the related frequency bands using genetic algorithm and a Modified distance function (MDF). The frequency bands and the number of bands were optimized based on the MDF. The MDF is designed to a) maximize the distance between centers of classes, b) minimize the dispersion of features in each class separately, and c) minimize dimension of extracted feature sets. The experimental signals in two different gearboxes were used to demonstrate the efficiency of the presented technique. The results show the effectiveness of the presented technique in gear fault diagnosis application.

  8. Unified description of perturbation theory and band center anomaly in one-dimensional Anderson localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kai; Qin, Shaojing; Wang, Chuilin

    2011-01-01

    We calculated numerically the localization length of one-dimensional Anderson model with diagonal disorder. For weak disorder, we showed that the localization length changes continuously as the energy changes from the band center to the boundary of the anomalous region near the band edge. We found that all the localization lengths for different disorder strengths and different energies collapse onto a single curve, which can be fitted by a simple equation. Thus the description of the perturbation theory and the band center anomaly were unified into this equation. -- Highlights: → We study the band center anomaly of one-dimensional Anderson localization. → We study numerically the Lyapunov exponent through a parametrization method of the transfer matrix. → We give a unified equation to describe the band center anomaly and perturbation theory.

  9. Resolution of the 179W-isomer anomaly: Exposure of a Fermi-aligned s band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, P.M.; Dracoulis, G.D.; Byrne, A.P.; Fabricius, B.; Kibedi, T.; Stuchbery, A.E.; Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 5XH United Kingdom)

    1991-01-01

    The K π =35/2 - , five-quasiparticle isomer in 179 W is shown to decay into the region of a backbend in the 7/2 - [514] band, allowing for the first time the identification of a full set of aligned-band states. Destructive interference results from level mixing in the band-crossing region. The deduced γ-ray branching ratios are used to establish the mixing matrix elements and to show that the aligned band has a high value of the K quantum number. The properties of well-defined alignment and yet also high K provide the first clear example of a Fermi-aligned s band. The anomalous decay of the isomer itself is now explained

  10. Miniaturized dual-band antenna array with double-negative (DNG) metamaterial for wireless applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqadami, Abdulrahman Shueai Mohsen; Jamlos, Mohd Faizal; Soh, Ping Jack; Rahim, Sharul Kamal Abdul; Vandenbosch, Guy A. E.; Narbudowicz, Adam

    2017-01-01

    A miniaturized dual-band antenna array using a negative index metamaterial is presented for WiMAX, LTE, and WLAN applications. This left-handed metamaterial plane is located behind the antenna array, and its unit cell is a combination of split-ring resonator, square electric ring resonator, and rectangular electrical coupled resonator. This enables the achievement of a metamaterial structure exhibiting both negative permittivity and permeability, which results in antenna size miniaturization, efficiency, and gain enhancement. Moreover, the proposed metamaterial antenna has realized dual-band operating frequencies compared to a single frequency for normal antenna. The measured reflection coefficient (S11) shows a 50.25% bandwidth in the lower band (from 2.119 to 3.058 GHz) and 4.27% in the upper band (from 5.058 to 5.276 GHz). Radiation efficiency obtained in the lower and upper band are >95 and 80%, respectively.

  11. Reducing support loss in micromechanical ring resonators using phononic band-gap structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Feng-Chia; Huang, Tsun-Che; Wang, Chin-Hung; Chang, Pin; Hsu, Jin-Chen

    2011-01-01

    In micromechanical resonators, energy loss via supports into the substrates may lead to a low quality factor. To eliminate the support loss, in this paper a phononic band-gap structure is employed. We demonstrate a design of phononic-crystal (PC) strips used to support extensional wine-glass mode ring resonators to increase the quality factor. The PC strips are introduced to stop elastic-wave propagation by the band-gap and deaf-band effects. Analyses of resonant characteristics of the ring resonators and the dispersion relations, eigenmodes, and transmission properties of the PC strips are presented. With the proposed resonator architecture, the finite-element simulations show that the leaky power is effectively reduced and the stored energy inside the resonators is enhanced simultaneously as the operating frequencies of the resonators are within the band gap or deaf bands. Realization of a high quality factor micromechanical ring resonator with minimized support loss is expected.

