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Sample records for prostatectomy surgical technique

  1. Radical prostatectomy: evolution of surgical technique from the laparoscopic point of view

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    Xavier Cathelineau

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To review the literature and present a current picture of the evolution in radical prostatectomy from the laparoscopic point of view. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted an extensive Medline literature search. Articles obtained regarding laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP and our experience at Institut Montsouris were used for reassessing anatomical and technical issues in radical prostatectomy. RESULTS: LRP nuances were reassessed by surgical teams in order to verify possible weaknesses in their performance. Our basic approach was to carefully study the anatomy and pioneer open surgery descriptions in order to standardized and master a technique. The learning curve is presented in terms of an objective evaluation of outcomes for cancer control and functional results. In terms of technique-outcomes, there are several key elements in radical prostatectomy, such as dorsal vein control-apex exposure and nerve sparing with particular implications in oncological and functional results. Major variations among the surgical teams' performance and follow-up prevented objective comparisons in radical prostatectomy. The remarkable evolution of LRP needs to be supported by comprehensive results. CONCLUSIONS: Radical prostatectomy is a complex surgical operation with difficult objectives. Surgical technique should be standardized in order to allow an adequate and reliable performance in all settings, keeping in mind that cancer control remains the primary objective. Reassessing anatomy and a return to basics in surgical technique is the means to improve outcomes and overcome the difficult task of the learning curve, especially in minimally access urological surgery.

  2. Impact of robotic technique and surgical volume on the cost of radical prostatectomy.

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    Hyams, Elias S; Mullins, Jeffrey K; Pierorazio, Phillip M; Partin, Alan W; Allaf, Mohamad E; Matlaga, Brian R

    2013-03-01

    Our present understanding of the effect of robotic surgery and surgical volume on the cost of radical prostatectomy (RP) is limited. Given the increasing pressures placed on healthcare resource utilization, such determinations of healthcare value are becoming increasingly important. Therefore, we performed a study to define the effect of robotic technology and surgical volume on the cost of RP. The state of Maryland mandates that all acute-care hospitals report encounter-level and hospital discharge data to the Health Service Cost Review Commission (HSCRC). The HSCRC was queried for men undergoing RP between 2008 and 2011 (the period during which robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy [RALRP] was coded separately). High-volume hospitals were defined as >60 cases per year, and high-volume surgeons were defined as >40 cases per year. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to evaluate whether robotic technique and high surgical volume impacted the cost of RP. There were 1499 patients who underwent RALRP and 2565 who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) during the study period. The total cost for RALRP was higher than for RRP ($14,000 vs 10,100; Probotic surgery has come to dominate the healthcare marketplace, strategies to increase the role of high-volume providers may be needed to improve the cost-effectiveness of prostate cancer surgical therapy.

  3. Systematic Review of Studies Reporting Positive Surgical Margins After Bladder Neck Sparing Radical Prostatectomy.

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    Bellangino, Mariangela; Verrill, Clare; Leslie, Tom; Bell, Richard W; Hamdy, Freddie C; Lamb, Alastair D

    2017-11-07

    Bladder neck preservation (BNP) during radical prostatectomy (RP) has been proposed as a method to improve early recovery of urinary continence after radical prostatectomy. However, there is concern over a possible increase in the risk of positive surgical margins and prostate cancer recurrence rate. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis reported improved early recovery and overall long-term urinary continence without compromising oncologic control. The aim of our study was to perform a critical review of the literature to assess the impact on bladder neck and base margins after bladder neck sparing radical prostatectomy. We carried out a systematic review of the literature using Pubmed, Scopus and Cochrane library databases in May 2017 using medical subject headings and free-text protocol according to PRISMA guidelines. We used the following search terms: bladder neck preservation, prostate cancer, radical prostatectomy and surgical margins. Studies focusing on positive surgical margins (PSM) in bladder neck sparing RP pertinent to the objective of this review were included. Overall, we found 15 relevant studies reporting overall and site-specific positive surgical margins rate after bladder neck sparing radical prostatectomy. This included two RCTs, seven prospective comparative studies, two retrospective comparative studies and four case series. All studies were published between 1993 and 2015 with sample sizes ranging between 50 and 1067. Surgical approaches included open, laparoscopic and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. The overall and base-specific PSM rates ranged between 7-36% and 0-16.3%, respectively. Mean base PSM was 4.9% in those patients where bladder neck sparing was performed, but only 1.85% in those without sparing. Bladder neck preservation during radical prostatectomy may increase base-positive margins. Further studies are needed to better investigate the impact of this technique on oncological outcomes. A future paradigm could

  4. Karolinska prostatectomy: a robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy technique.

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    Nilsson, Andreas E; Carlsson, Stefan; Laven, Brett A; Wiklund, N Peter

    2006-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed an increasing trend towards minimally invasive management of prostate cancer, including laparoscopic and, more recently, robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy. Several different laparoscopic approaches have been continuously developed during the last 5 years and it is still unclear which technique yields the best outcome. We present our current technique of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. The technique described has evolved during the course of >400 robotic prostatectomies performed by the robotic team since the robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy program was introduced at Karolinska University Hospital in January 2002. Our procedure comprises several modifications of previously reported ones, and we utilize fewer robotic instruments to reduce costs. An extended posterior dissection is performed to aid in the bladder neck-sparing dissection. In nerve-sparing procedures the vesicles are divided to avoid damage to the erectile nerves. In order to preserve the apical anatomy the dorsal venous complex is incised sharply and is first over-sewn after the apical dissection is completed. Our technique enables a more fluent dissection than previously described robotic techniques. Minimizing changes of instruments and the camera not only cuts costs but also reduces inefficient operating maneuvers, such as switching between 30 degrees and 0 degrees lenses during the procedure. We present a technique which in our hands has achieved excellent functional and oncological results.

  5. Surgical complications of radical retropubic prostatectomy: A single institutional experience of seven years

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    Neeraj K Goyal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the surgical complications of open retropubic radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods: Fifty-nine cases of localized prostate cancer underwent retropubic radical prostatectomy in our department in the last seven years. Standard technique of open retropubic radical prostatectomy as described by Walsh was used. During follow-up cancer control and quality of life indices (potency and urinary continence were noted. Result: Postoperative recovery of all patients except one was excellent. This patient required cardio-respiratory support and nine units of blood transfusion. Forty-nine out of 52 patients were continent, two had stress incontinence and one was totally incontinent at one year. Bladder neck contracture was present in eight out of 52 patients at one year. Forty-five patients were impotent at one year with or without oral tablet sildenafil. Cancer control was present in 45 out of 52 cases. Seven cases had biochemical failure at one year. Conclusion: Though retropubic radical prostatectomy is the standard treatment for early prostate cancer it is not without complications. It has a steep learning curve. More number of cases and refinement in technique is required to achieve world-class results.

  6. Surgical Management of Post-Prostatectomy Incontinence

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    Arthi Satyanarayan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Post-prostatectomy incontinence (PPI is a common and significant issue that can affect the quality of life in men who are undergoing treatment for prostate cancer. While some patients opt for conservative management of their incontinence, many elect to undergo surgical treatment as a result of the significant impact to quality of life. The most commonly employed surgical techniques to address PPI are placement of a male sling or artificial urinary sphincter (AUS. Currently, the AUS continues to serve as the gold standard for management, with robust data concerning longitudinal outcomes available. However, in recent years, the various methods to place the male sling have emerged as viable, less complex alternatives that avoid the need for pump manipulation. In the present review, we discuss these main surgical treatment modalities for PPI, and focus on the selection criteria that may influence appropriate operative stratification of PPI patients. Indeed, an individualised, comprehensive assessment of baseline urinary function, age, radiation, prior surgeries, functional status, and other comorbidities must be considered in the context of shared decision-making between the treatment provider and the patient in determining the optimal approach to managing PPI.

  7. Preliminary experience with extraperitoneal endoscopic radical prostatectomy through duplication of the open technique.

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    Tobias-Machado, M; Lasmar, Marco T C; Medina, Jimmy J A; Forseto, Pedro H; Juliano, Roberto V; Wroclawski, Eric R

    2005-01-01

    To describe surgical and functional results with extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy with duplication of the open technique, from the experience obtained in the treatment of 28 initial cases. In a 36-month period, we prospectively analyzed 28 patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer undergoing extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Mean surgical time was 280 min, with mean blood loss of 320 mL. As intraoperative complications, there were 2 rectal lesions repaired with laparoscopic suture in 2 planes. There was no conversion to open surgery. Median hospital stay was 3 days, with return to oral diet in the first post-operative day in patients. As post-operative complications, there were 3 cases of extraperitoneal urinary fistula. Two of these cases were resolved by maintaining a Foley catheter for 21 days, and the other one by late endoscopic reintervention for repositioning the catheter. Five out of 18 previously potent patients evolved with erectile dysfunction. The diagnosis of prostate cancer was confirmed in all patients, with focal positive margin occurring in 3 cases. During a mean follow-up of 18 months, 2 patients presented increased PSA, with no clinical evidence of disease. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy is a laborious and difficult procedure, with a long learning curve. Extraperitoneal access is feasible, and it is possible to practically duplicate the principles of open surgery. The present technique can possibly offer advantages in terms of decreased blood loss, preservation of erectile function and prevention of positive margins.

  8. Erectile dysfunction in robotic radical prostatectomy: Outcomes and management

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    Patrick Whelan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP has emerged as the most common treatment for localized prostate cancer. With improved surgical precision, RALP has produced hope of improved potency rates, especially with the advent of nerve-sparing and other modified techniques. However, erectile dysfunction (ED remains a significant problem for many men regardless of surgical technique. To identify the functional outcomes of robotic versus open and laparoscopic techniques, new robotic surgical techniques and current treatment options of ED following RALP. A Medline search was performed in March 2014 to identify studies comparing RALP with open retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, modified RALP techniques and treatment options and management for ED following radical prostatectomy. RALP demonstrates adequate potency rates without compromising oncologic benefit, with observed benefit for potency rates compared with RRP. Additionally, specific surgical technical modifications appear to provide benefit over traditional RALP. Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (PDE5I demonstrate benefit for ED treatment compared with placebo. However, long-term benefit is often lost after use. Other therapies have been less extensively studied. Additionally, correct patient identification is important for greatest clinical benefit. RALP appears to provide beneficial potency rates compared with RRP; however, these effects are most pronounced at high-volume centers with experienced surgeons. No optimal rehabilitation program with PDE5Is has been identified based on current data. Additionally, vacuum erection devices, intracavernosal injections and other techniques have not been well validated for post RALP ED treatment.

  9. Preliminary experience with extraperitoneal endoscopic radical prostatectomy through duplication of the open technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tobias-Machado

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe surgical and functional results with extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy with duplication of the open technique, from the experience obtained in the treatment of 28 initial cases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a 36-month period, we prospectively analyzed 28 patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer undergoing extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. RESULTS: Mean surgical time was 280 min, with mean blood loss of 320 mL. As intraoperative complications, there were 2 rectal lesions repaired with laparoscopic suture in 2 planes. There was no conversion to open surgery. Median hospital stay was 3 days, with return to oral diet in the first post-operative day in patients. As post-operative complications, there were 3 cases of extraperitoneal urinary fistula. Two of these cases were resolved by maintaining a Foley catheter for 21 days, and the other one by late endoscopic reintervention for repositioning the catheter. Five out of 18 previously potent patients evolved with erectile dysfunction. The diagnosis of prostate cancer was confirmed in all patients, with focal positive margin occurring in 3 cases. During a mean follow-up of 18 months, 2 patients presented increased PSA, with no clinical evidence of disease. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy is a laborious and difficult procedure, with a long learning curve. Extraperitoneal access is feasible, and it is possible to practically duplicate the principles of open surgery. The present technique can possibly offer advantages in terms of decreased blood loss, preservation of erectile function and prevention of positive margins.

  10. Effects of Pathologic Stage on the Learning Curve for Radical Prostatectomy: Evidence That Recurrence in Organ-Confined Cancer Is Largely Related to Inadequate Surgical Technique

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    Vickers, Andrew J.; Bianco, Fernando J.; Gonen, Mithat; Cronin, Angel M.; Eastham, James A.; Schrag, Deborah; Klein, Eric A.; Reuther, Alwyn M.; Kattan, Michael W.; Pontes, J. Edson; Scardino, Peter T.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives We previously demonstrated that there is a learning curve for open radical prostatectomy. We sought to determine whether the effects of the learning curve are modified by pathologic stage. Methods The study included 7765 eligible prostate cancer patients treated with open radical prostatectomy by one of 72 surgeons. Surgeon experience was coded as the total number of radical prostatectomies conducted by the surgeon prior to a patient’s surgery. Multivariable regression models of survival time were used to evaluate the association between surgeon experience and biochemical recurrence, with adjustment for PSA, stage, and grade. Analyses were conducted separately for patients with organ-confined and locally advanced disease. Results Five-year recurrence-free probability for patients with organ-confined disease approached 100% for the most experienced surgeons. Conversely, the learning curve for patients with locally advanced disease reached a plateau at approximately 70%, suggesting that about a third of these patients cannot be cured by surgery alone. Conclusions Excellent rates of cancer control for patients with organ-confined disease treated by the most experienced surgeons suggest that the primary reason such patients recur is inadequate surgical technique. PMID:18207316

  11. Incontinence and Erectile Dysfunction Following Radical Prostatectomy: A Review

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    Gerasimos Alivizatos

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Radical prostatectomy remains the treatment of choice for localized prostate cancer in age-appropriate and health-appropriate men. Although cancer control is the most important aspect of a radical prostatectomy, minimization of postoperative morbidity, especially urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction, is becoming a greater concern. We reviewed recent data available on Medline regarding the incidence, pathophysiology, evaluation, and treatment of incontinence and sexual dysfunction after radical prostatectomy. Health-related quality of life issues have been specifically addressed. Although low incidences of incontinence and erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy have been reported in the hands of experienced surgeons, the literature review revealed a great variety, with incontinence rates ranging from 0.3–65.6% and potency rates ranging from 11–87%. Several factors contribute to this wide difference, the most important being the application of a meticulous surgical technique. General and cancer-specific health-related quality of life is not being affected after radical prostatectomy. The incidence of incontinence and erectile dysfunction is higher after radical prostatectomy when compared to the incidence observed when other therapies for localized prostate cancer are applied. However, the majority of the patients undergoing radical prostatectomy would vote for the operation again. Today, avoidance of major complications after radical prostatectomy depends mostly on a high-quality surgical technique. When incontinence or erectile dysfunction persists after radical prostatectomy, the majority of the treated patients can be managed effectively by various methods.

  12. Risk of incisional hernia after minimally invasive and open radical prostatectomy.

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    Carlsson, Sigrid V; Ehdaie, Behfar; Atoria, Coral L; Elkin, Elena B; Eastham, James A

    2013-11-01

    The number of radical prostatectomies has increased. Many urologists have shifted from the open surgical approach to minimally invasive techniques. It is not clear whether the risk of post-prostatectomy incisional hernia varies by surgical approach. In the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data set we identified men 66 years old or older who were treated with minimally invasive or open radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer diagnosed from 2003 to 2007. The main study outcome was incisional hernia repair, as identified in Medicare claims after prostatectomy. We also examined the frequency of umbilical, inguinal and other hernia repairs. We identified 3,199 and 6,795 patients who underwent minimally invasive and open radical prostatectomy, respectively. The frequency of incisional hernia repair was 5.3% at a median 3.1-year followup in the minimally invasive group and 1.9% at a 4.4-year median followup in the open group, corresponding to an incidence rate of 16.1 and 4.5/1,000 person-years, respectively. Compared to the open technique, the minimally invasive procedure was associated with more than a threefold increased risk of incisional hernia repair when controlling for patient and disease characteristics (adjusted HR 3.39, 95% CI 2.63-4.38, p<0.0001). Minimally invasive radical prostatectomy was associated with an attenuated but increased risk of any hernia repair compared with open radical prostatectomy (adjusted HR 1.48, 95% CI 1.29-1.70, p<0.0001). Minimally invasive radical prostatectomy was associated with a significantly increased risk of incisional hernia compared with open radical prostatectomy. This is a potentially remediable complication of prostate cancer surgery that warrants increased vigilance with respect to surgical technique. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Critical appraisal of outcomes following open radical prostatectomy.

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    Galvin, David J; Eastham, James A

    2009-05-01

    Radical prostatectomy has evolved enormously over the last 25 years. Improvements include the use of smaller incisions, reduced blood loss, shorter hospital stays, and surgical refinement to improve the recovery of continence and potency. In addition, new technologies and minimally invasive techniques with the potential to further improve patient outcomes have been introduced. This article focuses on outcomes with open radical prostatectomy and is not meant to compare open radical prostatectomy and minimally invasive approaches. Despite a lack of randomized controlled trials, strong observational cohort studies demonstrate lower rates of positive surgical margins, high 10-year and 15-year biochemical recurrence-free rates, excellent prostate cancer-specific mortality rates, and improved recovery of urinary incontinence and erectile function after open radical prostatectomy. We review publications from the past 24 months regarding oncologic outcome, continence, and erectile function, as well as some earlier manuscripts that emphasize key aspects of open radical prostatectomy. Today open radical prostatectomy is a less-invasive procedure with low morbidity providing excellent control of clinically localized prostate cancer. Although open radical prostatectomy now accounts for a minority of radical prostatectomies in the United States, the concepts that have improved oncologic and quality-of-life outcomes are equally applicable to minimally invasive procedures.

  14. Trends in radical prostatectomy.

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    Eastham, James; Tokuda, Yuji; Scardino, Peter

    2009-02-01

    The surgical treatment of prostate cancer ideally removes the entire cancer, avoids excessive blood loss or serious perioperative complications, and results in complete recovery of continence and potency. To achieve this, the surgeon must excise sufficient periprostatic tissue to cure the cancer while preserving the cavernosal nerves required for erectile function and the neuromusculature required for normal urinary and bowel function. Here we will examine recent trends in radical prostatectomy, focusing on surgical technique.

  15. Blunt apical dissection during anatomic radical retropubic prostatectomy

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    Yacoub Saif

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meticulous apical dissection during a radical prostatectomy is imperative to achieve desirable pathologic and quality of life outcomes. Findings We describe a novel technique using careful blunt dissection to better delineate the apex of the prostate, providing a simple means to potentially lessen positive surgical margins at the apex and promote better continence and erectile function in men undergoing an anatomic radical prostatectomy. Median operative time and blood loss were 190 minutes and 675 mL, respectively. Only 10 percent of the patients with positive surgical margins were found to have apical positive surgical margins. Ninety-three percent of patients reported no urinary leakage. Conclusion We believe our technique of isolating the DVC with blunt dissection and then ligating and transecting the DVC to be feasible approach that requires larger studies to truly confirm its utility.

  16. The efficacy and utilisation of preoperative multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: does it change the surgical dissection plan?

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    Tavukçu, Hasan Hüseyin; Aytaç, Ömer; Balcı, Numan Cem; Kulaksızoğlu, Haluk; Atuğ, Fatih

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the effect of the use of multiparametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) on the dissection plan of the neurovascular bundle and the oncological results of our patients who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. We prospectively evaluated 60 consecutive patients, including 30 patients who had (Group 1), and 30 patients who had not (Group 2) mp-MRI before robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Based on the findings of mp-MRI, the dissection plan was changed as intrafascial, interfascial, and extrafascial in the mp-MRI group. Two groups were compared in terms of age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), Gleason sum scores and surgical margin positivity. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, PSA, biopsy Gleason score, final pathological Gleason score and surgical margin positivity. mp-MRI changed the initial surgical plan in 18 of 30 patients (60%) in Group 1. In seventeen of these patients (56%) surgical plan was changed from non-nerve sparing to interfascial nerve sparing plan. In one patient dissection plan was changed to non-nerve sparing technique which had extraprostatic extension on final pathology. Surgical margin positivity was similar in Groups 1, and 2 (16% and 13%, respectively) although, Group 1 had higher number of high- risk patients. mp-MRI confirmed the primary tumour localisation in the final pathology in 27 of of 30 patients (90%). Preoperative mp-MRI effected the decision to perform a nerve-sparing technique in 56% of the patients in our study; moreover, changing the dissection plan from non-nerve-sparing technique to a nerve sparing technique did not increase the rate of surgical margin positivity.

  17. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy by extraperitoneal access with duplication of the open technique

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    M. Tobias-Machado

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The laparoscopic radical prostatectomy is a continually developing technique. Transperitoneal access has been preferred by the majority of centers that employ this technique. Endoscopic extraperitoneal access is used by a few groups, nevertheless it is currently receiving a higher acceptance. In general, the antegrade technique is used, with dissection from the bladder neck to the prostate apex. The objective of the present paper is to describe the extraperitoneal technique with reproduction of the open surgery's surgical steps. SURGICAL TECHNIQUE: With this technique, the dissection of the prostate apex is performed and, following the section of the urethra while preserving the sphincteric apparatus, the Foley catheter is externally tied and internally recovered, which allows cranial traction, similarly to the way it is performed in conventional surgery. The retroprostatic space is posteriorly dissected and the seminal vesicles are identified by anterior and posterior approach, obtaining with this method an optimal exposure of the posterolateral pedicles and the prostate contour. The initial impression is that this technique does not present higher bleeding rate or difficulty level when compared with antegrade surgery. Potential advantages of this technique would be the greater familiarity with surgical steps, isolated extraperitoneal drainage of urine and secretions and a good definition of prostate limits and lateral pedicles, which are critical factors for preserving the neurovascular bundles and avoiding positive surgical margins. A higher number of cases and a long-term follow-up will demonstrate its actual value as a technical option for endoscopic access to the prostate.

  18. Significance and management of positive surgical margins at the time of radical prostatectomy.

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    Silberstein, Jonathan L; Eastham, James A

    2014-10-01

    Positive surgical margins (PSM) at the time of radical prostatectomy (RP) result in an increased risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) and secondary treatment. We review current literature with a focus on stratifying the characteristics of the PSM that may define its significance, the impact of modern imaging and surgical approaches in avoidance of PSM, and management strategies when PSM do occur. We performed a review of the available literature to identify factors associated with PSM and their management. PSM have been repeatedly demonstrated to be associated with an increased risk of BCR following RP. The specific characteristics (size, number, location, Gleason score at the margin) of the PSM may influence the risk of recurrence. Novel imaging and surgical approaches are being investigated and may allow for reductions of PSM in the future. The use of adjuvant treatment for a PSM remains controversial and should be decided on an individual basis after a discussion about the risks and benefits. The goal of RP is complete resection of the tumor. PSM are associated with increased risk of BCR and secondary treatments. Of the risk factors associated with BCR after RP, a PSM is directly influenced by surgical technique.

  19. Significance and management of positive surgical margins at the time of radical prostatectomy

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    Jonathan L. Silberstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Positive surgical margins (PSM at the time of radical prostatectomy (RP result in an increased risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR and secondary treatment. We review current literature with a focus on stratifying the characteristics of the PSM that may define its significance, the impact of modern imaging and surgical approaches in avoidance of PSM, and management strategies when PSM do occur. We performed a review of the available literature to identify factors associated with PSM and their management. PSM have been repeatedly demonstrated to be associated with an increased risk of BCR following RP. The specific characteristics (size, number, location, Gleason score at the margin of the PSM may influence the risk of recurrence. Novel imaging and surgical approaches are being investigated and may allow for reductions of PSM in the future. The use of adjuvant treatment for a PSM remains controversial and should be decided on an individual basis after a discussion about the risks and benefits. The goal of RP is complete resection of the tumor. PSM are associated with increased risk of BCR and secondary treatments. Of the risk factors associated with BCR after RP, a PSM is directly influenced by surgical technique.

  20. Radical prostatectomy: positive surgical margins matter.

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    Meeks, Joshua J; Eastham, James A

    2013-10-01

    A positive surgical margin (PSM) in the radical prostatectomy (RP) specimen is associated with biochemical recurrence (BCR) and the need for adjuvant radiation therapy, and is a surrogate for surgical quality. We review the available data describing the identification, anatomy, and management of PSM after RP. A PubMed search (using English language as a filter) was performed to identify factors affecting PSMs and their management. PSMs are associated with an increased likelihood of BCR after RP. The most common location for a PSM is the apex, followed by the posterolateral edge of the prostate. The risk of recurrence in a patient with a PSM is associated with the location, length, and Gleason score of the PSM. The management of a patient with a PSM remains controversial, with some recommending adjuvant radiation therapy for all PSMs and others suggesting only salvage radiation therapy for men who experience BCR. PSMs are associated with an increased likelihood of BCR and often result in initiation of adjuvant treatment. Therefore, the goal of surgery should be to minimize the likelihood of a PSM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: Multiparametric MR imaging-directed intraoperative frozen-section analysis to reduce the rate of positive surgical margins.

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    Petralia, Giuseppe; Musi, Gennaro; Padhani, Anwar R; Summers, Paul; Renne, Giuseppe; Alessi, Sarah; Raimondi, Sara; Matei, Deliu V; Renne, Salvatore L; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Bellomi, Massimo

    2015-02-01

    To investigate whether use of multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-directed intraoperative frozen-section (IFS) analysis during nerve-sparing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy reduces the rate of positive surgical margins. This retrospective analysis of prospectively acquired data was approved by an institutional ethics committee, and the requirement for informed consent was waived. Data were reviewed for 134 patients who underwent preoperative multiparametric MR imaging (T2 weighted, diffusion weighted, and dynamic contrast-material enhanced) and nerve-sparing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, during which IFS analysis was used, and secondary resections were performed when IFS results were positive for cancer. Control patients (n = 134) matched for age, prostate-specific antigen level, and stage were selected from a pool of 322 patients who underwent nerve-sparing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy without multiparametric MR imaging and IFS analysis. Rates of positive surgical margins were compared by means of the McNemar test, and a multivariate conditional logistic regression model was used to estimate the odds ratio of positive surgical margins for patients who underwent MR imaging and IFS analysis compared with control subjects. Eighteen patients who underwent MR imaging and IFS analysis underwent secondary resections, and 13 of these patients were found to have negative surgical margins at final pathologic examination. Positive surgical margins were found less frequently in the patients who underwent MR imaging and IFS analysis than in control patients (7.5% vs 18.7%, P = .01). When the differences in risk factors are taken into account, patients who underwent MR imaging and IFS had one-seventh the risk of having positive surgical margins relative to control patients (adjusted odds ratio: 0.15; 95% confidence interval: 0.04, 0.61). The significantly lower rate of positive surgical margins compared with that in control patients provides

  2. Radical prostatectomy. Results and indications; Indications et resultats de la prostatectomie radicale

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    Jacqmin, D. [Hopitaux universitaires de Strasbourg, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    1997-12-31

    Radical prostatectomy is the surgical curative treatment of localized prostate cancer. The survival is good in young patients (<70) with T2 N0M0 tumors and more than 10 year`s life expectancy. Side-effects are urinary incontinence, impotence and anastomosis stricture. Quality of life should be considered as an important factor for the choice of the patient between radical prostatectomy, radiotherapy and follow-up. (author)

  3. Anastomotic complications after robot-assisted laparoscopic and open radical prostatectomy

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    Jacobsen, André; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Iversen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective Anastomotic complications are well known after radical prostatectomy (RP). The vesicourethral anastomotic technique is handled differently between open and robotic RP. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the frequency of anastomotic leakages and strictures differed between...... patients undergoing retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and to identify risk factors associated with these complications. Materials and methods The study included 735 consecutive patients who underwent RRP (n = 499) or RARP (236) at the Department...... of Urology, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, in a complete 3 year period from 2010 to 2012. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to analyse associations between surgical procedure (RRP vs RARP) and anastomotic complications. Analyses included age, smoking status, diabetes, hypertension...

  4. [Organisation and early outcome after radical prostatectomy in Denmark 2004-2007

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    Borre, M.; Iversen, P.; Bendixen, A.

    2008-01-01

    .2%. CONCLUSION: There is an increasing rate of radical prostatectomies in Denmark. It is proposed that a national database be established to monitor early and long-term outcomes, including the role of surgical technique (nerve sparing, laparoscopic/robotic surgery, etc.) in order to ensure optimal organisation...

  5. Advances in Robotic-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy over Time

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    Emma F. P. Jacobs

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RALP, robotics has become increasingly more commonplace in the armamentarium of the urologic surgeon. Robotic utilization has exploded across surgical disciplines well beyond the fields of urology and prostate surgery. The literature detailing technical steps, comparison of large surgical series, and even robotically focused randomized control trials are available for review. RALP, the first robot-assisted surgical procedure to achieve widespread use, has recently become the primary approach for the surgical management of localized prostate cancer. As a result, surgeons are constantly trying to refine and improve upon current technical aspects of the operation. Recent areas of published modifications include bladder neck anastomosis and reconstruction, bladder drainage, nerve sparing approaches and techniques, and perioperative and postoperative management including penile rehabilitation. In this review, we summarize recent advances in perioperative management and surgical technique for RALP.

  6. Radical prostatectomy. Results and indications

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    Jacqmin, D.

    1997-01-01

    Radical prostatectomy is the surgical curative treatment of localized prostate cancer. The survival is good in young patients (<70) with T2 N0M0 tumors and more than 10 year's life expectancy. Side-effects are urinary incontinence, impotence and anastomosis stricture. Quality of life should be considered as an important factor for the choice of the patient between radical prostatectomy, radiotherapy and follow-up. (author)

  7. Robotic simple prostatectomy: A consideration for large prostate adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua B. Nething

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH has changed considerably over the last several decades. First line treatment of BPH and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS with medical therapy has created a population of men with much larger prostate glands, many of whom require surgical intervention. Patients with prostate glands greater than 80 to 100 grams may be better managed surgically with a retropubic prostatectomy. We explore our experience with robotic assisted simple prostatectomy and review the relevant literature. Database: The database reviewed includes our experience with seven patients undergoing robotic simple prostatectomy, and a comprehensive review of the previously published series of this procedure. In addition, the literature pertaining to a pure laparoscopic approach to simple prostatectomy is reviewed. Conclusion: Robotic experience and training has become a standard in resident training programs; while classic transurethral resection is being performed less for large prostate glands. The robotic approach to simple prostatectomy provides an excellent option for surgical treatment of very large prostate glands, providing patients acceptable results in terms of operative time, estimated blood loss, hospital stay and duration of Foley catheter.

