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Sample records for proteasome nuclear activity

  1. p53 mutations promote proteasomal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Moshe; Kotler, Eran

    2016-07-27

    p53 mutations occur very frequently in human cancer. Besides abrogating the tumour suppressive functions of wild-type p53, many of those mutations also acquire oncogenic gain-of-function activities. Augmentation of proteasome activity is now reported as a common gain-of-function mechanism shared by different p53 mutants, which promotes cancer resistance to proteasome inhibitors.

  2. Detection of O-propargyl-puromycin with SUMO and ubiquitin by click chemistry at PML-nuclear bodies during abortive proteasome activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uozumi, Naoki; Matsumoto, Hotaru [Course for Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Saitoh, Hisato, E-mail: hisa@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Course for Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2016-05-27

    The amino-nucleoside antibiotic, puromycin, acts by covalently linking to elongating polypeptide chains on ribosomes to generate prematurely terminated immature polypeptides. The trafficking of puromycin-conjugated (puromycylated) immature polypeptides within cell has, however, remained elusive. In this study, using O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro), the distribution of puromycylated polypeptides was assessed in HeLa cells by click chemistry. Under standard culture conditions, OP-Puro signals were detected in the cytoplasm and nucleus with the highest concentrations in the nucleolus. Intriguingly, when proteasome activities were aborted using MG132, OP-Puro signals began to accumulate at promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) in addition to the nucleolus. We also found promiscuous association of OP-Puro signals with SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin at PML-NBs, but not at the nucleolus, during abortive proteasome activities. This study reveals a previously unknown distribution of OP-Puro that argues for a nuclear function in regulating immature protein homeostasis. -- Highlights: •Click chemistry detects O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro) signals in the nucleus. •OP-Puro accumulates at PML-NBs during abortive proteasome activities. •SUMO and ubiquitin are promiscuously associated with OP-Puro at PML-NBs. •The nucleus may function in immature protein homeostasis.

  3. Detection of O-propargyl-puromycin with SUMO and ubiquitin by click chemistry at PML-nuclear bodies during abortive proteasome activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uozumi, Naoki; Matsumoto, Hotaru; Saitoh, Hisato

    2016-01-01

    The amino-nucleoside antibiotic, puromycin, acts by covalently linking to elongating polypeptide chains on ribosomes to generate prematurely terminated immature polypeptides. The trafficking of puromycin-conjugated (puromycylated) immature polypeptides within cell has, however, remained elusive. In this study, using O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro), the distribution of puromycylated polypeptides was assessed in HeLa cells by click chemistry. Under standard culture conditions, OP-Puro signals were detected in the cytoplasm and nucleus with the highest concentrations in the nucleolus. Intriguingly, when proteasome activities were aborted using MG132, OP-Puro signals began to accumulate at promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) in addition to the nucleolus. We also found promiscuous association of OP-Puro signals with SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin at PML-NBs, but not at the nucleolus, during abortive proteasome activities. This study reveals a previously unknown distribution of OP-Puro that argues for a nuclear function in regulating immature protein homeostasis. -- Highlights: •Click chemistry detects O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro) signals in the nucleus. •OP-Puro accumulates at PML-NBs during abortive proteasome activities. •SUMO and ubiquitin are promiscuously associated with OP-Puro at PML-NBs. •The nucleus may function in immature protein homeostasis.

  4. Dynamic recruitment of active proteasomes into polyglutamine initiated inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper-Krom, Sabine; Juenemann, Katrin; Jansen, Anne H; Wiemhoefer, Anne; van den Nieuwendijk, Rianne; Smith, Donna L; Hink, Mark A; Bates, Gillian P; Overkleeft, Hermen; Ovaa, Huib; Reits, Eric

    2014-01-03

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease are hallmarked by neuronal intracellular inclusion body formation. Whether proteasomes are irreversibly recruited into inclusion bodies in these protein misfolding disorders is a controversial subject. In addition, it has been proposed that the proteasomes may become clogged by the aggregated protein fragments, leading to impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here, we show by fluorescence pulse-chase experiments in living cells that proteasomes are dynamically and reversibly recruited into inclusion bodies. As these recruited proteasomes remain catalytically active and accessible to substrates, our results challenge the concept of proteasome sequestration and impairment in Huntington's disease, and support the reported absence of proteasome impairment in mouse models of Huntington's disease. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. All rights reserved.

  5. Bacterial proteasome activator bpa (rv3780) is a novel ring-shaped interactor of the mycobacterial proteasome.

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    Delley, Cyrille L; Laederach, Juerg; Ziemski, Michal; Bolten, Marcel; Boehringer, Daniel; Weber-Ban, Eilika

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of the proteasome in bacteria is limited to the phylum of actinobacteria, where it is maintained in parallel to the usual bacterial compartmentalizing proteases. The role it plays in these organisms is still not fully understood, but in the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) the proteasome supports persistence in the host. In complex with the ring-shaped ATPase Mpa (called ARC in other actinobacteria), the proteasome can degrade proteins that have been post-translationally modified with the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein Pup. Unlike for the eukaryotic proteasome core particle, no other bacterial proteasome interactors have been identified to date. Here we describe and characterize a novel bacterial proteasome activator of Mycobacterium tuberculosis we termed Bpa (Rv3780), using a combination of biochemical and biophysical methods. Bpa features a canonical C-terminal proteasome interaction motif referred to as the HbYX motif, and its orthologs are only found in those actinobacteria encoding the proteasomal subunits. Bpa can inhibit degradation of Pup-tagged substrates in vitro by competing with Mpa for association with the proteasome. Using negative-stain electron microscopy, we show that Bpa forms a ring-shaped homooligomer that can bind coaxially to the face of the proteasome cylinder. Interestingly, Bpa can stimulate the proteasomal degradation of the model substrate β-casein, which suggests it could play a role in the removal of non-native or damaged proteins.

  6. Structural Analysis of the Bacterial Proteasome Activator Bpa in Complex with the 20S Proteasome.

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    Bolten, Marcel; Delley, Cyrille L; Leibundgut, Marc; Boehringer, Daniel; Ban, Nenad; Weber-Ban, Eilika

    2016-12-06

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis harbors proteasomes that recruit substrates for degradation through an ubiquitin-like modification pathway. Recently, a non-ATPase activator termed Bpa (bacterial proteasome activator) was shown to support an alternate proteasomal degradation pathway. Here, we present the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of Bpa in complex with the 20S core particle (CP). For docking into the cryo-EM density, we solved the X-ray structure of Bpa, showing that it forms tight four-helix bundles arranged into a 12-membered ring with a 40 Å wide central pore and the C-terminal helix of each protomer protruding from the ring. The Bpa model was fitted into the cryo-EM map of the Bpa-CP complex, revealing its architecture and striking symmetry mismatch. The Bpa-CP interface was resolved to 3.5 Å, showing the interactions between the C-terminal GQYL motif of Bpa and the proteasome α-rings. This docking mode is related to the one observed for eukaryotic activators with features specific to the bacterial complex. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Nucleolar Proteome Analysis and Proteasomal Activity Assays Reveal a Link between Nucleolus and 26S Proteasome in A. thaliana

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    Montacié, Charlotte; Durut, Nathalie; Opsomer, Alison; Palm, Denise; Comella, Pascale; Picart, Claire; Carpentier, Marie-Christine; Pontvianne, Frederic; Carapito, Christine; Schleiff, Enrico; Sáez-Vásquez, Julio

    2017-01-01

    In all eukaryotic cells, the nucleolus is functionally and structurally linked to rRNA synthesis and ribosome biogenesis. This compartment contains as well factors involved in other cellular activities, but the functional interconnection between non-ribosomal activities and the nucleolus (structure and function) still remains an open question. Here, we report a novel mass spectrometry analysis of isolated nucleoli from Arabidopsis thaliana plants using the FANoS (Fluorescence Assisted Nucleolus Sorting) strategy. We identified many ribosome biogenesis factors (RBF) and proteins non-related with ribosome biogenesis, in agreement with the recognized multi-functionality of the nucleolus. Interestingly, we found that 26S proteasome subunits localize in the nucleolus and demonstrated that proteasome activity and nucleolus organization are intimately linked to each other. Proteasome subunits form discrete foci in the disorganized nucleolus of nuc1.2 plants. Nuc1.2 protein extracts display reduced proteasome activity in vitro compared to WT protein extracts. Remarkably, proteasome activity in nuc1.2 is similar to proteasome activity in WT plants treated with proteasome inhibitors (MG132 or ALLN). Finally, we show that MG132 treatment induces disruption of nucleolar structures in WT but not in nuc1.2 plants. Altogether, our data suggest a functional interconnection between nucleolus structure and proteasome activity. PMID:29104584

  8. Association of proteasomal activity with metastasis in luminal breast cancer

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    Shashova, E. E.; Fesik, E. A.; Doroshenko, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    Chimotrypsin-like (ChTL) and caspase-like (CL) proteasomal activities were investigated in different variants of the tumor progression of luminal breast cancer. Patients with primary luminal breast cancer (n = 123) in stage T1-3N0-2M0 who had not received neoadjuvant treatment were included in this study. Proteasome ChTL and CL activities were determined in the samples of tumor and adjacent tissues. The coefficients of chymotrypsin-like (kChTL) and caspase-like (kCL) proteasome activity were also calculated as the ratio of the corresponding activity in the tumor tissue to activity in the adjacent tissue. ChTL, CL, kChTL and kCL in the tissues of luminal A and B breast cancer with lymphogenic metastasis were compared, and their association with hematogenous metastasis was evaluated. On the one hand, CL activity of proteasomes increased in luminal A breast cancer with extensive lymphogenic metastasis (N2), on the other hand it decreased in the luminal B subtype of cancer. The ratio of proteasomal activity in the tumor and adjacent tissues plays a significant role in the hematogenic pathway of breast cancer progression and is associated with poor metastatic-free survival.

  9. Compensatory role of the Nrf2–ARE pathway against paraquat toxicity: Relevance of 26S proteasome activity

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    Yasuhiko Izumi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and the ubiquitin–proteasome system play a key role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease. Although the herbicide paraquat is an environmental factor that is involved in the etiology of Parkinson disease, the role of 26S proteasome in paraquat toxicity remains to be determined. Using PC12 cells overexpressing a fluorescent protein fused to the proteasome degradation signal, we report here that paraquat yielded an inhibitory effect on 26S proteasome activity without an obvious decline in 20S proteasome activity. Relative low concentrations of proteasome inhibitors caused the accumulation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, which is targeted to the ubiquitin–proteasome system, and activated the antioxidant response element (ARE-dependent transcription. Paraquat also upregulated the protein level of Nrf2 without increased expression of Nrf2 mRNA, and activated the Nrf2–ARE pathway. Consequently, paraquat induced expression of Nrf2-dependent ARE-driven genes, such as γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, catalase, and hemeoxygenase-1. Knockdown of Nrf2 or inhibition of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase and catalase exacerbated paraquat-induced toxicity, whereas suppression of hemeoxygenase-1 did not. These data indicate that the compensatory activation of the Nrf2–ARE pathway via inhibition of 26S proteasome serves as part of a cellular defense mechanism to protect against paraquat toxicity.

  10. The use of activity based protein profiling to study proteasome biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paniagua Soriano, Guillem

    2016-01-01

    The work described in this thesis focuses on the characterization of proteasome directed activity-based probes (ABPs) as well as on the adaptation mechanisms that make multiple myeloma derived cell lines resistant against proteasome inhibitors (PIs).

  11. Discovery and development of inhibitors selective for human constitutive proteasome and immunoproteasome active sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xin, B.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes the design and development of subunit‐selective inhibitors of particular catalytically active subunits of human constitutive proteasomes and immunoproteasomes. Most existing proteasome inhibitors are oligopeptides composed of 2‐4 amino acid residues, N‐terminally

  12. The 11S Proteasomal Activator REGγ Impacts Polyglutamine-Expanded Androgen Receptor Aggregation and Motor Neuron Viability through Distinct Mechanisms

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    Jill M. Yersak

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is caused by expression of a polyglutamine (polyQ-expanded androgen receptor (AR. The inefficient nuclear proteasomal degradation of the mutant AR results in the formation of nuclear inclusions containing amino-terminal fragments of the mutant AR. PA28γ (also referred to as REGγ is a nuclear 11S-proteasomal activator with limited proteasome activation capabilities compared to its cytoplasmic 11S (PA28α, PA28β counterparts. To clarify the role of REGγ in polyQ-expanded AR metabolism, we carried out genetic and biochemical studies in cell models of SBMA. Overexpression of REGγ in a PC12 cell model of SBMA increased polyQ-expanded AR aggregation and contributed to polyQ-expanded AR toxicity in the presence of dihydrotestosterone (DHT. These effects of REGγ were independent of its association with the proteasome and may be due, in part, to the decreased binding of polyQ-expanded AR by the E3 ubiquitin-ligase MDM2. Unlike its effects in PC12 cells, REGγ overexpression rescued transgenic SBMA motor neurons from DHT-induced toxicity in a proteasome binding-dependent manner, suggesting that the degradation of a specific 11S proteasome substrate or substrates promotes motor neuron viability. One potential substrate that we found to play a role in mutant AR toxicity is the splicing factor SC35. These studies reveal that, depending on the cellular context, two biological roles for REGγ impact cell viability in the face of polyQ-expanded AR; a proteasome binding-independent mechanism directly promotes mutant AR aggregation while a proteasome binding-dependent mechanism promotes cell viability. The balance between these functions likely determines REGγ effects on polyQ-expanded AR-expressing cells.

  13. Imaging Reporters for Proteasome Activity Identify Tumor- and Metastasis-Initiating Cells

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    Amanda C. Stacer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-initiating cells, also designated as cancer stem cells, are proposed to constitute a subpopulation of malignant cells central to tumorigenesis, metastasis, and treatment resistance. We analyzed the activity of the proteasome, the primary organelle for targeted protein degradation, as a marker of tumor- and metastasis-initiating cells. Using human and mouse breast cancer cells expressing a validated fluorescent reporter, we found a small subpopulation of cells with low proteasome activity that divided asymmetrically to produce daughter cells with low or high proteasome activity. Breast cancer cells with low proteasome activity had greater local tumor formation and metastasis in immunocompromised and immunocompetent mice. To allow flexible labeling of cells, we also developed a new proteasome substrate based on HaloTag technology. Patient-derived glioblastoma cells with low proteasome activity measured by the HaloTag reporter show key phenotypes associated with tumor-initiating cells, including expression of a stem cell transcription factor, reconstitution of the original starting population, and enhanced neurosphere formation. We also show that patient-derived glioblastoma cells with low proteasome activity have higher frequency of tumor formation in mouse xenografts. These studies support proteasome function as a tool to investigate tumor- and metastasis-initiating cancer cells and a potential biomarker for outcomes in patients with several different cancers.

  14. The Nrf1 CNC-bZIP protein is regulated by the proteasome and activated by hypoxia.

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    Chepelev, Nikolai L; Bennitz, Joshua D; Huang, Ting; McBride, Skye; Willmore, William G

    2011-01-01

    Nrf1 (nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45 subunit-related factor 1) is a transcription factor mediating cellular responses to xenobiotic and pro-oxidant stress. Nrf1 regulates the transcription of many stress-related genes through the electrophile response elements (EpREs) located in their promoter regions. Despite its potential importance in human health, the mechanisms controlling Nrf1 have not been addressed fully. We found that proteasomal inhibitors MG-132 and clasto-lactacystin-β-lactone stabilized the protein expression of full-length Nrf1 in both COS7 and WFF2002 cells. Concomitantly, proteasomal inhibition decreased the expression of a smaller, N-terminal Nrf1 fragment, with an approximate molecular weight of 23 kDa. The EpRE-luciferase reporter assays revealed that proteasomal inhibition markedly inhibited the Nrf1 transactivational activity. These results support earlier hypotheses that the 26 S proteasome processes Nrf1 into its active form by removing its inhibitory N-terminal domain anchoring Nrf1 to the endoplasmic reticulum. Immunoprecipitation demonstrated that Nrf1 is ubiquitinated and that proteasomal inhibition increased the degree of Nrf1 ubiquitination. Furthermore, Nrf1 protein had a half-life of approximately 5 hours in COS7 cells. In contrast, hypoxia (1% O(2)) significantly increased the luciferase reporter activity of exogenous Nrf1 protein, while decreasing the protein expression of p65, a shorter form of Nrf1, known to act as a repressor of EpRE-controlled gene expression. Finally, the protein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid activated Nrf1 reporter activity, while the latter was repressed by the PKC inhibitor staurosporine. Collectively, our data suggests that Nrf1 is controlled by several post-translational mechanisms, including ubiquitination, proteolytic processing and proteasomal-mediated degradation as well as by its phosphorylation status. © 2011 Chepelev et al.

  15. Spaceflight Activates Autophagy Programs and the Proteasome in Mouse Liver.

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    Blaber, Elizabeth A; Pecaut, Michael J; Jonscher, Karen R

    2017-09-27

    Increased oxidative stress is an unavoidable consequence of exposure to the space environment. Our previous studies showed that mice exposed to space for 13.5 days had decreased glutathione levels, suggesting impairments in oxidative defense. Here we performed unbiased, unsupervised and integrated multi-'omic analyses of metabolomic and transcriptomic datasets from mice flown aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis. Enrichment analyses of metabolite and gene sets showed significant changes in osmolyte concentrations and pathways related to glycerophospholipid and sphingolipid metabolism, likely consequences of relative dehydration of the spaceflight mice. However, we also found increased enrichment of aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis and purine metabolic pathways, concomitant with enrichment of genes associated with autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome. When taken together with a downregulation in nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2-mediated signaling, our analyses suggest that decreased hepatic oxidative defense may lead to aberrant tRNA post-translational processing, induction of degradation programs and senescence-associated mitochondrial dysfunction in response to the spaceflight environment.

  16. Spaceflight Activates Autophagy Programs and the Proteasome in Mouse Liver

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    Elizabeth A. Blaber

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Increased oxidative stress is an unavoidable consequence of exposure to the space environment. Our previous studies showed that mice exposed to space for 13.5 days had decreased glutathione levels, suggesting impairments in oxidative defense. Here we performed unbiased, unsupervised and integrated multi-‘omic analyses of metabolomic and transcriptomic datasets from mice flown aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis. Enrichment analyses of metabolite and gene sets showed significant changes in osmolyte concentrations and pathways related to glycerophospholipid and sphingolipid metabolism, likely consequences of relative dehydration of the spaceflight mice. However, we also found increased enrichment of aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis and purine metabolic pathways, concomitant with enrichment of genes associated with autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome. When taken together with a downregulation in nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2-mediated signaling, our analyses suggest that decreased hepatic oxidative defense may lead to aberrant tRNA post-translational processing, induction of degradation programs and senescence-associated mitochondrial dysfunction in response to the spaceflight environment.

  17. Dynamic recruitment of active proteasomes into polyglutamine initiated inclusion bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper-Krom, Sabine; Juenemann, Katrin; Jansen, Anne H.; Wiemhoefer, Anne; van den Nieuwendijk, Rianne; Smith, Donna L.; Hink, Mark A.; Bates, Gillian P.; Overkleeft, Hermen; Ovaa, Huib; Reits, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease are hallmarked by neuronal intracellular inclusion body formation. Whether proteasomes are irreversibly recruited into inclusion bodies in these protein misfolding disorders is a controversial subject. In addition, it has been proposed that

  18. Baicalin and scutellarin are proteasome inhibitors that specifically target chymotrypsin-like catalytic activity.

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    Wu, Yi-Xin; Sato, Eiji; Kimura, Wataru; Miura, Naoyuki

    2013-09-01

    Baicalin and scutellarin are the major active principal flavonoids extracted from the Chinese herbal medicines Scutellaria baicalensis and Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand-Mazz. It has recently been reported that baicalin and scutellarin have antitumor activity. However, the mechanisms of action are unknown. We previously reported that some flavonoids have a specific role in the inhibition of the activity of proteasome subunits and induced apoptosis in tumor cells. To further investigate these pharmacological effects, we examined the inhibitory activity of baicalin and scutellarin on the extracted proteasomes from mice and cancer cells. Using fluorogenic substrates for proteasome catalytic subunits, we found that baicalin and scutellarin specifically inhibited chymotrypsin-like activity but did not inhibit trypsin-like and peptidyl-glutamyl peptide hydrolyzing activities. These data suggested that baicalin and scutellarin specifically inhibit chymotrypsin-like catalytic activity in the proteasome. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Proteasome activity related with the daily physical activity of COPD patients

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    Lee KY

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Kang-Yun Lee,1,2,* Tzu-Tao Chen,1,* Ling-Ling Chiang,1,3 Hsiao-Chi Chuang,1,3 Po-Hao Feng,1,2 Wen-Te Liu,1–3 Kuan-Yuan Chen,1 Shu-Chuan Ho1,3 1Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, 2Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, 3School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: COPD is a debilitating disease that affects patients’ daily lives. One’s daily physical activity (DPA decreases due to multifactorial causes, and this decrease is correlated with a poor prognosis in COPD patients. Muscle wasting may at least be partly due to increased activity of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway and apoptosis.Methods: This study investigated the relationships among DPA, circulating proteasome activity, and protein carbonyl in COPD patients and healthy subjects (HSs. This study included 57 participants (42 patients and 15 healthy subjects. Ambulatory DPA was measured using actigraphy, and oxygen saturation was measured with a pulse oximeter.Results: COPD patients had lower DPA, lower 6 min walking distance (6MWD, lower delta saturation pulse oxygenation (SpO2 during the 6MWT, and lower delta SpO2 during DPA than HSs. COPD patients had higher proteasome activity and protein carbonyl than HSs. Circulating proteasome activity was significantly negatively correlated with DPA (r=−0.568, P<0.05 in COPD patients, whereas delta SpO2 during the 6MWT was significantly positively correlated with proteasome activity (r=0.685, P<0.05 in HSs. Protein carbonyl was significantly negatively correlated with the body mass index (r=−0.318, P<0.05, mid-arm circumference (r=0.350, P<0.05, calf circumference (r=0.322, P<0.05, forced expiratory volume in the first second (r=−0.441, P<0

  20. A new structural class of proteasome inhibitors that prevent NF-kappa B activation.

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    Lum, R T; Kerwar, S S; Meyer, S M; Nelson, M G; Schow, S R; Shiffman, D; Wick, M M; Joly, A

    1998-05-01

    The multicatalytic proteinase or proteasome is a highly conserved cellular structure that is responsible for the ATP-dependent proteolysis of many proteins involved in important regulatory cellular processes. We have identified a novel class of inhibitors of the chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity of the 20S proteasome that exhibit IC50 values ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 microgram/mL (0.1 to 1 microM). In cell proliferation assays, these compounds inhibit growth with an IC50 ranging from 5 to 10 micrograms/mL (10-20 microM). A representative member of this class of inhibitors was tested in other biological assays. CVT-634 (5-methoxy-1-indanone-3-acetyl-leu-D-leu-1-indanylamide) prevented lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-, and phorbol ester-induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) in vitro by preventing signal-induced degradation of I kappa B-alpha. In these studies, the I kappa B-alpha that accumulated was hyperphosphorylated, indicating that CVT-634 did not inhibit I kappa B-alpha kinase, the enzyme responsible for signal-induced phosphorylation of I kappa B-alpha. In vivo studies indicated that CVT-634 prevented LPS-induced TNF synthesis in a murine macrophage cell line. In addition, in mice pretreated with CVT-634 at 25 and 50 mg/kg and subsequently treated with LPS, serum TNF levels were significantly lower (225 +/- 59 and 83 +/- 41 pg/mL, respectively) than in those mice that were treated only with LPS (865 +/- 282 pg/mL). These studies suggest that specific inhibition of the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome is sufficient to prevent signal-induced NF-kappa B activation and that the proteasome is a novel target for the identification of agents that may be useful in the treatment of diseases whose etiology is dependent upon the activation of NF-kappa B.

  1. Functional interplay between mitochondrial and proteasome activity in skin aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kozie, Rafa; Greussing, Ruth; Maier, Andrea B.; Declercq, Lieve; Jansen-Dürr, Pidder

    According to the mitochondrial theory of aging, reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived primarily from mitochondria cause cumulative oxidative damage to various cellular molecules and thereby contribute to the aging process. On the other hand, a pivotal role of the proteasome, as a main proteolytic

  2. Gammaherpesviral Tegument Proteins, PML-Nuclear Bodies and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System

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    Florian Full

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Gammaherpesviruses like Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV subvert the ubiquitin proteasome system for their own benefit in order to facilitate viral gene expression and replication. In particular, viral tegument proteins that share sequence homology to the formylglycineamide ribonucleotide amidotransferase (FGARAT, or PFAS, an enzyme in the cellular purine biosynthesis, are important for disrupting the intrinsic antiviral response associated with Promyelocytic Leukemia (PML protein-associated nuclear bodies (PML-NBs by proteasome-dependent and independent mechanisms. In addition, all herpesviruses encode for a potent ubiquitin protease that can efficiently remove ubiquitin chains from proteins and thereby interfere with several different cellular pathways. In this review, we discuss mechanisms and functional consequences of virus-induced ubiquitination and deubiquitination for early events in gammaherpesviral infection.

  3. A monoclonal antibody that distinguishes latent and active forms of the proteasome (multicatalytic proteinase complex)

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    Weitman, D.; Etlinger, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were generated to proteasome purified from human erythrocytes. Five of six proteasome-specific mAbs reacted with three subunits in the molecular mass range of 25-28 kDa, indicating a common epitope. The other mAb (AP5C10) exhibited a more restricted reactivity, recognizing a 32-kDa subunit of the proteasome purified in its latent state. However, when the proteasome is isolated in its active state, AP5C10 reacts with a 28-kDa subunit, evidence for processing of the proteasome subunits during purification. Purified proteasome preparations which exhibited partial latency have both AP5C10 reactive subunits. Although the 32-kDa subunit appears required for latency, loss of this component and generation of the 28-kDa component are not obligatory for activation. The 32- and 28-kDa subunits can each be further resolved into three components by isoelectric focusing. The apparent loss of 4 kDa during the conversion of the 32- to 28-kDa subunit is accompanied by a shift to a more basic pI for each polypeptide. Western blots of the early steps of proteasome purification reveal an AP5C10-reactive protein at 41 kDa. This protein was separated from proteasomes by sizing chromatography and may represent a pool of precursor subunits. Since the 32-kDa subunit appears necessary for latency, it is speculated to play a regulatory role in ATP-dependent proteolytic activity.

  4. Sensitive detection of proteasomal activation using the Deg-On mammalian synthetic gene circuit.

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    Zhao, Wenting; Bonem, Matthew; McWhite, Claire; Silberg, Jonathan J; Segatori, Laura

    2014-04-08

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) has emerged as a drug target for diverse diseases characterized by altered proteostasis, but pharmacological agents that enhance UPS activity have been challenging to establish. Here we report the Deg-On system, a genetic inverter that translates proteasomal degradation of the transcriptional regulator TetR into a fluorescent signal, thereby linking UPS activity to an easily detectable output, which can be tuned using tetracycline. We demonstrate that this circuit responds to modulation of UPS activity in cell culture arising from the inhibitor MG-132 and activator PA28γ. Guided by predictive modelling, we enhanced the circuit's signal sensitivity and dynamic range by introducing a feedback loop that enables self-amplification of TetR. By linking UPS activity to a simple and tunable fluorescence output, these genetic inverters will enable a variety of applications, including screening for UPS activating molecules and selecting for mammalian cells with different levels of proteasome activity.

  5. ROS inhibitor N-acetyl-L-cysteine antagonizes the activity of proteasome inhibitors.

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    Halasi, Marianna; Wang, Ming; Chavan, Tanmay S; Gaponenko, Vadim; Hay, Nissim; Gartel, Andrei L

    2013-09-01

    NAC (N-acetyl-L-cysteine) is commonly used to identify and test ROS (reactive oxygen species) inducers, and to inhibit ROS. In the present study, we identified inhibition of proteasome inhibitors as a novel activity of NAC. Both NAC and catalase, another known scavenger of ROS, similarly inhibited ROS levels and apoptosis associated with H₂O₂. However, only NAC, and not catalase or another ROS scavenger Trolox, was able to prevent effects linked to proteasome inhibition, such as protein stabilization, apoptosis and accumulation of ubiquitin conjugates. These observations suggest that NAC has a dual activity as an inhibitor of ROS and proteasome inhibitors. Recently, NAC was used as a ROS inhibitor to functionally characterize a novel anticancer compound, piperlongumine, leading to its description as a ROS inducer. In contrast, our own experiments showed that this compound depicts features of proteasome inhibitors including suppression of FOXM1 (Forkhead box protein M1), stabilization of cellular proteins, induction of ROS-independent apoptosis and enhanced accumulation of ubiquitin conjugates. In addition, NAC, but not catalase or Trolox, interfered with the activity of piperlongumine, further supporting that piperlongumine is a proteasome inhibitor. Most importantly, we showed that NAC, but not other ROS scavengers, directly binds to proteasome inhibitors. To our knowledge, NAC is the first known compound that directly interacts with and antagonizes the activity of proteasome inhibitors. Taken together, the findings of the present study suggest that, as a result of the dual nature of NAC, data interpretation might not be straightforward when NAC is utilized as an antioxidant to demonstrate ROS involvement in drug-induced apoptosis.

  6. Altered composition of liver proteasome assemblies contributes to enhanced proteasome activity in the exceptionally long-lived naked mole-rat.

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    Rodriguez, Karl A; Edrey, Yael H; Osmulski, Pawel; Gaczynska, Maria; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2012-01-01

    The longest-lived rodent, the naked mole-rat (Bathyergidae; Heterocephalus glaber), maintains robust health for at least 75% of its 32 year lifespan, suggesting that the decline in genomic integrity or protein homeostasis routinely observed during aging, is either attenuated or delayed in this extraordinarily long-lived species. The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays an integral role in protein homeostasis by degrading oxidatively-damaged and misfolded proteins. In this study, we examined proteasome activity in naked mole-rats and mice in whole liver lysates as well as three subcellular fractions to probe the mechanisms behind the apparently enhanced effectiveness of UPS. We found that when compared with mouse samples, naked mole-rats had significantly higher chymotrypsin-like (ChT-L) activity and a two-fold increase in trypsin-like (T-L) in both whole lysates as well as cytosolic fractions. Native gel electrophoresis of the whole tissue lysates showed that the 20S proteasome was more active in the longer-lived species and that 26S proteasome was both more active and more populous. Western blot analyses revealed that both 19S subunits and immunoproteasome catalytic subunits are present in greater amounts in the naked mole-rat suggesting that the observed higher specific activity may be due to the greater proportion of immunoproteasomes in livers of healthy young adults. It thus appears that proteasomes in this species are primed for the efficient removal of stress-damaged proteins. Further characterization of the naked mole-rat proteasome and its regulation could lead to important insights on how the cells in these animals handle increased stress and protein damage to maintain a longer health in their tissues and ultimately a longer life.

  7. Altered composition of liver proteasome assemblies contributes to enhanced proteasome activity in the exceptionally long-lived naked mole-rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl A Rodriguez

    Full Text Available The longest-lived rodent, the naked mole-rat (Bathyergidae; Heterocephalus glaber, maintains robust health for at least 75% of its 32 year lifespan, suggesting that the decline in genomic integrity or protein homeostasis routinely observed during aging, is either attenuated or delayed in this extraordinarily long-lived species. The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS plays an integral role in protein homeostasis by degrading oxidatively-damaged and misfolded proteins. In this study, we examined proteasome activity in naked mole-rats and mice in whole liver lysates as well as three subcellular fractions to probe the mechanisms behind the apparently enhanced effectiveness of UPS. We found that when compared with mouse samples, naked mole-rats had significantly higher chymotrypsin-like (ChT-L activity and a two-fold increase in trypsin-like (T-L in both whole lysates as well as cytosolic fractions. Native gel electrophoresis of the whole tissue lysates showed that the 20S proteasome was more active in the longer-lived species and that 26S proteasome was both more active and more populous. Western blot analyses revealed that both 19S subunits and immunoproteasome catalytic subunits are present in greater amounts in the naked mole-rat suggesting that the observed higher specific activity may be due to the greater proportion of immunoproteasomes in livers of healthy young adults. It thus appears that proteasomes in this species are primed for the efficient removal of stress-damaged proteins. Further characterization of the naked mole-rat proteasome and its regulation could lead to important insights on how the cells in these animals handle increased stress and protein damage to maintain a longer health in their tissues and ultimately a longer life.

  8. Denervation-Induced Activation of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System Reduces Skeletal Muscle Quantity Not Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Cory W; Liu, Haiming M; Thompson, LaDora V

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the ubiquitin-proteasome system is activated in response to skeletal muscle wasting and functions to degrade contractile proteins. The loss of these proteins inevitably reduces skeletal muscle size (i.e., quantity). However, it is currently unknown whether activation of this pathway also affects function by impairing the muscle's intrinsic ability to produce force (i.e., quality). Therefore, the purpose of this study was twofold, (1) document how the ubiquitin-proteasome system responds to denervation and (2) identify the physiological consequences of these changes. To induce soleus muscle atrophy, C57BL6 mice underwent tibial nerve transection of the left hindlimb for 7 or 14 days (n = 6-8 per group). At these time points, content of several proteins within the ubiquitin-proteasome system were determined via Western blot, while ex vivo whole muscle contractility was specifically analyzed at day 14. Denervation temporarily increased several key proteins within the ubiquitin-proteasome system, including the E3 ligase MuRF1 and the proteasome subunits 19S, α7 and β5. These changes were accompanied by reductions in absolute peak force and power, which were offset when expressed relative to physiological cross-sectional area. Contrary to peak force, absolute and relative forces at submaximal stimulation frequencies were significantly greater following 14 days of denervation. Taken together, these data represent two keys findings. First, activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is associated with reductions in skeletal muscle quantity rather than quality. Second, shortly after denervation, it appears the muscle remodels to compensate for the loss of neural activity via changes in Ca2+ handling.

  9. The 20S proteasome splicing activity discovered by SpliceMet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Liepe

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The identification of proteasome-generated spliced peptides (PSP revealed a new unpredicted activity of the major cellular protease. However, so far characterization of PSP was entirely dependent on the availability of patient-derived cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTL thus preventing a systematic investigation of proteasome-catalyzed peptide splicing (PCPS. For an unrestricted PSP identification we here developed SpliceMet, combining the computer-based algorithm ProteaJ with in vitro proteasomal degradation assays and mass spectrometry. By applying SpliceMet for the analysis of proteasomal processing products of four different substrate polypeptides, derived from human tumor as well as viral antigens, we identified fifteen new spliced peptides generated by PCPS either by cis or from two separate substrate molecules, i.e., by trans splicing. Our data suggest that 20S proteasomes represent a molecular machine that, due to its catalytic and structural properties, facilitates the generation of spliced peptides, thereby providing a pool of qualitatively new peptides from which functionally relevant products may be selected.

  10. Murraya koenigii leaf extract inhibits proteasome activity and induces cell death in breast cancer cells

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    Noolu Bindu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhibition of the proteolytic activity of 26S proteasome, the protein-degrading machine, is now considered a novel and promising approach for cancer therapy. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitors have been demonstrated to selectively kill cancer cells and also enhance the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Recently, polyphenols/flavonoids have been reported to inhibit proteasome activity. Murraya koenigii Spreng, a medicinally important herb of Indian origin, has been used for centuries in the Ayurvedic system of medicine. Here we show that Murraya koenigii leaves (curry leaves, a rich source of polyphenols, inhibit the proteolytic activity of the cancer cell proteasome, and cause cell death. Methods Hydro-methanolic extract of curry leaves (CLE was prepared and its total phenolic content [TPC] determined by, the Folin-Ciocalteau’s method. Two human breast carcinoma cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 and a normal human lung fibroblast cell line, WI-38 were used for the studies. Cytotoxicity of the CLE was assessed by the MTT assay. We studied the effect of CLE on growth kinetics using colony formation assay. Growth arrest was assessed by cell cycle analysis and apoptosis by Annexin-V binding using flow cytometry. Inhibition of the endogenous 26S proteasome was studied in intact cells and cell extracts using substrates specific to 20S proteasomal enzymes. Results CLE decreased cell viability and altered the growth kinetics in both the breast cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. It showed a significant arrest of cells in the S phase albeit in cancer cells only. Annexin V binding data suggests that cell death was via the apoptotic pathway in both the cancer cell lines. CLE treatment significantly decreased the activity of the 26S proteasome in the cancer but not normal cells. Conclusions Our study suggests M. koenigii leaves to be a potent source of proteasome inhibitors that lead to cancer cell death

  11. Murraya koenigii leaf extract inhibits proteasome activity and induces cell death in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noolu, Bindu; Ajumeera, Rajanna; Chauhan, Anitha; Nagalla, Balakrishna; Manchala, Raghunath; Ismail, Ayesha

    2013-01-09

    Inhibition of the proteolytic activity of 26S proteasome, the protein-degrading machine, is now considered a novel and promising approach for cancer therapy. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitors have been demonstrated to selectively kill cancer cells and also enhance the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Recently, polyphenols/flavonoids have been reported to inhibit proteasome activity. Murraya koenigii Spreng, a medicinally important herb of Indian origin, has been used for centuries in the Ayurvedic system of medicine. Here we show that Murraya koenigii leaves (curry leaves), a rich source of polyphenols, inhibit the proteolytic activity of the cancer cell proteasome, and cause cell death. Hydro-methanolic extract of curry leaves (CLE) was prepared and its total phenolic content [TPC] determined by, the Folin-Ciocalteau's method. Two human breast carcinoma cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 and a normal human lung fibroblast cell line, WI-38 were used for the studies. Cytotoxicity of the CLE was assessed by the MTT assay. We studied the effect of CLE on growth kinetics using colony formation assay. Growth arrest was assessed by cell cycle analysis and apoptosis by Annexin-V binding using flow cytometry. Inhibition of the endogenous 26S proteasome was studied in intact cells and cell extracts using substrates specific to 20S proteasomal enzymes. CLE decreased cell viability and altered the growth kinetics in both the breast cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. It showed a significant arrest of cells in the S phase albeit in cancer cells only. Annexin V binding data suggests that cell death was via the apoptotic pathway in both the cancer cell lines. CLE treatment significantly decreased the activity of the 26S proteasome in the cancer but not normal cells. Our study suggests M. koenigii leaves to be a potent source of proteasome inhibitors that lead to cancer cell death. Therefore, identification of active component(s) from the leaf

  12. FOXOs modulate proteasome activity in human-induced pluripotent stem cells of Huntington's disease and their derived neural cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanying; Qiao, Fangfang; Leiferman, Patricia C; Ross, Alan; Schlenker, Evelyn H; Wang, Hongmin

    2017-11-15

    Although it has been speculated that proteasome dysfunction may contribute to the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease (HD), a devastating neurodegenerative disorder, how proteasome activity is regulated in HD affected stem cells and somatic cells remains largely unclear. To better understand the pathogenesis of HD, we analyzed proteasome activity and the expression of FOXO transcription factors in three wild-type (WT) and three HD induced-pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines. HD iPSCs exhibited elevated proteasome activity and higher levels of FOXO1 and FOXO4 proteins. Knockdown of FOXO4 but not FOXO1 expression decreased proteasome activity. Following neural differentiation, the HD-iPSC-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs) demonstrated lower levels of proteasome activity and FOXO expressions than their WT counterparts. More importantly, overexpression of FOXO4 but not FOXO1 in HD NPCs dramatically enhanced proteasome activity. When HD NPCs were further differentiated into DARPP32-positive neurons, these HD neurons were more susceptible to death than WT neurons and formed Htt aggregates under the condition of oxidative stress. Similar to HD NPCs, HD-iPSC-derived neurons showed reduced proteasome activity and diminished FOXO4 expression compared to WT-iPSC-derived neurons. Furthermore, HD iPSCs had lower AKT activities than WT iPSCs, whereas the neurons derived from HD iPSC had higher AKT activities than their WT counterparts. Inhibiting AKT activity increased both FOXO4 level and proteasome activity, indicating a potential role of AKT in regulating FOXO levels. These data suggest that FOXOs modulate proteasome activity, and thus represents a potentially valuable therapeutic target for HD. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Poly-Ub-substrate-degradative activity of 26S proteasome is not impaired in the aging rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Giannini

    Full Text Available Proteostasis is critical for the maintenance of life. In neuronal cells an imbalance between protein synthesis and degradation is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases during aging. Partly, this seems to be due to a decrease in the activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, wherein the 20S/26S proteasome complexes catalyse the proteolytic step. We have characterised 20S and 26S proteasomes from cerebrum, cerebellum and hippocampus of 3 weeks old (young and 24 month old (aged rats. Our data reveal that the absolute amount of the proteasome is not dfferent between both age groups. Within the majority of standard proteasomes in brain the minute amounts of immuno-subunits are slightly increased in aged rat brain. While this goes along with a decrease in the activities of 20S and 26S proteasomes to hydrolyse synthetic fluorogenic tripeptide substrates from young to aged rats, the capacity of 26S proteasomes for degradation of poly-Ub-model substrates and its activation by poly-Ub-substrates is not impaired or even slightly increased in brain of aged rats. We conclude that these alterations in proteasome properties are important for maintaining proteostasis in the brain during an uncomplicated aging process.

  14. Impaired methylation as a novel mechanism for proteasome suppression in liver cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osna, Natalia A., E-mail: nosna@UNMC.edu [Liver Study Unit, The Omaha Veterans Affairs VA Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68105 (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68105 (United States); White, Ronda L.; Donohue, Terrence M. [Liver Study Unit, The Omaha Veterans Affairs VA Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68105 (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68105 (United States); Beard, Michael R. [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Adelaide (Australia); Tuma, Dean J.; Kharbanda, Kusum K. [Liver Study Unit, The Omaha Veterans Affairs VA Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68105 (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68105 (United States)

    2010-01-08

    The proteasome is a multi-catalytic protein degradation enzyme that is regulated by ethanol-induced oxidative stress; such suppression is attributed to CYP2E1-generated metabolites. However, under certain conditions, it appears that in addition to oxidative stress, other mechanisms are also involved in proteasome regulation. This study investigated whether impaired protein methylation that occurs during exposure of liver cells to ethanol, may contribute to suppression of proteasome activity. We measured the chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity in Huh7CYP cells, hepatocytes, liver cytosols and nuclear extracts or purified 20S proteasome under conditions that maintain or prevent protein methylation. Reduction of proteasome activity of hepatoma cell and hepatocytes by ethanol or tubercidin was prevented by simultaneous treatment with S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Moreover, the tubercidin-induced decline in proteasome activity occurred in both nuclear and cytosolic fractions. In vitro exposure of cell cytosolic fractions or highly purified 20S proteasome to low SAM:S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) ratios in the buffer also suppressed proteasome function, indicating that one or more methyltransferase(s) may be associated with proteasomal subunits. Immunoblotting a purified 20S rabbit red cell proteasome preparation using methyl lysine-specific antibodies revealed a 25 kDa proteasome subunit that showed positive reactivity with anti-methyl lysine. This reactivity was modified when 20S proteasome was exposed to differential SAM:SAH ratios. We conclude that impaired methylation of proteasome subunits suppressed proteasome activity in liver cells indicating an additional, yet novel mechanism of proteasome activity regulation by ethanol.

  15. Hsp70-GlcNAc-binding activity is released by stress, proteasome inhibition, and protein misfolding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinez, Celine; Mir, Anne-Marie; Leroy, Yves; Cacan, Rene; Michalski, Jean-Claude; Lefebvre, Tony

    2007-01-01

    Numerous recent works strengthen the idea that the nuclear and cytosolic-specific O-GlcNAc glycosylation protects cells against injuries. We have first investigated O-GlcNAc level and Hsp70-GlcNAc-binding activity (HGBA) behaviour after exposure of HeLa and HepG 2 cells to a wide variety of stresses. O-GlcNAc and HGBA responses were different according to the stress and according to the cell. HGBA was released for almost all stresses, while O-GlcNAc level was modified either upwards or downwards, depending to the stress. Against all expectations, we demonstrated that energy charge did not significantly vary with stress whereas UDP-GlcNAc pools were more dramatically affected even if differences in UDP-GlcNAc contents were not correlated with O-GlcNAc variations suggesting that O-GlcNAc transferase is itself finely regulated during cell injury. Finally, HGBA could be triggered by proteasome inhibition and by L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (a proline analogue) incorporation demonstrating that protein misfolding is one of the key-activator of this Hsp70 property

  16. A cytosolic protein factor from the naked mole-rat activates proteasomes of other species and protects these from inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Karl A.; Osmulski, Pawel A.; Pierce, Anson; Weintraub, Susan T.; Gaczynska, Maria; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2015-01-01

    The naked mole-rat maintains robust proteostasis and high levels of proteasome-mediated proteolysis for most of its exceptional (~31y) life span. Here, we report that the highly active proteasome from the naked mole-rat liver resists attenuation by a diverse suite of proteasome-specific small molecule inhibitors. Moreover, mouse, human, and yeast proteasomes exposed to the proteasome-depleted, naked mole-rat cytosolic fractions, recapitulate the observed inhibition resistance, and mammalian proteasomes also show increased activity. Gel filtration coupled with mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy indicates that these traits are supported by a protein factor that resides in the cytosol. This factor interacts with the proteasome and modulates its activity. Although HSP72 and HSP40 (Hdj1) are among the constituents of this factor, the observed phenomenon, such as increasing peptidase activity and protecting against inhibition cannot be reconciled with any known chaperone functions. This novel function may contribute to the exceptional protein homeostasis in the naked mole-rat and allow it to successfully defy aging. PMID:25018089

  17. CRM1-mediated nuclear export is required for 26 S proteasome-dependent degradation of the TRIP-Br2 proto-oncoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Jit Kong; Gunaratnam, Lakshman; Hsu, Stephen I-Hong

    2008-04-25

    Overexpression of the proto-oncogene TRIP-Br2 (SERTAD2) has been shown to induce E2F activity and promote tumorigenesis, whereas ablation of TRIP-Br2 arrests cell proliferation. Timely degradation of many cell cycle regulators is fundamental to the maintenance of proper cell cycle progression. Here we report novel mechanism(s) that govern the tight regulation of TRIP-Br2 levels during cell cycle progression. TRIP-Br2 was observed to be a short-lived protein in which the expression level peaks at the G(1)/S boundary. TRIP-Br2 accumulated in cells treated with 26 S proteasome inhibitors. Co-immunoprecipitation studies revealed that TRIP-Br2 forms ubiquitin conjugates. In silico analysis identified a putative leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) motif that overlaps with the PHD-Bromo interaction domain in the acidic C-terminal transactivation domain (TAD) of TRIP-Br2. This NES motif is highly conserved in widely divergent species and in all TRIP-Br family members. TRIP-Br2 was shown to be stabilized in G(2)/M phase cells through nuclear entrapment, either by deletion of the acidic C-terminal TAD, which includes the NES motif, or by leptomycin B-mediated inhibition of the CRM1-dependent nuclear export machinery. Mutation of leucine residue 238 of this NES motif abolished the interaction between CRM1 and TRIP-Br2, as well as the nuclear export of TRIP-Br2 and its subsequent 26 S proteasome-dependent degradation. These data suggest that CRM1-mediated nuclear export may be required for the proper execution of ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent degradation of TRIP-Br2.

  18. Oxidized SOD1 alters proteasome activities in vitro and in the cortex of SOD1 overexpressing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pecheur, Marie; Bourdon, Emmanuel; Paly, Evelyne; Farout, Luc; Friguet, Bertrand; London, Jacqueline

    2005-07-04

    Premature ageing, one of the characteristics of Down syndrome (DS), may involve oxidative stress and impairment of proteasome activity. Transgenic mice overexpressing the human copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene are one of the first murine models for DS and it has been shown that SOD1 overexpression might be either deleterious or beneficial. Here, we show a reduction in proteasome activities in the cortex of SOD1 transgenic mice and an associated increase in the content of oxidized SOD1 protein. As we demonstrate that in vitro oxidized SOD can inhibit purified proteasome peptidase activities, modified SOD1 might be partially responsible for proteasome inhibition shown in SOD1 transgenic mice.

  19. Bcl2-associated Athanogene 3 Interactome Analysis Reveals a New Role in Modulating Proteasome Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Yang, Li-Na; Cheng, Li; Tu, Shun; Guo, Shu-Juan; Le, Huang-Ying; Xiong, Qian; Mo, Ran; Li, Chong-Yang; Jeong, Jun-Seop; Jiang, Lizhi; Blackshaw, Seth; Bi, Li-Jun; Zhu, Heng; Tao, Sheng-Ce; Ge, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Bcl2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3), a member of the BAG family of co-chaperones, plays a critical role in regulating apoptosis, development, cell motility, autophagy, and tumor metastasis and in mediating cell adaptive responses to stressful stimuli. BAG3 carries a BAG domain, a WW domain, and a proline-rich repeat (PXXP), all of which mediate binding to different partners. To elucidate BAG3's interaction network at the molecular level, we employed quantitative immunoprecipitation combined with knockdown and human proteome microarrays to comprehensively profile the BAG3 interactome in humans. We identified a total of 382 BAG3-interacting proteins with diverse functions, including transferase activity, nucleic acid binding, transcription factors, proteases, and chaperones, suggesting that BAG3 is a critical regulator of diverse cellular functions. In addition, we characterized interactions between BAG3 and some of its newly identified partners in greater detail. In particular, bioinformatic analysis revealed that the BAG3 interactome is strongly enriched in proteins functioning within the proteasome-ubiquitination process and that compose the proteasome complex itself, suggesting that a critical biological function of BAG3 is associated with the proteasome. Functional studies demonstrated that BAG3 indeed interacts with the proteasome and modulates its activity, sustaining cell survival and underlying resistance to therapy through the down-modulation of apoptosis. Taken as a whole, this study expands our knowledge of the BAG3 interactome, provides a valuable resource for understanding how BAG3 affects different cellular functions, and demonstrates that biologically relevant data can be harvested using this kind of integrated approach. PMID:23824909

  20. CDK11{sup p58} represses vitamin D receptor-mediated transcriptional activation through promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Yayun; Hong, Yi; Zong, Hongliang; Wang, Yanlin; Zou, Weiying; Yang, Junwu; Kong, Xiangfei; Yun, Xiaojing [Gene Research Center, Shanghai Medical College and Institutes of Biomedical, Shanghai 200032 (China); Gu, Jianxin, E-mail: jxgu@shmu.edu.cn [Gene Research Center, Shanghai Medical College and Institutes of Biomedical, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2009-08-28

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and regulates transcription of target genes. In this study, we identified CDK11{sup p58} as a novel protein involved in the regulation of VDR. CDK11{sup p58}, a member of the large family of p34cdc2-related kinases, is associated with cell cycle progression, tumorigenesis, and apoptotic signaling. Our study demonstrated that CDK11{sup p58} interacted with VDR and repressed VDR-dependent transcriptional activation. Furthermore, overexpression of CDK11{sup p58} decreased the stability of VDR through promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation. Taken together, these results suggest that CDK11{sup p58} is involved in the negative regulation of VDR.

  1. CDK11p58 represses vitamin D receptor-mediated transcriptional activation through promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Yayun; Hong, Yi; Zong, Hongliang; Wang, Yanlin; Zou, Weiying; Yang, Junwu; Kong, Xiangfei; Yun, Xiaojing; Gu, Jianxin

    2009-01-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and regulates transcription of target genes. In this study, we identified CDK11 p58 as a novel protein involved in the regulation of VDR. CDK11 p58 , a member of the large family of p34cdc2-related kinases, is associated with cell cycle progression, tumorigenesis, and apoptotic signaling. Our study demonstrated that CDK11 p58 interacted with VDR and repressed VDR-dependent transcriptional activation. Furthermore, overexpression of CDK11 p58 decreased the stability of VDR through promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation. Taken together, these results suggest that CDK11 p58 is involved in the negative regulation of VDR.

  2. Thioredoxin Txnl1/TRP32 Is a Redox-active Cofactor of the 26 S Proteasome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Katrine M; Klausen, Louise Kjær; Prag, Søren

    2009-01-01

    in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Txnl1 has thioredoxin activity with a redox potential of about -250 mV. Mutant Txnl1 with one active site cysteine replaced by serine formed disulfide bonds to eEF1A1, a substrate-recruiting factor of the 26S proteasome. eEF1A1 is therefore a likely physiological substrate....... In response to knock-down of Txnl1, ubiquitin-protein conjugates were moderately stabilised. Hence, Txnl1 is the first example of a direct connection between protein reduction and proteolysis, two major intracellular protein quality control mechanisms....

  3. Chemical analysis of Greek pollen - Antioxidant, antimicrobial and proteasome activation properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonos Efstathios

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pollen is a bee-product known for its medical properties from ancient times. In our days is increasingly used as health food supplement and especially as a tonic primarily with appeal to the elderly to ameliorate the effects of ageing. In order to evaluate the chemical composition and the biological activity of Greek pollen which has never been studied before, one sample with identified botanical origin from sixteen different common plant taxa of Greece has been evaluated. Results Three different extracts of the studied sample of Greek pollen, have been tested, in whether could induce proteasome activities in human fibroblasts. The water extract was found to induce a highly proteasome activity, showing interesting antioxidant properties. Due to this activity the aqueous extract was further subjected to chemical analysis and seven flavonoids have been isolated and identified by modern spectral means. From the methanolic extract, sugars, lipid acids, phenolic acids and their esters have been also identified, which mainly participate to the biosynthetic pathway of pollen phenolics. The total phenolics were estimated with the Folin-Ciocalteau reagent and the total antioxidant activity was determined by the DPPH method while the extracts and the isolated compounds were also tested for their antimicrobial activity by the dilution technique. Conclusions The Greek pollen is rich in flavonoids and phenolic acids which indicate the observed free radical scavenging activity, the effects of pollen on human fibroblasts and the interesting antimicrobial profile.

  4. Age-related and sex-specific differences in proteasome activity in individual Drosophila flies from wild type, longevity-selected and stress resistant strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina Østergaard; Sarup, Pernille Merete; Loeschcke, Volker

    2012-01-01

    with that in C1 males. However, in longevity-selected LS1 flies the proteasome activity was significantly lower compared to C1 flies, but the sex differences were maintained to some extent. Five other stress resistant lines also had significantly reduced proteasome activity in both sexes. During ageing...... and that increased lifespan and stress resistance lead to a reduction in proteasome activity and recession of the age-related decline observed in control females....

  5. Proteasome activity is important for replication recovery, CHK1 phosphorylation and prevention of G2 arrest after low-dose formaldehyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega-Atienza, Sara; Green, Samantha E.; Zhitkovich, Anatoly, E-mail: anatoly_zhitkovich@brown.edu

    2015-07-15

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a human carcinogen with numerous sources of environmental and occupational exposures. This reactive aldehyde is also produced endogenously during metabolism of drugs and other processes. DNA–protein crosslinks (DPCs) are considered to be the main genotoxic lesions for FA. Accumulating evidence suggests that DPC repair in high eukaryotes involves proteolysis of crosslinked proteins. Here, we examined a role of the main cellular proteolytic machinery proteasomes in toxic responses of human lung cells to low FA doses. We found that transient inhibition of proteasome activity increased cytotoxicity and diminished clonogenic viability of FA-treated cells. Proteasome inactivation exacerbated suppressive effects of FA on DNA replication and increased the levels of the genotoxic stress marker γ-H2AX in normal human cells. A transient loss of proteasome activity in FA-exposed cells also caused delayed perturbations of cell cycle, which included G2 arrest and a depletion of S-phase populations at FA doses that had no effects in control cells. Proteasome activity diminished p53-Ser15 phosphorylation but was important for FA-induced CHK1 phosphorylation, which is a biochemical marker of DPC proteolysis in replicating cells. Unlike FA, proteasome inhibition had no effect on cell survival and CHK1 phosphorylation by the non-DPC replication stressor hydroxyurea. Overall, we obtained evidence for the importance of proteasomes in protection of human cells against biologically relevant doses of FA. Biochemically, our findings indicate the involvement of proteasomes in proteolytic repair of DPC, which removes replication blockage by these highly bulky lesions. - Highlights: • Proteasome inhibition enhances cytotoxicity of low-dose FA in human lung cells. • Active proteasomes diminish replication-inhibiting effects of FA. • Proteasome activity prevents delayed G2 arrest in FA-treated cells. • Proteasome inhibition exacerbates replication stress by FA in

  6. Proteasome nuclear import mediated by Arc3 can influence efficient DNA damage repair and mitosis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabrera, Rodrigo; Sha, Zhe; Vadakkan, Tegy J.

    2010-01-01

    Proteasomes must remove regulatory molecules and abnormal proteins throughout the cell, but how proteasomes can do so efficiently remains unclear. We have isolated a subunit of the Arp2/3 complex, Arc3, which binds proteasomes. When overexpressed, Arc3 rescues phenotypes associated with proteasom...

  7. Identification and Characterisation of a Proteasome -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Katrine Mølgaard

    this domain. A txl1 yeast knockout mutant displays a synthetic growth defect with a cut8 knockout, whereas the txc1 knockout does not. In fission yeast, Cut8 is a nuclear protein that tethers the 26S proteasome to the nuclear membrane. In both wild type cells and in a cut8 null mutant Txl1 co......-down of Txnl1 in HeLa cells, whereas no stabilisation was detected in txl1¿ cells in S. pombe. In human cells, an active site Txnl1 mutant formed a mixed disulfide intermediate with eEF1A1, a reported substrate-recruiting factor of the 26S proteasome. Fission yeast Txl1 can reduce an oxidised proteasomal model...

  8. Spatial arrangement and functional role of α subunits of proteasome activator PA28 in hetero-oligomeric form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Masaaki, E-mail: sugiyama@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Sahashi, Hiroki [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan); Kurimoto, Eiji [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan); Faculty of Pharmacy, Meijo University, Nagoya 468-8503 (Japan); Takata, Shin-ichi [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Yagi, Hirokazu; Kanai, Keita; Sakata, Eri [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan); Minami, Yasufumi [Department of Biotechnology, Maebashi Institute of Technology, Gunma 371-0816 (Japan); Tanaka, Keiji [Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Kato, Koichi, E-mail: kkatonmr@ims.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan); Okazaki Institute for Integrative Bioscience, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8787 (Japan); Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8787 (Japan)

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► Homologous α and β subunits are alternatively arranged in the PA28 heptameric ring. ► The flexible loops of the three α subunits surround the site of substrate entry. ► The loops serve as gatekeepers that selectively hinder passage of longer peptides. - Abstract: A major form of proteasome activator PA28 is a heteroheptamer composed of interferon-γ-inducible α and β subunits, which share approximately 50% amino acid identity and possess distinct insert loops. This activator forms a complex with the 20S proteasome and thereby stimulates proteasomal degradation of peptides in an ATP-independent manner, giving rise to smaller antigenic peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. In this study, we performed biophysical and biochemical characterization of the structure and function of the PA28 hetero-oligomer. Deuteration-assisted small-angle neutron scattering demonstrated three α and four β subunits are alternately arranged in the heptameric ring. In this arrangement, PA28 loops surround the central pore of the heptameric ring (site for peptide entry). Activating the 20S proteasome with a PA28 mutant that lacked the α subunit loops cleaved model substrates longer than a nonapeptide with better efficiency when compared to wild-type PA28. Based on these data, we hypothesize that the flexible PA28 loops act as gatekeepers, which function to select the length of peptide substrates to be transported between the proteolytic chamber and the extra-proteasomal medium.

  9. Angiotensin II Regulates Th1 T Cell Differentiation Through Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor-PKA-Mediated Activation of Proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xian-Yun; Zhang, Yun-Long; Chi, Ya-Fei; Yan, Bo; Zeng, Xiang-Jun; Li, Hui-Hua; Liu, Ying

    2018-01-01

    Naive CD4+ T cells differentiate into T helper cells (Th1 and Th2) that play an essential role in the cardiovascular diseases. However, the molecular mechanism by which angiotensin II (Ang II) promotes Th1 differentiation remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether the Ang II-induced Th1 differentiation regulated by ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Jurkat cells were treated with Ang II (100 nM) in the presence or absence of different inhibitors. The gene mRNA levels were detected by real-time quantitative PCR analysis. The protein levels were measured by ELISA assay or Western blot analysis, respectively. Ang II treatment significantly induced a shift from Th0 to Th1 cell differentiation, which was markedly blocked by angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) inhibitor Losartan (LST). Moreover, Ang II significantly increased the activities and the expression of proteasome catalytic subunits (β1, β1i, β2i and β5i) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. However, Ang II-induced proteasome activities were remarkably abrogated by LST and PKA inhibitor H-89. Mechanistically, Ang II-induced Th1 differentiation was at least in part through proteasome-mediated degradation of IκBα and MKP-1 and activation of STAT1 and NF-κB. This study for the first time demonstrates that Ang II activates AT1R-PKA-proteasome pathway, which promotes degradation of IκBα and MKP-1 and activation of STAT1 and NF-κB thereby leading to Th1 differentiation. Thus, inhibition of proteasome activation might be a potential therapeutic target for Th1-mediated diseases. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Proteasome-mediated degradation of integral inner nuclear membrane protein emerin in fibroblasts lacking A-type lamins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muchir, Antoine; Massart, Catherine; Engelen, Baziel G. van; Lammens, Martin; Bonne, Gisele; Worman, Howard J.