  12. UV Photography Shows Hidden Sun Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mcat1=de12", ]; for (var c = 0; c UV photography shows hidden sun damage A UV photograph gives ... developing skin cancer and prematurely aged skin. Normal photography UV photography 18 months of age: This boy's ...

  13. Revisiting Short-Wave-Infrared (SWIR) Bands for Atmospheric Correction in Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlevan, Nima; Roger, Jean-Claude; Ahmad, Ziauddin

    2017-01-01

    The shortwave infrared (SWIR) bands on the existing Earth Observing missions like MODIS have been designed to meet land and atmospheric science requirements. The future geostationary and polar-orbiting ocean color missions, however, require highly sensitive SWIR bands (greater than 1550nm) to allow for a precise removal of aerosol contributions. This will allow for reasonable retrievals of the remote sensing reflectance (R(sub rs)) using standard NASA atmospheric corrections over turbid coastal waters. Design, fabrication, and maintaining high-performance SWIR bands at very low signal levels bear significant costs on dedicated ocean color missions. This study aims at providing a full analysis of the utility of alternative SWIR bands within the 1600nm atmospheric window if the bands within the 2200nm window were to be excluded due to engineering/cost constraints. Following a series of sensitivity analyses for various spectral band configurations as a function of water vapor amount, we chose spectral bands centered at 1565 and 1675nm as suitable alternative bands within the 1600nm window for a future geostationary imager. The sensitivity of this band combination to different aerosol conditions, calibration uncertainties, and extreme water turbidity were studied and compared with that of all band combinations available on existing polar-orbiting missions. The combination of the alternative channels was shown to be as sensitive to test aerosol models as existing near-infrared (NIR) band combinations (e.g., 748 and 869nm) over clear open ocean waters. It was further demonstrated that while in extremely turbid waters the 1565/1675 band pair yields R(sub rs) retrievals as good as those derived from all other existing SWIR band pairs (greater than 1550nm), their total calibration uncertainties must be less than 1% to meet current science requirements for ocean color retrievals (i.e., delta R(sub rs) (443) less than 5%). We further show that the aerosol removal using the

  14. Band 3 tyrosine kinase in avian erythrocyte plasma membrane is immunologically related to pp60c-src

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillsgrove, D.; Shores, C.G.; Parker, J.C.; Maness, P.F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have identified in the plasma membrane of the chicken erythrocyte a 60-kDa tyrosine-specific protein kinase immunologically related to the transforming protein pp60 v-src of Rous sarcoma virus. The erythrocyte protein kinase phosphorylated heavy chains of tumor-bearing rabbit (TBR) antibodies reactive with pp60 c-src at tyrosine in immune complex protein kinase assays. The kinase was identified as a 60-kDa protein by [ 35 S]methionine labeling of erythrocytes and by autophosphorylation in immune complexes. The kinase migrated on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with an apparent pI and molecular mass similar to pp60 c-src . A plasma membrane-enriched fraction isolated from chicken red cells contained the majority of the kinase activity. Incubation of the plasma membrane fraction with [ 32 P]ATP resulted in tyrosine phosphorylation of the anion transport protein band 3. Band 3 phosphorylation was blocked by TBR antibodies, indicting that the kinase recognized by pp60 c-src antibodies was responsible for band 3 phosphorylation. These results demonstrate that the avian erythrocyte plasma membrane contains a tightly bound tyrosine-specific protein kinase identical or closely related to pp60 c-src and that this kinase is responsible for band 3 phosphorylation in vitro