  8. Pertinent issues related to laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney C. Abreu

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We describe the critical steps of the laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP technique and discuss how they impact upon the pertinent issues regarding prostate cancer surgery: blood loss, potency and continence. RESULTS: A major advantage of LRP is the reduced operative blood loss. The precise placement of the dorsal vein complex stitch associated with the tamponading effect of the CO2 pneumoperitoneum significantly decrease venous bleeding, which is the main source of blood loss during radical prostatectomy. At the Cleveland Clinic, the average blood loss of our first 100 patients was 322.5 ml, resulting in low transfusion rates. The continuous venous bleeding narrowed pelvic surgical field and poor visibility can adversely impact on nerve preservation during open radical prostatectomy. Laparoscopy, with its enhanced and magnified vision in a relatively bloodless field allows for excellent identification and handling of the neurovascular bundles. During open retropubic radical prostatectomy, the pubic bone may impair visibility and access to the urethral stump, and the surgeon must tie the knots relying on tactile sensation alone. Consequently, open prostatectomy is associated with a prolonged catheterization period of 2 - 3 weeks. Comparatively, during laparoscopic radical prostatectomy all sutures are meticulously placed and each is tied under complete visual control, resulting in a precise mucosa-to-mucosa approximation. CONCLUSION: The laparoscopic approach may represent a reliable less invasive alternative to the conventional open approach. Despite the encouraging preliminary anatomical and functional outcomes, prospective randomized comparative trials are required to critically evaluate the role of laparoscopy for this sophisticated and delicate operation.

  9. Risk of biochemical recurrence and positive surgical margins in patients with pT2 prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Berg, Kasper Drimer

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To investigate risk factors associated with positive surgical margins (PSM) and biochemical recurrence (BR) in organ confined tumors (pT2) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for localized prostate cancer (PCa). METHODS: Between 1995 and 2011, 1,649 patients underwent RP...

  10. The Efficacy and Utilisation of Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Does it Change the Surgical Dissection Plan? A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Hüseyin Tavukçu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We investigated the effect of prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI on the dissection plan of the neurovascular bundle and the oncological results of our patients who underwent robotic radical prostatectomy operation. Materials and Methods: We prospectively evaluated 30 consecutive patients, 15 of whom had prostate MRI before the operation, and 15 of whom did not. With the findings of MRI, the dissection plan was changed as intrafascial, interfascial, and extrafascial technique in the MRI group. Two groups were compared in terms of age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA, and Gleason scores (GSs. Surgical margin status was also checked with the final pathology. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, PSA, biopsy GS, and final pathological GS. MRI changed the initial surgical plan to a nerve-sparing technique in 7 of the 15 patients. Only one patient in the MRI group had a positive surgical margin on bladder neck. MRI was confirmed as the primary tumour localisation in the final pathology in 93.3% of patients. Conclusion: Preoperative prostate MRI influenced the decision to carry out a nerve-sparing technique in 46% of the patients in our study; however, the change to a nerve-sparing technique did not seem to compromise the surgical margin positivity.

  11. Retzus-sparing robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: a step–by-step technique description of this first brazilian experience

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    Marcos Tobias-Machado

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Retzus-sparing robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy(RARP is a newly approach that preserve the Retzus structures and provide better recovery of continence and erectile function. In Brazil, this approach has not yet been previously reported. Objective: Our goal is to describe Step-by-Step the Retzus-sparing RARP surgical technique and report our first Brazilian experience. Methods: We present a case of a 60-year-old white man with low risk prostate cancer. Surgical materials were four arms Da Vinci robotic platform system, six transperitoneal portals, two prolene wires and Polymer Clips. This surgical technique was step-by-step described according to Galfano et al. One additional step was added as a modification of Galfano et al. Primary technique description: The closure of the Denovellier fascia. Results: We have operated one patient with this technique. The operative time was 180minutes, console time was135 min, the blood loss was 150ml, none perioperative or postoperative complications was found, hospital stay of 01 day. The anatomopathological classification revealed a pT2aN0M0 specimen with free surgical margins. The patient achieved continence immediately after bladder stent retrieval. Full erection reported after 30 days of surgery. Conclusion: Retzus-sparing RARP approach is feasible and reproducible. However, further comparative studies are necessary to demonstrate potential benefits in continence and sexual outcomes over the standard approaches.

  12. Salvage robotic radical prostatectomy

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    Samuel D Kaffenberger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Failure of non-surgical primary treatment for localized prostate cancer is a common occurrence, with rates of disease recurrence ranging from 20% to 60%. In a large proportion of patients, disease recurrence is clinically localized and therefore potentially curable. Unfortunately, due to the complex and potentially morbid nature of salvage treatment, radical salvage surgery is uncommonly performed. In an attempt to decrease the morbidity of salvage therapy without sacrificing oncologic efficacy, a number of experienced centers have utilized robotic assistance to perform minimally invasive salvage radical prostatectomy. Herein, we critically evaluate the existing literature on salvage robotic radical prostatectomy with a focus on patient selection, perioperative complications and functional and early oncologic outcomes. These results are compared with contemporary and historical open salvage radical prostatectomy series and supplemented with insights we have gained from our experience with salvage robotic radical prostatectomy. The body of evidence by which conclusions regarding the efficacy and safety of robotic salvage radical prostatectomy can be drawn comprises fewer than 200 patients with limited follow-up. Preliminary results are promising and some outcomes have been favorable when compared with contemporary open salvage prostatectomy series. Advantages of the robotic platform in the performance of salvage radical prostatectomy include decreased blood loss, short length of stay and improved visualization. Greater experience is required to confirm the long-term oncologic efficacy and functional outcomes as well as the generalizability of results achieved at experienced centers.

  13. Novel posterior reconstruction technique during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy: description and comparative outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Chang Wook; Oh, Jong Jin; Jeong, Seong Jin; Hong, Sung Kyu; Byun, Seok-Soo; Choe, Gheeyoung; Lee, Sang Eun

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the impact of a novel posterior reconstruction technique during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy on continence recovery. A total of 116 consecutive patients who received the novel posterior reconstruction (case group) were retrospectively compared with a cohort of 126 patients who did not receive posterior reconstruction (control group). The primary end-point was the duration of continence recovery (no pad use) after robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy. The posterior reconstruction was obtained by opposing the median dorsal fibrous raphe to the posterior counterpart of the detrusor apron, rather than the Denonvilliers' fascia. The case group showed higher continence rates at all points of evaluation, which were 2 weeks (30.1% vs 19.8%), 1 month (58.4% vs 45.7%), 3 months (82.7% vs 70.5%) and 6 months postoperatively (95.3% vs 86.4%) (P = 0.007). Application of the novel posterior reconstruction technique, age and length of membranous urethra were significant variables for the complete recovery of continence on multivariable analysis. This study shows that the application of this novel PR technique significantly improves the recovery of continence in patients undergoing robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy. © 2012 The Japanese Urological Association.

  14. Novel technique to enhance bladder neck dissection with traction of Foley catheter during extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

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    Henry Y. Lin

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Improved bladder neck enhancement provides a clearer vision during bladder neck dissection. Similar functional results and cancer control rates were also encountered during modified extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy. This novel technique is a feasible method for performing endoscopic radical prostatectomy using four ports instead of five.

  15. Radical Prostatectomy for Locally Advanced Prostate Cancers-Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivatsa, N; Nagaraja, H; Shweta, S; Raghunath, S K

    2017-06-01

    Twenty-five to thirty percent of patients with prostate cancer present with locally advanced disease. While risk stratification remains the same with high incidence of upstaging of disease on imaging and histopathological evaluation; there have been progressive refinements in surgical therapy. With availability of reasonably robust data, radical prostatectomy in men with locally advanced prostate cancers seems to effect improvement in both cancer specific and overall survival rates in comparison to the current standard of care of radiation with androgen deprivation therapy. Studies using radical prostatectomy as a part of multimodality approach have also shown promising results. There is an imminent need for well-designed prospective studies of benefits of radical prostatectomy over radiation and androgen deprivation as well as benefits of multimodality therapy over monotherapy. Surgery for patients with locally advanced prostate cancer is technically challenging. Surgical outcomes are comparable to those of organ-confined disease when performed in high-volume centers. Neoadjuvant therapies prior to radical prostatectomy might improve surgical outcomes, but whether they will translate into a better cancer specific and overall survival are yet to be ascertained.

  16. A comparative analysis of primary and secondary Gleason pattern predictive ability for positive surgical margins after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfoungaristos, S; Kavouras, A; Kanatas, P; Polimeros, N; Perimenis, P

    2011-01-01

    To compare the predictive ability of primary and secondary Gleason pattern for positive surgical margins in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer and a preoperative Gleason score ≤ 6. A retrospective analysis of the medical records of patients undergone a radical prostatectomy between January 2005 and October 2010 was conducted. Patients' age, prostate volume, preoperative PSA, biopsy Gleason score, the 1st and 2nd Gleason pattern were entered a univariate and multivariate analysis. The 1st and 2nd pattern were tested for their ability to predict positive surgical margins using receiver operating characteristic curves. Positive surgical margins were noticed in 56 cases (38.1%) out of 147 studied patients. The 2nd pattern was significantly greater in those with positive surgical margins while the 1st pattern was not significantly different between the 2 groups of patients. ROC analysis revealed that area under the curve was 0.53 (p=0.538) for the 1st pattern and 0.60 (p=0.048) for the 2nd pattern. Concerning the cases with PSA <10 ng/ml, it was also found that only the 2nd pattern had a predictive ability (p=0.050). When multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted it was found that the 2nd pattern was the only independent predictor. The second Gleason pattern was found to be of higher value than the 1st one for the prediction of positive surgical margins in patients with preoperative Gleason score ≤ 6 and this should be considered especially when a neurovascular bundle sparing radical prostatectomy is planned, in order not to harm the oncological outcome.

  17. FUNCTIONAL RESULTS OF ENDOSCOPIC EXTRAPERITONEAL RADICAL INTRAFASCIAL PROSTATECTOMY

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    D. V. Perlin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Endoscopic radical prostatectomy is a highly effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. Intrafascial prostate dissection ensures early recovery of urine continence function and erectile function. This article sums up our own experience of performing intrafascial endoscopic prostatectomy.Materials and methods. 25 patients have undergone this procedure. 12 months after surgery 88.2 % of the patients were fully continent, 11.7 % had symptoms of minimal stress urinary incontinence. We encountered no cases of positive surgical margins and one case of bio-chemical recurrence of the disease.Conclusion. Oncologically, intrafascial endoscopic radical prostatectomy is as effective as other modifications of radical prostatectomy and has the benefits of early recovery of urine continence function and erectile function. 

  18. Changes in urological surgical techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oktay Üçer

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, laparoscopic and afterwards robotic techniques have constituted most of urologic surgery procedures. Open surgery may give place to robotic surgery due to possible widespread use of robots in the future. Studies, that compare these two techniques are usually designed about radical prostatectomy, since it is the most common operation performed by using these techniques. In literature,robotic surgery seems more advantageous than other techniques but the most important disadvantage of this technique is cost-effective problems. In present review,history of open, laparoscopic and robotic surgery, and comparison of advantages, disadvantages and cost of these techniques have been discussed with literature.

  19. Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy for Patients with Prostatic Cancer and Factors Promoting Installation of the Robotic Surgical Equipment-Questionnaire Survey

    OpenAIRE

    塚本, 泰司; 田中, 滋

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey of hospitals with robot-assisted surgical equipment to study changes of the surgical case loads after its installation and the managerial strategies for its purchase. The study included 154 hospitals (as of April 2014) that were queried about their radical prostatectomy case loads from January 2009 to December 2013, strategies for installation of the equipment in their hospitals, and other topics related to the study purpose. The overall response rate of ho...

  20. Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy with early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle and endopelvic fascia sparing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Augusto Monteiro Lins de Albuquerque

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RAP is the dominant minimally invasive surgical treatment for patients with localized prostate cancer. The introduction of robotic assistance has the potential to improve surgical outcomes and reduce the steep learning curve associated with conventional laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. The purpose of this video is to demonstrate the early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle without open the endopelvic fascia during RAP. Materials and Methods A 51-year old male, presenting histological diagnosis of prostate adenocarcinoma, Gleason 6 (3+3, in 4 cores of 12, with an initial PSA=3.41ng/dl and the digital rectal examination demonstrating a prostate with hardened nodule in the right lobe of the prostate base (clinical stage T2a. Surgical treatment with the robot-assisted technique was offered as initial therapeutic option and the critical technical point was the early retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle with endopelvic fascia preservation, during radical prostatectomy. Results The operative time was of 89 minutes, blood loss was 100ml. No drain was left in the peritoneal cavity. The patient was discharged within 24 hours. There were no intraoperative or immediate postoperative complications. The pathological evaluation revealed prostate adenocarcinoma, Gleason 6, with free surgical margins and seminal vesicles free of neoplastic involvement (pathologic stage T2a. At 3-month-follow-up, the patient lies with undetectable PSA, continent and potent. Conclusion This is a feasible technique combining the benefits of retrograde release of the neurovascular bundle, the preservation of the pubo-prostatic collar and the preservation of the antero-lateral cavernous nerves.

  1. Oncological outcomes of high-risk prostate cancer patients between robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy in Taiwan

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    Chieh-Chun Liao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare pathological and oncological outcomes between robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RaLRP and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP among high-risk prostate cancer patient in a tertiary center in Taiwan. Materials and methods: From November 2003 to October 2013, 129 high-risk prostate cancer patients receiving minimally-invasive radical prostatectomy were included. The Kaplan–Meier analysis was used for measuring biochemical recurrence-free survival (BFS. Multivariate logistic regression models and Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to determine predictors of positive surgical margin and BFS. Results: Among the 129 high-risk prostate cancer patients included, 80 (62% patients received LRP and 49 (38% patients received RaLRP. There was no significant difference of positive surgical margin and biochemical recurrence rate between RaLRP and LRP group (P = 0.802 and 0.292. Higher pathological T stage predicted an increased likelihood of positive margins (OR = 3.44, 95% CI [1.45, 8.18], P = 0.005. Higher initial PSA level (HR = 2.88, 95% CI [1.04, 7.94], P = 0.041 and positive surgical margin (HR = 2.55, 95% CI [1.20, 5.44], P = 0.015 were poor prognostic factors for BFS. Conclusion: RaLRP can be considered among high-risk prostate cancer in Asian people with comparable oncological outcomes to LRP. Higher pathological T stage was associated with increased likelihood of positive margins, patients with higher iPSA level and positive surgical margin had worsen biochemical recurrence-free survival.

  2. Factors predicting early return of continence after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Jaspreet S; Eastham, James A

    2010-05-01

    Success of radical prostatectomy is measured by control of cancer and return of urinary and sexual function. Urinary incontinence is generally considered the greatest impairment in immediate postoperative urinary function. Multiple factors are associated with earlier return of urinary continence after radical prostatectomy. These factors can be divided into those known prior to surgery, and therefore possibly not modifiable, and factors that can be controlled during surgery or surgical planning. In addition, various postoperative maneuvers can help hasten urinary continence. This article examines the effect of known factors related to early return of urinary continence after radical prostatectomy.

  3. Proposed salvage treatment strategy for biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy in patients with prostate cancer: a retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Makito; Tanaka, Nobumichi; Asakawa, Isao; Morizawa, Yosuke; Anai, Satoshi; Torimoto, Kazumasa; Aoki, Katsuya; Yoneda, Tatsuo; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Konishi, Noboru; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2014-01-01

    Treatment options for patients with recurrent disease after radical prostatectomy include salvage radiotherapy of the prostatic bed and/or androgen deprivation therapy. To establish an effective treatment strategy for recurrent disease after radical prostatectomy, we retrospectively analyzed the outcome of salvage radiation monotherapy in such cases. Data from 61 men who had undergone salvage radiation monotherapy for biochemical recurrent disease after radical prostatectomy were retrospectively reviewed. In all patients, salvage radiotherapy consisted of iraradiation to the prostatic bed (70 Gy) using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy techniques. Treatment outcome was analyzed to identify predictive factors of salvage radiotherapy. The biochemical recurrence-free survival after salvage radiation monotherapy at 2 and 5 years was 55% and 38%, respectively. Cox proportional regression models revealed that the independent predictive factors for biochemical recurrence were Gleason Score ≥ 8, negative surgical margin, and PSA velocity ≥ 0.38 ng/mL/year. Negative surgical margin and PSA velocity ≥ 0.8 ng/mL/year were significantly associated with poor response in the serum PSA levels after salvage radiotherapy. Based on our findings, we propose a treatment strategy for biochemical recurrent disease after radical prostatectomy. Patients with Gleason score ≤ 7, positive surgical margin, and PSA velocity < 0.38 ng/mL/year are categorized the most favorable group, so that eradication by salvage radiation monotherapy could be expected. Other patients could be divided to two groups depending on surgical margin status and PSA velocity: 1) patients who might require combination of SRT and short-term androgen deprivation therapy and 2) patients who should be treated by androgen deprivation monotherapy

  4. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in Brazil: preliminary results

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    Jose Roberto Colombo Junior

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the initial experience on robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in Brazil. Methods: From March 2008 to March 2009, a hundred patients were treated with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Patient’s demographic data, as well as perioperative results of the procedures, are described in this study. Rresults: Patients’ mean age and mean PSA were 58 years and 7.58 ng/ml, respectively. All procedures were performed through transperitoneal approach, with a mean bleeding of 480 mL and surgical time of 298 minutes. A surgical margin affected by cancer was present in 16% of the cases. There were four complications: bleeding requiring transfusion (two cases, rectal perforation corrected on the spot and inadequate functioning of the robot. There was no conversion to another access or obit occurrences in this caseload. Cconclusions: Robot-assisted prostatectomy is a reality in Brazil and the results herein presented demonstrate that this procedure can be safely performed. Long-term follow-up is still necessary to assess the oncological and functional outcomes.

  5. Literature review of factors affecting continence after radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalibor Pacik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Radical prostatectomy (RP is the most common cause of stress urinary incontinence (UI in men. Several anatomic structures affect or may affect urinary continence - urethral sphincter, levator ani muscle, puboprostatic ligaments, bladder neck, endopelvic fascia, neurovascular bundle - and understanding of the anatomy of pelvic floor and urethra is crucial for satisfactory functional outcome of the procedure. Surgical techniques implemented to improve continence rates include nerve-sparing procedure, bladder neck preservation/plication, urethral length preservation, musculofascial reconstruction, puboprostatic ligaments preservation or seminal vesicle preservation. Perioperative (preoperative and postoperative pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT aims to shorten the duration of postoperative UI and thus, improve early continence rates postoperatively. In the review, complex information regarding anatomical, intra- and perioperative factors affecting urinary continence after RP is provided, including description of important anatomical structures, possible implications for surgical technique and evaluation of different PFMT strategies in perioperative period.

  6. Initial consecutive 125 cases of robotic assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy performed in Ireland's first robotic radical prostatectomy centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bouchier-Hayes, D M

    2012-03-01

    We examined the patient characteristics, operative proceedings and the outcomes of the initial series of 125 cases of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP) in an independent hospital in Ireland, performed by two surgeons using the da Vinci(®) surgical system.

  7. ROBOT-ASSISTED LAPAROSCOPIC PROSTATECTOMY: OUR EXPERIENCE

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    S. N. Nesterov

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Retropubic radical prostatectomy (RPE is now the gold standard of treatment for locally advanced prostate cancer (PC. However, robot-assisted RPE procedures using the da Vinci system are finding increasing acceptance.Materials and methods. The authors conducted a prospective study of 60 robot-assisted prostatectomies made at the Clinic of Urology, N.I. Pirogov National Medical Surgical Center, in the period January 2009 to December 2010.Results. The duration of an operation averaged 230 min; the average amount of blood loss was 200 ml. The mean duration of postoperative analgesia was 2,7 days. That of urinary catheterization was 8.5 days. A normal postoperative course was noted in most cases (88,4 %. Seven patients were found to have 8 (13,3 % mild and moderate complications. A pathohistological study revealed a positive surgical margin of resection in 21,7 % of the patients, extracapsular tumor growth in 21,7 %, and seminal vesicle invasion in 23,3 %. Tumor-affected regional lymph nodes were detected in 1 (1,7 % patient. In our observed series, 82 and 93 % of the subjects completely retained urine after 6 and 12 moths, respectively. Throughout the follow-up, erectile function recovered in 7 of the 15 patients undergoing a nerve-sparing surgical procedure.Conclusion. Postoperative results in our series of interventions are comparable to those obtained in the studies by Russian and foreign colleagues at the early stage of mastering this procedure. By considering a few observations, it is today difficult to say that our study is valid in the context of evidence-based medicine. Estimation of the benefits of robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy calls for long-term multicenter randomized trials.

  8. [Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy for Patients with Prostatic Cancer and Factors Promoting Installation of the Robotic Surgical Equipment-Questionnaire Survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Taiji; Tanaka, Shigeru

    2015-08-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey of hospitals with robot-assisted surgical equipment to study changes of the surgical case loads after its installation and the managerial strategies for its purchase. The study included 154 hospitals (as of April 2014) that were queried about their radical prostatectomy case loads from January 2009 to December 2013, strategies for installation of the equipment in their hospitals, and other topics related to the study purpose. The overall response rate of hospitals was 63%, though it marginally varied according to type and area. The annual case load was determined based on the results of the questionnaire and other modalities. It increased from 3,518 in 2009 to 6,425 in 2013. The case load seemed to be concentrated in hospitals with robot equipment since the increase of their number was very minimal over the 5 years. The hospitals with the robot treated a larger number of newly diagnosed patients with the disease than before. Most of the patients were those having localized cancer that was indicated for radical surgery, suggesting again the concentration of the surgical case loads in the hospitals with robots. While most hospitals believed that installation of a robot was necessary as an option for treatment procedures, the future strategy of the hospital, and other reasons, the action of the hospital to gain prestige may be involved in the process of purchasing the equipment. In conclusion, robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy has become popular as a surgical procedure for prostate cancer in our society. This may lead to a concentration of the surgical case load in a limited number of hospitals with robots. We also discuss the typical action of an acute-care hospital when it purchases expensive clinical medical equipment.

  9. Comparative effectiveness of prostate cancer surgical treatments: a population based analysis of postoperative outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrance, William T; Elkin, Elena B; Jacks, Lindsay M; Yee, David S; Jang, Thomas L; Laudone, Vincent P; Guillonneau, Bertrand D; Scardino, Peter T; Eastham, James A

    2010-04-01

    Enthusiasm for laparoscopic surgical approaches to prostate cancer treatment has grown despite limited evidence of improved outcomes compared with open radical prostatectomy. We compared laparoscopic prostatectomy with or without robotic assistance vs open radical prostatectomy in terms of postoperative outcomes and subsequent cancer directed therapy. Using a population based cancer registry linked with Medicare claims we identified men 66 years old or older with localized prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy from 2003 to 2005. Outcome measures were general medical/surgical complications and mortality within 90 days after surgery, genitourinary/bowel complications within 365 days, radiation therapy and/or androgen deprivation therapy within 365 days and length of hospital stay. Of the 5,923 men 18% underwent laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Adjusting for patient and tumor characteristics, there were no differences in the rate of general medical/surgical complications (OR 0.93 95% CI 0.77-1.14) or genitourinary/bowel complications (OR 0.96 95% CI 0.76-1.22), or in postoperative radiation and/or androgen deprivation (OR 0.80 95% CI 0.60-1.08). Laparoscopic prostatectomy was associated with a 35% shorter hospital stay (p <0.0001) and a lower bladder neck/urethral obstruction rate (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.58-0.94). In laparoscopic cases surgeon volume was inversely associated with hospital stay and the odds of any genitourinary/bowel complication. Laparoscopic prostatectomy and open radical prostatectomy have similar rates of postoperative morbidity and additional treatment. Men considering prostate cancer surgery should understand the expected benefits and risks of each technique to facilitate decision making and set realistic expectations. Copyright (c) 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Radical prostatectomy and positive surgical margins: relationship with prostate cancer outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo L. R. Felts de La Roca

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Positive surgical margins (PSMs are an adverse factor that may predict a worse outcome in patients submitted to radical prostatectomy (RP. However, not all of these cases will evolve to biochemical (BCR or clinical (CR recurrence, therefore relationship between PSMs and these recurrent events has to be correlated with other clinical and pathologic findings to indicate complementary treatment for selected patients. Materials and Methods Of 1250 patients submitted to open retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP, between March 1991 and June 2008, the outcome of 161 patients with PSMs and of 67 without PSMs as a control group, comprising a total of 228 cases were retrospectively reviewed. A minimum follow-up time of 2 years after surgery was considered. BCR was determined when PSA ≥ 0.2ng/mL. CR was determined whenever there was clinical evidence of tumor. Chi-square test was used to correlate clinical and pathologic variables with PSMs. Time interval to biochemical recurrence was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier product limit analysis using the log-rank test for comparison between groups. Univariate and multivariate Cox stepwise logistic regression models were used to identify significant predictors of risk of shorter intervals to BCR. Results Prostate circumference margin was the most common site with 78 cases (48.44%. Regarding the outcome of 228 cases from both groups, BCR occurred in 68 patients (29.82%, and CR in 10 (4.38%. Univariate analysis showed statistically significant associations (p < 0.001 between presence of PSMs with BCR, but not with CR (p = 0.05. At follow-up of the 161 patients with PSMs, only 61(37.8% presented BCR, while 100 (62.8% did not. BCR correlated with pathologic stage; Gleason score; preoperative PSA; tumor volume in the specimen; capsular and perineural invasion; presence and number of PSMs. CR correlated only with angiolymphatic invasion and Gleason score. Considering univariate analysis of clinical and

  11. [Relationship between tumor volume and PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Momose, Akishi; Okamoto, Akiko; Yamamoto, Hayato; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Iwabuchi, Ikuya; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Koie, Takuya; Kamimura, Noritaka; Ohyama, Chikara

    2010-02-01

    We examined whether the tumor volume (TV) is a good predictor of PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Data were collected for 158 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy without neoadjuvant hormonal therapy in our hospital since April 2005 to September 2007. Along with the routine pathological assessment, TV was assessed in all prostatectomy specimens. PSA recurrence was defined as PSA levels of greater than 0.2 ng/ml. The TVs were 1.81+/-1.66 ml (mean +/-SD) ranging from 0.02 to 8.20 ml. The TV in cT1c was 1.77+/-1.64, and 1.89+/-1.72 ml in cT2 (not significant). Significant differences were observed between TV and pT. The TVs in pT2a, pT2b and pT3/4 were 0.54+/-0.54, 1.63+/-1.47 and 2.67+/-1.80 ml, respectively. The median follow-up period was 32.3 months (range from 15 to 45) after radical prostatectomy, and PSA recurrence was observed in 32 cases. Patients with smaller TV (TV TV (TV > or = 1.3 ml, 66.7%) with a significant difference atp TV, pT, Gleason Score (GS), and surgical margins. Significant differences were observed for GS, and surgical margins, but not for TV. Clinically organ-confined disease in Japanese patients with prostate cancer included various cancers from clinically insignificant to locally advanced ones. In our series, TV was not regarded as a predictor of PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

  12. The Da Vinci Xi and robotic radical prostatectomy-an evolution in learning and technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonewardene, S S; Cahill, D

    2017-06-01

    The da Vinci Xi robot has been introduced as the successor to the Si platform. The promise of the Xi is to open the door to new surgical procedures. For robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP)/pelvic surgery, the potential is better vision and longer instruments. How has the Xi impacted on operative and pathological parameters as indicators of surgical performance? This is a comparison of an initial series of 42 RARPs with the Xi system in 2015 with a series using the Si system immediately before Xi uptake in the same calendar year, and an Si series by the same surgeon synchronously as the Xi series using operative time, blood loss, and positive margins as surrogates of surgical performance. Subjectively and objectively, there is a learning curve to Xi uptake in longer operative times but no impact on T2 positive margins which are the most reflective single measure of RARP outcomes. Subjectively, the vision of the Xi is inferior to the Si system, and the integrated diathermy system and automated setup are quirky. All require experience to overcome. There is a learning curve to progress from the Si to Xi da Vinci surgical platforms, but this does not negatively impact the outcome.

  13. First Danish single-institution experience with radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrang, Marie-Louise; Røder, Martin Andreas; Vainer, Ben

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the impact of positive surgical margins (PSMs), stratified by location and extension, on biochemical outcome after radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP). MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study included data from 605 consecutive patients treated with RRP for lo...

  14. Peri-operative comparison between daVinci-assisted radical prostatectomy and open radical prostatectomy in obese patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Carter Q.; Ho, Khai-Linh V.; Slezak, Jeffrey M.; Blute, Michael L.; Gettman, Matthew T.

    2007-02-01

    Introduction: While the effects of increasing body mass index on prostate cancer epidemiology and surgical approach have recently been studied, its effects on surgical outcomes are less clear. We studied the perioperative outcomes of obese (BMI >= 30) men treated with daVinci-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (DLP) and compared them to those treated with open radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) in a contemporary time frame. Method: After Institutional Review Board approval, we used the Mayo Clinic Radical Prostatectomy database to identify patients who had undergone DLP by a single surgeon and those who had undergone open RRP by a single surgeon between December 2002 and March 2005. Baseline demographics, peri- and post-operative courses, and complications were collected by retrospective chart review, and variables from the two cohorts compared using chi-square method and least-squares method of linear regression where appropriate. Results: 59 patients who had DLP and 76 undergoing RRP were available for study. Baseline demographics were not statistically different between the two cohorts. Although DLP had a significantly lower clinical stage than RRP (p=0.02), pathological stage was not statistically different (p=0.10). Transfusion rates, hospital stay, overall complications, and pathological Gleason were also not significantly different, nor were PSA progression, positive margin rate, or continence at 1 year. After bilateral nerve-sparing, erections suitable for intercourse with or without therapy at 1 year was 88.5% (23/26) for DLP and 61.2% (30/49) for RRP (p=0.01). Follow-up time was similar. Conclusion: For obese patients, DLP appears to have similar perioperative, as well as short-term oncologic and functional outcomes when compared to open RRP.