    2006-01-01

    We previously identified and characterized a homozygous LMNA nonsense mutation leading to the absence of A-type lamins in a premature neonate who died at birth. We show here that the absence of A-type lamins is due to degradation of the aberrant mRNA transcript with a premature termination codon. In cultured fibroblasts from the subject with the homozygous LMNA nonsense mutation, there was a decreased steady-state expression of the integral inner nuclear membrane proteins emerin and nesprin-1α associated with their mislocalization to the bulk endoplasmic reticulum and a hyperphosphorylation of emerin. To determine if decreased emerin expression occurred post-translationally, we treated cells with a selective proteasome inhibitor and observed an increase in expression. Our results show that mislocalization of integral inner nuclear membrane proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum in human cells lacking A-type lamins leads to their degradation and provides the first evidence that their degradation is mediated by the proteasome

  11. Proteasome activity or expression is not altered by activation of the heat shock transcription factor Hsf1 in cultured fibroblasts or myoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, David M; Kabashi, Edor; Agar, Jeffrey N; Minotti, Sandra; Durham, Heather D

    2005-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) with chaperoning function work together with the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway to prevent the accumulation of misfolded, potentially toxic proteins, as well as to control catabolism of the bulk of cytoplasmic, cellular protein. There is evidence for the involvement of both systems in neurodegenerative disease, and a therapeutic target is the heat shock transcription factor, Hsf1, which mediates upregulation of Hsps in response to cellular stress. The mechanisms regulating expression of proteasomal proteins in mammalian cells are less well defined. To assess any direct effect of Hsf1 on expression of proteasomal subunits and activity in mammalian cells, a plasmid encoding a constitutively active form of Hsf1 (Hsf1act) was expressed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking Hsf1 and in cultured human myoblasts. Plasmid encoding an inactivatible form of Hsf1 (Hsf1inact) served as control. In cultures transfected with plasmid hsf1act, robust expression of the major stress-inducible Hsp, Hsp70, occurred but not in cultures transfected with hsf1inact. No significant changes in the level of expression of representative proteasomal proteins (structural [20Salpha], a nonpeptidase beta subunit [20Sbeta3], or 2 regulatory subunits [19S subunit 6b, 11 Salpha]) or in chymotrypsin-, trypsin-, and caspaselike activities of the proteasome were measured. Thus, stress-induced or pharmacological activation of Hsf1 in mammalian cells would upregulate Hsps but not directly affect expression or activity of proteasomes.

  12. Assessing Subunit Dependency of the Plasmodium Proteasome Using Small Molecule Inhibitors and Active Site Probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, H.; Linden, W.A. van der; Verdoes, M.; Florea, B.I.; McAllister, F.E.; Govindaswamy, K.; Elias, J.E.; Bhanot, P.; Overkleeft, H.S.; Bogyo, M.

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is a potential pathway for therapeutic intervention for pathogens such as Plasmodium, the causative agent of malaria. However, due to the essential nature of this proteolytic pathway, proteasome inhibitors must avoid inhibition of the host enzyme complex to

  13. HDAC inhibitor L-carnitine and proteasome inhibitor bortezomib synergistically exert anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbiao Huang

    Full Text Available Combinations of proteasome inhibitors and histone deacetylases (HDAC inhibitors appear to be the most potent to produce synergistic cytotoxicity in preclinical trials. We have recently confirmed that L-carnitine (LC is an endogenous HDAC inhibitor. In the current study, the anti-tumor effect of LC plus proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (velcade, Vel was investigated both in cultured hepatoma cancer cells and in Balb/c mice bearing HepG2 tumor. Cell death and cell viability were assayed by flow cytometry and MTS, respectively. Gene, mRNA expression and protein levels were detected by gene microarray, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. The effect of Vel on the acetylation of histone H3 associated with the p21(cip1 gene promoter was examined by using ChIP assay and proteasome peptidase activity was detected by cell-based chymotrypsin-like (CT-like activity assay. Here we report that (i the combination of LC and Vel synergistically induces cytotoxicity in vitro; (ii the combination also synergistically inhibits tumor growth in vivo; (iii two major pathways are involved in the synergistical effects of the combinational treatment: increased p21(cip1 expression and histone acetylation in vitro and in vivo and enhanced Vel-induced proteasome inhibition by LC. The synergistic effect of LC and Vel in cancer therapy should have great potential in the future clinical trials.

  14. Inhibition of the host proteasome facilitates papaya ringspot virus accumulation and proteosomal catalytic activity is modulated by viral factor HcPro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandita Sahana

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin/26S proteasome system plays an essential role not only in maintaining protein turnover, but also in regulating many other plant responses, including plant-pathogen interactions. Previous studies highlighted different roles of the 20S proteasome in plant defense during virus infection, either indirectly through viral suppressor-mediated degradation of Argonaute proteins, affecting the RNA interference pathway, or directly through modulation of the proteolytic and RNase activity of the 20S proteasome, a component of the 20S proteasome, by viral proteins, affecting the levels of viral proteins and RNAs. Here we show that MG132, a cell permeable proteasomal inhibitor, caused an increase in papaya ringspot virus (PRSV accumulation in its natural host papaya (Carica papaya. We also show that the PRSV HcPro interacts with the papaya homologue of the Arabidopsis PAA (α1 subunit of the 20S proteasome, but not with the papaya homologue of Arabidopsis PAE (α5 subunit of the 20S proteasome, associated with the RNase activity, although the two 20S proteasome subunits interacted with each other. Mutated forms of PRSV HcPro showed that the conserved KITC54 motif in the N-terminal domain of HcPro was necessary for its binding to PAA. Co-agroinfiltration assays demonstrated that HcPro expression mimicked the action of MG132, and facilitated the accumulation of bothtotal ubiquitinated proteins and viral/non-viral exogenous RNA in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. These effects were not observed by using an HcPro mutant (KITS54, which impaired the HcPro - PAA interaction. Thus, the PRSV HcPro interacts with a proteasomal subunit, inhibiting the action of the 20S proteasome, suggesting that HcPro might be crucial for modulating its catalytic activities in support of virus accumulation.

  15. The Anti-Apoptotic Activity of BAG3 Is Restricted by Caspases and the Proteasome

    OpenAIRE

    Virador, Victoria M.; Davidson, Ben; Czechowicz, Josephine; Mai, Alisha; Kassis, Jareer; Kohn, Elise C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Caspase-mediated cleavage and proteasomal degradation of ubiquitinated proteins are two independent mechanisms for the regulation of protein stability and cellular function. We previously reported BAG3 overexpression protected ubiquitinated clients, such as AKT, from proteasomal degradation and conferred cytoprotection against heat shock. We hypothesized that the BAG3 protein is regulated by proteolysis. Methodology/Principal Findings Staurosporine (STS) was used as a tool to test ...

  16. Assessing subunit dependency of the Plasmodium proteasome using small molecule inhibitors and active site probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; van der Linden, Wouter A; Verdoes, Martijn; Florea, Bogdan I; McAllister, Fiona E; Govindaswamy, Kavitha; Elias, Joshua E; Bhanot, Purnima; Overkleeft, Herman S; Bogyo, Matthew

    2014-08-15

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is a potential pathway for therapeutic intervention for pathogens such as Plasmodium, the causative agent of malaria. However, due to the essential nature of this proteolytic pathway, proteasome inhibitors must avoid inhibition of the host enzyme complex to prevent toxic side effects. The Plasmodium proteasome is poorly characterized, making rational design of inhibitors that induce selective parasite killing difficult. In this study, we developed a chemical probe that labels all catalytic sites of the Plasmodium proteasome. Using this probe, we identified several subunit selective small molecule inhibitors of the parasite enzyme complex. Treatment with an inhibitor that is specific for the β5 subunit during blood stage schizogony led to a dramatic decrease in parasite replication while short-term inhibition of the β2 subunit did not affect viability. Interestingly, coinhibition of both the β2 and β5 catalytic subunits resulted in enhanced parasite killing at all stages of the blood stage life cycle and reduced parasite levels in vivo to barely detectable levels. Parasite killing was achieved with overall low host toxicity, something that has not been possible with existing proteasome inhibitors. Our results highlight differences in the subunit dependency of the parasite and human proteasome, thus providing a strategy for development of potent antimalarial drugs with overall low host toxicity.

  17. Distinct temporal requirements for autophagy and the proteasome in yeast meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fu-ping; Guo, Yue-shuai; Hu, Yang; Liu, Wei-xiao; Wang, Qian; Wang, Yuan-ting; Yu, Hai-Yan; Tang, Chao-ming; Yang, Jun; Zhou, Tao; Xie, Zhi-ping; Sha, Jia-hao; Guo, Xuejiang; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis is a special type of cellular renovation that involves 2 successive cell divisions and a single round of DNA replication. Two major degradation systems, the autophagy-lysosome and the ubiquitin-proteasome, are involved in meiosis, but their roles have yet to be elucidated. Here we show that autophagy mainly affects the initiation of meiosis but not the nuclear division. Autophagy works not only by serving as a dynamic recycling system but also by eliminating some negative meiotic regulators such as Ego4 (Ynr034w-a). In a quantitative proteomics study, the proteasome was found to be significantly upregulated during meiotic divisions. We found that proteasomal activity is essential to the 2 successive meiotic nuclear divisions but not for the initiation of meiosis. Our study defines the roles of autophagy and the proteasome in meiosis: Autophagy mainly affects the initiation of meiosis, whereas the proteasome mainly affects the 2 successive meiotic divisions.

  18. A regulator of ubiquitin-proteasome activity, 2-hexyldecanol, suppresses melanin synthesis and the appearance of facial hyperpigmented spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakozaki, T; Laughlin, T; Zhao, S; Wang, J; Deng, D; Jewell-Motz, E; Elstun, L

    2013-07-01

    2-Hexyldecanol has long been used in skin-care products, but has not previously been reported as an active ingredient for skin benefits. To evaluate 2-hexyldecanol in in vitro and ex vivo systems and, if found to be active, progress it to topical clinical testing to determine effects on pigmentation in skin. 2-Hexyldecanol was tested in melanocyte cell culture systems (B16 mouse melanoma cells and normal human melanocytes) for its effect on proteolytic activity and melanin production, in the absence and presence of the proteasome-specific inhibitor, MG132. It was further tested in a human skin explant model for its effect on melanin production. Lastly, topically applied 2-hexyldecanol was evaluated for its effect on the appearance of facial pigmentation in an 8-week, randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled, split-face incomplete block design study in Chinese women. In submerged cell culture, 2-hexyldecanol upregulated proteolytic activity and decreased melanin synthesis. These effects were antagonized by the proteasome-specific inhibitor MG132. MG132, tested in the absence of 2-hexyldecanol, increased melanin production. In a human skin explant model, topical 2-hexyldecanol suppressed the production of melanin vs. a vehicle control. In a human clinical study in Chinese women (n = 110 observations per test material), a 2-hexyldecanol-containing formulation significantly reduced the appearance of facial hyperpigmented spots vs. its control. These data indicate that regulation of proteasome activity is a viable target for control of melanin production, that 2-hexyldecanol upregulates proteasomal activity in melanocytes, and that topical 2-hexyldecanol reduces the appearance of hyperpigmentation. © 2013 The Authors BJD © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  19. Myostatin Activates the Ubiquitin-Proteasome and Autophagy-Lysosome Systems Contributing to Muscle Wasting in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong-Tao; Yang, Ya-Jun; Huang, Ren-Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Lin, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Our evidence demonstrated that CKD upregulated the expression of myostatin, TNF-α, and p-IkBa and downregulated the phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, and FoxO3a, which were also associated with protein degradation and muscle atrophy. The autophagosome formation and protein expression of autophagy-related genes were increased in muscle of CKD rats. The mRNA level and protein expression of MAFbx and MuRF-1 were also upregulated in CKD rats, as well as proteasome activity of 26S. Moreover, activation of myostatin elicited by TNF-α induces C2C12 myotube atrophy via upregulating the expression of autophagy-related genes, including MAFbx and MuRF1 and proteasome subunits. Inactivation of FoxO3a triggered by PI3K inhibitor LY294002 prevented the myostatin-induced increase of expression of MuRF1, MAFbx, and LC3-II protein in C2C12 myotubes. The findings were further consolidated by using siRNA interference and overexpression of myostatin. Additionally, expression of myostatin was activated by TNF-α via a NF-κB dependent pathway in C2C12 myotubes, while inhibition of NF-κB activity suppressed myostatin and improved myotube atrophy. Collectively, myostatin mediated CKD-induced muscle catabolism via coordinate activation of the autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome systems. PMID:26448817

  20. Inhibition of nuclear factor-κB and target genes during combined therapy with proteasome inhibitor bortezomib and reirradiation in patients with recurrent head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Waes, Carter; Chang, Angela A.; Lebowitz, Peter F.; Druzgal, Colleen H.; Chen, Zhong; Elsayed, Yusri A.; Sunwoo, John B.; Rudy, Susan; Morris, John C.; Mitchell, James B.; Camphausen, Kevin; Gius, David; Adams, Julian; Sausville, Edward A.; Conley, Barbara A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effects the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (VELCADE) on transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and target genes and the feasibility of combination therapy with reirradiation in patients with recurrent head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: The tolerability and response to bortezomib 0.6 mg/m 2 and 0.9 mg/m 2 given twice weekly concurrent with daily reirradiation to 50-70 Gy was explored. Blood proteasome inhibition and NF-κB-modulated cytokines and factors were measured. Proteasome inhibition, nuclear localization of NF-κB phospho-p65, apoptosis, and expression of NF-κB-modulated mRNAs were compared in serial biopsies from accessible tumors. Results: The maximally tolerated dose was exceeded, and study was limited to 7 and 2 patients, respectively, given bortezomib 0.6 mg/m 2 and 0.9 mg/m 2 /dose with reirradiation. Grade 3 hypotension and hyponatremia were dose limiting. Mucositis was Grade 3 or less and was delayed. The mean blood proteasome inhibition at 1, 24, and 48 h after 0.6 mg/m 2 was 32%, 16%, and 7% and after 0.9 mg/m 2 was 56%, 26%, and 14%, respectively. Differences in proteasome and NF-κB activity, apoptosis, and expression of NF-κB-modulated cell cycle, apoptosis, and angiogenesis factor mRNAs were detected in 2 patients with minor tumor reductions and in serum NF-κB-modulated cytokines in 1 patient with a major tumor reduction. Conclusions: In combination with reirradiation, the maximally tolerated dose of bortezomib was exceeded at a dose of 0.6 mg/m 2 and the threshold of proteasome inhibition. Although this regimen with reirradiation is not feasible, bortezomib induced detectable differences in NF-κB localization, apoptosis, and NF-κB-modulated genes and cytokines in tumor and serum in association with tumor reduction, indicating that other schedules of bortezomib combined with primary radiotherapy or reirradiation may merit future investigation

  1. Conversion of functionally undefined homopentameric protein PbaA into a proteasome activator by mutational modification of its C-terminal segment conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Sikdar, Arunima; Kozai, Toshiya; Inoue, Rintaro; Sugiyama, Masaaki; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Yagi, Hirokazu; Satoh, Tadashi; Kato, Koichi

    2018-01-01

    Recent bioinformatic analyses identified proteasome assembly chaperone-like proteins, PbaA and PbaB, in archaea. PbaB forms a homotetramer and functions as a proteasome activator, whereas PbaA does not interact with the proteasome despite the presence of an apparent C-terminal proteasome activation motif. We revealed that PbaA forms a homopentamer predominantly in the closed conformation with its C-terminal segments packed against the core domains, in contrast to the PbaB homotetramer with projecting C-terminal segments. This prompted us to create a novel proteasome activator based on a well-characterized structural framework. We constructed a panel of chimeric proteins comprising the homopentameric scaffold of PbaA and C-terminal segment of PbaB and subjected them to proteasome-activating assays as well as small-angle X-ray scattering and high-speed atomic force microscopy. The results indicated that the open conformation and consequent proteasome activation activity could be enhanced by replacement of the crystallographically disordered C-terminal segment of PbaA with the corresponding disordered segment of PbaB. Moreover, these effects can be produced just by incorporating two glutamate residues into the disordered C-terminal segment of PbaA, probably due to electrostatic repulsion among the negatively charged segments. Thus, we successfully endowed a functionally undefined protein with proteasome-activating activity by modifying its C-terminal segment. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Proteasome Activators, PA28α and PA28β, Govern Development of Microvascular Injury in Diabetic Nephropathy and Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Yadranji Aghdam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN and diabetic retinopathy (DR are major complications of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. DN and DR are mainly caused by injury to the perivascular supporting cells, the mesangial cells within the glomerulus, and the pericytes in the retina. The genes and molecular mechanisms predisposing retinal and glomerular pericytes to diabetic injury are poorly characterized. In this study, the genetic deletion of proteasome activator genes, PA28α and PA28β genes, protected the diabetic mice in the experimental STZ-induced diabetes model against renal injury and retinal microvascular injury and prolonged their survival compared with wild type STZ diabetic mice. The improved wellbeing and reduced renal damage was associated with diminished expression of Osteopontin (OPN and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1 in the glomeruli of STZ-injected PA28α/PA28β double knockout (Pa28αβDKO mice and also in cultured mesangial cells and retinal pericytes isolated from Pa28αβDKO mice that were grown in high glucose. The mesangial PA28-mediated expression of OPN under high glucose conditions was suppressed by peptides capable of inhibiting the binding of PA28 to the 20S proteasome. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that diabetic hyperglycemia promotes PA28-mediated alteration of proteasome activity in vulnerable perivascular cells resulting in microvascular injury and development of DN and DR.

  3. Silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles impair proteasome activity and increase the formation of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phukan, Geetika; Shin, Tae Hwan; Shim, Jeom Soon; Paik, Man Jeong; Lee, Jin-Kyu; Choi, Sangdun; Kim, Yong Man; Kang, Seong Ho; Kim, Hyung Sik; Kang, Yup; Lee, Soo Hwan; Mouradian, M. Maral; Lee, Gwang

    2016-01-01

    The potential toxicity of nanoparticles, particularly to neurons, is a major concern. In this study, we assessed the cytotoxicity of silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles containing rhodamine B isothiocyanate dye (MNPs@SiO2(RITC)) in HEK293 cells, SH-SY5Y cells, and rat primary cortical and dopaminergic neurons. In cells treated with 1.0 μg/μl MNPs@SiO2(RITC), the expression of several genes related to the proteasome pathway was altered, and proteasome activity was significantly reduced, compared with control and with 0.1 μg/μl MNPs@SiO2(RITC)-treated cells. Due to the reduction of proteasome activity, formation of cytoplasmic inclusions increased significantly in HEK293 cells over-expressing the α–synuclein interacting protein synphilin-1 as well as in primary cortical and dopaminergic neurons. Primary neurons, particularly dopaminergic neurons, were more vulnerable to MNPs@SiO2(RITC) than SH-SY5Y cells. Cellular polyamines, which are associated with protein aggregation, were significantly altered in SH-SY5Y cells treated with MNPs@SiO2(RITC). These findings highlight the mechanisms of neurotoxicity incurred by nanoparticles. PMID:27378605

  4. Functional study of hot pepper 26S proteasome subunit RPN7 induced by Tobacco mosaic virus from nuclear proteome analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Boo-Ja; Kwon, Sun Jae; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Park, Chang-Jin; Kim, Young-Jin; Park, Ohkmae K.; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2006-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) was applied for the screening of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-induced hot pepper (Capsicum annuum cv. Bugang) nuclear proteins. From differentially expressed protein spots, we acquired the matched peptide mass fingerprint (PMF) data, analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS, from the non-redundant hot pepper EST protein FASTA database using the VEMS 2.0 software. Among six identified nuclear proteins, the hot pepper 26S proteasome subunit RPN7 (CaRPN7) was subjected to further study. The level of CaRPN7 mRNA was specifically increased during incompatible TMV-P 0 interaction, but not during compatible TMV-P 1.2 interaction. When CaRPN7::GFP fusion protein was targeted in onion cells, the nuclei had been broken into pieces. In the hot pepper leaves, cell death was exacerbated and genomic DNA laddering was induced by Agrobacterium-mediated transient overexpression of CaPRN7. Thus, this report presents that the TMV-induced CaRPN7 may be involved in programmed cell death (PCD) in the hot pepper plant

  5. Aerobic exercise training improves oxidative stress and ubiquitin proteasome system activity in heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Luiz Henrique Soares; de Moraes, Wilson Max Almeida Monteiro; Matsuo Junior, Eduardo Hiroshi; de Orleans Carvalho de Moura, Elizabeth; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Montemor, Jairo; Antonio, Ednei Luiz; Bocalini, Danilo Sales; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira; Brum, Patricia Chakur; Medeiros, Alessandra

    2015-04-01

    The activity of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) and the level of oxidative stress contribute to the transition from compensated cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure in hypertension. Moreover, aerobic exercise training (AET) is an important therapy for the treatment of hypertension, but its effects on the UPS are not completely known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of AET on UPS's activity and oxidative stress level in heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). A total of 53 Wistar and SHR rats were randomly divided into sedentary and trained groups. The AET protocol was 5×/week in treadmill for 13 weeks. Exercise tolerance test, non-invasive blood pressure measurement, echocardiographic analyses, and left ventricle hemodynamics were performed during experimental period. The expression of ubiquitinated proteins, 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), Akt, phospho-Akt(ser473), GSK3β, and phospho-GSK3β(ser9) were analyzed by western blotting. The evaluation of lipid hydroperoxide concentration was performed using the xylenol orange method, and the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity was measured by fluorimetric assay. Sedentary hypertensive group presented cardiac hypertrophy, unaltered expression of total Akt, phospho-Akt, total GSK3β and phospho-GSK3β, UPS hyperactivity, increased lipid hydroperoxidation as well as elevated expression of 4-HNE but normal cardiac function. In contrast, AET significantly increased exercise tolerance, decreased resting systolic blood pressure and heart rate in hypertensive animals. In addition, the AET increased phospho-Akt expression, decreased phospho-GSK3β, and did not alter the expression of total Akt, total GSK3β, and ubiquitinated proteins, however, significantly attenuated 4-HNE levels, lipid hydroperoxidation, and UPS's activity toward normotensive group levels. Our results provide evidence for the main effect of AET on attenuating cardiac ubiquitin proteasome hyperactivity and oxidative stress in SHR

  6. An extract of Artemisia dracunculus L. inhibits ubiquitin-proteasome activity and preserves skeletal muscle mass in a murine model of diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Kirk-Ballard

    Full Text Available Impaired insulin signaling is a key feature of type 2 diabetes and is associated with increased ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent protein degradation in skeletal muscle. An extract of Artemisia dracunculus L. (termed PMI5011 improves insulin action by increasing insulin signaling in skeletal muscle. We sought to determine if the effect of PMI5011 on insulin signaling extends to regulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. C2C12 myotubes and the KK-A(y murine model of type 2 diabetes were used to evaluate the effect of PMI5011 on steady-state levels of ubiquitylation, proteasome activity and expression of Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1, muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases that are upregulated with impaired insulin signaling. Our results show that PMI5011 inhibits proteasome activity and steady-state ubiquitylation levels in vitro and in vivo. The effect of PMI5011 is mediated by PI3K/Akt signaling and correlates with decreased expression of Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1. Under in vitro conditions of hormonal or fatty acid-induced insulin resistance, PMI5011 improves insulin signaling and reduces Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 protein levels. In the KK-A(y murine model of type 2 diabetes, skeletal muscle ubiquitylation and proteasome activity is inhibited and Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expression is decreased by PMI5011. PMI5011-mediated changes in the ubiquitin-proteasome system in vivo correlate with increased phosphorylation of Akt and FoxO3a and increased myofiber size. The changes in Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expression, ubiquitin-proteasome activity and myofiber size modulated by PMI5011 in the presence of insulin resistance indicate the botanical extract PMI5011 may have therapeutic potential in the preservation of muscle mass in type 2 diabetes.

  7. Features of proteasome functioning in malignant tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondakova, I. V.; Spirina, L. V.; Shashova, E. E.; Kolegova, E. S.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Kolomiets, L. A.; Afanas'ev, S. G.; Choinzonov, Y. L.

    2017-09-01

    Proteasome ubiquitin system is the important system of intracellular proteolysis. The activity of the proteasomes may undergo changes during cancer development. We studied the chymotrypsin-like activity of proteasomes, their subunit composition, and their association with tumor stage in breast cancer, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, endometrial cancer, renal cancer, bladder cancer, stomach cancer, ovarian cancer, and colorectal cancer. The increase in chymotrypsin-like activity of proteasomes and decrease in total proteasome pool compared with adjacent tissues were shown in all malignant tumors excluding kidney cancer. The increase in chymotrypsin-like activity of proteasomes was found in primary tumors with all types of metastasis: lymphogenous of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, intraperitoneal metastasis of ovarian cancer, hematogenous metastasis colorectal cancer. The exception was kidney cancer, in which there was a decrease in chymotrypsin-like activity with distant metastasis.

  8. Proteasome- and Ethanol-Dependent Regulation of HCV-Infection Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A. Osna

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the role of the catabolism of HCV and signaling proteins in HCV protection and the involvement of ethanol in HCV-proteasome interactions. HCV specifically infects hepatocytes, and intracellularly expressed HCV proteins generate oxidative stress, which is further exacerbated by heavy drinking. The proteasome is the principal proteolytic system in cells, and its activity is sensitive to the level of cellular oxidative stress. Not only host proteins, but some HCV proteins are degraded by the proteasome, which, in turn, controls HCV propagation and is crucial for the elimination of the virus. Ubiquitylation of HCV proteins usually leads to the prevention of HCV propagation, while accumulation of undegraded viral proteins in the nuclear compartment exacerbates infection pathogenesis. Proteasome activity also regulates both innate and adaptive immunity in HCV-infected cells. In addition, the proteasome/immunoproteasome is activated by interferons, which also induce “early” and “late” interferon-sensitive genes (ISGs with anti-viral properties. Cleaving viral proteins to peptides in professional immune antigen presenting cells and infected (“target” hepatocytes that express the MHC class I-antigenic peptide complex, the proteasome regulates the clearance of infected hepatocytes by the immune system. Alcohol exposure prevents peptide cleavage by generating metabolites that impair proteasome activity, thereby providing escape mechanisms that interfere with efficient viral clearance to promote the persistence of HCV-infection.

  9. The anti-apoptotic activity of BAG3 is restricted by caspases and the proteasome.

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    Victoria M Virador

    Full Text Available Caspase-mediated cleavage and proteasomal degradation of ubiquitinated proteins are two independent mechanisms for the regulation of protein stability and cellular function. We previously reported BAG3 overexpression protected ubiquitinated clients, such as AKT, from proteasomal degradation and conferred cytoprotection against heat shock. We hypothesized that the BAG3 protein is regulated by proteolysis.Staurosporine (STS was used as a tool to test for caspase involvement in BAG3 degradation. MDA435 and HeLa human cancer cell lines exposed to STS underwent apoptosis with a concomitant time and dose-dependent loss of BAG3, suggesting the survival role of BAG3 was subject to STS regulation. zVAD-fmk or caspase 3 and 9 inhibitors provided a strong but incomplete protection of both cells and BAG3 protein. Two putative caspase cleavage sites were tested: KEVD (BAG3(E345A/D347A within the proline-rich center of BAG3 (PXXP and the C-terminal LEAD site (BAG3(E516A/D518A. PXXP deletion mutant and BAG3(E345A/D347A, or BAG3(E516A/D518A respectively slowed or stalled STS-mediated BAG3 loss. BAG3, ubiquitinated under basal growth conditions, underwent augmented ubiquitination upon STS treatment, while there was no increase in ubiquitination of the BAG3(E516A/D518A caspase-resistant mutant. Caspase and proteasome inhibition resulted in partial and independent protection of BAG3 whereas inhibitors of both blocked BAG3 degradation. STS-induced apoptosis was increased when BAG3 was silenced, and retention of BAG3 was associated with cytoprotection.BAG3 is tightly controlled by selective degradation during STS exposure. Loss of BAG3 under STS injury required sequential caspase cleavage followed by polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. The need for dual regulation of BAG3 in apoptosis suggests a key role for BAG3 in cancer cell resistance to apoptosis.

  10. Novel green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Citrullus lanatus rind and investigation of proteasome inhibitory activity, antibacterial, and antioxidant potential

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    Patra JK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Jayanta Kumar Patra, Kwang-Hyun Baek School of Biotechnology, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Gyeongbuk, Republic of Korea Abstract: Biological synthesis of nanoparticles using nontoxic, eco-friendly approaches is gaining importance owing to their fascinating biocompatibility and environmentally benign nature. This study describes the green synthesis approach for synthesis of gold nanoparticles (ANPs using aqueous extract of the rind of watermelon as a fruit waste and evaluate its biopotential in terms of proteasome inhibitory activity, antibacterial, and antioxidant potential. The synthesized ANPs were characterized using UV–vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The surface plasmon resonance spectra of ANPs were obtained at 560 nm. Scanning electron microscopy image revealed that particles had a spherical shape and have a size distribution of 20–140 nm, followed by the elemental analysis by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the crystallite nature of the ANPs and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the involvement of bioactive compounds from watermelon rind in the synthesis, capping, and stabilization of ANPs. ANPs exhibited potential antibacterial activity against five different foodborne pathogenic bacteria with diameter of inhibition zones ranged between 9.23 and 11.58 mm. They also displayed strong synergistic antibacterial activity together with kanamycin (11.93–21.08 mm inhibition zones and rifampicin (10.32–24.84 mm inhibition zones. ANPs displayed strong antioxidant activity in terms of DPPH radical scavenging (24.69%, nitric oxide scavenging (25.62%, ABTS scavenging (29.42%, and reducing power. Significantly high proteasome inhibitory potential of the ANPs (28.16% could be highly useful for cancer treatment and targeted cancer drug delivery. Overall, results highlight a

  11. Basic leucine zipper protein Cnc-C is a substrate and transcriptional regulator of the Drosophila 26S proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimberg, Kristian Björk; Beskow, Anne; Lundin, Daniel; Davis, Monica M; Young, Patrick

    2011-02-01

    While the 26S proteasome is a key proteolytic complex, little is known about how proteasome levels are maintained in higher eukaryotic cells. Here we describe an RNA interference (RNAi) screen of Drosophila melanogaster that was used to identify transcription factors that may play a role in maintaining levels of the 26S proteasome. We used an RNAi library against 993 Drosophila transcription factor genes to identify genes whose suppression in Schneider 2 cells stabilized a ubiquitin-green fluorescent protein reporter protein. This screen identified Cnc (cap 'n' collar [CNC]; basic region leucine zipper) as a candidate transcriptional regulator of proteasome component expression. In fact, 20S proteasome activity was reduced in cells depleted of cnc. Immunoblot assays against proteasome components revealed a general decline in both 19S regulatory complex and 20S proteasome subunits after RNAi depletion of this transcription factor. Transcript-specific silencing revealed that the longest of the seven transcripts for the cnc gene, cnc-C, was needed for proteasome and p97 ATPase production. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR confirmed the role of Cnc-C in activation of transcription of genes encoding proteasome components. Expression of a V5-His-tagged form of Cnc-C revealed that the transcription factor is itself a proteasome substrate that is stabilized when the proteasome is inhibited. We propose that this single cnc gene in Drosophila resembles the ancestral gene family of mammalian nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related transcription factors, which are essential in regulating oxidative stress and proteolysis.

  12. Novel green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Citrullus lanatus rind and investigation of proteasome inhibitory activity, antibacterial, and antioxidant potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Jayanta Kumar; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Biological synthesis of nanoparticles using nontoxic, eco-friendly approaches is gaining importance owing to their fascinating biocompatibility and environmentally benign nature. This study describes the green synthesis approach for synthesis of gold nanoparticles (ANPs) using aqueous extract of the rind of watermelon as a fruit waste and evaluate its biopotential in terms of proteasome inhibitory activity, antibacterial, and antioxidant potential. The synthesized ANPs were characterized using UV–vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The surface plasmon resonance spectra of ANPs were obtained at 560 nm. Scanning electron microscopy image revealed that particles had a spherical shape and have a size distribution of 20–140 nm, followed by the elemental analysis by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the crystallite nature of the ANPs and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the involvement of bioactive compounds from watermelon rind in the synthesis, capping, and stabilization of ANPs. ANPs exhibited potential antibacterial activity against five different foodborne pathogenic bacteria with diameter of inhibition zones ranged between 9.23 and 11.58 mm. They also displayed strong synergistic antibacterial activity together with kanamycin (11.93–21.08 mm inhibition zones) and rifampicin (10.32–24.84 mm inhibition zones). ANPs displayed strong antioxidant activity in terms of DPPH radical scavenging (24.69%), nitric oxide scavenging (25.62%), ABTS scavenging (29.42%), and reducing power. Significantly high proteasome inhibitory potential of the ANPs (28.16%) could be highly useful for cancer treatment and targeted cancer drug delivery. Overall, results highlight a potential low-cost green method of synthesizing ANPs from food waste materials. Significant biopotentials of synthesized ANPs could make it a potential

  13. Steviol reduces MDCK Cyst formation and growth by inhibiting CFTR channel activity and promoting proteasome-mediated CFTR degradation.

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    Chaowalit Yuajit

    Full Text Available Cyst enlargement in polycystic kidney disease (PKD involves cAMP-activated proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells and transepithelial fluid secretion into the cyst lumen via cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR chloride channel. This study aimed to investigate an inhibitory effect and detailed mechanisms of steviol and its derivatives on cyst growth using a cyst model in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells. Among 4 steviol-related compounds tested, steviol was found to be the most potent at inhibiting MDCK cyst growth. Steviol inhibition of cyst growth was dose-dependent; steviol (100 microM reversibly inhibited cyst formation and cyst growth by 72.53.6% and 38.2±8.5%, respectively. Steviol at doses up to 200 microM had no effect on MDCK cell viability, proliferation and apoptosis. However, steviol acutely inhibited forskolin-stimulated apical chloride current in MDCK epithelia, measured with the Ussing chamber technique, in a dose-dependent manner. Prolonged treatment (24 h with steviol (100 microM also strongly inhibited forskolin-stimulated apical chloride current, in part by reducing CFTR protein expression in MDCK cells. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitor, MG-132, abolished the effect of steviol on CFTR protein expression. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that prolonged treatment (24 h with steviol (100 microM markedly reduced CFTR expression at the plasma membrane. Taken together, the data suggest that steviol retards MDCK cyst progression in two ways: first by directly inhibiting CFTR chloride channel activity and second by reducing CFTR expression, in part, by promoting proteasomal degradation of CFTR. Steviol and related compounds therefore represent drug candidates for treatment of polycystic kidney disease.

  14. Puromycin induces SUMO and ubiquitin redistribution upon proteasome inhibition

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    Matsumoto, Hotaru [Course for Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Saitoh, Hisato, E-mail: hisa@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Course for Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2016-07-29

    We have previously reported the co-localization of O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro) with SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin at promyelocytic leukemia-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132, implying a role for the ubiquitin family in sequestering OP-puromycylated immature polypeptides to the nucleus during impaired proteasome activity. Here, we found that as expected puromycin induced SUMO-1/2/3 accumulation with ubiquitin at multiple nuclear foci in HeLa cells when co-exposed to MG132. Co-administration of puromycin and MG132 also facilitated redistribution of PML and the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 concurrently with SUMO-2/3. As removal of the drugs from the medium led to disappearance of the SUMO-2/3-ubiquitin nuclear foci, our findings indicated that nuclear assembly/disassembly of SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin was pharmacologically manipulable, supporting our previous observation on OP-Puro, which predicted the ubiquitin family function in sequestrating aberrant proteins to the nucleus. -- Highlights: •Puromycin exhibits the O-propargyl-puromycin effect. •Puromycin induces SUMO redistribution upon proteasome inhibition. •Ubiquitin and RNF4 accumulate at PML-nuclear bodies with SUMO-2/3. •The ubiquitin family may function in nuclear sequestration of immature proteins.

  15. Puromycin induces SUMO and ubiquitin redistribution upon proteasome inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Hotaru; Saitoh, Hisato

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported the co-localization of O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro) with SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin at promyelocytic leukemia-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132, implying a role for the ubiquitin family in sequestering OP-puromycylated immature polypeptides to the nucleus during impaired proteasome activity. Here, we found that as expected puromycin induced SUMO-1/2/3 accumulation with ubiquitin at multiple nuclear foci in HeLa cells when co-exposed to MG132. Co-administration of puromycin and MG132 also facilitated redistribution of PML and the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 concurrently with SUMO-2/3. As removal of the drugs from the medium led to disappearance of the SUMO-2/3-ubiquitin nuclear foci, our findings indicated that nuclear assembly/disassembly of SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin was pharmacologically manipulable, supporting our previous observation on OP-Puro, which predicted the ubiquitin family function in sequestrating aberrant proteins to the nucleus. -- Highlights: •Puromycin exhibits the O-propargyl-puromycin effect. •Puromycin induces SUMO redistribution upon proteasome inhibition. •Ubiquitin and RNF4 accumulate at PML-nuclear bodies with SUMO-2/3. •The ubiquitin family may function in nuclear sequestration of immature proteins.

  16. Profound activity of the anti-cancer drug bortezomib against Echinococcus multilocularis metacestodes identifies the proteasome as a novel drug target for cestodes.

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    Britta Stadelmann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A library of 426 FDA-approved drugs was screened for in vitro activity against E. multilocularis metacestodes employing the phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI assay. Initial screening at 20 µM revealed that 7 drugs induced considerable metacestode damage, and further dose-response studies revealed that bortezomib (BTZ, a proteasome inhibitor developed for the chemotherapy of myeloma, displayed high anti-metacestodal activity with an EC50 of 0.6 µM. BTZ treatment of E. multilocularis metacestodes led to an accumulation of ubiquinated proteins and unequivocally parasite death. In-gel zymography assays using E. multilocularis extracts demonstrated BTZ-mediated inhibition of protease activity in a band of approximately 23 kDa, the same size at which the proteasome subunit beta 5 of E. multilocularis could be detected by Western blot. Balb/c mice experimentally infected with E. multilocularis metacestodes were used to assess BTZ treatment, starting at 6 weeks post-infection by intraperitoneal injection of BTZ. This treatment led to reduced parasite weight, but to a degree that was not statistically significant, and it induced adverse effects such as diarrhea and neurological symptoms. In conclusion, the proteasome was identified as a drug target in E. multilocularis metacestodes that can be efficiently inhibited by BTZ in vitro. However, translation of these findings into in vivo efficacy requires further adjustments of treatment regimens using BTZ, or possibly other proteasome inhibitors.

  17. Cytoplasmic proteasomes are not indispensable for cell growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Hikaru; Arai, Naoko; Tanaka, Keiji, E-mail: tanaka-kj@igakuken.or.jp; Saeki, Yasushi, E-mail: saeki-ys@igakuken.or.jp

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •We succeeded to control the proteasome localization by the anchor-away technique. •Nuclear proteasome-depleted cells showed a lethal phenotype. •Cytoplasmic proteasomes are not indispensable for cell growth in dividing cells. -- Abstract: The 26S proteasome is an essential protease complex responsible for the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in eukaryotic cells. In rapidly proliferating yeast cells, proteasomes are mainly localized in the nucleus, but the biological significance of the proteasome localization is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the proteasome localization and the functions by the anchor-away technique, a ligand-dependent sequestration of a target protein into specific compartment(s). Anchoring of the proteasome to the plasma membrane or the ribosome resulted in conditional depletion of the nuclear proteasomes, whereas anchoring to histone resulted in the proteasome sequestration into the nucleus. We observed that the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins in all the proteasome-targeted cells, suggesting that both the nuclear and cytoplasmic proteasomes have proteolytic functions and that the ubiquitinated proteins are produced and degraded in each compartment. Consistent with previous studies, the nuclear proteasome-depleted cells exhibited a lethal phenotype. In contrast, the nuclear sequestration of the proteasome resulted only in a mild growth defect, suggesting that the cytoplasmic proteasomes are not basically indispensable for cell growth in rapidly growing yeast cells.

  18. Modeling proteasome dynamics in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneppen, Kim; Lizana, Ludvig; Jensen, Mogens H; Pigolotti, Simone; Otzen, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), there is evidence that α-synuclein (αSN) aggregation is coupled to dysfunctional or overburdened protein quality control systems, in particular the ubiquitin–proteasome system. Here, we develop a simple dynamical model for the on-going conflict between αSN aggregation and the maintenance of a functional proteasome in the healthy cell, based on the premise that proteasomal activity can be titrated out by mature αSN fibrils and their protofilament precursors. In the presence of excess proteasomes the cell easily maintains homeostasis. However, when the ratio between the available proteasome and the αSN protofilaments is reduced below a threshold level, we predict a collapse of homeostasis and onset of oscillations in the proteasome concentration. Depleted proteasome opens for accumulation of oligomers. Our analysis suggests that the onset of PD is associated with a proteasome population that becomes occupied in periodic degradation of aggregates. This behavior is found to be the general state of a proteasome/chaperone system under pressure, and suggests new interpretations of other diseases where protein aggregation could stress elements of the protein quality control system

  19. Activation of the Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway by Silk Fibroin Modified Chitosan Nanoparticles in Hepatic Cancer Cells

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    Ming-Hui Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Silk fibroin (SF is a protein with bulky hydrophobic domains and can be easily purified as sericin-free silk-based biomaterial. Silk fibroin modified chitosan nanoparticle (SF-CSNP, a biocompatible material, has been widely used as a potential drug delivery system. Our current investigation studied the bio-effects of the SF-CSNP uptake by liver cells. In this experiment, the characterizations of SF-CSNPs were measured by particle size analysis and protein assay. The average size of the SF-CSNP was 311.9 ± 10.7 nm, and the average zeta potential was +13.33 ± 0.3 mV. The SF coating on the SF-CSNP was 6.27 ± 0.17 μg/mL. Moreover, using proteomic approaches, several proteins involved in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway were identified by analysis of differential protein expressions of HepG2 cell uptake the SF-CSNP. Our experimental results have demonstrated that the SF-CSNP may be involved in liver cancer cell survival and proliferation.

  20. Graded Proteasome Dysfunction in Caenorhabditis elegans Activates an Adaptive Response Involving the Conserved SKN-1 and ELT-2 Transcription Factors and the Autophagy-Lysosome Pathway.

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    Scott A Keith

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The maintenance of cellular proteins in a biologically active and structurally stable state is a vital endeavor involving multiple cellular pathways. One such pathway is the ubiquitin-proteasome system that represents a major route for protein degradation, and reductions in this pathway usually have adverse effects on the health of cells and tissues. Here, we demonstrate that loss-of-function mutants of the Caenorhabditis elegans proteasome subunit, RPN-10, exhibit moderate proteasome dysfunction and unexpectedly develop both increased longevity and enhanced resistance to multiple threats to the proteome, including heat, oxidative stress, and the presence of aggregation prone proteins. The rpn-10 mutant animals survive through the activation of compensatory mechanisms regulated by the conserved SKN-1/Nrf2 and ELT-2/GATA transcription factors that mediate the increased expression of genes encoding proteasome subunits as well as those mediating oxidative- and heat-stress responses. Additionally, we find that the rpn-10 mutant also shows enhanced activity of the autophagy-lysosome pathway as evidenced by increased expression of the multiple autophagy genes including atg-16.2, lgg-1, and bec-1, and also by an increase in GFP::LGG-1 puncta. Consistent with a critical role for this pathway, the enhanced resistance of the rpn-10 mutant to aggregation prone proteins depends on autophagy genes atg-13, atg-16.2, and prmt-1. Furthermore, the rpn-10 mutant is particularly sensitive to the inhibition of lysosome activity via either RNAi or chemical means. We also find that the rpn-10 mutant shows a reduction in the numbers of intestinal lysosomes, and that the elt-2 gene also plays a novel and vital role in controlling the production of functional lysosomes by the intestine. Overall, these experiments suggest that moderate proteasome dysfunction could be leveraged to improve protein homeostasis and organismal health and longevity, and that the rpn-10 mutant

  1. The cleavage product of amyloid-β protein precursor sAβPPα modulates BAG3-dependent aggresome formation and enhances cellular proteasomal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renziehausen, Jana; Hiebel, Christof; Nagel, Heike; Kundu, Arpita; Kins, Stefan; Kögel, Donat; Behl, Christian; Hajieva, Parvana

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major age-associated form of dementia characterized by gradual cognitive decline. Aberrant cleavage of the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) is thought to play an important role in the pathology of this disease. Two principal AβPP processing pathways exist: amyloidogenic cleavage of AβPP resulting in production of the soluble N-terminal fragment sAβPPβ, amyloid-β (Aβ), which accumulates in AD brain, and the AβPP intracellular domain (AICD) sAβPPα, p3 and AICD are generated in the non-amyloidogenic pathway. Prevalence of amyloidogenic versus non-amyloidogenic processing leads to depletion of sAβPPα and an increase in Aβ. Although sAβPPα is a well-accepted neurotrophic protein, molecular effects of this fragment remains unknown. Different studies reported impaired protein degradation pathways in AD brain, pointing to a role of disturbed proteasomal activity in the pathogenesis of this disease. Here we studied the possible role of sAβPPα in Bag3-mediated selective macroautophagy and proteasomal degradation. Employing human IMR90 cells, HEK 293 cells, and primary neurons, we demonstrate that sAβPPα prevents the proteotoxic stress-induced increase of Bag3 at the protein and at the mRNA level indicating a transcriptional regulation. Intriguingly, p62 and LC3, two other key players of autophagy, were not affected. Moreover, the formation and the accumulation of disease-related protein aggregates were significantly reduced by sAβPPα. Interestingly, there was a significant increase of proteasomal activity by sAβPPα as demonstrated by using various proteasome substrates. Our findings demonstrate that sAβPPα modulates Bag3 expression, aggresome formation, and proteasomal activity, thereby providing first evidence for a function of sAβPPα in the regulation of proteostasis.

  2. Decreased proteasomal function accelerates cigarette smoke-induced pulmonary emphysema in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yosuke; Tomaru, Utano; Ishizu, Akihiro; Ito, Tomoki; Kiuchi, Takayuki; Ono, Ayako; Miyajima, Syota; Nagai, Katsura; Higashi, Tsunehito; Matsuno, Yoshihiro; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Miwa, Soichi; Kasahara, Masanori

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a disease common in elderly people, characterized by progressive destruction of lung parenchyma and chronic inflammation of the airways. The pathogenesis of COPD remains unclear, but recent studies suggest that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in alveolar cells contributes to emphysematous lung destruction. The proteasome is a multicatalytic enzyme complex that plays a critical role in proteostasis by rapidly destroying misfolded and modified proteins generated by oxidative and other stresses. Proteasome activity decreases with aging in many organs including lungs, and an age-related decline in proteasomal function has been implicated in various age-related pathologies. However, the role of the proteasome system in the pathogenesis of COPD has not been investigated. Recently, we have established a transgenic (Tg) mouse model with decreased proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity, showing age-related phenotypes. Using this model, we demonstrate here that decreased proteasomal function accelerates cigarette smoke (CS)-induced pulmonary emphysema. CS-exposed Tg mice showed remarkable airspace enlargement and increased foci of inflammation compared with wild-type controls. Importantly, apoptotic cells were found in the alveolar walls of the affected lungs. Impaired proteasomal activity also enhanced apoptosis in cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-exposed fibroblastic cells derived from mice and humans in vitro. Notably, aggresome formation and prominent nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor were observed in CSE-exposed fibroblastic cells isolated from Tg mice. Collective evidence suggests that CS exposure and impaired proteasomal activity coordinately enhance apoptotic cell death in the alveolar walls that may be involved in the development and progression of emphysema in susceptible individuals such as the elderly.

  3. HSF-1 activates the ubiquitin proteasome system to promote non-apoptotic developmental cell death in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinet, Maxime J; Malin, Jennifer A; Abraham, Mary C; Blum, Elyse S; Silverman, Melanie R; Lu, Yun; Shaham, Shai

    2016-03-08

    Apoptosis is a prominent metazoan cell death form. Yet, mutations in apoptosis regulators cause only minor defects in vertebrate development, suggesting that another developmental cell death mechanism exists. While some non-apoptotic programs have been molecularly characterized, none appear to control developmental cell culling. Linker-cell-type death (LCD) is a morphologically conserved non-apoptotic cell death process operating in Caenorhabditis elegans and vertebrate development, and is therefore a compelling candidate process complementing apoptosis. However, the details of LCD execution are not known. Here we delineate a molecular-genetic pathway governing LCD in C. elegans. Redundant activities of antagonistic Wnt signals, a temporal control pathway, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase signaling control heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1), a conserved stress-activated transcription factor. Rather than protecting cells, HSF-1 promotes their demise by activating components of the ubiquitin proteasome system, including the E2 ligase LET-70/UBE2D2 functioning with E3 components CUL-3, RBX-1, BTBD-2, and SIAH-1. Our studies uncover design similarities between LCD and developmental apoptosis, and provide testable predictions for analyzing LCD in vertebrates.

  4. Arctigenin promotes degradation of inducible nitric oxide synthase through CHIP-associated proteasome pathway and suppresses its enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiangyang; Li, Guilan; Lü, Chaotian; Xu, Hui; Yin, Zhimin

    2012-10-01

    Arctigenin, a natural dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan compound, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. Previous works showed that arctigenin decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced iNOS at transcription level. However, whether arctigenin could regulate iNOS at the post-translational level is still unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that arctigenin promoted the degradation of iNOS which is expressed under LPS stimulation in murine macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells. Such degradation of iNOS protein is due to CHIP-associated ubiquitination and proteasome-dependency. Furthermore, arctigenin decreased iNOS phosphorylation through inhibiting ERK and Src activation, subsequently suppressed iNOS enzyme activity. In conclusion, our research displays a new finding that arctigenin can promote the ubiqitination and degradation of iNOS after LPS stimulation. iNOS activity regulated by arctigenin is likely to involve a multitude of crosstalking mechanisms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Interactive effects of CO2 and trace metals on the proteasome activity and cellular stress response of marine bivalves Crassostrea virginica and Mercenaria mercenaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Götze, Sandra; Matoo, Omera B.; Beniash, Elia; Saborowski, Reinhard; Sokolova, Inna M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Elevated P CO 2 enhanced accumulation of Cu and Cd in the gills of mollusks. • The proteasome activities were affected by metals but robust to elevated P CO 2 . • Exposure to Cd and Cu had opposite effects on the proteasome activity. • Combined exposure to Cu and elevated P CO 2 negatively affected energy status. - Abstract: Increased anthropogenic emission of CO 2 changes the carbonate chemistry and decreases the pH of the ocean. This can affect the speciation and the bioavailability of metals in polluted habitats such as estuaries. However, the effects of acidification on metal accumulation and stress response in estuarine organisms including bivalves are poorly understood. We studied the interactive effects of CO 2 and two common metal pollutants, copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd), on metal accumulation, intracellular ATP/ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation, stress response and energy metabolism in two common estuarine bivalves—Crassostrea virginica (eastern oyster) and Mercenaria mercenaria (hard shell clam). Bivalves were exposed for 4–5 weeks to clean seawater (control) and to either 50 μg L −1 Cu or 50 μg L −1 Cd at one of three partial pressures of CO 2 (P CO 2 ∼395, ∼800 and ∼1500 μatm) representative of the present-day conditions and projections of the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) for the years 2100 and 2250, respectively. Clams accumulated lower metal burdens than oysters, and elevated P CO 2 enhanced the Cd and Cu accumulation in mantle tissues in both species. Higher Cd and Cu burdens were associated with elevated mRNA expression of metal binding proteins metallothionein and ferritin. In the absence of added metals, proteasome activities of clams and oysters were robust to elevated P CO 2 , but P CO 2 modulated the proteasome response to metals. Cd exposure stimulated the chymotrypsin-like activity of the oyster proteasome at all CO 2 levels. In contrast, trypsin- and caspase-like activities of

  6. Interactive effects of CO₂ and trace metals on the proteasome activity and cellular stress response of marine bivalves Crassostrea virginica and Mercenaria mercenaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Götze, Sandra [Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar, Marine Research, Functional Ecology, 27570 Bremerhaven (Germany); Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223 (United States); Matoo, Omera B. [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223 (United States); Beniash, Elia [Department of Oral Biology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Saborowski, Reinhard [Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar, Marine Research, Functional Ecology, 27570 Bremerhaven (Germany); Sokolova, Inna M., E-mail: isokolov@uncc.edu [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Elevated PCO₂ enhanced accumulation of Cu and Cd in the gills of mollusks. • The proteasome activities were affected by metals but robust to elevated PCO₂. • Exposure to Cd and Cu had opposite effects on the proteasome activity. • Combined exposure to Cu and elevated PCO₂ negatively affected energy status. - Abstract: Increased anthropogenic emission of CO₂ changes the carbonate chemistry and decreases the pH of the ocean. This can affect the speciation and the bioavailability of metals in polluted habitats such as estuaries. However, the effects of acidification on metal accumulation and stress response in estuarine organisms including bivalves are poorly understood. We studied the interactive effects of CO₂ and two common metal pollutants, copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd), on metal accumulation, intracellular ATP/ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation, stress response and energy metabolism in two common estuarine bivalves—Crassostrea virginica (eastern oyster) and Mercenaria mercenaria (hard shell clam). Bivalves were exposed for 4–5 weeks to clean seawater (control) and to either 50 μg L⁻¹ Cu or 50 μg L⁻¹ Cd at one of three partial pressures of CO₂ PCO₂ ~395, ~800 and ~1500 μatm) representative of the present-day conditions and projections of the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) for the years 2100 and 2250, respectively. Clams accumulated lower metal burdens than oysters, and elevated PCO₂ enhanced the Cd and Cu accumulation in mantle tissues in both species. Higher Cd and Cu burdens were associated with elevated mRNA expression of metal binding proteins metallothionein and ferritin. In the absence of added metals, proteasome activities of clams and oysters were robust to elevated PCO₂, but PCO₂ modulated the proteasome response to metals. Cd exposure stimulated the chymotrypsin-like activity of the oyster proteasome

  7. Standardized extracts of Bacopa monniera protect against MPP+- and paraquat-induced toxicity by modulating mitochondrial activities, proteasomal functions, and redox pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manjeet; Murthy, Ven; Ramassamy, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common age-related neurodegenerative diseases and affects millions of people worldwide. Strong evidence supports the role of free radicals, oxidative stress, mitochondrial, and proteasomal dysfunctions underlying neuronal death in PD. Environmental factors, especially pesticides, represent one of the primary classes of neurotoxic agents associated with PD, and several epidemiological studies have identified the exposure of the herbicide paraquat (PQ) as a potential risk factor for the onset of PD. The objective of our study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of the standardized extracts of Bacopa monniera (BM) against PQ-induced and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium iodide (MPP(+))-induced toxicities and to elucidate the mechanisms underlying this protection. Our results show that a pretreatment with the BM extract from 50 μg/ml protected the dopaminergic SK-N-SH cell line against MPP(+)- and PQ-induced toxicities in various cell survival assays. We demonstrate that BM pretreatment prevented the depletion of glutathione (GSH) besides preserving the mitochondrial membrane potential and maintaining the mitochondrial complex I activity. BM pretreatment from 10.0 μg/ml also prevented the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and decreased the mitochondrial superoxide level. BM treatment activated the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 pathway by modulating the expression of Keap1, thereby upregulating the endogenous GSH synthesis. The effect of BM on the phosphorylation of Akt further strengthens its role in the promotion of cell survival. By preserving the cellular redox homeostasis and mitochondrial activities and by promoting cell survival pathways, BM extract may have therapeutic uses in various age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as PD.

  8. In parkinsonian substantia nigra, alpha-synuclein is modified by acrolein, a lipid-peroxidation product, and accumulates in the dopamine neurons with inhibition of proteasome activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamoto-Nagai, M; Maruyama, W; Hashizume, Y; Yoshida, M; Osawa, T; Riederer, P; Naoi, M

    2007-01-01

    alpha-Synuclein (alphaSYN) plays a central role in the neural degeneration of Parkinson's disease (PD) through its conformational change. In PD, alphaSYN, released from the membrane, accumulates in the cytoplasm and forms Lewy body. However, the mechanism behind the translocation and conformational change of alphaSYN leading to the cell death has not been well elucidated. This paper reports that in the dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra containing neuromelanin from PD patients, alphaSYN was modified with acrolein (ACR), an aldehyde product of lipid peroxidation. Histopathological observation confirmed the co-localization of protein immunoreactive to anti-alphaSYN and ACR antibody. By Western blot analyses of samples precipitated with either anti-alphaSYN or anti-ACR antibody, increase in ACR-modified alphaSYN was confirmed in PD brain. Modification of recombinant alphaSYN by ACR enhanced its oligomerization, and at higher ACR concentrations alphaSYN was fragmented and polymerized forming a smear pattern in SDS-PAGE. ACR reduced 20S proteasome activity through the direct modification of the proteasome proteins and the production of polymerized ACR-modified proteins, which inhibited proteasome activity in vitro. These results suggest that ACR may initiate vicious cycle of modification and aggregation of proteins, including alphaSYN, and impaired proteolysis system, to cause neuronal death in PD.

  9. Regulation of HTLV-1 Tax Stability, Cellular Trafficking and NF-κB Activation by the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavorgna, Alfonso; Harhaj, Edward William

    2014-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a complex retrovirus that infects CD4+ T cells and causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) in 3%–5% of infected individuals after a long latent period. HTLV-1 Tax is a trans-activating protein that regulates viral gene expression and also modulates cellular signaling pathways to enhance T-cell proliferation and cell survival. The Tax oncoprotein promotes T-cell transformation, in part via constitutive activation of the NF-κB transcription factor; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Ubiquitination is a type of post-translational modification that occurs in a three-step enzymatic cascade mediated by E1, E2 and E3 enzymes and regulates protein stability as well as signal transduction, protein trafficking and the DNA damage response. Emerging studies indicate that Tax hijacks the ubiquitin machinery to activate ubiquitin-dependent kinases and downstream NF-κB signaling. Tax interacts with the E2 conjugating enzyme Ubc13 and is conjugated on C-terminal lysine residues with lysine 63-linked polyubiquitin chains. Tax K63-linked polyubiquitination may serve as a platform for signaling complexes since this modification is critical for interactions with NEMO and IKK. In addition to NF-κB signaling, mono- and polyubiquitination of Tax also regulate its subcellular trafficking and stability. Here, we review recent advances in the diverse roles of ubiquitin in Tax function and how Tax usurps the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway to promote oncogenesis. PMID:25341660

  10. Worker in nuclear activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goes Fischer, M.D. de; Associacao Brasileira de Direito Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro)

    1984-01-01

    Juridical aspects with respect to the workers in nuclear activity are presented. Special emphasis is given to the clauses of the statute of workers (Consolidacao das Leis do Trabalho) the rules of the Ministerio do Trabalho and the rules of the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear. The performance of the international authorities is also emphasized such as the International Labour Organization, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the International Radiological Protection Commission. (Author) [pt

  11. Proteasome impairment by α-synuclein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Zondler

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder worldwide and characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the patients' midbrains. Both the presence of the protein α-synuclein in intracellular protein aggregates in surviving neurons and the genetic linking of the α-synuclein encoding gene point towards a major role of α-synuclein in PD etiology. The exact pathogenic mechanisms of PD development are not entirely described to date, neither is the specific role of α-synuclein in this context. Previous studies indicate that one aspect of α-synuclein-related cellular toxicity might be direct proteasome impairment. The 20/26S proteasomal machinery is an important instrument of intracellular protein degradation. Thus, direct proteasome impairment by α-synuclein might explain or at least contribute to the formation of intracellular protein aggregates. Therefore this study investigates direct proteasomal impairment by α-synuclein both in vitro using recombinant α-synuclein and isolated proteasomes as well as in living cells. Our experiments demonstrate that the impairment of proteasome activity by α-synuclein is highly dependent upon the cellular background and origin. We show that recombinant α-synuclein oligomers and fibrils scarcely affect 20S proteasome function in vitro, neither does transient α-synuclein expression in U2OS ps 2042 (Ubi(G76V-GFP cells. However, stable expression of both wild-type and mutant α-synuclein in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y and PC12 cells results in a prominent impairment of the chymotrypsin-like 20S/26S proteasomal protein cleavage. Thus, our results support the idea that α-synuclein in a specific cellular environment, potentially present in dopaminergic cells, cannot be processed by the proteasome and thus contributes to a selective vulnerability of dopaminergic cells to α-synuclein pathology.