  15. The brittle-viscous-plastic evolution of shear bands in the South Armorican Shear Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukovská, Zita; Jeřábek, Petr; Morales, Luiz F. G.; Lexa, Ondrej; Milke, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Shear bands are microscale shear zones that obliquely crosscut an existing anisotropy such as a foliation. The resulting S-C fabrics are characterized by angles lower than 45° and the C plane parallel to shear zone boundaries. The S-C fabrics typically occur in granitoids deformed at greenschist facies conditions in the vicinity of major shear zones. Despite their long recognition, mechanical reasons for localization of deformation into shear bands and their evolution is still poorly understood. In this work we focus on microscale characterization of the shear bands in the South Armorican Shear Zone, where the S-C fabrics were first recognized by Berthé et al. (1979). The initiation of shear bands in the right-lateral South Armorican Shear Zone is associated with the occurrence of microcracks crosscutting the recrystallized quartz aggregates that define the S fabric. In more advanced stages of shear band evolution, newly formed dominant K-feldspar, together with plagioclase, muscovite and chlorite occur in the microcracks, and the shear bands start to widen. K-feldspar replaces quartz by progressively bulging into the grain boundaries of recrystallized quartz grains, leading to disintegration of quartz aggregates and formation of fine-grained multiphase matrix mixture. The late stages of shear band development are marked by interconnection of fine-grained white mica into a band that crosscuts the original shear band matrix. In its extremity, the shear band widening may lead to the formation of ultramylonites. With the increasing proportion of shear band matrix from ~1% to ~12%, the angular relationship between S and C fabrics increases from ~30° to ~40°. The matrix phases within shear bands show differences in chemical composition related to distinct evolutionary stages of shear band formation. The chemical evolution is well documented in K-feldspar, where the albite component is highest in porphyroclasts within S fabric, lower in the newly formed grains within

  16. Transition-metal impurities in semiconductors and heterojunction band lineups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Jerzy M.; Delerue, C.; Lannoo, M.; Heinrich, Helmut

    1988-10-01

    The validity of a recent proposal that transition-metal impurity levels in semiconductors may serve as a reference in band alignment in semiconductor heterojunctions is positively verified by using the most recent data on band offsets in the following lattice-matched heterojunctions: Ga1-xAlxAs/GaAs, In1-xGaxAsyP1-y/InP, In1-xGaxP/GaAs, and Cd1-xHgxTe/CdTe. The alignment procedure is justified theoretically by showing that transition-metal energy levels are effectively pinned to the average dangling-bond energy level, which serves as the reference level for the heterojunction band alignment. Experimental and theoretical arguments showing that an increasingly popular notion on transition-metal energy-level pinning to the vacuum level is unjustified and must be abandoned in favor of the internal-reference rule proposed recently [J. M. Langer and H. Heinrich, Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 1414 (1985)] are presented.

  17. Coloured leg bands affect male mate-guarding behaviour in the bluethroat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen; Lifjeld; Rohde

    1997-07-01

    Artificial traits such as coloured leg bands may affect an individual's mating success, as shown for some birds. One explanation is that colour-matching with a sexual ornament affects the individual's sexual attractiveness. This study reports a colour-band experiment with free-living bluethroats, Luscinia s. svecicaa species where males have a distinct blue and chestnut throat and upper breast. There was no apparent difference in pairing success between males with ornament-matching colour bands (blue and orange) and males with non-ornamental colour bands. However, males with ornamental bands guarded their mates less intensely and spent more time singing, performing song flights and intruding into neighbours' territories than males with non-ornamental bands. We conclude that colour bands affect the trade-off between mate guarding and advertisement behaviour in a way that is consistent with the hypothesis that bands with ornamental colours improve a male's attractiveness. The results are in concordance with a previous study of the same population, showing that males with experimentally reduced attractiveness guarded their mates more closely and advertised less for additional mates, than non-manipulated males.

  18. Robust indirect band gap and anisotropy of optical absorption in B-doped phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhi-Feng; Gao, Peng-Fei; Guo, Lei; Kang, Jun; Fang, Dang-Qi; Zhang, Yang; Xia, Ming-Gang; Zhang, Sheng-Li; Wen, Yu-Hua

    2017-12-06

    A traditional doping technique plays an important role in the band structure engineering of two-dimensional nanostructures. Since electron interaction is changed by doping, the optical and electrochemical properties could also be significantly tuned. In this study, density functional theory calculations have been employed to explore the structural stability, and electronic and optical properties of B-doped phosphorene. The results show that all B-doped phosphorenes are stable with a relatively low binding energy. Of particular interest is that these B-doped systems exhibit an indirect band gap, which is distinct from the direct one of pure phosphorene. Despite the different concentrations and configurations of B dopants, such indirect band gaps are robust. The screened hybrid density functional HSE06 predicts that the band gap of B-doped phosphorene is slightly smaller than that of pure phosphorene. Spatial charge distributions at the valence band maximum (VBM) and the conduction band minimum (CBM) are analyzed to understand the features of an indirect band gap. By comparison with pure phosphorene, B-doped phosphorenes exhibit strong anisotropy and intensity of optical absorption. Moreover, B dopants could enhance the stability of Li adsorption on phosphorene with less sacrifice of the Li diffusion rate. Our results suggest that B-doping is an effective way of tuning the band gap, enhancing the intensity of optical absorption and improving the performances of Li adsorption, which could promote potential applications in novel optical devices and lithium-ion batteries.