  15. Comparative Effectiveness of Surgical Treatments for Prostate Cancer: A Population-Based Analysis of Postoperative Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrance, William T.; Elkin, Elena B.; Jacks, Lindsay M.; Yee, David S.; Jang, Thomas L.; Laudone, Vincent P.; Guillonneau, Bertrand D.; Scardino, Peter T.; Eastham, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Enthusiasm for laparoscopic surgical approaches to prostate cancer treatment has grown, despite limited evidence of improved outcomes compared with open radical prostatectomy. We compared laparoscopic (with or without robotic assistance) versus open radical prostatectomy in terms of postoperative outcomes and subsequent cancer-directed therapy. Materials and Methods Using a population-based cancer registry linked with Medicare claims, we identified men age 66 or older with localized prostate cancer who received a radical prostatectomy from 2003-2005. Outcome measures were general medical/surgical complications and mortality within 90 days following surgery; genitourinary/bowel complications within 365 days; receipt of radiation therapy, androgen deprivation therapy or both within 365 days; length of hospital stay. Results Of the 5,923 men,18% received a laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Adjusting for patient and tumor characteristics, there were no differences in rates of general medical/surgical complications (OR 0.93; 95% CI: 0.77-1.14) or genitourinary/bowel complications (OR 0.96; 95% CI: 0.76-1.22) or in the use of postoperative radiation, androgen deprivation or both (OR 0.80; 95% CI: 0.60-1.08). Laparoscopic prostatectomy was associated with a 35% shorter hospital stay (p<0.0001) and a lower rate of bladder neck/urethral obstruction (OR 0.74; 95% CI 0.58-0.94). In laparoscopic patients, surgeon volume was inversely associated with length of hospital stay and the odds of any genitourinary/bowel complication. Conclusions Laparoscopic and open radical prostatectomy have similar rates of postoperative morbidity and use of additional treatment. Men considering prostate cancer surgery should understand the expected benefits and risks of each technique to facilitate decision-making and to set realistic expectations. PMID:20188381

  16. Comparison of the effects of two intrathecal anaesthetic techniques for transurethral prostatectomy on haemodynamic and pulmonary function.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, K H

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Transurethral prostatectomy is routinely performed under spinal anaesthesia. This technique can cause hypotension, which is particularly undesirable in the elderly. The objective was to compare spinal anaesthesia for transurethral prostatectomy using hyperbaric bupivacaine 15 mg (control group) and hyperbaric bupivacaine 10 mg (limiting spread by maintaining the upright position for 15 min) and fentanyl 25 microg (fentanyl group) in terms of haemodynamic and pulmonary function. METHODS: Thirty ASA I-III patients were randomly selected and underwent spinal anaesthesia with either hyperbaric bupivacaine 15 mg (immediately positioned supine) or hyperbaric bupivacaine 10 mg (upright for 15 min) and fentanyl 25 microg. RESULTS: The greatest changes in mean arterial pressure (P = 0.9), ephedrine requirements (P = 0.8) and mean maximum change in forced vital capacity (P = 0.5) were similar in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: The addition of fentanyl 25 microg to bupivacaine 10 mg and limiting the spread of the block does not improve either haemodynamic or pulmonary function compared with bupivacaine 15 mg in patients undergoing transurethral prostatectomy.

  17. The "halo effect" in Korea: change in practice patterns since the introduction of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Ee-Rah; Jeong, Wooju; Park, Sung Yul; Ham, Won Sik; Choi, Young Deuk; Hong, Sung Joon; Rha, Koon Ho

    2009-03-01

    Acquisition of the da Vinci surgical system (Intuitive Surgical, Mountain View, USA) has enabled robot-assisted surgery to become an acceptable alternative to open radical prostatectomy (ORP). Implementation of robotics at a single institution in Korea induced a gradual increase in the number of performances of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) to surgically treat localized prostate cancer. We analyzed the impact of robotic instrumentation on practice patterns among urologists and explain the change in value in ORP and RALP-the standard treatment and the new approach or innovation of robotic technology. The overall number of prostatectomies has increased over time because the number of RALPs has grown drastically whereas the number of OPRs did not decrease during the period of evaluation. Our experience emphasizes the potential of RALP to become the gold standard in the treatment of localized prostate cancer in various parts of the world.

  18. Radical prostatectomy for high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yossepowitch, Ofer; Eastham, James A

    2008-06-01

    Consensus recommendations for the identification and treatment of men whose apparent organ confined prostate cancer has high risk features are lacking. Despite ongoing refinements in surgical technique and improvements in morbidity and functional outcomes, the tradition of steering high-risk patients away from radical prostatectomy (RP) remains steadfast. We performed a medical literature search in English using MEDLINE/PubMed that addressed high risk prostate cancer. We analyzed the literature with respect to the historical evolution of this concept, current risk stratification schemes and treatment guidelines and related short and long term outcomes following RP. Contemporary evidence suggest that patients classified with high-risk prostate cancer by commonly used definitions do not have a uniformly poor prognosis after RP. Many cancers categorized clinically as high risk are actually pathologically confined to the prostate, and most men with such cancers who undergo RP are alive and free of additional therapy long after surgery. RP in the high-risk setting appears to be associated with a similar morbidity as in lower-risk patients. Men with clinically localized high-risk prostate cancer should not be categorically disqualified from local definitive therapy with RP. With careful attention to surgical technique, cancer control rates should improve further, and adverse effects on quality of life after RP should continue to decrease.

  19. Contemporary open and robotic radical prostatectomy practice patterns among urologists in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrance, William T; Eastham, James A; Savage, Caroline; Maschino, A C; Laudone, Vincent P; Dechet, Christopher B; Stephenson, Robert A; Scardino, Peter T; Sandhu, Jaspreet S

    2012-06-01

    We describe current trends in robotic and open radical prostatectomy in the United States after examining case logs for American Board of Urology certification. American urologists submit case logs for initial board certification and recertification. We analyzed logs from 2004 to 2010 for trends and used logistic regression to assess the impact of urologist age on robotic radical prostatectomy use. A total of 4,709 urologists submitted case logs for certification between 2004 and 2010. Of these logs 3,374 included 1 or more radical prostatectomy cases. Of the urologists 2,413 (72%) reported performing open radical prostatectomy only while 961 (28%) reported 1 or more robotic radical prostatectomies and 308 (9%) reported robotic radical prostatectomy only. During this 7-year period we observed a large increase in the number of urologists who performed robotic radical prostatectomy and a smaller corresponding decrease in those who performed open radical prostatectomy. Only 8% of patients were treated with robotic radical prostatectomy by urologists who were certified in 2004 while 67% underwent that procedure in 2010. Median age of urologists who exclusively performed open radical prostatectomy was 43 years (IQR 38-51) vs 41 (IQR 35-46) for those who performed only robotic radical prostatectomy. While the rate was not as high as the greater than 85% industry estimate, 67% of radical prostatectomies were done robotically among urologists who underwent board certification or recertification in 2010. Total radical prostatectomy volume almost doubled during the study period. These data provide nonindustry based estimates of current radical prostatectomy practice patterns and further our understanding of the evolving surgical treatment of prostate cancer. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Surgeon Experience is Strongly Associated with Biochemical Recurrence after Radical Prostatectomy for all Preoperative Risk Categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Eric A; Bianco, Fernando J; Serio, Angel M; Eastham, James A; Kattan, Michael W; Pontes, J. Edson; Vickers, Andrew J; Scardino, Peter T

    2013-01-01

    Background We have previously demonstrated that there is a learning curve for open radical prostatectomy. In this study we sought to determine whether the effects of the learning curve are modified by patient risk as defined by preoperative tumor characteristics. Methods The study included 7,683 eligible prostate cancer patients treated with open radical prostatectomy by one of 72 surgeons. Surgeon experience was coded as the total prior number of radical prostatectomies conducted by the surgeon prior to a patient’s surgery. Multivariable survival-time regression models were used to evaluate the association between surgeon experience and biochemical recurrence, separately for each preoperative risk group. Results We saw no evidence that patient risk affects the learning curve: there was a statistically significant association between biochemical recurrence and surgeon experience in all analyses. The absolute risk difference for a patient receiving treatment from a surgeon with 10 compared to 250 prior radical prostatectomies was 6.6% (95% C.I. 3.4%, 10.3%), 12.0% (6.9%, 18.2%) and 9.7% (1.2%, 18.2%) for patients at low, medium and high preoperative risk patients. Recurrence-free probability for patients with low risk disease approached 100% for the most experienced surgeons Conclusions Cancer control after radical prostatectomy improves with increasing surgeon experience irrespective of patient risk. Excellent rates of cancer control for patients with low risk disease treated by the most experienced surgeons suggests that the primary reason such patients recur is inadequate surgical technique. The results have significant implications for clinical care. PMID:18423716

  1. Tandem-robot assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy to improve the neurovascular bundle visualization: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Misop; Kim, Chunwoo; Mozer, Pierre; Schäfer, Felix; Badaan, Shadie; Vigaru, Bogdan; Tseng, Kenneth; Petrisor, Doru; Trock, Bruce; Stoianovici, Dan

    2011-02-01

    To examine the feasibility of image-guided navigation using transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) to visualize the neurovascular bundle (NVB) during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP). The preservation of the NVB during radical prostatectomy improves the postoperative recovery of sexual potency. The accompanying blood vessels in the NVB can serve as a macroscopic landmark to localize the microscopic cavernous nerves in the NVB. A novel, robotic transrectal ultrasound probe manipulator (TRUS Robot) and three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction software were developed and used concurrently with the daVinci surgical robot (Intuitive Surgical, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) in a tandem-robot assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (T-RALP). After appropriate approval and informed consent were obtained, 3 subjects underwent T-RALP without associated complications. The TRUS Robot allowed a steady handling and remote manipulation of the TRUS probe during T-RALP. It also tracked the TRUS probe position accurately and allowed 3-D image reconstruction of the prostate and surrounding structures. Image navigation was performed by observing the tips of the daVinci surgical instruments in the live TRUS image. Blood vessels in the NVB were visualized using Doppler ultrasound. Intraoperative 3-D image-guided navigation in T-RALP is feasible. The use of TRUS during radical prostatectomy can potentially improve the visualization and preservation of the NVB. Further studies are needed to assess the clinical benefit of T-RALP. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of complete bladder neck preservation on urinary continence, quality of life and surgical margins after radical prostatectomy: a randomized, controlled, single blind trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyarangi-Dix, Joanne N; Radtke, Jan Philipp; Hadaschik, Boris; Pahernik, Sascha; Hohenfellner, Markus

    2013-03-01

    We investigated the influence of bladder neck preservation on urinary continence, quality of life and surgical margins after radical prostatectomy. A total of 208 men who presented for radical prostatectomy were randomized to complete bladder neck preservation with subsequent urethro-urethral anastomosis or to no preservation as controls. Patients with failed bladder neck preservation were not included in study. We documented objective continence by the 24-hour pad test, social continence by the number of pads per day and quality of life outcomes by the validated Incontinence Quality of Life questionnaire in a single blind setting. Cancer resection was assessed by surgical margin status. At 0, 3, 6 and 12 months mean urine loss in the control vs the bladder neck preservation group was 713.3 vs 237.0, 49.6 vs 15.6, 44.4 vs 5.5 and 25.4 vs 3.1 gm, respectively (each p <0.001). At 3, 6 and 12 months in the control vs the preservation group the social continence rate was 55.3% vs 84.2% (p <0.001), 74.8% vs 89.5% (p = 0.05) and 81.4% vs 94.7% (p = 0.027), and the quality of life score was 80.4 vs 90.3 (p <0.001), 85.4 vs 91.7 (p = 0.016) and 86.0 vs 93.8 (p = 0.001), respectively. We noted significantly less urine loss, higher objective and social continence rates, and higher quality of life scores after complete bladder neck preservation at all followup points. On multiple logistic regression analysis complete bladder neck preservation was an independent positive predictor of continence. No significant difference was found in surgical margin status between the control and bladder neck preservation groups (12.5% vs 14.7%, p = 0.65). In what is to our knowledge the first prospective, randomized, controlled, single blind trial complete bladder neck preservation during radical prostatectomy was associated with a significantly higher urinary continence rate and increased patient satisfaction without compromising resection margins. Copyright © 2013 American Urological

  3. Discordance between location of positive cores in biopsy and location of positive surgical margin following radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Won; Park, Hyoung Keun; Kim, Hyeong Gon; Ham, Dong Yeub; Paick, Sung Hyun; Lho, Yong Soo; Choi, Woo Suk

    2015-10-01

    We compared location of positive cores in biopsy and location of positive surgical margin (PSM) following radical prostatectomy. This retrospective analysis included patients who were diagnosed as prostate cancer by standard 12-core transrectal ultrasonography guided prostate biopsy, and who have PSM after radical prostatectomy. After exclusion of number of biopsy cores location data, 46 patients with PSM were identified. Locations of PSM in pathologic specimen were reported as 6 difference sites (apex, base and lateral in both sides). Discordance of biopsy result and PSM was defined when no positive cores in biopsy was identified at the location of PSM. Most common location of PSM were right apex (n=21) and left apex (n=15). Multiple PSM was reported in 21 specimens (45.7%). In 32 specimens (69.6%) with PSM, one or more concordant positive biopsy cores were identified, but 14 specimens (28%) had no concordant biopsy cores at PSM location. When discordant rate was separated by locations of PSM, right apex PSM had highest rate of discordant (38%). The discordant group had significantly lower prostate volume and lower number of positive cores in biopsy than concordant group. This study showed that one fourth of PSM occurred at location where tumor was not detected at biopsy and that apex PSM had highest rate of discordant. Careful dissection to avoid PSM should be performed in every location, including where tumor was not identified in biopsy.

  4. The challenges of a prostatectomy in rural Africa | Gaido | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    prostatectomy can occur in rural settings, where different factors can influence the outcome, beyond appropriate indication for surgery and technical skills of surgeons. Here we present a case that was per se surgically unremarkable, however a number of delayed omplications appeared in the post operative period, ...

  5. Comparison of the rate of complications after TUEB and cystic prostatectomy in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Bachurin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Topicality. The most common disease of the men’s urogenital system is Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. Causation of disease - not fully understood. There are several theories of emergence benign prostatic hyperplasia, major importance given to age-related disorders of hormonal metabolism. According to the World Health Organization (WHO information BPH is found in 11.3% in men aged 40-49 years, and in 81,4% at the age of 80 years. Currently, the main treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia is operational. Each method of surgical treatment of BPH has its indications and contraindications. The indications for open prostatectomy is the presence of bladder stones, bladder tumors and bladder diverticulum, a large volume of a gland (80 cm3 or more. Endoscopic intervention (without opening of the bladder is performed if there is a serious general comorbidities, which does not allow to carry out major surgery if prostate volume does not exceed 80 cubic centimeters. It can be done in a relatively young age and if patient has desirability of sexual function preserving. Postoperative results of treatment of patients in both groups, overall survival, duration of the postoperative period, the number of postoperative complications and rehabilitation of patients in the postoperative period are based on the method of surgical treatment. The aim of our research was to make a comparative analysis of the effectiveness of transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP and open prostatectomy in patients with BPH. Matherials and methods: The work is based on a retrospective analysis of medical records and experience in the treatment of 40 patients with BPH (mean age - 67 ± 2,4 years, that in the period of 2012 were performed surgical treatment: 20 patients - transurethral resection (TUR and 20 patients - open prostatectomy (20. Results and Discussion. It was found that each method has its advantages. So at the TURP bleeding was less. It was diagnosed in 1%, while in

  6. A Critical Analysis of the Current Knowledge of Surgical Anatomy of the Prostate Related to Optimisation of Cancer Control and Preservation of Continence and Erection in Candidates for Radical Prostatectomy: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, Jochen; Epstein, Jonathan I; Ganzer, Roman; Graefen, Markus; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Kaouk, Jihad; Menon, Mani; Mottrie, Alexandre; Myers, Robert P; Patel, Vipul; Tewari, Ashutosh; Villers, Arnauld; Artibani, Walter

    2016-08-01

    In 2010, we published a review summarising the available literature on surgical anatomy of the prostate and adjacent structures involved in cancer control and the functional outcome of prostatectomy. To provide an update based on new literature to help the surgeon improve oncologic and surgical outcomes of radical prostatectomy (RP). We searched the PubMed database using the keywords radical prostatectomy, anatomy, neurovascular bundle, nerve, fascia, pelvis, sphincter, urethra, urinary continence, and erectile function. Relevant articles and textbook chapters published since the last review were critically reviewed, analysed, and summarised. Moreover, we integrated aspects that were not addressed in the last review into this update. We found new evidence for several topics. Up to 40% of the cross-sectional surface area of the urethral sphincter tissue is laterally overlapped by the dorsal vascular complex and might be injured during en bloc ligation. Denonvilliers fascia is fused with the base of the prostate in a horizontal fashion dorsally/caudally of the seminal vesicles, requiring sharp detachment when preserved. During extended pelvic lymph node dissection, the erectile nerves are at risk in the presacral and internal iliac area. Dissection planes for nerve sparing can be graded according to the amount of tissue left on the prostate as a safety margin against positive surgical margins. Vascular structures can serve as landmarks. The urethral sphincter and its length after RP are influenced by the shape of the apex. Taking this shape into account allows preservation of additional sphincter length with improved postoperative continence. This update provides additional, detailed information about the surgical anatomy of the prostate and adjacent tissues involved in RP. This anatomy remains complex and widely variable. These details facilitate surgical orientation and dissection during RP and ideally should translate into improved outcomes. Based on recent

  7. Comparative study between modified Freyer′s prostatectomy, classical Freyer′s prostatectomy and Millin′s prostatectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bapat R

    1991-07-01

    Full Text Available Classical Freyer′s method was modified in which, prostatic fossa was packed after the enucleation of the gland for hemostatic purpose; and the pack and suprapubic drain were brought out laterally. The pack was removed after 48-72 hours postoperatively and catheter was introduced per urethrum for early closure of suprapubic ostomy. Fifty such cases of Modified Freyer′s prostatectomy were compared with cases of classical Freyer′s prostatectomy (n = 25 and Millin′s prostatectomy (n = 25. The duration of surgery and requirements for perioperative blood transfusion were found to be less with our method.

  8. Robots drive the German radical prostatectomy market: a total population analysis from 2006 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeben, C; Koch, R; Baunacke, M; Wirth, M P; Huber, J

    2016-12-01

    To assess trends in the distribution of patients for radical prostatectomy in Germany from 2006 to 2013 and the impact of robotic surgery on annual caseloads. We hypothesized that the advent of robotics and the establishment of certified prostate cancer centers caused centralization in the German radical prostatectomy market. Using remote data processing we analyzed the nationwide German billing data from 2006 to 2013. We supplemented this database with additional hospital characteristics like the prostate cancer center certification status. Inclusion criteria were a prostate cancer diagnosis combined with radical prostatectomy. Hospitals with certification or a surgical robot in 2009 were defined as 'early' group. Linear covariant-analytic models were applied to describe trends over time. Annual radical prostatectomy numbers declined from 28 374 (2006) to 21 850 (2013). High-volume hospitals (⩾100 cases) decreased from 87 (22.0%) in 2006 to 43 (10.4%) in 2013. Low-volume hospitals (200 cases per year contrary to the overall trend (Pdecentralization of radical prostatectomy in Germany. The driving force for this development might consist in the overall decline of radical prostatectomy numbers. The most important factor for achieving higher caseloads was the presence of a robotic system. In order to optimize outcomes of radical prostatectomy additional health policy measures might be necessary.

  9. Risk factors predicting the outcome of salvage radiotherapy in patients with biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Hidefumi; Shimizu, Yosuke; Mizowaki, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Salvage radiotherapy is the only curative treatment for patients with prostate cancer showing biochemical progression after radical prostatectomy. In this study, we evaluated the clinicopathological parameters that influence the outcome of salvage radiotherapy. Medical records of 49 patients who underwent salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy from 1997 to 2008 at the Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, were retrospectively reviewed. Radiotherapy was carried out with 66 Gy on the prostatic bed. Biochemical progression-free survival after salvage radiotherapy at 2, 5 and 7 years was 51.0%, 42.2% and 42.2%, respectively. Significant parameters predicting biochemical progression after salvage radiotherapy by Cox regression analysis were prostatectomy Gleason score sum ≥8 (hazard ratio 0.08; 95% confidence interval 0.03-0.22; P=0.001), prostate-specific antigen nadir after radical prostatectomy ≥0.04 ng/mL (hazard ratio 0.30; 95% confidence interval 0.13-0.69; P=0.005) and negative surgical margin (hazard ratio 0.28; 95% confidence interval 0.12-0.70; P=0.006). When the patients were subgrouped by these risk factors, the 5-year progression-free survival rates after salvage radiotherapy were 77.8%, 50.0% and 6.7% in patients with 0, 1 and ≥2 predictors, respectively. In order to discriminate favorable candidates for salvage radiotherapy, Gleason score of prostatectomy, prostate-specific antigen nadir after prostatectomy and positive surgical margin represent independent predictors. Thus, progression-free survival might be more precisely predicted according to the presence/absence of these risk factors. The significance of this risk classification should be confirmed by large prospective studies. (author)

  10. Post-nerve-sparing prostatectomy, dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiotherapy: effect on erectile function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastasch, Michael D.; Teh, Bin S.; Mai, W.-Y.; Carpenter, L. Steven; Lu, Hsin H.; Chiu, J. Kam; Woo, Shiao Y.; Grant, Walter H.; Miles, Brian J.; Kadmon, Dov; Butler, E. Brian

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The advent of widespread prostate-specific antigen screening has resulted in more younger, potent men being diagnosed with early-stage, organ-confined prostate cancer amenable to definitive surgery. Nerve-sparing prostatectomy is a relatively new surgical advance in the treatment of prostate cancer. Very few data exist on the effect of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) on erectile function after nerve-sparing prostatectomy. They are based on conventional techniques using moderate doses of radiation, 45-54 Gy. Intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) is becoming more widespread because it allows dose escalation with increased sparing of the surrounding normal tissue. We investigated the effect of postprostatectomy, high-dose IMRT on patients' erectile function. Methods and Materials: A review of patient records found 51 patients treated between April 1998 and December 2000 with IMRT after unilateral or bilateral nerve-sparing prostatectomy. The pathologic disease stage in these patients was T2 in 47.4% and T3 in 52.6%. Postoperatively, 4 patients received hormonal ablation consisting of one injection of Lupron Depot (30 mg) 2 months before RT. The median age was 65 years (range 46-77) at the time of RT. The prescribed dose was 64 Gy (range 60-66). The mean dose was 69.6 Gy (range 64.0-72.3). Erectile function was assessed before and after RT by questionnaires. Sexual potency was defined as erectile rigidity adequate for vaginal penetration. Results: Of the 51 patients, 18 (35.3%) maintained their potency and 33 (64.7%) became impotent after nerve-sparing prostatectomy. Patients who underwent bilateral nerve-sparing prostatectomy had higher rates of postoperative potency than did those who underwent unilateral nerve-sparing surgery (72.2% vs. 27.8%; p=0.025). The follow-up for the entire group was 19.5 months. All 18 patients (100%) who were potent postoperatively remained potent after RT. The median follow-up for the 18 potent patients was 27.2 months, significantly

  11. Clinical outcome of radical prostatectomy for stage C prostate cancer. Comparison with other treatment modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Osamu; Meguro, Norio; Saiki, Shigeru; Kinouchi, Toshiaki; Kuroda, Masao; Usami, Michiyuki; Kotake, Toshihiko

    1997-01-01

    Of the 69 patients with clinical stage C prostate cancer under 75 years old and with good performance status between 1986 and 1995, 29 underwent radical prostatectomy combined with endocrine therapy, 21 underwent radiation therapy combined with endocrine therapy and remaining 19 patients were treated by endocrine therapy alone. The median follow-up was 44 months (range 4 to 122). Radical prostatectomy resulted in progression-free rates of 79% and 61% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Progression-free rates were lower in patients with lymph node metastasis or positive surgical margins. In patients with clinical stage T3a-c and well or moderately differentiated tumor, radical prostatectomy resulted in a progression-free rate of 100% at 5 years. However, in patients with clinical stage T4a or poorly differentiated tumor, radiation therapy resulted in a better progression-free rate than radical prostatectomy. These findings suggest that patients with clinical stage T3a-c and well or moderately differentiated tumor will benefit from radical prostatectomy combined with endocrine therapy and that radiation therapy will be effective for advanced diseases. (author)

  12. Temporal trends and predictors of pelvic lymph node dissection in open or minimally invasive radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feifer, Andrew H; Elkin, Elena B; Lowrance, William T; Denton, Brian; Jacks, Lindsay; Yee, David S; Coleman, Jonathan A; Laudone, Vincent P; Scardino, Peter T; Eastham, James A

    2011-09-01

    Pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) is an important component of prostate cancer staging and treatment, especially for surgical patients who have high-risk tumor features. It is not clear how the shift from open radical prostatectomy (ORP) to minimally invasive radical prostatectomy (MIRP) has affected the use of PLND. The objectives of this study were to identify predictors of PLND and to assess the impact of surgical technique in a contemporary, population-based cohort. In Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) cancer registry data linked with Medicare claims, the authors identified men who underwent ORP or MIRP for prostate cancer during 2003 to 2007. The impact of surgical approach on PLND was evaluated, and interactions were examined between surgical procedure, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and Gleason score with the analysis controlled for patient and tumor characteristics. Of 6608 men who underwent ORP or MIRP, 70% (n = 4600) underwent PLND. The use of PLND declined over time both overall and within subgroups defined by procedure type. PLND was 5 times more likely in men who underwent ORP than in men who underwent MIRP when the analysis was controlled for patient and tumor characteristics. Elevated PSA and biopsy Gleason score, but not clinical stage, were associated with a greater odds of PLND in both the ORP group and the MIRP group. However, the magnitude of the association between these factors and PLND was significantly greater for patients in the ORP group. PLND was less common among men who underwent MIRP, independent of tumor risk factors. A decline in PLND rates was not fully explained by an increase in MIRP. The authors concluded that these trends may signal a surgical approach-dependent disparity in prostate cancer staging and therapy. Cancer 2011 © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  13. Journal of Surgical Technique and Case Report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of Journal of Surgical Technique and Case Report is to advance surgical knowledge and practice by promoting the reporting of innovative and reproducible surgical techniques ... Anterior palatal island advancement flap for bone graft coverage: technical note · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  14. Outcomes After Radical Prostatectomy in Men Receiving Prior Pelvic Radiation for Non-Prostate Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, Timothy A.; Wedmid, Alexei; Sandhu, Jaspreet S.; Eastham, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Morbidity associated with salvage radical prostatectomy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after primary radiotherapy is well documented, but little is known about the impact on surgical difficulty and outcomes for radical prostatectomy in men who have had prior pelvic radiotherapy for non-prostate malignancies. We report functional outcomes of 9 patients treated at our institution. Materials and Methods From 1993 to 2007, 9 patients underwent radical prostatectomy following external beam radiotherapy for testicular seminoma (6), anorectal cancer (2), and colon cancer (1). Clinical information was obtained from a prospective prostate cancer database. Results Radical prostatectomy was completed without identifiable injury to adjacent structures in all 9 patients. Four patients had significant pelvic fibrosis, 3 required bilateral neurovascular bundle resection. Neurovascular bundle preservation was performed in the remaining 6 patients, 4 with good preoperative erectile function. However, no patient recovered erectile function postoperatively at a median follow-up time of 75 months (range 12 to 172). Of preoperatively continent men, 57% required ≤1 pad daily and 43% were completely dry, achieving complete urinary control at a median follow-up time of 7.5 months (range 2 to 20). Two patients developed anastomotic stricture, one being associated with concomitant ureteral stricture. Conclusions Radical prostatectomy after pelvic radiotherapy for non-prostate malignancies was not associated with increased intraoperative morbidity. However, rates of anastomotic stricture, erectile dysfunction, and urinary incontinence appear to be higher than those observed after radical prostatectomy in men with no prior radiotherapy and comparable to those seen in the salvage radical prostatectomy setting. PMID:19239447

  15. Problematics of open prostatectomy in an Ivorian District Hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mgbakor, Anthony Chukwura

    2012-09-01

    Benign prostatic hypertrophy forms the bulk of urology workload in many sub-Saharan African hospitals. However, its management in secondary hospitals encounters specific problems that are rarely seen in the bigger tertiary institutions. We have tried to describe these difficulties across an account of open prostatectomy in regional secondary referral hospitals in the Côte d'Ivoire. This is a retrospective account of the specific difficulties encountered in the management of 327 consecutive cases of open prostatectomy carried out between August 1991 and September 2007 mainly in two secondary referral hospitals in the Côte d'Ivoire. The difficulties were at different levels: late presentation with 309 (94.5%) of the patients having experienced at least an episode of acute retention of urine, surgery while most patients were still carrying a catheter, minimal investigations carried out, scoring the patients in the IPSS scale, shortage of funds in the course of the management, and surveillance in the immediate postoperative period. The overall results were relatively satisfactory given our conditions of work. The most frequent complications were wound infection (14.7%), bleeding requiring transfusion (8.6%) and re-operation for clot retention (4.3%). We had a case (0.3%) of the rare prostato-rectal fistula which was managed conservatively. There were 4 deaths (1.2%). Open prostatectomy is the only surgical option for the management of benign prostatic hypertrophy in most of the urology centers of sub-Saharan Africa. Concerning its management away from the Tertiary Institutes, the surgery team is faced with specific problems which demand precise adaptations. Despite difficult working conditions, the results are sufficiently encouraging and gratifying to justify its pursuit while Urologists await the availability of equipments for transurethral resection of the prostate and other novel techniques.