  12. Use of proteasome inhibitors in anticancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M. Schmitt

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway to cellular function has brought it to the forefront in the search for new anticancer therapies. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has proven promising in targeting various human cancers. The approval of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib for clinical treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma has validated the ubiquitin-proteasome as a rational target. Bortezomib has shown positive results in clinical use but some toxicity and side effects, as well as resistance, have been observed, indicating that further development of novel, less toxic drugs is necessary. Because less toxic drugs are necessary and drug development can be expensive and time-consuming, using existing drugs that can target the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in new applications, such as cancer therapy, may be effective in expediting the regulatory process and bringing new drugs to the clinic. Toward this goal, previously approved drugs, such as disulfiram, as well as natural compounds found in common foods, such as green tea polyphenol (--EGCG and the flavonoid apigenin, have been investigated for their possible proteasome inhibitory and cell death inducing abilities. These compounds proved quite promising in preclinical studies and have now moved into clinical trials, with preliminary results that are encouraging. In addition to targeting the catalytic activity of the proteasome pathway, upstream regulators, such as the 19S regulatory cap, as well as E1, E2, and E3, are now being investigated as potential drug targets. This review outlines the development of novel proteasome inhibitors from preclinical to clinical studies, highlighting their abilities to inhibit the tumor proteasome and induce apoptosis in several human cancers.

  13. E1AF degradation by a ubiquitin-proteasome pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Akiko; Higashino, Fumihiro; Aoyagi, Mariko; Yoshida, Koichi; Itoh, Miyuki; Kobayashi, Masanobu; Totsuka, Yasunori; Kohgo, Takao; Shindoh, Masanobu

    2005-01-01

    E1AF is a member of the ETS family of transcription factors. In mammary tumors, overexpression of E1AF is associated with tumorigenesis, but E1AF protein has hardly been detected and its degradation mechanism is not yet clear. Here we show that E1AF protein is stabilized by treatment with the 26S protease inhibitor MG132. We found that E1AF was modified by ubiquitin through the C-terminal region and ubiquitinated E1AF aggregated in nuclear dots, and that the inhibition of proteasome-activated transcription from E1AF target promoters. These results suggest that E1AF is degraded via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, which has some effect on E1AF function

  14. Changes in proteasome structure and function caused by HAMLET in tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Lotta; Aits, Sonja; Onnerfjord, Patrik; Trulsson, Maria; Storm, Petter; Svanborg, Catharina

    2009-01-01

    Proteasomes control the level of endogenous unfolded proteins by degrading them in the proteolytic core. Insufficient degradation due to altered protein structure or proteasome inhibition may trigger cell death. This study examined the proteasome response to HAMLET, a partially unfolded protein-lipid complex, which is internalized by tumor cells and triggers cell death. HAMLET bound directly to isolated 20S proteasomes in vitro and in tumor cells significant co-localization of HAMLET and 20S proteasomes was detected by confocal microscopy. This interaction was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation from extracts of HAMLET-treated tumor cells. HAMLET resisted in vitro degradation by proteasomal enzymes and degradation by intact 20S proteasomes was slow compared to fatty acid-free, partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin. After a brief activation, HAMLET inhibited proteasome activity in vitro and in parallel a change in proteasome structure occurred, with modifications of catalytic (beta1 and beta5) and structural subunits (alpha2, alpha3, alpha6 and beta3). Proteasome inhibition was confirmed in extracts from HAMLET-treated cells and there were indications of proteasome fragmentation in HAMLET-treated cells. The results suggest that internalized HAMLET is targeted to 20S proteasomes, that the complex resists degradation, inhibits proteasome activity and perturbs proteasome structure. We speculate that perturbations of proteasome structure might contribute to the cytotoxic effects of unfolded protein complexes that invade host cells.

  15. Targeting proteasomes in infectious organisms to combat disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibo-Verdugo, Betsaida; Jiang, Zhenze; Caffrey, Conor R; O'Donoghue, Anthony J

    2017-05-01

    Proteasomes are multisubunit, energy-dependent, proteolytic complexes that play an essential role in intracellular protein turnover. They are present in eukaryotes, archaea, and in some actinobacteria species. Inhibition of proteasome activity has emerged as a powerful strategy for anticancer therapy and three drugs have been approved for treatment of multiple myeloma. These compounds react covalently with a threonine residue located in the active site of a proteasome subunit to block protein degradation. Proteasomes in pathogenic organisms such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Plasmodium falciparum also have a nucleophilic threonine residue in the proteasome active site and are therefore sensitive to these anticancer drugs. This review summarizes efforts to validate the proteasome in pathogenic organisms as a therapeutic target. We describe several strategies that have been used to develop inhibitors with increased potency and selectivity for the pathogen proteasome relative to the human proteasome. In addition, we highlight a cell-based chemical screening approach that identified a potent, allosteric inhibitor of proteasomes found in Leishmania and Trypanosoma species. Finally, we discuss the development of proteasome inhibitors as anti-infective agents. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  16. Involvement of proteasomal subunits zeta and iota in RNA degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, F; Jarrousse, A S; Dahlmann, B; Sobek, A; Hendil, K B; Buri, J; Briand, Y; Schmid, H P

    1997-01-01

    We have identified two distinct subunits of 20 S proteasomes that are associated with RNase activity. Proteasome subunits zeta and iota, eluted from two-dimensional Western blots, hydrolysed tobacco mosaic virus RNA, whereas none of the other subunits degraded this substrate under the same conditions. Additionally, proteasomes were dissociated by 6 M urea, and subunit zeta, containing the highest RNase activity, was isolated by anion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. Purified subunit zeta migrated as a single spot on two-dimensional PAGE with a molecular mass of approx. 28 kDa. Addition of anti-(subunit zeta) antibodies led to the co-precipitation of this proteasome subunit and nuclease activity. This is the first evidence that proteasomal alpha-type subunits are associated with an enzymic activity, and our results provide further evidence that proteasomes may be involved in cellular RNA metabolism. PMID:9337855

  17. Proteasome phosphorylation regulates cocaine-induced sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Frankie R; Howell, Kristin K; Dozier, Lara E; Anagnostaras, Stephan G; Patrick, Gentry N

    2018-04-01

    Repeated exposure to cocaine produces structural and functional modifications at synapses from neurons in several brain regions including the nucleus accumbens. These changes are thought to underlie cocaine-induced sensitization. The ubiquitin proteasome system plays a crucial role in the remodeling of synapses and has recently been implicated in addiction-related behavior. The ATPase Rpt6 subunit of the 26S proteasome is phosphorylated by Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinases II alpha at ser120 which is thought to regulate proteasome activity and distribution in neurons. Here, we demonstrate that Rpt6 phosphorylation is involved in cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. Cocaine concomitantly increases proteasome activity and Rpt6 S120 phosphorylation in cultured neurons and in various brain regions of wild type mice including the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex. In contrast, cocaine does not increase proteasome activity in Rpt6 phospho-mimetic (ser120Asp) mice. Strikingly, we found a complete absence of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization in the Rpt6 ser120Asp mice. Together, these findings suggest a critical role for Rpt6 phosphorylation and proteasome function in the regulation cocaine-induced behavioral plasticity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Targeting proteasomes in infectious organisms to combat disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bibo-Verdugo, B; Jiang, Z; Caffrey, CR; O'Donoghue, AJ

    2017-01-01

    Proteasomes are multisubunit, energy-dependent, proteolytic complexes that play an essential role in intracellular protein turnover. They are present in eukaryotes, archaea, and in some actinobacteria species. Inhibition of proteasome activity has emerged as a powerful strategy for anticancer therapy and three drugs have been approved for treatment of multiple myeloma. These compounds react covalently with a threonine residue located in the active site of a proteasome subunit to block protein...

  19. Prefoldins Negatively Regulate Cold Acclimation in Arabidopsis thaliana by Promoting Nuclear Proteasome-Mediated HY5 Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea-Resa, Carlos; Rodríguez-Milla, Miguel A; Iniesto, Elisa; Rubio, Vicente; Salinas, Julio

    2017-06-05

    The process of cold acclimation is an important adaptive response whereby many plants from temperate regions increase their freezing tolerance after being exposed to low non-freezing temperatures. The correct development of this response relies on proper accumulation of a number of transcription factors that regulate expression patterns of cold-responsive genes. Multiple studies have revealed a variety of molecular mechanisms involved in promoting the accumulation of these transcription factors. Interestingly, however, the mechanisms implicated in controlling such accumulation to ensure their adequate levels remain largely unknown. In this work, we demonstrate that prefoldins (PFDs) control the levels of HY5, an Arabidopsis transcription factor with a key role in cold acclimation by activating anthocyanin biosynthesis, in response to low temperature. Our results show that, under cold conditions, PFDs accumulate into the nucleus through a DELLA-dependent mechanism, where they interact with HY5, triggering its ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. The degradation of HY5 would result, in turn, in anthocyanin biosynthesis attenuation, ensuring the accurate development of cold acclimation. These findings uncover an unanticipated nuclear function for PFDs in plant responses to abiotic stresses. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Decreased rate of protein synthesis, caspase-3 activity, and ubiquitin-proteasome proteolysis in soleus muscles from growing rats fed a low-protein, high-carbohydrate diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batistela, Emanuele; Pereira, Mayara Peron; Siqueira, Juliany Torres; Paula-Gomes, Silvia; Zanon, Neusa Maria; Oliveira, Eduardo Brandt; Navegantes, Luiz Carlos Carvalho; Kettelhut, Isis C; Andrade, Claudia Marlise Balbinotti; Kawashita, Nair Honda; Baviera, Amanda Martins

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in the rates of both protein synthesis and breakdown, and the activation of intracellular effectors that control these processes in soleus muscles from growing rats fed a low-protein, high-carbohydrate (LPHC) diet for 15 days. The mass and the protein content, as well as the rate of protein synthesis, were decreased in the soleus from LPHC-fed rats. The availability of amino acids was diminished, since the levels of various essential amino acids were decreased in the plasma of LPHC-fed rats. Overall rate of proteolysis was also decreased, explained by reductions in the mRNA levels of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1, ubiquitin conjugates, proteasome activity, and in the activity of caspase-3. Soleus muscles from LPHC-fed rats showed increased insulin sensitivity, with increased levels of insulin receptor and phosphorylation levels of AKT, which probably explains the inhibition of both the caspase-3 activity and the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The fall of muscle proteolysis seems to represent an adaptive response that contributes to spare proteins in a condition of diminished availability of dietary amino acids. Furthermore, the decreased rate of protein synthesis may be the driving factor to the lower muscle mass gain in growing rats fed the LPHC diet.

  1. Proteasome inhibitors activate autophagy involving inhibition of PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway as an anti-oxidation defense in human RPE cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingrong Tang

    Full Text Available The two major intracellular protein degradation systems, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS and autophagy, work collaboratively in many biological processes including development, apoptosis, aging, and countering oxidative injuries. We report here that, in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE, ARPE-19 cells, proteasome inhibitors, clasto-lactacystinβ-lactone (LA or epoxomicin (Epo, at non-lethal doses, increased the protein levels of autophagy-specific genes Atg5 and Atg7 and enhanced the conversion of microtubule-associated protein light chain (LC3 from LC3-I to its lipidative form, LC3-II, which was enhanced by co-addition of the saturated concentration of Bafilomycin A1 (Baf. Detection of co-localization for LC3 staining and labeled-lysosome further confirmed autophagic flux induced by LA or Epo. LA or Epo reduced the phosphorylation of the protein kinase B (Akt, a downstream target of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinases (PI3K, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR in ARPE-19 cells; by contrast, the induced changes of autophagy substrate, p62, showed biphasic pattern. The autophagy inhibitor, Baf, attenuated the reduction in oxidative injury conferred by treatment with low doses of LA and Epo in ARPE-19 cells exposed to menadione (VK3 or 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE. Knockdown of Atg7 with siRNA in ARPE-19 cells reduced the protective effects of LA or Epo against VK3. Overall, our results suggest that treatment with low levels of proteasome inhibitors confers resistance to oxidative injury by a pathway involving inhibition of the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway and activation of autophagy.

  2. High Fat Diet-Induced Skeletal Muscle Wasting Is Decreased by Mesenchymal Stem Cells Administration: Implications on Oxidative Stress, Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway Activation, and Myonuclear Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Abrigo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity can lead to skeletal muscle atrophy, a pathological condition characterized by the loss of strength and muscle mass. A feature of muscle atrophy is a decrease of myofibrillar proteins as a result of ubiquitin proteasome pathway overactivation, as evidenced by increased expression of the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases atrogin-1 and MuRF-1. Additionally, other mechanisms are related to muscle wasting, including oxidative stress, myonuclear apoptosis, and autophagy. Stem cells are an emerging therapy in the treatment of chronic diseases such as high fat diet-induced obesity. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are a population of self-renewable and undifferentiated cells present in the bone marrow and other mesenchymal tissues of adult individuals. The present study is the first to analyze the effects of systemic MSC administration on high fat diet-induced skeletal muscle atrophy in the tibialis anterior of mice. Treatment with MSCs reduced losses of muscle strength and mass, decreases of fiber diameter and myosin heavy chain protein levels, and fiber type transitions. Underlying these antiatrophic effects, MSC administration also decreased ubiquitin proteasome pathway activation, oxidative stress, and myonuclear apoptosis. These results are the first to indicate that systemically administered MSCs could prevent muscle wasting associated with high fat diet-induced obesity and diabetes.

  3. Proteasome dynamics between proliferation and quiescence stages of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S; Fatehi, Amatullah K; Enenkel, Cordula

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays a critical role in cellular protein homeostasis and is required for the turnover of short-lived and unwanted proteins, which are targeted by poly-ubiquitination for degradation. Proteasome is the key protease of UPS and consists of multiple subunits, which are organized into a catalytic core particle (CP) and a regulatory particle (RP). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, proteasome holo-enzymes are engaged in degrading poly-ubiquitinated substrates and are mostly localized in the nucleus during cell proliferation. While in quiescence, the RP and CP are sequestered into motile and reversible storage granules in the cytoplasm, called proteasome storage granules (PSGs). The reversible nature of PSGs allows the proteasomes to be transported back into the nucleus upon exit from quiescence. Nuclear import of RP and CP through nuclear pores occurs via the canonical pathway that includes the importin-αβ heterodimer and takes advantage of the Ran-GTP gradient across the nuclear membrane. Dependent on the growth stage, either inactive precursor complexes or mature holo-enzymes are imported into the nucleus. The present review discusses the dynamics of proteasomes including their assembly, nucleo-cytoplasmic transport during proliferation and the sequestration of proteasomes into PSGs during quiescence. [Formula: see text].

  4. Impaired proteasome function in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabashi, Edor; Agar, Jeffrey N; Strong, Michael J; Durham, Heather D

    2012-06-01

    Abstract The ubiquitin-proteasome system, important for maintaining protein quality control, is compromised in experimental models of familial ALS. The objective of this study was to determine if proteasome function is impaired in sporadic ALS. Proteasomal activities and subunit composition were evaluated in homogenates of spinal cord samples obtained at autopsy from sporadic ALS and non-neurological control cases, compared to cerebellum as a clinically spared tissue. The level of 20S α structural proteasome subunits was assessed in motor neurons by immunohistochemistry. Catalysis of peptide substrates of the three major proteasomal activities was substantially reduced in ALS thoracic spinal cord, but not in cerebellum, accompanied by alterations in the constitutive proteasome machinery. Chymotrypsin-like activity was decreased to 60% and 65% of control in ventral and dorsal spinal cord, respectively, concomitant with reduction in the β5 subunit with this catalytic activity. Caspase- and trypsin-like activities were reduced to a similar extent (46% - 68% of control). Proteasome levels, although generally maintained, appeared reduced specifically in motor neurons by immunolabelling. In conclusion, there are commonalities of findings in sporadic ALS patients and presymptomatic SOD1-G93A transgenic mice and these implicate inadequate proteasome function in the pathogenesis of both familial and sporadic ALS.

  5. Antitumorigenic effect of proteasome inhibitors on insulinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Størling, Joachim; Allaman-Pillet, Nathalie; Karlsen, Allan E

    2004-01-01

    inhibition of the proteasome has an antitumorigenic potential in insulinoma cells. Exposure of mouse betaTC3 insulinoma cells to the proteasome inhibitor N-Acetyl-Leu-Leu-Nle-CHO (ALLN) reduced cell viability, activated caspase-3, induced apoptosis, and suppressed insulin release. Treatment with ALLN also...

  6. Effect of ionizing radiation exposure on Trypanosoma cruzi ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Paula G; Passos-Silva, Danielle G; Vieira-da-Rocha, João P; Mendes, Isabela Cecilia; de Oliveira, Karla A; Oliveira, Camila F B; Vilela, Liza F F; Nagem, Ronaldo A P; Cardoso, Joseane; Nardelli, Sheila C; Krieger, Marco A; Franco, Glória R; Macedo, Andrea M; Pena, Sérgio D J; Schenkman, Sérgio; Gomes, Dawidson A; Guerra-Sá, Renata; Machado, Carlos R

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, proteasome involvement in the damage response induced by ionizing radiation (IR) became evident. However, whether proteasome plays a direct or indirect role in IR-induced damage response still unclear. Trypanosoma cruzi is a human parasite capable of remarkable high tolerance to IR, suggesting a highly efficient damage response system. Here, we investigate the role of T. cruzi proteasome in the damage response induced by IR. We exposed epimastigotes to high doses of gamma ray and we analyzed the expression and subcellular localization of several components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. We show that proteasome inhibition increases IR-induced cell growth arrest and proteasome-mediated proteolysis is altered after parasite exposure. We observed nuclear accumulation of 19S and 20S proteasome subunits in response to IR treatments. Intriguingly, the dynamic of 19S particle nuclear accumulation was more similar to the dynamic observed for Rad51 nuclear translocation than the observed for 20S. In the other hand, 20S increase and nuclear translocation could be related with an increase of its regulator PA26 and high levels of proteasome-mediated proteolysis in vitro. The intersection between the opposed peaks of 19S and 20S protein levels was marked by nuclear accumulation of both 20S and 19S together with Ubiquitin, suggesting a role of ubiquitin-proteasome system in the nuclear protein turnover at the time. Our results revealed the importance of proteasome-mediated proteolysis in T. cruzi IR-induced damage response suggesting that proteasome is also involved in T. cruzi IR tolerance. Moreover, our data support the possible direct/signaling role of 19S in DNA damage repair. Based on these results, we speculate that spatial and temporal differences between the 19S particle and 20S proteasome controls proteasome multiple roles in IR damage response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Nuclear Activities (Prohibitions) Act 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this Act is to protect the health and safety of the people of Victoria and its environment by prohibiting nuclear activities from being carried out and regulating the possession of certain nuclear material in a manner consistent with assisting Australia in meeting its international nuclear non-proliferation objectives. (NEA) [fr

  8. Nuclear fuel activities in Belgium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bairiot, H

    1997-12-01

    In his presentation on nuclear fuel activities in belgium the author considers the following directions of this work: fuel fabrication, NPP operation, fuel performance, research and development programmes.

  9. Proteins interacting with the 26S proteasome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, R; Gordon, C

    2004-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is the multi-protein protease that recognizes and degrades ubiquitinylated substrates targeted for destruction by the ubiquitin pathway. In addition to the well-documented subunit organization of the 26S holoenzyme, it is clear that a number of other proteins transiently...... associate with the 26S complex. These transiently associated proteins confer a number of different roles such as substrate presentation, cleavage of the multi-ubiquitin chain from the protein substrate and turnover of misfolded proteins. Such activities are essential for the 26S proteasome to efficiently...... fulfill its intracellular function in protein degradation....

  10. Trial Watch: Proteasomal inhibitors for anticancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrist, Florine; Manic, Gwenola; Kroemer, Guido; Vitale, Ilio; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The so-called "ubiquitin-proteasome system" (UPS) is a multicomponent molecular apparatus that catalyzes the covalent attachment of several copies of the small protein ubiquitin to other proteins that are generally (but not always) destined to proteasomal degradation. This enzymatic cascade is crucial for the maintenance of intracellular protein homeostasis (both in physiological conditions and in the course of adaptive stress responses), and regulates a wide array of signaling pathways. In line with this notion, defects in the UPS have been associated with aging as well as with several pathological conditions including cardiac, neurodegenerative, and neoplastic disorders. As transformed cells often experience a constant state of stress (as a result of the hyperactivation of oncogenic signaling pathways and/or adverse microenvironmental conditions), their survival and proliferation are highly dependent on the integrity of the UPS. This rationale has driven an intense wave of preclinical and clinical investigation culminating in 2003 with the approval of the proteasomal inhibitor bortezomib by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in multiple myeloma patients. Another proteasomal inhibitor, carfilzomib, is now licensed by international regulatory agencies for use in multiple myeloma patients, and the approved indications for bortezomib have been extended to mantle cell lymphoma. This said, the clinical activity of bortezomib and carfilzomib is often limited by off-target effects, innate/acquired resistance, and the absence of validated predictive biomarkers. Moreover, the antineoplastic activity of proteasome inhibitors against solid tumors is poor. In this Trial Watch we discuss the contribution of the UPS to oncogenesis and tumor progression and summarize the design and/or results of recent clinical studies evaluating the therapeutic profile of proteasome inhibitors in cancer patients.

  11. BAG3 induces the sequestration of proteasomal clients into cytoplasmic puncta: implications for a proteasome-to-autophagy switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoia, Melania; Boncoraglio, Alessandra; Vinet, Jonathan; Morelli, Federica F; Brunsting, Jeanette F; Poletti, Angelo; Krom, Sabine; Reits, Eric; Kampinga, Harm H; Carra, Serena

    2014-09-01

    Eukaryotic cells use autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome system as their major protein degradation pathways. Upon proteasomal impairment, cells switch to autophagy to ensure proper clearance of clients (the proteasome-to-autophagy switch). The HSPA8 and HSPA1A cochaperone BAG3 has been suggested to be involved in this switch. However, at present it is still unknown whether and to what extent BAG3 can indeed reroute proteasomal clients to the autophagosomal pathway. Here, we show that BAG3 induces the sequestration of ubiquitinated clients into cytoplasmic puncta colabeled with canonical autophagy linkers and markers. Following proteasome inhibition, BAG3 upregulation significantly contributes to the compensatory activation of autophagy and to the degradation of the (poly)ubiquitinated proteins. BAG3 binding to the ubiquitinated clients occurs through the BAG domain, in competition with BAG1, another BAG family member, that normally directs ubiquitinated clients to the proteasome. Therefore, we propose that following proteasome impairment, increasing the BAG3/BAG1 ratio ensures the "BAG-instructed proteasomal to autophagosomal switch and sorting" (BIPASS).

  12. Endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide-II modulates endothelial cell responses by degrading hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha through interaction with PSMA7, a component of the proteasome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tandle, Anita T. [Tumor Angiogenesis Section, Surgery Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Calvani, Maura; Uranchimeg, Badarch [DTP-Tumor Hypoxia Laboratory, SAIC Frederick, Inc., National Cancer Institute, Frederick, Maryland 21702 (United States); Zahavi, David [Tumor Angiogenesis Section, Surgery Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Melillo, Giovanni [DTP-Tumor Hypoxia Laboratory, SAIC Frederick, Inc., National Cancer Institute, Frederick, Maryland 21702 (United States); Libutti, Steven K., E-mail: slibutti@montefiore.org [Department of Surgery, Montefiore-Einstein Center for Cancer Care, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Greene Medical Arts Pavilion, 4th Floor 3400, Bainbridge Avenue, Bronx, New York 10467 (United States)

    2009-07-01

    The majority of human tumors are angiogenesis dependent. Understanding the specific mechanisms that contribute to angiogenesis may offer the best approach to develop therapies to inhibit angiogenesis in cancer. Endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide-II (EMAP-II) is an anti-angiogenic cytokine with potent effects on endothelial cells (ECs). It inhibits EC proliferation and cord formation, and it suppresses primary and metastatic tumor growth in-vivo. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms behind the anti-angiogenic activity of EMAP-II. In the present study, we explored the molecular mechanism behind the anti-angiogenic activity exerted by this protein on ECs. Our results demonstrate that EMAP-II binds to the cell surface {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin receptor. The cell surface binding of EMAP-II results in its internalization into the cytoplasmic compartment where it interacts with its cytoplasmic partner PSMA7, a component of the proteasome degradation pathway. This interaction increases hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1{alpha}) degradation under hypoxic conditions. The degradation results in the inhibition of HIF-1{alpha} mediated transcriptional activity as well as HIF-1{alpha} mediated angiogenic sprouting of ECs. HIF-1{alpha} plays a critical role in angiogenesis by activating a variety of angiogenic growth factors. Our results suggest that one of the major anti-angiogenic functions of EMAP-II is exerted through its inhibition of the HIF-1{alpha} activities.

  13. Endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide-II modulates endothelial cell responses by degrading hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha through interaction with PSMA7, a component of the proteasome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandle, Anita T.; Calvani, Maura; Uranchimeg, Badarch; Zahavi, David; Melillo, Giovanni; Libutti, Steven K.

    2009-01-01

    The majority of human tumors are angiogenesis dependent. Understanding the specific mechanisms that contribute to angiogenesis may offer the best approach to develop therapies to inhibit angiogenesis in cancer. Endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide-II (EMAP-II) is an anti-angiogenic cytokine with potent effects on endothelial cells (ECs). It inhibits EC proliferation and cord formation, and it suppresses primary and metastatic tumor growth in-vivo. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms behind the anti-angiogenic activity of EMAP-II. In the present study, we explored the molecular mechanism behind the anti-angiogenic activity exerted by this protein on ECs. Our results demonstrate that EMAP-II binds to the cell surface α5β1 integrin receptor. The cell surface binding of EMAP-II results in its internalization into the cytoplasmic compartment where it interacts with its cytoplasmic partner PSMA7, a component of the proteasome degradation pathway. This interaction increases hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α) degradation under hypoxic conditions. The degradation results in the inhibition of HIF-1α mediated transcriptional activity as well as HIF-1α mediated angiogenic sprouting of ECs. HIF-1α plays a critical role in angiogenesis by activating a variety of angiogenic growth factors. Our results suggest that one of the major anti-angiogenic functions of EMAP-II is exerted through its inhibition of the HIF-1α activities.

  14. KRAS Genotype Correlates with Proteasome Inhibitor Ixazomib Activity in Preclinical In Vivo Models of Colon and Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Potential Role of Tumor Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nibedita Chattopadhyay

    Full Text Available In non-clinical studies, the proteasome inhibitor ixazomib inhibits cell growth in a broad panel of solid tumor cell lines in vitro. In contrast, antitumor activity in xenograft tumors is model-dependent, with some solid tumors showing no response to ixazomib. In this study we examined factors responsible for ixazomib sensitivity or resistance using mouse xenograft models. A survey of 14 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and 6 colon xenografts showed a striking relationship between ixazomib activity and KRAS genotype; tumors with wild-type (WT KRAS were more sensitive to ixazomib than tumors harboring KRAS activating mutations. To confirm the association between KRAS genotype and ixazomib sensitivity, we used SW48 isogenic colon cancer cell lines. Either KRAS-G13D or KRAS-G12V mutations were introduced into KRAS-WT SW48 cells to generate cells that stably express activated KRAS. SW48 KRAS WT tumors, but neither SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors nor SW48-KRAS-G12V tumors, were sensitive to ixazomib in vivo. Since activated KRAS is known to be associated with metabolic reprogramming, we compared metabolite profiling of SW48-WT and SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors treated with or without ixazomib. Prior to treatment there were significant metabolic differences between SW48 WT and SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors, reflecting higher oxidative stress and glucose utilization in the KRAS-G13D tumors. Ixazomib treatment resulted in significant metabolic regulation, and some of these changes were specific to KRAS WT tumors. Depletion of free amino acid pools and activation of GCN2-eIF2α-pathways were observed both in tumor types. However, changes in lipid beta oxidation were observed in only the KRAS WT tumors. The non-clinical data presented here show a correlation between KRAS genotype and ixazomib sensitivity in NSCLC and colon xenografts and provide new evidence of regulation of key metabolic pathways by proteasome inhibition.

  15. KRAS Genotype Correlates with Proteasome Inhibitor Ixazomib Activity in Preclinical In Vivo Models of Colon and Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Potential Role of Tumor Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Nibedita; Berger, Allison J; Koenig, Erik; Bannerman, Bret; Garnsey, James; Bernard, Hugues; Hales, Paul; Maldonado Lopez, Angel; Yang, Yu; Donelan, Jill; Jordan, Kristen; Tirrell, Stephen; Stringer, Bradley; Xia, Cindy; Hather, Greg; Galvin, Katherine; Manfredi, Mark; Rhodes, Nelson; Amidon, Ben

    2015-01-01

    In non-clinical studies, the proteasome inhibitor ixazomib inhibits cell growth in a broad panel of solid tumor cell lines in vitro. In contrast, antitumor activity in xenograft tumors is model-dependent, with some solid tumors showing no response to ixazomib. In this study we examined factors responsible for ixazomib sensitivity or resistance using mouse xenograft models. A survey of 14 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 6 colon xenografts showed a striking relationship between ixazomib activity and KRAS genotype; tumors with wild-type (WT) KRAS were more sensitive to ixazomib than tumors harboring KRAS activating mutations. To confirm the association between KRAS genotype and ixazomib sensitivity, we used SW48 isogenic colon cancer cell lines. Either KRAS-G13D or KRAS-G12V mutations were introduced into KRAS-WT SW48 cells to generate cells that stably express activated KRAS. SW48 KRAS WT tumors, but neither SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors nor SW48-KRAS-G12V tumors, were sensitive to ixazomib in vivo. Since activated KRAS is known to be associated with metabolic reprogramming, we compared metabolite profiling of SW48-WT and SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors treated with or without ixazomib. Prior to treatment there were significant metabolic differences between SW48 WT and SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors, reflecting higher oxidative stress and glucose utilization in the KRAS-G13D tumors. Ixazomib treatment resulted in significant metabolic regulation, and some of these changes were specific to KRAS WT tumors. Depletion of free amino acid pools and activation of GCN2-eIF2α-pathways were observed both in tumor types. However, changes in lipid beta oxidation were observed in only the KRAS WT tumors. The non-clinical data presented here show a correlation between KRAS genotype and ixazomib sensitivity in NSCLC and colon xenografts and provide new evidence of regulation of key metabolic pathways by proteasome inhibition.

  16. Nuclear Activities in Argentina, 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreri, J.C.; Ferreri, J.C.; Clausse, A.; Clausse, A.; Clausse, A.; Ordonez, J.P.; Mazzantini, O.A.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear activities in Argentina are restarted. After almost two decades of near stagnation, the governments political decision of August 2006 regarding electrical energy production, considered the nuclear option as a valid one to solve the problems of the growing demand of electrical energy. This decision triggered again the activities related to the finalization of the third nuclear power reactor (Atucha-II), now actively progressing, the construction of a prototype of the CAREM integral advanced reactor, the life extension of the Embalse CANDU nuclear power plant (NPP) and the studies for the emplacement of a fourth NPP in an appropriate site. In all those years of near stagnation, there were notable exceptions related to the design and construction of experimental and radioisotope production reactors, led by INVAP, a state-owned industry, which exported its production. The accompanying industries of nuclear fuel elements production also remained active, given the demand of the two active NPPs. Meanwhile, the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina continued the efforts on research and development that were at the base of the technological achievements of the nuclear activities in Argentina. Nuclear safety studies associated with Atucha II and Embalse NPPs and radiological safety were also a substantive part of the continued efforts by Nucleo-Electrica de Argentina SA and the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina

  17. Public acceptance in nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paunescu, A.; Stiopol, M.; Manole, F.; Petran, C.; Chiper, L.

    1998-01-01

    All over the world the most part of population considers nuclear power as the energy of the future. To reinforce this opinion some fundamental requirements should be met, namely: - nuclear facilities and power plants should be safe and competitive in point of costs; - nuclear activity should record no severe accidents; - to make actual progress in the field of radwaste management and disposal; - to actually witness and increase of electric power demands. In Romania the activities related to the nuclear research and power sum-up about 40 years of experience and these can be structured as per the following directions: - nuclear power and related activities (industrial, mining, processing, storage); - research reactors; - nuclear sciences and techniques and their applications. Public opinion information is aimed at assisting such activities and make the public familiar with the concepts typical for the nuclear field. Generally, there is a feeling of fear on the part of the officials in supporting the nuclear. The basic cause would be application of on incomplete and obsolete model when educating the public opinion. That model leads to the conclusion that the open expression of one's support in favour of nuclear is a political risk. A new, more, comprehensive model leading to different conclusions was conceived and finalized lately. The two models are different from each other by 3 characteristic elements: - influence of perception; - approach of the opinion; - definition of the support. The paper describes the actions undertaken in Romania in order to fulfill these requirements

  18. Military nuclear activities. Strategic prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coldefy, Alain; Wodka-Gallien, Philippe; Tertrais, Bruno; Rouillard, Gwendal; Widemann, Thierry; Guillaume, Louis-Michel; Steininger, Philippe; Guillemette, Alain; Amabile, Jean-Christophe; Granger-Veyron, Nicolas; Carbonnieres, Hubert de; Roche, Nicolas; Guillou, Herve; Bouvier, Antoine; Pastre, Bertrand; Baconnet, Alexis; Monsonis, Guillem; Brisset, Jean-Vincent; Hemez, Remy; Tchernega, Vladimir; Wedin, Lars; Dumoulin, Andre; Razoux, Pierre; Migault, Philippe; Wilson, Ward; Maillard, Benjamin de; Aichi, Leila; Charvoz, Ivan; Rousset, Valery; Lespinois, Jerome de; Kempf, Olivier; Dufourcq, Jean; Gere, Francois; Mauro, Frederic; Delort Laval, Gabriel; Charaix, Patrick; Norlain, Bernard; Collin, Jean-Marie; Jourdier, Francois

    2015-01-01

    This special dossier aims at providing some key articles about France's deterrence doctrine. It provides a comprehensive overview of the challenges and questions about military nuclear activities and opens up some future prospects about this question. The dossier comprises 37 papers dealing with: 1 - Military nuclear activities: yesterday, today, tomorrow (Coldefy, A.); 2 - Deterrence according to French President Francois Hollande: continuation, precision and inflexions (Tertrais, B.); 3 - French deterrence warrantor of our independence in the 21. century (Rouillard, G.); 4 - The deterrence concept prior to the nuclear weapon era (Widemann, T.); 5 - France: the strategic marine force in operation (Guillaume, L.M.); 6 - Relevance of the airborne component in the nuclear deterrence strategy (Steininger, P.); 7 - Deterrence stakes for the Directorate General of Armaments (Guillemette, A.); 8 - The Charles-de-Gaulle aircraft carrier: the deterrence voice from the sea (Wodka-Gallien, P.); 9 - Deterrence: missions of the army's radiation protection department (Amabile, J.C.; Granger-Veyron, N.; Carbonnieres, H. de); 10 - The French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and the French defense strategy (Roche, N.); 11 - DCNS, general contractor in the service of deterrence (Guillou, H.); 12 - The airborne nuclear component for MBDA (Bouvier, A.); 13 - Ballistic missile of the marine nuclear component: industrial stakes (Pastre, B.); 14 - Beyond defense against missiles: a US anti-deterrence strategy (Baconnet, A.); 15 - Deterrence dynamics in South Asia (Monsonis, G.); 16 - Military nuclear activities in East Asia (Brisset, J.V.); 17 - North Korea would own nuclear weapons, so what? (Hemez, R.); 18 - About the risk of nuclear warfare in Europe (Tchernega, V.); 19 - Present day nuclear activities: deterrence and gesticulation (Wedin, L.); 20 - Belgian F-16 replacement: nuclear dimension (Dumoulin, A.); 21 - Israel and nuclear deterrence (Razoux, P.); 22 - Nuclear

  19. VRK1 regulates Cajal body dynamics and protects coilin from proteasomal degradation in cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero, Lara; Sanz-García, Marta; Vinograd-Byk, Hadar; Renbaum, Paul; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Lazo, Pedro A

    2015-06-12

    Cajal bodies (CBs) are nuclear organelles associated with ribonucleoprotein functions and RNA maturation. CBs are assembled on coilin, its main scaffold protein, in a cell cycle dependent manner. The Ser-Thr VRK1 (vaccinia-related kinase 1) kinase, whose activity is also cell cycle regulated, interacts with and phosphorylates coilin regulating assembly of CBs. Coilin phosphorylation is not necessary for its interaction with VRK1, but it occurs in mitosis and regulates coilin stability. Knockdown of VRK1 or VRK1 inactivation by serum deprivation causes a loss of coilin phosphorylation in Ser184 and of CBs formation, which are rescued with an active VRK1, but not by kinase-dead VRK1. The phosphorylation of coilin in Ser184 occurs during mitosis before assembly of CBs. Loss of coilin phosphorylation results in disintegration of CBs, and of coilin degradation that is prevented by proteasome inhibitors. After depletion of VRK1, coilin is ubiquitinated in nuclei, which is partly mediated by mdm2, but its proteasomal degradation occurs in cytosol and is prevented by blocking its nuclear export. We conclude that VRK1 is a novel regulator of CBs dynamics and stability in cell cycle by protecting coilin from ubiquitination and degradation in the proteasome, and propose a model of CB dynamics.

  20. Proteasomes in the archaea: from structure to function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin-Furlow, J A; Wilson, H L; Kaczowka, S J; Ou, M S

    2000-09-01

    Survival of cells is critically dependent on their ability to rapidly adapt to changes in the natural environment no matter how 'extreme'the habitat. An interplay between protein folding and hydrolysis is emerging as a central mechanism for stress survival and proper cell function. In eucaryotic cells, most proteins destined for destruction are covalently modified by the ubiquitin-system and then degraded in an energy-dependent mechanism by the 26S proteasome, a multicatalytic protease. The 26S proteasome is composed of a 20S proteolytic core and 19S cap (PA700) regulator which includes six AAA+ ATPase subunits. Related AAA+ proteins and 20S proteasomes are found in the archaea and Gram positive actinomycetes. In general, 20S proteasomes form a barrel-shaped nanocompartment with narrow openings which isolate rather non-specific proteolytic active-sites to the interior of the cylinder and away from interaction with cytosolic proteins. The proteasome-associated AAA+ proteins are predicted to form ring-like structures which unfold substrate proteins for entry into the central proteolytic 20S chamber resulting in an energy-dependent and processive destruction of the protein. Detailed biochemical and biophysical analysis as well as identification of proteasomes in archaea with developed genetic tools are providing a foundation for understanding the biological role of the proteasome in these unusual organisms.

  1. Proteasome and NF-kappaB inhibiting phaeophytins from the green alga Cladophora fascicularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinping; Li, Min; Xu, Bo; Zhu, Xiaobin; Deng, Zhiwei; Lin, Wenhan

    2007-03-21

    Chemical examination of the green alga Cladophora fascicularis resulted in the isolation and characterization of a new porphyrin derivative, porphyrinolactone (1), along with five known phaeophytins 2-6 and fourteen sterols and cycloartanes. The structure of 1 was determined on the basis of spectroscopic analyses and by comparison of its NMR data with those of known phaeophytins. Compounds 1-6 displayed moderate inhibition of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation, while 2 and 4 displayed potential inhibitory activity toward proteasome chymotripsin-like activation. The primary structure-activity relationship was also discussed.

  2. Severe energy deficit at high altitude inhibits skeletal muscle mTORC1-mediated anabolic signaling without increased ubiquitin proteasome activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Lee M; Carbone, John W; Berryman, Claire E; Carrigan, Christopher T; Murphy, Nancy E; Ferrando, Arny A; Young, Andrew J; Pasiakos, Stefan M

    2018-06-07

    Muscle loss at high altitude (HA) is attributable to energy deficit and a potential dysregulation of anabolic signaling. Exercise and protein ingestion can attenuate the effects of energy deficit on muscle at sea level (SL). Whether these effects are observed when energy deficit occurs at HA is unknown. To address this, muscle obtained from lowlanders ( n = 8 males) at SL, acute HA (3 h, 4300 m), and chronic HA (21 d, -1766 kcal/d energy balance) before [baseline (Base)] and after 80 min of aerobic exercise followed by a 2-mile time trial [postexercise (Post)] and 3 h into recovery (Rec) after ingesting whey protein (25 g) were analyzed using standard molecular techniques. At SL, Post, and REC, p-mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) Ser2448 , p-p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) Ser424/421 , and p-ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) Ser235/236 were similar and higher ( P anabolic resistance that is exacerbated by energy deficit during acclimatization, with no change in proteolysis.-Margolis, L. M., Carbone, J. W., Berryman, C. E., Carrigan, C. T., Murphy, N. E., Ferrando, A. A., Young, A. J., Pasiakos, S. M. Severe energy deficit at high altitude inhibits skeletal muscle mTORC1-mediated anabolic signaling without increased ubiquitin proteasome activity.

  3. Induction of 26S proteasome subunit PSMB5 by the bifunctional inducer 3-methylcholanthrene through the Nrf2-ARE, but not the AhR/Arnt-XRE, pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Mi-Kyoung; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2006-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is responsible for degradation of abnormal intracellular proteins, including oxidatively damaged proteins and may play a role as a component of a cellular antioxidative system. However, little is known about regulation of proteasome expression. In the present study, regulation of proteasome expression by the bifunctional enzyme inducer and a specific signaling pathway for this regulation were investigated in murine neuroblastoma cells. Expression of catalytic core subunits including PSMB5 and peptidase activities of the proteasome were elevated following incubation with 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC). Studies using reporter genes containing the murine Psmb5 promoter showed that transcriptional activity of this gene was enhanced by 3-MC. Overexpression of AhR/Arnt did not affect activation of the Pmsb5 promoter by 3-MC and deletion of the xenobiotic response elements (XREs) from this promoter exerted modest effects on inducibility in response to 3-MC. However, mutation of the proximal AREs of the Psmb5 promoter largely abrogated its inducibility by 3-MC. In addition, this promoter showed a blunted response toward 3-MC in the absence of nrf2; 3-MC incubation increased nuclear levels of Nrf2 only in wild-type cells. Collectively, these results indicate that expression of proteasome subunit PSMB5 is modulated by bifunctional enzyme inducers in a manner independent of the AhR/Arnt-XRE pathway but dependent upon the Nrf2-ARE pathway

  4. Handbook on nuclear activation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This Handbook is being issued for the particular benefit of scientists working in the fields of education and industrial applications using nuclear activation methods, as well as in basic research. The content of the report is divided into four parts: standard reference data, neutron activation data, charged particle activation data and photonuclear activation data. The emphasis is on evaluated or recommended values rather than on an exhaustive presentation of all experimental results

  5. Transparency of nuclear regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    One of the main missions of nuclear regulators is to protect the public, and this cannot be completely achieved without public confidence. The more a regulatory process is transparent, the more such confidence will grow. Despite important cultural differences across countries, a number of common features characterise media and public expectations regarding any activity with an associated risk. A common understanding of transparency and main stakeholders' expectations in the field of nuclear safety were identified during this workshop, together with a number of conditions and practices aimed at improving the transparency of nuclear regulatory activities. These conditions and practices are described herein, and will be of particular interest to all those working in the nuclear regulatory field. Their implementation may, however, differ from one country to another depending on national context. (authors)

  6. Nuclear fuel activities in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, D S [Fuel Development Branch, Chalk River Labs., AECL (Canada)

    1997-12-01

    Nuclear fuel activities in Canada are considered in the presentation on the following directions: Canadian utility fuel performance; CANDU owner`s group fuel programs; AECL advanced fuel program (high burnup fuel behaviour and development); Pu dispositioning (MOX) activities. 1 tab.

  7. Resveratrol protects leukemic cells against cytotoxicity induced by proteasome inhibitors via induction of FOXO1 and p27Kip1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Xiao-Fang; Liu, Bao-Qin; Du, Zhen-Xian; Gao, Yan-Yan; Li, Chao; Li, Ning; Guan, Yifu; Wang, Hua-Qin

    2011-01-01

    It was reported recently that resveratrol could sensitize a number of cancer cells to the antitumoral effects of some conventional chemotherapy drugs. The current study was designed to investigate whether resveratrol could sensitize leukemic cells to proteasome inhibitors. Leukemic cells were treated with MG132 alone or in combination with resveratrol. Cell viability was investigated using MTT assay, and induction of apoptosis and cell cycle distribution was measured using flow cytometry. Western blot and real-time RT-PCR were used to investigate the expression of FOXO1 and p27 Kip1 . CHIP was performed to investigate the binding of FOXO1 to the p27 Kip1 promoter. Resveratrol strongly reduced cytotoxic activities of proteasome inhibitors against leukemic cells. MG132 in combination with resveratrol caused cell cycle blockade at G1/S transition via p27 Kip1 accumulation. Knockdown of p27 Kip1 using siRNA dramatically attenuated the protective effects of resveratrol on cytotoxic actions of proteasome inhibitors against leukemic cells. Resveratrol induced FOXO1 expression at the transcriptional level, while MG132 increased nuclear distribution of FOXO1. MG132 in combination with resveratrol caused synergistic induction of p27 Kip1 through increased recruitment of FOXO1 on the p27 Kip1 promoter. Resveratrol may have the potential to negate the cytotoxic effects of proteasome inhibitors via regulation of FOXO1 transcriptional activity and accumulation of p27 Kip1

  8. Organization of nuclear regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blidaru, Valentin

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the structure, missions and organizational aspects of the CNCAN, the National Commission for the control of nuclear activities in Romania. The paper addresses the following main issues: 1.General aspects; 2.Organizational structure of the NRA in Romania; 3.General description of the Division for Nuclear Safety Assessments; 4.Specific activities; 5.Regulatory approaches and practices. Under the title of 'General aspects' the following three basic statements are highlighted: 1.CNCAN is a governmental organization responsible for the development of the regulatory framework, the control of its implementation and the licensing of nuclear facilities; 2.CNCAN is the national authority competent in exercising the regulatory activity, authorization and control in the nuclear field provided by the law No. 111/ 1996 republished in 1998; 3.The Commission exercises its functions independently of the ministries and other authorities of the public control administration being subordinated to the Romanian Government. The organizational structure is as follows: - President, the Managerial Council and the Advisory Council coordinating the four General Divisions that are responsible for: - Nuclear Safety with Division of Nuclear Safety Assessment and Division of Nuclear Objectives Surveillance; - Radiological Safety with Division of Radiological Safety Assessment and Division of Operational Radiation Protection; - Surveillance of Environmental Radioactivity with Division of Assessment and Analysis and Division of National Network; - Development and Resource with the Division of Economy and Division of Human Resources. In addition under direct coordination of the President operate the Division of Radiation Protection, Transport and Radioactive Waste and the Division of International Cooperation and Communication. Specific activities are listed describing among others the issues of: - Safety of nuclear installation; - Evaluation relating to licensing of nuclear

  9. Human Antiviral Protein IFIX Suppresses Viral Gene Expression during Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) Infection and Is Counteracted by Virus-induced Proteasomal Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Marni S; Cristea, Ileana M

    2017-04-01

    The interferon-inducible protein X (IFIX), a member of the PYHIN family, was recently recognized as an antiviral factor against infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). IFIX binds viral DNA upon infection and promotes expression of antiviral cytokines. How IFIX exerts its host defense functions and whether it is inhibited by the virus remain unknown. Here, we integrated live cell microscopy, proteomics, IFIX domain characterization, and molecular virology to investigate IFIX regulation and antiviral functions during HSV-1 infection. We find that IFIX has a dynamic localization during infection that changes from diffuse nuclear and nucleoli distribution in uninfected cells to discrete nuclear puncta early in infection. This is rapidly followed by a reduction in IFIX protein levels. Indeed, using immunoaffinity purification and mass spectrometry, we define IFIX interactions during HSV-1 infection, finding an association with a proteasome subunit and proteins involved in ubiquitin-proteasome processes. Using synchronized HSV-1 infection, microscopy, and proteasome-inhibition experiments, we demonstrate that IFIX co-localizes with nuclear proteasome puncta shortly after 3 h of infection and that its pyrin domain is rapidly degraded in a proteasome-dependent manner. We further demonstrate that, in contrast to several other host defense factors, IFIX degradation is not dependent on the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of the viral protein ICP0. However, we show IFIX degradation requires immediate-early viral gene expression, suggesting a viral host suppression mechanism. The IFIX interactome also demonstrated its association with transcriptional regulatory proteins, including the 5FMC complex. We validate this interaction using microscopy and reciprocal isolations and determine it is mediated by the IFIX HIN domain. Finally, we show IFIX suppresses immediate-early and early viral gene expression during infection. Altogether, our study demonstrates that IFIX antiviral

  10. Civil liability on nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittar, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    The civil liability theory in the actual context is shown in the first and second part of this thesis, including some considerations about concepts and types of liability in dangerous and not dangerous activities. In the third part, the legal aspects of civil liability for the nuclear activities are analyzed, with a brief description of the history evolution, standard systems, inspection corporation and juridical regulation. (C.G.C.). 239 refs

  11. Focal dysfunction of the proteasome: a pathogenic factor in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabashi, Edor; Agar, Jeffrey N; Taylor, David M; Minotti, Sandra; Durham, Heather D

    2004-06-01

    Mutations in the Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD-1) gene are responsible for a familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). The present study demonstrated impaired proteasomal function in the lumbar spinal cord of transgenic mice expressing human SOD-1 with the ALS-causing mutation G93A (SOD-1(G93A)) compared to non-transgenic littermates (LM) and SOD-1(WT) transgenic mice. Chymotrypsin-like activity was decreased as early as 45 days of age. By 75 days, chymotrypsin-, trypsin-, and caspase-like activities of the proteasome were impaired, at about 50% of control activity in lumbar spinal cord, but unchanged in thoracic spinal cord and liver. Both total and specific activities of the proteasome were reduced to a similar extent, indicating that a change in proteasome function, rather than a decrease in proteasome levels, had occurred. Similar decreases of total and specific activities of the proteasome were observed in NIH 3T3 cell lines expressing fALS mutants SOD-1(G93A) and SOD-1(G41S), but not in SOD-1(WT) controls. Although overall levels of proteasome were maintained in spinal cord of SOD-1(G93A) transgenic mice, the level of 20S proteasome was substantially reduced in lumbar spinal motor neurons relative to the surrounding neuropil. It is concluded that impairment of the proteasome is an early event and contributes to ALS pathogenesis.

  12. Interplay between Structure and Charge as a Key to Allosteric Modulation of Human 20S Proteasome by the Basic Fragment of HIV-1 Tat Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Karpowicz

    Full Text Available The proteasome is a giant protease responsible for degradation of the majority of cytosolic proteins. Competitive inhibitors of the proteasome are used against aggressive blood cancers. However, broadening the use of proteasome-targeting drugs requires new mechanistic approaches to the enzyme's inhibition. In our previous studies we described Tat1 peptide, an allosteric inhibitor of the proteasome derived from a fragment of the basic domain of HIV-Tat1 protein. Here, we attempted to dissect the structural determinants of the proteasome inhibition by Tat1. Single- and multiple- alanine walking scans were performed. Tat1 analogs with stabilized beta-turn conformation at positions 4-5 and 8-9, pointed out by the molecular dynamics modeling and the alanine scan, were synthesized. Structure of Tat1 analogs were analyzed by circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies, supplemented by molecular dynamics simulations. Biological activity tests and structural studies revealed that high flexibility and exposed positive charge are hallmarks of Tat1 peptide. Interestingly, stabilization of a beta-turn at the 8-9 position was necessary to significantly improve the inhibitory potency.

  13. Nelfinavir augments proteasome inhibition by bortezomib in myeloma cells and overcomes bortezomib and carfilzomib resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, M; Bader, J; Overkleeft, H; Driessen, C

    2013-01-01

    HIV protease inhibitors (HIV-PI) are oral drugs for HIV treatment. HIV-PI have antitumor activity via induction of ER-stress, inhibition of phospho-AKT (p-AKT) and the proteasome, suggesting antimyeloma activity. We characterize the effects of all approved HIV-PI on myeloma cells. HIV-PI were compared regarding cytotoxicity, proteasome activity, ER-stress induction and AKT phosphorylation using myeloma cells in vitro. Nelfinavir is the HIV-PI with highest cytotoxic activity against primary myeloma cells and with an IC 50 near therapeutic drug blood levels (8–14 μM), irrespective of bortezomib sensitivity. Only nelfinavir inhibited intracellular proteasome activity in situ at drug concentrations <40 μℳ. Ritonavir, saquinavir and lopinavir inhibited p-AKT comparable to nelfinavir, and showed similar synergistic cytotoxicity with bortezomib against bortezomib-sensitive cells. Nelfinavir had superior synergistic activity with bortezomib/carfilzomib in particular against bortezomib/carfilzomib-resistant myeloma cells. It inhibited not only the proteasomal β1/β5 active sites, similar to bortezomib/carfilzomib, but in addition the β2 proteasome activity not targeted by bortezomib/carfilzomib. Additional inhibition of β2 proteasome activity is known to sensitize cells for bortezomib and carfilzomib. Nelfinavir has unique proteasome inhibiting activity in particular on the bortezomib/carfilzomib-insensitive tryptic (β2) proteasome activity in intact myeloma cells, and is active against bortezomib/carfilzomib-resistant myeloma cells in vitro

  14. Nuclear data activities in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jonghwa; Lee, Young-Ouk

    2002-01-01

    The situation of the nuclear data project in Korea is reviewed in this paper. The results of the first stage from 1997 - 2000 are reviewed with associated application projects such as a test reactor HANARO, a light water reactor project SMART, a liquid metal reactor project KALIMER, an ADS project KOMAC, a waste project, medial application, and electron linac application. The strategy for setting up the second stage, during 2001 - 2004, are introduced. The user requirement, quality assurance, nuclear data processing, service, and measurement activity are reviewed. (author)

  15. Studies on terrein as a new class of proteasome inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demasi, M.; Felicio, A.L.; Lima, C.; Pacheco, A.O.; Leite, H.G.; Andrade, L.H.

    2010-01-01

    The proteasome is an intracellular multicatalytic protease involved in the cell cycle regulation, signaling response, antigen presentation and apoptosis. Since proteasome inhibitors promote cell death by apoptosis, they have been proposed as new anti-tumoral drugs. Terrein, a secondary metabolite secreted by the fungus Aspergillus terreus, was firstly described in 1935. In the present work we report that terrein isolated through the screening for inhibitors of the 20S proteasome showed inhibitory effect upon both chymotrypsin- and trypsin-like activities of the multicatalytic core particle, the 20S proteasome. Despite of the high inhibitory concentration determined in vitro, that verified by incubating cells (fibroblasts and a pulmonary tumor cell line) in the presence of terrein was 4-fold lower indicating the proteasome as a selective intracellular target. Moreover, terrein promoted apoptotic cell death on both fibroblasts and pulmonary tumor cell line tested. Although terrein concentrations (mM range) necessary to elicit apoptosis in the cellular models herein tried were high when compared to those (muM and nM range) of other inhibitors recently described, its chemical structure is not correlated to any other inhibitor reported thus far. Therefore, the present results point out for the possibility of exploring terrein as a new molecular fragment for the development of synthetic proteasome inhibitors. (author)

  16. Proteasome function is not impaired in healthy aging of the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniard, Anne; Ballweg, Korbinian; Lukas, Christina; Yildirim, Ali Ö; Eickelberg, Oliver; Meiners, Silke

    2015-10-01

    Aging is the progressive loss of cellular function which inevitably leads to death. Failure of proteostasis including the decrease in proteasome function is one hallmark of aging. In the lung, proteasome activity was shown to be impaired in age-related diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, little is known on proteasome function during healthy aging. Here, we comprehensively analyzed healthy lung aging and proteasome function in wildtype, proteasome reporter and immunoproteasome knockout mice. Wildtype mice spontaneously developed senile lung emphysema while expression and activity of proteasome complexes and turnover of ubiquitinated substrates was not grossly altered in lungs of aged mice. Immunoproteasome subunits were specifically upregulated in the aged lung and the caspase-like proteasome activity concomitantly decreased. Aged knockout mice for the LMP2 or LMP7 immunoproteasome subunits showed no alteration in proteasome activities but exhibited typical lung aging phenotypes suggesting that immunoproteasome function is dispensable for physiological lung aging in mice. Our results indicate that healthy aging of the lung does not involve impairment of proteasome function. Apparently, the reserve capacity of the proteostasis systems in the lung is sufficient to avoid severe proteostasis imbalance during healthy aging.

  17. On the role of proteasomes in cell biology and proteasome inhibition as a novel frontier in the development of immunosuppressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiangping

    2002-11-01

    The proteasome, a large protease complex in cells, is the major machinery for protein degradation. It was previously considered a humble garbage collector, performing housekeeping duties to remove misfolded or spent proteins. Until recently, the interests of immunologists in proteasomes were focused largely on its role in antigen processing. Its real importance in cell biology has only been revealed contemporarily due to the availability of relatively specific inhibitors. It has now become increasingly clear that many aspects of immune responses highly depend on proper proteasome activity. Recently, a proteasome inhibitor has been successfully used to prevent acute as well as ongoing heart allograft rejection in mice. Such inhibitors are also efficacious in treating several autoimmune diseases, such as arthritis, psoriasis, and probably type I diabetes, in animal models. Phase II and III clinical trials of proteasome inhibitors in treating various tumors have shown promising results, and the side-effects of these drugs are tolerable. Therefore, proteasome inhibition represents a new and promising frontier in immunosuppressant development.

  18. Status of nuclear data activities in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Ouk; Chang, Jonghwa [Nuclear Data Evaluation Lab., Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Yusung, Taejon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-03-01

    Although nuclear data activities in Korea are still in the early stage, considerable demands for more accurate and wide-range nuclear data from nuclear R and D fields activated a new nuclear data project titled as `Development of Nuclear Data System`. It was launched this year as one of nation-wide long-term nuclear R and D programs in Korea for the next decade. Its main goals are (1) to establish nuclear data system, (2) to build up the infra-structure for utilization of nuclear data and (3) to develop highly reliable nuclear data system. To achieve these goals, international cooperation and cultivation of human resource as well as construction of measurement facilities will be indispensable. This report briefly describes the demands of nuclear data from the nuclear R and D programs, current nuclear data activities and future plan with its strategy. (author)

  19. Status of nuclear data activities in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young-Ouk; Chang, Jonghwa

    1998-01-01

    Although nuclear data activities in Korea are still in the early stage, considerable demands for more accurate and wide-range nuclear data from nuclear R and D fields activated a new nuclear data project titled as 'Development of Nuclear Data System'. It was launched this year as one of nation-wide long-term nuclear R and D programs in Korea for the next decade. Its main goals are 1) to establish nuclear data system, 2) to build up the infra-structure for utilization of nuclear data and 3) to develop highly reliable nuclear data system. To achieve these goals, international cooperation and cultivation of human resource as well as construction of measurement facilities will be indispensable. This report briefly describes the demands of nuclear data from the nuclear R and D programs, current nuclear data activities and future plan with its strategy. (author)

  20. Activity of Armenian Nuclear Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martirosyan, A.; Kurghinyan, V.

    2001-01-01

    The activities of the Armenian regulatory body (ANRA) during 2000 includes: development of normative documents in the field of the peaceful use of atomic energy; supervision for nuclear and radiation safety; personnel training and international co-operation. In the field of nuclear legislation a project of a decree of RA Government 'About making scientific and technical center on nuclear and radiation safety' and 'Requirements to a format and content of the safety analysis report for the unit 2 of ANPP' are prepared. During the year 13 inspections have been carried out in the following direction: modernization, performance of measures re-apprising of seismic safety; performance of the operational control of metal of equipment and tubes, observation of radiation safety, safety control of radioactive waste, emergency preparedness. A statistics of the incidents after the starting-up with INES rating (1995) is presented. In 2000 3 events (2 of level 0 and 1 of level 1) took place. The training activities include the set-up of a new multifunctional simulator, personnel training and examinations. The international co-operation activities connected with IAEA, NRC, European Commission and other countries are presented

  1. Activities report in nuclear physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J. F. W.; Scholten, O.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental studies of giant resonances, nuclear structure, light mass systems, and heavy mass systems are summarized. Theoretical studies of nuclear structure, and dynamics are described. Electroweak interactions; atomic and surface physics; applied nuclear physics; and nuclear medicine are

  2. Inhibitors of the proteasome suppress homologous DNA recombination in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakawa, Yasuhiro; Sonoda, Eiichiro; Barber, Louise J; Zeng, Weihua; Yokomori, Kyoko; Kimura, Hiroshi; Niimi, Atsuko; Lehmann, Alan; Zhao, Guang Yu; Hochegger, Helfrid; Boulton, Simon J; Takeda, Shunichi

    2007-09-15

    Proteasome inhibitors are novel antitumor agents against multiple myeloma and other malignancies. Despite the increasing clinical application, the molecular basis of their antitumor effect has been poorly understood due to the involvement of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in multiple cellular metabolisms. Here, we show that treatment of cells with proteasome inhibitors has no significant effect on nonhomologous end joining but suppresses homologous recombination (HR), which plays a key role in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. In this study, we treat human cells with proteasome inhibitors and show that the inhibition of the proteasome reduces the efficiency of HR-dependent repair of an artificial HR substrate. We further show that inhibition of the proteasome interferes with the activation of Rad51, a key factor for HR, although it does not affect the activation of ATM, gammaH2AX, or Mre11. These data show that the proteasome-mediated destruction is required for the promotion of HR at an early step. We suggest that the defect in HR-mediated DNA repair caused by proteasome inhibitors contributes to antitumor effect, as HR plays an essential role in cellular proliferation. Moreover, because HR plays key roles in the repair of DSBs caused by chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin and by radiotherapy, proteasome inhibitors may enhance the efficacy of these treatments through the suppression of HR-mediated DNA repair pathways.