  19. Multi-flexural band gaps in an Euler–Bernoulli beam with lateral local resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ting, E-mail: WT323@mail.nwpu.edu.cn [School of Marine Science and Technology, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi, 710072 (China); College of Engineering and Computer Science, The Australian National University, ACT, 2600 (Australia); Sheng, Mei-Ping [School of Marine Science and Technology, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi, 710072 (China); Qin, Qing-Hua [College of Engineering and Computer Science, The Australian National University, ACT, 2600 (Australia)

    2016-02-05

    Flexural vibration suppression in an Euler–Bernoulli beam with attached lateral local resonators (LLR) is studied theoretically and numerically. Hamilton's principle and Bloch's theorem are employed to derive the dispersion relation which reveals that two band gaps are generated. Within both band gaps, the flexural waves are partially transformed into longitudinal waves through a four-link-mechanism and totally blocked. The band gaps can be flexibly tuned by changing the geometry parameter of the four-link-mechanism and the spring constants of the resonators. Frequency response function (FRF) from finite element analysis via commercial software of ANSYS shows large flexural wave attenuation within the band gaps and the effect of damping from the LLR substructures which helps smooth and lower the response peaks at the sacrifice of the band gap effect. The existence of the multi-flexural band gaps can be exploited for the design of flexural vibration control of beams. - Highlights: • A metamaterial beam with lateral local resonance is proposed. • The metamaterial beam can generate multi-band gaps for flexural wave suppression. • The substructure can transform the flexural wave into longitudinal wave and absorb the waves. • Damping from different part has different influence on the band gaps. • The design of the metamaterial beam can be used for multi-flexural vibration control.

  20. Microleakage under orthodontic bands cemented with nano-hydroxyapatite-modified glass ionomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enan, Enas T; Hammad, Shaza M

    2013-11-01

    To estimate the in vivo effect of nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) modification of banding glass-ionomer cement on microleakage under orthodontic bands. Eighty noncarious premolars scheduled for extraction in 20 orthodontic patients were randomly divided into four groups. Grouping was based on the ratio of nano-HA (0%, 5%, 10%, 15% by weight) added to the luting glass-ionomer cement (GIC) Ketac-Cem, which was used for cementation of prefabricated micro-etched orthodontic bands. Dye penetration method was used for microleakage evaluation at the cement-band and cement-enamel interfaces. Statistical evaluation was performed with a Kruskal-Wallis test and a Mann-Whitney U-test, and a Bonferroni-adjusted significance level was calculated. Bands cemented with conventional GIC showed the highest microleakage scores in comparison to those cemented with nano-HA-modified GIC. No significant difference was found between teeth banded with 10% and 15% modified GIC. Modification of the banding GIC with 15% nano-HA revealed a positive effect on reducing microleakage around orthodontic bands.

  1. Excited negative parity bands in 160Yb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, A.; Bhattacharjee, T.; Curien, D.; Dedes, I.; Mazurek, K.; Banerjee, S. R.; Rajbanshi, S.; Bisoi, A.; de Angelis, G.; Bhattacharya, Soumik; Bhattacharyya, S.; Biswas, S.; Chakraborty, A.; Das Gupta, S.; Dey, B.; Goswami, A.; Mondal, D.; Pandit, D.; Palit, R.; Roy, T.; Singh, R. P.; Saha Sarkar, M.; Saha, S.; Sethi, J.