  16. Treatment results of adjuvant radiotherapy and salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadasaki, Koichi; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Kenjo, Masahiro; Matsuura, Kanji; Murakami, Yuji; Hashimoto, Yasutoshi; Ito, Katsuhide; Kiriu, Hiroshi; Ito, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    The indications for and the efficacy of radiation therapy after radical operation for patients with prostate cancer are not clear. We analyzed the treatment results of adjuvant radiotherapy and salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Between September 1997 and November 2004, 57 patients received adjuvant radiotherapy or salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Fifteen patients received radiation therapy because of positive margins and/or extracapsular invasion in surgical specimens (adjuvant group). Forty-two patients received radiation therapy because of rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) during follow-up (salvage group). Radiation therapy was delivered to the fossa of the prostate±seminal vesicles by a three-dimensional (3-D) conformal technique to a total dose of 60-66 Gy (median, 60 Gy). Biochemical control was defined as the maintenance of a PSA level of less than 0.2 ng/ml. The median follow-up period after radiation therapy was 33 months (range, 12-98 months). Three-year biochemical control rates were 87% for the adjuvant group and 61% for the salvage group. For patients in the salvage group treated without hormone therapy, the preradiation PSA value was the most significant factor for the biochemical control rate. The 3-year biochemical control rate was 93% in patients whose preradiation PSA was 0.5 ng/ml or less and 29% in patients whose preradiation PSA was more than 0.5 ng/ml. No severe adverse effects (equal to or more than grade 3) were seen in treated patients. Radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy seemed to be effective for adjuvant therapy and for salvage therapy in patients with a preradiation PSA of 0.5 ng/ml or less. Also, radiation to the fossa of the prostate±seminal vesicles, to a total dose of 60-66 Gy, using a three-dimensional (3-D) conformal technique, seemed to be safe. (author)

  17. Prostate bed motion may cause geographic miss in post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, Linda J.; Cox, Jennifer; Eade, Thomas; Rinks, Marianne; Kneebone, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    There is little data to guide radiation oncologists on appropriate margin selection in the post-prostatectomy setting. The aim of this study was to quantify interfraction variation in motion of the prostate bed to determine these margins. The superior and inferior surgical clips in the prostate bed were tracked on pretreatment cone beam CT images (n=377) for 40 patients who had received post-prostatectomy radiotherapy. Prostate bed motion was calculated for the upper and lower segments by measuring the position of surgical clips located close to midline relative to bony anatomy in the axial (translational) and sagittal (tilt) planes. The frequency of potential geographic misses was calculated for either 1cm or 0.5cm posterior planning target volume margins. The mean magnitude of movement of the prostate bed in the anterior–posterior, superior–inferior and left–right planes, respectively, were as follows: upper portion, 0.50cm, 0.28cm, 0.10cm; lower portion, 0.18cm, 0.18cm, 0.08cm. The random and systematic errors, respectively, of the prostate bed motion in the anterior–posterior, superior–inferior and left–right planes, respectively, were as follows: upper portion, 0.47cm and 0.50cm, 0.28cm and 0.27cm, 0.11cm and 0.11cm; lower portion, 0.17cm and 18cm, 0.17cm and 0.19cm, 0.08cm and 0.10cm. Most geographic misses occurred in the upper prostate bed in the anterior–posterior plane. The median prostate bed tilt was 1.8° (range −23.4° to 42.3°). Variability was seen in all planes for the movement of both surgical clips. The greatest movement occurred in the anterior–posterior plane in the upper prostate bed, which could cause geographic miss of treatment delivery. The variability in the movement of the superior and inferior clips indicates a prostate bed tilt that would be difficult to correct with standard online matching techniques. This creates a strong argument for using anisotropic planning target volume margins in post-prostatectomy

  18. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and resection of rectum performed together: first experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodak, Milos; Orhalmi, Julius; Kosina, Josef; Balik, Michal; Pacovsky, Jaroslav

    2015-09-01

    Laparoscopy is an increasingly used approach in the surgical treatment of rectal cancer and prostate cancer. The anatomical proximity of the two organs is the main reason to consider performing both procedures simultaneously. To present our first experience of laparoscopic rectal resection and radical prostatectomy, performed simultaneously, in 3 patients. The first patient was diagnosed with locally advanced rectal cancer and tumor infiltration of the prostate and seminal vesicles. The other 2 patients were diagnosed with tumor duplicity. The surgery of the first patient started with laparoscopic prostatectomy except division of the prostate from the rectal wall. The next step was resection of the rectum, extralevator amputation of the rectum and vesicourethral anastomosis. In the other patients, resection of the rectum, followed by radical prostatectomy, was performed. The median follow-up was 12 months. The median operation time was 4 h 40 min, with blood loss of 300 ml. The operations and postoperative course were without incident in the case of 2 patients. However, 1 patient had stercoral peritonitis and a vesicorectal fistula in the early postoperative stage. Sigmoidostomy and postponed ureteroileal conduit were carried out. All patients were in oncologic remission. Combined laparoscopic rectal resection and radical prostatectomy is a viable option for selected patients with locally advanced rectal cancer or tumor duplication. The procedures were completed without complications in 2 out of 3 patients.

  19. Comparative randomized study on the efficaciousness of treatment of BOO due to BPH in patients with prostate up to 100 gr by endoscopic gyrus prostate resection versus open prostatectomy. Preliminary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulianelli, Roberto; Brunori, Stefano; Gentile, Barbara Cristina; Vincenti, Giorgio; Nardoni, Stefano; Pisanti, Francesco; Shestani, Teuta; Mavilla, Luca; Albanesi, Luca; Attisani, Francesco; Mirabile, Gabriella; Schettini, Manlio

    2011-06-01

    With the advent of medical management and minimally techniques for benign prostate hypeplasia (BPH), invasive surgical procedures such open prostatectomy (OPSU) have become less common, although selected patients may still benefit from open prostatectomy. Aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy and safety of Bipolar TURP (Gyrus electro surgical system) versus standard open prostatectomy in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) with markedly enlarged glands refractory to medical therapy. From January 2003 to January 2004, 140 patients affected by mild-severe LUTS, secondary to BOO from BPH, refractory to medical therapy, with markedly enlarged glands, were randomized in two groups (1:1), and subjected to open prostatectomy (OPSU) carried out with traditional method (Bracci Thechnique) versus transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) utilizing the bipolar methodology. Preoperative work-up included IPSS, IIEF-5 and Qol questionnaires. All patients were submitted to uroflowmetry, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), measurament of postvoidal residual urine and PSA determination. IPSS, IIEF-5 and Qol, uroflowmetry, TRUS, measurement of post-voidal residual urine, PSA determination and number of reoperations were evaluated at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30 and 36 months. Operative time, resected tissue weight and perioperative complications were also registered. Total post-operative catheter time, total postoperative hospital stay, haemoglobin loss were recorded in the 2 groups. Comparative data on IPSS symptom score, IIEF-5 and Qol, PSA, peak urinary flow rates and post-void residual urine volume in the 2 groups were similar but showed a significative improvement with respect to baseline value. Postoperative haemoglobin levels, postoperative catheterization, hospital stay and 3-yr overall surgical re-treatment-free rate were significantly better in the Bipolar group. In the treatment of LUTS due to bladder outlet

  20. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy has lower biochemical recurrence than laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon Heui Lee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the effectiveness and safety of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP versus laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP in the treatment of prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Existing systematic reviews were updated to investigate the effectiveness and safety of RARP. Electronic databases, including Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, the Cochrane Library, KoreaMed, Kmbase, and others, were searched through July 2014. The quality of the selected systematic reviews was assessed by using the revised assessment of multiple systematic reviews (R-Amstar and the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Meta-analysis was performed by using Revman 5.2 (Cochrane Community and Comprehensive Meta-Analysis 2.0 (CMA; Biostat. Cochrane Q and I2 statistics were used to assess heterogeneity. Results: Two systematic reviews and 16 additional studies were selected from a search performed of existing systematic reviews. These included 2 randomized controlled clinical trials and 28 nonrandomized comparative studies. The risk of complications, such as injury to organs by the Clavien-Dindo classification, was lower with RARP than with LRP (relative risk [RR], 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23–0.85; p=0.01. The risk of urinary incontinence was lower (RR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.31–0.60; p<0.000001 and the potency rate was significantly higher with RARP than with LRP (RR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.11–1.70; I2 =78%; p=0.003. Regarding positive surgical margins, no significant difference in risk between the 2 groups was observed; however, the biochemical recurrence rate was lower after RARP than after LRP (RR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.48–0.73; I2 =21%; p<0.00001. Conclusions: RARP appears to be a safe and effective technique compared with LRP with a lower complication rate, better potency, a higher continence rate, and a decreased rate of biochemical recurrence.

  1. Consumerism and its impact on robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Sultan; Lawrentschuk, Nathan

    2011-12-01

    • Many experts consider that media coverage, marketing and/or direct-to-consumer advertising, particularly Internet-based forms, are fundamental to the widespread adoption of robotic-assisted prostatectomy (RARP). However, this has not been explored previously. • The primary objective of the present study was to delineate the role of media coverage and marketing of RARP on the Internet, whereas the secondary goal focused on website quality with respect to the presentation of prostatectomy. • Website content was evaluated for direct-to-consumer advertising after the retrieval of the first 50 websites using Google and Yahoo for each of the terms: 'robotic prostatectomy, laparoscopic prostatectomy (LP) and open radical prostatectomy (ORP)'. • A linear regression analysis was performed for the annual number of Internet news hits over the last decade for each procedure. Website quality assessment was performed using WHO Honesty on the Internet (HON) code principles. • Of the retrieved sites, the proportion containing direct-to-consumer advertising for RARP vs LP vs ORP using Google was 64% vs 14% vs 0%, respectively (P 0.05). • Media coverage and marketing of RARP on the Internet is more widespread compared to LP and ORP. • Disturbingly, the quality of websites using any technique for prostatectomy was of poor quality when using principles of honest information presenting and such findings need to be discussed with respect to obtaining informed consent from patients. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  2. Journal of Surgical Technique and Case Report: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The aim of Journal of Surgical Technique and Case Report is to advance surgical knowledge and practice by promoting the reporting of innovative and reproducible surgical techniques and illustrative surgical cases on various surgical disciplines. The journal encourages authoritative synthesis of current ...

  3. A short-term cost-effectiveness study comparing robot-assisted laparoscopic and open retropubic radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hohwü, Lena; Borre, Michael; Ehlers, Lars

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cost effectiveness and cost utility comparing robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) versus retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP). METHODS: In a retrospective cohort study a total of 231 men between the age of 50 and 69 years and with clinically localised prostate....... An economic evaluation was made to estimate direct costs of the first postoperative year and an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) per successful surgical treatment and per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). A successful RP was defined as: no residual cancer (PSA ... high volume urology centres and utilise the full potential of each robot....

  4. Statin use and risk of disease recurrence and death after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskiväli, Teemu; Kujala, Paula; Visakorpi, Tapio; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Murtola, Teemu J

    2016-04-01

    Statins have been linked with improved prostate cancer survival and lower risk of recurrence in men treated with radiation therapy. However, the association is unclear for surgically-treated men. We studied the risk of prostate cancer recurrence and death by statin usage after radical prostatectomy in a cohort of prostate cancer patients treated with radical prostatectomy. A cohort of 1,314 men who underwent curative-intent radical prostatectomy at the Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland during 1995-2009 were linked to national prescription database to obtain detailed information on statin purchases. The risk of PSA recurrence and death (overall and prostate cancer-specific) by statin use before and after the surgery were evaluated using Cox regression with model adjustment for tumor characteristics, total cholesterol and simultaneous use of antidiabetic and antihypertensive drugs. Tissue expression of putative prognostic markers were measured from a subgroup of 323 men. During the median follow-up of 8.6 years after surgery 484 men recurred, while 244 men died (32 due to prostate cancer). In general statin use before or after prostatectomy was not associated with risk of disease recurrence or death. Tissue expression of Ki-67 and ERG modified the association between statin use and risk of disease recurrence; the risk estimates were lower in men with Ki-67 expression above the median (P for interaction 0.001 and 0.004 for statin use before and after prostatectomy, respectively) and no ERG expression in the tumor tissue (P for interaction 0.006 and 0.011). Statin use generally did not affect prostate cancer prognosis after prostatectomy. The effect on disease recurrence may depend on tumor properties, such as proliferation activity. Thus possible future prospective studies should recognize and enroll subgroups of prostate cancer patients most likely to benefit from statins. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Radical perineal prostatectomy: cost efficient, outcome effective, minimally invasive prostate cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michael J

    2003-09-01

    Localized prostate cancer is a common disease for which minimally invasive treatment methods are being explored. Perineal prostatectomy, as a historical open procedure, is modified to incorporate contemporary surgical ideas. There is relatively little in the literature regarding modern adaptations of perineal prostatectomy. This method of anatomic radical perineal prostatectomy has been developed to accomplish a minimally invasive method of achieving goals of disease control and preservation of genito-urinary functions. Prospective outcome data is accumulated on 508 consecutive radical perineal prostatectomies by a single surgeon. Pathologic stage and PSA detectability are measures of cancer control. Pad use and ability to complete intercourse measure urinary and sexual function. General complications and other outcome measures are evaluated. Freedom from PSA detectability by pathologic stage is 96.3%, 79.4%, and 69.4% for organ confined, specimen confined and margin positive in the absence of seminal vesical invasion with an average 4 years follow up (3-114 months). Margins are positive in 18% of cases. The average cancer size is 9.4g and 36% of cases have extracapsular invasion. By the first, third, sixth months and one year, 38%, 65%, 88% and 96% are free of pad use and report being dry. While over 80% of nerve-spared patients enjoy the return of spontaneous erectile function, the men with bilateral nerve preservation note earlier and more complete return of function. There are no cardiopulmonary complications or deaths. Transfusions occurred in 1%, none in the past 400 cases. Average total hospital charges are USD$4889.00 in 1999 and 2000. Anterior urethral strictures, anastomotic strictures and fecal urgency/stress flatus occur 2%, 2% and 2-4%, respectively. This method of prostatectomy is able to achieve complete cancer resection while preserving urinary and sexual function as well as laparoscopic or retropubic prostatectomy. The simplicity and minimally

  6. Light Reflectance Spectroscopy to Detect Positive Surgical Margins on Prostate Cancer Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Monica S C; Lay, Aaron H; Wang, Xinlong; Kapur, Payal; Ozayar, Asim; Sayah, Maryam; Zeng, Li; Liu, Hanli; Roehrborn, Claus G; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A

    2016-02-01

    Intraoperative frozen section analysis is not routinely performed to determine positive surgical margins at radical prostatectomy due to time requirements and unproven clinical usefulness. Light reflectance spectroscopy, which measures light intensity reflected or backscattered from tissues, can be applied to differentiate malignant from benign tissue. We used a novel light reflectance spectroscopy probe to evaluate positive surgical margins on ex vivo radical prostatectomy specimens and correlate its findings with pathological examination. Patients with intermediate to high risk disease undergoing radical prostatectomy were enrolled. Light reflectance spectroscopy was performed on suspected malignant and benign prostate capsule immediately following organ extraction. Each light reflectance spectroscopy at 530 to 830 nm was analyzed and correlated with pathological results. A regression model and forward sequential selection algorithm were developed for optimal feature selection. Eighty percent of light reflectance spectroscopy data were selected to train a logistic regression model, which was evaluated by the remaining 20% data. This was repeated 5 times to calculate averaged sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. Light reflectance spectroscopy analysis was performed on 17 ex vivo prostate specimens, on which a total of 11 histologically positive and 22 negative surgical margins were measured. Two select features from 700 to 830 nm were identified as unique to malignant tissue. Cross-validation when performing the predictive model showed that the optical probe predicted positive surgical margins with 85% sensitivity, 86% specificity, 86% accuracy and an AUC of 0.95. Light reflectance spectroscopy can identify positive surgical margins accurately in fresh ex vivo radical prostatectomy specimens. Further study is required to determine whether such analysis may be used in real time to improve surgical decision making and decrease positive surgical margin rates

  7. HYDRODISSECTION FOR PRESERVATION OF NEUROVASCULAR BUNDLE DURING RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Gevorgyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy is one of the high-tech operations in urology, and the challenge of the surgeon is not only to remove the prostate tumor, but also to provide a high quality of life. The fact that most questions devoted from patients in a conversation with the surgeon before the operation are devoted to this issue, shows the importance and relevance. At present, the diagnostic methods allow significantly more likely to detect early  prostate cancer, making finding and treatment of these patients more affordable and allows to apply this operation.Lately, it seems urgent to explore the possibility of water jet dissection in the field of urology, in particular, for nerve-sparing prostatectomy. Preservation of erectile function depends largely on the quality of separating the neurovascular bundle. Standard use of electrocautery is associated with damage to the neurovascular bundle.  When performing operations using water-jet mobilization of prostate the selective dissection of tissue is performed. This avoids injury of neurovascular bundle and further postoperative complications. The use of this technique may allow the surgeon to provide a more accurate mobilization prostate and selectively controlled intersection vessels heading to the prostate from the neurovascular bundle, reduce intraoperative blood loss,  maintaining continence, erectile function.This literature review is considered by the experience of using nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy using a water-jet dissector, estimated intraoperative parameters using this method.However, we have the lack of extensive research capabilities of this technique when performing nerve-preserving radical prostatectomy, that does not allow to make a comprehensive presentation on the benefits of this technique and its effects on erectile function and quality of urination, further study of this issue in such a difficult category of patients.

  8. Anatomic Considerations for Radical Retropubic Prostatectomy in an Achondroplastic Dwarf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Gyomber

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the first report of a radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP in an achondroplastic dwarf. We highlight the pelvic anatomy, precluding laparoscopic or robotic prostatectomy, and making open surgery extremely difficult. We review relevant literature regarding general, urological, and orthopedic abnormalities of achondroplasia (ACH and present a clinical case. No reports of RRP in achondroplastic dwarfs exist, with only one case of an abandoned RRP due to similar pelvic anatomy in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta. Significant lumbar lordosis found in ACH results in a short anteroposterior dimension, severely limiting access to the prostate. We present a case of a 62-year-old achondroplastic dwarf who had Gleason 3+4 disease on transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy in four from 12 cores. Surgery was difficult due to narrow anteroposterior pelvic dimension, but achievable. Histological analysis revealed multifocal prostate cancer, with negative surgical margins and no extraprostatic extension. RRP in ACH patients, although possible, should be approached with caution due to the abnormal pelvic dimensions, and discussions regarding potential abandonment of surgery should be included during informed consent. This case highlights the preoperative use of computed tomography to assist in the surgical planning for patients with difficult pelvic anatomy.

  9. Influence of secondary diagnoses in the development of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Padilla-Fernández

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study whether there are factors related to secondary diagnoses (SDg present in patients with prostate cancer that influence the development of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy (RP. Materials and methods: A retrospective multicenter observational study was performed reviewing the medical records of 430 men who underwent RP due to organ-confined prostate cancer in 9 different hospitals. Two study groups were distinguished: Group A (GA: Patients without urinary incontinence after RP; Group B (GB: patients with any degree of post-surgical urinary incontinence. Results: Average age at surgery was 63.42 years (range 45-73. 258 patients were continent after surgery and 172 patients complaint of any degree of incontinence after RP. A higher percentage of healthy patients was found in group A (continent after surgery than in group B (p = 0.001. The most common SDg prior to surgery were hypertension, lower urinary tract symptoms, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus and erectile dysfunction, but none did show a greater trend towards post-surgical incontinence. Conclusions: A better health status prior to surgery is associated to a lower incidence of new-onset urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy. However, no correlation was found between the most common medical disorders and the development of post-surgical urinary incontinence.

  10. An unusual localization of seven months delayed pelvic lymphocele following radical retropubic prostatectomy: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berk Hazır

    Full Text Available Introduction: A pelvic lymphocele is a collection of lymphatic fluid that develops after extensive lymphadenectomies in surgeries such as urological malignancies or renal transplantation. Pelvic lymphoceles may cause complications such as fever, abdominal pain, leg swelling, genital swelling and flank pain. This report summarizes the management of a pelvic lymphocele after open radical retropubic prostatectomy with bilateral lymphadenectomy. Presentation of case: Herein, we present a case in which a pelvic lymphocele developed seven months post-radical open retropubic prostatectomy and through this patient we discussed the lymphocele following radical prostatectomy. The pelvic lymphocele occurred along the sciatic nerve from the sciatica foramen to the intergluteal muscles. The patient was treated with three drainage catheters. This localization is an atypical and unusual for lymphocele after radical retropubic prostatectomy. Discussion: Lymphocele formation that leads to major complications after radical prostatectomy is rare. Lymphocele formation is most commonly seen in the early postoperative period, but it should be considered in patients with fever, abdominal pain or leg swelling during the late postoperative period. Lymphocele formation was the most common cause of hospital readmission after radical prostatectomy. Conclusion: Lymphocele formation can be seen in atypical regions and can lead to unexpected complications after radical prostatectomy. Therefore, it should be brought to mind when complaints such as fever and lower extremity swelling occurred in patients underwent extensive lymph node dissection. Surgical treatment options are available, but percutaneous interventions can also be used. Keywords: Radical retropubic prostatectomy, Pelvic lymphocele, Percutaneous drainage, Prostate cancer, Case-report

  11. Preservation of the smooth muscular internal (vesical) sphincter and of the proximal urethra for the early recovery of urinary continence after retropubic radical prostatectomy: a prospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunocilla, Eugenio; Schiavina, Riccardo; Pultrone, Cristian Vincenzo; Borghesi, Marco; Rossi, Martina; Cevenini, Matteo; Martorana, Giuseppe

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the influence of preservation of the muscular internal sphincter and proximal urethra on continence recovery after radical prostatectomy. This was a prospective single-center, case-control study. A total of 40 consecutive patients with organ-confined prostate cancer were submitted to radical prostatectomy with the preservation of the muscular internal sphincter and the proximal urethra (group 1), and their outcomes were compared with those of 40 patients submitted to a standard procedure (group 2). Continence rates were assessed using a self-administrated questionnaire at 3, 7 and 30 days, and 3 and 12 months after removal of the catheter. Group 1 had a faster recovery of early continence than group 2 at day 3 (45% vs 22%; P = 0.029) and at day 7 (75% vs 50%; P = 0.018). Considering the number of pads, group 1 had a faster recovery of continence at 3, 7 and 30 days, and also had less incidence of severe incontinence. There was no statistically significant difference in terms of continence at 3 and 12 months among the two groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that surgical technique and young age were significantly associated with earlier time to continence at 3 and 7 days. The two groups had no significant differences in terms of surgical margins. Our modified technique of radical retropubic prostatectomy with preservation of the smooth muscular internal sphincter, as well as of the proximal urethra during bladder neck dissection, results in a significantly increased urinary continence at 3, 7 and 30 days after catheter removal, with a minor incidence of severe incontinence. The technique is also oncologically safe, and it does not increase the operative duration of the procedure. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  12. Orgasm after radical prostatectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeman, M; VanDriel, MF; Schultz, WCMW; Mensink, HJA

    Objective To evaluate the ability to obtain and the quality of orgasm after radical prostatectomy, Patients and methods The orgasms experienced after undergoing radical prostatectomy were evaluated in 20 men (median age 65 years, range 56-76) using a semi-structured interview and a self-administered

  13. Experience with open prostatectomy in Bingham University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Vol 8, No 4 (2017) > ... The standard of care for benign prostatic hyperplasia is still the open prostatectomy ... Keywords: Open prostatectomy, benign prostatic hyperplasia, Complications, Assisted robotic radical prostatectomy ...

  14. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy in the canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, D T; Chari, R S; Neighbors, J D; Eubanks, S; Schuessler, W W; Preminger, G M

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of performing laparoscopic radical prostatectomy in a canine model. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy was performed on six adult male canines. A new endoscopic needle driver was used to construct a secure vesicourethral anastomosis. Average operative time required to complete the procedure was 304 min (range 270-345 min). Dissection of the prostate gland took an average of 67 min (range 35-90 min), and construction of the vesicourethral anastomosis took 154 min (rage 80-240 min). There were no intraoperative complications and only one postoperative complication (anastomotic leak). Five of the six animals recovered uneventfully from the procedure, and their foley catheters were removed 10-14 days postoperatively after a retrograde cystourethrogram demonstrated an intact vesicourethral anastomosis. Four (80%) of the surviving animals were clinically continent within 10 days after catheter removal. Post mortem examination confirmed that the vesicourethral anastomosis was intact with no evidence of urine extravasation. These data demonstrate the feasibility of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy in a canine model, and suggest that additional work with this technique should be continued to develop its potential clinical application.

  15. Early Experience with Robot-assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Gee Sim

    2004-10-01

    Conclusions: rLRP is feasible in a practice with a low volume of radical prostatectomies. Significant improvement in perioperative parameters occurs after the first eight cases. This technique confers the benefits of enhanced precision and dexterity for complex laparoscopic work in the pelvic cavity.

  16. Effects of Biofeedback in Preventing Urinary Incontinence and Erectile Dysfunction after Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana S. B. Perez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present a biofeedback method for the strengthening of perineal muscles during the preoperative procedures for radical prostatectomy, and we evaluate this technique as a prevention measure against complications such as urinary incontinence (UI and erectile dysfunction (ED, which affect prostatectomy patients after surgery. In the experimental protocol, the patients performed specific exercises with the help of a device that provided the patient with visual biofeedback, based on a plot of the anal pressure. For the experimental protocol, we selected 20 male patients, with an average age of 64.0 years, and submitted them to ten therapeutic sessions each. A control group consisting of 32 men with an average age of 66.3 years, who were treated with the same surgical procedure but not with the preoperative procedures, also took part in the experiment. To evaluate UI and ED after the surgery in both control and experimental groups, we used two validated questionnaires—to assess UI, we used the King’s Health Questionnaire (KHQ and, for ED, we used the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5 Questionnaire. We compared the variables associated with UI and ED after the surgery for the control and experimental groups. The occurrence of UI after radical prostatectomy in the control group (100% of the patients was higher than that for the experimental group (5% of the patients, with p < 0.0001. Likewise, the occurrence of erectile dysfunction after prostatectomy in the control group (48.6% of the patients was higher than that for the experimental group (5% of the patients, with p < 0.0001. The number of nocturia events also decreased as a consequence of the intervention (p < 0.0001, as did the number of disposable underwear units for urinary incontinence (p < 0.0001. Furthermore, we compared, only for the experimental group, the anal pressure before the biofeedback intervention and after the surgery, and we

  17. Computer-Assisted Technique for Surgical Tooth Extraction

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    Hosamuddin Hamza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Surgical tooth extraction is a common procedure in dentistry. However, numerous extraction cases show a high level of difficulty in practice. This difficulty is usually related to inadequate visualization, improper instrumentation, or other factors related to the targeted tooth (e.g., ankyloses or presence of bony undercut. Methods. In this work, the author presents a new technique for surgical tooth extraction based on 3D imaging, computer planning, and a new concept of computer-assisted manufacturing. Results. The outcome of this work is a surgical guide made by 3D printing of plastics and CNC of metals (hybrid outcome. In addition, the conventional surgical cutting tools (surgical burs are modified with a number of stoppers adjusted to avoid any excessive drilling that could harm bone or other vital structures. Conclusion. The present outcome could provide a minimally invasive technique to overcome the routine complications facing dental surgeons in surgical extraction procedures.

  18. Prophylactic belladonna suppositories on anesthetic recovery after robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavonetto, Federica; Lamborn, David R; McCaffrey, Joan M; Schroeder, Darrell R; Gettman, Mattew T; Sprung, Juraj; Weingarten, Toby N

    2013-06-01

    Two prospective trials have demonstrated prophylactic antimuscarinics following prostatectomy reduce pain from bladder spasms. Our practice adopted the routine administration of prophylactic belladonna and opium (B&O) suppositories to patients undergoing robotic assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP). The aim of this study is to determine if this change in clinical practice was associated with improvement of postoperative outcomes. The medical records of 202 patients that underwent RALP surgery who were or were not administered prophylactic B&O suppositories in the immediate postoperative period were abstracted for duration of anesthesia recovery, pain and analgesic use. Patient and surgical characteristics between groups were similar except B&O group were slightly older (p = 0.04) and administered less opioid analgesics (p = 0.05). There was no difference between groups in the duration of phase I recovery from anesthesia (p = 0.96). Multivariable adjustments for age, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status, and surgical duration were made, and again it was found that suppository administration had no association with phase I recovery times (p = 0.94). The use of antimuscarinic medication for bladder spams in the B&O group was less during phase I recovery (p suppositories at the immediate conclusion of RALP surgery was not associated with improvements of the postoperative course.

  19. Learning curve of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy for a single experienced surgeon: comparison with simultaneous laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Ja Yoon; Ha, Hong Koo

    2015-04-01

    Despite the large number of analytical reports regarding the learning curve in the transition from open to robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP), few comparative results with laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) have been reported. Thus, we evaluated operative and postoperative outcomes in RARP versus 100 simultaneously performed LRPs. A single surgeon had performed more than 1,000 laparoscopic operations, including 415 cases of radical nephrectomy, 85 radical cystectomies, 369 radical prostatectomies, and treatment of 212 other urological tumors, since 2009. We evaluated operative (operation time, intraoperative transfusion, complications, hospital stay, margin status, pathological stage, Gleason score) and postoperative (continence and erectile function) parameters in initial cases of RARP without tutoring compared with 100 recently performed LRPs. Mean operation time and length of hospital stay for RARP and LRP were 145.5±43.6 minutes and 118.1±39.1 minutes, and 6.4±0.9 days and 6.6±1.1 days, respectively (p=0.003 and p=0.721). After 17 cases, the mean operation time for RARP was similar to LRP (less than 2 hours). Positive surgical margins in localized cancer were seen in 11.1% and 8.9% of cases in RARP and LRP, respectively (p=0.733). At postoperative 3 months, sexual intercourse was reported in 14.0% and 12.0%, and pad-free continence in 96.0% and 81.0% in patients with RARP and LRP, respectively (p=0.796 and p=0.012). Previous large-volume experience of LRPs may shorten the learning curve for RARP in terms of oncological outcome. Additionally, previous experience with laparoscopy may improve the functional outcomes of RARP.