  3. The human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 oncoproteins promotes nuclear localization of active caspase 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzo-Merino, Joaquin; Massimi, Paola; Lizano, Marcela; Banks, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    The HPV-16 E6 and E6 ⁎ proteins have been shown previously to be capable of regulating caspase 8 activity. We now show that the capacity of E6 to interact with caspase 8 is common to diverse HPV types, being also seen with HPV-11 E6, HPV-18 E6 and HPV-18 E6 ⁎ . Unlike most E6-interacting partners, caspase 8 does not appear to be a major proteasomal target of E6, but instead E6 appears able to stimulate caspase 8 activation, without affecting the overall apoptotic activity. This would appear to be mediated in part by the ability of the HPV E6 oncoproteins to recruit active caspase 8 to the nucleus. - Highlights: • Multiple HPV E6 oncoproteins interact with the caspase 8 DED domain. • HPV E6 stimulates activation of caspase 8. • HPV E6 promotes nuclear accumulation of caspase 8

  4. The human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 oncoproteins promotes nuclear localization of active caspase 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzo-Merino, Joaquin [Unidad de Investigación Biomédica en Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, México/Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Av. San Fernando No. 22, Col. Sección XVI, Tlalpan 14080 (Mexico); Massimi, Paola [International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Padriciano 99, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Lizano, Marcela, E-mail: lizanosoberon@gmail.com [Unidad de Investigación Biomédica en Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, México/Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Av. San Fernando No. 22, Col. Sección XVI, Tlalpan 14080 (Mexico); Banks, Lawrence, E-mail: banks@icgeb.org [International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Padriciano 99, I-34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    The HPV-16 E6 and E6{sup ⁎} proteins have been shown previously to be capable of regulating caspase 8 activity. We now show that the capacity of E6 to interact with caspase 8 is common to diverse HPV types, being also seen with HPV-11 E6, HPV-18 E6 and HPV-18 E6{sup ⁎}. Unlike most E6-interacting partners, caspase 8 does not appear to be a major proteasomal target of E6, but instead E6 appears able to stimulate caspase 8 activation, without affecting the overall apoptotic activity. This would appear to be mediated in part by the ability of the HPV E6 oncoproteins to recruit active caspase 8 to the nucleus. - Highlights: • Multiple HPV E6 oncoproteins interact with the caspase 8 DED domain. • HPV E6 stimulates activation of caspase 8. • HPV E6 promotes nuclear accumulation of caspase 8.

  5. A heart that beats for 500 years: age-related changes in cardiac proteasome activity, oxidative protein damage and expression of heat shock proteins, inflammatory factors, and mitochondrial complexes in Arctica islandica, the longest-living noncolonial animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnowska, Danuta; Richardson, Chris; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan; Ridgway, Iain

    2014-12-01

    Study of negligibly senescent animals may provide clues that lead to better understanding of the cardiac aging process. To elucidate mechanisms of successful cardiac aging, we investigated age-related changes in proteasome activity, oxidative protein damage and expression of heat shock proteins, inflammatory factors, and mitochondrial complexes in the heart of the ocean quahog Arctica islandica, the longest-lived noncolonial animal (maximum life span potential: 508 years). We found that in the heart of A. islandica the level of oxidatively damaged proteins did not change significantly up to 120 years of age. No significant aging-induced changes were observed in caspase-like and trypsin-like proteasome activity. Chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity showed a significant early-life decline, then it remained stable for up to 182 years. No significant relationship was observed between the extent of protein ubiquitination and age. In the heart of A. islandica, an early-life decline in expression of HSP90 and five mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes was observed. We found significant age-related increases in the expression of three cytokine-like mediators (interleukin-6, interleukin-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α) in the heart of A. islandica. Collectively, in extremely long-lived molluscs, maintenance of protein homeostasis likely contributes to the preservation of cardiac function. Our data also support the concept that low-grade chronic inflammation in the cardiovascular system is a universal feature of the aging process, which is also manifest in invertebrates. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. IAEA activities on nuclear fuel cycle 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, N.

    1997-01-01

    The presentation discussing the IAEA activities on nuclear fuel cycle reviews the following issues: organizational charts of IAEA, division of nuclear power and the fuel cycle, nuclear fuel cycle and materials section; 1997 budget estimates; budget trends; the nuclear fuel cycle programme

  7. IAEA activities on nuclear fuel cycle 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oi, N [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Materials Section

    1997-12-01

    The presentation discussing the IAEA activities on nuclear fuel cycle reviews the following issues: organizational charts of IAEA, division of nuclear power and the fuel cycle, nuclear fuel cycle and materials section; 1997 budget estimates; budget trends; the nuclear fuel cycle programme.

  8. Chemotherapy inhibits skeletal muscle ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilignac, Thomas; Temparis, Sandrine; Combaret, Lydie; Taillandier, Daniel; Pouch, Marie-Noëlle; Cervek, Matjaz; Cardenas, Diana M; Le Bricon, Thierry; Debiton, Eric; Samuels, Susan E; Madelmont, Jean-Claude; Attaix, Didier

    2002-05-15

    Chemotherapy has cachectic effects, but it is unknown whether cytostatic agents alter skeletal muscle proteolysis. We hypothesized that chemotherapy-induced alterations in protein synthesis should result in the increased incidence of abnormal proteins, which in turn should stimulate ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent proteolysis. The effects of the nitrosourea cystemustine were investigated in skeletal muscles from both healthy and colon 26 adenocarcinoma-bearing mice, an appropriate model for testing the impact of cytostatic agents. Muscle wasting was seen in both groups of mice 4 days after a single cystemustine injection, and the drug further increased the loss of muscle proteins already apparent in tumor-bearing animals. Cystemustine cured the tumor-bearing mice with 100% efficacy. Surprisingly, within 11 days of treatment, rates of muscle proteolysis progressively decreased below basal levels observed in healthy control mice and contributed to the cessation of muscle wasting. Proteasome-dependent proteolysis was inhibited by mechanisms that include reduced mRNA levels for 20S and 26S proteasome subunits, decreased protein levels of 20S proteasome subunits and the S14 non-ATPase subunit of the 26S proteasome, and impaired chymotrypsin- and trypsin-like activities of the enzyme. A combination of cisplatin and ifosfamide, two drugs that are widely used in the treatment of cancer patients, also depressed the expression of proteasomal subunits in muscles from rats bearing the MatB adenocarcinoma below basal levels. Thus, a down-regulation of ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent proteolysis is observed with various cytostatic agents and contributes to reverse the chemotherapy-induced muscle wasting.

  9. Transcriptional upregulation of BAG3 upon proteasome inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Huaqin; Liu Haimei; Zhang Haiyan; Guan Yifu; Du Zhenxian

    2008-01-01

    Proteasome inhibitors exhibit antitumoral activity against malignancies of different histology. Emerging evidence indicates that antiapoptotic factors may also accumulate as a consequence of exposure to these drugs, thus it seems plausible that activation of survival signaling cascades might compromise their antitumoral effects. Bcl-2-associated athanogene (BAG) family proteins are characterized by their property of interaction with a variety of partners involved in modulating the proliferation/death balance, including heat shock proteins (HSP), Bcl-2, Raf-1. In this report, we demonstrated that BAG3 is a novel antiapoptotic molecule induced by proteasome inhibitors in various cancer cells at the transcriptional level. Moreover, we demonstrated that BAG3 knockdown by siRNA sensitized cancer cells to MG132-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our results suggest that BAG3 induction might represents as an unwanted molecular consequence of utilizing proteasome inhibitors to combat tumors

  10. The ubiquitin-proteasome system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... the discovery of protein ubiquitination has led to the recognition of cellular proteolysis as a central area of research in biology. Eukaryotic proteins targeted for degradation by this pathway are first 'tagged' by multimers of a protein known as ubiquitin and are later proteolyzed by a giant enzyme known as the proteasome.

  11. Structure and function based design of Plasmodium-selective proteasome inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; O'Donoghue, Anthony J.; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Xie, Stanley C.; Yoo, Euna; Foe, Ian T.; Tilley, Leann; Craik, Charles S.; da Fonseca, Paula C. A.; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome is a multi-component protease complex responsible for regulating key processes such as the cell cycle and antigen presentation1. Compounds that target the proteasome are potentially valuable tools for the treatment of pathogens that depend on proteasome function for survival and replication. In particular, proteasome inhibitors have been shown to be toxic for the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum at all stages of its life cycle2-5. Most compounds that have been tested against the parasite also inhibit the mammalian proteasome resulting in toxicity that precludes their use as therapeutic agents2,6. Therefore, better definition of the substrate specificity and structural properties of the Plasmodium proteasome could enable the development of compounds with sufficient selectivity to allow their use as anti-malarial agents. To accomplish this goal, we used a substrate profiling method to uncover differences in the specificities of the human and P. falciparum proteasome. We designed inhibitors based on amino acid preferences specific to the parasite proteasome, and found that they preferentially inhibit the β 2 subunit. We determined the structure of the P. falciparum 20S proteasome bound to the inhibitor using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single particle analysis, to a resolution of 3.6 Å. These data reveal the unusually open P. falciparum β2 active site and provide valuable information regarding active site architecture that can be used to further refine inhibitor design. Furthermore, consistent with the recent finding that the proteasome is important for stress pathways associated with resistance of artemisinin (ART) family anti-malarials7,8, we observed growth inhibition synergism with low doses of this β 2 selective inhibitor in ART sensitive and resistant parasites. Finally, we demonstrated that a parasite selective inhibitor could be used to attenuate parasite growth in vivo without significant toxicity to the host. Thus, the

  12. Structure- and function-based design of Plasmodium-selective proteasome inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; O'Donoghue, Anthony J; van der Linden, Wouter A; Xie, Stanley C; Yoo, Euna; Foe, Ian T; Tilley, Leann; Craik, Charles S; da Fonseca, Paula C A; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-02-11

    The proteasome is a multi-component protease complex responsible for regulating key processes such as the cell cycle and antigen presentation. Compounds that target the proteasome are potentially valuable tools for the treatment of pathogens that depend on proteasome function for survival and replication. In particular, proteasome inhibitors have been shown to be toxic for the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum at all stages of its life cycle. Most compounds that have been tested against the parasite also inhibit the mammalian proteasome, resulting in toxicity that precludes their use as therapeutic agents. Therefore, better definition of the substrate specificity and structural properties of the Plasmodium proteasome could enable the development of compounds with sufficient selectivity to allow their use as anti-malarial agents. To accomplish this goal, here we use a substrate profiling method to uncover differences in the specificities of the human and P. falciparum proteasome. We design inhibitors based on amino-acid preferences specific to the parasite proteasome, and find that they preferentially inhibit the β2-subunit. We determine the structure of the P. falciparum 20S proteasome bound to the inhibitor using cryo-electron microscopy and single-particle analysis, to a resolution of 3.6 Å. These data reveal the unusually open P. falciparum β2 active site and provide valuable information about active-site architecture that can be used to further refine inhibitor design. Furthermore, consistent with the recent finding that the proteasome is important for stress pathways associated with resistance of artemisinin family anti-malarials, we observe growth inhibition synergism with low doses of this β2-selective inhibitor in artemisinin-sensitive and -resistant parasites. Finally, we demonstrate that a parasite-selective inhibitor could be used to attenuate parasite growth in vivo without appreciable toxicity to the host. Thus, the Plasmodium proteasome is a

  13. General overview of nuclear activities in Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karouani, K.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear activities have been introduced in Morocco since the early seventies. These activities concern the utilization of nuclear techniques in medicine, food and agriculture as well as training and research in nuclear physics. In 1984, Morocco decided to undertake a technical and economic feasibility study as well as the site study of the first nuclear power plant. Two years after, he decided to create the ''Centre National de l'Energie des Sciences et des Techniques Nucleaires'' as a technical and research support for the nuclear power program and as a promoting institute of nuclear techniques. Obviously, he also decided to set up a regulatory framework. (author)

  14. Termination of past nuclear activities at the nuclear research institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.; Krizman, M.

    2006-01-01

    Many countries, particularly in Europe, started with nuclear programs in the fifties of the last century. As a consequence nuclear research institutes were established, among them also the Institute Jozef Stefan (IJS) in Slovenia. The nuclear activities at the IJS were related to the development of uranium ore processing technology and technologies comprising uranium oxide and hexafluoride. After very intensive period of nuclear activities the decline began step by step due to different reasons. Various approaches of the termination and decommissioning of facilities were used. The inspectors of the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA), the responsible authority, started intensive activities at the IJS at the end of 2004. All together 22 research laboratories or research units were included in the inspection program and around 50 researchers of the IJS were involved into the inspection procedures. The inspection was very intensive in the laboratories and storages where past nuclear activities took place and were later on abandoned. As a result several contaminated equipments and sites in addition to around 200 unregistered sources were found. The majority of these sources is related to past nuclear activities. The inspection program related to the terminated research activities is still in progress. The IJS immediately started with the remediation activities including the development of methodology related to decontamination of radioactive liquids. The decontamination of two nuclear laboratories and three different storages of radioactive waste at its sites is in progress. Sixty of the above mentioned sources have been already stored in the Central Interim Storage for Radioactive Waste. (author)

  15. Characterisation of 20S Proteasome in Tritrichomonas foetus and Its Role during the Cell Cycle and Transformation into Endoflagellar Form.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Pereira-Neves

    Full Text Available Proteasomes are intracellular complexes that control selective protein degradation in organisms ranging from Archaea to higher eukaryotes. These structures have multiple proteolytic activities that are required for cell differentiation, replication and maintaining cellular homeostasis. Here, we document the presence of the 20S proteasome in the protist parasite Tritrichomonas foetus. Complementary techniques, such as a combination of whole genome sequencing technologies, bioinformatics algorithms, cell fractionation and biochemistry and microscopy approaches were used to characterise the 20S proteasome of T. foetus. The 14 homologues of the typical eukaryotic proteasome subunits were identified in the T. foetus genome. Alignment analyses showed that the main regulatory and catalytic domains of the proteasome were conserved in the predicted amino acid sequences from T. foetus-proteasome subunits. Immunofluorescence assays using an anti-proteasome antibody revealed a labelling distributed throughout the cytosol as punctate cytoplasmic structures and in the perinuclear region. Electron microscopy of a T. foetus-proteasome-enriched fraction confirmed the presence of particles that resembled the typical eukaryotic 20S proteasome. Fluorogenic assays using specific peptidyl substrates detected presence of the three typical peptidase activities of eukaryotic proteasomes in T. foetus. As expected, these peptidase activities were inhibited by lactacystin, a well-known specific proteasome inhibitor, and were not affected by inhibitors of serine or cysteine proteases. During the transformation of T. foetus to endoflagellar form (EFF, also known as pseudocyst, we observed correlations between the EFF formation rates, increases in the proteasome activities and reduced levels of ubiquitin-protein conjugates. The growth, cell cycle and EFF transformation of T. foetus were inhibited after treatment with lactacystin in a dose-dependent manner. Lactacystin

  16. Nuclear energy Division - 2011 Activity report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This document reports the activity of the Nuclear Energy Department (DEN) within the CEA. It evokes its international relationship (participation to international initiatives, cooperation with different countries), describes the scientific activity within the DEN, presents the Advanced Material Program, and the activities undertaken in different fields: future nuclear industrial systems (fourth generation reactors, downstream part of the future fuel cycle, fundamental scientific and technological research), optimization of the present nuclear industrial activity (second and third generation reactors, nuclear security, upstream and downstream part of the present fuel cycle), tools for nuclear development (numerical simulation, Jules Horowitz reactor), cleaning up and nuclear dismantling (dismantling strategy, the Passage project in Grenoble, works in Marcoule, the Aladin project in Fontenay, waste and material flow management, nuclear support installations, transports). It finally addresses the specific activities of the Marcoule, Cadarache and Saclay centres

  17. SPR imaging biosensor for the 20S proteasome: Sensor development and application to measurement of proteasomes in human blood plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorodkiewicz, E.; Sankiewicz, A.; Ostrowska, H.

    2011-01-01

    The 20S proteasome is a multicatalytic enzyme complex responsible for intracellular protein degradation in mammalian cells. Its antigen level or enzymatic activity in blood plasma are potentially useful markers for various malignant and nonmalignant diseases. We have developed a method for highly selective determination of the 20S proteasome using a Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging (SPRI) technique. It is based on the highly selective interaction between the proteasome's catalytic β5 subunit and immobilized inhibitors (the synthetic peptide PSI and epoxomicin). Inhibitor concentration and pH were optimized. Analytical responses, linear ranges, accuracy, precision and interferences were investigated. Biosensors based on either PSI and epoxomicin were found to be suitable for quantitative determination of the proteasome, with a precision of ±10% for each, and recoveries of 102% and 113%, respectively, and with little interference by albumin, trypsin, chymotrypsin, cathepsin B and papain. The proteasome also was determined in plasma of healthy subjects and of patients suffering from acute leukemia. Both biosensors gave comparable results (2860 ng.mL -1 on average for control, and 42300 ng.mL -1 on average for leukemia patients). (author)

  18. Ciliopathy proteins regulate paracrine signaling by modulating proteasomal degradation of mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangfan P.; Tsai, I-Chun; Morleo, Manuela; Oh, Edwin C.; Leitch, Carmen C.; Massa, Filomena; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Parker, David S.; Finley, Daniel; Zaghloul, Norann A.; Franco, Brunella; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are critical mediators of paracrine signaling; however, it is unknown whether proteins that contribute to ciliopathies converge on multiple paracrine pathways through a common mechanism. Here, we show that loss of cilopathy-associated proteins Bardet-Biedl syndrome 4 (BBS4) or oral-facial-digital syndrome 1 (OFD1) results in the accumulation of signaling mediators normally targeted for proteasomal degradation. In WT cells, several BBS proteins and OFD1 interacted with proteasomal subunits, and loss of either BBS4 or OFD1 led to depletion of multiple subunits from the centrosomal proteasome. Furthermore, overexpression of proteasomal regulatory components or treatment with proteasomal activators sulforaphane (SFN) and mevalonolactone (MVA) ameliorated signaling defects in cells lacking BBS1, BBS4, and OFD1, in morphant zebrafish embryos, and in induced neurons from Ofd1-deficient mice. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that other proteasome-dependent pathways not known to be associated with ciliopathies are defective in the absence of ciliopathy proteins. We found that loss of BBS1, BBS4, or OFD1 led to decreased NF-κB activity and concomitant IκBβ accumulation and that these defects were ameliorated with SFN treatment. Taken together, our data indicate that basal body proteasomal regulation governs paracrine signaling pathways and suggest that augmenting proteasomal function might benefit ciliopathy patients. PMID:24691443

  19. Mouse zygote-specific proteasome assembly chaperone important for maternal-to-zygotic transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Wook Shin

    2012-11-01

    During the maternal-to-zygotic transition (MZT, maternal proteins in oocytes are degraded by the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS, and new proteins are synthesized from the zygotic genome. However, the specific mechanisms underlying the UPS at the MZT are not well understood. We identified a molecule named zygote-specific proteasome assembly chaperone (ZPAC that is specifically expressed in mouse gonads, and expression of ZPAC was transiently increased at the mouse MZT. ZPAC formed a complex with Ump1 and associated with precursor forms of 20S proteasomes. Transcription of ZPAC genes was also under the control of an autoregulatory feedback mechanism for the compensation of reduced proteasome activity similar to Ump1 and 20S proteasome subunit gene expression. Knockdown of ZPAC in early embryos caused a significant reduction of proteasome activity and decrease in Ump1 and mature proteasomes, leading to accumulation of proteins that need to be degraded at the MZT and early developmental arrest. Therefore, a unique proteasome assembly pathway mediated by ZPAC is important for progression of the mouse MZT.

  20. Regulation of mIκBNS stability through PEST-mediated degradation by proteasome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Koog Chan; Jeong, Jiyeong; Kim, Keun Il, E-mail: kikim@sookmyung.ac.kr

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • mIκBNS is degraded rapidly by proteasome without ubiquitylation. • N-terminal PEST sequence is responsible for the unstable nature of mIκBNS. • PEST sequence is not critical for nuclear localization of mIκBNS. • There is single bona fide NLS at the C-terminus of mIκBNS. - Abstract: Negative regulatory proteins in a cytokine signaling play a critical role in restricting unwanted excess activation of the signaling pathway. At the same time, negative regulatory proteins need to be removed rapidly from cells to respond properly to the next incoming signal. A nuclear IκB protein called IκBNS is known to inhibit a subset of NF-κB target genes upon its expression by NF-κB activation. Here, we show a mechanism to control the stability of mIκBNS which might be important for cells to prepare the next round signaling. We found that mIκBNS is a short-lived protein of which the stability is controlled by proteasome, independent of ubiquitylation process. We identified that the N-terminal PEST sequence in mIκBNS was critical for the regulation of stability.

  1. Nuclear power development and nuclear data activities in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gui Ah Auu [Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research, Ministry of Science, Technology and the Environment, Selangor (Malaysia)

    1999-03-01

    In this paper, research activities on nuclear power requirement carried out jointly by MINT and other organizations are described. Also discussed are activities on neutronics such as TRIGA reactor fuel management, storage pool criticality, and reactor fuel transfer cask calculations. In addition, recent work on radiation transport activities in MINT such as skyshine and photon phantom dose calculations using the MCNP and MRIPP computer codes are presented. Finally, nuclear data measurement works by researchers in Malaysian universities are described. (author)

  2. Nuclear power development and nuclear data activities in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gui Ah Auu

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, research activities on nuclear power requirement carried out jointly by MINT and other organizations are described. Also discussed are activities on neutronics such as TRIGA reactor fuel management, storage pool criticality, and reactor fuel transfer cask calculations. In addition, recent work on radiation transport activities in MINT such as skyshine and photon phantom dose calculations using the MCNP and MRIPP computer codes are presented. Finally, nuclear data measurement works by researchers in Malaysian universities are described. (author)

  3. Annual report on nuclear physics activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeringa, W.; Voss, F.

    1988-02-01

    This report surveys the activities in basic research from July 1, 1986 to June 30, 1987 at the Institute for Nuclear Physics (IK) of the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe. The research program of this institute comprises laser spectroscopy, nuclear reactions with light ions, neutron physics, neutrino physics and high energy physics, as well as detector technology. (orig.) [de

  4. Activities planning of Nuclear Data Center - 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, R.P.K.

    1980-01-01

    The main process systems of nuclear data files and the actual nuclear data processing implantation in the Instituto de Estudos Avancados, are presented. The research activities of Nuclear Data Center during 1980 in relation to the implantation of file process systems for multigroup cross sections, and the calculations of integral reactor parameters, are described. (M.C.K.) [pt

  5. Characterization of the proteasome from the extremely halophilic archaeon Haloarcula marismortui

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Franzetti

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20S proteasome, comprising two subunits α and β, was purified from the extreme halophilic archaeon Haloarcula marismortui, which grows only in saturated salt conditions. The three-dimensional reconstruction of the H. marismortui proteasome (Hm proteasome, obtained from negatively stained electron micrographs, is virtually identical to the structure of a thermophilic proteasome filtered to the same resolution. The stability of the Hm proteasome was found to be less salt-dependent than that of other halophilic enzymes previously described. The proteolytic activity of the Hm proteasome was investigated using the malate dehydrogenase from H. marismortui (HmMalDH as a model substrate. The HmMalDH denatures when the salt concentration is decreased below 2 M. Under these conditions, the proteasome efficiently cleaves HmMalDH during its denaturation process, but the fully denatured HmMalDH is poorly degraded. These in vitro experiments show that, at low salt concentrations, the 20S proteasome from halophilic archaea eliminates a misfolded protein.

  6. BAG3 induces the sequestration of proteasomal clients into cytoplasmic puncta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoia, Melania; Boncoraglio, Alessandra; Vinet, Jonathan; Morelli, Federica F; Brunsting, Jeanette F; Poletti, Angelo; Krom, Sabine; Reits, Eric; Kampinga, Harm H; Carra, Serena

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells use autophagy and the ubiquitin–proteasome system as their major protein degradation pathways. Upon proteasomal impairment, cells switch to autophagy to ensure proper clearance of clients (the proteasome-to-autophagy switch). The HSPA8 and HSPA1A cochaperone BAG3 has been suggested to be involved in this switch. However, at present it is still unknown whether and to what extent BAG3 can indeed reroute proteasomal clients to the autophagosomal pathway. Here, we show that BAG3 induces the sequestration of ubiquitinated clients into cytoplasmic puncta colabeled with canonical autophagy linkers and markers. Following proteasome inhibition, BAG3 upregulation significantly contributes to the compensatory activation of autophagy and to the degradation of the (poly)ubiquitinated proteins. BAG3 binding to the ubiquitinated clients occurs through the BAG domain, in competition with BAG1, another BAG family member, that normally directs ubiquitinated clients to the proteasome. Therefore, we propose that following proteasome impairment, increasing the BAG3/BAG1 ratio ensures the “BAG-instructed proteasomal to autophagosomal switch and sorting” (BIPASS). PMID:25046115

  7. Early cysteine-dependent inactivation of 26S proteasomes does not involve particle disassembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Hugo

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Under oxidative stress 26S proteasomes suffer reversible disassembly into its 20S and 19S subunits, a process mediated by HSP70. This inhibits the degradation of polyubiquitinated proteins by the 26S proteasome and allows the degradation of oxidized proteins by a free 20S proteasome. Low fluxes of antimycin A-stimulated ROS production caused dimerization of mitochondrial peroxiredoxin 3 and cytosolic peroxiredoxin 2, but not peroxiredoxin overoxidation and overall oxidation of cellular protein thiols. This moderate redox imbalance was sufficient to inhibit the ATP stimulation of 26S proteasome activity. This process was dependent on reversible cysteine oxidation. Moreover, our results show that this early inhibition of ATP stimulation occurs previous to particle disassembly, indicating an intermediate step during the redox regulation of the 26S proteasome with special relevance under redox signaling rather than oxidative stress conditions.

  8. Activity transport in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narasimhan, S.V.

    2000-01-01

    The chemistry of the primary coolant is such that the general material loss is immeasurably low. However, the generation of radioactive corrosion products in the coolant, their transportation and distribution to different out of core surfaces occur irrevocably through the life cycle of the reactor. This phenomena leading to the build up of radiation field, which is unique to the nuclear reactor systems, is the only major problem of any significance. Minimization of this phenomenon can be done by many ways. The processes involved in the mechanism of activity transport are quite complex and are not at all thoroughly understood. The codes that have been developed so far use many empirical coefficients for some of the rate processes, which are either partially justified by simulated experimental studies or supported theoretically. In a multi-metal system like that of the reactor, the corrosion rates or release rates need not be similar especially in reactors like PHWRs. The mechanisms involved in the formation of protective oxide coating are quite complex to model in a simplified manner. The paper brings out some these features involved in the activity transport modeling and analyses the need for extensive field related experimental work to substantiate the model. (author)

  9. Isoform-specific proteasomal degradation of Rbfox3 during chicken embryonic development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kee K.; Adelstein, Robert S.; Kawamoto, Sachiyo, E-mail: kawamots@mail.nih.gov

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Protein stability of Rbfox3 splice isoforms is differentially regulated. • Rbfox3-d31, an Rbfox3 isoform lacking the RRM, is highly susceptible to degradation. • The protein stability of Rbfox3-d31 is regulated by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. • Rbfox3-d31 inhibits the nuclear localization of Rbfox2. • Rbfox3-d31 inhibits the splicing activity of Rbfox2. - Abstract: Rbfox3, a neuron-specific RNA-binding protein, plays an important role in neuronal differentiation during development. An isoform Rbfox3-d31, which excludes the 93-nucleotide cassette exon within the RNA recognition motif of chicken Rbfox3, has been previously identified. However, the cellular functions of Rbfox3-d31 remain largely unknown. Here we find that Rbfox3-d31 mRNA is highly expressed during the early developmental stages of the chicken embryo, while Rbfox3-d31 protein is barely detected during the same stage due to its rapid degradation mediated by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. Importantly, this degradation is specific to the Rbfox3-d31 isoform and it does not occur with full-length Rbfox3. Furthermore, suppression of Rbfox3-d31 protein degradation with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 attenuates the splicing activity of another Rbfox family member Rbfox2 by altering the subcellular localization of Rbfox2. These results suggest that Rbfox3-d31 functions as a repressor for the splicing activity of the Rbfox family and its protein level is regulated in an isoform-specific manner in vivo.

  10. Nuclear desalination activities in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, B.

    1999-01-01

    The main emphasis of this article is on utilization of nuclear energy for desalination. Nuclear desalination is cheaper, eco-friendly and assists in sustainable growth of total energy generation programme in a country. PHWR type reactors are the main stay of nuclear energy programme in India. Nuclear waste heat for desalination is available in the moderator system of the 220 MW(e) and 500 MW(e) PHWRs. The low temperature evaporation technology (LET) for producing pure water from sea water is also discussed

  11. ABA-dependent inhibition of the ubiquitin proteasome system during germination at high temperature in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Rex Shun; Pan, Shiyue; Zhao, Rongmin; Gazzarrini, Sonia

    2016-12-01

    During germination, endogenous and environmental factors trigger changes in the transcriptome, translatome and proteome to break dormancy. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) degrades proteins that promote dormancy to allow germination. While research on the UPS has focused on the identification of proteasomal substrates, little information is known about the regulation of its activity. Here we characterized the activity of the UPS during dormancy release and maintenance by monitoring protein ubiquitination and degradation of two proteasomal substrates: Suc-LLVY-AMC, a well characterized synthetic substrate, and FUSCA3 (FUS3), a dormancy-promoting transcription factor degraded by the 26S proteasome. Our data indicate that proteasome activity and protein ubiquitination increase during imbibition at optimal temperature (21°C), and are required for seed germination. However, abscisic acid (ABA) and supraoptimal temperature (32°C) inhibit germination by dampening both protein ubiquitination and proteasome activity. Inhibition of UPS function by high temperature is reduced by the ABA biosynthesis inhibitor, fluridone, and in ABA biosynthetic mutants, suggesting that it is ABA dependent. Accordingly, inhibition of FUS3 degradation at 32°C is also dependent on ABA. Native gels show that inhibition of proteasome activity is caused by interference with the 26S/30S ratio as well as free 19S and 20S levels, impacting the proteasome degradation cycle. Transfer experiments show that ABA-mediated inhibition of proteasome activity at 21°C is restricted to the first 2 days of germination, a time window corresponding to seed sensitivity to environmental and ABA-mediated growth inhibition. Our data show that ABA and high temperature inhibit germination under unfavourable growth conditions by repressing the UPS. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Nuclear Energy Division. 2009 Activity report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    After a presentation of the future investment programme of the nuclear energy department at the French national Nuclear Research Center (CEA), this report proposes a description of tomorrow's industrial nuclear systems (back-end of future fuel cycle, fourth generation systems, basic scientific and technological research), describes how current nuclear industrial systems are optimized (front-end and back-end of fuel cycle, second and third generation reactors). It presents the main tools for nuclear development: simulation programme, the Jules Horowitz reactor project, maintenance of specific facilities, research valorisation. It reports the activities related to the clean-up and dismantling in different nuclear sites, presents the activities of CEA's nuclear research centres (Saclay, Cadarache, Marcoule), briefly presents the transverse material programme, recalls some events, and gives some key figures

  13. The juridical issues of nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaume, M.; Kerever, A.; Pasquier, J.L.; Brillanceau, F.; Besson, J.P.; Chaumette, L.; Niel, J.C.; Reculeau, Y.; Treflez, M.; Pezennec, D.; Cochaud, J.F.; Phan Van, L.; Cormis, F. de; Galmot, Y.; Saint-Raymond, P.; Blanchard, P.; Robert, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    This issue is dedicated to the juridical aspects of civil nuclear activities. It comprises 3 parts and 16 papers. Radiation protection law is dealt with in part 1: prevention of risks due to ionizing radiations in occupational environment; sources and men; the regulation of radioactive materials transport; the regulation of the rejection of gaseous and liquid radioactive effluents. Part 2 tackles the question of checking the pacific uses of nuclear energy, that is the juridical consequences of the non-proliferation and physical protection policies are reviewed: international efforts that aim to limit the military uses of nuclear energy; the juridical and practical aspects of non-proliferation rules and international controls; the national control of radioactive materials. The juridical framing of nuclear activities, nuclear civil liability and infraction of the law are gathered in part 3: the CIINB and its contribution to the safety of nuclear installations; the mining law; the control of nuclear installations safety; the influence of the realization of the nuclear program on the evolution of the French law; the intervention of the administrative judge in nuclear affairs; the protection of population against nuclear risk - statement of existing provisions and new trends; the special regime of the civil nuclear responsibility - at the time of change; the penal infractions of the nuclear law. (J.S.)

  14. Application of nuclear activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamonov, E.I.; Khlystova, A.F.

    1979-01-01

    Consideration is given to the applications of nuclear-activation analysis (NAA) as discussed at the International Conference of 1977. One of the new results in the present-day NAA practices is the growing number of elements detected in samples without using a destructive radiochemical separation. An essential feature in this context is the development of the system automation of control and information NAA operations through the use computers. In biological medicine a multicomponent NAA is employed to determine the concentration of elements in various human organs and objects, in metabolic studies and for diagnostic purposes. In agriculture NAA finds applications in the evaluation of grain protein, analysis of element feed composition, soil and fertilizers. The application of this method to the environmental monitoring is considered with particular reference to the element analysis of water (especially drinking water), air, plant residues. Data are presented for the use of NAA in metallurgy, geology, archaeology and criminal law. Tables are provided to illustrate the uses of NAA in various fields

  15. Argentine nuclear energy standardization activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boero, Norma; Corcuera, Roberto; Palacios, Tulio A.; Hey, Alfredo M.; Berte, G.; Trama, L.

    2004-01-01

    The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has more than 200 Technical Committees that develop technical standards. During April 2004 took place in Buenos Aires the 14th Plenary of the ISO/TC 85 Nuclear Energy Committee. During this Plenary issues as Nuclear Terminology, Radiation Protection, Nuclear Fuels, Nuclear Reactors and Irradiation Dosimetry was dealt with. 105 International delegates and 45 National delegates (belonging to CNEA, ARN, NASA, INVAP, CONUAR, IONICS and other organizations) attended the meetings. During this meeting ISO/TC 85 changed its scope; the new scope of the Committee is 'Standardization in the fields of peaceful applications of nuclear energy and of the protection of individuals against all sources of ionizing radiations'. This work summarizes the most important advances and resolutions about the development of standards taken during this meeting as well as the main conclusions. (author) [es

  16. Bladder cancer detection using a peptide substrate of the 20S proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruba, Natalia; Wysocka, Magdalena; Brzezińska, Magdalena; Dębowski, Dawid; Sieńczyk, Marcin; Gorodkiewicz, Ewa; Guszcz, Tomasz; Czaplewski, Cezary; Rolka, Krzysztof; Lesner, Adam

    2016-08-01

    The 20S catalytic core of the human 26S proteasome can be secreted from cells, and high levels of extracellular 20S proteasome have been linked to many types of cancers and autoimmune diseases. Several diagnostic approaches have been developed that detect 20S proteasome activity in plasma, but these suffer from problems with efficiency and sensitivity. In this report, we describe the optimization and synthesis of an internally quenched fluorescent substrate of the 20S proteasome, and investigate its use as a potential diagnostic test in bladder cancer. This peptide, 2-aminobenzoic acid (ABZ)-Val-Val-Ser-Tyr-Ala-Met-Gly-Tyr(3-NO2 )-NH2 , is cleaved by the chymotrypsin 20S proteasome subunit and displays an excellent specificity constant value (9.7 × 10(5)  m(-1) ·s(-1) ) and a high kcat (8 s(-1) ). Using this peptide, we identified chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity in the majority of urine samples obtained from patients with bladder cancer, whereas the proteasome activity in urine samples from healthy volunteers was below the detection limit (0.5 pm). These findings were confirmed by an inhibitory study and immunochemistry methods. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  17. Nuclear information: An overview of IAEA's activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchesi, I.H.; Konstantinov, L.V.

    1986-01-01

    As stated in this overview of IAEA nuclear information activities the Agency's role in information services is rapidly evolving and multifaceted. The Agency maintains more than 200 computerized files of information. Some 60 of these are part of systems directly related to nuclear activities. Some of these are briefly profiled in this overview such as INIS, the IAEA Nuclear Data Programme, the IAEA Incident Reporting System, the IAEA Energy and Economic Databank, the IAEA Power Reactor Information System, the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System, and the International Uranium Geology Information System. Future directions are pointed out. Different ways to upgrade information systems are listed

  18. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib induces testicular toxicity by upregulation of oxidative stress, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and deregulation of germ cell development in adult murine testis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wei; Fu, Jianfang; Zhang, Shun; Zhao, Jie; Xie, Nianlin; Cai, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how chemotherapeutic agents mediate testicular toxicity is crucial in light of compelling evidence that male infertility, one of the severe late side effects of intensive cancer treatment, occurs more often than they are expected to. Previous study demonstrated that bortezomib (BTZ), a 26S proteasome inhibitor used to treat refractory multiple myeloma (MM), exerts deleterious impacts on spermatogenesis in pubertal mice via unknown mechanisms. Here, we showed that intermittent treatment with BTZ resulted in fertility impairment in adult mice, evidenced by testicular atrophy, desquamation of immature germ cells and reduced caudal sperm storage. These deleterious effects may originate from the elevated apoptosis in distinct germ cells during the acute phase and the subsequent disruption of Sertoli–germ cell anchoring junctions (AJs) during the late recovery. Mechanistically, balance between AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and Akt/ERK pathway appeared to be indispensable for AJ integrity during the late testicular recovery. Of particular interest, the upregulated testicular apoptosis and the following disturbance of Sertoli–germ cell interaction may both stem from the excessive oxidative stress elicited by BTZ exposure. We also provided the in vitro evidence that AMPK-dependent mechanisms counteract follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) proliferative effects in BTZ-exposed Sertoli cells. Collectively, BTZ appeared to efficiently prevent germ cells from normal development via multiple mechanisms in adult mice. Employment of antioxidants and/or AMPK inhibitor may represent an attractive strategy of fertility preservation in male MM patients exposed to conventional BTZ therapy and warrants further investigation. - Highlights: • Intermittent treatment with BTZ caused fertility impairment in adult mice. • BTZ treatment elicited apoptosis during early phase of testicular recovery. • Up-regulation of oxidative stress by BTZ treatment

  19. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib induces testicular toxicity by upregulation of oxidative stress, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and deregulation of germ cell development in adult murine testis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wei [Department of Human Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Fu, Jianfang [Department of Endocrinology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Zhang, Shun [Reproductive Medicine Center, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Zhao, Jie [Department of Human Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Xie, Nianlin, E-mail: xienianlin@126.com [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Cai, Guoqing, E-mail: firstchair@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China)

    2015-06-01

    Understanding how chemotherapeutic agents mediate testicular toxicity is crucial in light of compelling evidence that male infertility, one of the severe late side effects of intensive cancer treatment, occurs more often than they are expected to. Previous study demonstrated that bortezomib (BTZ), a 26S proteasome inhibitor used to treat refractory multiple myeloma (MM), exerts deleterious impacts on spermatogenesis in pubertal mice via unknown mechanisms. Here, we showed that intermittent treatment with BTZ resulted in fertility impairment in adult mice, evidenced by testicular atrophy, desquamation of immature germ cells and reduced caudal sperm storage. These deleterious effects may originate from the elevated apoptosis in distinct germ cells during the acute phase and the subsequent disruption of Sertoli–germ cell anchoring junctions (AJs) during the late recovery. Mechanistically, balance between AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and Akt/ERK pathway appeared to be indispensable for AJ integrity during the late testicular recovery. Of particular interest, the upregulated testicular apoptosis and the following disturbance of Sertoli–germ cell interaction may both stem from the excessive oxidative stress elicited by BTZ exposure. We also provided the in vitro evidence that AMPK-dependent mechanisms counteract follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) proliferative effects in BTZ-exposed Sertoli cells. Collectively, BTZ appeared to efficiently prevent germ cells from normal development via multiple mechanisms in adult mice. Employment of antioxidants and/or AMPK inhibitor may represent an attractive strategy of fertility preservation in male MM patients exposed to conventional BTZ therapy and warrants further investigation. - Highlights: • Intermittent treatment with BTZ caused fertility impairment in adult mice. • BTZ treatment elicited apoptosis during early phase of testicular recovery. • Up-regulation of oxidative stress by BTZ treatment

  20. Apoptosis and radiosensitization of Hodgkin cells by proteasome inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajonk, Frank; Pajonk, Katja; McBride, William H.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Malignant cells from Hodgkin's disease have been reported to be defective in regulation of NF-κB activity. Ionizing radiation is known to activate NF-κB, and it has been suggested that this pathway may protect cells from apoptosis following exposure to radiation and other therapeutic agents. Defective NF-κB regulation in Hodgkin cells could therefore dictate the response of this disease to therapy, as well as be responsible for maintaining the malignant phenotype. The purpose of this study was to explore whether NF-κB activity could be modulated in Hodgkin cells and whether it determines the response of these cells to treatment with ionizing radiation and/or dexamethasone. Methods and Materials: Activation of NF-κB in cells is accomplished in large part by degradation of its inhibitor IκB through the 26s proteasome. HD-My-Z Hodgkin cells were treated with the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 or transduced with a dominant negative super-repressor IκBα. Clonogenic survival, apoptosis, proteasome activity, and NF-κB binding activity were monitored in response to ionizing radiation and/or dexamethasone treatment. Results: HD-My-Z Hodgkin cells had modest NF-κB levels but, unlike other cell types, did not decrease their level of constitutively active NF-κB in response to proteasome inhibition with MG-132. In contrast, transduction with a non-phosphorable IκBα construct abolished expression. MG-132 did, however, induce apoptosis in HD-My-Z cells and sensitized them to ionizing radiation. Dexamethasone treatment had no effect on NF-κB activity or clonogenic survival of Hodgkin cells, but protected them from irradiation. Conclusion: We conclude that inhibition of 26s proteasome activity can induce apoptosis in HD-My-Z Hodgkin cells and radiosensitize them, in spite of the fact that their constitutively active NF-κB levels are unaltered. The proteasome may be a promising new therapeutic target for intervention in this disease. In contrast, the use of

  1. Nuclear data: IAEA activity overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchezi, A.Kh.; Konstantinov, L.V.

    1986-01-01

    The IAEA data banks, aimed at expanding information exchange and maintaining science and technology development in the whole world are briefly described. The following items are are considered: INIS; power reactor information system (PRIS); NPP incident information system (IRS); research reactor data base (RRDB); nuclear fuel cycle information system (NFCIS); nuclear data system (NDS); International uranium geology information system (INTURGEO); power engineering and economy data bank (PEEDB); radioactive material shipment data base; isotopic hydrology data base

  2. Recent Activities on Global Nuclear Safety Regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kun-Woo; Park, Jeong-Seop; Kim, Do-Hyoung

    2006-01-01

    Recently, rapid progress on the globalization of the nuclear safety issues is being made in IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) and its member states. With the globalization, the need for international cooperation among international bodies and member states continues to grow for resolving these universal nuclear safety issues. Furthermore, the importance of strengthening the global nuclear safety regime is emphasized through various means, such as efforts in application of IAEA safety standards to all nuclear installations in the world and in strengthening the code of conduct and the convention on nuclear safety. In this regards, it is important for us to keep up with the activities related with the global nuclear safety regime as an IAEA member state and a leading country in nuclear safety regulation

  3. Activities of the Nuclear Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuketa, Toyojiro

    1978-01-01

    The present status of international cooperation system for the nuclear data activities is introductorily explained in outline. The Nuclear Data Center of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is presently the only public data center in the field of nuclear data in Japan, and it has the following scope of the works: evaluation of the nuclear data, compilation of the Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (JENDL), application of the data including benchmark tests, development of the data storage, retrieval and processing systems, data service to the users, secretariat of the Japanese Nuclear Data Committee, and international cooperation. An introduction to the use of nuclear data is given with a brief information on the availability of the data and with some matters that demand special attention. (auth.)

  4. Quantitative assessment of the degradation of aggregated TDP-43 mediated by the ubiquitin proteasome system and macroautophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascella, Roberta; Fani, Giulia; Capitini, Claudia; Rusmini, Paola; Poletti, Angelo; Cecchi, Cristina; Chiti, Fabrizio

    2017-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions are neurodegenerative disorders that share the cytosolic deposition of TDP-43 (TAR DNA-binding protein 43) in the CNS. TDP-43 is well known as being actively degraded by both the proteasome and macroautophagy. The well-documented decrease in the efficiency of these clearance systems in aging and neurodegeneration, as well as the genetic evidence that many of the familial forms of TDP-43 proteinopathies involve genes that are associated with them, suggest that a failure of these protein degradation systems is a major factor that contributes to the onset of TDP-43-associated disorders. Here, we inserted preformed human TDP-43 aggregates in the cytosol of murine NSC34 and N2a cells in diffuse form and observed their degradation under conditions in which exogenous TDP-43 is not expressed and endogenous nuclear TDP-43 is not recruited, thereby allowing a time zero to be established in TDP-43 degradation and to observe its disposal kinetically and analytically. TDP-43 degradation was observed in the absence and presence of selective inhibitors and small interfering RNAs against the proteasome and autophagy. We found that cytosolic diffuse aggregates of TDP-43 can be distinguished in 3 different classes on the basis of their vulnerability to degradation, which contributed to the definition-with previous reports-of a total of 6 distinct classes of misfolded TDP-43 species that range from soluble monomer to undegradable macroaggregates. We also found that the proteasome and macroautophagy-degradable pools of TDP-43 are fully distinguishable, rather than in equilibrium between them on the time scale required for degradation, and that a significant crosstalk exists between the 2 degradation processes.-Cascella, R., Fani, G., Capitini, C., Rusmini, P., Poletti, A., Cecchi, C., Chiti, F. Quantitative assessment of the degradation of aggregated TDP-43 mediated by the ubiquitin

  5. Peptide-based proteasome inhibitors in anticancer drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micale, Nicola; Scarbaci, Kety; Troiano, Valeria; Ettari, Roberta; Grasso, Silvana; Zappalà, Maria

    2014-09-01

    The identification of the key role of the eukaryotic 26S proteasome in regulated intracellular proteolysis and its importance as a target in many pathological conditions wherein the proteasomal activity is defective (e.g., malignancies, autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, etc.) prompted several research groups to the development of specific inhibitors of this multicatalytic complex with the aim of obtaining valid drug candidates. In regard to the anticancer therapy, the peptide boronate bortezomib (Velcade®) represents the first molecule approved by FDA for the treatment of multiple myeloma in 2003 and mantle cell lymphoma in 2006. Since then, a plethora of molecules targeting the proteasome have been identified as potential anticancer agents and a few of them reached clinical trials or are already in the market (i.e., carfilzomib; Kyprolis®). In most cases, the design of new proteasome inhibitors (PIs) takes into account a proven peptide or pseudopeptide motif as a base structure and places other chemical entities throughout the peptide skeleton in such a way to create an efficacious network of interactions within the catalytic sites. The purpose of this review is to provide an in-depth look at the current state of the research in the field of peptide-based PIs, specifically those ones that might find an application as anticancer agents. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Antiatherogenic effect of quercetin is mediated by proteasome inhibition in the aorta and circulating leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashevin, Denis A; Tumanovska, Lesya V; Dosenko, Victor E; Nagibin, Vasyl S; Gurianova, Veronika L; Moibenko, Alexey A

    2011-01-01

    Quercetin, a plant-derived flavonoid, has attracted considerable attention as promising compound for heart disease prevention and therapy. It has been linked to decreased mortality from heart disease and decreased incidence of stroke. Here, we report new data showing the angioprotective properties of quercetin mediated by its effect on proteasomal proteolysis. This study was designed to investigate the ability of quercetin to modulate proteasomal activity in a rabbit model of cholesterol-induced atherosclerosis. First, we show proteasomal trypsin-like (TL) activity increased up to 2.4-fold, chymotrypsin-like (CTL) activity increased by up to 43% and peptidyl-glutamyl peptide-hydrolyzing (PGPH) activity increased by up to 10% after 8 weeks of a cholesterol-rich diet. A single intravenous injection of the water-soluble form of quercetin (Corvitin) significantly decreased proteasomal TL activity 1.85-fold in monocytes, and decreased the CTL and PGPH activities more than 2-fold in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) after 2 h. Prolonged administration (1 month) of Corvitin to animals following a cholesterol-rich diet significantly decreased all types of proteolytic proteasome activities both in tissues and in circulating leukocytes and was associated with the reduction of atherosclerotic lesion areas in the aorta. Additionally, the pharmacological form of quercetin (Quertin) was shown to have an antiatherogenic effect and an ability to inhibit proteasome activities.

  7. Activities of IPEN Nuclear Metrology Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, M.S.; Koskinas, M.F.; Pocobi, E.; Silva, C.A.M.; Machado, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    The activities of IPEN Nuclear Metrology Laboratory, which the principal objective is radionuclides activities determination for supplying sources and standard radioactive solutions in activity are presented. The systems installed, the activity bands and some of standards radionuclides are shown. (C.G.C.) [pt

  8. 26 S proteasomes function as stable entities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendil, Klavs B; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Tanaka, Keiji

    2002-01-01

    , shuttles between a free state and the 26-S proteasome, bringing substrate to the complex. However, S5a was not found in the free state in HeLa cells. Besides, all subunits in PA700, including S5a, exchanged at similar low rates. It therefore seems that 26-S proteasomes function as stable entities during...

  9. Defining the Strategy of Nuclear Activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racana, R.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents nuclear activity as defined within the field of the nuclear industry, which is studied from its capacity to generate electric power to its application in industry and medicine as well as a source for weapons of mass destruction. These fields of analysis introduce some problems that the nuclear activity itself must know how to confront employing action strategies aimed at becoming an activity to be kept in mind when making use of the benefits that its peaceful use contributes to human life. (Author)

  10. Proteasome inhibitors induce apoptosis and reduce viral replication in primary effusion lymphoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saji, Chiaki [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Higashi, Chizuka; Niinaka, Yasufumi [Faculty of Medicine, University of Yamanashi, Chuoh-shi 409-3898 (Japan); Yamada, Koji [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Noguchi, Kohji [Faculty of Pharmacy, Keio University, 1-5-30 Shiba-koen, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8512 (Japan); Fujimuro, Masahiro, E-mail: fuji2@mb.kyoto-phu.ac.jp [Department of Cell Biology, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Misasagi-Shichonocho 1, Yamashinaku, Kyoto 607-8412 (Japan)

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Constitutive NF-{kappa}B signaling is essential for the survival and growth of PEL cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NF-{kappa}B signaling is upregulated by the proteasome-dependent degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proteasome inhibitors suppress NF-{kappa}B signaling and induce apoptosis in PEL cells through stabilization of I{kappa}B{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proteasome inhibitors suppress viral replication in PEL cells during lytic KSHV infection. -- Abstract: Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is an aggressive neoplasm caused by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). This study provides evidence that proteasomal activity is required for both survival of PEL cells stably harboring the KSHV genome and viral replication of KSHV. We evaluated the cytotoxic effects of proteasome inhibitors on PEL cells. The proteasome inhibitors MG132, lactacystin, and proteasome inhibitor I dramatically inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis of PEL cells through the accumulation of p21 and p27. Furthermore, proteasome inhibitors induced the stabilization of NF-{kappa}B inhibitory molecule (I{kappa}B{alpha}) and suppressed the transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B in PEL cells. The NF-{kappa}B specific inhibitor BAY11-7082 also induced apoptosis in PEL cells. The constitutive activation of NF-{kappa}B signaling is essential for the survival and growth of B cell lymphoma cells, including PEL cells. NF-{kappa}B signaling is upregulated by proteasome-dependent degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. The suppression of NF-{kappa}B signaling by proteasome inhibitors may contribute to the induction of apoptosis in PEL cells. In addition, proteasome activity is required for KSHV replication in KSHV latently infected PEL cells. MG132 reduced the production of progeny virus from PEL cells at low concentrations, which do not affect PEL cell growth. These findings suggest that proteasome

  11. Annual report on nuclear physics activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borie, E.; Doll, P.; Rebel, H.

    1982-11-01

    This report surveys the activities in fundamental research from July 1, 1981 to June 30, 1982 at the three institutes of the KfK which are concerned with nuclear physics. The research program comprises laser spectroscopy, nuclear reactions with light ions, neutron physics, neutrino physics and physics at medium and higher energies. (orig.) [de

  12. Annual report on nuclear physics activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.; Bueche, G.; Fluegge, G.

    1982-02-01

    This report surveys the activities in fundamental research from July 1, 1980 to June 30, 1981 at the three institutes of the KfK which are concerned with nuclear physics. The research program comprises laser spectroscopy, nuclear reactions with light ions and physics at medium and higher energies. (orig.) [de

  13. IAEA activities on nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basak, U.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a brief description and the main objectives of IAEA Programme B on Nuclear fuel cycle are given. The following Coordinated Research Projects: 1) FUel performance at high burn-up and in ageing plant by management and optimisation of WAter Chemistry Technologies (FUWAC ); 2) Near Term and Promising Long Term Options for Deployment of Thorium Based Nuclear Energy; 3) Fuel Modelling (FUMEX-III) are shortly described. The data collected by the IAEA Expert Group of Fuel Failures in Water Cooled Reactors including information about fuel failure cause for PWR (1994-2006) and failure mechanisms for BWR fuel (1994-2006) are shown. The just published Fuel Failure Handbook as well as preparation of a Monograph on Zirconium including an overview of Zirconium for nuclear applications are presented. The current projects in Sub-programme B2 - Power Reactor Fuel Engineering are also listed

  14. CEA nuclear energy Directorate - Activity report 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    After an overview of the activities of the Directorate at the international level, of its scientific activities, and of the consideration given to quality, and a presentation of the transverse program on advanced materials, this report proposes presentations of activities in different domains: future nuclear industrial systems (reactors of 4. generation, back-end of the future cycle, sustainable management of nuclear materials, fundamental scientific and technological research), optimization of the present industrial nuclear activity (reactors of 2. and 3. generation, front-end and back-end of the fuel cycle), the main tools for nuclear development (numerical simulation, the Jules Horowitz reactor), valorisation, economic support of Haute-Marne and Meuse territories (the Syndiese project), nuclear dismantling and decontamination (dismantling projects, projects and works in Fontenay-aux-Roses, Grenoble and Saclay, waste and material flow management, nuclear service facilities, transports). It also presents the activities of some specific CEA centres like Marcoule (R and D in fuel cycle), Cadarache (future energies) and Saclay (nuclear sciences and simulation of reactors and fuel cycle)

  15. Future financial liabilities of nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report deals with future financial liabilities arising from nuclear activities, in particular electricity generation. Future financial liabilities are defined as costs which an organisation or company is expected to meet beyond some five years as a consequence of its current and past activities. The study provides a comprehensive picture on policies for recognizing and funding future financial liabilities arising from nuclear activities and their implementation schemes in Nea Member countries. Mechanisms for reporting and funding future financial liabilities are described, analysed and compared. The report offers some findings, conclusions and recommendations for consideration by Member countries. The nuclear activities considered in the report include nuclear research and development, nuclear industry sectors such as uranium mining and milling, conversion and enrichment, nuclear fuel fabrication, nuclear power plant operation and maintenance, and radioisotopes production. Future financial liabilities arising from these activities cover management and disposal of radioactive wastes, reprocessing of spent fuels when applicable and decommissioning of facilities at the end of their life time. 12 refs., 14 figs., 16 tabs

  16. Nuclear activities and the Pacific islanders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyke, J. Van; Smith, K.R.; Siwatibau, S.

    1984-01-01

    Although to outsiders the Pacific islands may seem far removed from the center of activities and controversies related to nuclear energy, this area has had more direct and negative experiences with nuclear issues than any other area in the world. These experiences have led to a deep-rooted skepticism of all nuclear activities in which distinctions between civilian and military activities, weapons and power, and low-and high-level waste bear little relation to the important Pacific concerns. Antinuclear sentiments are intimately linked to anticolonialism, growing regionalism and emerging cultural pride. Opposition and concern have been expressed in a number of international, regional, national and nongovernmental forums. In this climate, arguments about the relative safety of various waste disposal operations and other nuclear activities are not likely to be meaningful. (author)

  17. Divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network of old mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Andrew Rodriguez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapamycin, an allosteric inhibitor of the mTOR kinase, increases longevity in mice in a sex-specific manner. In contrast to the widely accepted theory that a loss of proteasome activity is detrimental to both life- and healthspan, biochemical studies in vitro reveal that rapamycin inhibits 20S proteasome peptidase activity. We tested if this unexpected finding is also evident after chronic rapamycin treatment in vivo by measuring peptidase activities for both the 26S and 20S proteasome in liver, fat, and brain tissues of old, male and female mice fed encapsulated chow containing 2.24mg/kg (14 ppm rapamycin for 6 months. Further we assessed if rapamycin altered expression of the chaperone proteins known to interact with the proteasome-mediated degradation system (PMDS, heat shock factor 1 (HSF1, and the levels of key mTOR pathway proteins. Rapamycin had little effect on liver proteasome activity in either gender, but increased proteasome activity in female brain lysates and lowered its activity in female fat tissue. Rapamycin-induced changes in molecular chaperone levels were also more substantial in tissues from female animals. Furthermore, mTOR pathway proteins showed more significant changes in female tissues compared to those from males. These data show collectively that there are divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network and that these may be linked to the disparate effects of rapamycin on males and females. Further our findings suggest that rapamycin induces indirect regulation of the PMDS/heat-shock response through its modulation of the mTOR pathway rather than via direct interactions between rapamycin and the proteasome.

  18. Direction of Nuclear Energy. Activity report 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-11-01

    This report proposes an overview of the research activities performed by the French DEN (Direction de l'Energie Nucleaire, Direction of Nuclear Energy) within the CEA. These activities address the future nuclear industrial systems (4. generation reactors, back-end of the future fuel cycle, basic scientific and technological research), the optimization of the industrial nuclear power (fuel cycle front end, second and third generation reactors, back-end of the present fuel cycle), major tools for the development of nuclear energy (simulation tools, Jules Horowitz reactor, value creation), clean up and dismantling of nuclear facilities (present status, the Passage project in Grenoble, the Aladin project in Fontenay-aux-Roses, projects at Marcoule, flow management of radioactive wastes, materials and disused fuels, transport). Three research centres are presented: Marcoule, Cadarache and Saclay

  19. Ignition properties of nuclear grade activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, W.P.; Hunt, J.R.; Kovach, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    The ignition property of new activated carbons used in air cleaning systems of nuclear facilities has been evaluated in the past, however very little information has been generated on the behavior of aged, weathered carbons which have been exposed to normal nuclear facility environment. Additionally the standard procedure for evaluation of ignition temperature of carbon is performed under very different conditions than those used in the design of nuclear air cleaning systems. Data were generated evaluating the ageing of activated carbons and comparing their CH 3 131 I removal histories to their ignition temperatures. A series of tests were performed on samples from one nuclear power reactor versus use time, a second series evaluated samples from several plants showing the variability of atmospheric effects. The ignition temperatures were evaluated simulating the conditions existing in nuclear air cleaning systems, such as velocity, bed depth, etc., to eliminate potential confusion resulting from artifically set current standard conditions

  20. Development and evaluation of a sandwich ELISA for quantification of the 20S proteasome in human plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutaud, Dominique; Aubry, Laurent; Henry, Laurent

    2002-01-01

    Because quantification of the 20S proteasome by functional activity measurements is difficult and inaccurate, we have developed an indirect sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for quantification of the 20S proteasome in human plasma. This sandwich ELISA uses a combination...