    2018-03-01

    Negative parity rotational bands in {} 70160Yb{}90 nucleus have been studied. They were populated in the 148Sm(16O, 4n)160Yb reaction at 90 MeV. The gamma-coincidence data have been collected using Indian National Gamma Array composed of twenty Compton suppressed clover germanium (Ge) detectors. Double gating on triple gamma coincidence data were selectively used to develop the decay scheme for these negative parity bands by identifying and taking care of the multiplet transitions. The even- and odd-spin negative parity bands in 160Yb have been studied by comparing the reduced transition probability ratios with the similar bands in neighbouring even-even rare earth nuclei. It is concluded that the concerned odd-spin and even-spin bands are not signature partners and that their structures are compatible with those of the ‘pear-shape’ and ‘pyramid-shape’ oscillations, respectively, the octupole shapes superposed with the quadrupole shape of the ground-state.

  2. Planar C-Band Antenna with Electronically Controllable Switched Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Barba

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The design, manufacturing, and measurements of a switchable-beam antenna at 3.5 GHz for WLL or Wimax base station antennas in planar technology are presented. This antenna performs a discrete beam scan of a 60∘ sector in azimuth and can be easily upgraded to 5 or more steps. The switching capabilities have been implemented by the inclusion of phase shifters based on PIN diodes in the feed network following a strategy that allows the reduction of the number of switches compared to a classic design. The measurements show that the design objectives have been achieved and encourage the application of the acquired experience in antennas for space applications, such as X-band SAR and Ku-band DBS.

  3. New features of superdeformed bands in 194Hg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens, R.V.F.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M.P.

    1995-01-01

    A striking difference between superdeformed (SD) nuclei near A = 190 and those in the other regions is the behavior of the dynamic moment of inertia (lm) with the rotational frequency hω. While the (lm) patterns of the SD bands near A = 130 and A = 150 show pronounced variations, the majority of the SD bands near A = 190 display the same large, smooth increase of (lm) within the frequency range 0.15 194 Hg were populated with the reaction 150 Nd( 48 Ca,4n) 194 Hg at a beam energy of 206 MeV. The gamma rays emitted in the reaction were detected with the Gammasphere detector array (32 detectors for this experiment)

  4. Educational Outreach: The Space Science Road Show

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, N. L. J.

    2002-01-01

    The poster presented will give an overview of a study towards a "Space Road Show". The topic of this show is space science. The target group is adolescents, aged 12 to 15, at Dutch high schools. The show and its accompanying experiments would be supported with suitable educational material. Science teachers at schools can decide for themselves if they want to use this material in advance, afterwards or not at all. The aims of this outreach effort are: to motivate students for space science and engineering, to help them understand the importance of (space) research, to give them a positive feeling about the possibilities offered by space and in the process give them useful knowledge on space basics. The show revolves around three main themes: applications, science and society. First the students will get some historical background on the importance of space/astronomy to civilization. Secondly they will learn more about novel uses of space. On the one hand they will learn of "Views on Earth" involving technologies like Remote Sensing (or Spying), Communication, Broadcasting, GPS and Telemedicine. On the other hand they will experience "Views on Space" illustrated by past, present and future space research missions, like the space exploration missions (Cassini/Huygens, Mars Express and Rosetta) and the astronomy missions (Soho and XMM). Meanwhile, the students will learn more about the technology of launchers and satellites needed to accomplish these space missions. Throughout the show and especially towards the end attention will be paid to the third theme "Why go to space"? Other reasons for people to get into space will be explored. An important question in this is the commercial (manned) exploration of space. Thus, the questions of benefit of space to society are integrated in the entire show. It raises some fundamental questions about the effects of space travel on our environment, poverty and other moral issues. The show attempts to connect scientific with

  5. Design of suitable carrier buffer for free-flow zone electrophoresis by charge-to-mass ratio and band broadening analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fan-Zhi; Yang, Ying; He, Yu-Chen; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Guo-Qing; Fan, Liu-Yin; Xiao, Hua; Li, Shan; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2016-09-01

    In this work, charge-to-mass ratio (C/M) and band broadening analyses were combined to provide better guidance for the design of free-flow zone electrophoresis carrier buffer (CB). First, the C/M analyses of hemoglobin and C-phycocyanin (C-PC) under different pH were performed by CLC Protein Workbench software. Second, band dispersion due to the initial bandwidth, diffusion, and hydrodynamic broadening were discussed, respectively. Based on the analyses of the C/M and band broadening, a better guidance for preparation of free-flow zone electrophoresis CB was obtained. Series of experiments were performed to validate the proposed method. The experimental data showed high accordance with our prediction allowing the CB to be prepared easily with our proposed method. To further evaluate this method, C-PC was purified from crude extracts of Spirulina platensis with the selected separation condition. Results showed that C-PC was well separated from other phycobiliproteins that have similar physicochemical properties, and analytical grade product with purity up to 4.5 (A620/A280) was obtained. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Graphene-induced band gap renormalization in polythiophene: a many-body perturbation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsusi, F.; Fedorov, I. A.; Gerivani, S.