  20. Radical prostatectomy and positive surgical margins: tumor volume and Gleason score predicts cancer outcome

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    La Roca, Ricardo L.R. Felts de; Fonseca, Francisco Paula da; Cunha, Isabela Werneck da; Bezerra, Stephania Martins

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: positive surgical margins (PSMs) are common adverse factors to predict the outcome of a patient submitted to radical prostatectomy (PR). However, not all of these men will follow with biochemical (BCR) or clinical (CR) recurrence. Relationship between PSMs with these recurrent events has to be correlated with other clinicopathological findings in order to recognize more aggressive tumors in order to recommend complementary treatment to these selected patients. Materials and methods: we retrospectively reviewed the outcome of 228 patients submitted to open retropubic RP between March 1991 and June 2008, where 161 had and 67 did not have PSMs. Minimum follow-up time was considered 2 years after surgery. BCR was considered when PSA ≥ 0.2 ng/ml. CR was determined when clinical evidence of tumor appeared. Chi-square test was used to correlate clinical and pathologic variables with PSMs. The estimated 5-year risk of BCR and CR in presence of PSMs was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared to log-rank tests. Results: from the total of 228 patients, 161 (71%) had PSMs, while 67 (29%) had negative surgical margins (NSMs). Prostatic circumferential margin was the most common (43.4%) site. Univariate analysis showed statistically significant (p < 0.001) associations between the presence of PSMs and BCR, but not with CR (p = 0.06). Among 161 patients with PSMs, 61 (37.8%) presented BCR, while 100 (62.8%) did not. Predicting progression-free survival for 5 years, BCR was correlated with pathological stage; Gleason score; pre-treatment PSA; tumor volume in specimen; capsular and perineural invasion; presence and number of PSMs. RC correlated only with angiolymphatic invasion and Gleason score. Considering univariate analyses the clinicopathological factors predicting BCR for 5 years, results statistically significant links with prostate weight; pre-treatment PSA; Gleason score; pathological stage; tumor volume; PSMs; capsular and perineural

  1. Radical prostatectomy and positive surgical margins: tumor volume and Gleason score predicts cancer outcome

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    La Roca, Ricardo L.R. Felts de, E-mail: Ricardo@delarocaurologia.com.br [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, Francisco Paula da, E-mail: fpf@uol.com.br [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Urologia. Dept. de Cirurgia Pelvica; Cunha, Isabela Werneck da; Bezerra, Stephania Martins, E-mail: iwerneck@gmail.com, E-mail: stephaniab@gmail.com [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Patologia

    2013-07-01

    Introduction: positive surgical margins (PSMs) are common adverse factors to predict the outcome of a patient submitted to radical prostatectomy (PR). However, not all of these men will follow with biochemical (BCR) or clinical (CR) recurrence. Relationship between PSMs with these recurrent events has to be correlated with other clinicopathological findings in order to recognize more aggressive tumors in order to recommend complementary treatment to these selected patients. Materials and methods: we retrospectively reviewed the outcome of 228 patients submitted to open retropubic RP between March 1991 and June 2008, where 161 had and 67 did not have PSMs. Minimum follow-up time was considered 2 years after surgery. BCR was considered when PSA {>=} 0.2 ng/ml. CR was determined when clinical evidence of tumor appeared. Chi-square test was used to correlate clinical and pathologic variables with PSMs. The estimated 5-year risk of BCR and CR in presence of PSMs was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared to log-rank tests. Results: from the total of 228 patients, 161 (71%) had PSMs, while 67 (29%) had negative surgical margins (NSMs). Prostatic circumferential margin was the most common (43.4%) site. Univariate analysis showed statistically significant (p < 0.001) associations between the presence of PSMs and BCR, but not with CR (p = 0.06). Among 161 patients with PSMs, 61 (37.8%) presented BCR, while 100 (62.8%) did not. Predicting progression-free survival for 5 years, BCR was correlated with pathological stage; Gleason score; pre-treatment PSA; tumor volume in specimen; capsular and perineural invasion; presence and number of PSMs. RC correlated only with angiolymphatic invasion and Gleason score. Considering univariate analyses the clinicopathological factors predicting BCR for 5 years, results statistically significant links with prostate weight; pre-treatment PSA; Gleason score; pathological stage; tumor volume; PSMs; capsular and perineural

  2. Artificial urinary sphincter for urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy: a historical cohort from 2004 to 2015

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    Augusto Cesar Soares dos Santos Junior

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to retrospectively evaluate a cohort of patients with prostate cancer and persistent urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy. From January 2004 to December 2015, eighty-six individuals were identified to have received an AUS implant, provided by a private nonprofit HMO operating in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. On total, there were 91 AUS implants, with a median interval between radical prostatectomy and AUS implant of 3.6 years (IQR 1.9 to 5.5. The rate of AUS cumulative survival, after a median follow-up of 4.1 years (IQR 1.7-7.2 years, was 44% (n=40. The median survival of AUS implants was 2.9 years (IQR 0.5-7.9 years. Thirty-seven AUS implants (40.7% resulted in grade III surgical complications. There were 5 deaths at 2.1, 4.7, 5.7, 5.7 and 6.5 years of follow-up, but none due to causes directly associated to the AUS implant. Persistent severe incontinence was documented in 14 (15.3% additional patients. From the 51 AUS implants which resulted in grade III surgical complications or persistent severe incontinence, 24 (47.1% underwent surgical revisions. Explantation of the sphincter or its components was observed in 6 cases (25.0%. Mechanical failure, described as fluid loss and/or inability to recycle the AUS device, was observed in 4 devices (16.7%. In conclusion, although AUS implants are recommended as the gold-standard treatment of severe urinary incontinence after prostatectomy, the observed high rates of malfunction and grade III adverse events are a matter of concern warranting further assessment on the safety and efficacy of these devices.

  3. Relationship of age to outcome and clinicopathologic findings in men submitted to radical prostatectomy

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    Athanase Billis

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It is controversial whether age is associated with higher grade and worse outcome. Some studies have not found age to be related to outcome nor younger age to be associated with better response to therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study population consisted of 27 patients aged 55 years or younger and 173 patients 56 years or older submitted to radical prostatectomy. The variables studied were preoperative PSA, time to PSA progression following radical prostatectomy and pathologic findings in surgical specimens: Gleason score, Gleason predominant grade, positive surgical margins, tumor extent, extraprostatic extension (pT3a, and seminal vesicle invasion (pT3b. RESULTS: Comparing patients aged 55 years or younger and 56 years or older, there was no statistically significant difference for all variables studied: preoperative PSA (p = 0.4417, Gleason score (p = 0.3934, Gleason predominant grade (p = 0.2653, tumor extent (p = 0.1190, positive surgical margins (p = 0.8335, extraprostatic extension (p = 0.3447 and seminal vesicle invasion (p > 0.9999. During the study period, 44 patients (22% developed PSA progression. No difference was found in the time to biochemical progression between men aged 55 years or younger and 56 years or older. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that age alone do not influence the biological aggressiveness of prostate cancer.

  4. A new technique of bladder neck reconstruction during radical prostatectomy in patients with prostate cancer

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    Yuri Tolkach

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose:To evaluate continence after radical prostatectomy in prostate cancer patients, in whom a new method of the bladder neck reconstruction (BNR using deep dorsal stitch was implemented (deep single stitch through all bladder layers directly dorsal to the bladder opening after “tennis racket” reconstruction and to provide justification for its use by means of anatomical study in cadavers.Material and Methods:Open radical retropubic prostatectomy was performed in 84 patients: 39 patients with a new BNR method used to improve continence and control group of 45 patients with standard “tennis racket” BNR. Median follow-up was 14 months in control group and 12 months in study group. Continence recovery was accessed early postoperatively and every 3 months thereafter. Anatomical study was performed on 2 male fresh cadavers reproducing two different BNR techniques to clarify any underlying continence related mechanisms.Results:Patients with new BNR achieved full continence significantly faster (p=0.041, but the continence rates after 12 months were similar between groups. The severity of incontinence up to month 9 was significantly reduced in BNR group. The anastomotic stricture rate was not affected. Applying new BNR to the cadaver model revealed effects on early continence, namely presence of proximal passive closure mechanism in area of bladder neck.Conclusions:Continence in patients with the new BNR method using deep dorsal stitch recovered significantly faster. Moreover, a reduced grade of residual incontinence was documented. The effect was non-significant at month 12 of follow-up, meaning that only early effect was present.

  5. Physician social networks and variation in rates of complications after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evan Pollack, Craig; Wang, Hao; Bekelman, Justin E; Weissman, Gary; Epstein, Andrew J; Liao, Kaijun; Dugoff, Eva H; Armstrong, Katrina

    2014-07-01

    Variation in care within and across geographic areas remains poorly understood. The goal of this article was to examine whether physician social networks-as defined by shared patients-are associated with rates of complications after radical prostatectomy. In five cities, we constructed networks of physicians on the basis of their shared patients in 2004-2005 Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare data. From these networks, we identified subgroups of urologists who most frequently shared patients with one another. Among men with localized prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy, we used multilevel analysis with generalized linear mixed-effect models to examine whether physician network structure-along with specific characteristics of the network subgroups-was associated with rates of 30-day and late urinary complications, and long-term incontinence after accounting for patient-level sociodemographic, clinical factors, and urologist patient volume. Networks included 2677 men in five cities who underwent radical prostatectomy. The unadjusted rate of 30-day surgical complications varied across network subgroups from an 18.8 percentage-point difference in the rate of complications across network subgroups in city 1 to a 26.9 percentage-point difference in city 5. Large differences in unadjusted rates of late urinary complications and long-term incontinence across subgroups were similarly found. Network subgroup characteristics-average urologist centrality and patient racial composition-were significantly associated with rates of surgical complications. Analysis of physician networks using Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare data provides insight into observed variation in rates of complications for localized prostate cancer. If validated, such approaches may be used to target future quality improvement interventions. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier

  6. A comparison of bladder neck preservation and bladder neck reconstruction for urinary incontinence after radical retro pubic prostatectomy

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    Mohammad Hossein Izadpanahi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide and will include about 30% of all malignancies in men. Since the initial report of the anatomic radical prostatectomy, refinements in the surgical technique have been made. Several studies show that bladder neck preservation (BNP during radical prostatectomy makes improve early return of urinary continence, erectile function or both. However, some clinical trials have suggested little difference between the return of continence while using modifications. In this study, we compared outcomes of BNP and bladder neck reconstruction (BNR during radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was performed on 60 patients at a referral university hospital from March 2010 to March 2012. Study population was all patients candidate for RRP (RRP in this period. All patients divided into two groups, A and B (30 patients in each group. Group A (n = 30 who preserved bladder neck (BNP and Group B (n = 30 who had BNR. Prostate specific antigen (PSA before and at 2, 6, 9, 12 and18 months after surgery, anastomotic stricture symptoms, positive bladder neck margin, Gleason score and urine incontinence were compared between two groups. Also, we compared bladder neck contracture, urinary continence and positive surgical margin rates after BNP and BNR while retropubic prostatectomy in 24 months period follow-up. Results: The mean age of the patients was 61.81 ± 7.15 years (range, 50-74 years. After a follow-up period of 24 months, the PSA rising was not different between the two groups. After 2 months, 19 (63.33% of patients in A group and the same number in B group were continent (P = 0.78. Stricture of the bladder neck at the anastomosis site requiring transurethral dilation occurred in 7 (23.33% and 3 (10.0% patients in groups A and B, respectively (P = 0.04. Conclusion: Although there was no difference in prevalence and duration of return of urinary

  7. Holmium laser enucleation versus laparoscopic simple prostatectomy for large adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juaneda, R; Thanigasalam, R; Rizk, J; Perrot, E; Theveniaud, P E; Baumert, H

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate with another minimally invasive technique, the laparoscopic simple prostatectomy. We compared outcomes of a series of 40 patients who underwent laparoscopic simple prostatectomy (n=20) with laser enucleation of the prostate (n=20) for large adenomas (>100 grams) at our institution. Study variables included operative time and catheterization time, hospital stay, pre- and post-operative International Prostate Symptom Score and maximum urinary flow rate, complications and economic evaluation. Statistical analyses were performed using the Student t test and Fisher test. There were no significant differences in patient age, preoperative prostatic size, operating time or specimen weight between the 2 groups. Duration of catheterization (P=.0008) and hospital stay (P.99). Holmium enucleation of the prostate has similar short term functional results and complication rates compared to laparoscopic simple prostatectomy performed in large glands with the advantage of less catheterization time, lower economic costs and a reduced hospital stay. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy: what does it mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourinho-Barbosa, Rafael; Srougi, Victor; Nunes-Silva, Igor; Baghdadi, Mohammed; Rembeyo, Gregory; Eiffel, Sophie S.; Barret, Eric; Rozet, Francois; Galiano, Marc; Cathelineau, Xavier; Sanchez-Salas, Rafael

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Radical prostatectomy (RP) has been used as the main primary treatment for prostate cancer (PCa) for many years with excellent oncologic results. However, approximately 20-40% of those patients has failed to RP and presented biochemical recurrence (BCR). Prostatic specific antigen (PSA) has been the pivotal tool for recurrence diagnosis, but there is no consensus about the best PSA threshold to define BCR until this moment. The natural history of BCR after surgical procedure is highly variable, but it is important to distinguish biochemical and clinical recurrence and to find the correct timing to start multimodal treatment strategy. Also, it is important to understand the role of each clinical and pathological feature of prostate cancer in BCR, progression to metastatic disease and cancer specific mortality (CSM). Review design A simple review was made in Medline for articles written in English language about biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Objective To provide an updated assessment of BCR definition, its meaning, PCa natural history after BCR and the weight of each clinical/pathological feature and risk group classifications in BCR, metastatic disease and CSM. PMID:29039897

  9. Simple prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Han M, Partin AW. Simple prostatectomy: open and robot-assisted laparoscopic approaches. In: Wein AJ, Kavoussi LR, ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  10. Laser prostatectomy using a right angle delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo-Rocha, Flavio; Mitre, Anuar I.; Chavantes, Maria C.; Arap, Sami

    1995-05-01

    Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) represents a major health problem in old men. In the present transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) is the gold standard treatment for BPH. Although TURP is related to low mortality rates its mobidity is quite high. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a new surgical treatment for BPH we undertook 30 patients with symptomatic BPH. All of them were submitted to a laser prostatectomy using a lateral delivery system (non contact) connected to a Nd-YAG laser font. The preoperative evaluation showed a prostate weight ranging from 30,5 to 86 grams (mean equals 42,5). The preoperative prostatic specific antigen (PSA) ranged from 0,9 to 10,2 ng/dl (mean equals 4.3). The International prostate symptom score (I-PSS) ranged from 16 to 35 points (means equals 23,58). The flow rate ranged from 0 to m 12.8 ml/sec (mean equals 4,65) and the postvoid residual urine from 20 to 400 ml (mean equals 100). We obtained follow-up in 20 patients. After three months after the procedure the parameters were: I-PSS from 4 to 20 points (mean equals 7,0) p stenosis in one patient. We concluded that laser prostatectomy is a safe and effective treatment for BPH.

  11. Results of preoperative electrical stimulation of pelvic floor muscles in the continence status following radical retropubic prostatectomy

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    Carla Elaine Laurienzo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To evaluate preoperative rectal electrical stimulation in the recovery of urinary continence in patients who undergo radical retropubic prostatectomy. Materials and Methods Patients were divided into 3 randomized groups: control, pelvic exercises, and electrical stimulation. A 1 hour pad-test, the ICIQ-SF, and the SF-36 were performed 1, 3, and 6 months after the surgical procedure. Results Of the 58 patients who were initially included in the study, 9 were excluded due to radiotherapy after surgical intervention, an indwelling urethral catheter for more than 30 days, high surgical risk, loss of follow-up, or incomplete participation in the study routines and spontaneous interruption. Forty-nine patients concluded the study (15 in the control group, 17 in the exercise group, and 17 in the electrical stimulation group. We did not observe any significant difference in the pad test (p > 0.05, the 8 domains of the SF-36, or ICIQ-SF score compared with control groups (control, exercise, and electrical stimulation. Conclusion Preoperative rectal electrical stimulation has no impact on continence status in patients who undergo radical retropubic prostatectomy. There is no difference in the three above mentioned groups with regard to urinary leakage and quality of life.

  12. Definition and visualisation of regions of interest in post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy

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    Bell, Linda J, E-mail: linda.bell1@health.nsw.gov.au; Cox, Jennifer [Radiation Oncology Department, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Eade, Thomas; Rinks, Marianne; Kneebone, Andrew [Radiation Oncology Department, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia)

    2014-09-15

    Standard post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT) image verification uses bony anatomy alignment. However, the prostate bed (PB) moves independently of bony anatomy. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) can be used to soft tissue match, so radiation therapists (RTs) must understand pelvic anatomy and PPRT clinical target volumes (CTV). The aims of this study are to define regions of interest (ROI) to be used in soft tissue matching image guidance and determine their visibility on planning CT (PCT) and CBCT. Published CTV guidelines were used to select ROIs. The PCT scans (n = 23) and CBCT scans (n = 105) of 23 post-prostatectomy patients were reviewed. Details on ROI identification were recorded. Eighteen patients had surgical clips. All ROIs were identified on PCTs at least 90% of the time apart from mesorectal fascia (MF) (87%) due to superior image quality. When surgical clips are present, the seminal vesicle bed (SVB) was only seen in 2.3% of CBCTs and MF was unidentifiable. Most other structures were well identified on CBCT. The anterior rectal wall (ARW) was identified in 81.4% of images and penile bulb (PB) in 68.6%. In the absence of surgical clips, the MF and SVB were always identified; the ARW was identified in 89.5% of CBCTs and PB in 73.7%. Surgical clips should be used as ROIs when present to define SVB and MF. In the absence of clips, SVB, MF and ARW can be used. RTs must have a strong knowledge of soft tissue anatomy and PPRT CTV to ensure coverage and enable soft tissue matching.

  13. Definition and visualisation of regions of interest in post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, Linda J; Cox, Jennifer; Eade, Thomas; Rinks, Marianne; Kneebone, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Standard post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT) image verification uses bony anatomy alignment. However, the prostate bed (PB) moves independently of bony anatomy. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) can be used to soft tissue match, so radiation therapists (RTs) must understand pelvic anatomy and PPRT clinical target volumes (CTV). The aims of this study are to define regions of interest (ROI) to be used in soft tissue matching image guidance and determine their visibility on planning CT (PCT) and CBCT. Published CTV guidelines were used to select ROIs. The PCT scans (n = 23) and CBCT scans (n = 105) of 23 post-prostatectomy patients were reviewed. Details on ROI identification were recorded. Eighteen patients had surgical clips. All ROIs were identified on PCTs at least 90% of the time apart from mesorectal fascia (MF) (87%) due to superior image quality. When surgical clips are present, the seminal vesicle bed (SVB) was only seen in 2.3% of CBCTs and MF was unidentifiable. Most other structures were well identified on CBCT. The anterior rectal wall (ARW) was identified in 81.4% of images and penile bulb (PB) in 68.6%. In the absence of surgical clips, the MF and SVB were always identified; the ARW was identified in 89.5% of CBCTs and PB in 73.7%. Surgical clips should be used as ROIs when present to define SVB and MF. In the absence of clips, SVB, MF and ARW can be used. RTs must have a strong knowledge of soft tissue anatomy and PPRT CTV to ensure coverage and enable soft tissue matching

  14. Orgasmic Dysfunction after Radical Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventimiglia, Eugenio; Cazzaniga, Walter; Montorsi, Francesco; Salonia, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    In addition to urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction, several other impairments of sexual function potentially occurring after radical prostatectomy (RP) have been described; as a whole, these less frequently assessed disorders are referred to as neglected side effects. In particular, orgasmic dysfunctions (ODs) have been reported in a non-negligible number of cases, with detrimental impacts on patients' overall sexual life. This review aimed to comprehensively discuss the prevalence and physiopathology of post-RP ODs, as well as potential treatment options. Orgasm-associated incontinence (climacturia) has been reported to occur in between 20% and 93% of patients after RP. Similarly, up to 19% of patients complain of postoperative orgasm-associated pain, mainly referred pain at the level of the penis. Moreover, impairment in the sensation of orgasm or even complete anorgasmia has been reported in 33% to 77% of patients after surgery. Clinical and surgical factors including age, the use of a nerve-sparing technique, and robotic surgery have been variably associated with the risk of ODs after RP, although robust and reliable data allowing for a proper estimation of the risk of postoperative orgasmic function impairment are still lacking. Likewise, little evidence regarding the management of postoperative ODs is currently available. In general, physicians should be aware of the prevalence of ODs after RP, in order to properly counsel all patients both preoperatively and immediately post-RP about the potential occurrence of bothersome and distressful changes in their overall sexual function. PMID:28459142

  15. Orgasmic Dysfunction after Radical Prostatectomy

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    Paolo Capogrosso

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In addition to urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction, several other impairments of sexual function potentially occurring after radical prostatectomy (RP have been described; as a whole, these less frequently assessed disorders are referred to as neglected side effects. In particular, orgasmic dysfunctions (ODs have been reported in a non-negligible number of cases, with detrimental impacts on patients’ overall sexual life. This review aimed to comprehensively discuss the prevalence and physiopathology of post-RP ODs, as well as potential treatment options. Orgasm-associated incontinence (climacturia has been reported to occur in between 20% and 93% of patients after RP. Similarly, up to 19% of patients complain of postoperative orgasm-associated pain, mainly referred pain at the level of the penis. Moreover, impairment in the sensation of orgasm or even complete anorgasmia has been reported in 33% to 77% of patients after surgery. Clinical and surgical factors including age, the use of a nerve-sparing technique, and robotic surgery have been variably associated with the risk of ODs after RP, although robust and reliable data allowing for a proper estimation of the risk of postoperative orgasmic function impairment are still lacking. Likewise, little evidence regarding the management of postoperative ODs is currently available. In general, physicians should be aware of the prevalence of ODs after RP, in order to properly counsel all patients both preoperatively and immediately post-RP about the potential occurrence of bothersome and distressful changes in their overall sexual function.

  16. Surgical implantation techniques for electronic tags in fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Glenn N.; Cooke, Steven J.; Brown, Richard S.; Deters, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Intracoelomic implantation of transmitters into fish requires making a surgical incision, incision closure, and other surgery related techniques; however, the tools and techniques used in the surgical process vary widely. We review the available literature and focus on tools and techniques used for conducting surgery on juvenile salmonids because of the large amount of research that is conducted on them. The use of sterilized surgical instruments properly selected for a given size of fish will minimize tissue damage and infection rates, and speed the wound healing of fish implanted with transmitters. For the implantation of transmitters into small fish, the optimal surgical methods include making an incision on the ventral midline along the linea alba (for studies under 1 month), protecting the viscera (by lifting the skin with forceps while creating the incision), and using absorbable monofilament suture with a small-swaged-on swaged-on tapered or reverse-cutting needle. Standardizing the implantation techniques to be used in a study involving particular species and age classes of fish will improve survival and transmitter retention while allowing for comparisons to be made among studies and across multiple years. This review should be useful for researchers working on juvenile salmonids and other sizes and species of fish.

  17. Incidence of positive surgical margins after robotic assisted radical prostatectomy: Does the surgeon's experience have an influence on all pathological stages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamil, A W; Costabel, J I; Billordo Peres, N; Martínez, P F; Giudice, C R; Damia, O H

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the clinical and surgical features of patients who underwent robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) at our institution, and the impact of the surgeon's experience in the oncological results related to pathological stage. An analysis of 300 RARP consecutively performed by the same urologist was conducted. Patients were divided into 3 groups of 100 patients in chronological order, according to surgery date. All patients had organ-confined clinical stage. Variables which could impact in positive margins rates were analyzed. Finally, positive surgical margins (PSM) in regard to pathological stage and surgeon's experience were compared and analyzed. No significant differences were found in variables which could impact in PSM rates. The overall PSM rate was 21%, with 28% in the first group, 20% in the second, and 16% in the third (P = .108). Significant lineal decreasing tendency was observed (P = .024). In pT2 patients, the overall PSM rate was 16.6%, with 27%, 13.8%, and 7.3% in each group respectively (P = .009). A significant difference was found between group 1 and group 3 (P = .004). In pT3 patients, the surgeon's experience was not significantly associated with margin reductions with an overall PSM rate of 27.7% (28.2%, 28.6%, and 26.7% in each group respectively). Clinical and surgical features in our patients did not vary over time. We found a significant reduction of PSM related to surgeon's experience in pT2 patients. Contrariwise, the margin status remained stable despite increasing experience in pT3 patients. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Associations between ABO blood groups and biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoshio; Ohori, Makoto; Nakashima, Jun; Okubo, Hidenori; Satake, Naoya; Takizawa, Issei; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Hamada, Riu; Nakagami, Yoshihiro; Yoshioka, Kunihiko; Tachibana, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated associations between ABO blood groups and prognosis in various types of cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between ABO blood groups and biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP). A total of 555 patients with prostate cancer who underwent RP were included in the study. No patients received neoadjuvant and/or adjuvant therapy. The effect of ABO blood groups on BCR was examined using univariate and multivariate analyses. During the follow-up period (mean, 52.0 months), 166 patients (29.9%) experienced BCR, with a 5-year BCR-free rate of 67.3%. Although the ABO blood group was not a significantly associated with BCR in the univariate analysis, it was an independent predictor of BCR in the multivariate analysis: blood type O patients had a significantly lower risk of BCR compared to type A patients (Hazard ratio, 0.608; 95% confidence interval, 0.410-0.902; P = 0.014). Further analyses revealed that surgical margin status confounded the assessment of the association between the ABO blood group and BCR. In the analyses of patients with a negative surgical margin, the 5-year BCR-free rate in blood type O patients was a significantly higher than that in type A patients (91.2% vs. 71.0%; P = 0.026). Blood type O is significantly associated with a decreased risk of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Further studies are needed to clarify the nature of this association.

  19. Radical prostatectomy outcome when performed with PSA above 20 ng/ml.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Connolly, S S

    2012-02-01

    Many centres currently do not offer radical prostatectomy (RP) to men with high-risk localised prostate cancer due to concerns regarding poor outcome, despite evidence to the contrary. We identified 18 men undergoing RP with serum PSA >20 ng\\/ml (high-risk by National Comprehensive Cancer Network definition) and minimum follow-up of 12 years (mean 13.5). Mean preoperative PSA was 37.0 ng\\/ml (Range 21.1-94.0). Prostatectomy pathology reported extracapsular disease in 16 (88.9%), positive surgical margins in 15 (83%) and positive pelvic lymph nodes in 5 (27.8%). Overall and cancer-specific survival at 5 and 10-years was 83.3%, 88.2%, 72% and 76.5% respectively. With complete follow-up 11 (61.1%) are alive, and 5 (27.8%) avoided any adjuvant therapy. Complete continence (defined as no involuntary urine leakage and no use of pads) was achieved in 60%, with partial continence in the remainder. We conclude that surgery for this aggressive variant of localised prostate cancer can result in satisfactory outcome.

  20. Detailed Surgical Anatomy of Prostate: Relationship between Urethra and Dorsal Vein Complex with Apex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunc, Lutfi; Akin, Yigit; Gumustas, Huseyin; Ak, Esat; Peker, Tuncay; Veneziano, Domenico; Guneri, Cagri

    2016-01-01

    To describe our surgical technique for dissecting the apex of prostate during robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) and detailed surgical anatomy of prostate including relationship between urethra and dorsal vein complex with apex. In retrospective view of prospective collected data, 73 patients underwent RALP between December 2012 and September 2014. Surgical anatomy of prostate was revealed in all procedures. Quality of life (QoL) scores were assessed before, immediately after catheter removal, and 1 month after surgery. We divided urinary continence into 3 groups, as very early continence; continence at time of urethral catheter removal, early continent; and continence 1 month after surgery. The rest of the patients were accepted as continence. The mean follow-up was 10.2 ± 5.4 months and mean age was 61.5 ± 6.6. Maximum protection of urethra could be provided in all. Mean catheter removal was 8.9 ± 1.7 days, and all patients were continent at the time of catheter removal. QoL scores before RALP could be protected after surgery (p = 0.2). Neither conversion to open/conventional laparoscopic surgery nor complications related with bladder neck were detected. Our surgical technique can be a strong candidate for being a surgical technique for preserving urethra and very early continence could be provided after surgery. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Intrafascial nerve-sparing endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Rabenalt, Robert; Do, Minh; Schwalenberg, Thilo; Winkler, Mathias; Dietel, Anja; Liatsikos, Evangelos

    2008-05-01

    Based on our recently published anatomic studies, we present the most recent refinement of the endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy (EERPE), the intrafascial nerve-sparing EERPE (nsEERPE). As part of the intrafascial technique, the dissection plane is directly on the prostatic capsule, freeing the prostate laterally from its thin surrounding fascia that contains small vessels and nerves. The technique enables puboprostatic ligament preservation, leaving intact endopelvic fascia, periprostatic fascia, and neurovascular bundles. The operation was performed in 150 patients with indications for nerve-sparing procedure. The mean operative time was 131 min (range: 50-210 min) and the mean catheterization time was 5.9 d (range: 4-20 d). Twelve months postoperatively, 94.3% of the patients were continent (no need for pads), 4.6% had minimal stress incontinence, and one patient required >2 pads/d. At the 12-mo follow-up, the potency rates (erections sufficient for intercourse with or without the use of phosphodiesterase 5 [PDE5] inhibitors) of the patients who underwent bilateral intrafascial nsEERPE were 89.7% (age: 44-55 yr), 81.1% (age: 56-65 yr), and 61.9% (age: >65 yr). Positive surgical margins in pT2 and pT3 tumors were 4.5% and 29.4%, respectively. The intrafascial nsEERPE enables the dissection of the prostate with limited trauma to the surrounding fascias and the enclosed neurovascular bundles. We propose that the preserved neurovascular bundles with intrafascial nsEERPE are more viable. The results advocate this proposition.

  2. Best laser for prostatectomy in the year 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Pankaj N Maheshwari; Nitin Joshi; Reeta P Maheshwari

    2013-01-01

    Lasers have come a long way in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Over last nearly two decades, various different lasers have been utilized for prostatectomy. Neodymium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser that started this journey, is no longer used for prostatectomy. Holmium laser can achieve transurethral enucleation of the prostatic adenoma producing a fossa that can be compared with the fossa after Freyer's prostatectomy. Green light laser has a short learning curve, is nearly blo...

  3. Ahmed glaucoma valve implant: surgical technique and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riva I

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ivano Riva,1 Gloria Roberti,1 Francesco Oddone,1 Anastasios GP Konstas,2 Luciano Quaranta3 1IRCCS “Fondazione GB Bietti per l’Oftalmologia”, Rome, Italy; 21st University Department of Ophthalmology, Glaucoma Unit, AHEPA Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece; 3Department of Medical and Surgical Specialties, Section of Ophthalmology, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy Abstract: Implantation of Ahmed glaucoma valve is an effective surgical technique to reduce intraocular pressure in patients affected with glaucoma. While in the past, the use of this device was reserved to glaucoma refractory to multiple filtration surgical procedures, up-to-date mounting experience has encouraged its use also as a primary surgery for selected cases. Implantation of Ahmed glaucoma valve can be challenging for the surgeon, especially in patients who already underwent previous multiple surgeries. Several tips have to be acquired by the surgeon, and a long learning curve is always needed. Although the valve mechanism embedded in the Ahmed glaucoma valve decreases the risk of postoperative hypotony-related complications, it does not avoid the need of a careful follow-up. Complications related to this type of surgery include early and late postoperative hypotony, excessive capsule fibrosis around the plate, erosion of the tube or plate edge, and very rarely infection. The aim of this review is to describe surgical technique for Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation and to report related complications. Keywords: glaucoma, surgical technique, glaucoma drainage devices, Ahmed glaucoma valve, complications

  4. Learning curve for radical retropubic prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando J. A. Saito

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The learning curve is a period in which the surgical procedure is performed with difficulty and slowness, leading to a higher risk of complications and reduced effectiveness due the surgeon's inexperience. We sought to analyze the residents' learning curve for open radical prostatectomy (RP in a training program. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a prospective study from June 2006 to January 2008 in the academic environment of the University of São Paulo. Five residents operated on 184 patients during a four-month rotation in the urologic oncology division, mentored by the same physician assistants. We performed sequential analyses according to the number of surgeries, as follows: = 10, 11 to 19, 20 to 28, and = 29. RESULTS: The residents performed an average of 37 RP each. The average psa was 9.3 ng/mL and clinical stage T1c in 71% of the patients. The pathological stage was pT2 (73%, pT3 (23%, pT4 (4%, and 46% of the patients had a Gleason score 7 or higher. In all surgeries, the average operative time and estimated blood loss was 140 minutes and 488 mL. Overall, 7.2% of patients required blood transfusion, and 23% had positive surgical margins. CONCLUSION: During the initial RP learning curve, we found a significant reduction in the operative time; blood transfusion during the procedures and positive surgical margin rate were stable in our series.