  1. Modulation of the Proteasome Pathway by Nano-Curcumin and Curcumin in Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos de Carvalho, J Emanuel; Verwoert, Milan T; Vogels, Ilse M C; Schipper-Krom, Sabine; Van Noorden, Cornelis J F; Reits, Eric A; Klaassen, Ingeborg; Schlingemann, Reinier O

    2018-01-01

    Curcumin has multiple biological effects including the modulation of protein homeostasis by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The purpose of this study was to assess the in vitro cytotoxic and oxidative effects of nano-curcumin and standard curcumin and characterize their effects on proteasome regulation in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Viability, cell cycle progression, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were determined after treatment with nano-curcumin or curcumin. Subsequently, the effects of nano-curcumin and curcumin on proteasome activity and the gene and protein expression of proteasome subunits PA28α, α7, β5, and β5i were assessed. Nano-curcumin (5-100 μM) did not show significant cytotoxicity or anti-oxidative effects against H2O2-induced oxidative stress, whereas curcumin (≥10 μM) was cytotoxic and a potent inducer of ROS production. Both nano-curcumin and curcumin induced changes in proteasome-mediated proteolytic activity characterized by increased activity of the proteasome subunits β2 and β5i/β1 and reduced activity of β5/β1i. Likewise, nano-curcumin and curcumin affected mRNA and protein levels of household and immunoproteasome subunits. Nano-curcumin is less toxic to RPE cells and less prone to induce ROS production than curcumin. Both nano-curcumin and curcumin increase proteasome-mediated proteolytic activity. These results suggest that nano-curcumin may be regarded as a proteasome-modulating agent of limited cytotoxicity for RPE cells. The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Civil liability on nuclear activities; Responsabilidade civil nas atividades nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bittar, C A

    1983-12-31

    The civil liability theory in the actual context is shown in the first and second part of this thesis, including some considerations about concepts and types of liability in dangerous and not dangerous activities. In the third part, the legal aspects of civil liability for the nuclear activities are analyzed, with a brief description of the history evolution, standard systems, inspection corporation and juridical regulation. (C.G.C.). 239 refs.

  3. Inhibitors of the proteasome reduce the accelerated proteolysis in atrophying rat skeletal muscles.

    OpenAIRE

    Tawa, N E; Odessey, R; Goldberg, A L

    1997-01-01

    Several observations have suggested that the enhanced proteolysis and atrophy of skeletal muscle in various pathological states is due primarily to activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. To test this idea, we investigated whether peptide aldehyde inhibitors of the proteasome, N-acetyl-leucyl-leucyl-norleucinal (LLN), or the more potent CBZ-leucyl-leucyl-leucinal (MG132) suppressed proteolysis in incubated rat skeletal muscles. These agents (e.g., MG132 at 10 microM) inhibited nonlyso...

  4. BAX/BAK–Independent Mitoptosis during Cell Death Induced by Proteasome Inhibition?

    OpenAIRE

    Lomonosova, Elena; Ryerse, Jan; Chinnadurai, G.

    2009-01-01

    Proteasome inhibitors induce rapid death of cancer cells. We show that in epithelial cancer cells, such death is associated with dramatic and simultaneous up-regulation of several BH3-only proteins, including BIK, BIM, MCL-1S, NOXA, and PUMA, as well as p53. Elevated levels of these proteins seem to be the result of direct inhibition of their proteasomal degradation, induction of transcription, and active translation. Subsequent cell death is independent of BAX, and probably BAK, and proceeds...

  5. Nuclear waste: Status of DOE's nuclear waste site characterization activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Three potential nuclear waste repository sites have been selected to carry out characterization activities-the detailed geological testing to determine the suitability of each site as a repository. The sites are Hanford in south-central Washington State, Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada, and Deaf Smith in the Texas Panhandle. Two key issues affecting the total program are the estimations of the site characterization completion data and costs and DOE's relationship with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission which has been limited and its relations with affected states and Indian tribes which continue to be difficult

  6. Regulators of the proteasome pathway, Uch37 and Rpn13, play distinct roles in mouse development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Al-Shami

    Full Text Available Rpn13 is a novel mammalian proteasomal receptor that has recently been identified as an amplification target in ovarian cancer. It can interact with ubiquitin and activate the deubiquitinating enzyme Uch37 at the 26S proteasome. Since neither Rpn13 nor Uch37 is an integral proteasomal subunit, we explored whether either protein is essential for mammalian development and survival. Deletion of Uch37 resulted in prenatal lethality in mice associated with severe defect in embryonic brain development. In contrast, the majority of Rpn13-deficient mice survived to adulthood, although they were smaller at birth and fewer in number than wild-type littermates. Absence of Rpn13 produced tissue-specific effects on proteasomal function: increased proteasome activity in adrenal gland and lymphoid organs, and decreased activity in testes and brain. Adult Rpn13(-/- mice reached normal body weight but had increased body fat content and were infertile due to defective gametogenesis. Additionally, Rpn13(-/- mice showed increased T-cell numbers, resembling growth hormone-mediated effects. Indeed, serum growth hormone and follicular stimulating hormone levels were significantly increased in Rpn13(-/- mice, while growth hormone receptor expression was reduced in the testes. In conclusion, this is the first report characterizing the physiological roles of Uch37 and Rpn13 in murine development and implicating a non-ATPase proteasomal protein, Rpn13, in the process of gametogenesis.

  7. Globalization of nuclear activities and global governance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefidvash, Farhang

    1997-01-01

    The safe production of nuclear energy as well as the disarmament of nuclear weapons and the peaceful utilization of nuclear materials resulting from dismantling of such weapons are some of the formidable problems of global governance. The Commission on Global Governance was established in 1992 in the belief that international developments had created a unique opportunity for strengthening global co-operation to meet the challenge of securing peace, achieving sustainable development, and universalizing democracy. Here a summary of their proposals on the globalization of nuclear activities to face challenges of the coming century is given. To follow up their activities by the worlds community in general. The research Centre for Global Governance (RCGG) at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul was established. Already a great number of researchers from many different countries have adhered to the Centre. Here the program of the RCGG is described. (author)

  8. Globalization of nuclear activities and global governance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sefidvash, Farhang [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear

    1997-07-01

    The safe production of nuclear energy as well as the disarmament of nuclear weapons and the peaceful utilization of nuclear materials resulting from dismantling of such weapons are some of the formidable problems of global governance. The Commission on Global Governance was established in 1992 in the belief that international developments had created a unique opportunity for strengthening global co-operation to meet the challenge of securing peace, achieving sustainable development, and universalizing democracy. Here a summary of their proposals on the globalization of nuclear activities to face challenges of the coming century is given. To follow up their activities by the worlds community in general. The research Centre for Global Governance (RCGG) at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul was established. Already a great number of researchers from many different countries have adhered to the Centre. Here the program of the RCGG is described. (author)

  9. Fusion Nuclear Data activities at FNL, IPR

    OpenAIRE

    P. M. Prajapati; B. Pandey; S. Jakhar; C.V. S. Rao; T. K. Basu; B. K. Nayak; S. V. Suryanarayana; A. Saxena

    2015-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the current fusion nuclear data activities at Fusion Neutronics Laboratory, Institute for Plasma Research. It consist of infrastructure development for the cross-section measurements of structural materials with an accelerator based 14 MeV neutron generator and theoretical study of the cross-section using advanced nuclear reaction modular codes EMPIRE and TALYS. It will also cover the proposed surrogate experiment to measure 55Fe (n, p) 55Mn using BARC-TIFR Pel...

  10. Validation of the 2nd Generation Proteasome Inhibitor Oprozomib for Local Therapy of Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Semren

    Full Text Available Proteasome inhibition has been shown to prevent development of fibrosis in several organs including the lung. However, effects of proteasome inhibitors on lung fibrosis are controversial and cytotoxic side effects of the overall inhibition of proteasomal protein degradation cannot be excluded. Therefore, we hypothesized that local lung-specific application of a novel, selective proteasome inhibitor, oprozomib (OZ, provides antifibrotic effects without systemic toxicity in a mouse model of lung fibrosis. Oprozomib was first tested on the human alveolar epithelial cancer cell line A549 and in primary mouse alveolar epithelial type II cells regarding its cytotoxic effects on alveolar epithelial cells and compared to the FDA approved proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (BZ. OZ was less toxic than BZ and provided high selectivity for the chymotrypsin-like active site of the proteasome. In primary mouse lung fibroblasts, OZ showed significant anti-fibrotic effects, i.e. reduction of collagen I and α smooth muscle actin expression, in the absence of cytotoxicity. When applied locally into the lungs of healthy mice via instillation, OZ was well tolerated and effectively reduced proteasome activity in the lungs. In bleomycin challenged mice, however, locally applied OZ resulted in accelerated weight loss and increased mortality of treated mice. Further, OZ failed to reduce fibrosis in these mice. While upon systemic application OZ was well tolerated in healthy mice, it rather augmented instead of attenuated fibrotic remodelling of the lung in bleomycin challenged mice. To conclude, low toxicity and antifibrotic effects of OZ in pulmonary fibroblasts could not be confirmed for pulmonary fibrosis of bleomycin-treated mice. In light of these data, the use of proteasome inhibitors as therapeutic agents for the treatment of fibrotic lung diseases should thus be considered with caution.

  11. Managing Siting Activities for Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-06-15

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to ''seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world''. One way this objective is achieved is through the publication of a range of technical series. Two of these are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III.A.6 of the IAEA Statute, the safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property.' The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are written primarily in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own programmes. The principal users are the regulatory bodies in Member States and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series comprises reports designed to encourage and assist R and D on, and application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia, and government officials, among others. This information is presented in guides, reports on technology status and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series complements the IAEA Safety Standards Series. The introduction of nuclear power brings new challenges to States - one of them being the selection of appropriates sites. It is a project that needs to begin early, be well managed, and deploy good communications with all stakeholders; including regulators. This is important, not just for those States introducing nuclear power for the first time, but for any State looking to build a new nuclear power plant. The purpose of the siting activities goes beyond choosing a suitable site and acquiring a licence. A large part of the project is about producing and maintaining a validated

  12. Managing Siting Activities for Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to ''seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world''. One way this objective is achieved is through the publication of a range of technical series. Two of these are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III.A.6 of the IAEA Statute, the safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property.' The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are written primarily in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own programmes. The principal users are the regulatory bodies in Member States and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series comprises reports designed to encourage and assist R and D on, and application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia, and government officials, among others. This information is presented in guides, reports on technology status and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series complements the IAEA Safety Standards Series. The introduction of nuclear power brings new challenges to States - one of them being the selection of appropriates sites. It is a project that needs to begin early, be well managed, and deploy good communications with all stakeholders; including regulators. This is important, not just for those States introducing nuclear power for the first time, but for any State looking to build a new nuclear power plant. The purpose of the siting activities goes beyond choosing a suitable site and acquiring a licence. A large part of the project is about producing and maintaining a validated

  13. Nuclear activated cw chemical laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, T.G.

    1982-01-01

    A cw chemical laser which uses processed radioactive waste to produce active atoms from a chemically inactive gas before being mixed with another molecule such as hydrogen or deuterium is disclosed. This laser uses no toxic or corrosive fuels and does not require any electrical or other type of auxiliary power supply. The energy released by the radioactive material is used to produce the active atoms such as fluorine. This is accomplished by using the radiation products from processed radioactive waste to dissociate the inert gas in the plenum of the laser. The radioactive material is held in the passageway walls of a device similar to a heat exchanger. The exchanger device may be located in the gas generator section of a chemical laser. The inactive gas is passed through the exchanger device and while passing through it the radiation from the radioactive material dissociates the gas, producing a concentration of free active atoms. This active atom generator then feeds the nozzle bank or mixing section of a laser to produce a lasing action

  14. Ubiquitin Proteasome System in Parkinson Disease: a keeper or a witness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Branco, Diogo; Esteves, Ana R.; Santos, Daniel; Arduino, Daniela M.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Oliveira, Catarina R.; Januario, Cristina; Cardoso, Sandra M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this work was to evaluate the role of Ubiquitin-Proteasome System (UPS) on mitochondrial-driven alpha-synuclein (aSN) clearance in in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo Parkinson disease (PD) cellular models. Method We used SH-SY5Y ndufa2 knock-down (KD) cells, PD cybrids and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients meeting the diagnostic criteria for PD. We quantified aSN aggregation, proteasome activity and protein ubiquitination levels. In PBMC of PD patients population we evaluated aSN levels in plasma and the influence of several demographic characteristics in the above mentioned determinations. Results We found that ubiquitin-independent proteasome activity was up-regulated in SH-SY5Y ndufa2 KD cells while a down regulation was observed in PD cybrids and PBMC. Moreover, we observed an increase in protein ubiquitination that correlates with a decrease in ubiquitin-dependent proteasome activity. Accordingly, proteasome inhibition prevented ubiquitin-dependent aSN clearance. Ubiquitin-independent proteasome activity was positively correlated with ubiquitination in PBMC. We also report a negative correlation of chymotrypsin-like activity with age in control and late-onset PD groups. Total ubiquitin content is positively correlated with aSN oligomers levels, which leads to an age-dependent increase of aSN ubiquitination in LOPD. Moreover, aSN levels are increased in the plasma of PD patients. Interpretation aSN oligomers are ubiquitinated and we identified an ubiquitin-dependent clearance insufficiency with accumulation of both aSN and ubiquitin. However, SH-SY5Y ndufa2 KD cells showed a significant up-regulation of ubiquitin-independent proteasomal enzymatic activity that could mean a cell rescue attempt. Moreover, we identified that UPS function is age-dependent in PBMC. PMID:22921536

  15. Discovery of an Inhibitor of the Proteasome Subunit Rpn11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Christian; Li, Jing; Parlati, Francesco; Rouffet, Matthieu; Ma, Yuyong; Mackinnon, Andrew L; Chou, Tsui-Fen; Deshaies, Raymond J; Cohen, Seth M

    2017-02-23

    The proteasome plays a crucial role in degradation of normal proteins that happen to be constitutively or inducibly unstable, and in this capacity it plays a regulatory role. Additionally, it degrades abnormal/damaged/mutant/misfolded proteins, which serves a quality-control function. Inhibitors of the proteasome have been validated in the treatment of multiple myeloma, with several FDA-approved therapeutics. Rpn11 is a Zn 2+ -dependent metalloisopeptidase that hydrolyzes ubiquitin from tagged proteins that are trafficked to the proteasome for degradation. A fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) approach was utilized to identify fragments with activity against Rpn11. Screening of a library of metal-binding pharmacophores (MBPs) revealed that 8-thioquinoline (8TQ, IC 50 value ∼2.5 μM) displayed strong inhibition of Rpn11. Further synthetic elaboration of 8TQ yielded a small molecule compound (35, IC 50 value ∼400 nM) that is a potent and selective inhibitor of Rpn11 that blocks proliferation of tumor cells in culture.

  16. Nuclear data for proton activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhammedov, S; Vasidov, A [Institute of Nuclear Physics of Academy of Sciences of Uzbekistan, 702132 Ulugbek, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Comsan, M N.H. [Nuclear Research Centre, Inshas Cyclotron Facility, AEA 13759 Cairo (Egypt)

    2000-11-15

    The activation analysis with charged particles (ChPAA), as well as proton activation analysis (PAA), mainly requires separately irradiation of thick (thicker than the range of particles) samples and standard. Therefore for simplicity of determination of traces of chemical elements by instrumental PAA the absolute activity of the radionuclides must be known. Consequently we compilated data for nuclear decays (half life, radiation energy and intensity, type of decay, saturation factor), for nuclear reactions (excitation function, threshold energy, Q-value, yields of radionuclides), for the element under study (natural isotopic abundance of the nuclide, which yields the nuclear reaction considered, molar mass), stopping power of the irradiated material and the range of the particle that are used in the calculation of the absolute activity of the radionuclides and for the resolution of a nuclear interference problems of PAA. These data are tabulated. The tables of the radionuclides are presented in dependence on increasing atomic number and radiation energy as well as on methods of the radionuclide formation. The thick target yields of analytical radionuclides are presented versus particle energy.

  17. Status of nuclear data activities at Karlsruhe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Toshihiko [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    This is a brief introduction to nuclear data activity at Karlsruhe Research Center. Some URLs concerned are given. Topics mentioned here are, the FENDL and JEF/EFF project at INR, and measurements of neutron capture cross sections at IK III. (author)

  18. Nuclear data for proton activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhammedov, S.; Vasidov, A.; Comsan, M.N.H.

    2000-01-01

    The activation analysis with charged particles (ChPAA), as well as proton activation analysis (PAA), mainly requires separately irradiation of thick (thicker than the range of particles) samples and standard. Therefore for simplicity of determination of traces of chemical elements by instrumental PAA the absolute activity of the radionuclides must be known. Consequently we compilated data for nuclear decays (half life, radiation energy and intensity, type of decay, saturation factor), for nuclear reactions (excitation function, threshold energy, Q-value, yields of radionuclides), for the element under study (natural isotopic abundance of the nuclide, which yields the nuclear reaction considered, molar mass), stopping power of the irradiated material and the range of the particle that are used in the calculation of the absolute activity of the radionuclides and for the resolution of a nuclear interference problems of PAA. These data are tabulated. The tables of the radionuclides are presented in dependence on increasing atomic number and radiation energy as well as on methods of the radionuclide formation. The thick target yields of analytical radionuclides are presented versus particle energy

  19. Disposal of high-activity nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, E.I.

    1983-01-01

    A discussion is presented on the deep sea ocean disposal for high-activity nuclear wastes. The following topics are covered: effect of ionizing radiation on marine ecosystems; pathways by which radionuclides are transferred to man from the marine environment; information about releases of radioactivity to the sea; radiological protection; storage and disposal of radioactive wastes and information needs. (U.K.)

  20. Mitochondrial Malfunctioning, Proteasome Arrest and Apoptosis in Cancer Cells by Focused Intracellular Generation of Oxygen Radicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Postiglione

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Photofrin/photodynamic therapy (PDT at sub-lethal doses induced a transient stall in proteasome activity in surviving A549 (p53+/+ and H1299 (p53−/− cells as indicated by the time-dependent decline/recovery of chymotrypsin-like activity. Indeed, within 3 h of incubation, Photofrin invaded the cytoplasm and localized preferentially within the mitochondria. Its light activation determined a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and a reversible arrest in proteasomal activity. A similar result is obtained by treating cells with Antimycin and Rotenone, indicating, as a common denominator of this effect, the ATP decrease. Both inhibitors, however, were more toxic to cells as the recovery of proteasomal activity was incomplete. We evaluated whether combining PDT (which is a treatment for killing tumor cells, per se, and inducing proteasome arrest in the surviving ones with Bortezomib doses capable of sustaining the stall would protract the arrest with sufficient time to induce apoptosis in remaining cells. The evaluation of the mitochondrial membrane depolarization, residual proteasome and mitochondrial enzymatic activities, colony-forming capabilities, and changes in protein expression profiles in A549 and H1299 cells under a combined therapeutic regimen gave results consistent with our hypothesis.

  1. Apoptosis inducer NGFI-B is degraded by the proteasome and stabilized by treatment with EGF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Bjorn O. [Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1068 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Paulsen, Ragnhild E., E-mail: r.e.paulsen@farmasi.uio.no [Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1068 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway)

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NGFI-B is a molecular target for some anti-cancer drugs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NGFI-B turnover may be important for their anti-cancer action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NGFI-B is degraded by the proteasome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NGFI-B is stabilized by treatment with EGF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mimicking the EGF-induced phosphorylation also stabilizes the protein. -- Abstract: NGFI-B is a nuclear receptor and immediate early gene that is upregulated in many different tumour cell lines. As it is involved in cell death and survival, it has been suggested as a target for anti-cancer drugs. The protein level of NGFI-B is important for its functions and may be regulated through induction or stabilization. NGFI-B protein stability was studied using the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide in CV1 cells transiently transfected with NGFI-B. Inhibiting the proteasome with MG132 stabilized NGFI-B, indicating that the proteasome is responsible for break-down of NGFI-B, as it is for many nuclear receptors. In order to determine regions responsible for the break-down of NGFI-B two N-terminal regions with high PEST-scores were deleted. Deletion of amino acids 122-195 containing a PEST-sequence which includes an ERK2 phosphorylation target, gave a more stable protein. In addition, treatment of the cells with the ERK2 activator EGF increased the stability of wild type NGFI-B. We then tested whether a mutation at threonine 142 influenced the stability of NGFI-B. We found that the phosphorylation-mimicking mutant NGFI-B T142E had an increased stability, while the non-phosphorylable mutant (T142A) showed similar stability to the wild type. Thus, EGF-stimulation of cells may be a mechanism for priming the cells for effects of NGFI-B by increasing its stability.

  2. Proteasome and NF-κB Inhibiting Phaeophytins from the Green Alga Cladophora fascicularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhan Lin

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemical examination of the green alga Cladophora fascicularis resulted in the isolation and characterization of a new porphyrin derivative, porphyrinolactone (1, along with five known phaeophytins 2-6 and fourteen sterols and cycloartanes. The structure of 1 was determined on the basis of spectroscopic analyses and by comparison of its NMR data with those of known phaeophytins. Compounds 1-6 displayed moderate inhibition of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activation, while 2 and 4 displayed potential inhibitory activity toward proteasome chymotripsin-like activation. The primary structure-activity relationship was also discussed.

  3. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. 5 activity report. 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The main activities of the Agency are reviewed: nuclear power trends; regulatory aspects of nuclear power; technical developments: Eurochemic, Halden, Dragon, food irradiation; gas-cooled fast reactors, isotopic batteries; nuclear data Centers

  4. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. 3. Activity report, 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The main activities of the Agency are reviewed: study of nuclear power trends; regulatory aspects of nuclear power; technical developments: Eurochemic, Halden, Dragon, food irradiation, gas-cooled fast reactors, direct conversion, isotopic batteries; nuclear energy information

  5. Mechanism of Action of Bortezomib and the New Proteasome Inhibitors on Myeloma Cells and the Bone Microenvironment: Impact on Myeloma-Induced Alterations of Bone Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Accardi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM is characterized by a high capacity to induce alterations in the bone remodeling process. The increase in osteoclastogenesis and the suppression of osteoblast formation are both involved in the pathophysiology of the bone lesions in MM. The proteasome inhibitor (PI bortezomib is the first drug designed and approved for the treatment of MM patients by targeting the proteasome. However, recently novel PIs have been developed to overcome bortezomib resistance. Interestingly, several preclinical data indicate that the proteasome complex is involved in both osteoclast and osteoblast formation. It is also evident that bortezomib either inhibits osteoclast differentiation induced by the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB ligand (RANKL or stimulates the osteoblast differentiation. Similarly, the new PIs including carfilzomib and ixazomib can inhibit bone resorption and stimulate the osteoblast differentiation. In a clinical setting, PIs restore the abnormal bone remodeling by normalizing the levels of bone turnover markers. In addition, a bone anabolic effect was described in responding MM patients treated with PIs, as demonstrated by the increase in the osteoblast number. This review summarizes the preclinical and clinical evidence on the effects of bortezomib and other new PIs on myeloma bone disease.

  6. Advancing capabilities for detecting undeclared nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baute, J.

    2013-01-01

    When a country presents a consistent, transparent and predictable picture of its nuclear programme that is supported by the analysis of all information, IAEA inspectors do not need to go there as frequently for routine verification activities. Rather IAEA can redirect those resources to addressing safeguards issues in the state posing real proliferation concerns. The point is how to establish a coherent picture of a nuclear program and how to identify early warnings of safeguard breaches. A key element is the exploitation of all the information available (open sources, inspection report, satellite imagery, state declarations,...) through effective and quick information analysis. This document is made up of the slides of the presentation

  7. Activation Analysis and Nuclear Research in Burma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiele, R. W.

    1971-07-01

    Research endeavours in the field of Nuclear Sciences in Burma appear to be concentrated in three main Institutions. These are the Chemistry and Physics Departments of the Rangoon Arts & Science University and the Union of Burma Applied Research Institute (UBARI). In view of possible forthcoming developments an expanded research programme, which is to be implemented on the basis of a five year plan, has been drawn up. Research topics included in this programme are predominantly of practical interest and aimed at a contribution by nuclear methods, in particular activation analysis, to the technological and industrial needs of the country.

  8. Scientific activities 1980 Nuclear Research Center ''Democritos''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The scientific activities and achievements of the Nuclear Research Center Democritos for the year 1980 are presented in the form of a list of 76 projects giving title, objectives, responsible of each project, developed activities and the pertaining lists of publications. The 16 chapters of this work cover the activities of the main Divisions of the Democritos NRC: Electronics, Biology, Physics, Chemistry, Health Physics, Reactor, Scientific Directorate, Radioisotopes, Environmental Radioactivity, Soil Science, Computer Center, Uranium Exploration, Medical Service, Technological Applications, Radioimmunoassay and Training. (N.C.)

  9. Outreach activity by using three-dimensional nuclear chart. Understanding nuclear physics and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koura, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    A three-dimensional nuclear chart is constructed with toy blocks for usage of outreach activity related on nuclear physics and atomic energy. The height of each block represents quantities like atomic mass per nucleon, the total half-life, etc. The bulk properties of the nuclei can be easily understood by using these charts. Explanations for the energy generation of nuclear fusion and fission are visually given. In addition, we newly set another chart with blocks of fission fragment mass distribution from U-235 + a thermal neutron. As an example, the origin of abundances of rather radioactive isotopes like Sr-90 and Cs-137 is explained which created in nuclear reactor and also distributed in the eastern side of Fukushima prefecture due to the accident of Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Using our charts, lectures entitled 'Alchemy of the Universe' were delivered to high schools and public places. (author)

  10. Experimental Nuclear Physics Activity in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavassa, E.; de Marco, N.

    2003-04-01

    The experimental Nuclear Physics activity of the Italian researchers is briefly reviewed. The experiments, that are financially supported by the INFN, are done in strict collaboration by more than 500 INFN and University researchers. The experiments cover all the most important field of the modern Nuclear Physics with probes extremely different in energy and interactions. Researches are done in all the four National Laboratories of the INFN even if there is a deeper involvement of the two national laboratories expressly dedicated to Nuclear Physics: the LNL (Laboratorio Nazionale di Legnaro) and LNS (Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud) where nuclear spectroscopy and reaction dynamics are investigated. All the activities with electromagnetic probes develops in abroad laboratories as TJNAF, DESY, MAMI, ESFR and are dedicated to the studies of the spin physics and of the nucleon resonance; hypernuclear and kaon physics is investigated at LNF. A strong community of researchers work in the relativistic and ultra-relativistic heavy ions field in particular at CERN with the SPS Pb beam and in the construction of the ALICE detector for heavy-ion physics at the LHC collider. Experiments of astrophysical interest are done with ions of very low energy; in particular the LUNA accelerator facility at LNGS (Laboratorio Nazionale del Gran Sasso) succeeded measuring cross section at solar energies, below or near the solar Gamow peak. Interdisciplinary researches on anti-hydrogen atom spectroscopy and on measurements of neutron cross sections of interest for ADS development are also supported.

  11. Nuclear activation techniques in the life sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1978-08-15

    The analysis of the elemental composition of biological materials is presently undertaken on a large scale in many countries around the world One recent estimate puts the number of such analyses at six thousand million single-element determinations per year, of which about sixteen million are for the so-called trace elements. Since many of these elements are known to play an important role in relation to health and disease, there is considerable interest in learning more about the ways in which they function in living organisms. Nuclear activation techniques, generally referred to collectively as 'activation analysis' constitute an important group of methods for the analysis of the elemental composition of biological materials. Generally they rely on the use of a research nuclear reactor as a source of neutrons for bombarding small samples of biological material, followed by a measurement of the induced radioactivity to provide an estimate of the concentrations of elements. Other methods of activation with Bremsstrahlung and charged particles may also be used, and have their own special applications. These methods of in vitro analysis are particularly suitable for the study of trace elements. Another important group of methods makes use of neutrons from isotopic neutron sources or neutron generators to activate the whole body, or a part of the body, of a living patient. They are generally used for the study of major elements such as Ca, Na and N. All these techniques have previously been the subject of two symposia organised by the IAEA in 1967 and 1972. The present meeting was held to review some of the more recent developments in this field and also to provide a viewpoint on the current status of nuclear activation techniques vis-a-vis other competing non-nuclear methods of analysis.

  12. Nuclear Forensics' role in analyzing nuclear trafficking activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrnecek, E.; Mayer, K.; Schubert, A.; Wallenius, M.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear forensics aims at identifying origin and intended use of nuclear material using information inherent to the nuclear material.The information gathered in nuclear forensics include isotopic composition, elemental composition, impurities and age of the material, macroscopic appearance and microstructure. The information so collected helps to solve criminal cases and put the individuals involved in nuclear trafficking in jails. The information also helps to improve safeguards and physical protection measures at place of theft or diversion to prevent future thefts or diversions.

  13. The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 sensitizes PC-3 prostate cancer cells to ionizing radiation by a DNA-PK-independent mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajonk, Frank; Ophoven, Arndt van; Weissenberger, Christian; McBride, William H

    2005-01-01

    By modulating the expression levels of specific signal transduction molecules, the 26S proteasome plays a central role in determining cell cycle progression or arrest and cell survival or death in response to stress stimuli, including ionizing radiation. Inhibition of proteasome function by specific drugs results in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and radiosensitization of many cancer cell lines. This study investigates whether there is also a concomitant increase in cellular radiosensitivity if proteasome inhibition occurs only transiently before radiation. Further, since proteasome inhibition has been shown to activate caspase-3, which is involved in apoptosis, and caspase-3 can cleave DNA-PKcs, which is involved in DNA-double strand repair, the hypothesis was tested that caspase-3 activation was essential for both apoptosis and radiosensitization following proteasome inhibition. Prostate carcinoma PC-3 cells were treated with the reversible proteasome inhibitor MG-132. Cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, caspase-3 activity, DNA-PKcs protein levels and DNA-PK activity were monitored. Radiosensitivity was assessed using a clonogenic assay. Inhibition of proteasome function caused cell cycle arrest and apoptosis but this did not involve early activation of caspase-3. Short-time inhibition of proteasome function also caused radiosensitization but this did not involve a decrease in DNA-PKcs protein levels or DNA-PK activity. We conclude that caspase-dependent cleavage of DNA-PKcs during apoptosis does not contribute to the radiosensitizing effects of MG-132

  14. Structural characterization of the bacterial proteasome homolog BPH reveals a tetradecameric double-ring complex with unique inner cavity properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Adrian C D; Maldoner, Lorena; Hipp, Katharina; Hartmann, Marcus D; Martin, Jörg

    2018-01-19

    Eukaryotic and archaeal proteasomes are paradigms for self-compartmentalizing proteases. To a large extent, their function requires interplay with hexameric ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA+) that act as substrate unfoldases. Bacteria have various types of self-compartmentalizing proteases; in addition to the proteasome itself, these include the proteasome homolog HslV, which functions together with the AAA+ HslU; the ClpP protease with its partner AAA+ ClpX; and Anbu, a recently characterized ancestral proteasome variant. Previous bioinformatic analysis has revealed a novel bacterial member of the proteasome family Betaproteobacteria proteasome homolog (BPH). Using cluster analysis, we here affirmed that BPH evolutionarily descends from HslV. Crystal structures of the Thiobacillus denitrificans and Cupriavidus metallidurans BPHs disclosed a homo-oligomeric double-ring architecture in which the active sites face the interior of the cylinder. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and electron microscopy averaging, we found that BPH forms tetradecamers in solution, unlike the dodecamers seen in HslV. Although the highly acidic inner surface of BPH was in striking contrast to the cavity characteristics of the proteasome and HslV, a classical proteasomal reaction mechanism could be inferred from the covalent binding of the proteasome-specific inhibitor epoxomicin to BPH. A ligand-bound structure implied that the elongated BPH inner pore loop may be involved in substrate recognition. The apparent lack of a partner unfoldase and other unique features, such as Ser replacing Thr as the catalytic residue in certain BPH subfamilies, suggest a proteolytic function for BPH distinct from those of known bacterial self-compartmentalizing proteases. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Applied nuclear physics group - activities report. 1977-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appoloni, Carlos Roberto

    1998-06-01

    This report presents the activities conducted by the Applied Nuclear Physics group of the Londrina State University - Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory - Brazil, from the activities beginning (1977) up to the end of the year 1997

  16. Uch2/Uch37 is the major deubiquitinating enzyme associated with the 26S proteasome in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stone, Miranda; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Seeger, Michael

    2004-01-01

    . Some deubiquitinating enzymes are associated with the 26S proteasome contributing to and regulating the particle's activity. Here, we characterise fission yeast Uch2 and Ubp6, two proteasome associated deubiquitinating enzymes. The human orthologues of these enzymes are known as Uch37 and Usp14......, respectively. We report that the subunit Uch2/Uch37 is the major deubiquitinating enzyme associated with the fission yeast 26S proteasome. In contrast, the activity of Ubp6 appears to play a more regulatory and/or structural role involving the proteasome subunits Mts1/Rpn9, Mts2/Rpt2 and Mts3/Rpn12, as Ubp6...... becomes essential when activity of these subunits is compromised by conditional mutations. Finally, when the genes encoding Uch2/Uch37 and Ubp6 are disrupted, the cells are viable without showing obvious signs of impaired ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis, indicating that other deubiquitinating enzymes may...

  17. Nuclear Power and Safety Division activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazdera, F.

    1991-01-01

    History of the Division is briefly described. Present research is centered on reliability analyses and thermal hydraulic analyses of transients and accidents. Some results of the safety analyses have been applied at nuclear power plants. A characterization is presented of computer codes for analyzing the behavior of fuel in normal and accident conditions. Research activities in the field of water chemistry and corrosion are oriented to the corrosion process at high temperatures and high pressures, and the related mass and radioactivity transfer; the effect of some chemical processes on primary coolant circuit materials; optimization of PWR filtration systems; and the development of the requisite monitoring instrumentation. A computerized operator support system has been developed, and at present it is tested at the Dukovany nuclear power plant. A program of nuclear fuel cycle strategy and economy has been worked out for nuclear fuel performance evaluation. Various options for better fuel exploitation, alternatives for advanced fuelling, and fuel cycle costs are assessed, and out-of-reactor fuel cycle options are compared. (M.D.). 7 refs., 32 refs

  18. Regulation of nuclear and radiological activities; Reglementarea activitatilor nucleare si radiologice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidorencu, Angela; Vasilieva, Natalia; Buzdugan, Artur; Balan, Ionel [Agentia Nationala de Reglementare a Activitatilor Nucleare si Radiologice, Alecu Russo, 1, MD 2068, Chisinau (Moldova, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    The paper presents a review of the Moldovan regulatory framework regarding nuclear and radiological activities and of the competence of state regulatory authority - the National Agency for the Regulation of Nuclear and Radiological Activities.

  19. SOCS-1 localizes to the microtubule organizing complex-associated 20S proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Bao Q; Arenzana, Teresita L; Showalter, Brian M; Losman, Julie; Chen, X Peter; Mostecki, Justin; Banks, Alexander S; Limnander, Andre; Fernandez, Neil; Rothman, Paul B

    2004-10-01

    The regulation of cytokine signaling is critical for controlling cellular proliferation and activation during an immune response. SOCS-1 is a potent inhibitor of Jak kinase activity and of signaling initiated by several cytokines. SOCS-1 protein levels are tightly regulated, and recent data suggest that SOCS-1 may regulate the protein levels of some signaling proteins by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway; however, the cellular mechanism by which SOCS-1 directs proteins for degradation is unknown. In this report, SOCS-1 is found to colocalize and biochemically copurify with the microtubule organizing complex (MTOC) and its associated 20S proteasome. The SOCS-1 SH2 domain is required for the localization of SOCS-1 to the MTOC. Overexpression of SOCS-1 targets Jak1 in an SH2-dependent manner to a perinuclear distribution resembling the MTOC-associated 20S proteasome. Analysis of MTOCs fractionated from SOCS-1-deficient cells demonstrates that SOCS-1 may function redundantly to regulate the localization of Jak1 to the MTOC. Nocodazole inhibits the protein turnover of SOCS-1, demonstrating that the minus-end transport of SOCS-1 to the MTOC-associated 20S proteasome is required to regulate SOCS-1 protein levels. These data link SOCS-1 directly with the proteasome pathway and suggest another function for the SH2 domain of SOCS-1 in the regulation of Jak/STAT signaling.

  20. Conformational switching in the coiled-coil domains of a proteasomal ATPase regulates substrate processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoberger, Aaron; Brettrager, Evan J; Smith, David M

    2018-06-18

    Protein degradation in all domains of life requires ATPases that unfold and inject proteins into compartmentalized proteolytic chambers. Proteasomal ATPases in eukaryotes and archaea contain poorly understood N-terminally conserved coiled-coil domains. In this study, we engineer disulfide crosslinks in the coiled-coils of the archaeal proteasomal ATPase (PAN) and report that its three identical coiled-coil domains can adopt three different conformations: (1) in-register and zipped, (2) in-register and partially unzipped, and (3) out-of-register. This conformational heterogeneity conflicts with PAN's symmetrical OB-coiled-coil crystal structure but resembles the conformational heterogeneity of the 26S proteasomal ATPases' coiled-coils. Furthermore, we find that one coiled-coil can be conformationally constrained even while unfolding substrates, and conformational changes in two of the coiled-coils regulate PAN switching between resting and active states. This switching functionally mimics similar states proposed for the 26S proteasome from cryo-EM. These findings thus build a mechanistic framework to understand regulation of proteasome activity.

  1. Diclofenac induces proteasome and mitochondrial dysfunction in murine cardiomyocytes and hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Rajeshwary; Goswami, Sumanta K; Feitoza, Luis Felipe B B; Hammock, Bruce; Gomes, Aldrin V

    2016-11-15

    One of the most common nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) used worldwide, diclofenac (DIC), has been linked to increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The molecular mechanism(s) by which DIC causes CVD is unknown. Proteasome activities were studied in hearts, livers, and kidneys from male Swiss Webster mice treated with either 100mg/kg DIC for 18h (acute treatment) or 10mg/kg DIC for 28days (chronic treatment). Cultured H9c2 cells and neonatal cardiomyocytes were also treated with different concentrations of DIC and proteasome function, cell death and ROS generation studied. Isolated mouse heart mitochondria were utilized to determine the effect of DIC on various electron transport chain complex activities. DIC significantly inhibited the chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity in rat cardiac H9c2 cells, murine neonatal cardiomyocytes, and mouse hearts, but did not affect proteasome subunit expression levels. Proteasome activity was also affected in liver and kidney tissues from DIC treated animals. The levels of polyubiquitinated proteins increased in hearts from DIC treated mice. Importantly, the levels of oxidized proteins increased while the β5i immunoproteasome activity decreased in hearts from DIC treated mice. DIC increased ROS production and cell death in H9c2 cells and neonatal cardiomyocytes while the cardioprotective NSAID, aspirin, had no effect on ROS levels or cell viability. DIC inhibited mitochondrial Complex III, a major source of ROS, and impaired mitochondrial membrane potential suggesting that mitochondria are the major sites of ROS generation. These results suggest that DIC induces cardiotoxicity by a ROS dependent mechanism involving mitochondrial and proteasome dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Proteomics of the 26S proteasome in Spodoptera frugiperda cells infected with the nucleopolyhedrovirus, AcMNPV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyupina, Yulia V; Zatsepina, Olga G; Serebryakova, Marina V; Erokhov, Pavel A; Abaturova, Svetlana B; Kravchuk, Oksana I; Orlova, Olga V; Beljelarskaya, Svetlana N; Lavrov, Andrey I; Sokolova, Olga S; Mikhailov, Victor S

    2016-06-01

    Baculoviruses are large DNA viruses that infect insect species such as Lepidoptera and are used in biotechnology for protein production and in agriculture as insecticides against crop pests. Baculoviruses require activity of host proteasomes for efficient reproduction, but how they control the cellular proteome and interact with the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) of infected cells remains unknown. In this report, we analyzed possible changes in the subunit composition of 26S proteasomes of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9), cells in the course of infection with the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). 26S proteasomes were purified from Sf9 cells by an immune affinity method and subjected to 2D gel electrophoresis followed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and Mascot search in bioinformatics databases. A total of 34 homologues of 26S proteasome subunits of eukaryotic species were identified including 14 subunits of the 20S core particle (7 α and 7 β subunits) and 20 subunits of the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP contained homologues of 11 of RPN-type and 6 of RPT-type subunits, 2 deubiquitinating enzymes (UCH-14/UBP6 and UCH-L5/UCH37), and thioredoxin. Similar 2D-gel maps of 26S proteasomes purified from uninfected and AcMNPV-infected cells at 48hpi confirmed the structural integrity of the 26S proteasome in insect cells during baculovirus infection. However, subtle changes in minor forms of some proteasome subunits were detected. A portion of the α5(zeta) cellular pool that presumably was not associated with the proteasome underwent partial proteolysis at a late stage in infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Noncanonical SQSTM1/p62-Nrf2 pathway activation mediates proteasome inhibitor resistance in multiple myeloma cells via redox, metabolic and translational reprogramming

    OpenAIRE

    Riz, Irene; Hawley, Teresa S.; Marsal, Jeffrey W.; Hawley, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple Myeloma (MM) is a B-cell malignancy characterized by the accumulation of clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow, with drug resistance being a major cause of therapeutic failure. We established a carfilzomib-resistant derivative of the LP-1 MM cell line (LP-1/Cfz) and found that the transcription factor NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2; gene symbol NFE2L2) contributes to carfilzomib resistance. The mechanism of Nrf2 activation involved enhanced translation of Nrf2 as well as its posit...

  4. BAG3 induces the sequestration of proteasomal clients into cytoplasmic puncta : Implications for a proteasome-to-autophagy switch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minoia, Melania; Boncoraglio, Alessandra; Vinet, Jonathan; Morelli, Federica F.; Brunsting, Jeanette F.; Poletti, Angelo; Krom, Sabine; Reits, Eric; Kampinga, Harm H.; Carra, Serena

    Eukaryotic cells use autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome system as their major protein degradation pathways. Upon proteasomal impairment, cells switch to autophagy to ensure proper clearance of clients (the proteasome-to-autophagy switch). The HSPA8 and HSPA1A cochaperone BAG3 has been suggested

  5. BAG3 induces the sequestration of proteasomal clients into cytoplasmic puncta: implications for a proteasome-to-autophagy switch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minoia, Melania; Boncoraglio, Alessandra; Vinet, Jonathan; Morelli, Federica F.; Brunsting, Jeanette F.; Poletti, Angelo; Krom, Sabine; Reits, Eric; Kampinga, Harm H.; Carra, Serena

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells use autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome system as their major protein degradation pathways. Upon proteasomal impairment, cells switch to autophagy to ensure proper clearance of clients (the proteasome-to-autophagy switch). The HSPA8 and HSPA1A cochaperone BAG3 has been suggested

  6. Building Public Confidence in Nuclear Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, T

    2002-01-01

    Achieving public acceptance has become a central issue in discussions regarding the future of nuclear power and associated nuclear activities. Effective public communication and public participation are often put forward as the key building blocks in garnering public acceptance. A recent international workshop in Finland provided insights into other features that might also be important to building and sustaining public confidence in nuclear activities. The workshop was held in Finland in close cooperation with Finnish stakeholders. This was most appropriate because of the recent successes in achieving positive decisions at the municipal, governmental, and Parliamentary levels, allowing the Finnish high-level radioactive waste repository program to proceed, including the identification and approval of a proposed candidate repository site. Much of the workshop discussion appropriately focused on the roles of public participation and public communications in building public confidence. It was clear that well constructed and implemented programs of public involvement and communication and a sense of fairness were essential in building the extent of public confidence needed to allow the repository program in Finland to proceed. It was also clear that there were a number of other elements beyond public involvement that contributed substantially to the success in Finland to date. And, in fact, it appeared that these other factors were also necessary to achieving the Finnish public acceptance. In other words, successful public participation and communication were necessary but not sufficient. What else was important? Culture, politics, and history vary from country to country, providing differing contexts for establishing and maintaining public confidence. What works in one country will not necessarily be effective in another. Nonetheless, there appear to be certain elements that might be common to programs that are successful in sustaining public confidence and some of

  7. Building Public Confidence in Nuclear Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, T

    2002-01-01

    Achieving public acceptance has become a central issue in discussions regarding the future of nuclear power and associated nuclear activities. Effective public communication and public participation are often put forward as the key building blocks in garnering public acceptance. A recent international workshop in Finland provided insights into other features that might also be important to building and sustaining public confidence in nuclear activities. The workshop was held in Finland in close cooperation with Finnish stakeholders. This was most appropriate because of the recent successes in achieving positive decisions at the municipal, governmental, and Parliamentary levels, allowing the Finnish high-level radioactive waste repository program to proceed, including the identification and approval of a proposed candidate repository site Much of the workshop discussion appropriately focused on the roles of public participation and public communications in building public confidence. It was clear that well constructed and implemented programs of public involvement and communication and a sense of fairness were essential in building the extent of public confidence needed to allow the repository program in Finland to proceed. It was also clear that there were a number of other elements beyond public involvement that contributed substantially to the success in Finland to date. And, in fact, it appeared that these other factors were also necessary to achieving the Finnish public acceptance. In other words, successful public participation and communication were necessary but not sufficient. What else was important? Culture, politics, and history vary from country to country, providing differing contexts for establishing and maintaining public confidence. What works in one country will not necessarily be effective in another. Nonetheless, there appear to be certain elements that might be common to programs that are successful in sustaining public confidence, and some of

  8. Effects of Radiation on Proteasome Function in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    precursor [ Homo sapiens ] BCL2-associated athanogene 3 adhesion regulating molecule 1 precursor CD44 antigen heat shock 27kDa protein 1 DnaJ... feature of CICs that can easily be exploited to identify , track, and target them in vitro and in vivo . J Natl Cancer Inst 2009;101:1–10 Q1 Q5 JNCI...P = .055; Supplementary Figure 1, D and E, available online), indicating that reduced proteasome activity in CICs is a feature found across tumor

  9. Nuclear data project evaluation activity report. October 1998 - October 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akovali, Y.; Blackmon, J.; Radford, D.; Smith, M.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the ORNL Nuclear Data Project since the IAEA Advisory Group meeting in December 1998. The group's future plans are also included. The ORNL Nuclear Data Project's responsibility includes the compilation/evaluation of astrophysics data, as well as the evaluation and compilation of nuclear structure data. The Nuclear Data Project, therefore, is composed of two groups. The Nuclear Data Project staff through September 2000 is listed below. Accomplishments for the period of October 1998 through September 2000 of the nuclear structure data group and the nuclear astrophysics group are submitted in this Nuclear Data Project report

  10. Nuclear data project evaluation activity report. October 1998 - October 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akovali, Y; Blackmon, J; Radford, D; Smith, M [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2001-02-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the ORNL Nuclear Data Project since the IAEA Advisory Group meeting in December 1998. The group's future plans are also included. The ORNL Nuclear Data Project's responsibility includes the compilation/evaluation of astrophysics data, as well as the evaluation and compilation of nuclear structure data. The Nuclear Data Project, therefore, is composed of two groups. The Nuclear Data Project staff through September 2000 is listed below. Accomplishments for the period of October 1998 through September 2000 of the nuclear structure data group and the nuclear astrophysics group are submitted in this Nuclear Data Project report.

  11. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Luxembourg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Framework: 1. General; 2. Mining; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency measures); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. General Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister of Health; Minister of Labour; Other Ministers competent); 2. Advisory bodies (Higher Health Council)

  12. Inhibitors of the proteasome reduce the accelerated proteolysis in atrophying rat skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawa, N E; Odessey, R; Goldberg, A L

    1997-07-01

    Several observations have suggested that the enhanced proteolysis and atrophy of skeletal muscle in various pathological states is due primarily to activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. To test this idea, we investigated whether peptide aldehyde inhibitors of the proteasome, N-acetyl-leucyl-leucyl-norleucinal (LLN), or the more potent CBZ-leucyl-leucyl-leucinal (MG132) suppressed proteolysis in incubated rat skeletal muscles. These agents (e.g., MG132 at 10 microM) inhibited nonlysosomal protein breakdown by up to 50% (P protein synthesis or amino acid pools, but improved overall protein balance in the muscle. Upon treatment with MG132, ubiquitin-conjugated proteins accumulated in the muscle. The inhibition of muscle proteolysis correlated with efficacy against the proteasome, although these agents could also inhibit calpain-dependent proteolysis induced with Ca2+. These inhibitors had much larger effects on proteolysis in atrophying muscles than in controls. In the denervated soleus undergoing atrophy, the increase in ATP-dependent proteolysis was reduced 70% by MG132 (P muscle proteolysis induced by administering thyroid hormones was reduced 40-70% by the inhibitors. Finally, in rats made septic by cecal puncture, the increase in muscle proteolysis was completely blocked by MG132. Thus, the enhanced proteolysis in many catabolic states (including denervation, hyperthyroidism, and sepsis) is due to a proteasome-dependent pathway, and inhibition of proteasome function may be a useful approach to reduce muscle wasting.

  13. Exploiting nature's rich source of proteasome inhibitors as starting points in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräwert, Melissa Ann; Groll, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Cancer is the No. 2 cause of death in the Western world and one of the most expensive diseases to treat. Thus, it is not surprising, that every major pharmaceutical and biotechnology company has a blockbuster oncology product. In 2003, Millennium Pharmaceuticals entered the race with Velcade®, a first-in-class proteasome inhibitor that has been approved by the FDA for treatment of multiple myeloma and its sales have passed the billion dollar mark. Velcade®'s extremely toxic boronic acid pharmacophore, however, contributes to a number of severe side effects. Nevertheless, the launching of this product has validated the proteasome as a target in fighting cancer and further proteasome inhibitors have entered the market as anti-cancer drugs. Additionally, proteasome inhibitors have found application as crop protection agents, anti-parasitics, immunosuppressives, as well as in new therapies for muscular dystrophies and inflammation. Many of these compounds are based on microbial metabolites. In this review, we emphasize the important role of the structural elucidation of the various unique binding mechanisms of these compounds that have been optimized throughout evolution to target the proteasome. Based on this knowledge, medicinal chemists have further optimized these natural products, resulting in potential drugs with reduced off-target activities. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  14. Acetylation-Mediated Proteasomal Degradation of Core Histones during DNA Repair and Spermatogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Min-Xian; Pang, Ye; Liu, Cui Hua; Haratake, Kousuke; Du, Bo-Yu; Ji, Dan-Yang; Wang, Guang-Fei; Zhu, Qian-Qian; Song, Wei; Yu, Yadong; Zhang, Xiao-Xu; Huang, Hai-Tao; Miao, Shiying; Chen, Lian-Bin; Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liang, Ya-Nan; Liu, Shan; Cha, Hwangho; Yang, Dong; Zhai, Yonggong; Komatsu, Takuo; Tsuruta, Fuminori; Li, Haitao; Cao, Cheng; Li, Wei; Li, Guo-Hong; Cheng, Yifan; Chiba, Tomoki; Wang, Linfang; Goldberg, Alfred L.; Shen, Yan; Qiu, Xiao-Bo

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Histone acetylation plays critical roles in chromatin remodeling, DNA repair, and epigenetic regulation of gene expression, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Proteasomes usually catalyze ATP- and polyubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. Here we show that the proteasomes containing the activator PA200 catalyze the polyubiquitin-independent degradation of histones. Most proteasomes in mammalian testes (“spermatoproteasomes”) contain a spermatid/sperm-specific α-subunit α4s/PSMA8 and/or the catalytic β-subunits of immunoproteasomes in addition to PA200. Deletion of PA200 in mice abolishes acetylation-dependent degradation of somatic core histones during DNA double-strand breaks, and delays core histone disappearance in elongated spermatids. Purified PA200 greatly promotes ATP-independent proteasomal degradation of the acetylated core histones, but not polyubiquitinated proteins. Furthermore, acetylation on histones is required for their binding to the bromodomain-like regions in PA200 and its yeast ortholog, Blm10. Thus, PA200/Blm10 specifically targets the core histones for acetylation-mediated degradation by proteasomes, providing mechanisms by which acetylation regulates histone degradation, DNA repair, and spermatogenesis. PMID:23706739

  15. Anticancer activity of calyx of Diospyros kaki Thunb. through downregulation of cyclin D1 via inducing proteasomal degradation and transcriptional inhibition in human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Su Bin; Park, Gwang Hun; Song, Hun Min; Son, Ho-Jun; Um, Yurry; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2017-09-05

    Although it has been reported to contain high polyphenols, the pharmacological studies of the calyx of Diospyros kaki Thunb (DKC) have not been elucidated in detail. In this study, we elucidated anti-cancer activity and potential molecular mechanism of DKC against human colorectal cancer cells. Anti-cell proliferative effect of 70% ethanol extracts from the calyx of Diospyros kaki (DKC-E70) was evaluated by MTT assay. The effect of DKC-E70 on the expression of cyclin D1 in the protein and mRNA level was evaluated by Western blot and RT-PCR, respectively. DKC-E70 suppressed the proliferation of human colorectal cancer cell lines such as HCT116, SW480, LoVo and HT-29. Although DKC-E70 decreased cyclin D1 expression in protein and mRNA level, decreased level of cyclin D1 protein by DKC-E70 occurred at the earlier time than that of cyclin D1 mRNA, which indicates that DKC-E70-mediated downregulation of cyclin D1 protein may be a consequence of the induction of degradation and transcriptional inhibition of cyclin D1. In cyclin D1 degradation, we found that cyclin D1 downregulation by DKC-E70 was attenuated in presence of MG132. In addition, DKC-E70 phosphorylated threonine-286 (T286) of cyclin D1 and T286A abolished cyclin D1 downregulation by DKC-E70. We also observed that DKC-E70-mediated T286 phosphorylation and subsequent cyclin D1 degradation was blocked in presence of the inhibitors of ERK1/2, p38 or GSK3β. In cyclin D1 transcriptional inhibition, DKC-E70 inhibited the expression of β-catenin and TCF4, and β-catenin/TCF-dependent luciferase activity. Our results suggest that DKC-E70 may downregulate cyclin D1 as one of the potential anti-cancer targets through cyclin D1 degradation by T286 phosphorylation dependent on ERK1/2, p38 or GSK3β, and cyclin D1 transcriptional inhibition through Wnt signaling. From these findings, DKC-E70 has potential to be a candidate for the development of chemoprevention or therapeutic agents for human colorectal cancer.

  16. Redox-Regulated Pathway of Tyrosine Phosphorylation Underlies NF-κB Induction by an Atypical Pathway Independent of the 26S Proteasome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Sarah; Ponnappan, Subramaniam; Ponnappan, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Alternative redox stimuli such as pervanadate or hypoxia/reoxygenation, induce transcription factor NF-κB by phospho-tyrosine-dependent and proteasome-independent mechanisms. While considerable attention has been paid to the absence of proteasomal regulation of tyrosine phosphorylated IκBα, there is a paucity of information regarding proteasomal regulation of signaling events distinct from tyrosine phosphorylation of IκBα. To delineate roles for the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in the phospho-tyrosine dependent mechanism of NF-κB induction, we employed the proteasome inhibitor, Aclacinomycin, and the phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, pervanadate (PV). Results from these studies demonstrate that phospho-IκBα (Tyr-42) is not subject to proteasomal degradation in a murine stromal epithelial cell line, confirming results previously reported. Correspondingly, proteasome inhibition had no discernable effect on the key signaling intermediaries, Src and ERK1/2, involved in the phospho-tyrosine mechanisms regulating PV-mediated activation of NF-κB. Consistent with previous reports, a significant redox imbalance leading to the activation of tyrosine kinases, as occurs with pervanadate, is required for the induction of NF-κB. Strikingly, our studies demonstrate that proteasome inhibition can potentiate oxidative stress associated with PV-stimulation without impacting kinase activation, however, other cellular implications for this increase in intracellular oxidation remain to be fully delineated. PMID:25671697

  17. Up-stream events in the nuclear factor κB activation cascade in response to sparsely ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Langen, Britta; Klimow, Galina; Ruscher, Roland; Schmitz, Claudia; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Reitz, Günther

    2009-10-01

    Radiation is a potentially limiting factor for manned long-term space missions. Prolonged exposure to galactic cosmic rays may shorten the healthy life-span after return to Earth due to cancer induction. During the mission, a solar flare can be life threatening. For better risk estimation and development of appropriate countermeasures, the study of the cellular radiation response is necessary. Since apoptosis may be a mechanism the body uses to eliminate damaged cells, the induction by cosmic radiation of the nuclear anti-apoptotic transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) could influence the cancer risk of astronauts exposed to cosmic radiation by improving the survival of radiation-damaged cells. In previous studies using a screening assay for the detection of NF-κB-dependent gene induction (HEK-pNF-κB-d2EGFP/Neo cells), the activation of this transcription factor by heavy ions was shown [Baumstark-Khan, C., Hellweg, C.E., Arenz, A., Meier, M.M. Cellular monitoring of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway for assessment of space environmental radiation. Radiat. Res. 164, 527-530, 2005]. Studies with NF-κB inhibitors can map functional details of the NF-κB pathway and the influence of radiation-induced NF-κB activation on various cellular outcomes such as survival or cell cycle arrest. In this work, the efficacy and cytotoxicity of four different NF-κB inhibitors, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), capsaicin, the proteasome inhibitor MG-132, and the cell permeable peptide NF-κB SN50 were analyzed using HEK-pNF-κB-d2EGFP/Neo cells. In the recommended concentration range, only CAPE displayed considerable cytotoxicity. CAPE and capsaicin partially inhibited NF-κB activation by the cytokine tumor necrosis factor α. MG-132 completely abolished the activation and was therefore used for experiments with X-rays. NF-κB SN-50 could not reduce NF-κB dependent expression of the reporter destabilized Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (d2EGFP). MG-132

  18. New activities in nuclear power plants maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mico, F.; Specht, J.

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses the consequences of the progressive deregulation of the electricity market of several key countries on the maintenance practices and techniques face to the growing pressures on O and M costs. The responses of the nuclear maintenance industry to make maintenance activities more efficient maintaining if not enhancing the safety of NPP's are briefly described. The article also analyses the potential impact of shortage of experience maintenance personnel to serve the NPP's in the future as some countries are already experiencing. (Author)

  19. Activities of the USSR Nuclear Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usachev, L.M.; Popov, V.J.

    1972-01-01

    In any activity, one must start with the determination of its usefulness: in the field of nuclear data, this consists in the compilation of request lists, analogous to the RENDA list, issued in cooperation by the CCDN and the Nuclear Data Center of the N. D. S. At Obninsk, we have a somewhat different approach for our RENDA entries. We do not ask our reactor physicists to formulate their requests for concrete microscopic measurements or to share the requested accuracies between the different needed cross sections, because they are not really specialists in this field. We ask them to formulate their requirements, based on technical and economical considerations, for the tolerable uncertainties on the reactor parameters which are, of course, linked to the uncertainties on nuclear data. In addition, we ask them to give us the sensitivity coefficients for the values of reactor parameters as a function of modifications of the nuclear data. These sensitivity coefficients include all the needed information concerning the reactor in view of the determination of the requirements on nuclear data. The problem of the determination of the set of measurements necessary to obtain the reactor parameters with the required accuracies must, from our point of view be treated mathematically by specialists of the planification theory, working in close connection with specialists of microscopic data measurements and of integral experiments. In order to work out an optimal planing, it is necessary to evaluate the relative costs of the experiments; it is also essential to evaluate correctly the correlations between the uncertainties of the measurements and the estimation of their costs. Moreover, we may know all the information concerning the present accuracy on the measurements of a given type, first of all for a comparative evaluation of the costs of the experiments and, secondly, for drawing conclusions on the possible necessity for more accurate values by comparing the accuracies which

  20. Requirement and prospect of nuclear data activities for nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Itsuro

    2000-01-01

    Owing to continuous efforts by the members of JNDC (Japanese Nuclear Data Committee) and Nuclear Data Center in JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute), several superb evaluated nuclear data files, such as JENDL, FP (fission product) yields and decay heat, have been compiled in Japan and opened to the world. However, they are seldom adopted in safety design and safety evaluation of light water reactors and are hardly found in related safety regulatory guidelines and standards except the decay heat. In this report, shown are a few examples of presently used nuclear data in the safety design and the safety evaluation of PWRs (pressurized water reactors) and so forth. And then, several procedures are recommended in order to enhance more utilization of Japanese evaluated nuclear data files for nuclear safety. (author)

  1. Activities of nuclear human resource development in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujikura, Yonezo

    2010-01-01

    Since 2007, the JAIF (Japan Atomic Industrial Forum) had established the nuclear energy human resource development council to make analysis of the issue on nuclear human resource development. The author mainly contributed to develop its road map as a chairman of working group. Questionnaire survey to relevant parties on issues of nuclear human resource development had been conducted and the council identified the six relevant issues and ten recommendations. Both aspects for career design and skill-up program are necessary to develop nuclear human resource at each developing step and four respective central coordinating hubs should be linked to each sector participating in human resource development. (T. Tanaka)

  2. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment (Licensing; Registration and monitoring of nuclear materials and radioactive sources; High activity sources); 4. Nuclear facilities (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiological protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (The President of the National Atomic Energy Agency - Prezes Panstwowej Agencji Atomistyki (President of the PAA); Minister of Health; Minister of the Environment); 2. Advisory bodies (Council for Nuclear Safety and Radiological Protection); 3. Public and semi-public bodies (Radioactive Waste Management Plant); 4. Research institutes (Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection; National Centre for Nuclear Research; Institute of Nuclear Physics; Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology; Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion)

  3. Gambogic Acid Is a Tissue-Specific Proteasome Inhibitor In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofen Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gambogic acid (GA is a natural compound derived from Chinese herbs that has been approved by the Chinese Food and Drug Administration for clinical trials in cancer patients; however, its molecular targets have not been thoroughly studied. Here, we report that GA inhibits tumor proteasome activity, with potency comparable to bortezomib but much less toxicity. First, GA acts as a prodrug and only gains proteasome-inhibitory function after being metabolized by intracellular CYP2E1. Second, GA-induced proteasome inhibition is a prerequisite for its cytotoxicity and anticancer effect without off-targets. Finally, because expression of the CYP2E1 gene is very high in tumor tissues but low in many normal tissues, GA could therefore produce tissue-specific proteasome inhibition and tumor-specific toxicity, with clinical significance for designing novel strategies for cancer treatment.