    2018-01-01

    Density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory at the G0W0 level are employed to study the electronic properties of polythiophene (PT) adsorbed on the graphene surface. Analysis of the charge density difference shows that substrate-adsorbate interaction leads to a strong physisorption and interfacial electric dipole moment formation. The electrostatic potential displays a  -0.19 eV shift in the graphene work function from its initial value of 4.53 eV, as the result of the interaction. The LDA band gap of the polymer does not show any change. However, the band structure exhibits weak orbital hybridizations resulting from slight overlapping between the polymer and graphene states wave functions. The interfacial polarization effects on the band gap and levels alignment are investigated at the G0W0 level and show a notable reduction of PT band gap compared to that of the isolated chain.

  7. 2008 LHC Open Days Physics: the show

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    A host of events and activities await visitors to the LHC Open Days on 5 and 6 April. A highlight will be the physics shows funded by the European Physical Society (EPS), which are set to surprise and challenge children and adults alike! School children use their experience of riding a bicycle to understand how planets move around the sun (Copyright : Circus Naturally) Participating in the Circus Naturally show could leave a strange taste in your mouth! (Copyright : Circus Naturally) The Rino Foundation’s experiments with liquid nitrogen can be pretty exciting! (Copyright: The Rino Foundation)What does a bicycle have in common with the solar system? Have you ever tried to weigh air or visualise sound? Ever heard of a vacuum bazooka? If you want to discover the answers to these questions and more then come to the Physics Shows taking place at the CERN O...

  8. Online Italian fandoms of American TV shows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Benecchi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Internet has changed media fandom in two main ways: it helps fans connect with each other despite physical distance, leading to the formation of international fan communities; and it helps fans connect with the creators of the TV show, deepening the relationship between TV producers and international fandoms. To assess whether Italian fan communities active online are indeed part of transnational online communities and whether the Internet has actually altered their relationship with the creators of the original text they are devoted to, qualitative analysis and narrative interviews of 26 Italian fans of American TV shows were conducted to explore the fan-producer relationship. Results indicated that the online Italian fans surveyed preferred to stay local, rather than using geography-leveling online tools. Further, the sampled Italian fans' relationships with the show runners were mediated or even absent.

  9. Snow bands over the Gulf of Finland in wintertime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Mazon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Large shore-parallel, quasi-stationary snow bands are occasionally observed over the Gulf of Finland during wintertime when the sea is not frozen. On the basis of Weather Research and Forecasting mesoscale model experiments and radar observations of snow bands formed in January 2006 and February 2012, we show that their dynamics share common characteristics: (1 the sea gulf that produces the known lake effect, (2 cold easterly large-scale flow along the gulf and (3 a cold local flow from the two near and opposite coastlines of Estonia and Finland in the form of two land-breeze cells which collide offshore. The associated fronts, which have strong rising motions, are maintained by the convergence of the land-breeze cells. In addition to these factors, the concave shape of the coast in the eastern part of the Gulf of Finland promotes offshore convergence and the formation of several secondary bands of precipitation that are adjacent to the eastern part of the main band. When the easterlies turn to southerlies, horizontal convective rolls appear over the sea. The Estonian land breeze is enhanced while the cold air remains stagnant inland over the Finnish coast, acting as an orographic barrier lifting the marine air mass upwards. Consequently, a line of convective precipitation composed of several cells is formed along the Finnish coast. In both events, the simulations also show two low-level jets generated by the combined effects of the land-breeze cells and baroclinicity over the coast of Finland and Estonia.