  5. Pathological and 3 Tesla Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predictors of Biochemical Recurrence after Robotic Assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Correlation with Whole Mount Histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Nelly; Shen, Luyao; Khoshnoodi, Pooria; Alcalá, Héctor E; Yu, Weixia; Hsu, William; Reiter, Robert E; Lu, David Y; Raman, Steven S

    2018-05-01

    We sought to identify the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging variables predictive of biochemical recurrence after robotic assisted radical prostatectomy in patients who underwent multiparametric 3 Tesla prostate magnetic resonance imaging. We performed an institutional review board approved, HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) compliant, single arm observational study of 3 Tesla multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging prior to robotic assisted radical prostatectomy from December 2009 to March 2016. Clinical, magnetic resonance imaging and pathological information, and clinical outcomes were compiled. Biochemical recurrence was defined as prostate specific antigen 0.2 ng/cc or greater. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis was performed. Biochemical recurrence had developed in 62 of the 255 men (24.3%) included in the study at a median followup of 23.5 months. Compared to the subcohort without biochemical recurrence the subcohort with biochemical recurrence had a greater proportion of patients with a high grade biopsy Gleason score, higher preoperative prostate specific antigen (7.4 vs 5.6 ng/ml), intermediate and high D'Amico classifications, larger tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging (0.66 vs 0.30 ml), higher PI-RADS® (Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System) version 2 category lesions, a greater proportion of intermediate and high grade radical prostatectomy Gleason score lesions, higher pathological T3 stage (all p <0.01) and a higher positive surgical margin rate (19.3% vs 7.8%, p = 0.016). On multivariable analysis only tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging (adjusted OR 1.57, p = 0.016), pathological T stage (adjusted OR 2.26, p = 0.02), positive surgical margin (adjusted OR 5.0, p = 0.004) and radical prostatectomy Gleason score (adjusted OR 2.29, p = 0.004) predicted biochemical recurrence. In this cohort tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging and pathological variables, including Gleason score

  6. Prophylactic antibiotics in transurethral prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Christiansen, H.M.; Ehlers, D

    1984-01-01

    The study included 88 patients with sterile urine prior to transurethral prostatectomy. Forty-five received a preoperative dose of 2 g of cefotaxime (Claforan) and the remaining 43 were given 10 ml of 0.9% NaCl. The two groups did not differ in frequency of postoperative urinary infection (greate...... of infection and the few side effects of the infections that did occur, prophylactic treatment with an antibiotic is not indicated for transurethral prostatectomy in patients with sterile urine....

  7. Evolution of surgical techniques for a progressive risk reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Bruno; Santoro, Mario; Izzo, Raffaele; Servillo, Giuseppe; Compagna, Rita; Di Domenico, Lorenza; Di Nardo, Veronica; Giugliano, Giuseppe

    2017-07-18

    Advanced age is a strong predictor of high perioperative mortality in surgical patients and patients aged 75 years and older have an elevated surgical risk, much higher than that of younger patients. Progressive advances in surgical techniques now make it possible to treat high-risk surgical patients with minimally invasive procedures. Endovascular techniques have revolutionized the treatment of several vascular diseases, in particular carotid stenosis, aortic pathologies, and severely incapacitating intermittent claudication or critical limb ischemia. The main advantages of the endovascular approach are the low complication rate, high rate of technical success and a good clinical outcome. Biliary stenting has improved the clinical status of severely ill patients with bile duct stricture before major surgery, and represents a good palliative therapy in the case of malignant biliary obstruction.

  8. Restoring accommodation: surgical technique and preliminary evaluation in rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahi, Hassan; Chapon, Pascal F.; Hamaoui, Marie; Lee, William E.; Holden, Brien; Parel, Jean-Marie A.

    1999-06-01

    Purpose. To evaluate an innovative surgical technique for phaco-ersatz, a cataract surgery designed to restore accommodation. Techniques for very small capsulorhexis as well as the refilling procedure were developed. This study evaluates the feasibility and reproducibility of the surgical technique. Methods. The right eye of 8 NZW rabbits (~ 2 Kg) were operated following the ARVO Statements for the Use of Animals in Ophthalmic and Vision Research. The surgery is begun by making a small peripheral capsulorhexis of about 1 mm using. The lens content is then removed. The lens is then refilled with a novel in situ polymerizable gel and the corneal incision is closed using one 10/0 Nylon interrupted stitch. Results. The capsulorhexis technique was succesfully performed and reproducible in all animals. The average size of the capsulorhexis opening was 1. 2 mm (+/-0.14). Lens material removal and refilling of the capsular bag with an in situ polymerizable material was also performed in each trial study. Conclusion. This surgical technique seemed feasible and reproducible.

  9. [Composite digital allotransplants: surgical technique and different applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casoli, V; Rousvoal, A; Zirak, C; Bakhach, J; Guimberteau, J-C

    2007-10-01

    Microsurgery and human allotransplantation progress as well as the improvement of immunosuppressive drugs actually allow the development of the composite tissue allotransplantation. One of the latest challenges in plastic surgery is to restore the anatomic and functional structures using similar tissues. Composite tissue allotransplantation will probably reach this goal. Our work is to find new surgical techniques for the reconstruction of the osteotendinous apparatus of the long digits. In this paper, we will demonstrate the surgical technique to harvest the allotransplant and its modulation in the reconstruction of various digital defects.

  10. Surgical techniques for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Édder de Mello Cardoso Lima

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux is one of the most frequently gastrointestinal tract diseases currently found, having a great impact on the patient's quality of life. Purpose: to analyze the main surgical techniques used in the treatment of this pathology, their indications, advantages and disadvantages. Methods: this is a literature review. Thirteen articles published between 1998 and 2013 in the Lilacs, Bireme e Scielo databases, addressing different surgical techniques for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux were selected. Results: Five hundred and thirty-eight total fundoplications and 466 partial fundoplications were performed. Conclusion: The findings of this review show that total fundoplication is the most commonly used technique in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  11. Dextranomer Based Implant (Deflux) for Endoscopic Treatment of Post-Prostatectomy Incontinence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-El-Azayem, Khaled M.; Abdel-Meguid, Taha A.; Soliman, S.

    2006-01-01

    Endoscopic treatment for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence has gained popularity using several inject-able bulking materials. The current study reports our experience with endoscopic submucosal injection of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer for treatment of post-prostatectomy incontinence due to sphincteric deficiency. A total of 14 patients with post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence; 13 post-trans urethral resection of prostate (TURP) and 1 post-open prostatectomy, were enrolled. The patients aged between 59-85 years. Preoperative evaluation included multi-channel video urodynamics. Patients who had verified intrinsic sphincteric deficiency, adequate bladder capacity, absent unhibited detrusor contractions and minimal or no post void residual (PVR) urine were selected for injection therapy. The standard 4 quadrant sub-mucosal injection technique was utilized. Follow-up was scheduled at 1 month after each injection and at 6-months interval thereafter. A total of 25 procedures were done. Seven patients (50%) received single injection, 3 patients (21.4%) required 2 injections and 4 patients (28.6%) needed 3 injections. The mean volume of injected material was 3.7 mL per procedure (range 2-8). The mean operative time was 30 minutes (range 15-60). The procedure was performed without intraoperative adverse events or significant postoperative complications. The overall cure rate, significant improvement rate and failure rate were 28.6%, 35.7% and 35.7%.respectively, with a total of 64.3% considered as success (cured or significantly improved). At 1 year of follow-up, 71.4% of the patients (cured or improved) demonstrated persistence of the favourable outcome. Endoscopic treatment of post prostatectomy incontinence due sphinteric deficiency is a minimally invasive, safe and successful procedure. Endoscopic submucosal injection of dextranomer has shown a durable favorable outcome at 1 year of follow-up. (author)

  12. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic neoadjuvant study of hedgehog pathway inhibitor Sonidegib (LDE-225) in men with high-risk localized prostate cancer undergoing prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Ashley E; Hughes, Robert M; Glavaris, Stephanie; Ghabili, Kamyar; He, Ping; Anders, Nicole M; Harb, Rana; Tosoian, Jeffrey J; Marchionni, Luigi; Schaeffer, Edward M; Partin, Alan W; Allaf, Mohamad E; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Chapman, Carolyn; O'Neal, Tanya; DeMarzo, Angelo M; Hurley, Paula J; Rudek, Michelle A; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S

    2017-11-28

    To determine the pharmacodynamic effects of Sonidegib (LDE-225) in prostate tumor tissue from men with high-risk localized prostate cancer, by comparing pre-surgical core-biopsy specimens to tumor tissue harvested post-treatment at prostatectomy. We conducted a prospective randomized (Sonidegib vs. observation) open-label translational clinical trial in men with high-risk localized prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients in each arm who achieved at least a two-fold reduction in GLI1 mRNA expression in post-treatment versus pre-treatment tumor tissue. Secondary endpoints included the effect of pre-surgical treatment with Sonidegib on disease progression following radical prostatectomy, and safety. Fourteen men were equally randomized (7 per arm) to either neoadjuvant Sonidegib or observation for 4 weeks prior to prostatectomy. Six of seven men (86%) in the Sonidegib arm (and none in the control group) achieved a GLI1 suppression of at least two-fold. In the Sonidegib arm, drug was detectable in plasma and in prostatic tissue; and median intra-patient GLI1 expression decreased by 63-fold, indicating potent suppression of Hedgehog signaling. Sonidegib was well tolerated, without any Grade 3-4 adverse events observed. Disease-free survival was comparable among the two arms (HR = 1.50, 95% CI 0.26-8.69, P = 0.65). Hedgehog pathway activity (as measured by GLI1 expression) was detectable at baseline in men with localized high-risk prostate cancer. Sonidegib penetrated into prostatic tissue and induced a >60-fold suppression of the Hedgehog pathway. The oncological benefit of Hedgehog pathway inhibition in prostate cancer remains unclear.

  13. Transient Occlusion of Bilateral Internal Iliac Arteries Facilitates Bloodless Operative Field in Subcapsular Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takumi Takeuchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transurethral resection of the prostate is the gold standard of surgical treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. Nevertheless, open subcapsular prostatectomy is still performed for large BPH. While enucleation of prostatic adenoma is being performed, unneglectable bleeding can occur and surgeons need to rush to remove adenomas, often using fingers and in a blinded fashion. The blood supply to the prostatic capsule and adenoma can be reduced to a marked extent in subcapsular prostatectomy if the bilateral internal iliac arteries are transiently occluded. Thus, a bloodless operative field is reasonably acquired during enucleation of adenoma, which would, otherwise, be a cause for concern to surgeons due to bleeding. It is not always applicable, but it could be an option if the estimated volume of BPH is more than 100 mL. In two cases, bilateral internal iliac arteries were occluded with Bulldog clamps, and then adenomas of 159 and 97 g were enucleated.

  14. Intraoperative technique as a factor in the prevention of surgical site infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2012-02-01

    Approximately five percent of patients who undergo surgery develop surgical site infections (SSIs) which are associated with an extra seven days as an inpatient and with increased postoperative mortality. The competence and technique of the surgeon is considered important in preventing SSI. We have reviewed the evidence on different aspects of surgical technique and its role in preventing SSI. The most recent guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the UK recommend avoiding diathermy for skin incision even though this reduces incision time and blood loss, both associated with lower infection rates. Studies comparing different closure techniques, i.e. continuous versus interrupted sutures, have not found a statistically significant difference in the SSI rate, but using continuous sutures is quicker. For contaminated wounds, the surgical site should be left open for four days to allow for treatment of local infection before subsequent healing by primary intention. Surgical drains should be placed through separate incisions, closed suction drains are preferable to open drains, and all drains should be removed as soon as possible. There are relatively few large studies on the impact of surgical techniques on SSI rates. Larger multicentre prospective studies are required to define what aspects of surgical technique impact on SSI, to better inform surgical practice and support education programmes for surgical trainees.

  15. Intraoperative technique as a factor in the prevention of surgical site infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2011-02-28

    Approximately five percent of patients who undergo surgery develop surgical site infections (SSIs) which are associated with an extra seven days as an inpatient and with increased postoperative mortality. The competence and technique of the surgeon is considered important in preventing SSI. We have reviewed the evidence on different aspects of surgical technique and its role in preventing SSI. The most recent guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the UK recommend avoiding diathermy for skin incision even though this reduces incision time and blood loss, both associated with lower infection rates. Studies comparing different closure techniques, i.e. continuous versus interrupted sutures, have not found a statistically significant difference in the SSI rate, but using continuous sutures is quicker. For contaminated wounds, the surgical site should be left open for four days to allow for treatment of local infection before subsequent healing by primary intention. Surgical drains should be placed through separate incisions, closed suction drains are preferable to open drains, and all drains should be removed as soon as possible. There are relatively few large studies on the impact of surgical techniques on SSI rates. Larger multicentre prospective studies are required to define what aspects of surgical technique impact on SSI, to better inform surgical practice and support education programmes for surgical trainees.

  16. Best laser for prostatectomy in the year 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Pankaj N; Joshi, Nitin; Maheshwari, Reeta P

    2013-07-01

    Lasers have come a long way in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Over last nearly two decades, various different lasers have been utilized for prostatectomy. Neodymium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser that started this journey, is no longer used for prostatectomy. Holmium laser can achieve transurethral enucleation of the prostatic adenoma producing a fossa that can be compared with the fossa after Freyer's prostatectomy. Green light laser has a short learning curve, is nearly blood-less with good immediate results. Thulium laser is a faster cutting laser while diode laser is a portable laser device. Often laser prostatectomy is considered as a replacement for the standard transurethral resection of prostate (TURP). To be comparable, laser should reduce or avoid the immediate and long-term complications of TURP, especially bleeding and need for blood transfusion. It should also be safe in the ever increasing patient population on antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs. We need to take stock of the situation and identify, which among the present day lasers has stood the test of time. A review of the literature was performed to see if any of these lasers could be called the "best laser for prostatectomy in 2013."

  17. Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy: American Society for Radiation Oncology/American Urological Association Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valicenti, Richard K., E-mail: Richard.valicenti@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Davis, California (United States); Thompson, Ian [Department of Urology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Albertsen, Peter [Division of Urology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut (United States); Davis, Brian J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Medical School, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Goldenberg, S. Larry [Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Wolf, J. Stuart [Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sartor, Oliver [Department of Medicine and Urology, Tulane Medical School, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Klein, Eric [Glickman Urological Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Hahn, Carol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Faraday, Martha M. [Four Oaks, Inc (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this guideline was to provide a clinical framework for the use of radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy as adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods and Materials: A systematic literature review using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane database was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications relevant to the use of radiation therapy after prostatectomy. The review yielded 294 articles; these publications were used to create the evidence-based guideline statements. Additional guidance is provided as Clinical Principles when insufficient evidence existed. Results: Guideline statements are provided for patient counseling, use of radiation therapy in the adjuvant and salvage contexts, defining biochemical recurrence, and conducting a restaging evaluation. Conclusions: Physicians should offer adjuvant radiation therapy to patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invastion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiation therapy to patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or local recurrence after prostatectomy in whom there is no evidence of distant metastatic disease. The offer of radiation therapy should be made in the context of a thoughtful discussion of possible short- and long-term side effects of radiation therapy as well as the potential benefits of preventing recurrence. The decision to administer radiation therapy should be made by the patient and the multidisciplinary treatment team with full consideration of the patient's history, values, preferences, quality of life, and functional status. The American Society for Radiation Oncology and American Urological Association websites show this guideline in its entirety, including the full literature review.

  18. Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy: American Society for Radiation Oncology/American Urological Association Guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valicenti, Richard K.; Thompson, Ian; Albertsen, Peter; Davis, Brian J.; Goldenberg, S. Larry; Wolf, J. Stuart; Sartor, Oliver; Klein, Eric; Hahn, Carol; Michalski, Jeff; Roach, Mack; Faraday, Martha M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this guideline was to provide a clinical framework for the use of radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy as adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods and Materials: A systematic literature review using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane database was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications relevant to the use of radiation therapy after prostatectomy. The review yielded 294 articles; these publications were used to create the evidence-based guideline statements. Additional guidance is provided as Clinical Principles when insufficient evidence existed. Results: Guideline statements are provided for patient counseling, use of radiation therapy in the adjuvant and salvage contexts, defining biochemical recurrence, and conducting a restaging evaluation. Conclusions: Physicians should offer adjuvant radiation therapy to patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invastion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiation therapy to patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or local recurrence after prostatectomy in whom there is no evidence of distant metastatic disease. The offer of radiation therapy should be made in the context of a thoughtful discussion of possible short- and long-term side effects of radiation therapy as well as the potential benefits of preventing recurrence. The decision to administer radiation therapy should be made by the patient and the multidisciplinary treatment team with full consideration of the patient's history, values, preferences, quality of life, and functional status. The American Society for Radiation Oncology and American Urological Association websites show this guideline in its entirety, including the full literature review

  19. Problems associated with basic oral surgical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapatkin, A.S.; Marretta, S.M.; Schloss, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    The veterinarian must be able to diagnose several types of dental problems. History, physical examination, clinical pathology, and radiography are important in making an accurate diagnosis. Basic oral surgery includes various extraction techniques and management of their associated complications. Knowledge of dental anatomy and proper surgical technique can make an extraction curative rather than a frustrating procedure with multiple complications

  20. Endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy: the University of Leipzig experience of 1,300 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Rabenalt, Robert; Do, Minh; Truss, Michael C; Burchardt, Martin; Herrmann, Thomas R; Schwalenberg, Thilo; Kallidonis, Panagiotis; Liatsikos, Evangelos N

    2007-03-01

    We herein review our experience with endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy (EERPE) as a first line therapy for localized prostate cancer. A series of 1,300 patients underwent EERPE ("wide excision", standard nervesparing technique (nsEERPE), or intrafascial nsEERPE). The mean age of the patients was 63.3 years. Preoperative PSA mean value was 10.1 ng/ml. A total of 415 patients had undergone previous surgical procedure in the lower abdomen (n = 336) and prior surgery of the prostate (n = 79), respectively. The EERPE was employed in all cases without any specific selection criteria. Mean operative time was 153 (50-320) min. including lymphadenectomy with no conversion to open surgery. Seven intraoperative, 91 early and 4 late complications occurred. The transfusion rate was 0.9%. Positive surgical margins were found in 83 patients with pT2 stage (9.8%) and in 154 patients in pT3 stage (34.3%). The mean catheterization time was 6.2 days. The 12 month follow up indicated continence rate of 91.9% and potency rates of 34% in the unilateral nerve sparing group and 69.8% in the bilateral group. In the intrafascial nsEERPE group potency rates were 33.3% (unilateral) and 79.1% (bilateral) after 12 months. Postoperative positive surgical margins rate were 6.1% for pT2 and 20% for pT3 and the complications rate 4%. The results of this large series of 1,300 patients are promising. The recently introduced intrafascial nsEERPE further ameliorates the outcome of the procedure.

  1. REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Pavlov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available According to the data obtained by Russian and foreign investigators, the major complication after radical prostatectomy (RPE is urinaryincontinence that is recorded in 20-30% of cases.Objective. To improve the results of surgical treatment in patients with prostate cancer, by developing and introducing a well-rounded post-operative rehabilitation program.Subjects and methods. Seventy-four patients who were treated at the urology clinic, Bashkir State Medical University, and underwent RPEin 2005 to 2007 have been examined; 27 of them were diagnosed as having urinary incontinence (UI. After discharge from the clinic, acontrol group received rehabilitative treatment at the sanatorium “Krasnousolsk” of the Republic of Bashkortostan. Results and discussion. Therapeutic exercises and pelvic floor electrostimulation halve the number of day urinations and paddings used inpatients with UI, by increasing the bladder capacity from 138.2±12.7 to 196±11.2 ml and improving the trophism of the bladder neck andurethra in the sphincteral area. 

  2. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy is a safe procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Hvarness, Helle

    2013-01-01

    We present our departmental experience with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and describe complications and early results for the first 239 consecutive patients.......We present our departmental experience with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and describe complications and early results for the first 239 consecutive patients....

  3. Best laser for prostatectomy in the year 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj N Maheshwari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lasers have come a long way in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Over last nearly two decades, various different lasers have been utilized for prostatectomy. Neodymium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser that started this journey, is no longer used for prostatectomy. Holmium laser can achieve transurethral enucleation of the prostatic adenoma producing a fossa that can be compared with the fossa after Freyer′s prostatectomy. Green light laser has a short learning curve, is nearly blood-less with good immediate results. Thulium laser is a faster cutting laser while diode laser is a portable laser device. Often laser prostatectomy is considered as a replacement for the standard transurethral resection of prostate (TURP. To be comparable, laser should reduce or avoid the immediate and long-term complications of TURP, especially bleeding and need for blood transfusion. It should also be safe in the ever increasing patient population on antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs. We need to take stock of the situation and identify, which among the present day lasers has stood the test of time. A review of the literature was performed to see if any of these lasers could be called the "best laser for prostatectomy in 2013."

  4. Trends in radical prostatectomy: centralization, robotics, and access to urologic cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitzenberg, Karyn B; Wong, Yu-Ning; Nielsen, Matthew E; Egleston, Brian L; Uzzo, Robert G

    2012-01-01

    Robotic surgery has been widely adopted for radical prostatectomy. We hypothesized that this change is rapidly shifting procedures away from hospitals that do not offer robotics and consequently increasing patient travel. A population-based observational study of all prostatectomies for cancer in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania from 2000 to 2009 was performed using hospital discharge data. Hospital procedure volume was defined as the number of prostatectomies performed for cancer in a given year. Straight-line travel distance to the treating hospital was calculated for each case. Hospitals were contacted to determine the year of acquisition of the first robot. From 2000 to 2009, the total number of prostatectomies performed annually increased substantially. The increase occurred almost entirely at the very high-volume centers (≥ 106 prostatectomies/year). The number of hospitals performing prostatectomy fell 37% from 2000 to 2009. By 2009, the 9% (21/244) of hospitals that had very high volume performed 57% of all prostatectomies, and the 35% (86/244) of hospitals with a robot performed 85% of all prostatectomies. The median travel distance increased 54% from 2000 to 2009 (Probotic surgery. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  5. Standardization of surgical techniques used in facial bone contouring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Sung

    2015-12-01

    Since the introduction of facial bone contouring surgery for cosmetic purposes, various surgical methods have been used to improve the aesthetics of facial contours. In general, by standardizing the surgical techniques, it is possible to decrease complication rates and achieve more predictable surgical outcomes, thereby increasing patient satisfaction. The technical strategies used by the author to standardize facial bone contouring procedures are introduced here. The author uses various pre-manufactured surgical tools and hardware for facial bone contouring. During a reduction malarplasty or genioplasty procedure, double-bladed reciprocating saws and pre-bent titanium plates customized for the zygomatic body, arch and chin are used. Various guarded oscillating saws are used for mandibular angloplasty. The use of double-bladed saws and pre-bent plates to perform reduction malarplasty reduces the chances of post-operative asymmetry or under- or overcorrection of the zygoma contours due to technical faults. Inferior alveolar nerve injury and post-operative jawline asymmetry or irregularity can be reduced by using a guarded saw during mandibular angloplasty. For genioplasty, final placement of the chin in accordance with preoperative quantitative analysis can be easily performed with pre-bent plates, and a double-bladed saw allows more procedural accuracy during osteotomies. Efforts by the surgeon to avoid unintentional faults are key to achieving satisfactory results and reducing the incidence of complications. The surgical techniques described in this study in conjunction with various in-house surgical tools and modified hardware can be used to standardize techniques to achieve aesthetically gratifying outcomes. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Does nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy increase the risk of positive surgical margins and biochemical progression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkhateeb Sultan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since the introduction of nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (NSRP, there have been concerns about the increased risks of positive surgical margins (PSM and biochemical progression (BP. We examined the relationship of NSRP with PSM and BP using a large, mature dataset. Materials and Methods: Patients who underwent RP for clinically localized prostate cancer at our center between 1997 and 2008 were identified. Patients who received neoadjuvant therapy were excluded. We examined the relation of NSRP to the rate of PSM and BP in univariate and multivariate analyses adjusting for clinical and pathological variables including age, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA levels and doubling time, and pathological stage and grade. Results: In total, 856 patients were included, 70.9% underwent NSRP and 29.1% had non-NSRP. PSM rates were 13.5% in the NSRP group compared to 17.7% in non-NSRP (P=0.11. In a multivariate analysis, non-NSRP was preformed in patients with a higher pathological stage (HR 1.95, 95% CI 1.25-3.04, P=0.003 and a higher baseline PSA level (HR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.08, P=0.005. With a median follow-up of 41 months, BP-free survival was 88% for non-NSRP compared to 92% for the NSRP group (log rank P=0.018; this difference was not significant in a multivariate Cox regression analysis (HR 0.54, 95% CI 0.28-1.06, P=0.09. Conclusion: When used in properly selected patients, NSRP does not seem to increase the risk of PSM and disease progression. The most effective way of resolving this issue is through a randomized clinical trial; however, such a trial is not feasible.

  7. Optimal pain management for radical prostatectomy surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Grish P; Jaschinski, Thomas; Bonnet, Francis

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increase in the diagnosis of prostate cancer has increased the incidence of radical prostatectomy. However, the literature assessing pain therapy for this procedure has not been systematically evaluated. Thus, optimal pain therapy for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy remains...... controversial. METHODS: Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for studies assessing the effects of analgesic and anesthetic interventions on pain after radical prostatectomy. All searches were conducted in October 2012 and updated in June 2015. RESULTS: Most...... treatments studied improved pain relief and/or reduced opioid requirements. However, there were significant differences in the study designs and the variables evaluated, precluding quantitative analysis and consensus recommendations. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review reveals that there is a lack...

  8. Application of minimally invasive technique in surgical treatment of pancreatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Yixi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, with the rapid development of minimally invasive concept, from laparoscopic operation to three-dimension laparoscopic technique and to robotic surgical system, treatment modalities have changed a lot. Pancreatic diseases, including multiple lesions, have different prognoses. An appropriate surgical procedure should be selected while ensuring the radical treatment of disease, so as to minimize the injury to patients and the impairment of organ function. Minimally invasive technique is of great significance in the surgical treatment of pancreatic diseases.

  9. Wrong to be Right: Margin Laterality is an Independent Predictor of Biochemical Failure After Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung J; Reiter, Robert E; Kummer, Nicolas; DeKernion, Jean; Steinberg, Michael L; King, Christopher R

    2018-01-01

    To examine the impact of positive surgical margin (PSM) laterality on failure after radical prostatectomy (RP). A PSM can influence local recurrence and outcomes after salvage radiation. Unlike intrinsic risk factors, a PSM is caused by intervention and thus iatrogenic failures may be elucidated by analyzing margin laterality as surgical approach is itself lateralized. We reviewed 226 RP patients between 1991 and 2013 with PSM. Data includes operation type, pre/postoperative PSA, surgical pathology, and margin type (location, focality, laterality). The median follow-up was 47 months. Biochemical recurrence after RP was defined as PSA≥0.1 ng/mL or 2 consecutive rises above nadir. Ninety-two patients received salvage radiation therapy (SRT). Failure after SRT was defined as any PSA≥0.2 ng/mL or greater than presalvage. Kaplan-Meier and Cox multivariate analyses compared relapse rates. The majority of PSM were iatrogenic (58%). Laterality was associated with differences in median relapse: right 20 versus left 51 versus bilateral 14 months (PRight-sided margins were more likely to progress than left (hazard ratio, 1.67; P=0.04). More right-sided margins were referred for SRT (55% right vs. 23% left vs. 22% bilateral), but were equally salvaged. Only T-stage and pre-SRT PSA independently influenced SRT success. Most PSM are iatrogenic, with right-sided more likely to progress (and sooner) than left sided. Margin laterality is a heretofore unrecognized independent predictor of biochemical relapse and hints at the need to modify the traditional unilateral surgical technique.

  10. Transvesical prostatectomy in the management of benign prostatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-02

    Jun 2, 2014 ... only occurred in 76 patients (25.7%); acute urinary retention was seen in 106 patients (35.7%). Chronic ... prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common problem in the ... of the drugs, open prostatectomy or transurethral resection .... Storage LUTS. 37 ... there was paucity of data about prostatectomy specimen.

  11. Cytoreductive prostatectomy in metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Joachim Aidt; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Røder, Martin Andreas

    2018-01-01

    The impact of cytoreductive radical prostatectomy on oncological outcome in patients with prostate cancer and limited number of bone metastases is unclear. Data from cancer registries, multi-institutional databases and a single institutional case-control study indicate a possible benefit of combi......The impact of cytoreductive radical prostatectomy on oncological outcome in patients with prostate cancer and limited number of bone metastases is unclear. Data from cancer registries, multi-institutional databases and a single institutional case-control study indicate a possible benefit...