  4. Synergistic apoptosis induction in leukemic cells by the phosphatase inhibitor salubrinal and proteasome inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes C A Drexler

    Full Text Available Cells adapt to endoplasmic reticulum (ER-stress by arresting global protein synthesis while simultaneously activating specific transcription factors and their downstream targets. These processes are mediated in part by the phosphorylation-dependent inactivation of the translation initiation factor eIF2alpha. Following restoration of homeostasis protein synthesis is resumed when the serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PP1 dephosphorylates and reactivates eIF2alpha. Proteasome inhibitors, used to treat multiple myeloma patients evoke ER-stress and apoptosis by blocking the ER-associated degradation of misfolded proteins (ERAD, however, the role of eIF2alpha phosphorylation in leukemic cells under conditions of proteasome inhibitor-mediated ER stress is currently unclear.Bcr-Abl-positive and negative leukemic cell lines were used to investigate the functional implications of PP1-related phosphatase activities on eIF2alpha phosphorylation in proteasome inhibitor-mediated ER stress and apoptosis. Rather unexpectedly, salubrinal, a recently identified PP1 inhibitor capable to protect against ER stress in various model systems, strongly synergized with proteasome inhibitors to augment apoptotic death of different leukemic cell lines. Salubrinal treatment did not affect the phosphorlyation status of eIF2alpha. Furthermore, the proapoptotic effect of salubrinal occurred independently from the chemical nature of the proteasome inhibitor, was recapitulated by a second unrelated phosphatase inhibitor and was unaffected by overexpression of a dominant negative eIF2alpha S51A variant that can not be phosphorylated. Salubrinal further aggravated ER-stress and proteotoxicity inflicted by the proteasome inhibitors on the leukemic cells since characteristic ER stress responses, such as ATF4 and CHOP synthesis, XBP1 splicing, activation of MAP kinases and eventually apoptosis were efficiently abrogated by the translational inhibitor cycloheximide.Although PP1

  5. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive Substances and Equipment; 4. Nuclear installations; 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities - National Radiation Laboratory - NRL; 2. Advisory bodies - Radiation Protection Advisory Council; 3. Public and semi-public agencies - Research institutes

  6. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Iceland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations; 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister of Health and Social Security; Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute)

  7. A neutron irradiator to perform nuclear activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamboni, C. B.; Zahn, G.S.; Figueredo, A. M. G.; Madi, T. F.; Yoriyaz, H.; Lima, R. B.; Shtejer, K.; Dalaqua Jr, L.

    2001-01-01

    The development of appropriate nuclear instrumentation to perform neutron activation analyze (NAA), using thermal and fast neutrons, can be useful to investigate materials outside the reactor premises. Considering this fact, a small size neutron irradiator prototype was developed at IPEN facilities (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - Brazil). Basically, this prototype consists of a cylinder of 1200 mm long and 985 mm diameter (filled with paraffin) with two Am-Be sources (600GBq each) arranged in the longitudinal direction of its geometric center. The material to be irradiated is positioned at a radial direction of the cylinder between the two Am-Be sources. The main advantage of this irradiator is a very stable neutron flux eliminating the use of standard material (measure of the induced activity in the sample by comparative method). This way the process became agile, practical and economic, but quantities at mg levels of samples are necessary to achieve good sensitivity, when the material has a low microscopy neutron cross section. As fast and thermal neutron can be used, the flux distribution, for both, were calculated and the prototype performance is discussed

  8. Reviewing surveillance activities in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    This document provides guidance to Operational Safety Review Teams (OSARTs) for reviewing surveillance activities at a nuclear power plant. In addition, the document contains reference material to support the review of surveillance activities, to assist within the Technical Support area and to ensure consistency between individual reviews. Drafts of the document have already been used on several OSART missions and found to be useful. The document first considers the objectives of an excellent surveillance programme. Investigations to determine the quality of the surveillance programme are then discussed. The attributes of an excellent surveillance programme are listed. Advice follows on how to phrase questions so as to obtain an informative response on surveillance features. Finally, specific equipment is mentioned that should be considered when reviewing functional tests. Four annexes provide examples drawn from operating nuclear power plants. They were selected to supplement the main text of the document with the best international practices as found in OSART reviews. They should in no way limit the acceptance and development of alternative approaches that lead to equivalent or better results. Refs, figs and tabs

  9. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    In Greece, there are no nuclear power plants and nuclear energy is not considered as an option in the foreseeable future. There is, however, one nuclear research reactor (in extended shutdown since 2014) and one sub-critical assembly. Radioactive waste originating from medicine, research and industry is classified as low level. Although there is no framework act dealing comprehensively with the different aspects of nuclear energy, there are various laws, decrees and regulations of a more specific nature governing several aspects of nuclear activities. This paper gives information on the general regulatory regime (mining regime, radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment, nuclear installations (licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety, emergency response, trade in nuclear materials and equipment, radiation protection, radioactive waste management, nuclear security, transport, nuclear third party liability) and on the institutional framework with the regulatory and supervisory authorities (Greek Atomic Energy Commission (EEAE))

  10. Summary of nuclear fuel reprocessing activities around the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellinger, P.J.; Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.

    1984-11-01

    This review of international practices for nuclear fuel reprocessing was prepared to provide a nontechnical summary of the current status of nuclear fuel reprocessing activities around the world. The sources of information are widely varied

  11. 1984 Act on nuclear activities (1984:3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This 1984 Act on Nuclear Activities (1984:3) replaces the 1956 Atomic Energy Act as well as the 1977 Act on special permits to charge nuclear reactors with nuclear fuel and the 1980 Act on Public Insight into the Safety Work at Nuclear Power Plants. Like the 1956 Act, the 1984 Act in a safety legislation, which is based on a system of licensing conditions and supervision. According to the fundamental provisions of the 1984 Act, nuclear activities should be conducted in such a way as to meet safety requirements and fulfil the obligations that follow from Sweden's international agreements for the purpose of preventing the proliferation of nuclear weapons. (NEA) [fr

  12. Proteasomes remain intact, but show early focal alteration in their composition in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabashi, Edor; Agar, Jeffrey N; Hong, Yu; Taylor, David M; Minotti, Sandra; Figlewicz, Denise A; Durham, Heather D

    2008-06-01

    In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis caused by mutations in Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1), altered solubility and aggregation of the mutant protein implicates failure of pathways for detecting and catabolizing misfolded proteins. Our previous studies demonstrated early reduction of proteasome-mediated proteolytic activity in lumbar spinal cord of SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice, tissue particularly vulnerable to disease. The purpose of this study was to identify any underlying abnormalities in proteasomal structure. In lumbar spinal cord of pre-symptomatic mice [postnatal day 45 (P45) and P75], normal levels of structural 20S alpha subunits were incorporated into 20S/26S proteasomes; however, proteasomal complexes separated by native gel electrophoresis showed decreased immunoreactivity with antibodies to beta3, a structural subunit of the 20S proteasome core, and beta5, the subunit with chymotrypsin-like activity. This occurred prior to increase in beta5i immunoproteasomal subunit. mRNA levels were maintained and no association of mutant SOD1 with proteasomes was identified, implicating post-transcriptional mechanisms. mRNAs also were maintained in laser captured motor neurons at a later stage of disease (P100) in which multiple 20S proteins are reduced relative to the surrounding neuropil. Increase in detergent-insoluble, ubiquitinated proteins at P75 provided further evidence of stress on mechanisms of protein quality control in multiple cell types prior to significant motor neuron death.

  13. BAG3-dependent noncanonical autophagy induced by proteasome inhibition in HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bao-Qin; Du, Zhen-Xian; Zong, Zhi-Hong; Li, Chao; Li, Ning; Zhang, Qiang; Kong, De-Hui; Wang, Hua-Qin

    2013-06-01

    Emerging lines of evidence have shown that blockade of ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) activates autophagy. The molecular players that regulate the relationship between them remain to be elucidated. Bcl-2 associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) is a member of the BAG co-chaperone family that regulates the ATPase activity of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) chaperone family. Studies on BAG3 have demonstrated that it plays multiple roles in physiological and pathological processes, including antiapoptotic activity, signal transduction, regulatory role in virus infection, cell adhesion and migration. Recent studies have attracted much attention on its role in initiation of autophagy. The current study, for the first time, demonstrates that proteasome inhibitors elicit noncanonical autophagy, which was not suppressed by inhibitors of class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) or shRNA against Beclin 1 (BECN1). In addition, we demonstrate that BAG3 is ascribed to activation of autophagy elicited by proteasome inhibitors and MAPK8/9/10 (also known as JNK1/2/3 respectively) activation is also implicated via upregulation of BAG3. Moreover, we found that noncanonical autophagy mediated by BAG3 suppresses responsiveness of HepG2 cells to proteasome inhibitors.

  14. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations; (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Ministry of Trade and Industry - KTM; Ministry of Social Affairs and Health; Ministry of the Interior; Ministry of the Environment; Ministry of Foreign Affairs); 2. Advisory bodies (Advisory Committee on Nuclear Energy; Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority - STUK; State Nuclear Waste Management Fund)

  15. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear items and spent fuel (Ionising radiation sources; Nuclear items; Spent fuel); 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response; Decommissioning); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (State Office for Nuclear Safety - SUJB; Ministry of Industry and Trade; Ministry of the Interior; Ministry of the Environment); 2. Public and semi-public agencies (CEZ, a.s.; National Radiation Protection Institute - NRPI; Radioactive Waste Repository Authority - RAWRA; Diamo; Nuclear Physics Institute - NPI; National Institute for Nuclear, Chemical and Biological Protection; Nuclear Research Institute Rez, a.s. - NRI)

  16. Natural proteasome inhibitor celastrol suppresses androgen-independent prostate cancer progression by modulating apoptotic proteins and NF-kappaB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Dai

    Full Text Available Celastrol is a natural proteasome inhibitor that exhibits promising anti-tumor effects in human malignancies, especially the androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC with constitutive NF-κB activation. Celastrol induces apoptosis by means of proteasome inhibition and suppresses prostate tumor growth. However, the detailed mechanism of action remains elusive. In the current study, we aim to test the hypothesis that celastrol suppresses AIPC progression via inhibiting the constitutive NF-κB activity as well as modulating the Bcl-2 family proteins.We examined the efficacy of celastrol both in vitro and in vivo, and evaluated the role of NF-κB in celastrol-mediated AIPC regression. We found that celastrol inhibited cell proliferation in all three AIPC cell lines (PC-3, DU145 and CL1, with IC₅₀ in the range of 1-2 µM. Celastrol also suppressed cell migration and invasion. Celastrol significantly induced apoptosis as evidenced by increased sub-G1 population, caspase activation and PARP cleavage. Moreover, celastrol promoted cleavage of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 and activated the pro-apoptotic protein Noxa. In addition, celastrol rapidly blocked cytosolic IκBα degradation and nuclear translocation of RelA. Likewise, celastrol inhibited the expression of multiple NF-κB target genes that are involved in proliferation, invasion and anti-apoptosis. Celastrol suppressed AIPC tumor progression by inhibiting proliferation, increasing apoptosis and decreasing angiogenesis, in PC-3 xenograft model in nude mouse. Furthermore, increased cellular IκBα and inhibited expression of various NF-κB target genes were observed in tumor tissues.Our data suggest that, via targeting the proteasome, celastrol suppresses proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis by inducing the apoptotic machinery and attenuating constitutive NF-κB activity in AIPC both in vitro and in vivo. Celastrol as an active ingredient of traditional herbal medicine could thus be

  17. Nuclear safety regulation on nuclear safety equipment activities in relation to human and organizational factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tianshu

    2013-01-01

    Based on years of knowledge in nuclear safety supervision and experience of investigating and dealing with violation events in repair welding of DFHM, this paper analyzes major faults in manufacturing and maintaining activities of nuclear safety equipment in relation to human and organizational factors. It could be deducted that human and organizational factors has definitely become key features in the development of nuclear energy and technology. Some feasible measures to reinforce supervision on nuclear safety equipment activities have also been proposed. (author)

  18. An overview on the activities of Pacific Nuclear Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Mamoru

    2003-01-01

    Pacific Nuclear Council (PNC) is a non-governmental organization (NGO) for cooperation and exchange of information on the nuclear science and technologies and its use in the Pacific basin countries to be established in November, 1989. The charter members are Canadian Nuclear Society, Canada Nuclear Association, Atomic Energy Society of Japan, Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc., Korea Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc., and Mexico Nuclear Society. The activities of PNC are stated as followings; a charter, rules, objects, construction, management, activities for a member organization, Pacific Basin Nuclear Conference, foreign activities, social trend as back ground and future activities. As the activities for a member organization, eight working groups such as training of people, nuclear safety, public acceptances, reorganization of system, control of radioactive waste, public information and out reach, next generation reactor and rules and standards had been worked and the last four groups are working now. (S.Y.)

  19. Control of nuclear β-dystroglycan content is crucial for the maintenance of nuclear envelope integrity and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez-Aguilera, Griselda; de Dios Gómez-López, Juan; Jiménez-Gutiérrez, Guadalupe E; Vásquez-Limeta, Alejandra; Laredo-Cisneros, Marco S; Gómez, Pablo; Winder, Steve J; Cisneros, Bulmaro

    2018-02-01

    β-Dystroglycan (β-DG) is a plasma membrane protein that has ability to target to the nuclear envelope (NE) to maintain nuclear architecture. Nevertheless, mechanisms controlling β-DG nuclear localization and the physiological consequences of a failure of trafficking are largely unknown. We show that β-DG has a nuclear export pathway in myoblasts that depends on the recognition of a nuclear export signal located in its transmembrane domain, by CRM1. Remarkably, NES mutations forced β-DG nuclear accumulation resulting in mislocalization and decreased levels of emerin and lamin B1 and disruption of various nuclear processes in which emerin (centrosome-nucleus linkage and β-catenin transcriptional activity) and lamin B1 (cell cycle progression and nucleoli structure) are critically involved. In addition to nuclear export, the lifespan of nuclear β-DG is restricted by its nuclear proteasomal degradation. Collectively our data show that control of nuclear β-DG content by the combination of CRM1 nuclear export and nuclear proteasome pathways is physiologically relevant to preserve proper NE structure and activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Basic principles for regulating nuclear activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The AECB has developed as its mission statement: `To ensure that the use of nuclear energy in Canada does not pose undue risk to health, safety, security and the environment`. This report proposes eleven qualitative principles for regulating nuclear activities whose achievement would satisfy the broad policy enunciated in the statement. They would further provide a basis for the specific regulatory requirements expressed by the AECB in its Regulations and other documents. They would thus represent a connecting link between the policy enunciated in the mission statement and the requirements. The proposed principles are largely concerned with how the allowable risk should be set for members of the public, for industry workers, for society as a whole, and for the environment. In making these recommendations the risks from normal operation of the licensed facility and those from a possible serious accident are considered separately. The distribution of risk between geographic communities and between generations is also addressed in the proposed principles. These are listed in the final section of the report. 23 refs.

  1. Basic principles for regulating nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    The AECB has developed as its mission statement: 'To ensure that the use of nuclear energy in Canada does not pose undue risk to health, safety, security and the environment'. This report proposes eleven qualitative principles for regulating nuclear activities whose achievement would satisfy the broad policy enunciated in the statement. They would further provide a basis for the specific regulatory requirements expressed by the AECB in its Regulations and other documents. They would thus represent a connecting link between the policy enunciated in the mission statement and the requirements. The proposed principles are largely concerned with how the allowable risk should be set for members of the public, for industry workers, for society as a whole, and for the environment. In making these recommendations the risks from normal operation of the licensed facility and those from a possible serious accident are considered separately. The distribution of risk between geographic communities and between generations is also addressed in the proposed principles. These are listed in the final section of the report. 23 refs

  2. Advanced nuclear fuel cycles activities in IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawada, H.P.; Ganguly, C.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Of late several developments in reprocessing areas along with advances in fuel design and robotics have led to immense interest in partitioning and transmutation (P and T). The R and D efforts in the P and T area are being paid increased attention as potential answers to ever-growing issues threatening sustainability, environmental protection and non-proliferation. Any fuel cycle studies that integrate partitioning and transmutation are also known as ''advanced fuel cycles'' (AFC), that could incinerate plutonium and minor actinide (MA) elements (namely Am, Np, Cm, etc.) which are the main contributors to long-term radiotoxicity. The R and D efforts in developing these innovative fuel cycles as well as reactors are being co-ordinated by international initiatives such as Innovative Nuclear Power Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO), the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) and the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GENP). For these advanced nuclear fuel cycle schemes to take shape, the development of liquid-metal-cooled reactor fuel cycles would be the most essential step for implementation of P and T. Some member states are also evaluating other concepts involving the use of thorium fuel cycle or inert-matrix fuel or coated particle fuel. Advanced fuel cycle involving novel partitioning methods such as pyrochemical separation methods to recover the transuranic elements are being developed by some member states which would form a critical stage of P and T. However, methods that can achieve a very high reduction (>99.5%) of MA and long-lived fission products in the waste streams after partitioning must be achieved to realize the goal of an improved protection of the environment. In addition, the development of MA-based fuel is also an essential and crucial step for transmutation of these transuranic elements. The presentation intends to describe progress of the IAEA activities encompassing the following subject-areas: minimization of

  3. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I) - General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection (Bilateral safeguards agreements; International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Agreement; The South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty Act; The Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Act; The Nuclear Non-Proliferation (Safeguards) Act); 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II) - Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister for Health and Ageing; Minister for Foreign Affairs; Minister for the Environment, Heritage and the Arts; Minister for, Resources, Energy and Tourism); 2. Advisory bodies (Radiation Health and Safety Advisory Council; Advisory Committees); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA); Australian Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Office; Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO); Supervising Scientist)

  4. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities. Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    The NEA has updated, in coordination with the Permanent Delegation of Japan to the OECD, the report on the Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities in Japan. This country report provides comprehensive information on the regulatory and institutional framework governing nuclear activities in Japan. It provides a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. Content: I - General Regulatory Regime: Introduction; Mining regime; Radioactive substances and equipment; Nuclear installations (Reactor Regulation, Emergency response); Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; Radiological protection; Radioactive waste management; Nuclear safeguards and nuclear security; Transport; Nuclear third party liability. II - Institutional Framework: Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Cabinet Office, Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA), Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), The Agency for Natural Resources and Energy (ANRE), Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT), Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT)); Advisory bodies (Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), Reactor Safety Examination Committee, Nuclear Fuel Safety Examination Committee, Radiation Council, Other advisory bodies); Public and semi-public agencies (Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST), Nuclear Damage Compensation and Decommissioning Facilitation Corporation (NDF), Nuclear Waste Management Organisation (NUMO))

  5. Nuclear air cleaning activities in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, J.

    1991-01-01

    The discussion is limited to nuclear air cleaning activities in the Federal Republic of Germany. Work is underway on containment venting with regard to filtration based on a combination of stainless steel roughing and fine filters with a decontamination factor similar to or better than that achieved with high-efficiency particulate air filters. The main point of interest is the development of relatively small filter units that can be located inside the containment. The concept of a new design for double containment having annular rooms between the steel containment and the concrete containment is discussed. Work related to the dismantling of decommissioned reactors and limited research for fuel reprocessing facilities are also noted

  6. Proteasomal Dysfunction Induced By Diclofenac Engenders Apoptosis Through Mitochondrial Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanullah, Ayeman; Upadhyay, Arun; Chhangani, Deepak; Joshi, Vibhuti; Mishra, Ribhav; Yamanaka, Koji; Mishra, Amit

    2017-05-01

    Diclofenac is the most commonly used phenylacetic acid derivative non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that demonstrates significant analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory effects. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated anti-proliferative activity of NSAIDs and examined their apoptotic induction effects in different cancer cell lines. However, the precise molecular mechanisms by which these pharmacological agents induce apoptosis and exert anti-carcinogenic properties are not well known. Here, we have observed that diclofenac treatment induces proteasome malfunction and promotes accumulation of different critical proteasome substrates, including few pro-apoptotic proteins in cells. Exposure of diclofenac consequently elevates aggregation of various ubiquitylated misfolded proteins. Finally, we have shown that diclofenac treatment promotes apoptosis in cells, which could be because of mitochondrial membrane depolarization and cytochrome c release into cytosol. This study suggests possible beneficial insights of NSAIDs-induced apoptosis that may improve our existing knowledge in anti-proliferative interspecific strategies development. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1014-1027, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Regulating the 20S Proteasome Ubiquitin-Independent Degradation Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gili Ben-Nissan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available For many years, the ubiquitin-26S proteasome degradation pathway was considered the primary route for proteasomal degradation. However, it is now becoming clear that proteins can also be targeted for degradation by the core 20S proteasome itself. Degradation by the 20S proteasome does not require ubiquitin tagging or the presence of the 19S regulatory particle; rather, it relies on the inherent structural disorder of the protein being degraded. Thus, proteins that contain unstructured regions due to oxidation, mutation, or aging, as well as naturally, intrinsically unfolded proteins, are susceptible to 20S degradation. Unlike the extensive knowledge acquired over the years concerning degradation by the 26S proteasome, relatively little is known about the means by which 20S-mediated proteolysis is controlled. Here, we describe our current understanding of the regulatory mechanisms that coordinate 20S proteasome-mediated degradation, and highlight the gaps in knowledge that remain to be bridged.

  8. Karlsruhe nuclear research center. Main activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article reports on problems of securing the fuel supply for nuclear power generation, on reprocessing and ultimate storage of radioactive material, on the safety of nuclear facilities, on new technologies and basic research, and on the infrastructure of the Karlsruhe nuclear research center, as well as finance and administration. (HK) [de

  9. BATAN Activities in Developing Nuclear Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darmawati, S.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: BATAN (National Atomic Energy Agency of Indonesia) was established in 1964, and after the issuance of Law 10 of 1997 it become National Nuclear Energy Agency. During the last seven years, BATAN has suffered the loss of many of its valuable human resources due to the zero-growth policy of the government in recruiting new staffs. The uncertain future of nuclear power programme in Indonesia has also reduced the interest of young generation to study nuclear related subjects, resulting in the closing of several departments in universities that once offered nuclear sciences as subject of studies. These situations triggered management of BATAN to develop various efforts to keep nuclear knowledge exist and disseminate among BATAN itself, university students, and public as a whole. BATAN has in recent years established higher school of nuclear technology and organized various nuclear related training programmes, and also in cooperation with other governmental organizations establish nuclear zones, nuclear information centres and nuclear corners in public as well as in high school areas throughout Indonesia. All these efforts are aimed to transfer and preserve nuclear knowledge for the better future of the applications of nuclear science and technology in Indonesia. (author

  10. Public acceptance (PA) activities of nuclear power in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Masafumi; Iguchi, Tatsuro

    1993-10-01

    At the first part of presentation present status of nuclear power development in Japan is described. Then results of poll on nuclear energy acceptance by population are analyzed. Further, current activities and future efforts directed to broad understanding by people benefits of nuclear energy are described. 6 figs

  11. Reorganization and redimensioning of nuclear activities in Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    This paper is of a self-critical nature, beginning with a retrospective look at nuclear activities in Venezuela. An inventory of human resources, materials and existing techniques is also made. National nuclear policies and developments are examined pointing out failures and successes. Finally, conclusions are presented about the technical assistance received from international organizations in research, nuclear safety and technological development

  12. Nuclear technology for sustainable development and FNCA activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machi, Sueo

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear techniques have been contributing to sustainable development and human welfare through their applications in agriculture, health care, food supply, industry, water resources and environmental conservation. Nuclear techniques are more advantageous and/or complementary with other techniques to achieve goals. For many applications nuclear technique is more environmentally friendly because it does not need chemical agents to induce necessary reactions. This paper also illustrates successful applications of nuclear techniques and activities of the regional nuclear cooperation in Asia, FNCA (Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia) to achieve common goals with limited resources. (author)

  13. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects (The Environmental Code, Environmental impact statement, Permit under the Environmental Code)); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiological protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability (The Nuclear Liability Act; Chernobyl legislation); II. Institutional Framework: 1. Ministries with responsibilities concerning nuclear activities (Ministry of the Environment; Ministry of Enterprise, Energy and Communications; Ministry of Justice; Ministry of Foreign Affairs); 2. Swedish Radiation Safety Authority

  14. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; 11. Nuclear terrorism; II. Institutional Framework - The federal government: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Ministry of Energy; Ministry of Health; Ministry of Labour and Social Security; Ministry of the Environment and Natural Resources; Ministry of Communications and Transport); 2. Public and semi-public agencies: (National Nuclear Safety and Safeguards Commission; National Nuclear Research Institute)

  15. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Safeguards for nuclear material; 7. Radiation protection; 8. Radioactive waste management; 9. Nuclear security; 10. Transport; 11. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration - SNSA; Slovenian Radiation Protection Administration - SRPA); 2. Advisory bodies; 3. Public and semi-public agencies; 4. Technical support organisations - approved experts

  16. Proteasomal and Lysosomal Protein Degradation and Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xuejun; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    In the cell, the proteasome and lysosomes represent the most important proteolytic machineries, responsible for the protein degradation in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy, respectively. Both the UPS and autophagy are essential to protein quality and quantity control. Alterations in cardiac proteasomal and lysosomal degradation are remarkably associated with most heart disease in humans and are implicated in the pathogenesis of congestive heart failure. Studies carried out ...

  17. Overview of nuclear data activities at the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel-Sendis, F.; Dupont, E.; Gulliford, J.; Nordborg, G.

    2011-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) is a specialised agency within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The mission of the NEA is to assist its member countries in maintaining and further developing, through international co-operation, the scientific, technological and legal bases required for the safe, environmentally friendly and economical use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. All activities relevant to nuclear data measurements, evaluations and applications are managed by the NEA Nuclear Science Committee through the Nuclear Science section and the Data Bank, which work closely together. This paper gives an overview of current and planned nuclear data activities at the Nuclear Energy Agency through the program of work of the Data Bank in general and of the NEA Working Party on international nuclear data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC) in particular. (authors)

  18. The Current Status and Implications of Nuclear Energy Cultural Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Won

    2006-01-01

    The Korean nuclear energy community paid a high price in terms of the tremendous social costs incurred in the process of securing a site for mid-to-low radioactive waste disposal facility, indicating that interest in the technical danger of nuclear energy has spread to the realm of people's daily lives. Under the circumstances it is important to raise rational public awareness of nuclear science as a foundation of everyday life through nuclear cultural activities. This study examines the various types of public relations activities of the Korea Nuclear Energy Foundation, an organization in charge of promoting nuclear energy, and explores what activities are required to ensure efficient promotion in accordance with development of nuclear culture

  19. Nuclear power company activity based costing management analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Dan

    2012-01-01

    With Nuclear Energy Industry development, Nuclear Power Company has the continual promoting stress of inner management to the sustainable marketing operation development. In view of this, it is very imminence that Nuclear Power Company should promote the cost management levels and built the nuclear safety based lower cost competitive advantage. Activity based costing management (ABCM) transfer the cost management emphases from the 'product' to the 'activity' using the value chain analysis methods, cost driver analysis methods and so on. According to the analysis of the detail activities and the value chains, cancel the unnecessary activity, low down the resource consuming of the necessary activity, and manage the cost from the source, achieve the purpose of reducing cost, boosting efficiency and realizing the management value. It gets the conclusion from the detail analysis with the nuclear power company procedure and activity, and also with the selection to 'pieces analysis' of the important cost related project in the nuclear power company. The conclusion is that the activities of the nuclear power company has the obviously performance. It can use the management of ABC method. And with the management of the procedure and activity, it is helpful to realize the nuclear safety based low cost competitive advantage in the nuclear power company. (author)

  20. Nuclear knowledge portal for supporting licensing and controlling nuclear activities in the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, E.; Braga, F.

    2005-01-01

    The knowledge economy is pivotal for moving the wealth and development of traditional industrial sectors - abundant in manual labour, raw materials and capital - to areas whose products, processes and services are rich in technology and knowledge. Even in research areas such as nuclear energy, where goods are based on high technology, the ability to transform information into knowledge, and knowledge into decisions and actions, is extremely important. Therefore, the value of products from these areas depends more and more on the degree of innovation, technology and intelligence incorporated by them. Thus, it has become increasingly important and relevant to acquire strategic knowledge and make it available to the organisation. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to present the construction of a Nuclear Knowledge Portal for aiding and streamlining the Licensing and Management activities of the CNEN. (author)

  1. Nuclear knowledge portal to support licensing and control nuclear activities in the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, M.E.; Braga, M.F.

    2004-01-01

    The Knowledge Economy is pivotal for moving the wealth and development of traditional industrial sectors - abundant in manual labor, raw materials and capital - to areas whose products, processes and services are rich in technology and knowledge. Even in research areas such as nuclear energy, where goods are based on high technology, the ability to transform information into knowledge, and knowledge into decisions and actions, is extremely important. Therefore, the value of products from these areas depends more and more on the degree of innovation, technology and intelligence incorporated by them. Thus, it has become increasingly important and relevant to acquire strategic knowledge and make it available to the organization. Therefore, the objective of this article is to present the construction of a Nuclear Knowledge Portal for aiding and streamlining the Licensing and Management activities of the CNEN. (author)

  2. IAEA activities in nuclear safety: future perspectives. Spanish Nuclear Safety Council, Madrid, 28 May 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document represents the conference given by the Director General of the IAEA at the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council in Madrid, on 28 May 1998, on Agency's activities in nuclear safety. The following aspects are emphasized: Agency's role in creating a legally binding nuclear safety regime, non-binding safety standards, services provided by the Agency to assist its Member States in the Application of safety standards, Agency's nuclear safety strategy, and future perspective concerning safety aspects related to radioactive wastes, residues of past nuclear activities, and security of radiological sources

  3. Nuclear knowledge portal to support licensing and control nuclear activities in the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Elizabeth; Braga, Fabiane

    2004-01-01

    importance of keeping the intellectual capital in the organizations that is to work with the knowledge from the collaborators. In Brazil still have many authors that discusses this concept and we adopt for this paper the definition form Cavalcanti where is the concept 'intellectual capital' refers either to the capacity, ability or experience, as well as to the formal education that the collaborators members have and add to the Organization. The 'intellectual capital' is an intangible asset, which belongs to the individual himself, thus it might be utilized by the organizations in order to generate value. The development and preservation of this intellectual capital is made through the implementation of forums of discussion, workshops or knowledge portals where the organization's collaborators share their experiences. Nevertheless, to assimilate and to develop the 'intellectual capital' does not add value to the organization: It is necessary to keep it. And one way to do so is to create desirable and encouraging work environments, to promote a sharing management and to offer programs of profits sharing. The objective of this paper is to describe how Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission - CNEN has been developing a nuclear knowledge portal, focused in the Radiation and Safety Nuclear area. The Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) is a federal autarchy created in October 10 of 1956, as a superior agency of planning, guiding, supervision and inspection in nuclear area being also the body entitled to establish standards and regulations on radiological protection, to issue licenses (permissions) and to survey and control the nuclear activities in Brazil. CNEN also develops researches related to the use of nuclear techniques in benefit of the society. The Radiation and Safety Nuclear directorate of CNEN acts, mainly, in the licensing of nuclear and radioactive installations. The people who work at this area recognize the importance of management and sharing the accumulated

  4. FoxM1 is a general target for proteasome inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uppoor G Bhat

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Proteasome inhibitors are currently in the clinic or in clinical trials, but the mechanism of their anticancer activity is not completely understood. The oncogenic transcription factor FoxM1 is one of the most overexpressed genes in human tumors, while its expression is usually halted in normal non-proliferating cells. Previously, we established that thiazole antibiotics Siomycin A and thiostrepton inhibit FoxM1 and induce apoptosis in human cancer cells. Here, we report that Siomycin A and thiostrepton stabilize the expression of a variety of proteins, such as p21, Mcl-1, p53 and hdm-2 and also act as proteasome inhibitors in vitro. More importantly, we also found that well-known proteasome inhibitors such as MG115, MG132 and bortezomib inhibit FoxM1 transcriptional activity and FoxM1 expression. In addition, overexpression of FoxM1 specifically protects against bortezomib-, but not doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. These data suggest that negative regulation of FoxM1 by proteasome inhibitors is a general feature of these drugs and it may contribute to their anticancer properties.

  5. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Cabinet Office; Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry - METI; Minister of Land, Infrastructure and Transport - MLIT; Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology - MEXT); 2. Advisory bodies (Atomic Energy Commission - AEC; Nuclear Safety Commission - NSC; Radiation Council; Special Committee on Energy Policy; Other advisory bodies); 3. Public and Semi-Public Agencies (Japan Atomic Energy Agency - JAEA)

  6. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining Regime; 3. Radioactive Substances, Nuclear Fuel and Equipment; 4. Nuclear Installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment (Trade governed by nuclear energy legislation; Trade governed by radiation protection legislation; Trade governed by export/import control legislation); 6. Radiation Protection; 7. Radioactive Waste Management; 8. Non-Proliferation and Physical Protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and Supervisory Authorities: A. Ministerial Level (Ministry of Health and Social Affairs; Ministry of Trade and Industry; Ministry of Foreign Affairs; Other Ministries); B. Subsidiary Level: (The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority - NRPA; The Norwegian Nuclear Emergency Organisation); 2. Public and Semi-Public Agencies - Institute for Energy Technology - IFE

  7. Nuclear power plants - active environment protection|

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aegerter, I.

    1987-01-01

    The Federal Commission, which is studying energy scenarios, will doubtlessly come to the conclusion that a withdrawal from nuclear energy is technically and economically feasible. Feasibility alone however is no justification for action. Have the questions been asked correctly by the parliamentarians? Are the real problems being bypassed? Is the demand for a withdrawal from nuclear energy soundly based? Is it not oversimplified? Many people are afraid of nuclear energy because they do not understand it. It is necessary that specialists formulate their ideas so that the layman can easily understand them. The broad public can be educated to lose their fear of nuclear power plants which they compare with the nuclear bombs. They can also be educated to lose their fear of radioactivity. The public should also realize that the CO 2 problem is actual and very serious, and that nuclear energy can in fact help to alleviate this particular problem. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  8. Nuclear power plant construction activity, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in commercial operation and units in the construction pipeline as of December 31, 1986, are presented. This report, which is updated annually, was prepared to provide an overview of the nuclear power plant construction industry. The report contains information on the status of nuclear generating units, average construction costs and lead-times, and construction milestones for individual reactors

  9. Azithromycin attenuates myofibroblast differentiation and lung fibrosis development through proteasomal degradation of NOX4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubouchi, Kazuya; Araya, Jun; Minagawa, Shunsuke; Hara, Hiromichi; Ichikawa, Akihiro; Saito, Nayuta; Kadota, Tsukasa; Sato, Nahoko; Yoshida, Masahiro; Kurita, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Kenji; Ito, Saburo; Fujita, Yu; Utsumi, Hirofumi; Yanagisawa, Haruhiko; Hashimoto, Mitsuo; Wakui, Hiroshi; Yoshii, Yutaka; Ishikawa, Takeo; Numata, Takanori; Kaneko, Yumi; Asano, Hisatoshi; Yamashita, Makoto; Odaka, Makoto; Morikawa, Toshiaki; Nakayama, Katsutoshi; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi

    2017-08-03

    Accumulation of profibrotic myofibroblasts is involved in the process of fibrosis development during idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) pathogenesis. TGFB (transforming growth factor β) is one of the major profibrotic cytokines for myofibroblast differentiation and NOX4 (NADPH oxidase 4) has an essential role in TGFB-mediated cell signaling. Azithromycin (AZM), a second-generation antibacterial macrolide, has a pleiotropic effect on cellular processes including proteostasis. Hence, we hypothesized that AZM may regulate NOX4 levels by modulating proteostasis machineries, resulting in inhibition of TGFB-associated lung fibrosis development. Human lung fibroblasts (LF) were used to evaluate TGFB-induced myofibroblast differentiation. With respect to NOX4 regulation via proteostasis, assays for macroautophagy/autophagy, the unfolded protein response (UPR), and proteasome activity were performed. The potential anti-fibrotic property of AZM was examined by using bleomycin (BLM)-induced lung fibrosis mouse models. TGFB-induced NOX4 and myofibroblast differentiation were clearly inhibited by AZM treatment in LF. AZM-mediated NOX4 reduction was restored by treatment with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor. AZM inhibited autophagy and enhanced the UPR. Autophagy inhibition by AZM was linked to ubiquitination of NOX4 via increased protein levels of STUB1 (STIP1 homology and U-box containing protein 1), an E3 ubiquitin ligase. An increased UPR by AZM was associated with enhanced proteasome activity. AZM suppressed lung fibrosis development induced by BLM with concomitantly reduced NOX4 protein levels and enhanced proteasome activation. These results suggest that AZM suppresses NOX4 by promoting proteasomal degradation, resulting in inhibition of TGFB-induced myofibroblast differentiation and lung fibrosis development. AZM may be a candidate for the treatment of the fibrotic lung disease IPF.

  10. Paradoxical resistance of multiple myeloma to proteasome inhibitors by decreased levels of 19S proteasomal subunits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acosta-Alvear, Diego; Cho, Min Y; Wild, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Hallmarks of cancer, including rapid growth and aneuploidy, can result in non-oncogene addiction to the proteostasis network that can be exploited clinically. The defining example is the exquisite sensitivity of multiple myeloma (MM) to 20S proteasome inhibitors, such as carfilzomib. However, MM...

  11. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Framework: 1. General (The French nuclear power programme and its main players; French nuclear law); 2. Mining Regime; 3. Radioactive Substances and Nuclear Equipment (Regulatory diversity; Radioactive sources; Medical activities); 4. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment (Basic nuclear installations - INB; Tax on basic nuclear installations, Additional taxes, Funding nuclear costs; Installations classified for environmental protection purposes (ICPE) using radioactive substances; Nuclear pressure equipment - ESPN; Defence-related nuclear installations and activities - IANID; Emergency plans); 5. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment (General provisions; Patents); 6. Radiation protection (Protection of the public; Protection of workers; Radiation protection inspectors; Labour inspectors; Protection of individuals in a radiological emergency); 7. Radioactive Waste Management (General regulations; Radioactive waste regulations; Discharge of effluents); 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection (Materials not used for the nuclear deterrent; Materials used for the nuclear deterrent); 9. Transport (Licensing and notification regime: Transport of radioactive materials, Transport of nuclear materials, Transport of radioactive substances between member states of the European Union; Methods of transport: Land transport, Sea transport, Air transport, Transport by post); 10

  12. Instituto de Asuntos Nucleares. Report of Activities 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    It is a summary of the technical activities carried out by the Instituto de Asuntos Nucleares, Bogota, Colombia, during 1989. It includes activities in topics as: research projects, transfer of technology, scientific information, qualification and training programs, mainly, which were done in areas like: agriculture, industrial applications, medicine, radiation protection, hydrology, nuclear technology development, radiochemistry and physics, among others

  13. Safety surveillance of activities on nuclear pressure components in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ganjie; Li Tianshu; Yan Tianwen

    2005-01-01

    The nuclear pressure components, which perform the nuclear safety functions, are one of the key physical barriers for nuclear safety. For the national strategy on further development of nuclear power and localization of nuclear pressure components, there still exist some problems in preparedness on the localization. As for the technical basis, what can not be overlooked is the management. Aiming at the current problems, National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA) has taken measures to strengthen the propagation and popularization of nuclear safety culture, adjust the review and approval policies for nuclear pressure components qualification license, establish more stringent management requirements, and enhance the surveillance of activities on nuclear pressure equipment. Meanwhile, NNSA has improved the internal management and the regulation efficiency on nuclear pressure components. At the same time, with the development and implementation of 'Rules on the Safety Regulation for Nuclear Safety Important Components' to be promulgated by the State Council of China, NNSA will complete and improve the regulation on nuclear pressure components and other nuclear equipment. (authors)

  14. Nuclear public information activities in Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz Quintana; R

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear plans and developing programs in developing and developed countries are facing-in a higher or lower degree- opposition from public opinion. The objectives and contents of the public education program on nuclear energy in Chile are dealt with in this paper

  15. CNEN activities and brazilian nuclear power policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, E.M. da

    1989-01-01

    The goal of the brazilian policy in nuclear power is to provide its use in a pacific way to promote the well being of our people. It is intended, as well, to finish the construction of Angra II and III and proceed with the implementation of the nuclear fuel cycle, progressively fomenting its nationalization. (A.C.A.S.)

  16. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Fissionable materials, ores, radioactive materials and equipment (Fissionable materials and ores; Radioactive materials and equipment); 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection (Protection of workers; Protection of the public; Protection of individuals undergoing medical exposure); 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister for Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment; Minister for Economic Affairs; Minister for Social Affairs and Employment; Minister for Health, Welfare and Sports; Minister for Finance; Minister for Foreign Affairs); 2. Advisory body - Health Council of the Netherlands; 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group - NRG; Central Organisation for Radioactive Waste - COVRA)

  17. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trading in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection (Safeguards and non-proliferation; Physical protection); 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Trade - MITYC; Ministry of the Interior - MIR; Ministry of Economy and the Exchequer - MEH; Ministry of the Environment and Rural and Marine Affairs - MARM); 2. Public and semi-public agencies (Nuclear Safety Council - CSN; Centre for Energy-related, Environmental and Technological Research - CIEMAT; National Energy Commission - CNE; 3. Public capital companies (Enusa Industrias Avanzadas, s.a. - ENUSA; Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos, s.a. - ENRESA)

  18. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Ministry of Health; Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education; Ministry of Economy and Innovation; Ministry of Environment and Territorial Planning; Other authorities); 2. Advisory bodies (Independent Commission for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety - CIPRSN; National Radiation Protection Commission - CNPCR; National Commission for Radiological Emergencies - CNER; Other advisory bodies); 3. Public and semi-public agencies

  19. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction (Licensing system; Offences, compliance and enforcement; Regulatory documents; Other relevant legislation); 2. Mining regime; 3. Nuclear substances and radiation devices; 4. Nuclear facilities; 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment (Exports, Other imports); 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Governor in council; Minister of natural resources; Other Ministerial authorities; Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission - CNSC); 2. Public and semi-public agencies (National Research Council - NRC; Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council; Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. - AECL)

  20. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Atomic Energy Co-ordination Council; Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority - HAEA; Minister for Health; Minister for Local Government and Regional Development and Minister for Justice and Law Enforcement; Minister for Agriculture and Rural Development; Minister for Economy and Transport; Minister of Environment Protection and Water Management; Minister for Defence; Minister for Education; President of the Hungarian Mining and Geological Authority; Governmental Co-ordination Committee); 2. Advisory bodies (Scientific Board); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Institute for Electric Power Research - VEIKI; Atomic Energy Research Institute - AEKI; Institute of Isotopes; Department of Physical Chemistry of the University of Pannon; Hungarian Power Companies Ltd - MVM Zrt.)

  1. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Denmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister of Health; Minister for the Environment/Minister of Transport and Energy; Minister of Justice; Minister of Defence; National Board of Health; Emergency Management Agency); 2. Advisory bodies (The Danish Ministry of Energy, Supply and Climate and the Danish Energy Agency); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Risoe National Laboratory)

  2. Modulation of apoptosis sensitivity through the interplay with autophagic and proteasomal degradation pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, M E; Dyck, L; Laussmann, M A; Rehm, M

    2014-01-01

    Autophagic and proteasomal degradation constitute the major cellular proteolysis pathways. Their physiological and pathophysiological adaptation and perturbation modulates the relative abundance of apoptosis-transducing proteins and thereby can positively or negatively adjust cell death susceptibility. In addition to balancing protein expression amounts, components of the autophagic and proteasomal degradation machineries directly interact with and co-regulate apoptosis signal transduction. The influence of autophagic and proteasomal activity on apoptosis susceptibility is now rapidly gaining more attention as a significant modulator of cell death signalling in the context of human health and disease. Here we present a concise and critical overview of the latest knowledge on the molecular interplay between apoptosis signalling, autophagy and proteasomal protein degradation. We highlight that these three pathways constitute an intricate signalling triangle that can govern and modulate cell fate decisions between death and survival. Owing to rapid research progress in recent years, it is now possible to provide detailed insight into the mechanisms of pathway crosstalk, common signalling nodes and the role of multi-functional proteins in co-regulating both protein degradation and cell death. PMID:24457955

  3. Combination of Proteasomal Inhibitors Lactacystin and MG132 Induced Synergistic Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Shirley

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The proteasome inhibitor Velcade (bortezomib/PS-341 has been shown to block the targeted proteolytic degradation of short-lived proteins that are involved in cell maintenance, growth, division, and death, advocating the use of proteasomal inhibitors as therapeutic agents. Although many studies focused on the use of one proteasomal inhibitor for therapy, we hypothesized that the combination of proteasome inhibitors Lactacystin (AG Scientific, Inc., San Diego, CA and MG132 (Biomol International, Plymouth Meeting, PA may be more effective in inducing apoptosis. Additionally, this regimen would enable the use of sublethal doses of individual drugs, thus reducing adverse effects. Results indicate a significant increase in apoptosis when LNCaP prostate cancer cells were treated with increasing levels of Lactacystin, MG132, or a combination of sublethal doses of these two inhibitors. Furthermore, induction in apoptosis coincided with a significant loss of IKKα, IKKβ, and IKKγ proteins and NFκB activity. In addition to describing effective therapeutic agents, we provide a model system to facilitate the investigation of the mechanism of action of these drugs and their effects on the IKK-NFκB axis.

  4. Retinoblastoma protein co-purifies with proteasomal insulin-degrading enzyme: Implications for cell proliferation control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radulescu, Razvan T., E-mail: ratura@gmx.net [Molecular Concepts Research (MCR), Muenster (Germany); Duckworth, William C. [Department of Medicine, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Levy, Jennifer L. [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Fawcett, Janet, E-mail: janet.fawcett@va.gov [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2010-04-30

    Previous investigations on proteasomal preparations containing insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE; EC 3.4.24.56) have invariably yielded a co-purifying protein with a molecular weight of about 110 kDa. We have now found both in MCF-7 breast cancer and HepG2 hepatoma cells that this associated molecule is the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB). Interestingly, the amount of RB in this protein complex seemed to be lower in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells, indicating a higher (cytoplasmic) protein turnover in the former vs. the latter cells. Moreover, immunofluorescence showed increased nuclear localization of RB in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells. Beyond these subtle differences between these distinct tumor cell types, our present study more generally suggests an interplay between RB and IDE within the proteasome that may have important growth-regulatory consequences.

  5. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities: a growing activity in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anasco, Raul

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear power plants and nuclear facilities are no different from normal buildings and factories. Eventually, they become worn-out or old fashioned, too expensive to maintain or remodel. Decommissioning a nuclear facility is different from retiring other types because of the radioactivity involved. The most important consideration in nuclear decommissioning is to protect workers and the public from exposure to harmful levels of radiation. General criteria and strategies for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities are described as well as the present decommissioning activities of the Argentine CNEA (author)

  6. Distinct effects of methamphetamine on autophagy–lysosome and ubiquitin–proteasome systems in HL-1 cultured mouse atrial cardiomyocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funakoshi-Hirose, Izumi; Aki, Toshihiko; Unuma, Kana; Funakoshi, Takeshi; Noritake, Kanako; Uemura, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The psychostimulant drug methamphetamine is also known to cause cardiovascular injuries. • Methamphetamine cardiotoxicity was examined using HL-1 mouse atrial cardiomyocytes. • Methamphetamine impairs the autophagy–lysosome protein degradation system. • Methamphetamine causes myosin heavy chain degradation by the ubiquitin–proteasome system. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to investigate the molecular mechanism underling the cardiotoxicity of methamphetamine, a psychostimulant drug that is currently abused in the world. A mouse atrial cardiac cell line, HL-1, which retains phenotypes of cardiac cells and serves as a useful model for examining cardiac pathophysiology, was used for this purpose. During treatment with 1 mM methamphetamine (MAP) for 3–48 h, massive but transient cytoplasmic vacuolization (3–12 h) followed by an intracellular accumulation of granules (24–48 h) was observed under light microscopy. The vacuoles were surrounded by the lysosome membrane marker LAMP1, while the granules colocalized with the autophagy markers LC3 and p62 as well as ubiquitinated proteins. Western blot analysis showed that LC3 was activated during MAP administration, although p62 was not degraded but rather accumulated. Concordant with p62 accumulation, the nuclear translocation of an anti-oxidative transcription factor, Nrf2, and the subsequent induction of its target gene, HO-1, was observed, suggesting an impairment of autophagic protein degradation and the subsequent activation of the p62/Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. In addition, proteomic analysis revealed a reduction in myosin heavy chain (MHC) protein levels during MAP administration. The ubiquitination of MHC and the induction of the muscle sarcomere protein-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases MuRF1 and atrogin-1 were proved by immunoprecipitation and quantitative real-time PCR, respectively. Taken together, the vacuolization of lysosomes and the subsequent accumulation of autophagosomes indicate

  7. Nuclear fear and children: the impact of parental nuclear activism, responsivity, and fear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaGuardia, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    This study examines the extent to which parental nuclear fear, parental activism, and parental responsivity is associated with children's (age 10) nuclear fear. Other associated variables investigated include: nuclear denial, general anxiety and fear, and the personal characteristics of sex, socio-economic status, and academic aptitude. Findings indicate that children attend to nuclear issues when their parents attend to a significant degree. Children's hopelessness about the arms race is increased as parents' worry about nuclear war increases. Children's fear about not surviving a nuclear war increases as parents' worry about survivability decreases. Children who have more general fears also indicated that they have a high level of hopelessness, pervasive worry, and much concern about being able to survive a nuclear war. Children with a high degree of general anxiety did not indicate high degrees of nuclear fears. Children with high academic aptitude were more knowledgeable about nuclear issues and expressed more fears about the nuclear threat. Boys demonstrated more knowledge about nuclear issues than girls, and girls expressed much more frequent fear and worry about the nuclear threat than boys. Parents of lower socio-economic statues (SES) expressed more denial about the nuclear threat and were more pro-military than the higher SES parents.

  8. Inhibition of autophagy induced by proteasome inhibition increases cell death in human SHG-44 glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Ji-Zhou; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Meng, Fan-Kai; Li, Wen-Chen; Luan, Yong-Xin; Ling, Feng; Luo, Yi-Nan

    2009-07-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and lysosome-dependent macroautophagy (autophagy) are two major intracellular pathways for protein degradation. Recent studies suggest that proteasome inhibitors may reduce tumor growth and activate autophagy. Due to the dual roles of autophagy in tumor cell survival and death, the effect of autophagy on the destiny of glioma cells remains unclear. In this study, we sought to investigate whether inhibition of the proteasome can induce autophagy and the effects of autophagy on the fate of human SHG-44 glioma cells. The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 was used to induce autophagy in SHG-44 glioma cells, and the effect of autophagy on the survival of SHG-44 glioma cells was investigated using an autophagy inhibitor 3-MA. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle were detected by flow cytometry. The expression of autophagy related proteins was determined by Western blot. MG-132 inhibited cell proliferation, induced cell death and cell cycle arrest at G(2)/M phase, and activated autophagy in SHG-44 glioma cells. The expression of autophagy-related Beclin-1 and LC3-I was significantly up-regulated and part of LC3-I was converted into LC3-II. However, when SHG-44 glioma cells were co-treated with MG-132 and 3-MA, the cells became less viable, but cell death and cell numbers at G(2)/M phase increased. Moreover, the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles was decreased, the expression of Beclin-1 and LC3 was significantly down-regulated and the conversion of LC3-II from LC3-I was also inhibited. Inhibition of the proteasome can induce autophagy in human SHG-44 glioma cells, and inhibition of autophagy increases cell death. This discovery may shed new light on the effect of autophagy on modulating the fate of SHG-44 glioma cells.Acta Pharmacologica Sinica (2009) 30: 1046-1052; doi: 10.1038/aps.2009.71.

  9. Implication of altered ubiquitin-proteasome system and ER stress in the muscle atrophy of diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S Sreenivasa; Shruthi, Karnam; Prabhakar, Y Konda; Sailaja, Gummadi; Reddy, G Bhanuprakash

    2018-02-01

    Skeletal muscle is adversely affected in type-1 diabetes, and excessively stimulated ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) was found to be a leading cause of muscle wasting or atrophy. The role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in muscle atrophy of type-1 diabetes is not known. Hence, we investigated the role of UPS and ER stress in the muscle atrophy of chronic diabetes rat model. Diabetes was induced with streptozotocin (STZ) in male Sprague-Dawley rats and were sacrificed 2- and 4-months thereafter to collect gastrocnemius muscle. In another experiment, 2-months post-STZ-injection diabetic rats were treated with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, for the next 2-months and gastrocnemius muscle was collected. The muscle fiber cross-sectional area was diminished in diabetic rats. The expression of UPS components: E1, MURF1, TRIM72, UCHL1, UCHL5, ubiquitinated proteins, and proteasome activity were elevated in the diabetic rats indicating activated UPS. Altered expression of ER-associated degradation (ERAD) components and increased ER stress markers were detected in 4-months diabetic rats. Proteasome inhibition by MG132 alleviated alterations in the UPS and ER stress in diabetic rat muscle. Increased UPS activity and ER stress were implicated in the muscle atrophy of diabetic rats and proteasome inhibition exhibited beneficiary outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Detection of antibodies to the 20s proteasome by ELISA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Karin Meinike; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup

    2013-01-01

    The presence of antibodies against the 20S proteasome has been correlated with diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but no definite association has been established. In order to investigate this further, we optimized an ELISA for proteasome antibodies...

  11. Recent activities on nuclear codes and standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minematsu, Akiyoshi; Ishimoto, Shozaburo; Honjin, Masao

    2000-01-01

    The technical codes and standards relating to the nuclear power stations in Japan are prepared by shapes of laws (ministerial ordinances and bulletins) issued by the government and obliged to comply with by 'the Law concerning the Regulations of Nuclear Material Substances, Nuclear Fuel Substances and Nuclear Reactors' and 'the Electricity Business Act' and of guides defined by the Nuclear Safety Commission, and further some private standards have been issued at a shape of complement of these laws and guides by receiving national recommendation. On the other hand, in the fields of electricity and heat facilities except atomic energy, simplification and feature stipulation of the national technical codes and standards was recently carried out, by which a system usable for the private standards in and out of Japan were prepared through approval of the private Japan Electrotechnical Standards and Codes Committee (JESC). As the nuclear field was now excepted from simultaneous transfer to the private standard and the standard application system, it is expected in future to realize similar transfer if possible and preparation of the private standards is now being advanced. Here were introduced on present state on technical codes and standards relating to the nuclear power generation facilities and recent trends on their private standardization. (G.K.)

  12. Educational activity on nuclear energy in Aomori region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Katsunori

    2008-01-01

    There are many nuclear industries and research facilities in Aomori Prefecture, Japan. Fuel cycle facilities and a LWR power station are now in operation. Another fuel cycle facilities and power stations will soon be under construction. Fusion research activity, ITER-BA, has started last year. We have launched nuclear-related education and research programs to teach nuclear engineering knowledge and skills to the local students. Hachinohe Institute of Technology is located on Pacific ocean side of Aomori Prefecture close to Rokkasho area, and has six undergraduate departments and three graduate courses. Hitherto, many alumni have engaged in nuclear-related companies in the area. In addition to previous subject on nuclear engineering, a new activity 'Challenge Nuclear-site Experience Program' started in 2007, as one of nuclear educational promotion programs in Japan. The students from various engineering departments learned the status and role of nuclear industries and researches. A curriculum course for nuclear engineering will be ready in 2009 for undergraduate students through various departments. In the summer of 2007, the introductory lesson on nuclear power generation and the technical tour to the power station were carried out for two days. In the autumn, the introductory lesson on nuclear fuel cycle and the tour to fuel cycle facilities were performed for three days, including one day tour to research facilities in the area. Its aim was to let the students recognize the role of regional nuclear activities and the attractiveness of nuclear-related industries. The program was supported by Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry and was performed in cooperation with Tohoku Electric Power Company, Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited and Japan Atomic Energy Agency. (author)

  13. Status and future plan of nuclear data activities in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Soo-Youl; Chang, Jonghwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-01

    It was reviewed the nuclear data related activities in Korea, and was explained a 15-year term nation-wide R and D project that had been launched at 1996. The experiences up to now show, as a whole, that the nuclear data field in Korea is in the early stage. Through the long term project, however, it is expected that a firm foundation be established. Then it would be possible to contribute actively to the international nuclear data community as well as to meet domestic requests for nuclear data. Also it was pointed out the necessity of the international collaboration such as consultings and co-works. (author)

  14. SUMOylation of Blimp-1 promotes its proteasomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimshon, Livnat; Michaeli, Avital; Hadar, Rivka; Nutt, Stephen L; David, Yael; Navon, Ami; Waisman, Ari; Tirosh, Boaz

    2011-08-04

    B lymphocyte induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1) is a transcription repressor of the Krueppel-like family. Blimp-1 plays important roles in developmental processes, such as of germ cells and hair follicle stem cells. In B lymphocytes Blimp-1 orchestrates the terminal differentiation into plasma cells. We discovered that Blimp-1 undergoes SUMOylation by SUMO-1. This SUMOylation is modulated by the SUMO protease SENP1. While Blimp-1 is relatively stable in 293T cells, a fusion with SUMO1 rendered it to rapid proteasomal degradation. Increase in SENP1 activity stabilized Blimp-1, while a decrease promoted its degradation. Our data indicate that SUMOylation of Blimp-1 regulates its intracellular stability. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Comprehensive study of proteasome inhibitors against Plasmodium falciparum laboratory strains and field isolates from Gabon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kremsner Peter G

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to almost all available antimalarial drugs necessitates the search for new chemotherapeutic compounds. The ubiquitin/proteasome system plays a major role in overall protein turnover, especially in fast dividing eukaryotic cells including plasmodia. Previous studies show that the 20S proteasome is expressed and catalytically active in plasmodia and treatment with proteasome inhibitors arrests parasite growth. This is the first comprehensive screening of proteasome inhibitors with different chemical modes of action against laboratory strains of P. falciparum. Subsequently, a selection of inhibitors was tested in field isolates from Lambaréné, Gabon. Methods Epoxomicin, YU101, YU102, MG132, MG115, Z-L3-VS, Ada-Ahx3-L3-VS, lactacystin, bortezomib (Velcade®, gliotoxin, PR11 and PR39 were tested and compared to chloroquine- and artesunate-activities in a standardized in vitro drug susceptibility assay against P. falciparum laboratory strains 3D7, D10 and Dd2. Freshly obtained field isolates from Lambaréné, Gabon, were used to measure the activity of chloroquine, artesunate, epoxomicin, MG132, lactacystin and bortezomib. Parasite growth was detected through histidine-rich protein 2 (HRP2 production. Raw data were fitted by a four-parameter logistic model and individual inhibitory concentrations (50%, 90%, and 99% were calculated. Results Amongst all proteasome inhibitors tested, epoxomicin showed the highest activity in chloroquine-susceptible (IC50: 6.8 nM [3D7], 1.7 nM [D10] and in chloroquine-resistant laboratory strains (IC50: 10.4 nM [Dd2] as well as in field isolates (IC50: 8.5 nM. The comparator drug artesunate was even more active (IC50: 1.0 nM, whereas all strains were chloroquine-resistant (IC50: 113 nM. Conclusion The peptide α',β'-epoxyketone epoxomicin is highly active against P. falciparum regardless the grade of the parasite's chloroquine

  16. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining Regime; 3. Radioactive Substances and Equipment; 4. Nuclear Installations (Licensing and Inspection, including Nuclear Safety; Emergency Response); 5. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment; 6. Radiological Protection; 7. Radioactive Waste Management; 8. Non-proliferation and Physical Protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and Supervisory Authorities (Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic - UJD; Ministry of Health; Ministry of the Environment; Ministry of the Interior; Ministry of Economy; Ministry of Labour and National Labour Inspectorate); 2. Public and Semi-Public Agencies

  17. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations; 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Prime Minister; Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources; Ministry of Health; Ministry of the Environment and Forestry); 2. Public and semi-public agencies (Turkish Atomic Energy Authority - TAEK; General Directorate for Mineral Research and Exploration - MTA; ETI Mine Works General Management; Turkish Electric Generation and Transmission Corporation - TEAS; Turkish Electricity Distribution Corporation - TEDAS)

  18. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment (Nuclear fuels; Radioactive substances and equipment generating ionising radiation); 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; 11. Environmental protection; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Federal Council; Federal Assembly; Federal Department of the Environment, Transport, Energy and Communications - DETEC; Federal Office of Energy - SFOE; Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate - IFSN; Federal Department of Home Affairs - FDHA; Federal Office of Public Health - FOPH; State Secretariat for Education and Research - SER; Other authorities); 2. Advisory bodies (Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Commission - KNS; Federal Commission for Radiological Protection and Monitoring of the Radioactivity in the Environment; Federal Emergency Organisation on Radioactivity); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Paul-Scherrer Institute - PSI; Fund for the decommissioning of nuclear installations and for the waste disposal; National Co-operative for the

  19. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Nuclear facilities (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response; Decommissioning); 4. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 5. Radiological protection; 6. Radioactive waste management; 7. Non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and physical protection of nuclear material (International aspects; National control and security measures); 8. Transport; 9. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Federal Agency for Nuclear Control - FANC; Federal Public Service for Home Affairs; Federal Public Service for Economy, SME's, Self-Employed and Energy; Federal Public Service for Employment, Labour and Social Dialogue; Federal Public Service for Defence; Federal Public Service for Foreign Affairs, Foreign Trade and Development Co-operation; Federal Public Planning Service for Science Policy); 2. Advisory bodies (Scientific Council for Ionizing Radiation of the Federal Agency for Nuclear Control; Superior Health Council; Superior Council for Safety, Hygiene and Enhancement of Workplaces; Advisory Committee for the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons; Commission for Electricity and Gas Regulation - CREG)

  20. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment (General provisions; Patents); 6. Radiation Protection (Protection of workers; Protection of the public; Protection of the environment); 7. Radioactive Waste Management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Interdepartmental Committee for Economic Planning; Nuclear Safety Agency; Prime Minister; Minister for Economic Development; Minister for Labour and Social Security; Minister for Health; Minister for the Environment; Minister for the Interior; Minister for Transport and Navigation; Minister for Foreign Trade (now incorporated in Ministry for Economic Development); Minister for Education; Treasury Minister; Minister for Universities and for Scientific and Technical Research; Minister for Foreign Affairs; State Advocate General); 2. Advisory bodies (Inter-ministerial Council for Consultation and Co-ordination; Coordinating Committee for Radiation Protection of Workers and the Public; Regional and Provincial Commissions for Public Health Protection

  1. Insulin alleviates degradation of skeletal muscle protein by inhibiting the ubiquitin-proteasome system in septic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiyi; Li, Ning; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Weiqin; Tang, Shaoqiu; Yu, Wenkui; Gao, Tao; Zhang, Juanjuan; Li, Jieshou

    2011-06-03

    Hypercatabolism is common under septic conditions. Skeletal muscle is the main target organ for hypercatabolism, and this phenomenon is a vital factor in the deterioration of recovery in septic patients. In skeletal muscle, activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system plays an important role in hypercatabolism under septic status. Insulin is a vital anticatabolic hormone and previous evidence suggests that insulin administration inhibits various steps in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. However, whether insulin can alleviate the degradation of skeletal muscle protein by inhibiting the ubiquitin-proteasome system under septic condition is unclear. This paper confirmed that mRNA and protein levels of the ubiquitin-proteasome system were upregulated and molecular markers of skeletal muscle proteolysis (tyrosine and 3-methylhistidine) simultaneously increased in the skeletal muscle of septic rats. Septic rats were infused with insulin at a constant rate of 2.4 mU.kg-1.min-1 for 8 hours. Concentrations of mRNA and proteins of the ubiquitin-proteasome system and molecular markers of skeletal muscle proteolysis were mildly affected. When the insulin infusion dose increased to 4.8 mU.kg-1.min-1, mRNA for ubiquitin, E2-14 KDa, and the C2 subunit were all sharply downregulated. At the same time, the levels of ubiquitinated proteins, E2-14KDa, and the C2 subunit protein were significantly reduced. Tyrosine and 3-methylhistidine decreased significantly. We concluded that the ubiquitin-proteasome system is important skeletal muscle hypercatabolism in septic rats. Infusion of insulin can reverse the detrimental metabolism of skeletal muscle by inhibiting the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and the effect is proportional to the insulin infusion dose.