  10. Increased theta band EEG power in sickle cell disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Case M

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Michelle Case,1 Sina Shirinpour,1 Huishi Zhang,1 Yvonne H Datta,2 Stephen C Nelson,3 Karim T Sadak,4 Kalpna Gupta,2 Bin He1,5 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, 3Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, 4Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, University of Minnesota Masonic Children’s Hospital, 5Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA Objective: Pain is a major issue in the care of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD. The mechanisms behind pain and the best way to treat it are not well understood. We studied how electroencephalography (EEG is altered in SCD patients. Methods: We recruited 20 SCD patients and compared their resting state EEG to that of 14 healthy controls. EEG power was found across frequency bands using Welch’s method. Electrophysiological source imaging was assessed for each frequency band using the eLORETA algorithm. Results: SCD patients had increased theta power and decreased beta2 power compared to controls. Source localization revealed that areas of greater theta band activity were in areas related to pain processing. Imaging parameters were significantly correlated to emergency department visits, which indicate disease severity and chronic pain intensity. Conclusion: The present results support the pain mechanism referred to as thalamocortical dysrhythmia. This mechanism causes increased theta power in patients. Significance: Our findings show that EEG can be used to quantitatively evaluate differences between controls and SCD patients. Our results show the potential of EEG to differentiate between different levels of pain in an unbiased setting, where specific frequency bands could be used as biomarkers for chronic pain. Keywords: sickle cell disease, electroencephalography, chronic pain, electrophysiological source imaging, thalamocortical dysrhythmia

  11. Band gaps for the relativistic Mathieu potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerk, G.J.; McKellar, B.H.J.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the band structure of a massless particle in a cosine potential is made via the Dirac equation. It is shown that every alternate band gap disappears as a consequence of a periodicity of the potential combined with a peculiar symmetry of the Dirac equation. This basic potential is then used to study a simple one-dimensional model of the nucleus from which it is ascertained that modelling the mean field of the quarks in the nucleus via a pure scalar potential is unsatisfactory. A simple extension involving a combined scalar and vector potential is then proposed as a possible solution to this problem. The effect of the addition of this vector component to the band structure is also investigated. 32 refs

  12. Some general constraints on identical band symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidry, M.W.; Strayer, M.R.; Wu, C.; Feng, D.H.

    1993-01-01

    We argue on general grounds that nearly identical bands observed for superdeformation and less frequently for normal deformation must be explicable in terms of a symmetry having a microscopic basis. We assume that the unknown symmetry is associated with a Lie algebra generated by terms bilinear in fermion creation and annihilation operators. Observed features of these bands and the general properties of Lie groups are then used to place constraints on acceptable algebras. Additional constraints are placed by assuming that the collective spectrum is associated with a dynamical symmetry, and examining the subgroup structure required by phenomenology. We observe that requisite symmetry cannot be unitary, and that the simplest known group structures consistent with these minimal criteria are associated with the Ginocchio algebras employed in the fermion dynamical symmetry model. However, our arguments are general in nature, and we propose that they imply model-independent constraints on any candidate explanation for identical bands

  13. Exact folded-band chaotic oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corron, Ned J; Blakely, Jonathan N

    2012-06-01

    An exactly solvable chaotic oscillator with folded-band dynamics is shown. The oscillator is a hybrid dynamical system containing a linear ordinary differential equation and a nonlinear switching condition. Bounded oscillations are provably chaotic, and successive waveform maxima yield a one-dimensional piecewise-linear return map with segments of both positive and negative slopes. Continuous-time dynamics exhibit a folded-band topology similar to Rössler's oscillator. An exact solution is written as a linear convolution of a fixed basis pulse and a discrete binary sequence, from which an equivalent symbolic dynamics is obtained. The folded-band topology is shown to be dependent on the symbol grammar.