  12. Reverse Stage Shift at a Tertiary Care Center: Escalating Risk in Men Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Jonathan L.; Vickers, Andrew J.; Power, Nicholas E.; Fine, Samson W.; Scardino, Peter T.; Eastham, James A.; Laudone, Vincent P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate changes in clinical and pathological characteristics of prostate cancer in patients treated surgically at a large tertiary care center in the context of increased use of active surveillance (AS) and minimally invasive surgery (MIS). Materials We performed retrospective review of 6,624 patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy from 2000–2010 at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Patients were stratified by surgical approach (open, laparoscopic or robotic) and risk categories (low, intermediate, or high). Patients with low-risk disease, without intervention and minimum followup of 6 months were considered to have elected AS. Results AS cases increased from <20 per year between 2000–2004 to ≥100 per year between 2007–2009. Over the same decade MIS cases (laparoscopic or robotic) increased from zero to 63% of all surgical cases. The percentage of patients in intermediate- and high-risk categories increased over time, while the percentage in the low-risk category decreased (OR per year 0.91, 95% CI 0.89, 0.92, p <0.0005). The proportion of surgery patients with Gleason 6 tumors decreased over time (OR per year 0.87, 95% CI 0.85, 0.88; p <0.0005) while pathologic stage and Gleason score increased (p <0.0005). The proportion of low-risk cases decreased across all types of surgery, with the largest decrease in robotic surgery (p <0.0005). Conclusions We observed a reverse stage shift in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy since 2000 despite the introduction and rapid proliferation of MIS. These findings may be due to increased use of AS and institutional focus on treatment of higher-risk disease. PMID:21484780

  13. Outcomes after radical prostatectomy in the PSA era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scardino, Peter T.

    1996-01-01

    This year 317,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 41,400 will die of this disease. Prostate cancer will kill nearly 1 million men alive today who are now over 50 years old. Since the mortality rate from prostate cancer increases more rapidly with age than any other cancer, and the most rapidly growing segment of the population is those > 80 years old, and mortality from other causes is declining, the number of deaths from prostate cancer is expected to increase inexorably for many years. Among the clinical prognostic factors that have been established as important predictors of the natural history of prostate cancer in conservatively treated patients, none is more important than the grade of the tumor. A similar influence of grade has been reported in patients treated surgically. At Baylor we assessed a variety of clinical prognostic factors in 728 men treated with radical prostatectomy and followed with serial PSA levels with no other therapy before proven recurrence of the cancer. While a variety of factors were significant in univariate analyses, in multivariate analysis only grade and serum PSA levels were significant clinical prognostic factors. Once the prostate was removed and pathologic information was available, however, pathologic stage became the most important factor (especially seminal vesicle or lymph node involvement), but Gleason grade was also a powerful independent factor. Surgical margin status and the presence of extracapsular extension were also independent predictors of recurrence, but total tumor volume added little additional information. Once the pathological information is available, none of the prognostic factors known before the operation, including PSA, PSA density, and clinical, have any independent power to predict prognosis. While radical prostatectomy may carry greater risk of complications than radiotherapy, its major advantage is the high probability that the cancer can be completely eradicated, especially if it is

  14. What if the hand piece spring disassembles during robotic radical prostatectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, Ziya; Canda, Abdullah Erdem; Atmaca, Ali Fuat; Asil, Erem; Isgoren, Egemen; Balbay, Mevlana Derya

    2011-01-01

    Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP) is successfully being performed for treating prostate cancer (PCa). However, instrumentation failure associated with robotic procedures represents a unique new problem. We report the successful completion of RALRP in spite of a disassembled hand piece spring during the procedure. A PubMed/Medline search was made concerning robotic malfunction and robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy to discuss our experience. We performed RALRP in a 60-year-old male patient with localized PCa. During the procedure, the spring of the hand piece disassembled, and we were not able to reassemble it. We completed the procedure successfully however without fixing the disassembled hand piece spring. We were able to grasp tissue and needles when we brought our fingers together. The only movement we needed to do was to move fingers apart to release tissue or needles caught by robotic instrument. Although malfunction risk related to the da Vinci Surgical System seems to be very low, it might still occur. Sometimes, simple maneuvers may compensate for the failed function as occurred in our case. However, patients should be informed before the operation about the possibility of converting their procedure to laparoscopic or open due to robotic malfunction.

  15. Robotic Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy after High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Telis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in men. As new focal therapies become more popular in treatment of prostate cancer, failure cases requiring salvage therapy with either surgical or other techniques are being reported. Objective. To report the options in treatment of prostate cancer after recurrence or failure of the primary treatment modality. Methods. We report a salvage robotic assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP for prostate cancer recurrence following high intensity focused ultrasound treatment (HIFU in the United States. Results. A 67-year-old man who underwent HIFU treatment for prostate adenocarcinoma 2 years prior was presented with a rising prostate specific antigen of 6.1 ng/mL to our clinic. A biopsy proven recurrent disease in the area of previous treatment documented the failure of treatment. The patient elected to undergo a salvage RALP. The operation time was 159 minutes. The patient was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 1 with no complications. The catheter was removed on post-op day 10. The patient reserved sexual function and urinary continence. The PSA levels on 6 months’ follow-up are undetectable. Conclusions. Salvage RALP is an effective and safe treatment choice for recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following failed HIFU treatment if operated by an experienced surgeon.

  16. Ahmed glaucoma valve implant: surgical technique and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Ivano; Roberti, Gloria; Oddone, Francesco; Konstas, Anastasios Gp; Quaranta, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    Implantation of Ahmed glaucoma valve is an effective surgical technique to reduce intraocular pressure in patients affected with glaucoma. While in the past, the use of this device was reserved to glaucoma refractory to multiple filtration surgical procedures, up-to-date mounting experience has encouraged its use also as a primary surgery for selected cases. Implantation of Ahmed glaucoma valve can be challenging for the surgeon, especially in patients who already underwent previous multiple surgeries. Several tips have to be acquired by the surgeon, and a long learning curve is always needed. Although the valve mechanism embedded in the Ahmed glaucoma valve decreases the risk of postoperative hypotony-related complications, it does not avoid the need of a careful follow-up. Complications related to this type of surgery include early and late postoperative hypotony, excessive capsule fibrosis around the plate, erosion of the tube or plate edge, and very rarely infection. The aim of this review is to describe surgical technique for Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation and to report related complications.

  17. Intrafascial versus interfascial nerve sparing in radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Hong; Zeng, Xian-Tao; Li, Sheng; Meng, Xiang-Yu; Shi, Ming-Jun; He, Da-Lin; Wang, Xing-Huan

    2017-09-13

    The present study aimed to systematically evaluate the effectiveness and safety of the intrafascial and interfascial nerve sparing (ITR-NS and ITE-NS) radical prostatectomy. PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases were searched for eligible studies. Meta-analysis with random-effects model was performed. Six comparative trials were selected and embraced in this research, including one randomized controlled trial, three prospective comparative trials, and two retrospective comparative trials. With regard to perioperative parameters, no significant association of operative time, blood loss, transfusion rates, duration of catheterization, and hospital stay existed between ITR-NS and ITE-NS. With respect to the functional results, ITR-NS had advantages in terms of both continence and potency recovery compared with ITE-NS. In reference to the oncologic results, the ITR-NS showed lower overall positive surgical margin (PSM) compared with ITE-NS but pT2 PSM and biochemical recurrence free rates were similar to the two surgical types. This study demonstrates that ITR-NS has better continence at 6 mo and 36 mo and better potency recovery at 6 mo and 12 mo postoperatively, regardless of the surgical technique. The cancer control of ITR-NS was also better than that of ITE-NS. This may be explained by the fact that patients in ITE-NS group present higher risk cancer than patients in ITR-NS group.

  18. Development of a Three-dimensional Surgical Navigation System with Magnetic Resonance Angiography and a Three-dimensional Printer for Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomoto, Wataru; Tanooka, Masao; Doi, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Keisuke; Mitsuie, Chiemi; Yamada, Yusuke; Suzuki, Toru; Yamano, Toshiko; Ishikura, Reiichi; Kotoura, Noriko; Yamamoto, Shingo

    2018-01-02

    We sought to develop a surgical navigation system using magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and a three-dimensional (3D) printer for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Six patients with pathologically proven localized prostate cancer were prospectively enrolled in this study. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), consisting of T2-weighted sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip-angle evolutions (SPACE) and true fast imaging with steady-state precession (true FISP), reconstructed by volume rendering, was followed by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA performed with a volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) during intravenous bolus injection of gadobutrol. Images of arterial and venous phases were acquired over approximately 210 seconds. Selected images were sent to a workstation for generation of 3D volume-rendered images and standard triangulated language (STL) files for 3D print construction. The neurovascular bundles (NVBs) were found in sequence on non-contrast images. Accessory pudendal arteries (APAs) were found in all cases in the arterial phase of contrast enhancement but were ill-defined on non-contrast enhanced MRA. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA helped to detect APAs, suggesting that this 3D system using MRI will be useful in RARP.

  19. [Intestinal stomas--indications, stoma types, surgical technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzulli, P; Candinas, D

    2007-09-01

    The formation of an intestinal stoma is one of the most frequent operations in visceral surgery. Despite new operative techniques and a more restrictive use of the stoma, the stoma formation remains an often necessary surgical procedure, which results to a dramatic change in the patients' life. The stoma formation and its later closure are associated with a high morbidity. Many complications, such as stoma necrosis, stoma retraction or stoma prolapse, are related to surgical mistakes made during stoma formation. These complications are therefore largely avoidable. The stoma formation needs careful planning together with a professional stoma nursing team. Moreover, it is mandatory that the stoma formation is made with great care and that it meticulously follows the well established surgical principles. A perfectly placed, technically correctly fashioned and easy to care for stoma is essential for a good patients'quality of life.

  20. Urinary infection before and after prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pourmand Gholamreza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the prevalence of pre and post prostatectomy related urinary tract in-fection and its correlation with peri-operative events, we studied 120 patients who underwent pros-tatectomy due to benign prostatic hypertrophy from September 2005 to September 2006. Urine cultures were performed before the operations, after a week, and three months later. Data including prostate volume, prostatic specific antigen (PSA, post voiding residue (PVR and histopathological reports as well as the duration of urinary leak, bladder irrigation, hospitalization, and catheterization were studied. The mean age of the studied patients was 70.5 ± 8 years. Significant preoperative bac-teriuria was revealed in 18 (15% patients of whom 14(77% patients developed negative cultures following the operation. Postoperative bacteriuria was detected in 9(7.5% patients who negative urine cultures preoperatively. Pre and post operative micro-organisms were different in the majority of the cases. The mean PSA was higher in patients with a positive history of infection. Following prostatectomy, patients with positive urine cultures had significantly longer urinary leakage, cathe-terization, and hospital stays compared with those who remained culture negative. We conclude that the incidence of positive urine culture pri-prostatectomy for BPH can be improved by appropriate antibiotic therapy, and the risk factors for postoperative urinary infection include preoperative infec-tion, prolonged urinary leakage, catheterization, and hospital stay. The elevated PSA may be a risk factor.

  1. Predictor of response to salvage radiotherapy in patients with PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy. The usefulness of PSA doubling time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numata, Kousaku; Azuma, Koji; Hashine, Katsuyoshi; Sumiyoshi, Yoshiteru

    2005-01-01

    We assessed predictors of response to salvage radiotherapy (sRT) in patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence after radical prostatectomy. A total of 21 patients receiving sRT for PSA recurrence without systemic progression after radical prostatectomy had medical records available for retrospective review. We defined sRT as external beam radiotherapy for patients with a continuous increase in PSA level≥0.2 ng/ml after radical prostatectomy. Response was defined as achievement of a PSA nadir of ≤0.1 ng/ml. Various pre-treatment parameters were evaluated retrospectively. The median follow-up period after sRT was 38 months. Of the 21 patients, 15 were good responders (71%). The only predictive factor was PSA doubling time (PSADT). Age and PSA level at diagnosis, Gleason score and surgical margin status were not significant predictors of response. The median PSADT in responders was 6.2 months versus 1.9 months in non-responders (P=0.019). The patients with a PSADT of ≥5 months were all responders. PSADT appears to be a good predictor of response to sRT. sRT was especially effective when PSADT was ≥5 months. (author)

  2. [Individual learning curve for radical robot-assisted prostatectomy based on the example of three professionals working in one clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasner, P I; Pushkar', D Iu; Kolontarev, K B; Kotenkov, D V

    2014-01-01

    The appearance of new surgical technique always requires evaluation of its effectiveness and ease of acquisition. A comparative study of the results of the first three series of successive robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) performed on at time by three surgeons, was conducted. The series consisted of 40 procedures, and were divided into 4 groups of 10 operations for the analysis. When comparing data, statistically significant improvement of intra- and postoperative performance in each series was revealed, with increase in the number of operations performed, and in each subsequent series compared with the preceding one. We recommend to perform the planned conversion at the first operation. In our study, previous laparoscopic experience did not provide any significant advantages in the acquisition of robot-assisted technology. To characterize the individual learning curve, we recommend the use of the number of operations that the surgeon looked in the life-surgery regimen and/or in which he participated as an assistant before his own surgical activity, as well as the indicator "technical defect". In addition to the term "individual learning curve", we propose to introduce the terms "surgeon's individual training phase", and "clinic's learning curve".

  3. Evaluation of primary and secondary stability of titanium implants using different surgical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Afsheen; Meijer, Gert J; Walboomers, X Frank; Jansen, John A

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the influence of different surgical techniques on the primary and secondary implant stability using trabecular bone of goats as an implantation model. In the iliac crest of eight goats, 48 cylindrical-screw-type implants with a diameter of 4.2 mm (Dyna(®) ; Bergen op Zoom, the Netherlands) were installed, using three different surgical techniques: (i) 5% undersized, using a final drill diameter of 4 mm; (ii) 15% undersized, using a final drill diameter of 3.6 mm; and (iii) 25% undersized, using a final drill diameter of 3.2 mm. Peak insertion torque values were measured by a Digital(®) (MARK-10 Corporation, New York, NY, USA) torque gauge instrument during placement. At 3 weeks after implantation, removal torque was measured. Histomorphometrically, the peri-implant bone volume was measured in three zones; the inner zone (0-500 μm), the middle zone (500-1000 μm) and the outer zone (1000-1500 μm). Evaluation of the obtained data demonstrated no statistically significant difference between different surgical techniques regarding removal torque values. With respect to the percentage peri-implant bone volume (%BV), also no significant difference could be observed between all three applied surgical techniques for both the inner, middle and outer zone. However, irrespective of the surgical technique, it was noticed that the %BV was significantly higher for the inner zone as compared to middle and outer zone (P < 0.05) around the implant. At 3 weeks after implant installation, independent of the used undersized surgical technique, the %BV in the inner zone (0-500 μm) peri-implant area was improved due to both condensation of the surrounding bone as also the translocation of host bone particles along the implant surface. Surprisingly, no mechanical beneficial effect of the 25% undersized surgical technique could be observed as compared to the 5% or 15% undersized surgical technique to improve primary or secondary implant stability. © 2013

  4. Predicting an optimal outcome after radical prostatectomy: the trifecta nomogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, James A; Scardino, Peter T; Kattan, Michael W

    2008-06-01

    The optimal outcome after radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer is freedom from biochemical recurrence along with the recovery of continence and erectile function, a so-called trifecta. We evaluated our series of open radical prostatectomy cases to determine the likelihood of this outcome and develop a nomogram predicting the trifecta. We reviewed the records of patients undergoing open radical prostatectomy for clinical stage T1c-T3a prostate cancer at our center during 2000 to 2006. Men were excluded if they received preoperative hormonal therapy, chemotherapy or radiation therapy, if pretreatment prostate specific antigen was more than 50 ng/ml, or if they were impotent or incontinent before radical prostatectomy. A total of 1,577 men were included in the study. Freedom from biochemical recurrence was defined as post-radical prostatectomy prostate specific antigen less than 0.2 ng/ml. Continence was defined as not having to wear any protective pads. Potency was defined as erection adequate for intercourse upon most attempts with or without phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor. Mean patient age was 58 years and mean pretreatment prostate specific antigen was 6.4 ng/ml. A trifecta outcome (cancer-free status with recovery of continence and potency) was achieved in 62% of patients. In a nomogram developed to predict the likelihood of the trifecta baseline prostate specific antigen was the major predictive factor. Area under the ROC curve for the nomogram was 0.773 and calibration appeared excellent. A trifecta (optimal) outcome can be achieved in most men undergoing radical prostatectomy. The nomogram permits patients to estimate preoperatively their likelihood of an optimal outcome after radical prostatectomy.

  5. Variation of prostate-specific antigen expression in different tumour growth patterns present in prostatectomy specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.W. Gallee; E. Visser-de Jong (E.); J.A.G.M. van der Korput (J. A G M); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); F.J.W. ten Kate (Fiebo); F.H. Schröder (Fritz); J. Trapman (Jan)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractA series of 55 randomly chosen radical prostatectomy specimens was analyzed for expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) by immunohistochemical techniques. Tissue sections were selected in such a manner that in addition to glandular benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), one or more

  6. Review of Surgical Techniques of Experimental Renal Transplantation in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Badri; Haylor, John

    2017-08-01

    Microvascular surgical techniques of renal transplant in rats have evolved over the past 5 decades to achieve successful rat renal transplant; these modifications have included surgical techniques to address the anatomic variations in the renal blood vessels and those to reduce ischemic and operation durations. Here, we review the surgical techniques of renal transplant in rats and evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of individual techniques of vascular and ureteric anastomoses. For this review, we performed a systematic literature search using relevant medical subject heading terms and included appropriate publications in the review. Since the first description of a rat model of renal transplant by Bernard Fisher and his colleagues in 1965, which used end-to-side anastomosis between the renal vein and renal artery to the recipient inferior vena cava and aorta, several vascular and ureteric anastomosis techniques have been modified. Vascular anastomosis techniques now include end-to-end anastomosis, use of donor aortic and inferior vena cava conduits, sleeve and cuff anastomoses, and application of fibrin glue. Likewise, restoration of the urinary tract can now be achieved by direct anastomosis of the donor ureter to the recipient bladder, end-to-end anastomosis between the donor and recipient ureters, and donor bladder cuff to the recipient bladder. There are advantages and disadvantages attributable to individual techniques. The range of vascular and ureteric anastomosis techniques that has emerged reflects the need for mastering more than one technique to suit the vascular anatomy of individual animals and to reduce operating time for achieving successful outcomes after renal transplant.

  7. The surgical correction of buried penis: a new technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boemers, T. M.; de Jong, T. P.

    1995-01-01

    We report a new surgical technique for the correction of buried penis. The study comprised 10 boys with buried penis. The technique consisted of resection of abnormal dartos attachments, unfurling of the prepuce and correction of the deficient shaft skin by reapproximation of the preputial skin

  8. Analysis of second malignancies after modern radiotherapy versus prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jiayi; Kestin, Larry L.; Ye, Hong; Wallace, Michelle; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify the risk of developing second primary cancers (SPCs) after radiotherapy (RT) versus prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer (PCa) in the modern era. Methods: The RT cohort consisted of 2120 patients matched on a 1:1 basis with surgical patients according to age and follow-up time. RT techniques consisted of conventional or two-dimensional RT (2DRT, 36%), three-dimensional conformal RT and/or intensity modulated RT (3DCRT/IMRT, 29%), brachytherapy (BT, 16%), and a combination of 2DRT and BT (BT boost, 19%). Results: The overall SPC risk was not significantly different between the matched-pair (HR 1.14, 95% CI 0.94-1.39), but the risk became significant >5 years or >10 years after RT (HR 1.86, 95% CI 1.36-2.55; HR 4.94, 95% CI 2.18-11.2, respectively). The most significant sites of increased risk were bladder, lymphoproliferative, and sarcoma. Of the different RT techniques, only 2DRT was associated with a significantly higher risk (HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.32-2.35), but not BT boost (HR 0.83, 95% CI 0.50-1.38), 3DCRT/IMRT (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.55-1.21), or BT (HR 0.53, 95% CI 0.28-1.01). Conclusions: Radiation-related SPC risk varies depending on the RT technique and may be reduced by using BT, BT boost, or 3DCRT/IMRT.

  9. Change in functional bowel symptoms after prostatectomy: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyman Adibi

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: This is the first forward study regarding bowel symptom changes following prostatectomy. The main positive finding of this study is that open prostatectomy was followed by significant increase in diarrhea and bowel habit alternation associated with onset of abdominal pain. Specifically the change was found after open operation but not after TURP. Prostatectomy whether in form of open or transurethral may cause onset of abdominal discomfort and bowel habit change.

  10. Surgical dislocation of the hip in patients with femoroacetabular impingement: Surgical techniques and our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Marko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Arthrosis of the hip is the most common cause of a hip joint disorders. The aim of this study was to present our experience in the application of a safe surgical dislocation of the hip in patients with minor morphological changes in the hip joint, which, through the mechanism of femoroacetabular impingement, cause damage to the acetabular labrum and adjacent cartilage as an early sign of the hip arthrosis. Methods. We have operated 51 patients with different morphological bone changes in the hip area and resultant soft tissue damage of the acetabular labrum and its adjacent cartilage. Surgical technique that we applied in this group of patients, was adapted to our needs and capabilities and it was minimaly modified compared to the original procedure. Results. The surgical technique presented in this paper, proved to be a good method of treatment of bone and soft tissue pathomorphological changes of the hip in patients with femoroacetabular impingement. We had no cases with avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and two patients had nonunion of the greater trochanter, 9 patients developed paraarticular ossification, without subjective symptoms, while 3 patients suffered from postoperative pain in the groin during more energetic physical activities. Conclusion. Utilization of our partly modified surgical technique of controlled and safe dislocation of the hip can solve all the bone and soft tissue problems in patients with femoroacetibular impingement to stop already developed osteoarthritis of the hip or to prevent mild form of it.

  11. Innovative Surgical Management of the Synovial Chondromatosis of Temporo-Mandibular Joints: Highly Conservative Surgical Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionna, Franco; Amantea, Massimiliano; Mastrangelo, Filiberto; Ballini, Andrea; Maglione, Maria Grazia; Aversa, Corrado; De Cecio, Rossella; Russo, Daniela; Marrelli, Massimo; Tatullo, Marco

    2016-07-01

    Synovial chondromatosis (SC) is an uncommon disease characterized by a benign nodular cartilaginous proliferation arising from the joint synovium, bursae, or tendon sheaths. Although the temporomandibular joint is rarely affected by neoplastic lesions, SC is the most common neoplastic lesion of this joint. The treatment of this disease consists in the extraoral surgery with a wide removal of the lesion; in this study, the authors described a more conservative intraoral surgical approach. Patient with SC of temporomandibular joint typically refer a limitation in the mouth opening, together with a persistent not physiological mandibular protrusion and an appearance of a neoformation located at the right preauricular region: the authors reported 1 scholar patient. After biopsy of the neoformation, confirming the synovial chondromatosis, the patient underwent thus to the surgical excision of the tumor, via authors' conservative transoral approach, to facilitate the enucleation of the neoformation. The mass fully involved the pterygo-maxillary fossa with involvement of the parotid lodge and of the right TMJ: this multifocal extension suggested for a trans-oral surgical procedure, in the light of the suspicion of a possible malignant nature of the neoplasm. Our intraoral conservative approach to surgery is aimed to reduce the presence of unaesthetic scars in preauricular and facial regions, with surgical results undoubtedly comparable to the traditional surgical techniques much more aggressive. Our technique could be a valid, alternative, and safe approach to treat this rare and complex kind of oncological disease.

  12. A method of handing down surgical clipping technique for cerebral aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idei, Masaru; Yamane, Kanji; Okita, Shinji; Kumano, Kiyoshi; Nakae, Ryuta

    2009-01-01

    Meticulous clipping techniques are essential to obtain good results. Recently, the introduction of intravascular surgery for cerebral aneurysms has decreased the number of the direct clipping surgeries. And the increasing number of the lawsuits against doctors further discourages young surgeons from attempting clipping. As a result, young neurosurgeons, have less experience performing clipping. Therefore, we must learn clipping techniques from expert neurosurgeons under the limitation of having fewer opportunities to perform clipping surgery. In this paper, I present my experiences and discuss ways to obtain techniques for clipping surgery. I performed surgical clipping in 19 cases, 12 unruptured and 7 ruptured aneurysms, 7 males and 12 females aged from 36 to 79 years old (mean 61.9 years). Postoperatively, there were no symptomatic complications, but there were 2 asymptomatic infarctions that were revealed on CT scan. Intraoperative premature rupture occurred in 1 patient with a ruptured aneurysm. Techniques of manipulation with micro-forceps, suction and spatula are required for successful clipping. Off-the-job training of dissecting chicken wing arteries and rat abdominal aortas and vena cavas is useful. Moreover, actual experiences of surgical operations are essential. Surgical experiences raise the motivation of young neurosurgeons and encourage them to train more. We believe that this benign cycle contributes to meticulous surgical skills. (author)

  13. Nonpenetrating glaucoma surgery with goniosynechiolysis ab interno: a surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshahi, A; Scharioth, G B

    2009-01-01

    To present a surgical technique for treatment of peripheral anterior synechiae (PAS or goniosynechiae) at the operative field during nonpenetrating glaucoma surgery. After usual preparation of a superficial and a deep scleral flap with externalization of the Schlemm's canal and peeling the juxtacanalicular trabecular meshwork, the goniosynechia is transected by a spatula introduced to the anterior chamber through a paracentesis. A Descemet's window provides full visual control at the peripheral cornea at the basis of the superficial scleral flap. With this surgical technique, selective treatment of goniosynechiae is possible exactly at the area where creation of low outflow resistance is intended by the surgeon during nonpenetrating glaucoma surgery. This technique enables the surgeon to perform nonpenetrating glaucoma surgery even in the presence of peripheral anterior synechiae.

  14. Sexuality Following Radical Prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Serefoglu, Ege C; Albersen, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    incontinence in relation to sexual activity after surgery. This can present at the time of orgasm (ie, climacturia) or arise during arousal. In general, the problem subsides with time and pelvic floor training and tension penile loops can be used as treatments. Orgasmic disturbances after radical prostatectomy...

  15. Penile vibratory stimulation in the treatment of post-prostatectomy incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Sønksen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To examine penile vibratory stimulation (PVS) in the treatment of post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence (UI). METHODS: Patients with post-prostatectomy UI were included in a 12-week trial. A 24-hr pad test and a 72-hr voiding diary were collected at baseline. Participants were randomized ...

  16. Automatic localization of the da Vinci surgical instrument tips in 3-D transrectal ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohareri, Omid; Ramezani, Mahdi; Adebar, Troy K; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Salcudean, Septimiu E

    2013-09-01

    Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP) using the da Vinci surgical system is the current state-of-the-art treatment option for clinically confined prostate cancer. Given the limited field of view of the surgical site in RALRP, several groups have proposed the integration of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging in the surgical workflow to assist with accurate resection of the prostate and the sparing of the neurovascular bundles (NVBs). We previously introduced a robotic TRUS manipulator and a method for automatically tracking da Vinci surgical instruments with the TRUS imaging plane, in order to facilitate the integration of intraoperative TRUS in RALRP. Rapid and automatic registration of the kinematic frames of the da Vinci surgical system and the robotic TRUS probe manipulator is a critical component of the instrument tracking system. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic registration technique based on automatic 3-D TRUS localization of robot instrument tips pressed against the air-tissue boundary anterior to the prostate. The detection approach uses a multiscale filtering technique to identify and localize surgical instrument tips in the TRUS volume, and could also be used to detect other surface fiducials in 3-D ultrasound. Experiments have been performed using a tissue phantom and two ex vivo tissue samples to show the feasibility of the proposed methods. Also, an initial in vivo evaluation of the system has been carried out on a live anaesthetized dog with a da Vinci Si surgical system and a target registration error (defined as the root mean square distance of corresponding points after registration) of 2.68 mm has been achieved. Results show this method's accuracy and consistency for automatic registration of TRUS images to the da Vinci surgical system.

  17. Feasibility study of a clinically-integrated randomized trial of modifications to radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickers Andrew J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous technical modifications to radical prostatectomy have been proposed. Such modifications are likely to lead to only slight improvements in outcomes. Although small differences would be worthwhile, an appropriately powered randomized trial would need to be very large, and thus of doubtful feasibility given the expense, complexity and regulatory burden of contemporary clinical trials. We have proposed a novel methodology, the clinically-integrated randomized trial, which dramatically streamlines trial procedures in order to reduce the marginal cost of an additional patient towards zero. We aimed to determine the feasibility of implementing such a trial for radical prostatectomy. Methods Patients undergoing radical prostatectomy as initial treatment for prostate cancer were randomized in a factorial design to involvement of the fascia during placement of the anastomotic sutures, urethral irrigation, both or neither. Endpoint data were obtained from routine clinical documentation. Accrual and compliance rates were monitored to determine the feasibility of the trial. Results From a total of 260 eligible patients, 154 (59% consented; 56 patients declined to participate, 20 were not approached on recommendation of the treating surgeon, and 30 were not approached for logistical reasons. Although recording by surgeons of the procedure used was incomplete (~80%, compliance with randomization was excellent when it was recorded, with only 6% of procedures inconsistent with allocation. Outcomes data was received from 71% of patients at one year. This improved to 83% as the trial progressed. Conclusions A clinically-integrated randomized trial was conducted at low cost, with excellent accrual, and acceptable compliance with treatment allocation and outcomes reporting. This demonstrates the feasibility of the methodology. Improved methods to ensure documentation of surgical procedures would be required before wider implementation

  18. Risk of complications and urinary incontinence following cytoreductive prostatectomy: a multi-institutional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Keun Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence has suggested that cytoreductive prostatectomy (CRP allows superior oncologic control when compared to current standard of care androgen deprivation therapy alone. However, the safety and benefit of cytoreduction in metastatic prostate cancer (mPCa has not been proven. Therefore, we evaluated the incidence of complications following CRP in men newly diagnosed with mPCa. A total of 68 patients who underwent CRP from 2006 to 2014 at four tertiary surgical centers were compared to 598 men who underwent radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer (PCa. Urinary incontinence was defined as the use of any pad. CRP had longer operative times (200 min vs 140 min, P < 0.0001 and higher estimated blood loss (250 ml vs 125 ml, P < 0.0001 compared to the control group. However, both overall (8.82% vs 5.85% and major complication rates (4.41% vs 2.17% were comparable between the two groups. Importantly, urinary incontinence rate at 1-year after surgery was significantly higher in the CRP group (57.4% vs 90.8%, P < 0.0001. Univariate logistic analysis showed that the estimated blood loss was the only independent predictor of perioperative complications both in the unadjusted model (OR: 1.18; 95% CI: 1.02-1.37; P = 0.025 and surgery type-adjusted model (OR: 1.17; 95% CI: 1.01-1.36; P = 0.034. In conclusion, CRP is more challenging than radical prostatectomy and associated with a notably higher incidence of urinary incontinence. Nevertheless, CRP is a technically feasible and safe surgery for selecting PCa patients who present with node-positive or bony metastasis when performed by experienced surgeons. A prospective, multi-institutional clinical trial is currently underway to verify this concept.