  2. Progress report on nuclear data activities in Sweden for 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conde, H.

    1981-04-01

    This report contains information from laboratories in Sweden about measurements and compilations which are relevant to obtain nuclear data for research and development in different applied fields of nuclear physics. Reports relevant to the nuclear energy field are given of neutron cross section measurements and studies of the fission process. Reports are also given of nuclear structure and decay data measurements especially fission product nuclear data measurements of importance for the research on reactor safety and nuclear waste handling. Charged particle and photonuclear cross section measurements with applications in e.g. activation analysis and the production of radioisotopes for medical use are reported as well. In some cases reports are also given of measurements aiming to test nuclear models which are commonly used for the calculation of the above type of data. The report also contains short information about changes of existing experimental facilities. (Auth.)

  3. Mouse homologue of yeast Prp19 interacts with mouse SUG1, the regulatory subunit of 26S proteasome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sihn, Choong-Ryoul; Cho, Si Young; Lee, Jeong Ho; Lee, Tae Ryong; Kim, Sang Hoon

    2007-01-01

    Yeast Prp19 has been shown to involve in pre-mRNA splicing and DNA repair as well as being an ubiquitin ligase. Mammalian homologue of yeast Prp19 also plays on similar functional activities in cells. In the present study, we isolated mouse SUG1 (mSUG1) as binding partner of mouse Prp19 (mPrp19) by the yeast two-hybrid system. We confirmed the interaction of mPrp9 with mSUG1 by GST pull-down assay and co-immunoprecipitation assay. The N-terminus of mPrp19 including U-box domain was associated with the C-terminus of mSUG1. Although, mSUG1 is a regulatory subunit of 26S proteasome, mPrp19 was not degraded in the proteasome-dependent pathway. Interestingly, GFP-mPrp19 fusion protein was co-localized with mSUG1 protein in cytoplasm as the formation of the speckle-like structures in the presence of a proteasome inhibitor MG132. In addition, the activity of proteasome was increased in cells transfected with mPrp19. Taken together, these results suggest that mPrp19 involves the regulation of protein turnover and may transport its substrates to 26S proteasome through mSUG1 protein

  4. SOCS-1 Localizes to the Microtubule Organizing Complex-Associated 20S Proteasome

    OpenAIRE

    Vuong, Bao Q.; Arenzana, Teresita L.; Showalter, Brian M.; Losman, Julie; Chen, X. Peter; Mostecki, Justin; Banks, Alexander S.; Limnander, Andre; Fernandes, Neil; Rothman, Paul B.

    2005-01-01

    The regulation of cytokine signaling is critical for controlling cellular proliferation and activation during an immune response. SOCS-1 is a potent inhibitor of Jak kinase activity and of signaling initiated by several cytokines. SOCS-1 protein levels are tightly regulated, and recent data suggest that SOCS-1 may regulate the protein levels of some signaling proteins by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway; however, the cellular mechanism by which SOCS-1 directs proteins for degradation is unkno...

  5. 1984 Ordinance on nuclear activities (1984:14)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This Supplementary Ordinance on Nuclear Activities (1984:14) sets out a regulatory regime for the conveyance out of Sweden of equipment or material that has been specially designed or prepared for the processing, use or production of nuclear substances or which is otherwise of essential importance for the production of nuclear devices. The Annex to the Ordinance sets out the list of such equipment or material whose export is subject to Government authorisation. (NEA) [fr

  6. Activities report 1991-1992: Nuclear Research Center of Strasbourg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This activities report of the Nuclear Research Centre of Strasbourg for the years 1991 and 1992, presents nine research axis: theoretical physics, mechanisms of reactions and nuclear structure, extreme forms of nuclei, exotic nuclei, hot and dense nuclear matter, ultra-relativistic heavy ions, physics of LEP (European Large Electron-Positron storage ring) at 'DELPHI', chemistry and physics of radiations, physics and applications of semi-conductors

  7. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I) - General Regulatory Regime - General Outline: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining Regime; 3. Radioactive Substances, Nuclear Fuel and Equipment; 4. Nuclear Installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment; 6. Radiation Protection; 7. Radioactive Waste Management; 8. Non-Proliferation and Physical Protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II) - Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and Supervisory Authorities: A. Federal Authorities - Bund (The Federal Chancellery; The Federal Minister for Women's Affairs and Consumer Protection; The Federal Minister of the Interior; The Federal Minister for Economic Affairs; The Federal Minister of Finance; The Federal Minister of Labour, Health and Social Affairs; The Federal Minister of Science and Transport; The Federal Minister of Justice; The Federal Minister for the Environment; The Federal Minister for Foreign Affairs) B. Regional Authorities - Laender; C. District Authorities - Bezirksverwaltungsbehorden; 2. Advisory Bodies (Forum for Nuclear Questions, Radiation Protection Commission - SSK); 3. Public and Semi-Public Agencies (The Seibersdorf Austrian Research Centre; The Graz Nuclear Institute; The Nuclear Institute of the Austrian Universities; The Institute of Risk Research, University of Vienna)

  8. Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    This CD-ROM is attached to the booklet 'Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)'. It contains the background material with regard to ANENT in full text, including policy level papers, reports, presentation material made by Member States, and meeting summaries during the period 2002-2005. Further information on the current ANENT activities and related IAEA activities is available at 'http://anent-iaea.org' and 'http://iaea.org/inisnkm'

  9. Complex formation of p65/RelA with nuclear Akt1 for enhanced transcriptional activation of NF-κB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Osong; Kim, Kyung A; He, Long; Jung, Mira; Jeong, Sook Jung; Ahn, Jong Seog; Kim, Bo Yeon

    2008-01-01

    Akt1 was revealed to interact with Ki-Ras in the cytoplasm of Ki-Ras-transformed human prostate epithelial cells, 267B1/K-ras. Moreover, p65/RelA in the nucleus was found to interact with both Ki-Ras and Akt1, suggesting the nuclear translocation of Akt1:Ki-Ras complex for NF- κB activation. In support of this, compared with wild type Akt1, the dominant negative Akt1 mutant was decreased in its nuclear expression, reducing the Ki-Ras-induced NF-κB transcriptional activation. Moreover, inhibitors of Ras (sulindac sulfide and farnesyltransferase inhibitor I) or PI3K/Akt (wortmannin), reduced the amounts of Akt1 and Ki-Ras in the nucleus as well as partial NF-κB activity. The complete inhibition of Ki-Ras-induced NF-κB activation, however, could only be obtained by combined treatment with wortmannin and proteasome inhibitor-1. Accordingly, clonogenic assay showed Akt1 contribution to IκBα-mediated NF-κB activation for oncogenic cell growth by Ki-Ras. Our data suggest a crucial role of Ki-Ras:Akt1 complex in NF-κB transcriptional activation and enhancement of cell survival

  10. Synergism in regulation of nuclear and radiological activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzdugan, A.

    2009-01-01

    In 2006 the reform of nuclear activity regulation in Moldova was initiated. On May 11, 2006, the Parliament of the Republic of Moldova passed the law Nr 111-XVI 'About Safe Accomplishment of Nuclear and Radiological Activity'. On the 23rd of March, 2007 the National Agency for Regulation of Nuclear and Radiological Activities (NARNRA) was founded due to the decree of the Government under the Ministry of Ecology and Natural Resources. Its first objective was elaboration of necessary regulation documents in this field

  11. The monopoly of the nuclear activities in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santanna, Luciano Portal

    2009-01-01

    The difficulty in dealing with some technical and legal concepts related to use of radioactivity and nuclear energy, combined with a confusing law silent and many respects outdated, doubts arise and often, misconceptions about scope of the monopoly of the Federal Government on activities with nuclear ores and minerals and derivatives. With an interdisciplinary approach, the aim of this work address key aspects of the legal regime of nuclear activities and facilities in Brazil, distinguishing it from that applicable to the activities and radiative facilities

  12. Proteasomal targeting and minigene repetition improve cell-surface presentation of a transfected, modified melanoma tumour antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, A B; Zocca, M-B; Bonefeld, C M

    2004-01-01

    Melanoma antigen recognized by T cell 1 (MART-1) is regarded as a candidate peptide for vaccination against malignant melanoma, and it is of importance to develop strategies to improve the vaccine-elicited T-cell activation towards MART-1. T-cell activation is, among other determinants, dependent...... on the density of specific major histocompatibility complex-peptide complexes on the surface of the antigen-presenting cell. In this study, we explored the cell-surface presentation of a substituted MART-1 peptide encoded by transfected minigenes. We investigated the potential of proteasomal targeting compared...... to non-proteasomal targeting of the epitope to increase its cell-surface presentation. Furthermore, we explored the potential of incorporating multiple minigenes instead of one to increase cell-surface presentation. We show that both proteasomal targeting and repetition of the minigene increase cell...

  13. Two waves of proteasome-dependent protein degradation in the hippocampus are required for recognition memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Luciana S; Dornelles, Arethuza S; Petry, Fernanda S; Falavigna, Lucio; Dargél, Vinicius A; Köbe, Luiza M; Aguzzoli, Cristiano; Roesler, Rafael; Schröder, Nadja

    2015-04-01

    Healthy neuronal function and synaptic modification require a concert of synthesis and degradation of proteins. Increasing evidence indicates that protein turnover mediated by proteasome activity is involved in long-term synaptic plasticity and memory. However, its role in different phases of memory remains debated, and previous studies have not examined the possible requirement of protein degradation in recognition memory. Here, we show that the proteasome inhibitor, lactacystin (LAC), infused into the CA1 area of the hippocampus at two specific time points during consolidation, impairs 24-retention of memory for object recognition in rats. Administration of LAC after retrieval did not affect retention. These findings provide the first evidence for a requirement of proteasome activity in recognition memory, indicate that protein degradation in the hippocampus is necessary during selective time windows of memory consolidation, and further our understanding of the role of protein turnover in memory formation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations; 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection (Radiation protection standards; Emergency response); 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister for the Environment, Heritage and Local Government; Minister for Agriculture and Food; Minister for Communications, Marine and Natural Resources; Minister for Finance; Minister for Health and Children; Minister for Defence); 2. Public and semi-public agencies (Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland; Food Safety Authority of Ireland)

  15. Activities on covariance estimation in Japanese Nuclear Data Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Keiichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Described are activities on covariance estimation in the Japanese Nuclear Data Committee. Covariances are obtained from measurements by using the least-squares methods. A simultaneous evaluation was performed to deduce covariances of fission cross sections of U and Pu isotopes. A code system, KALMAN, is used to estimate covariances of nuclear model calculations from uncertainties in model parameters. (author)

  16. Activity report 2006 - INB - Brazilian Nuclear Industries Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This document reports the activities of Brazilian Nuclear Industry company during 2006 as follows: uranium isotope enrichment; production of nuclear fuel; mineral resources; finance and administration; planning and sales; quality, safety and environment, communication and social action; economic and financial management

  17. Report of activities of the Japanese Nuclear Data Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A progress report of the Japanese Nuclear Data Committee for the period of April 1, 1975 to March 31, 1977 is presented with emphasis on the topics of Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library, version I(JENDL-1). Activities of working groups are also reported briefly. (auth.)

  18. Regulatory and institutional framework for nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This study is part of a series of analytical studies on nuclear legislation in OECD Member countries, prepared with the co-operation of the countries concerned. Each study has been organised on the basis of a standardised format for all countries, thus facilitating the comparison of information. The studies are intended to be updated periodically, taking into account modifications to the nuclear legislation in each country. This is the first update to the 1995 Edition. Unfortunately, due to the constraints of the OECD Publications Service, it covers only those legislative and institutional changes which, in our view, are of the greatest significance for our readers. Thus, you will find new chapters on Finland, Greece, Italy, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, Portugal and the United States. Changes to the nuclear legislation and institutions of the remaining countries will be incorporated into the next Update which is expected to be published at the end of 1997. (author)

  19. The monopoly of the nuclear activities in Brazil; O monopolio das atividades nucleares no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santanna, Luciano Portal

    2009-07-01

    The difficulty in dealing with some technical and legal concepts related to use of radioactivity and nuclear energy, combined with a confusing law silent and many respects outdated, doubts arise and often, misconceptions about scope of the monopoly of the Federal Government on activities with nuclear ores and minerals and derivatives. With an interdisciplinary approach, the aim of this work address key aspects of the legal regime of nuclear activities and facilities in Brazil, distinguishing it from that applicable to the activities and radiative facilities.

  20. Legislation on and regulation of nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    This work is a compilation of legislative texts and regulations published by the Atomic Energy Commission's Legal Affairs Department (CEA). It provides a comprehensive source of knowledge and information on nuclear energy law. Legislative texts published over the last forty years, are collected and analytically indexed. The publication covers both French regulations and regulations of international organisations such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and Euratom. It is divided into eight different chapters, dealing with regulations relevant to international and national institutions, nuclear installations, third party liability, protection of persons and the environment, etc. A chronological table of the texts of international and national laws is also included in this work. (NEA) [fr

  1. Military nuclear activities. The simulation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpuech, A.

    2000-01-01

    The durability of the French nuclear weapon dissuasion has to integrate two kind of problems: the geopolitical situation with the comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty (CTBT) and the aging of weapons. The replacement of decayed weapons requires a complete safety and reliability validation of the new weapons which is performed using simulation. This paper gives a brief presentation of the simulation program and of the technical means developed by the military division of the French atomic energy commission (CEA-DAM): the Airix X-ray radiography installation and the 'megajoule' laser facility. (J.S.)

  2. Activities of Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission in the field of nuclear power plant licesing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, R.N.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives, the procedures and the ways of implementation of measures aiming at safety use of nuclear energy are presented. The juridical aspects in the licensing area and the regulatory activities used by CNEN. The description of nuclear power plants and the methodology used in studies of environmental protection and radiation protection are presented [pt

  3. Annual and activity report 2005 - INB - Brazilian Nuclear Industries. Nuclear fuel: technology for the essential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This document reports the activities of Brazilian Nuclear Industry company during 2005 as follows: uranium isotope enrichment; production of nuclear fuel; mineral resources; finance and administration; planning and sales; quality, safety and environment, communication and social action; economic and financial management

  4. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining Regime; 3. Radioactive Substances; 4. Nuclear Installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment; 6. Radiation Protection; 7. Radioactive Waste Management; 8. Non-Proliferation and Physical Protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and Supervisory Authorities (Department of Trade and Industry - DTI; Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and the Secretary of State for Health; Secretary of State for Transport; Secretary of State for Education); 2. Advisory Bodies (Medical Research Council - MRC; Nuclear Safety Advisory Committee; Radioactive Waste Management Advisory Committee); 3. Public and Semi-Public Agencies (United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority - UKAEA; Health and Safety Commission and Executive - HSC/HSE; National Radiological Protection Board - NRPB; Environment Agencies; British Nuclear Fuels plc. - BNFL; Amersham International plc.; The National Nuclear Corporation Ltd. - NNC; United Kingdom Nirex Ltd.; Magnox Electric plc.; British Energy Generation Ltd.; Scottish Electricity Generator Companies; British Energy Generation Ltd.; Regional Electricity Companies in England and Wales)

  5. Proteasomal and lysosomal protein degradation and heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuejun; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2014-06-01

    In the cell, the proteasome and lysosomes represent the most important proteolytic machineries, responsible for the protein degradation in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy, respectively. Both the UPS and autophagy are essential to protein quality and quantity control. Alterations in cardiac proteasomal and lysosomal degradation are remarkably associated with most heart disease in humans and are implicated in the pathogenesis of congestive heart failure. Studies carried out in animal models and in cell culture have begun to establish both sufficiency and, in some cases, the necessity of proteasomal functional insufficiency or lysosomal insufficiency as a major pathogenic factor in the heart. This review article highlights some recent advances in the research into proteasome and lysosome protein degradation in relation to cardiac pathology and examines the emerging evidence for enhancing degradative capacities of the proteasome and/or lysosome as a new therapeutic strategy for heart disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Protein Quality Control, the Ubiquitin Proteasome System, and Autophagy". Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Safety objectives for nuclear activities in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    This report by the Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety presents a concise statement of the basic safety objectives which the Committee considers underlie, or should underlie, the regulations and the licensing and compliance practices of the Atomic Energy Control Board. The report also includes a number of general criteria for achieving these objectives

  7. Nuclear Energy Agency. 6. activity report. 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    NEA has, as a primary objective, to ensure through international co-operation that the nuclear option is available for consideration in its true worth. The safety and regulatory aspects of nulear development have represented in 1977 about two thirds of NEA's total effort; and a high degree of priority was given to questions of nuclear safety and of radioactive waste management. Similarly, the growing need of Member countries for an integrated appraisal of technical, economic, safety, environmental and political questions influencing the nuclear fuel cycle was increasingly taken into account. Finally, a general effort was made to achieve greater visibility for the positive results of the NEA programme, as a contribution to improved public understanding of the factors underlying nuclear power programmes. As in previous years, the NEA programme continued to involve close collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Commission of the European Communities. Within the OECD, close collaboration was maintained with the Combined Energy Staff and the Environment Directorate

  8. Activities in nuclear and high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    High energy and nuclear physics research concerning bubble chamber investigations, European hybrid system ACCMOR, WA 18, PETRA, PEP, VA 4, SING, LENA, LEP 3 and DELPHI experiments is summarized. Experiments with electron beams, and in pions and muons physics, and radiochemistry are reported on.

  9. Programmatic activities of IAEA in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padhy, A.K.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is high-tech medicine. Nevertheless, it is essential for addressing important health problems of people living in developing countries also. Not only is it sometimes expensive to start with, it also involves a lot of technical know-how, requiring transfer of technology from developed to the developing countries. The rapid development of nuclear medicine, of sophisticated instrumentation and radiopharmaceuticals has resulted in an enormous increase in costs and in the need for maintaining quality. These constitute a challenge and a venture when promoting nuclear medicine globally and particularly in developing countries. No other international organization except IAEA has any specific mandate for application of nuclear energy in the area of human health. WHO has no specific programin nuclear medicine, hence the importance of IAEA's involvement. The IAEA has, ever since its inception, given high priority to enhancing the awareness and capabilities of developing member states to employ nuclear technology for health care and medical research. Much of the Agency promoted research in nuclear medicine is delivered through the so called co-ordinated research projects (CRPs). The CRPs are normally organised as multi-center, prospective studies so that large volume of scientific data could be generated in a short period of 18-24 months. The research is normally done within an operational frame work, established and co-ordinated by the IAEA. The reason for this is that the results can be compared despite site or country specific differences. The methods and materials used for such studies usually conform to a predetermined standard. The protocols for various investigations, criteria for patient selection, mode of arriving at a final diagnosis and analysis of data from these multi-center studies are normally agreed upon by the Chief Scientific Investigators from each participating institution and the IAEA prior to the start of the actual work programme. The

  10. Graduate nuclear engineering programmes motivate educational and research activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavko, B.

    2000-01-01

    Some fifteen years ago the University of Ljubljana, Faculty for Mathematics and Physics together with the national research organisation the J. Stefan jointly established a Graduate programme of Nuclear Engineering. From the onset, the programme focused on nuclear technology, nuclear safety, and reactor physics and environment protection. Over the years this graduate programme has became the focal point of nuclear related, research and educational activities in Slovenia. It has grown into a meeting ground for recognised national and distinguished foreign educators and experienced professionals from the industry. In conjunction with an important national project, supported by the Slovenian government, entitled 'Jung Researcher' it also enhances the knowledge transfer to the next generation. Since the programme was introduced, the interest for this programme has been steadily growing. Accordingly, a number of PhD and MS degrees in NE have been awarded. The graduates of this programme have encountered very good job opportunities in nuclear as well as in non-nuclear sector. (author)

  11. Activities of the ANS special committee on nuclear nonproliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckner, M.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Sanders, T.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) Special Committee on Nuclear Nonproliferation (SCNN) believes that to reverse current trends, U.S. policy must revisit the fundamental premise of Atoms for Peace: A collaborative nuclear enterprise enhances rather than diminishes national security. To accomplish this, the U.S. Government must develop an integrated policy on energy, nuclear technology, and national security. The policy must recognize that these are interrelated and that an integrated policy will require substantial investments in nuclear research and development and in nuclear education. This paper describes the current activities of the SCNN to heighten awareness of nonproliferation issues for decision makers and ANS members, and alert them to the need for action to resolve these concerns. (author)

  12. Activities of the ANS special committee on nuclear nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckner, M.R.; Sanders, T.L.

    2001-01-01

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) Special Committee on Nuclear Nonproliferation (SCNN) believes that to reverse current trends, U.S. policy must revisit the fundamental premise of Atoms for Peace: A collaborative nuclear enterprise enhances rather than diminishes national security. To accomplish this, the U.S. Government must develop an integrated policy on energy, nuclear technology, and national security. The policy must recognize that these are interrelated and that an integrated policy will require substantial investments in nuclear research and development and in nuclear education. This paper describes the current activities of the SCNN to heighten awareness of nonproliferation issues for decision makers and ANS members, and alert them to the need for action to resolve these concerns. (author)

  13. Progress report on nuclear data activities in Sweden for 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conde, H.

    1981-04-01

    The report contains information from laboratories in Sweden about measurements and compilations which are relevant to obtain nuclear data for research and development in different applied fields of nuclear physics. The report also contains short information about changes of existing experimental facilities. Reports relevant to the nuclear energy field are given of neutron cross section measurements and studies of the fission process. Reports are also given of nuclear structure and decay data measurements especially fission product nuclear data measurements of importance for the research on reactor safety and nuclear waste handling. Charged particle and photonuclear cross section measurements with applications in e.g. activation analysis and the production of radioisotopes for medical use are reported as well.(author)

  14. Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation activities in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haapanen, P.; Wahlstroem, B.

    1990-01-01

    Finland has achieved some remarkable achievements in nuclear power production. Existing four plants have some of the best operating records in the world - high capacity factors, low occupational doses and short refuelling outages. Although public opinion was strongly turned against nuclear power after Chernobyl accident, and no decisions for new nuclear plants can be made before next elections in 1991, the nuclear option is still open. Utility companies are maintaining readiness to start new construction immediately after a positive political decision is made. One important component of the good operation history of the Finnish nuclear power plants is connected to the continuous research, development, modification and upgrading work, which is proceeding in Finland. In the following a short description is given on recent activities related to the I and C-systems of the nuclear power plants. (author). 2 tabs

  15. Analysis by nuclear reactions and activations. A current bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujdoso, E.

    2001-01-01

    A current bibliography based on INIS Atomindex with 78 references on Analysis by nuclear reactions and activations has been prepared for year 1998. References are arranged by first authors' name. (N.T.)

  16. Activity report of the ENEA Nuclear Data project in 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, A.

    2009-03-01

    Descriptions are given of the nuclear data activities undertaken during 2008 at the Bologna Research Centre of the Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment (ENEA). (author)

  17. Activities of Japan Nuclear Technology Institute Japanese TSO of Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, T.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear energy is a superior form of energy in that it delivers stable power supplies and counters global warming, and it is important to promote nuclear power generation as the core power sources for a nation. However, the Japanese environment surrounding nuclear energy is changing drastically, following the liberalization of market and recent series of troubles or falsifications shaking public confidence in nuclear energy. In the above mentioned situation, nuclear industries and organizations must fulfill their individual roles, and amass its strength to work toward enhancing industry initiatives for safety activities, securing safe / stable plant operations, restoring public confidence and initiate revitalization of nuclear energy operations. The Japan Nuclear Technology Institute (JANTI) has been established as a new entity for supporting and leading the industry's further progress in March 2005. Members of JANTI are not only utilities but also component manufacturers and constructors. JANTI enhance the technological foundation of nuclear energy based on scientific and rational data, coordinates its use among a wide range of relevant organizations, and helps members enhance their voluntary safety activities. At the same time, it is independent of utilities, and exercises a function of checking industry at the objective, third-party standpoint. As for the activities of JANTI itself, information disclosure and the establishment of a council comprising external members will enhance administration transparency. (author)

  18. Nuclear starburst activity induced by elongated bulges in spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunbin; Kim, Sungsoo S.; Choi, Yun-Young; Lee, Gwang-Ho; de Grijs, Richard; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Hwang, Ho Seong

    2018-06-01

    We study the effects of bulge elongation on the star formation activity in the centres of spiral galaxies using the data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. We construct a volume-limited sample of face-on spiral galaxies with Mr nuclear starbursts using the fibre specific star formation rates derived from the SDSS spectra. We find a statistically significant correlation between bulge elongation and nuclear starbursts in the sense that the fraction of nuclear starbursts increases with bulge elongation. This correlation is more prominent for fainter and redder galaxies, which exhibit higher ratios of elongated bulges. We find no significant environmental dependence of the correlation between bulge elongation and nuclear starbursts. These results suggest that non-axisymmetric bulges can efficiently feed the gas into the centre of galaxies to trigger nuclear starburst activity.

  19. Nuclear legislation: analytical study. Regulatory and institutional framework for nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Australia' s basic legislation in the nuclear field consists in five Acts passed by the Federal Parliament. These Acts are as follow: the South Pacific nuclear free zone treaty Act; the nuclear non-proliferation act; the Australian nuclear science and technology organisation act; the Australian nuclear science and technology organisation amendment act; the radiation protection and nuclear safety act. The two first Acts were prompted by the need for domestic legislation to implement Australia 's international obligations. The third arose from a long-standing recognition that the Atomic energy Act was inappropriate as the legislative basis for the activities of Australia 's national nuclear organisation. For its part the fourth Act introduced some necessary changes into the Australian nuclear science and technology organisation Act. Finally, the fifth act establishes a regime to regulate the operation of nuclear installations and the management of radiation sources, where the activities are undertaken by Commonwealth entities. Each of these Acts is discussed in more details in this work. (N.C.)

  20. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites

  1. Nuclear safety activities in the SR of Slovenia in 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susnik, J.

    1987-06-01

    Currently Yugoslavia has one 632 MWe nuclear power plant (NPP) of PWR design, located at Krsko in the Socialist Republic (SR) of Slovenia. Krsko NPP, which is a two-loop plant, started power operation in 1981. In general, reactor safety activities in the SR of Slovenia are mostly related to upgrading the safety of our Krsko NPP and to developing capabilities for use in future units. This report presents the nuclear safety related legislation and organization of the corresponding regulatory body, and the activities related to nuclear safety of the participating organizations in the SR of Slovenia in 1986. (author)

  2. Nuclear safety activities in the SR of Slovenia in 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susnik, J [Inst. Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    1987-06-15

    Currently Yugoslavia has one 632 MWe nuclear power plant (NPP) of PWR design, located at Krsko in the Socialist Republic (SR) of Slovenia. Krsko NPP, which is a two-loop plant, started power operation in 1981. In general, reactor safety activities in the SR of Slovenia are mostly related to upgrading the safety of our Krsko NPP and to developing capabilities for use in future units. This report presents the nuclear safety related legislation and organization of the corresponding regulatory body, and the activities related to nuclear safety of the participating organizations in the SR of Slovenia in 1986. (author)

  3. Regulatory control of maintenance activities in Argentine nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, J.C.; Caruso, G.

    2000-01-01

    The main maintenance objective is to assure that the safety features of structures, components and systems of nuclear power plants are kept as designed. Therefore, there is a direct relationship between safety and maintenance. Owing to the above mentioned, maintenance activities are considered a relevant regulatory issue for the Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN). This paper describes the regulatory control to maintenance activities of Argentine nuclear power plants. It also addresses essential elements for maintenance control, routine inspections, special inspections during planned outages, audits and license conditions and requirements. (author)

  4. Recent development in safety regulation of nuclear fuel cycle activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, S.

    2001-01-01

    Through the effort of deliberation and legislation over five years, Japanese government structure was reformed this January, with the aim of realizing simple, efficient and transparent administration. Under the reform, the Agency for Nuclear and Industrial Safety (ANIS) was founded in the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) to be responsible for safety regulation of energy-related nuclear activities, including nuclear fuel cycle activities, and industrial activities, including explosives, high-pressure gasses and mining. As one of the lessons learned from the JCO criticality accident of September 1999, it was pointed out that the government's inspection function was not enough for fuel fabrication facilities. Accordingly, new statutory regulatory activities were introduced, namely, inspection of observance of safety rules and procedures for all kinds of nuclear operators and periodic inspection of fuel fabrication facilities. In addition, in order to cope with insufficient safety education and training of workers in nuclear facilities, licensees of nuclear facilities are required by law to specify safety education and training for their workers. ANIS is committed to enforce these new regulatory activities effectively and efficiently. In addition, it is going to be prepared, in its capacity as safety regulatory authority, for future development of Japanese fuel cycle activities, including commissioning of JNFL Rokkasho reprocessing plant and possible application for licenses for JNFL MOX fabrication plant and for spent fuel interim storage facilities. (author)

  5. The Over-expression of the β2 Catalytic Subunit of the Proteasome Decreases Homologous Recombination and Impairs DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Collavoli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available By a human cDNA library screening, we have previously identified two sequences coding two different catalytic subunits of the proteasome which increase homologous recombination (HR when overexpressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we investigated the effect of proteasome on spontaneous HR and DNA repair in human cells. To determine if the proteasome has a role in the occurrence of spontaneous HR in human cells, we overexpressed the β2 subunit of the proteasome in HeLa cells and determined the effect on intrachromosomal HR. Results showed that the overexpression of β2 subunit decreased HR in human cells without altering the cell proteasome activity and the Rad51p level. Moreover, exposure to MG132 that inhibits the proteasome activity reduced HR in human cells. We also found that the expression of the β2 subunit increases the sensitivity to the camptothecin that induces DNA double-strand break (DSB. This suggests that the β2 subunit has an active role in HR and DSB repair but does not alter the intracellular level of the Rad51p.

  6. Recent activities of the nuclear fuel technology department of Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Can, S.; Aybers, T.; Kopuz, B.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Technology Department (NFTD) in CNRTC is a unique unit in Turkey in charge of performing all activities in nuclear fuel field. It has a pilot plant on uranium refining and conversion to UO 2 since 1986. Presently, its R and D activities are focused on pellet manufacturing and characterization: UO 2 , ThO 2 and (Th,U)O 2 . The studies on thorium dioxide fuel include to obtain ThO 2 pellets from thorium nitrate and mixed (Th,U)O 2 pellets. A study on evaluation of different fuel cycle options in accordance with nuclear energy planning in Turkey is also going on. (author)

  7. Peaceful nuclear programme and front end nuclear fuel cycle activities in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Mukhtar Ahmed

    1999-01-01

    Pakistan has a modest but broad based nuclear programme related to peaceful uses of atomic energy in nuclear power, agriculture, medicine and industry. While development projects in these areas form the major segment of Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission's work, complimentary activities in basic research and human resource development are also supported. PAEC through its activities has been moving towards the goal of achieving self-reliance for its existing programme in an international atmosphere of embargoes and restrictions and in pursuit of creating an infrastructure to help sustain an indigenous nuclear power programme. To solve the local needs and requirements, radioisotopes and nuclear techniques have been applied in agriculture, medicine, hydrology and industry. PAEC has one large research and development establishment in physical sciences, three R and D centers in agriculture, one in biotechnology, and ten nuclear medical centers for diagnostics and oncology treatment. Two research reactors form nucleus of research and development activities in nuclear sciences. In the power sector a 137 Mew CANDU power reactor is in operation in Karachi since 1971. Another 300 Mew PWR is under construction and is nearing completion. Front-end fuel cycle and engineering infrastructure facilities have been established to support continued operation of Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (KANUPP). To support the engineering activities it has established facilities for precision workshops, non-destructive testing center and a welding institute. (author)

  8. Nuclear cardiology in the UK: activity and practice 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prvulovich, Elizabeth; Metcalfe, Malcolm J.

    2002-01-01

    A questionnaire was sent to 251 nuclear medicine centres asking for details of nuclear medicine activity, and nuclear cardiology activity and practice in 1997. One hundred and seventy-one (68%) centres replied. Nuclear medicine activity was estimated at 11.8 studies/1,000 population/year, and 9.5% of these studies were within cardiology (1.12 studies/1,000/year). Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) studies accounted for 77% and radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) for 22% of all nuclear cardiology. On a national basis this represents activity levels of 0.86 and 0.25 studies/1,000/year for MPI and RNV, respectively. Of the 171 responding centres, 102 (60%) performed MPI studies and 81 (79%) of these reported that activity was increasing. However, MPI activity was unevenly distributed between hospitals. Two centres accounted for 13% of total MPI; others had far lower activity rates, and 51/102 (50%) centres performed less than 200 MPI studies/year. Comparison with previous surveys showed that nuclear medicine activity had almost doubled since 1990 (it was 6.0 studies/1,000 population in 1990, 9.3 studies/1,000 in 1994 and 11.8 studies/1,000 in 1997). Over the same period, nuclear cardiology activity had also risen, the greatest increase being seen for the last 3 years (it was 0.7 studies/1,000 population in 1990, 0.82 studies/1,000 in 1994 and 1.12 studies/1,000 in 1997). Despite these encouraging figures, MPI activity for 1997 remained well below that recommended by the British Cardiac Society in 1994 (2.6 studies/1,000/year) as adequate to serve the needs of patients with cardiac disease in the UK; it was also below the European average activity for the same year (2.2 studies/1,000/year). The anticipated increased workload for nuclear cardiology is encouraging despite the wide and varied practice of nuclear cardiology around the UK. The nuclear medicine community now needs to address the issues that will prevent it keeping up with demand, such as restricted camera

  9. Sensitive nuclear activities in certain free world countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    A concise, ready reference is provided for use in reviewing license applications for exporting to several countries for possible need of referral to DOE. For each country, nuclear explosive and sensitive nuclear activities, such as enrichment, reprocessing, heavy water production, and fabrication of fuel containing plutonium, are listed, as well as the organizations and installations responsible for such activities. Some activities are also included that are not sensitive but are closely related and could easily lead to sensitive activities. The countries covered are: Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Federal Republic of Germany, France, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Turkey, and the United States

  10. Evolution of nuclear security regulatory activities in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, Luiz A. de; Monteiro Filho, Joselio S.; Belem, Lilia M.J.; Torres, Luiz F.B.

    2009-01-01

    The changing of the world scenario in the last 15 years has increased worldwide the concerns about overall security and, as a consequence, about the nuclear and radioactive material as well as their associated facilities. Considering the new situation, in February 2004, the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), decided to create the Nuclear Security Office. This Office is under the Coordination of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, in the Directorate for Safety, Security and Safeguards (Regulatory Directorate). Before that, security regulation issues were dealt in a decentralized manner, within that Directorate, by different licensing groups in specific areas (power reactors, fuel cycle facilities, radioactive facilities, transport of nuclear material, etc.). This decision was made in order to allow a coordinated approach on the subject, to strengthen the regulation in nuclear/radioactive security, and to provide support to management in the definition of institutional security policies. The CNEN Security Office develops its work based in the CNEN Physical Protection Regulation for Nuclear Operational Units - NE-2.01, 1996, the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and the IAEA Nuclear Security Series . This paper aims at presenting the activities developed and the achievements obtained by this new CNEN office, as well as identifying the issues and directions for future efforts. (author)

  11. The national law on nuclear activity: some consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Acosta, G.

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the contents of the new National Law on Nuclear Activities of the Argentine Republic, analysing the functions of the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) (former National Board of Nuclear Regulation -ENREN) and the privatisation of the nuclear power generation performed by the enterprise Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A. (NASA). It also includes some comments about political and legislative records of the Law in the framework of the Nation's reorganization undertaken by the National Government for the privatisation of the rendering of public services, such as the production of energy and related activities. The Law was approved by Law 24.804 of April 2, 1997, and published in the Official Bulletin of the Argentine Republic on April 25, 1997. In accordance with the provisions of this Law, the National Government, through the above mentioned organisations, will fix the nuclear policy and the functions of research, development, surveillance and control of the nuclear activity. Also, as part of the execution of the nuclear policy, all the obligations accepted by Argentina as signatory party to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (Tlatelolco Treaty), the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (TNP), the Agreement between the Argentine Republic and the Federative Republic of Brazil through the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to enforce Safeguards, in addition to the commitments signed by Argentina as a member of the Suppliers Group and the National Control System for Sensitive Exports, shall be met [es

  12. Proteomic Profiling of Radiation-Induced Skin Fibrosis in Rats: Targeting the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenjie [School of Radiation Medicine and Protection and Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Cyrus Tang Hematology Center, Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Luo, Judong [Department of Radiotherapy, Changzhou Tumor Hospital, Soochow University, Changzhou (China); Sheng, Wenjiong; Xue, Jiao; Li, Ming [School of Radiation Medicine and Protection and Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Ji, Jiang [Department of Dermatology, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Liu, Pengfei [Department of Gastroenterology, the Affiliated Jiangyin Hospital of Southeast University, Jiangyin (China); Zhang, Xueguang [Institute of Medical Biotechnology and Jiangsu Stem Cell Key Laboratory, Medical College of Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Cao, Jianping [School of Radiation Medicine and Protection and Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Zhang, Shuyu, E-mail: zhang.shuyu@hotmail.com [School of Radiation Medicine and Protection and Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Cyrus Tang Hematology Center, Soochow University, Suzhou (China)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the molecular changes underlying the pathogenesis of radiation-induced skin fibrosis. Methods and Materials: Rat skin was irradiated to 30 or 45 Gy with an electron beam. Protein expression in fibrotic rat skin and adjacent normal tissues was quantified by label-free protein quantitation. Human skin cells HaCaT and WS-1 were treated by x-ray irradiation, and the proteasome activity was determined with a fluorescent probe. The effect of proteasome inhibitors on Transforming growth factor Beta (TGF-B) signaling was measured by Western blot and immunofluorescence. The efficacy of bortezomib in wound healing of rat skin was assessed by the skin injury scale. Results: We found that irradiation induced epidermal and dermal hyperplasia in rat and human skin. One hundred ninety-six preferentially expressed and 80 unique proteins in the irradiated fibrotic skin were identified. Through bioinformatic analysis, the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway showed a significant fold change and was investigated in greater detail. In vitro experiments demonstrated that irradiation resulted in a decline in the activity of the proteasome in human skin cells. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib suppressed profibrotic TGF-β downstream signaling but not TGF-β secretion stimulated by irradiation in HaCaT and WS-1 cells. Moreover, bortezomib ameliorated radiation-induced skin injury and attenuated epidermal hyperplasia. Conclusion: Our findings illustrate the molecular changes during radiation-induced skin fibrosis and suggest that targeting the ubiquitin-proteasome system would be an effective countermeasure.

  13. HIV-1 replication through hHR23A-mediated interaction of Vpr with 26S proteasome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Li

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 Vpr is a virion-associated protein. Its activities link to viral pathogenesis and disease progression of HIV-infected patients. In vitro, Vpr moderately activates HIV-1 replication in proliferating T cells, but it is required for efficient viral infection and replication in vivo in non-dividing cells such as macrophages. How exactly Vpr contributes to viral replication remains elusive. We show here that Vpr stimulates HIV-1 replication at least in part through its interaction with hHR23A, a protein that binds to 19S subunit of the 26S proteasome and shuttles ubiquitinated proteins to the proteasome for degradation. The Vpr-proteasome interaction was initially discovered in fission yeast, where Vpr was shown to associate with Mts4 and Mts2, two 19S-associated proteins. The interaction of Vpr with the 19S subunit of the proteasome was further confirmed in mammalian cells where Vpr associates with the mammalian orthologues of fission yeast Mts4 and S5a. Consistently, depletion of hHR23A interrupts interaction of Vpr with proteasome in mammalian cells. Furthermore, Vpr promotes hHR23A-mediated protein-ubiquitination, and down-regulation of hHR23A using RNAi significantly reduced viral replication in non-proliferating MAGI-CCR5 cells and primary macrophages. These findings suggest that Vpr-proteasome interaction might counteract certain host restriction factor(s to stimulate viral replication in non-dividing cells.

  14. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment (Special nuclear material; Source material; By-product material; Agreement state programmes); 4. Nuclear installations (Initial licensing; Operation and inspection, including nuclear safety; Operating licence renewal; Decommissioning; Emergency response); 5. Radiological protection (Protection of workers; Protection of the public); 6. Radioactive waste management (High-level waste; Low-level waste; Disposal at sea; Uranium mill tailings; Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program - FUSRAP); 7. Non-proliferation and exports (Exports of source material, special nuclear material, production or utilisation facilities and sensitive nuclear technology; Exports of components; Exports of by-product material; Exports and imports of radiation sources; Conduct resulting in the termination of exports or economic assistance; Subsequent arrangements; Technology exports; Information and restricted data); 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Nuclear Regulatory Commission - NRC; Department of Energy - DOE; Department of Labor - DOL; Department of Transportation - DOT; Environmental Protection Agency - EPA); 2. Public and semi-public agencies: A. Cabinet-level departments (Department of

  15. Applied nuclear physics group - activities report. 1977-1997; Grupo de fisica nuclear aplicada - relatorio de atividades. 1977-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appoloni, Carlos Roberto

    1998-06-01

    This report presents the activities conducted by the Applied Nuclear Physics group of the Londrina State University - Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory - Brazil, from the activities beginning (1977) up to the end of the year 1997.

  16. The Report on Activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic. Annual Report 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-04-01

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD SR) in 2012 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: Foreword; (1) Legislative activities; (2) Regulatory Activities; (3) Nuclear safety of nuclear power plants; (4) Stress tests on the nuclear power plants; (5) Nuclear Materials in SR; (6) Building Authority; (7) Emergency planning and preparedness; (8) International activities; (9) Public communication; (10) Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic; (11) Attachments; (12) Abbreviations used.

  17. General activities of JAERI nuclear data center and Japanese nuclear data committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukahori, Tokio

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear data center of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI/NDC) is playing the role of Japanese domestic nuclear data center and gateway to foreign data centers. As the domestic nuclear data center, activities of JAERI/NDC are 1) compiling the Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (JENDL) for both general and special purposes, 2) importing and exporting nuclear data, 3) nuclear data services for the domestic users, and 4) organizing japanese Nuclear Data Committee (JNDC) as a secretariat. Compiled JENDL General Purpose Files up to now are JENDL-1, 2, 3, 3.1 and 3.2. The data for 340 nuclei in the energy range from 10 -5 eV to 20 MeV are available in JENDL-3.2. JENDL Special Purpose Files were also prepared in order to meet the requests from the specified application fields. JNDC has about 140 members. JNDC consists of Main Committee, Steering Committee, Subcommittee on Nuclear Data, Subcommittee on Reactor Constants, Subcommittee on Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Standing Groups. Above subcommittees are performing essential evaluation for the files described above, checking the JENDL files through the benchmark and integral testing as well as considering the standard group constant, and considering about evaluation of decay heat and nuclide generation/depletion and fission product yields. (author)

  18. INDUCED NUCLEAR ACTIVITY IN GALAXY PAIRS

    OpenAIRE

    F. J. Hernández-Ibarra; D. Dultzin; Y. Krongold; A. Del Olmo; J. Perea

    2011-01-01

    Analizamos espectros del núcleo de 893 galaxias entre pares de galaxias y galaxias aisladas de la muestra SLOAN (DR7). Estos pares pueden ser divididos en tres grupos: S+S, E+E y E+S de acuerdo con el catálago de pares aislados de galaxias de Karachentsev (KPG). También analizamos dos muestras de galaxias aisladas: el catálogo de galaxias aisladas de Karachentseva (CIG) y la muestra de galaxias aisladas en el hemisferio norte de Varela. Estudiamos la incidencia de la actividad nuclear en cada...

  19. Sensor Fusion for Nuclear Proliferation Activity Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adel Ghanem, Ph D

    2007-03-30

    The objective of Phase 1 of this STTR project is to demonstrate a Proof-of-Concept (PoC) of the Geo-Rad system that integrates a location-aware SmartTag (made by ZonTrak) and a radiation detector (developed by LLNL). It also includes the ability to transmit the collected radiation data and location information to the ZonTrak server (ZonService). The collected data is further transmitted to a central server at LLNL (the Fusion Server) to be processed in conjunction with overhead imagery to generate location estimates of nuclear proliferation and radiation sources.

  20. Protection against murine osteoarthritis by inhibition of the 26S proteasome and lysine-48 linked ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Marta; Wilkinson, David J; Hui, Wang; Destrument, Auriane P M; Charlton, Sarah H; Barter, Matt J; Gibson, Beth; Coulombe, Josée; Gray, Douglas A; Rowan, Andrew D; Young, David A

    2015-08-01

    To determine whether the process of ubiquitination and/or activity of the 26S proteasome are involved in the induction of osteoarthritis (OA). Bovine cartilage resorption assays, chondrocyte cell-line SW1353 and primary human articular chondrocytes were used with the general proteasome inhibitor MG132 or vehicle to identify a role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in cartilage destruction and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP13) expression. In vivo, MG132 or vehicle, were delivered subcutaneously to mice following destabilisation of the medial meniscus (DMM)-induced OA. Subsequently, DMM was induced in Lys-to-Arg (K48R and K63R) mutant ubiquitin (Ub) transgenic mice. Cytokine signalling in SW1353s was monitored by immunoblotting and novel ubiquitinated substrates identified using Tandem Ubiquitin Binding Entities purification followed by mass spectrometry. The ubiquitination of TRAFD1 was assessed via immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting and its role in cytokine signal-transduction determined using RNA interference and real-time RT-PCR for MMP13 and interleukin-6 (IL6). Supplementation with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 protected cartilage from cytokine-mediated resorption and degradation in vivo in mice following DMM-induced OA. Using transgenic animals only K48R-mutated Ub partially protected against OA compared to wild-type or wild-type Ub transgenic mice, and this was only evident on the medial femoral condyle. After confirming ubiquitination was vital for NF-κB signalling and MMP13 expression, a screen for novel ubiquitinated substrates involved in cytokine-signalling identified TRAFD1; the depletion of which reduced inflammatory mediator-induced MMP13 and IL6 expression. Our data for the first time identifies a role for ubiquitination and the proteasome in the induction of OA via regulation of inflammatory mediator-induced MMP13 expression. These data open avenues of research to determine whether the proteasome, or K48-linked ubiquitination, are

  1. Summary of aerospace and nuclear engineering activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The Texas A&M Nuclear and Aerospace engineering departments have worked on five different projects for the NASA/USRA Advanced Design Program during the 1987/88 year. The aerospace department worked on two types of lunar tunnelers that would create habitable space. The first design used a heated cone to melt the lunar regolith, and the second used a conventional drill to bore its way through the crust. Both used a dump truck to get rid of waste heat from the reactor as well as excess regolith from the tunneling operation. The nuclear engineering department worked on three separate projects. The NEPTUNE system is a manned, outer-planetary explorer designed with Jupiter exploration as the baseline mission. The lifetime requirement for both reactor and power-conversion systems was twenty years. The second project undertaken for the power supply was a Mars Sample Return Mission power supply. This was designed to produce 2 kW of electrical power for seven years. The design consisted of a General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) utilizing a Stirling engine as the power conversion unit. A mass optimization was performed to aid in overall design. The last design was a reactor to provide power for propulsion to Mars and power on the surface. The requirements of 300 kW of electrical power output and a mass of less than 10,000 Rg were set. This allowed the reactor and power conversion unit to fit within the Space Shuttle cargo bay.

  2. Nuclear and atomic data activities in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Suhaimi; Gui Ah Auu.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear and atomic data measurements and calculations in Malaysia are mostly done at the National University of Malaysia (UKM) and Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT). At UKM, (n,t) reactions for 6 Li, 10 B and reactor structural materials have been investigated using liquid scintillation counting and gas phase β - anticoincidence counting. Tritium productions via ternary fission in 235 U and 232 Th are measured using vacuum extraction and β - counting of accumulated tritium. In addition, γ-ray attenuation coefficients on cooking oil, petroleum products, building materials, natural rubber and tropical woods have also been measured. Calculations to determine μ-value according to Hubbel method are initiated. Some collaborative works between UKM and Juelich Research Centre of Germany have been completed while others are in progress namely; (n,t) reactions study on 9 Be, 10 B, 14 N and also measurement of excitation functions and isomer ratios of fast neutron induced reactions on Zn, Ga and Ge. At MINT, the 1-D diffusion code TRIGAM and the 2-D EXTERMINATOR code are used for neutronic analyses of TRIGA Reactor. The radiation shielding calculation have been carried out by using ANISN, a 1-D discrete ordinates code. Some preliminary calculations for the fuel transfer cask using ORIGEN2 and MERCURE-4 have been performed. Response functions for neutrons and the associated secondary photons for neutron skyshine analyses have been generated using the MCNP code. (author)

  3. Chicago section activities to enhance public acceptance of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, T.L.; Keffer, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    The Chicago section of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) is an active organization with ∼450 members. The local section territory encompasses northern Illinois and includes in its territory all six of Commonwealth Edison Company's (CECo's) nuclear generating stations as well as Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Included in the territory are several large engineering firms - ABB Impell, Bechtel, Fluor Daniel, and Sargent ampersand Lundy. The national headquarters of the ANS is also located within the local section boundaries. All these organizations are represented in the local section membership and provide access to abundant technical resources that can be used to enhance public acceptance of nuclear power. An important attribute of any local section that enables it to perform interesting programs and be active in the community is its financial resources. The Chicago section has a strong financial base because of its ability to raise funds by participating in and sponsoring ANS topical and other meetings. For instance, in 1991, they sponsored and were actively involved in the Emergency Preparedness Topical Meeting held in Chicago. In 1992, they were actively involved in sponsoring the organizational activities of the ANS/ENS International Meeting, which will celebrate the 50th year of nuclear fission. The financial and technical resources of the Chicago section continue to contribute to a successful program of public education and public acceptance activities regarding the nuclear industry

  4. Activities report of Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear - 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    This is an activities report of 1993 year from Nuclear Engineering Institute - IEN, Brazilian CNEN. It achieves research and development in science and technology in nuclear areas and correlative, generating knowledge, products and services in society benefit. Its major activities are: production and supply of 30 equipment for radioprotection and nuclear physics, and the project and construction of monitoring system of neutron flux and radioprotection of Triga reactor of CDTN; project and construction of an actuation/attenuation circuit system of ATWS (anticipated transient without scram) at Angra-1 nuclear power plant; obtention of rare earths; development and optimization of a computational program to three-dimensional fluid mechanic - NSD 3D; study of technical and economical feasibility to the implantation, at IEN, of a big size irradiator for the sterilization, using ionizing radiation, of hospital, pharmaceutical and cosmetic goods. (C.M.). 7 tabs, 2 graphs

  5. Background and future activities of PBNCC's nuclear training working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong Hun Rieh; Kunmo Chung; Hamlin, K.W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the background and activities of the nuclear training working group of the Pacific Basin Nuclear Cooperation Committee. The working group has examined various mechanisms for regional cooperation including the development of aregional catalog of training programs and the conceptualization of sharing training facilities among nuclear operators in the region. The working group has focused its attention on the exchange of information on the on-going training programs, operator training facilities, available resources for training assistance and proposed cooperative schemes. These activities are expected to continue and will provide invaluable information for nuclear power programs in the Pacific Basin region. The group also reviewed problems and issues associated with developing regional cooperation. (author)

  6. Background and future activities of PBNCC's nuclear training working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieh, C.H.; Chung, K.; Hamlin, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the background and activities of the nuclear training working group of the Pacific Basin Nuclear Cooperation Committee. The working group has examined various mechanisms for regional cooperation including the development of a regional catalog of training programs and the conceptualization of sharing training facilities among nuclear operators in the region. The working group has focused its attention on the exchange of information on the on-going training programs, operator training facilities, available resources for training assistance and proposed cooperative schemes. These activities are expected to continue and will provide invaluable information for nuclear power programs in the Pacific Basin region. The group also reviewed problems and issues associated with developing regional cooperation

  7. MCPIP1 contributes to the toxicity of proteasome inhibitor MG-132 in HeLa cells by the inhibition of NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalniak, Lukasz; Dziendziel, Monika; Jura, Jolanta

    2014-10-01

    Recently, we have shown that the treatment of cells with proteasome inhibitor MG-132 results in the induction of expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 induced protein 1 (MCPIP1). MCPIP1 is a ribonuclease, responsible for the degradation of transcripts encoding certain pro-inflammatory cytokines. The protein is also known as an inhibitor of NF-κB transcription factor. Thanks to its molecular properties, MCPIP1 is considered as a regulator of inflammation, differentiation, and survival. Using siRNA technology, we show here that MCPIP1 expression contributes to the toxic properties of MG-132 in HeLa cells. The inhibition of proteasome by MG-132 and epoxomicin markedly increased MCPIP1 expression. While MG-132 induces HeLa cell death, down-regulation of MCPIP1 expression by siRNA partially protects HeLa cells from MG-132 toxicity and restores Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity, inhibited by MG-132 treatment. Inversely, overexpression of MCPIP1 decreased constitutive activity of NF-κB and limited the survival of HeLa cells, as we have shown in the previous study. Interestingly, although MG-132 decreased the expression of IκBα and increased p65 phosphorylation, the inhibition of constitutive NF-κB activity was observed in MG-132-treated cells. Since the elevated constitutive activity of NF-κB is one of the mechanisms providing increased survival of cancer cells, including HeLa cells, we propose that death-promoting properties of MCPIP1 in MG-132-treated HeLa cells may, at least partially, derive from the negative effect on the constitutive NF-κB activity.

  8. Fem1b, a proapoptotic protein, mediates proteasome inhibitor-induced apoptosis of human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subauste, M Cecilia; Sansom, Owen J; Porecha, Nehal; Raich, Natacha; Du, Liqin; Maher, Joseph F

    2010-02-01

    In the treatment of colon cancer, the development of resistance to apoptosis is a major factor in resistance to therapy. New molecular approaches to overcome apoptosis resistance, such as selectively upregulating proapoptotic proteins, are needed in colon cancer therapy. In a mouse model with inactivation of the adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) tumor suppressor gene, reflecting the pathogenesis of most human colon cancers, the gene encoding feminization-1 homolog b (Fem1b) is upregulated in intestinal epithelium following Apc inactivation. Fem1b is a proapoptotic protein that interacts with apoptosis-inducing proteins Fas, tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1), and apoptotic protease activating factor-1 (Apaf-1). Increasing Fem1b expression induces apoptosis of cancer cells, but effects on colon cancer cells have not been reported. Fem1b is a homolog of feminization-1 (FEM-1), a protein in Caenorhabditis elegans that is regulated by proteasomal degradation, but whether Fem1b is likewise regulated by proteasomal degradation is unknown. Herein, we found that Fem1b protein is expressed in primary human colon cancer specimens, and in malignant SW620, HCT-116, and DLD-1 colon cancer cells. Increasing Fem1b expression, by transfection of a Fem1b expression construct, induced apoptosis of these cells. We found that proteasome inhibitor treatment of SW620, HCT-116, and DLD-1 cells caused upregulation of Fem1b protein levels, associated with induction of apoptosis. Blockade of Fem1b upregulation with morpholino antisense oligonucleotide suppressed the proteasome inhibitor-induced apoptosis of these cells. In conclusion, the proapoptotic protein Fem1b is downregulated by the proteasome in malignant colon cancer cells and mediates proteasome inhibitor-induced apoptosis of these cells. Therefore, Fem1b could represent a novel molecular target to overcome apoptosis resistance in therapy of colon cancer.

  9. Further activities of safety culture toward nuclear transportation industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, Y.; Shimakura, D.