  14. Band Edge Dynamics and Multiexciton Generation in Narrow Band Gap HgTe Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livache, Clément; Goubet, Nicolas; Martinez, Bertille; Jagtap, Amardeep; Qu, Junling; Ithurria, Sandrine; Silly, Mathieu G; Dubertret, Benoit; Lhuillier, Emmanuel

    2018-04-11

    Mercury chalcogenide nanocrystals and especially HgTe appear as an interesting platform for the design of low cost mid-infrared (mid-IR) detectors. Nevertheless, their electronic structure and transport properties remain poorly understood, and some critical aspects such as the carrier relaxation dynamics at the band edge have been pushed under the rug. Some of the previous reports on dynamics are setup-limited, and all of them have been obtained using photon energy far above the band edge. These observations raise two main questions: (i) what are the carrier dynamics at the band edge and (ii) should we expect some additional effect (multiexciton generation (MEG)) as such narrow band gap materials are excited far above the band edge? To answer these questions, we developed a high-bandwidth setup that allows us to understand and compare the carrier dynamics resonantly pumped at the band edge in the mid-IR and far above the band edge. We demonstrate that fast (>50 MHz) photoresponse can be obtained even in the mid-IR and that MEG is occurring in HgTe nanocrystal arrays with a threshold around 3 times the band edge energy. Furthermore, the photoresponse can be effectively tuned in magnitude and sign using a phototransistor configuration.

  15. Side-band-separating heterodyne mixer for band 9 of ALMA.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mena, F. P.; Baryshev, A. M.; Kooi, J.; Lodewijk, C. F. J.; Gerlofsma, G.; Hesper, R.; Wild, W.; Shen, XC; Lu, W; Zhang, J; Dou, WB

    2006-01-01

    Here we present the realization of a side-band-separating (2SB) heterodyne mixer for the frequency range from 602 to 720 GHz (corresponding to ALMA band 9). The mixer, in brief, consists of a quadrature hybrid, two LO injectors, two SIS junctions, and three dumping loads. All the parts were modeled

  16. Elastic band prediction equations for combined free-weight and elastic band bench presses and squats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoepe, Todd C; Ramirez, David A; Almstedt, Hawley C

    2010-01-01

    Elastic bands added to traditional free-weight techniques have become a part of suggested training routines in recent years. Because of the variable loading patterns of elastic bands (i.e., greater stretch produces greater resistance), it is necessary to quantify the exact loading patterns of bands to identify the volume and intensity of training. The purpose of this study was to determine the length vs. tension properties of multiple sizes of a set of commonly used elastic bands to quantify the resistance that would be applied to free-weight plus elastic bench presses (BP) and squats (SQ). Five elastic bands of varying thickness were affixed to an overhead support beam. Dumbbells of varying weights were progressively added to the free end while the linear deformation was recorded with each subsequent weight increment. The resistance was plotted as a factor of linear deformation, and best-fit nonlinear logarithmic regression equations were then matched to the data. For both the BP and SQ loading conditions and all band thicknesses tested, R values were greater than 0.9623. These data suggest that differences in load exist as a result of the thickness of the elastic band, attachment technique, and type of exercise being performed. Facilities should adopt their own form of loading quantification to match their unique set of circumstances when acquiring, researching, and implementing elastic band and free-weight exercises into the training programs.

  17. Band-gap and band-edge engineering of multicomponent garnet scintillators from first principles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yadav, S.K.; Uberuaga, B.P.; Nikl, Martin; Jiang, C.; Stanek, C.R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 5 (2015), "054012-1"-"054012-9" ISSN 2331-7019 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/12/0805 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : scintillator * electronic band gap structure * garnets * band gap engineering Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.061, year: 2015

  18. Interpolation of band-limited discrete-time signals by minimising out-of-band energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, A.J.E.M.; Vries, L.B.

    1984-01-01

    An interpolation method for restoring burst errors in discrete—time, band—limited signals is presented. The restoration is such that the restored signal has minimal out—of—band energy. The filter coefficients depend Only on the burst length and on the size of the band to which the signal is assumed

  19. Band to Band Tunneling (BBT) Induced Leakage Current Enhancement in Irradiated Fully Depleted SOI Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adell, Phillipe C.; Barnaby, H. J.; Schrimpf, R. D.; Vermeire, B.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a model, validated with simulations, describing how band-to-band tunneling (BBT) affects the leakage current degradation in some irradiated fully-depleted SOI devices. The dependence of drain current on gate voltage, including the apparent transition to a high current regime is explained.

  20. Duchenne muscular dystrophy models show their age

    OpenAIRE

    Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    The lack of appropriate animal models has hampered efforts to develop therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). A new mouse model lacking both dystrophin and telomerase (Sacco et al., 2010) closely mimics the pathological progression of human DMD and shows that muscle stem cell activity is a key determinant of disease severity.