    2004-01-01

    On September 30, 1999, a criticality accident occurred at the uranium processing facility of the JCO Co. Ltd. (hereinafter referred to as ''JCO'') Tokai plant, located in Tokaimura, Ibaraki Prefecture. This was an unprecedented accident in Japan's history of peaceful use of nuclear power, resulting in three workers exposed to severe radiation, two of whom died, and the evacuation and enforced indoor confinement of local residents. Nuclear power suppliers must take personal responsibility for ensuring safety. In this connection, the electric power industry, heavy electric machinery manufacturers, fuel fabricators, and nuclear power research organizations gathered together to establish the Nuclear Safety Network (NSnet) in December 1999, based on the resolve to share and improve the level of the safety culture across the entire nuclear power industry and to assure that such an accident never occurs again. NSnet serves as a link between nuclear power enterprises, research organizations, and other bodies, based on the principles of equality and reciprocity. A variety of activities are pursued, such as diffusing a safety culture, implementing mutual evaluation among members, and exchanging safety-related information. Aiming to share and improve the safety culture throughout the entire nuclear power industry, NSnet thoroughly implements the principle of safety first, while at the same time making efforts to restore trust in nuclear power

  10. Stakeholder involvement in international conventions governing civil nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmerechts, Sam

    2017-01-01

    Mr Emmerechts explained that international conventions have varying positions on stakeholders and their involvement depending upon the intent of the legislator and the field they cover, ranging from a narrow to a broad interpretation. He addressed stakeholder involvement in two other international conventions governing civil nuclear activities, namely the Convention on Nuclear Safety, and the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (the Joint Convention), both concluded under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). He noted that the Convention on Nuclear Safety remains a 'traditional' international legal instrument, focusing on governments and governmental bodies as the main stakeholders and limiting obligations regarding the involvement of the public and intergovernmental organisations to their receiving information and observing. Likewise, the Joint Convention limits obligations regarding public involvement to access to information, notably as to the siting of proposed facilities. However, he noted that in the European Union, the Directive on Nuclear Safety (2014/87/Euratom) and the Directive for the Safe Management of Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste (2011/70/Euratom) have more advanced public participation requirements in nuclear decision making. Mr Emmerechts explained that the substantial differences between nuclear legislation and the Aarhus and Espoo Conventions with regards to public involvement requirements could partly be explained by the technicality of nuclear information and by issues related to nuclear security

  11. Nuclear data activities at the NEA Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, A.; Henriksson, H.; Mompean, F.J.; Nordborg, C.; Rugama, Y.; Sartori, E.

    2008-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank is an international centre of reference for its member countries with respect to basic nuclear tools, such as computer codes and nuclear data. The Data Bank is part of an international network of data centres in charge of the compilation and dissemination of basic nuclear data. The NEA nuclear data services include the collection of data, validation and distribution of the Nuclear Data libraries via the NEA web-site, offering easy access to databases containing bibliographical and experimental information, as well as evaluated libraries, e.g., the Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion (JEFF) library. The selection and distribution of chemical thermodynamic data for radioactive waste management applications is the subject of the Thermochemical Database Project (TDB), supported by 17 organisations in 12 member countries and co-ordinated by the NEA Data Bank. In support of data evaluation, and generation of project oriented data libraries, relevant computer codes in the field of nuclear models, experimental data processing and evaluated data processing are made available to experts with the support of the member countries. Large collections of benchmark experiments for data and code validation are also available from the NEA in areas such as criticality safety (ICSBEP), radiation shielding (SINBAD), fuel performance (IFPE) and reactor physics (IRPhE). The NEA Working Party on international nuclear data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC) provides a framework for co-operative activities between the six major evaluation projects (BROND, CENDL, Endf, FENDL, JEFF and JENDL). (authors)

  12. Further activities of safety culture toward nuclear transportation industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machida, Y.; Shimakura, D. [NSnet, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    On September 30, 1999, a criticality accident occurred at the uranium processing facility of the JCO Co. Ltd. (hereinafter referred to as ''JCO'') Tokai plant, located in Tokaimura, Ibaraki Prefecture. This was an unprecedented accident in Japan's history of peaceful use of nuclear power, resulting in three workers exposed to severe radiation, two of whom died, and the evacuation and enforced indoor confinement of local residents. Nuclear power suppliers must take personal responsibility for ensuring safety. In this connection, the electric power industry, heavy electric machinery manufacturers, fuel fabricators, and nuclear power research organizations gathered together to establish the Nuclear Safety Network (NSnet) in December 1999, based on the resolve to share and improve the level of the safety culture across the entire nuclear power industry and to assure that such an accident never occurs again. NSnet serves as a link between nuclear power enterprises, research organizations, and other bodies, based on the principles of equality and reciprocity. A variety of activities are pursued, such as diffusing a safety culture, implementing mutual evaluation among members, and exchanging safety-related information. Aiming to share and improve the safety culture throughout the entire nuclear power industry, NSnet thoroughly implements the principle of safety first, while at the same time making efforts to restore trust in nuclear power.

  13. IAEA activities in nuclear power plant personnel training and qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mautner-Markhof, F.

    1993-01-01

    Training to achieve and maintain the qualification and competence of nuclear power personnel is essential for safe and economic nuclear power. Technical Cooperation Meeting on Training-Related Activities for Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Personnel in the countries of Central and Eastern Europe (CEEC) and of the former Soviet Union (FSU) has as its main objective the identification, through information exchange and discussion, of possible Technical Cooperation (TC) projects to assist Member States in meeting NPP personnel training needs and priorities, including the enhancing of training capabilities

  14. Third Party Liability governing Dangerous and Nuclear Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Martino, Vittorio.

    1979-01-01

    The introductory chapters of this book analyse the concept of fault as a basis for third party liability and the evolution of jurisprudence and doctrine towards the concept of absolute liability. The following part covers the Italian system of liability for hazardous activities. The nuclear third party liability system is then analysed according to existing international conventions and nuclear legislation in several countries. The Appendix contains various legislative and regulatory texts on nuclear third party liability in Italy and in other countries which provide for special legislation in this field. (NEA) [fr

  15. Activities of the PNC Nuclear Safety Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, W.Y.

    1991-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Working Group of the Pacific Nuclear Council promotes nuclear safety cooperation among its members. Status of safety research, emergency planning, development of lists of technical experts, severe accident prevention and mitigation have been the topics of discussion in the NSWG. This paper reviews and compares the severe accident prevention and mitigation program activities in some of the areas of the Pacific Basin region based on papers presented at a special session organized by the NSWG at an ANS Topical Meeting as well as papers from other sources

  16. Nuclear power reactor safety research activities in CIAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu Shendi; Huang Yucai; Xu Hanming; Zhang Zhongyue

    1994-01-01

    The power reactor safety research activities in CIAE are briefly reviewed. The research work performed in 1980's and 1990's is mainly emphasised, which is closely related to the design, construction and licensing review of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant and the safety review of Guangdong Nuclear Power Station. Major achievements in the area of thermohydraulics, nuclear fuel, probabilistic safety assessment and severe accident researches are summarized. The foreseeable research plan for the near future, relating to the design and construction of 600 MWe PWR NPP at Qinshan Site (phase II development) is outlined

  17. Past, present and future of the nuclear activities in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirimelo, Roberto O.

    2001-01-01

    A short history is given of the activities of the National Atomic Energy Commission. The present program in the field of the fuel cycle, material sciences, waste management, nuclear reactors, radioisotope production, radiation and radioisotope applications, research and development and education and training is described. The objectives and activities of the companies related to the National Atomic Energy Commission are also outlined

  18. A review of the nuclear safety activities in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merelli, A.

    1989-01-01

    A review of research programs carried out in Italy in the field of nuclear reactor safety was done in 1986, in the frame of the activities of the Commission of the European Communities, the International Energy Agency and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The report contains information on these programs, as well as information on the organization of safety research in Italy and the evolution of safety research programs

  19. Summary of US activities in commercial nuclear airborne waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groenier, W.S.

    1985-01-01

    Most of the US nuclear air cleaning technology development in recent years has addressed advanced retention concepts in response to environmental concerns. In particular, efforts have centered in the fuel reprocessing portion of the nuclear fuel cycle. Although generally well developed on a cold engineering scale, the individual retention steps for 3 H, 14 C, 85 Kr, and 129 I) must yet be demonstrated in an active integrated facility. Fixation and disposal technologies for retained airborne constituents are generally less well developed

  20. Institute of Nuclear Physics, mission and scientific research activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoto, J.; Zaganjori, S.

    2004-01-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) was established in 1971 as a scientific research institution with main goal basic scientific knowledge transmission and transfer the new methods and technologies of nuclear physics to the different economy fields. The organizational structure and main research areas of the Institute are described. The effects of the long transition period of the Albanian society and economy on the Institution activity are also presented

  1. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment (Definitions; Licensing requirements); 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing regime; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response; Surveillance of installations and activities); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection (General; Principal elements of the Radiation Protection Ordinance; Additional radiation protection norms); 7. Radioactive waste management (Atomic Energy Act 2002; Radiation Protection Ordinance; International obligations); 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection (Non-proliferation regime; Physical protection regime); 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities: Federal authorities (Federal Minister for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety, Federal Minister for Education and Research, Federal Minister of Finance, Federal Minister of Transport, Building and Urban Affairs, Federal Minister for Economy and Technology, Federal Minister of Defence, Federal Office for Radiation Protection - BfS, Federal Office of Economics and Export Control); Authorities of the Laender; 2. Advisory bodies (Reactor Safety Commission - RSK; Radiation Protection Commission - SSK; Disposal Commission - ESK; Nuclear Technology

  2. EPRI expert system activities for nuclear utility industry application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naser, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on expert systems which have reached a level of maturity where they offer considerable benefits for the nuclear utility industry. The ability of expert systems to enhance expertise makes them an important tool for the nuclear utility industry in the areas of engineering, operations and maintenance. Benefits of expert system applications include comprehensive and consistent reasoning, reduction of time required for activities, retention of human expertise and ability to utilize multiple experts knowledge for an activity. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been performing four basic activities to help the nuclear industry take advantage of this expert system technology. The first is the development of expert system building tools which are tailored to nuclear utility industry applications. The second is the development of expert system applications. The third is work in developing a methodology for verification and validation of expert systems. The last is technology transfer activities to help the nuclear utility industry benefit from expert systems. The purpose of this paper is to describe the EPRI activities

  3. A project in support of international nuclear cooperation activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeongkong; Kim, Myungro; Choi, Pyunghoon; Kim, Kyungpyo; Jung, Sunghyon; Park, Jiyeon; Eom, Jaesik; Kim, Wangkeun; Chung, Byungsun

    2011-12-15

    This study contains the work undertaken to promote multilateral cooperation within the framework of international nuclear related organizations and regional cooperative agreements and the relevant forums, to enhance bilateral cooperation with foreign nuclear related research institutes as well as to promote cooperation through the exchange of foreign scientists. As for multilateral cooperation, activities for promoting cooperation within the IAEA and regional cooperative frameworks are introduced. Regarding bilateral cooperation, activities for concluding arrangements and MOUs with foreign research institutes and for participation in joint nuclear coordinating committee meetings between Korea and other countries are presented. For promoting personnel exchanges, activities for inviting and utilizing foreign scientists and mutual discussions with foreign experts, who have visited KAERI, are also described. Continuous efforts to contributing towards the international community through utilizing Korea's experience gained in the process of technical self-reliance and development of human resources are needed. Also efforts to establish the foundation of international cooperation and to make inroad into overseas nuclear markets for export of our nuclear technologies should be made. Meanwhile in the bilateral cooperation, we need to beef up cooperation with U. S. A. and Canada through the joint committee for the joint export to third countries. It is expected that this study would be utilized as a basic material for the international cooperation of nuclear energy, especially for the KAERI's international cooperation in an effective way.

  4. Japan's nuclear PA activity in local governments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Nobuyuki

    1995-01-01

    This presentation emphasises some points of PA activities, based on the experience of 'cooperation projects for local governments'. Local governments distribute the public information directly to the residents. This is very important because officers of the local government can be the opinion leaders of the region. Local government exist very close to the residents, while the central government is a distant and faceless existence for the local people. It is believed that the local governments play an imperative role in PA activities. In other words, we must further utilize the organizations and functions of the local governments to implement PA activities. In conclusion, three recommendations are offered. Firstly, enough budget and authority should be given to the local governments as far as PA activities in their areas are concerned, and most of such activities should be entrusted to the local governments. Local governments should place more public relations officers, and continue the manpower development. Second, with regard to highly technical or specialized issues which a local governments cannot treat alone, related organizations like JAERO should support their PA activities. Third, such related organizations should also cooperate with local government including assistance in providing know-how, when their public information activities focus on educators, journalists, or the women. These three points should be given due consideration in our cooperation projects for the local governments, and JAERO is doing its best every day

  5. Medical activities at nuclear disaster. Experience in the accident of Fukushima nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Arifumi

    2013-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake brought multiple disaster resulting nuclear accident at Fukushima. Existing medical system for emergency radiation exposure did not work well. Present medical system for the nuclear disaster is maintained temporary with supports by teams from regions other than Fukushima Pref. The radiation protection action must be both for the public and the medical persons. Medical activities for nuclear disaster are still in progress now. Medical system for radiation exposure should be maintained in future for works of decommissioning of reactors. Problems, however, may exist in economy and education of medical personnel. (K.Y.)

  6. Activities of Nuclear Regulatory Authority and safety of nuclear facilities in the Slovak Republic in 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA SR) in 1993 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Introduction; (2) Regulatory activities at nuclear power plants units in operation; (2.1) Nuclear power plant SEP-EBO V-1; (4) Selected operation events and safety assessment in NPP SEP-EBO V-1; (2.2) Safety assessment of NPP SEP-EBO V-2; (3) Results of regulatory activities at the decommissioning of NPP A-1; (4) Regulatory activities at units under construction SEP-EMO - NPP Mochovce; (5) Further regulatory activities. (5.1) Preparation of designated personnel; (5.2) Inspection and accountancy of nuclear material; (5.3) Security provisions; (5.4) Accounted items and double use items; (5.5) Problem of radioactive wastes; (6.1) International co-operation activities of NRA; (6.2) Emergency planning; (6.3) International activities for quality enhancement of national supervision; (7) Conclusion [sk

  7. Dynamic regulation of Drosophila nuclear receptor activity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanker, Laura; Necakov, Aleksandar S; Sampson, Heidi M; Ni, Ruoyu; Hu, Chun; Thummel, Carl S; Krause, Henry M

    2006-09-01

    Nuclear receptors are a large family of transcription factors that play major roles in development, metamorphosis, metabolism and disease. To determine how, where and when nuclear receptors are regulated by small chemical ligands and/or protein partners, we have used a 'ligand sensor' system to visualize spatial activity patterns for each of the 18 Drosophila nuclear receptors in live developing animals. Transgenic lines were established that express the ligand binding domain of each nuclear receptor fused to the DNA-binding domain of yeast GAL4. When combined with a GAL4-responsive reporter gene, the fusion proteins show tissue- and stage-specific patterns of activation. We show that these responses accurately reflect the presence of endogenous and exogenously added hormone, and that they can be modulated by nuclear receptor partner proteins. The amnioserosa, yolk, midgut and fat body, which play major roles in lipid storage, metabolism and developmental timing, were identified as frequent sites of nuclear receptor activity. We also see dynamic changes in activation that are indicative of sweeping changes in ligand and/or co-factor production. The screening of a small compound library using this system identified the angular psoralen angelicin and the insect growth regulator fenoxycarb as activators of the Ultraspiracle (USP) ligand-binding domain. These results demonstrate the utility of this system for the functional dissection of nuclear receptor pathways and for the development of new receptor agonists and antagonists that can be used to modulate metabolism and disease and to develop more effective means of insect control.

  8. Radiopharmaceutical activities administered for paediatric nuclear medicine procedures in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towson, J.E.; Smart, R.C.; Rossleigh, M.A.; Children's Hospital, Randwick, NSW

    2000-01-01

    A survey of radiopharmaceutical activities used at the eight hospital centres specialising in paediatric nuclear medicine in Australia was conducted in 1999-2000 by the Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine and the Australasian Radiation Protection Society. Data on the maximum and minimum administered activities was obtained for 43 paediatric imaging procedures. The maximum values were significantly less than the corresponding Reference Activities for adults determined in a previous study. Activities for individual patients are calculated using surface area scaling at five centres and body weight scaling at three centres. The median values of A max and A min are recommended as Paediatric Reference Activities. The effective dose to patients of various sizes for the Paediatric Reference Activities and both methods of scaling was calculated for each procedure. Copyright (2000) Australasian Radiation Protection Society Inc

  9. Proteasome-independent degradation of HIV-1 in naturally non-permissive human placental trophoblast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barré-Sinoussi Françoise

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human placenta-derived cell line BeWo has been demonstrated to be restrictive to cell-free HIV-1 infection. BeWo cells are however permissive to infection by VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1, which enters cells by a receptor-independent mechanism, and to infection by HIV-1 via a cell-to-cell route. Results Here we analysed viral entry in wild type BeWo (CCR5+, CXCR4+ and BeWo-CD4+ (CD4+, CCR5+, CXCR4+ cells. We report that HIV-1 internalisation is not restricted in either cell line. Levels of internalised p24 antigen between VSV-G HIV-1 pseudotypes and R5 or X4 virions were comparable. We next analysed the fate of internalised virions; X4 and R5 HIV-1 virions were less stable over time in BeWo cells than VSV-G HIV-1 pseudotypes. We then investigated the role of the proteasome in restricting cell-free HIV-1 infection in BeWo cells using proteasome inhibitors. We observed an increase in the levels of VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1 infection in proteasome-inhibitor treated cells, but the infection by R5-Env or X4-Env pseudotyped virions remains restricted. Conclusion Collectively these results suggest that cell-free HIV-1 infection encounters a surface block leading to a non-productive entry route, which either actively targets incoming virions for non-proteasomal degradation, and impedes their release into the cytoplasm, or causes the inactivation of mechanisms essential for viral replication.

  10. What do we really know about the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in muscle atrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagoe, R. T.; Goldberg, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    Studies of many different rodent models of muscle wasting have indicated that accelerated proteolysis via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is the principal cause of muscle atrophy induced by fasting, cancer cachexia, metabolic acidosis, denervation, disuse, diabetes, sepsis, burns, hyperthyroidism and excess glucocorticoids. However, our understanding about how muscle proteins are degraded, and how the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is activated in muscle under these conditions, is still very limited. The identities of the important ubiquitin-protein ligases in skeletal muscle, and the ways in which they recognize substrates are still largely unknown. Recent in-vitro studies have suggested that one set of ubquitination enzymes, E2(14K) and E3(alpha), which are responsible for the 'N-end rule' system of ubiquitination, plays an important role in muscle, especially in catabolic states. However, their functional significance in degrading different muscle proteins is still unclear. This review focuses on the many gaps in our understanding of the functioning of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in muscle atrophy, and highlights the strengths and limitations of the different experimental approaches used in such studies.

  11. IAEA safeguards and detection of undeclared nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harry, R.J.S.

    1996-03-01

    Verfication of State declarations is an essential feature of IAEA safeguards. The issue of completeness of the declaration of all nuclear material, nuclear activities and nuclear facilities arises only in full scope safeguards, like those pursuant to NPT. Concentrating on the accountability aspect of nuclear material, the NPT safeguards system has achieved a high level of objective and quantified performance. Some of the basic ideas of the drafters of INFCIRC/153 (corrected) have been stalled. Non-proliferation concerns demand also for a detection probability for undeclared nuclear activities. Following the example of the Chemical Weapon Convention (CWC), advanced detection techniques are proposed, which go beyond the classical nuclear material accountability approach. Recent proposals for additional measures to strengthen IAEA safeguards conform to rules of NPT and related safeguards. Some proposals have been agreed generally, others can only be implemented on a voluntary basis between the State and the IAEA. The implementation will require additional resources and support for the IAEA. Great care is required to maintain the existing capability of the IAEA for a technically sound, independent, objective, and internationally acceptable judgement with available resources, and at the same time to change emphasis on certain elements of the existing safeguards system. (orig.)

  12. IAEA safeguards and detection of undeclared nuclear activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harry, R.J.S.

    1996-03-01

    Verfication of State declarations is an essential feature of IAEA safeguards. The issue of completeness of the declaration of all nuclear material, nuclear activities and nuclear facilities arises only in full scope safeguards, like those pursuant to NPT. Concentrating on the accountability aspect of nuclear material, the NPT safeguards system has achieved a high level of objective and quantified performance. Some of the basic ideas of the drafters of INFCIRC/153 (corrected) have been stalled. Non-proliferation concerns demand also for a detection probability for undeclared nuclear activities. Following the example of the Chemical Weapon Convention (CWC), advanced detection techniques are proposed, which go beyond the classical nuclear material accountability approach. Recent proposals for additional measures to strengthen IAEA safeguards conform to rules of NPT and related safeguards. Some proposals have been agreed generally, others can only be implemented on a voluntary basis between the State and the IAEA. The implementation will require additional resources and support for the IAEA. Great care is required to maintain the existing capability of the IAEA for a technically sound, independent, objective, and internationally acceptable judgement with available resources, and at the same time to change emphasis on certain elements of the existing safeguards system. (orig.).

  13. Activities in the field of small nuclear power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranaev, Yu.D.; Dolgov, V.V.; Sergeev, Yu.A. [Physics and Power Eng. Inst., Obninsk (Russian Federation). State Res. Centre

    1997-10-01

    Considerable efforts have been undertaken for development, design, construction and operation of small nuclear power plants (SNPP) in Russia. Systematic work in this area was started in the mid-1950s. The driving force for this activity was the awareness that the use of nuclear fuel would practically solve the problem of fuel transportation. As far as the remote northern regions are concerned, this provides the key advantage of nuclear over conventional energy sources. The activity in the field of SNPP has included pre-design analytical feasibility studies and experimental research including large-scale experiments on critical assemblies, thermal and hydraulic test facilities, research and development work, construction and operation of pilot and demonstration SNPPs, and finally, construction and more than 20 years of operation of the commercial SNPP, namely Bilibino nuclear co-generation plant (NCGP) located in Chukotka autonomous district, which is one of the most remote regions in the far north-east of Russia. In recent years, studies have been carried out on the development of several new SNPP designs using advanced reactors of the new generation. Among these are the second stage of Bilibino NCGP, floating NCGP VOLNOLOM-3, designated for siting in the Arctic sea coast area, and a nuclear district heating plant for the town of Apatity, in the Murmansk region. In this paper, the background and current status of the SNPPs are given, and the problems as well as prospects of small nuclear reactors development and implementation are considered. (orig.) 20 refs.

  14. Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This document proposes a presentation and discussion of the main notions, issues, principles, or characteristics related to nuclear energy: radioactivity (presence in the environment, explanation, measurement, periods and activities, low doses, applications), fuel cycle (front end, mining and ore concentration, refining and conversion, fuel fabrication, in the reactor, back end with reprocessing and recycling, transport), the future of the thorium-based fuel cycle (motivations, benefits and drawbacks), nuclear reactors (principles of fission reactors, reactor types, PWR reactors, BWR, heavy-water reactor, high temperature reactor of HTR, future reactors), nuclear wastes (classification, packaging and storage, legal aspects, vitrification, choice of a deep storage option, quantities and costs, foreign practices), radioactive releases of nuclear installations (main released radio-elements, radioactive releases by nuclear reactors and by La Hague plant, gaseous and liquid effluents, impact of releases, regulation), the OSPAR Convention, management and safety of nuclear activities (from control to quality insurance, to quality management and to sustainable development), national safety bodies (mission, means, organisation and activities of ASN, IRSN, HCTISN), international bodies, nuclear and medicine (applications of radioactivity, medical imagery, radiotherapy, doses in nuclear medicine, implementation, the accident in Epinal), nuclear and R and D (past R and D programmes and expenses, main actors in France and present funding, main R and D axis, international cooperation)

  15. Selected working papers[Nuclear data activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-08-01

    The following working papers are included in this report: WP 2002-2, Dictionary Restructuring; WP-2002-4, Page numbers for REFERENCE (CP-C/285); WP-2002-5, Correlation quantities; WP 2002-8, Proposed data heading EN-CM-TOT (memo CP-A/121); WP 2002-9, Proposed high energy quantities (memo CP-A/123); WP 2002-11, Use of nuclide codes in SF 7 (memo CP-C/302); WP 2002-12, Redundant coding, new data heading PART-OUT; WP 2002-16, Zeros in error field (CP-C/306); WP 2002-17, Multiple appearance of the first Reference in EXFOR; WP 2002-18 + Add., EXFOR master file comparisons; WP 2002-19, Measures of Security at the NDS Open Area for EXFOR; WP 2002-20, New and revised entries received at NDS; WP 2002-21, EXFOR transmissions (NNDC); WP 2002-22, CINDA statistics (NNDC); WP 2002-24, CINDA batch exchange information (NDS); WP 2002-25, Journal coverage for CINDA; WP 2002-26, EXFOR-relational as multi-platform database (V. Zerkin); WP 2002-27, Completeness of EXFOR compil. as indexed by CINDA; WP 2002-28, Future NRDC Cooperation on CINDA: see Appendix 9; WP 2002-31, Development of Web Editor for Charged-Particle Nuclear Reaction Data (N. Otuka, H. Noto, A. Ohnishi, K. Kato). The following other papers, or the memos of which they consist, are available from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section: WP 2002-1, Actions of previous meetings (2002, 2001) see INDC(NDS)-427, pp.20-26, and INDC(NDS)-418, pp.26-31; WP 2002-3, Units for particle and product yields: see memos CP-C/294, 286; WP 2002-6, 4-momentum transfer and mom.distr.data: see memos CP-C/295 and CP-D/330; WP 2002-7, Several 'straightforward' new quantities: see memos CP-/C-291, 298 and CP-A/118; WP 2002-10, Quantities proposed by JCPRG (see memos DP-D/337, CP-E/004, 003); WP 2002-13, Clarifications on Product Yields and Thick Target Yields (see memo CP-D/332); WP 2002-14, Clarifications on Polarization quantities (see memo CP-D/320); WP 2002-15, New Legendre polynomial modifier proposed (see CP-C/305); WP 2002-23, see memo 4C-4

  16. Research and Production Corporation Radiy activities within Canadian nuclear market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhmach, I.; Siora, O.; Kharchenko, V.; Sklyar, V.; Andrashov, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents key results of RPC Radiy activities within Canadian nuclear market. RPC Radiy (located in Kirovograd, Ukraine) is a vendor which designs and produces digital safety I and C platform as well as turnkey applications, based on the platform, for NPPs (safety systems). The main feature of the Radiy Platform is the application of Field Programmable Gates Arrays (FPGA) as programmable components for logic control operations. Since 2009 RPC Radiy started to explore the possibility to conduct the expansion to Canadian nuclear market. The activities performed by RPC Radiy related to this direction are resulted in several joint projects with Canadian companies. (author)

  17. 4. Activity report of the Nuclear Energy Agency. 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Despite the many economic and related difficulties experienced throughout the OECD area during 1975, for nuclear power the year brought much promise, together with consolidation and some incouragement for the nuclear industry. 1975 saw a concentration of NEA's technical work on nuclear safety, radioactive waste management, and studies related to the nuclear fuel cycle. NEA's work on regulatory questions was also important. Besides NEA's substantial involvement in the preparation of Extension Agreements for the Halden and Dragon Reactor Projects and for the International Food Irradiation Project, as well as the Agreement to establish a research and development program at Eurochemic on high-activity waste treatment, the Agency has also been closely concerned with scientific and technological developments both within these Projects and in other areas

  18. Status of Nuclear Activities of Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begum, Zakia [Planning and Development, Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission - BAEC, Paramanu Bhaban, E 12/A, Agargoan, 01207 Shere Banglanagar, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2008-07-01

    Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) is the national authority for acquisition, development and application of Nuclear Science and Technology and thus is playing the pioneering role for the development of the country's nuclear research programmes and thus helping to achieve the cherished goal of self-reliance through national efforts and international co-operation. Being firmly committed to the peaceful uses of Atomic Energy, programmes have been undertaken in Physical Sciences, Biological Sciences, Engineering and Nuclear Power Sector by Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission and some of the results have been transferred from laboratories to hospitals, agriculture, industries and environment for practical applications. In spite of some major constrains, presently BAEC's activities have increased many folds and keeping in view of the overall power crisis of the country efforts have also been given to establish Nuclear Power Plant in the country. (author)

  19. Nuclear Data Activities in Support of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westfall, R.M.; McKnight, R.D.

    2005-01-01

    The DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) provides the technical infrastructure maintenance for those technologies applied in the evaluation and performance of safe fissionable-material operations in the DOE complex. These technologies include an Analytical Methods element for neutron transport as well as the development of sensitivity/uncertainty methods, the performance of Critical Experiments, evaluation and qualification of experiments as Benchmarks, and a comprehensive Nuclear Data program coordinated by the NCSP Nuclear Data Advisory Group (NDAG).The NDAG gathers and evaluates differential and integral nuclear data, identifies deficiencies, and recommends priorities on meeting DOE criticality safety needs to the NCSP Criticality Safety Support Group (CSSG). Then the NDAG identifies the required resources and unique capabilities for meeting these needs, not only for performing measurements but also for data evaluation with nuclear model codes as well as for data processing for criticality safety applications. The NDAG coordinates effort with the leadership of the National Nuclear Data Center, the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), and the Working Party on International Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee. The overall objective is to expedite the issuance of new data and methods to the DOE criticality safety user. This paper describes these activities in detail, with examples based upon special studies being performed in support of criticality safety for a variety of DOE operations

  20. Mechanisms promoting and inhibiting the process of proteasomal degradation of cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedrycz Agnieszka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Defects in the process of degradation of unneeded cellular proteins underlie many diseases. This article discusses one of the most important systems of removal of abnormal proteins. It describes the process of ubiquitination of proteins for proteasome degradation. It also describes the structure of the 26S and 20S proteasomes and the mechanism of ubiquitin-proteasome system. Proteasome proteolytic system is highly specialized and organized. Protease-proteasome 26S is particularly important for proper cell functioning. It recognizes and degrades marked proteins. Inhibition of proteasome pathway leads to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  1. Activity transport in nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, A.B.

    1975-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to give a basic understanding of the operational limitations caused by radiation fields in the present design of CANDU-PHW reactors. A simple model of activity transport is described, and the significance of various radioisotopes identified. The impact which radiation fields have at the Divisional, Station Manager and Operation levels, is outlined in the context of typical work situations. (author)

  2. Activities of nuclear training centre in Ljubljana for nuclear community in Slovenia and internationally

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stritar, Andrej

    1998-01-01

    It is the vision of the Nuclear Training Centre to be a respected source of knowledge about nuclear technologies in the country and internationally. Our main mission is training of NPP Krsko personnel. For that purpose the training centre was established ten years ago. In addition we are spreading our activities also to other users. We are organizing international training courses, mainly under the sponsorship of the International Atomic Energy Agency. We are also authorized to train professionals, dealing with ionizing radiation in medicine, industry and science. Growing importance is given to our public information activity in our information centre. (author)

  3. Topics on Education Activities in Japanese Nuclear Industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroiwa, Haruko

    2008-01-01

    The progression of an aging society with fewer children or a foreseeable decrease in population has caused the nuclear power plants under planning canceled or delayed. As a result, the number of students graduating with a nuclear degree began to decrease, while the development of the next generation light water reactor or of the practical use of the fast breeder reactor requires many skilled engineers. Atomic Energy Commission of Japan realized this potential impact of human resources. The Commission submitted the Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy including this issue to the government. The report says that without future talent development, Japan will lose its competitiveness against other industrialized countries, and that without replenishment after a large number of baby boomers retire, the shortage of specialists in the radiation field will occur. In conjunction with the Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry carried out the Nuclear Power Human Resources Development Program in 2007 fiscal year. The program focused on i) Support of educational activities, such as basic nuclear education and research, internship, and preparation of core curriculums and texts for nuclear power, ii) Implementation of research in the basic and infrastructure technology fields supporting the nuclear power (ex. structural strength, material strength, welding, erosion/corrosion, heat transfer, radiation safety). This program will continue till the end of 2009 fiscal year. Besides in order to promote nuclear power acceptance and to secure diversity, effective measures should be taken to support young, women, and foreign researchers and to promote their utilization. Mitsubishi accepts overseas students and researchers as an internship every year, and accelerates the safety architecture in the world. (author)

  4. Topics on Education Activities in Japanese Nuclear Industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroiwa, Haruko [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, LTD - MHI, 2-16-5 Kona Minato-K 108-8215 Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    The progression of an aging society with fewer children or a foreseeable decrease in population has caused the nuclear power plants under planning canceled or delayed. As a result, the number of students graduating with a nuclear degree began to decrease, while the development of the next generation light water reactor or of the practical use of the fast breeder reactor requires many skilled engineers. Atomic Energy Commission of Japan realized this potential impact of human resources. The Commission submitted the Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy including this issue to the government. The report says that without future talent development, Japan will lose its competitiveness against other industrialized countries, and that without replenishment after a large number of baby boomers retire, the shortage of specialists in the radiation field will occur. In conjunction with the Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry carried out the Nuclear Power Human Resources Development Program in 2007 fiscal year. The program focused on i) Support of educational activities, such as basic nuclear education and research, internship, and preparation of core curriculums and texts for nuclear power, ii) Implementation of research in the basic and infrastructure technology fields supporting the nuclear power (ex. structural strength, material strength, welding, erosion/corrosion, heat transfer, radiation safety). This program will continue till the end of 2009 fiscal year. Besides in order to promote nuclear power acceptance and to secure diversity, effective measures should be taken to support young, women, and foreign researchers and to promote their utilization. Mitsubishi accepts overseas students and researchers as an internship every year, and accelerates the safety architecture in the world. (author)

  5. Management of nuclear PRs activity with optimal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Teruaki

    1997-01-01

    A methodology is proposed to derive optimal conditions for the activity of nuclear public relations (PRs). With the use of data-bases available at present, expressions were derived which connect the budget allocated for the PRs activity with the intensity of stimulus for four types of activity of the advertisement in the press, the exclusive publicity, the pamphlet and the advertisement on television. Optimal conditions for the activity were determined by introducing a model describing a relation between the intensity of stimulus and the extent of the change of public's attitude to nuclear energy, namely the effect of PRs activity, and also by giving the optimal ratio of allocation of the budget among the four types of activity as a function of cost versus effectiveness of each type. Those optimal conditions, being for the ratio of allocation of the budget, the execution time and the intensity of each type of activity at that time, vary depending on the number of household in a target region, the target class of demography, the duration time of activity, and the amount of budget for the activity. It becomes clear from numerical calculation that the optimal conditions and the effect of activity show quite strong non-linearity with respect to the variation of those variables, and that the effect of PRs activity averaged over all public in the target region becomes to be maximum, in Japan, when the activity is executed with the optimal conditions determined for the target class of middle- and advanced-aged women. The management of nuclear PRs activity becomes possible by introducing such a method of fixation of optimal conditions for the activity as described here. (author)

  6. The radiological safety in the use of nuclear technique -activities developed by Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CNEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, T.; Pereira, E.G.; Hirayama, T.

    1991-01-01

    The activities developed by the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CDTN supporting the users of nuclear techniques are described. The methodology used and future plans for the group are shown. (E.G.)

  7. The significance of human factors in nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weil, L.; Berg, H.P.

    1999-01-01

    Human factors is an aspect increasingly investigated in the last few years in efforts and programmes for enhancing the operational safety of nuclear systems. Methodology has been elaborated for analysis and evaluation of human reliability, or development of instruments supporting the decisions to be taken by the operators at the man-control room interface of nuclear installations, as well as initial approaches to introduce organisational factors which may influence the man-machine function allocation, and thus are an element of the safety culture concept. The significance of human factors in nuclear activities, as well as activities at the national and international level for optimisation of the man-machine interface and the man-organisation interface are discussed. (orig./CB) [de

  8. JAEA's activities relating the Fukushima Nuclear Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    JAEA started the activities relating to the Fukushima nuclear plant accident immediately after the Great East Japan Earthquake. The Office of Fukushima Partnership Operations for Environmental Remediation was opened and the JAEA staff was stationed as the base of cooperation with other organizations. It is conducting environmental radiation monitoring, environmental radioactivity analyses, resident public consulting, and demonstration of decontamination technology. Experts of JAEA are providing technical advice and supports to the Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan and the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports. Furthermore, the water radiolysis leading to hydrogen gas evolution by Cs 137 adsorbed zeolite and the technique for radioactive waste process and its disposal of fuel debris are being studied. JAEA's Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center (NEAT) is acting as a center of these supporting activities of JAEA. (S. Ohno)

  9. 1988 activity report of the Nuclear Physics Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    The 1988 activity report of the Nuclear Physics Institute (France) is presented. The report covers the scientific activities from the 1st October 1987 to the 30th September 1988 and the technical developments form the 1st October 1986 to the 30th September 1988. The main research fields include works on exotic nuclei, hot nuclei characteristics, physics of strangeness, nuclear structure studies by means of nuclear reactions, high spin states and radiochemistry. The project of an electron accelerator, delivering a 4 GeV beam (in a first step), is one of the Institute's priorities. The research works carried out in the Experimental Research and Theoretical Physics Divisions as well as technological projects are included [fr

  10. Expression and proteasomal degradation of the major vault protein (MVP) in mammalian oocytes and zygotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutovsky, Peter; Manandhar, Gaurishankar; Laurincik, Jozef; Letko, Juraj; Caamaño, Jose Nestor; Day, Billy N; Lai, Liangxue; Prather, Randall S; Sharpe-Timms, Kathy L; Zimmer, Randall; Sutovsky, Miriam

    2005-03-01

    Major vault protein (MVP), also called lung resistance-related protein is a ribonucleoprotein comprising a major part (>70%) of the vault particle. The function of vault particle is not known, although it appears to be involved in multi-drug resistance and cellular signaling. Here we show that MVP is expressed in mammalian, porcine, and human ova and in the porcine preimplantation embryo. MVP was identified by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) peptide sequencing and Western blotting as a protein accumulating in porcine zygotes cultured in the presence of specific proteasomal inhibitor MG132. MVP also accumulated in poor-quality human oocytes donated by infertile couples and porcine embryos that failed to develop normally after in vitro fertilization or somatic cell nuclear transfer. Normal porcine oocytes and embryos at various stages of preimplantation development showed mostly cytoplasmic labeling, with increased accumulation of vault particles around large cytoplasmic lipid inclusions and membrane vesicles. Occasionally, MVP was associated with the nuclear envelope and nucleolus precursor bodies. Nucleotide sequences with a high degree of homology to human MVP gene sequence were identified in porcine oocyte and endometrial cell cDNA libraries. We interpret these data as the evidence for the expression and ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent turnover of MVP in the mammalian ovum. Similar to carcinoma cells, MVP could fulfill a cell-protecting function during early embryonic development.

  11. Proteasome Inhibition Suppresses Dengue Virus Egress in Antibody Dependent Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milly M Choy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV is a cause of significant global health burden, with an estimated 390 million infections occurring annually. However, no licensed vaccine or specific antiviral treatment for dengue is available. DENV interacts with host cell factors to complete its life cycle although this virus-host interplay remains to be fully elucidated. Many studies have identified the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP to be important for successful DENV production, but how the UPP contributes to DENV life cycle as host factors remains ill defined. We show here that proteasome inhibition decouples infectious virus production from viral RNA replication in antibody-dependent infection of THP-1 cells. Molecular and imaging analyses in β-lactone treated THP-1 cells suggest that proteasome function does not prevent virus assembly but rather DENV egress. Intriguingly, the licensed proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, is able to inhibit DENV titers at low nanomolar drug concentrations for different strains of all four serotypes of DENV in primary monocytes. Furthermore, bortezomib treatment of DENV-infected mice inhibited the spread of DENV in the spleen as well as the overall pathological changes. Our findings suggest that preventing DENV egress through proteasome inhibition could be a suitable therapeutic strategy against dengue.

  12. Overview of expert systems applications in Westinghouse Nuclear Fuel Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leech, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Expert system applications have been introduced in several nuclear fuel activities, including engineering and manufacturing. This technology has been successfully implemented on the manufacturing floors to provide on-line process control at zirconium tubing and fuel fabrication plants. This paper provides an overview of current applications at Westinghouse with respect to fuel fabrication, zirconium tubing, zirconium production, and core design

  13. Active and Passive Diagnostic Signatures of Special Nuclear Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, William L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Myers, Steven Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-26

    An overview will be given discussing signatures associated with special nuclear materials acquired using both active and passive diagnostic techniques. Examples of how technology advancements have helped improve diagnostic capabilities to meet the challenges of today’s applications will be discussed.

  14. Regulatory oversight of maintenance activities at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pape, M.

    1997-01-01

    Regulation of nuclear safety in the UK is based on monitoring of compliance with licence conditions. This paper discusses legislation aspects, license conditions, license requirements for maintenance and maintenance activities in the UK. It also addresses the regulator utility interaction, the regulatory inspection of maintenance and the trends in maintenance. (author)

  15. Activity report of the ENEA nuclear data project in 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, A.

    2006-03-01

    Descriptions are given of the nuclear data activities at the Bologna Research Centre of the Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment (ENEA), in the year 2005. This work has been done within the P9H6 project of the Division for Advanced Physics Technologies. (author)

  16. Identification of uranium signatures in swipe samples on verification of nuclear activities for nuclear safeguards purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pestana, Rafael Cardoso Baptistini

    2013-01-01

    The use of environmental sampling for safeguards purposes, has been applied by the International Atomic Energy Agency–IAEA since 1996 and are routinely used as a complementary measure to strengthen the traditional nuclear safeguards procedures. The aim is verify if the states signatory to the safeguards agreements are not diverging their peaceful nuclear activities for undeclared nuclear activities. This work describes a new protocol of collect and analysis of the swipe samples for identification of nuclear signatures that may be related to the nuclear activities developed in the inspected facility. This work was used as a case of study a real uranium conversion plant of the nuclear fuel cycle of IPEN. The strategy proposed uses different analytical techniques, such as alpha radiation meter, SEM-EDX and ICP-MS to identify signatures of uranium adhered to the swipe samples. In the swipe samples analysis, it was possible to identify particles of UO 2 F 2 and UF4 through the morphological comparison and semi-quantitative analyses performed by SEM-EDX technique. In this work, methods were used that as a result has the average isotopic composition of the sample, in which the enrichment ranged from 1.453 ± 0.023 to 18.24 % ± 0.15 % in the 235 U isotope. Through these externally collections, a non-intrusive sampling, it was possible to identify enriched material handling activities with enrichment of 1.453 % ± 0.023 % to 6.331 ± 0.055 % in the isotope 235 U, as well as the use of reprocessed material, through the identification of the 236 U isotope. The uncertainties obtained for the n( 235 U)/n( 238 U) ratio varied from 0.40% to 0.86 % for the internal swipe samples. (author)

  17. Procedures, activities and doses in nuclear medicine cycle in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Silvia Maria Velasques de

    2005-01-01

    With the aim of characterizing nuclear medicine procedures performed in Brazil, activities of radiopharmaceuticals used and effective doses to patients, data was collected from nuclear medicine institutions in three regions of the country, namely the Southeast, the Northeast and the South regions, representing public hospitals, university hospitals, private and philanthropic institutions with low, medium and high levels of consumption of radiopharmaceuticals. The three chosen regions are responsible for 92% of radiopharmaceutical consumption and imaging equipment in the country. Accordingly, it was requested of some participating institutions to fulfill manually from individual patients data, to record gender, age, weight, height and activities used, for each type of exam as well as the equipment used. In others, the researcher collected data personally. Per institution, nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures ranged from 700 to 13,000 per year, most of which are myocardial and bone imaging procedures, and imaging equipment ranged, from 1 to 8 machines, one or two head SPECT's (hybrid or not). 26.782 patients protocols were analysed, 24.371 adults and 2.411 children and teenagers. For adult patients, differences were observed in the amount of activities used in diagnostic procedures between public and private institutions, with lower average activities used in public institutions. Activities administered to children and their effective doses were difficult to evaluate due to the incompleteness of individual records. Appropriate individual patient records could be adopted without affecting hospitals routine and contributing for a comprehensive evaluation of the radiation protection of nuclear medicine patients. Data from 8.881 workers were analysed, 346 working at nuclear medicine institutions. For monitored workers and measurably exposed workers in nuclear medicine, the values 2.3 mSv and 5.4 mSv, respectively, for effective annual doses are greater than data

  18. IAEA activity related to safety of nuclear desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparini, M.

    2000-01-01

    The nuclear plants for desalination to be built in the future will have to meet the standards of safety required for the best nuclear power plants currently in operation or being designed. The current safety approach, based on the achievement of the fundamental safety functions and defence in depth strategy, has been shown to be a sound foundation for the safety and protection of public health, and gives the plant the capability of dealing with a large variety of sequences, even beyond the design basis. The Department of Nuclear Safety of the IAEA is involved in many activities, the most important of which are to establish safety standards, and to provide various safety services and technical knowledge in many Technical Co-operation assistance projects. The department is also involved in other safety areas, notably in the field of future reactors. The IAEA is carrying out a project on the safety of new generation reactors, including those used for desalination, with the objective of fostering an exchange of information on safety approaches, promoting harmonization among Member States and contributing towards the development and revision of safety standards and guidelines for nuclear power plant design. The safety, regulatory and environmental concerns in nuclear powered desalination are those related directly to nuclear power plants, with due consideration given to the coupling process. The protection of product water against radioactive contamination must be ensured. An effective infrastructure, including appropriate training, a legal framework and regulatory regime, is a prerequisite to considering use of nuclear power for desalination plants, also in those countries with limited industrial infrastructures and little experience in nuclear technology or safety. (author)

  19. Evaluation and development of advanced nuclear materials: IAEA activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inozemtsev, V.; Basak, U.; Killeen, J.; Dyck, G.; Zeman, A.; )

    2011-01-01

    Economical, environmental and non-proliferation issues associated with sustainable development of nuclear power bring about a need for optimization of fuel cycles and implementation of advanced nuclear systems. While a number of physical and design concepts are available for innovative reactors, the absence of reliable materials able to sustain new challenging irradiation conditions represents the real bottle-neck for practical implementation of these promising ideas. Materials performance and integrity are key issues for the safety and competitiveness of future nuclear installations being developed for sustainable nuclear energy production incorporating fuel recycling and waste transmutation systems. These systems will feature high thermal operational efficiency, improved utilization of resources (both fissile and fertile materials) and reduced production of nuclear waste. They will require development, qualification and deployment of new and advanced fuel and structural materials with improved mechanical and chemical properties combined with high radiation and corrosion resistance. The extensive, diverse, and expensive efforts toward the development of these materials can be more effectively organized within international collaborative programmes with wide participation of research, design and engineering communities. IAEA carries out a number of international projects supporting interested Member States with the use of available IAEA program implementation tools (Coordinated Research Projects, Technical Meetings, Expert Reviews, etc). The presentation summarizes the activities targeting material developments for advanced nuclear systems, with particular emphasis on fast reactors, which are the focal topics of IAEA Coordinated Research Projects 'Accelerator Simulation and Theoretical Modelling of Radiation Effects' (on-going), 'Benchmarking of Structural Materials Pre-Selected for Advanced Nuclear Reactors', 'Examination of advanced fast reactor fuel and core

  20. Nuclear safety activities in SR Slovenia in 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    Currently Yugoslavia has one 632 MWe nuclear power plant of PWR design, located at Krsko in the Socialist Republic of Slovenia. NPP Krsko, which is a two-loop plant, started power operation in 1981. In general, reactor safety activities in SR Slovenia are mostly related to upgrading the safety of our NPP Krsko and to develop capabilities to be used for the future units. This report presents safety related organizations in SR Slovenia and their activities performed in 1985. (author)

  1. Nuclear safety activities in SR Slovenia in 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-09-15

    Currently Yugoslavia has one 632 MWe nuclear power plant of PWR design, located at Krsko in the Socialist Republic of Slovenia. NPP Krsko, which is a two-loop plant, started power operation in 1981. In general, reactor safety activities in SR Slovenia are mostly related to upgrading the safety of our NPP Krsko and to develop capabilities to be used for the future units. This report presents safety related organizations in SR Slovenia and their activities performed in 1985. (author)

  2. Results of activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety in state supervision of nuclear safety of nuclear facilities and radiation protection in 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovar, P.

    2004-01-01

    The report summarises results of activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety (SUJB) in the supervision of nuclear safety and radiation protection in the Czech Republic. The first part of the report evaluates nuclear safety of nuclear installations and contains information concerning the results of supervision of radiation protection in 2003 in the Czech Republic. The second part of the report describes new responsibilities of the SUJB in the domain of nuclear, chemical, bacteriological (biological) and toxin weapons ban. (author)

  3. The Ubiquitin-Proteasome System and Microvascular Complications of Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Yadranji Aghdam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS is the mainstay of protein quality control which regulates cell cycle, differentiation and various signal transduction pathways in eukaryotic cells. The timely and selective degradation of surplus and/or aberrant proteins by the UPS is essential for normal cellular physiology. Any disturbance, delay or exaggeration in the process of selection, sequestration, labeling for degradation and degradation of target proteins by the UPS will compromise cellular and tissue homeostasis. High blood glucose or hyperglycemia caused by diabetes disrupts normal vascular function in several target organs including the retina and kidney resulting in the development of diabetic retinopathy (DR and diabetic nephropathy (DN. We and others have shown that hyperglycemia and oxidative stress modulate UPS activity in the retina and kidney. The majority of studies have focused on the kidney and provided insights into the contribution of dysregulated UPS to microvascular damage in DN. The eye is a unique organ in which a semi-fluid medium, the vitreous humor, separates the neural retina and its anastomosed blood vessels from the semi-solid lens tissue. The complexity of the cellular and molecular components of the eye may require a normal functioning and well tuned UPS for healthy vision. Altered UPS activity may contribute to the development of retinal microvascular complications of diabetes. A better understanding of the molecular nature of the ocular UPS function under normal and diabetic conditions is essential for development of novel strategies targeting its activity. This review will discuss the association of retinal vascular cell UPS activity with microvascular damage in DR with emphasis on alterations of the PA28 subunits of the UPS.

  4. Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (a Brazilian regional center for nuclear sciences) - activities report - 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-12-01

    The annual activities report of 1999 of nuclear sciences regional center - Brazilian organization - introduces the next main topics: institutional relations; sectorial actions - logistic support and training, laboratory of radiation protection and dosimetry, laboratory of metrology, laboratory of chemical characterization; technical and scientific events; and financial resources and perspectives for 2000

  5. MSU SINP CDFE nuclear data activities in the nuclear reaction data centres network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boboshin, I.N.; Varlamov, V.V.; Komarov, S.Yu.; Peskov, N.N.; Semin, S.B.; Stepanov, M.E.; Chesnokov, V.V.

    2002-01-01

    This paper is the progress report of the Centre for Photonuclear Experiments Data, Moscow. It is a short review of the works carried out by the CDFE concerning the IAEA nuclear reaction data centers network activities from May 2001 until May 2002. and the description of the main results obtained. (a.n.)

  6. Radiopharmaceutical activities administered for paediatric nuclear medicine procedures in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towson, J.E.; Smart, R.C.; Rossleigh, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    A survey of radiopharmaceutical activities used at the eight hospital centres specialising in paediatric nuclear medicine in Australia was conducted in 1999-2000 by the Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine and the Australasian Radiation Protection Society. Data on the maximum and minimum administered activities (A max and A min ) as obtained for 43 paediatric imaging procedures are presented. The results are also available on the ANZSNM and ARPS websites at: http://www.anzsnm.org.au and http://www.arps.org.au. The A max values were significantly less than the corresponding Reference Activities for adults determined in a previous study. Activities for individual patients are calculated using surface area scaling at five centres and body weight scaling at three centres. The median values of A max and A min are recommended as Paediatric Reference Activities. The effective dose to patients of various sizes for the Paediatric Reference Activities and both methods of scaling was calculated for each procedure. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  7. EPRI activities in support of new nuclear plant deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulford, T.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the challenges to new plant deployment in the United States and discusses the role of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in efforts to address these challenges. These technical challenges include completing remaining design work, licensing review, and standardization required to ensure that new LWRs are a competitive near-term option. The costs for construction, licensing, and operation of new nuclear plants are uncertain and this uncertainty, along with concerns about construction schedule form a financial challenge to investment. Because the new process for licensing nuclear power plants in the United States has not been fully demonstrated, regulatory concerns also serve as a challenge to near-term commitments to build new nuclear power plants. EPRI is working in concert with utilities and vendors to upgrade certified LWR designs and obtain certification of new LWR designs. Specific technical areas being addressed by EPRI projects include updating the Utility Requirements Document (URD), seismic resolution, radiation protection, radioactive waste management, the development of utility planning tools, and staff optimization. EPRI's key on-going project, the New Plant Deployment Program Model (NPDPM), is designed to help prospective and actual new nuclear plant managers and staff to identify schedule and resource requirements from the point of the decision to build a plant through to the start of commercial operation. This model will describe and organize key activities and assess schedule, activity duration, logic relationships and critical path analysis. The new plant licensing and deployment process is a five to ten year activity representing a significant financial investment that requires coordination with federal and state regulators, designers, architect engineers, and numerous other contributing organizations. Planning is crucial to schedule and budget control. EPRI has also supported projects to quantify the environmental

  8. Nuclear data activity at Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Savar, Dhaka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhuiyan, S.I.; Molla, N.I.

    1995-01-01

    The nuclear data activity at AERE, Savar is briefly presented in this paper. Major thrust is on the customization of cross section libraries for general purpose reactor and shielding calculations. The processing codes that are available are NJOY91.91, some AMPX-Modules and the modules in SCALE-PC. Recent measurements on cross section data over the energy range 13-15 MeV at the Institute of Nuclear science and Technology have been reviewed. Measurements and calculations are based on the determination of excitation functions of neutron induced reactions on the elements and isotopes of FRT-relevant structural materials. (author)

  9. Practical applications of activation analysis and other nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, W.S.

    1982-01-01

    Neeutron activation analysis (NAA) is a versatile, sensitive multielement, usually nondestructive analytical technique used to determine elemental concentrations in a variety of materials. Samples are irradiated with neutrons in a nuclear reactor, removed, and for the nondestructive technique, the induced radioactivity measured. This measurement of γ rays emitted from specific radionuclides makes possible the quantitative determination of elements present. The method is described, advantages and disadvantages listed and a number of examples of its use given. Two other nuclear methods, particle induced x-ray emission and synchrotron produced x-ray fluorescence are also briefly discussed

  10. Potential role of proteasome on c-jun related signaling in hypercholesterolemia induced atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdi Sozen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis and its complications are major causes of death all over the world. One of the major risks of atherosclerosis is hypercholesterolemia. During atherosclerosis, oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL regulates CD36-mediated activation of c-jun amino terminal kinase-1 (JNK1 and modulates matrix metalloproteinase (MMP induction which stimulates inflammation with an invasion of monocytes. Additionally, inhibition of proteasome leads to an accumulation of c-jun and phosphorylated c-jun and activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1 related increase of MMP expression. We have previously reported a significant increase in cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36 mRNA levels in hypercholesterolemic rabbits and shown that vitamin E treatment prevented the cholesterol induced increase in CD36 mRNA expression. In the present study, our aim is to identify the signaling molecules/transcription factors involved in the progression of atherosclerosis following CD36 activation in an in vivo model of hypercholesterolemic (induced by 2% cholesterol containing diet rabbits. In this direction, proteasomal activities by fluorometry and c-jun, phospo c-jun, JNK1, MMP-9 expressions by quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting were tested in aortic tissues. The effects of vitamin E on these changes were also investigated in this model. As a result, c-jun was phosphorylated following decreased proteasomal degradation in hypercholesterolemic group. MMP-9 expression was also increased in cholesterol group rabbits contributing to the development of atherosclerosis. In addition, vitamin E showed its effect by decreasing MMP-9 levels and phosphorylation of c-jun.

  11. Heat-shock stress activates a novel nuclear import pathway mediated by Hikeshi

    OpenAIRE

    Imamoto, Naoko; Kose, Shingo

    2012-01-01

    Cellular stresses significantly affect nuclear transport systems. Nuclear transport pathways mediated by importin β-family members, which are active under normal conditions, are downregulated. During thermal stress, a nuclear import pathway mediated by a novel carrier, which we named Hikeshi, becomes active. Hikeshi is not a member of the importin β family and mediates the nuclear import of Hsp70s. Unlike importin β family-mediated nuclear transport, the Hikeshi-mediated nuclear import of Hsp...

  12. Regulatory Activities on Civil Nuclear Safety Equipment in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaoshang, Lu; Choi, Kwang Sik

    2011-01-01

    It is stipulated in IAEA Fundamental Safety Principles (SF1) that the fundamental safety objective is to protect people and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. The fundamental safety objective applies for all facilities and activities and for all stages over the lifetime of a facility or radiation source, including planning, sitting, design, manufacturing, construction, commissioning and operation, as well as decommissioning and closure. So, according to the requirement, the related activities such as design, manufacturing, installation and non-destructive test that conducted on civil nuclear equipment should be well controlled by the vendors, the owner of the nuclear power plants and the regulatory body. To insure the quality of those equipment, Chinese government had taken a series of measures to regulate the related activities on them

  13. Radiation shielding activities at the OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, Enrico; Vaz, Pedro

    2000-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has devoted considerable effort over the years to radiation shielding issues. The issues are addressed through international working groups. These activities are carried out in close co-ordination and co-operation with the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC). The areas of work include: basic nuclear data activities in support of radiation shielding, computer codes, shipping cask shielding applications, reactor pressure vessel dosimetry, shielding experiments database. The method of work includes organising international code comparison exercises and benchmark studies. Training courses on radiation shielding computer codes are organised regularly including hands-on experience in modelling skills. The scope of the activity covers mainly reactor shields and spent fuel transportation packages, but also fusion neutronics and in particular shielding of accelerators and irradiation facilities. (author)

  14. Nuclear design of a very-low-activation fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, E.T.; Hopkins, G.R.

    1983-06-01

    An investigation was conducted to study the nuclear design aspects of using very-low-activation materials, such as SiC, MgO, and aluminum for fusion-reactor first wall, blanket, and shield applications. In addition to the advantage of very-low radioactive inventory, it was found that the very-low-activation fusion reactor can also offer an adequate tritium-breeding ratio and substantial amount of blanket nuclear heating as a conventional-material-structured reactor does. The most-stringent design constraint found in a very-low-activation fusion reactor is the limited space available in the inboard region of a tokamak concept for shielding to protect the superconducting toroidal field coil. A reference design was developed which mitigates the constraint by adopting a removable tungsten shield design that retains the inboard dimensions and gives the same shield performance as the reference STARFIRE tokamak reactor design

  15. Active neutron technique for detecting attempted special nuclear material diversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.W.; Rice, L.G. III.

    1979-01-01

    The identification of special nuclear material (SNM) diversion is necessary if SNM inventory control is to be maintained at nuclear facilities. (Special nuclear materials are defined for this purpose as either 235 U of 239 Pu.) Direct SNM identification by the detection of natural decay or fission radiation is inadequate if the SNM is concealed by appropriate shielding. The active neutron interrogation technique described combines direct SNM identification by delayed fission neutron (DFN) detection with implied SNM detection by the identification of materials capable of shielding SNM from direct detection. This technique is being developed for application in an unattended material/equipment portal through which items such as electronic instruments, packages, tool boxes, etc., will pass. The volume of this portal will be 41-cm wide, 53-cm high and 76-cm deep. The objective of this technique is to identify an attempted diversion of at least 20 grams of SNM with a measurement time of 30 seconds

  16. Applicability of compton imaging in nuclear decommissioning activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljubenov, V.Lj.; Marinkovic, P.M.

    2002-01-01

    During the decommissioning of nuclear facilities significant part of the activities is related to the radiological characterization, waste classification and management. For these purposes a relatively new imaging technique, based on information from the gamma radiation that undergoes Compton scattering, is applicable. Compton imaging systems have a number of advantages for nuclear waste characterization, such as identifying hot spots in mixed waste in order to reduce the volume of high-level waste requiring extensive treatment or long-term storage, imaging large contaminated areas and objects etc. Compton imaging also has potential applications for monitoring of production, transport and storage of nuclear materials and components. This paper discusses some system design requirements and performance specifications for these applications. The advantages of Compton imaging are compared to competing imaging techniques. (author)

  17. Argentine activities on fuels for nuclear generation stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olezza, R.L.; Valesi, J.

    1995-01-01

    In the last six years, significant changes have taken place in the nuclear fuel activity field in Argentina, therefore all the areas of the nuclear fuel cycle have been strongly influenced by these. The strategies carried out by CNEA to give an initial answer to the modifications of the domestic and international context of the nuclear fuel cycle were described in the previous Conference. Three years later, it is possible to appreciate the first results of the application of those strategies, and also that the frame has continued not only evolving and requiring new answers, but adapting and accentuating some strategies as well. A brief review of those results is presented here, together with a summary of the condition of the current situation and of the proposals to face it. (author)

  18. System to detect nuclear materials by active neutron method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koroev, M.; Korolev, Yu.; Lopatin, Yu.; Filonov, V.

    1999-01-01

    The report presents the results of the development of the system to detect nuclear materials by active neutron method measuring delayed neutrons. As the neutron source the neutron generator was used. The neutron generator was controlled by the system. The detectors were developed on the base of the helium-3 counters. Each detector consist of 6 counters. Using a number of such detectors it is possible to verify materials stored in different geometry. There is an spectrometric scintillator detector in the system which gives an