  19. Post-prostatectomy radiation therapy: Consensus guidelines of the Australian and New Zealand Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidhom, Mark A.; Kneebone, Andrew B.; Lehman, Margot; Wiltshire, Kirsty L.; Millar, Jeremy L.; Mukherjee, Rahul K.; Shakespeare, Thomas P.; Tai, Keen-Hun

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Three randomised trials have demonstrated the benefit of adjuvant post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT) for high risk patients. Data also documents the effectiveness of salvage radiotherapy following a biochemical relapse post-prostatectomy. The Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group recognised the need to develop consensus guidelines on to whom, when and how to deliver PPRT. Materials and methods: Draft guidelines were developed and refined at a consensus conference in June 2006 attended by 63 delegates where urological, radiotherapy and diagnostic imaging experts spoke on aspects of PPRT. Unresolved issues were further developed by working parties and redistributed until consensus was reached. Results: Central to the recommendations is that patients with positive surgical margins, seminal vesicle invasion and/or extracapsular extension have a high risk of residual local disease and should be informed of the options of either immediate adjuvant radiotherapy or active surveillance with early salvage in the event of biochemical recurrence. Salvage radiotherapy should be instituted at the earliest confirmation of biochemical recurrence. Detailed contouring guidelines have been developed, defining the regions at risk of residual microscopic disease which should be included in the clinical target volume. The recommended doses are 60-64 Gy for adjuvant, and 60-66 Gy for salvage radiotherapy. The role of hormone therapy in conjunction with PPRT is yet to be defined. Conclusions: These consensus guidelines have been developed to give clinical and technical guidance to radiation oncologists and urologists in the management of high risk post-prostatectomy patients

  20. Role of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in the management of high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay Sood

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the role of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP in the management of high-risk prostate cancer (PCa, with a focus on oncological, functional and perioperative outcomes. Further, we also aimed to briefly describe our novel modification to conventional RARP that allows immediate organ retrieval and examination for intra-operative surgical margin assessment. A literature search of PubMed was performed for articles on the management of high-risk PCa. Papers written in English and concerning clinical outcomes following RARP for locally advanced and high-risk PCa were selected. Outcomes data from our own center were also included. A total of 10 contemporary series were evaluated. Biopsy Gleason score ≥ 8 was the most common cause for classification of patients into the high-risk PCa group. Biochemical failure rate, in the few series that looked at long-term follow-up, varied from 9% to 26% at 1 year. The positive surgical margin rate varied from 12% to 53.3%. Urinary continence rates varied from 78% to 92% at 1 year. The overall complication rates varied from 2.4% to 30%, with anastomotic leak and lymphocele being the most common complications. Long-term data on oncological control following RARP in high-risk patients is lacking. Short-term oncological outcomes and functional outcomes are equivalent to open radical prostatectomy (RP. Safety outcomes are better in patients undergoing RARP when compared with open RP. Improved tools for predicting the presence of organ-confined disease (OCD are available. High-risk patients with OCD would be ideal candidates for RARP and would benefit most from surgery alone.

  1. The impact of days off between cases on perioperative outcomes for robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Shane M; Pariser, Joseph J; Patel, Sanjay G; Anderson, Blake B; Eggener, Scott E; Zagaja, Gregory P

    2016-02-01

    To examine the effect of days off between cases on perioperative outcomes for robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP). We analyzed a single-surgeon series of 2036 RALP cases between 2003 and 2014. Days between cases (DBC) was calculated as the number of days elapsed since the surgeon's previous RALP with the second start cases assigned 0 DBC. Surgeon experience was assessed by dividing sequential case experience into cases 0-99, cases 100-249, cases 250-999, and cases 1000+ based on previously reported learning curve data for RALP. Outcomes included estimated blood loss (EBL), operative time (OT), and positive surgical margins (PSMs). Multiple linear regression was used to assess the impact of the DBC and surgeon experience on EBL, OT, and PSM, while controlling for patient characteristics, surgical technique, and pathologic variables. Overall median DBC was 1 day (0-3) and declined with increasing surgeon case experience. Multiple linear regression demonstrated that each additional DBC was independently associated with increased EBL [β = 3.7, 95% CI (1.3-6.2), p < 0.01] and OT [β = 2.3 (1.4-3.2), p < 0.01], but was not associated with rate of PSM [β = 0.004 (-0.003-0.010), p = 0.2]. Increased experience was also associated with reductions in EBL and OT (p < 0.01). Surgeon experience of 1000+ cases was associated with a 10% reduction in PSM rate (p = 0.03) compared to cases 0-99. In a large single-surgeon RALP series, DBC was associated with increased blood loss and operative time, but not associated with positive surgical margins, when controlling for surgeon experience.

  2. Surgical robotics beyond enhanced dexterity instrumentation: a survey of machine learning techniques and their role in intelligent and autonomous surgical actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassahun, Yohannes; Yu, Bingbin; Tibebu, Abraham Temesgen; Stoyanov, Danail; Giannarou, Stamatia; Metzen, Jan Hendrik; Vander Poorten, Emmanuel

    2016-04-01

    Advances in technology and computing play an increasingly important role in the evolution of modern surgical techniques and paradigms. This article reviews the current role of machine learning (ML) techniques in the context of surgery with a focus on surgical robotics (SR). Also, we provide a perspective on the future possibilities for enhancing the effectiveness of procedures by integrating ML in the operating room. The review is focused on ML techniques directly applied to surgery, surgical robotics, surgical training and assessment. The widespread use of ML methods in diagnosis and medical image computing is beyond the scope of the review. Searches were performed on PubMed and IEEE Explore using combinations of keywords: ML, surgery, robotics, surgical and medical robotics, skill learning, skill analysis and learning to perceive. Studies making use of ML methods in the context of surgery are increasingly being reported. In particular, there is an increasing interest in using ML for developing tools to understand and model surgical skill and competence or to extract surgical workflow. Many researchers begin to integrate this understanding into the control of recent surgical robots and devices. ML is an expanding field. It is popular as it allows efficient processing of vast amounts of data for interpreting and real-time decision making. Already widely used in imaging and diagnosis, it is believed that ML will also play an important role in surgery and interventional treatments. In particular, ML could become a game changer into the conception of cognitive surgical robots. Such robots endowed with cognitive skills would assist the surgical team also on a cognitive level, such as possibly lowering the mental load of the team. For example, ML could help extracting surgical skill, learned through demonstration by human experts, and could transfer this to robotic skills. Such intelligent surgical assistance would significantly surpass the state of the art in surgical

  3. Penile rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Ohl, Dana A; Ralph, David

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy (RP) is believed to include neuropraxia, which leads to temporarily reduced oxygenation and subsequent structural changes in penile tissue. This results in veno-occlusive dysfunction, therefore, penile rehabilitation programmes...

  4. Teflon injections in post-prostatectomy incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, P J; Røhl, H F

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-five males with post-prostatectomy incontinence due to sphincter damage underwent transperineal or transurethral Teflon injections. The results were classified into three grades: good, moderate, and poor. Good or moderate results were obtained in 24%. No major immediate complications...... or longterm side-effects were observed. This intervention is associated with a minimum of discomfort for the patient and hospitalization can be limited to 48-72 hours. The results are not so good as those obtained in female incontinence, and the procedure cannot be recommended as first choice treatment...... in patients with post-prostatectomy incontinence, but because of the simplicity of the procedure, it is considered to be a valuable alternative in patients not suitable for prosthetic surgery....

  5. The Kock pouch reconsidered: an alternative surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawshaw, Alison; Williams, Julia; Woodhouse, Fran

    The psychological impact stoma surgery can have on an individual is well documented within the literature (White and Hunt, 1997; Borwell, 2009; Williams, 2005; Brown, 2005). For many years, surgeons have explored and developed innovations in surgical techniques, in particular restorative procedures with a view of preventing permanent stoma formation; ileal anal pouch (IAP) now being the surgical procedure of choice for treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC) and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). However, high morbidity rates are associated with pouch longevity (Castillo et al 2005; Nessar and Wu, 2012) and once removed can lead to a high-output ileostomy with risks of electrolyte imbalance and malabsorption. This then creates the dilemma of whether the Kock pouch (KP) should be offered as a surgical option. This article offers a historical perspective of the KP and its place in the surgical management of UC and FAP. This article also presents results from a recent audit funded by the Ileostomy Association (IA), highlighting how patients manage their KP and the importance of maintaining bowel control and being free of an incontinent stoma as a means of coming to terms with their condition.

  6. Rupture of vesicourethral anastomosis following radical retropubic prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Dall'oglio

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Rupture of vesicourethral anastomosis following radical retropubic prostatectomy is a complication that requires immediate management. We evaluated the morbidity of this rare complication. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed retrospectively 5 cases of disruption of vesicourethral anastomosis during post-operative period in a consecutive series of 1,600 radical retropubic prostatectomies, performed by a single surgeon. RESULTS: It occurred in a ratio of 1:320 prostatectomies (0,3%. Management was conservative in all the cases with an average catheter permanence time of 28 days, being its removal preceded by cystography. Two cases were secondary to bleeding, 1 followed the change of vesical catheter and 2 by unknown causes after removing the Foley catheter. Only one patient evolved with urethral stenosis, in the period ranging from 6 to 120 months. CONCLUSION: Rupture of vesicourethral anastomosis is not related to the surgeon's experience, and conservative treatment has shown to be effective.

  7. Surgical attenuation of congenital portosystemic shunts in dogs. Techniques, complications and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kummeling, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304828793

    2009-01-01

    The general aim of this thesis was to identify factors associated with outcome after surgical attenuation of congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) in dogs and to clarify underlying mechanisms of postoperative recovery in this disease. Two surgical techniques used for CPSS attenuation, ligation and

  8. Stratified analysis of 800 Asian patients after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy with a median 64 months of follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Raheem, Ali; Kim, Dae Keun; Santok, Glen Denmer; Alabdulaali, Ibrahim; Chung, Byung Ha; Choi, Young Deuk; Rha, Koon Ho

    2016-09-01

    To report the 5-year oncological outcomes of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy from the largest series ever reported from Asia. A retrospective analysis of 800 Asian patients who were treated with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy from July 2005 to May 2010 in the Department of Urology and Urological Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea was carried out. The primary end-point was to evaluate the biochemical recurrence. The secondary end-point was to show the biochemical recurrence-free survival, metastasis-free survival and cancer-specific survival. A total of 197 (24.65%), 218 (27.3%), and 385 (48.1%) patients were classified as low-, intermediate- and high-risk patients according to the D'Amico risk stratification risk criteria, respectively. The median follow-up period was 64 months (interquartile range 28-71 months). The overall incidence of positive surgical margin was 36.6%. There was biochemical recurrence in 183 patients (22.9%), 38 patients (4.8%) developed distant metastasis and 24 patients (3%) died from prostate cancer. Actuarial biochemical recurrence-free survival, metastasis-free survival, and cancer-specific survival rates at 5 years were 76.4%, 94.6% and 96.7%, respectively. Positive lymph node was associated with lower 5-year biochemical recurrence-free survival (9.1%), cancer-specific survival (75.7%) and metastasis-free survival (61.9%) rates (P < 0.001). On multivariable analysis, among all the predictors, positive lymph node was the strongest predictor of biochemical recurrence, cancer-specific survival and metastasis-free survival (P < 0.001). Herein we report the largest robot-assisted radical prostatectomy series from Asia. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy is confirmed to be an oncologically safe procedure that is able to provide effective 5-year cancer control, even in patients with high-risk disease. © 2016 The Japanese Urological Association.

  9. A natural language processing program effectively extracts key pathologic findings from radical prostatectomy reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Brian J; Merchant, Madhur; Zheng, Chengyi; Thomas, Anil A; Contreras, Richard; Jacobsen, Steven J; Chien, Gary W

    2014-12-01

    Natural language processing (NLP) software programs have been widely developed to transform complex free text into simplified organized data. Potential applications in the field of medicine include automated report summaries, physician alerts, patient repositories, electronic medical record (EMR) billing, and quality metric reports. Despite these prospects and the recent widespread adoption of EMR, NLP has been relatively underutilized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of an internally developed NLP program in extracting select pathologic findings from radical prostatectomy specimen reports in the EMR. An NLP program was generated by a software engineer to extract key variables from prostatectomy reports in the EMR within our healthcare system, which included the TNM stage, Gleason grade, presence of a tertiary Gleason pattern, histologic subtype, size of dominant tumor nodule, seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), perineural invasion (PNI), angiolymphatic invasion (ALI), extracapsular extension (ECE), and surgical margin status (SMS). The program was validated by comparing NLP results to a gold standard compiled by two blinded manual reviewers for 100 random pathology reports. NLP demonstrated 100% accuracy for identifying the Gleason grade, presence of a tertiary Gleason pattern, SVI, ALI, and ECE. It also demonstrated near-perfect accuracy for extracting histologic subtype (99.0%), PNI (98.9%), TNM stage (98.0%), SMS (97.0%), and dominant tumor size (95.7%). The overall accuracy of NLP was 98.7%. NLP generated a result in report. This novel program demonstrated high accuracy and efficiency identifying key pathologic details from the prostatectomy report within an EMR system. NLP has the potential to assist urologists by summarizing and highlighting relevant information from verbose pathology reports. It may also facilitate future urologic research through the rapid and automated creation of large databases.

  10. Laser prostatectomy in high-risk patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayib, Abdulmalik M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to evaluate the short-term tolerability and outcome of high power green light potassium titanyl phosphate laser prostatectomy in high-risk patients with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia. Eleven high risk operative patients were included in this study at the International Medical Center, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, between January and September 2007. Patients enrolled in this study underwent preoperative and postoperative, cardiac and anesthesia evaluation. Clinical presentations, ultrasound of urinary tract and preoperative laboratory investigation were recorded. All patients underwent high power green light laser prostatectomy using the green light photo vaporization system with setting of 120 watts. The intraoperative and postoperative complications and follow-up were recorded. The patient's age varied between 65-82 years with a mean age of 75.3+-8.6 years old. Seven patients presented with refractory acute urinary retention and 4 patients presented with severe lower urinary tract symptoms. The average prostate volume was 61.22 cc. All patients had uneventful intra- and postoperative course, without the intensive care. The average blood loss was insignificant and only one of the patients required blood transfusion. Foley catheters were removed one day after the procedure. All patients voided satisfactorily after removal of catheter and 8 patients complained of urgency. High power green light laser prostatectomy is a safe and effective method of treating symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia in patients with high operative risk. (author)

  11. Stricture prophylaxis in transurethral prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, R I; Jensen, A R; Stage, P

    1987-01-01

    In a prospective study 317 patients with prostatic hypertrophy, admitted for transurethral prostatectomy (TUR P), were randomized into three different groups: (1) urethral dilation and TUR P; (2) urethrotomy according to Otis and TUR P, and (3) TUR P alone. The number of postoperative urethral...

  12. Robotic prostatectomy: the anesthetist's view for robotic urological surgeries, a prospective study,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menekse Oksar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Although many features of robotic prostatectomy are similar to those of conventional laparoscopic urological procedures (such as laparoscopic prostatectomy, the procedure is associated with some drawbacks, which include limited intravenous access, relatively long operating time, deep Trendelenburg position, and high intra-abdominal pressure. The primary aim was to describe respiratory and hemodynamic challenges and the complications related to high intra-abdominal pressure and the deep Trendelenburg position in robotic prostatectomy patients. The secondary aim was to reveal safe discharge criteria from the operating room. Methods: Fifty-three patients who underwent robotic prostatectomy between December 2009 and January 2011 were prospectively enrolled. Main outcome measures were non-invasive monitoring, invasive monitoring and blood gas analysis performed at supine (T0, Trendelenburg (T1, Trendelenburg + pneumoperitoneum (T2, Trendelenburg-before desufflation (T3, Trendelenburg (after desufflation (T4, and supine (T5 positions. Results: Fifty-three robotic prostatectomy patients were included in the study. The main clinical challenge in our study group was the choice of ventilation strategy to manage respiratory acidosis, which is detected through end-tidal carbon dioxide pressure and blood gas analysis. Furthermore, the mean arterial pressure remained unchanged, the heart rate decreased significantly and required intervention. The central venous pressure values were also above the normal limits. Conclusion: Respiratory acidosis and "upper airway obstruction-like" clinical symptoms were the main challenges associated with robotic prostatectomy procedures during this study.

  13. ROBOT-ASSISTED RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY: ANALYSIS OF THE FIRST 80 CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Pushkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. As a common disease, prostate cancer (PC has taken now first place among all malignancies in many countries of the world.The authors have analyzed the results of their series of robot-assisted radical laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP in patients with PC. They also present a number of surgical techniques that may be useful for novice surgeons. Materials and methods. In November 2008 to November 2009, the Department of Urology, Moscow State University of Medicine and Dentistry, performed 80 RALPs using the da Vinci S surgical robotic system. The patients’ mean age was 63.7 (49–71 years; the mean blood level of total prostate-specific antigen was 6.1 (2.1–20.84 ng/ml; the mean prostate volume was 44 (18–94 cm3, as evidenced by transrectal ultrasound study. The authors analyzed the following indicators: operating time, degree of blood loss, conversion of surgical intervention,degrees of intra- and postoperative complications, and oncological and functional results. Results. In our series, RALP was performed without preserving neurovascular bundles or by using a nerve-sparing procedure in 66 (82.5% and 14 (17.5%, respectively; 22 (27.5% patients underwent lymphadenectomy. The average length of hospital stay was 7 (4–21 days; the mean time of urethral catheter removal was 10 (6–21 days postoperatively. The mean time of surgical intervention was 174 (121–276 min. Mean blood loss was 248 (35–1950 ml. Postmortem study revealed a positive surgical margin in 19 (24% cases and tumor invasion into the seminal vesicles in 5 (6% patients. Stages pT2 and pT3 were found in 56 (70% and 24 (30%, respectively; total Gleason scores were 6 (3+3, 7 (3+4, 7 (4+3, 8 (4+4 in 38 (47.5%, 35 (43.75%, 5 (6.25%, and 2 (2.5% patients, respectively. Among 34 patients examined 3 months after RALP, 28 (82.4% patients completely retained urine; 5 (14.7% applied not more than a pad a day. In patients with preserved erectile function, the

  14. CD147 expression predicts biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy independent of histologic and pathologic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Tyler M; Ewald, Jonathan A; Huang, Wei; Ricke, William A

    2015-07-25

    CD147 is an MMP-inducing protein often implicated in cancer progression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of CD147 in prostate cancer (PCa) progression and the prognostic ability of CD147 in predicting biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy. Plasma membrane-localized CD147 protein expression was quantified in patient samples using immunohistochemistry and multispectral imaging, and expression was compared to clinico-pathological features (pathologic stage, Gleason score, tumor volume, preoperative PSA, lymph node status, surgical margins, biochemical recurrence status). CD147 specificity and expression were confirmed with immunoblotting of prostate cell lines, and CD147 mRNA expression was evaluated in public expression microarray datasets of patient prostate tumors. Expression of CD147 protein was significantly decreased in localized tumors (pT2; p = 0.02) and aggressive PCa (≥pT3; p = 0.004), and metastases (p = 0.001) compared to benign prostatic tissue. Decreased CD147 was associated with advanced pathologic stage (p = 0.009) and high Gleason score (p = 0.02), and low CD147 expression predicted biochemical recurrence (HR 0.55; 95 % CI 0.31-0.97; p = 0.04) independent of clinico-pathologic features. Immunoblot bands were detected at 44 kDa and 66 kDa, representing non-glycosylated and glycosylated forms of CD147 protein, and CD147 expression was lower in tumorigenic T10 cells than non-tumorigenic BPH-1 cells (p = 0.02). Decreased CD147 mRNA expression was associated with increased Gleason score and pathologic stage in patient tumors but is not associated with recurrence status. Membrane-associated CD147 expression is significantly decreased in PCa compared to non-malignant prostate tissue and is associated with tumor progression, and low CD147 expression predicts biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy independent of pathologic stage, Gleason score, lymph node status, surgical margins, and tumor volume in multivariable

  15. Priority of surgical treatment techniques of full cartilage defects of knee joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Андрій Вікторович Літовченко

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Surgical treatment of chondromalacia of knee joint cartilage is an actual problem of the modern orthopedics because the means of conservative therapy can be realized at an initial stage only and almost exhausted at the further ones. Imperfections of palliative surgical techniques are the short-term clinical effect and pathogenetic baselessness because surgical procedure is not directed on reparation of cartilaginous tissue. For today there are a lot of transplantation techniques that are used for biological renewal of articular surface with formation of hyaline or at least hyaline-like cartilage. The deep forage of cartilage defect bottom to the medullary canal is a perspective and priority technique.Methods. The results of treatment of 61 patients with chondromalacia of knee joint of 3-4 degree according to R. Outerbridge are the base of the work. 20 patients of every group underwent microfracturization of cartilage defect bottom and subchondral forage of defect zone. 21 patients underwent the deep forage of defect zone of knee joint according to an offered technique.Result. The results of treatment with microfracturization, subchondral forage and deep forage of defect zone indicate the more strong clinical effect especially in the last clinical group where good and satisfactory results ratios in the term of observation 18 and 24 month remain stable.Conclusions. Deep forage of cartilage defects zone is the most adequate reparative technique of the surgical treatment of local knee joint cartilage defects. Owing to this procedure the number of cells of reparative chondrogenesis predecessors is realized

  16. Surgical techniques for quantitative nutrient digestion and absorbtion studies in the pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henry; Serena, Anja; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2010-01-01

    Surgical techniques allow quantitative measurement of nutrient digestion and absorption in pigs. The present paper presents our updated techniques for anaesthesia and surgery. The surgery technique of catheterization of the portal vein, mesenteric vein and mesenteric artery, as well as the fitting...

  17. WE-G-204-08: Optimized Digital Radiographic Technique for Lost Surgical Devices/Needle Identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman, A; Seabrook, G; Brakken, A; Dubois, M; Marn, C; Wilson, C; Jacobson, D; Liu, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Small surgical devices and needles are used in many surgical procedures. Conventionally, an x-ray film is taken to identify missing devices/needles if post procedure count is incorrect. There is no data to indicate smallest surgical devices/needles that can be identified with digital radiography (DR), and its optimized acquisition technique. Methods: In this study, the DR equipment used is a Canon RadPro mobile with CXDI-70c wireless DR plate, and the same DR plate on a fixed Siemens Multix unit. Small surgical devices and needles tested include Rubber Shod, Bulldog, Fogarty Hydrogrip, and needles with sizes 3-0 C-T1 through 8-0 BV175-6. They are imaged with PMMA block phantoms with thickness of 2–8 inch, and an abdomen phantom. Various DR techniques are used. Images are reviewed on the portable x-ray acquisition display, a clinical workstation, and a diagnostic workstation. Results: all small surgical devices and needles are visible in portable DR images with 2–8 inch of PMMA. However, when they are imaged with the abdomen phantom plus 2 inch of PMMA, needles smaller than 9.3 mm length can not be visualized at the optimized technique of 81 kV and 16 mAs. There is no significant difference in visualization with various techniques, or between mobile and fixed radiography unit. However, there is noticeable difference in visualizing the smallest needle on a diagnostic reading workstation compared to the acquisition display on a portable x-ray unit. Conclusion: DR images should be reviewed on a diagnostic reading workstation. Using optimized DR techniques, the smallest needle that can be identified on all phantom studies is 9.3 mm. Sample DR images of various small surgical devices/needles available on diagnostic workstation for comparison may improve their identification. Further in vivo study is needed to confirm the optimized digital radiography technique for identification of lost small surgical devices and needles

  18. Ontogeny of a surgical technique: Robotic kidney transplantation with regional hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Akshay; McCulloch, Peter; Dahm, Philipp; Ahlawat, Rajesh; Jeong, Wooju; Bhandari, Mahendra; Menon, Mani

    2016-01-01

    Innovation is a hallmark of surgical practice. It is generally accepted that a new procedure will undergo technical changes during its evolution; however, quantitative accounts of the process are limited. Multiple groups, including our own, have recently described a minimally-invasive approach to conventional kidney transplantation (KT) operation. Unique to our experience is a structured development of the technique within the confines of a safe surgical innovation framework - the IDEAL framework (idea, development, exploration, assessment, long-term monitoring; stages 0-4). We here provide a first-hand narrative of the progress of robotic KT operation from preclinical trial to clinical application. Overall, 54 patients underwent robotic KT with regional hypothermia successfully. Major technical changes including selection of optimal patient position (flank vs. lithotomy), robotic instrumentation, vascular occlusion method (bulldog vs. tourniquet) and suture material (prolene vs. GoreTex) occurred early during the procedure development (IDEAL stage 0, preclinical). Minor technical changes such as utilization of the aortic punch for arteriotomy (case 3), use of barbed suture during ureteroneocystostomy (case 6) and extraperitonealization of the graft kidney (case 6) that increased the efficiency and safety of the procedure continued throughout procedure development (IDEAL stages 1-2, clinical stages). We demonstrate that a surgical technique evolves continually; although, the majority of technical alterations occur early in the life-cycle of the procedure. Development of a new technique within the confines a structured surgical innovation framework allows for evidence based progression of the technique and may minimize the risk of harm to the patient. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Erectile function after radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Frey, Anders; Jakobsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    collected database and a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study in patients following radical prostatectomy. Erectile function was assessed with the IIEF-5 and the question "Is your erectile function as good as before the surgery (yes/no)". Patients were included if they were sexually active before...

  20. Gleason Score Correlation Between Prostate Biopsy and Radical Prostatectomy Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Öztürk

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men and the second cause of cancer-related mortality. Prostate biopsy and the Gleason score guide treatment decisions in prostate cancer. Several studies have investigated the correlation between biopsy scores and radical prostatectomy specimen scores. We also evaluated the correlation of Gleason scores of these specimens in our patient series. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the data of 468 men who were diagnosed with prostate cancer and underwent radical prostatectomy between 2008 and 2017. Patients’ age, prostate-specific antigen levels at diagnosis, and prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimen Gleason scores were recorded. Upgrading and downgrading were defined as increase or decrease of Gleason score of radical prostate specimen compared to Gleason score of prostate biopsy. Results: A total of 442 men diagnosed with prostate cancer were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 62.62±6.26 years (44-84 years and mean prostate specific antigen level was 9.01±6.84 ng/mL (1.09-49 ng/mL. Prostate biopsy Gleason score was 7 in 27 (6.1% men. Radical prostatectomy specimen Gleason score was 7 in 62 (14% men. Gleason correlation was highest in the 240 patients (71.6% with score <7 and was lowest in the 31 (38.75% patients with score =7. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the discordance rate between Gleason scores of prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimens was 35.7%.

  1. Pathological confirmation of nerve-sparing types performed during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Woo Jin; Hruby, Gregory W; Turk, Andrew T; Landman, Jaime; Badani, Ketan K

    2013-03-01

    WHAT'S KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? AND WHAT DOES THE STUDY ADD?: Incremental nerve-sparing techniques (NSTs) improve postoperative erectile function after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). However, there are no studies to date that histologically confirm the surgeon intended NST. Thus, in the present study, we histologically confirmed that the surgeon performed the nerve preservation as his intended NSTs during RARP. Also, we found that there was more variability in fascia width outcome on the left side compared with the right. Therefore, when performing nerve preservation on the surgeon's non-dominant side, we need to pay more close attention. To confirm that the surgeon achieved true intended histological nerve sparing during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) by studying RP specimens. To aid the novice robotic surgeon to develop the skills of RARP. Between June 2008 and May 2009, 122 consecutive patients underwent RARP by a single surgeon (K.K.B.). The degree of nerve sparing (wide resection [WR], interfascial nerve sparing [ITE-NS], intrafascial nerve sparing [ITR-NS]) on both sides was recorded. The posterior sectors of RP specimens from distal, mid, and proximal parts were evaluated. Fascia width (FW) of each position in RP specimens were compared across nerve-sparing types (NSTs). FW was recorded at 15 ° intervals (3-9 o'clock position), measured as the distance between the outermost prostate gland and surgical margin. The slides were reviewed by an experienced uropathologist who was 'blinded' to the NST. In all, 93 men were included. The overall mean (sd) FW was the greatest in the order of WR, ITE-NS, and ITR-NS, at 2.42 (1.62), 1.71 (1.40) and 1.16 (1.08) mm, respectively (P ITE-NS, bilateral ITE-NS, ITE-NS/WR, and bilateral WR, respectively. To further validate and confirm these preliminary findings, additional studies involving multicentre cohorts would be required. The surgeon intended dissection and FW correlate, with ITR

  2. Impact of surgical case order on perioperative outcomes for robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil A Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Surgical case order may influence perioperative outcomes for RARP with decreased operative times and increased length of hospital stay associated with later cases. These findings indicate that select perioperative factors may improve with ascending case order as the surgical team "warms up" during the day. In addition, 3 rd round cases can increase hospital costs associated with increased lengths of hospital stay. Knowledge of these differences may assist in surgical planning to improve outcomes and limit costs.

  3. Surgical Tips in Frozen Abdomen Management: Application of Coliseum Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriazanos, Ioannis D; Manatakis, Dimitrios K; Stamos, Nikolaos; Stoidis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Wound dehiscence is a serious postoperative complication, with an incidence of 0.5-3% after primary closure of a laparotomy incision, and represents an acute mechanical failure of wound healing. Relatively recently the concept of "intentional open abdomen" was described and both clinical entities share common pathophysiological and clinical pathways ("postoperative open abdominal wall"). Although early reconstruction is the target, a significant proportion of patients will develop adhesions between abdominal viscera and the anterolateral abdominal wall, a condition widely recognized as "frozen abdomen," where delayed wound closure appears as the only realistic alternative. We report our experience with a patient who presented with frozen abdomen after wound dehiscence due to surgical site infection and application of the "Coliseum technique" for its definitive surgical management. This novel technique represents an innovative alternative to abdominal exploration, for cases of "malignant" frozen abdomen due to peritoneal carcinomatosis. Lifting the edges of the surgical wound upwards and suspending them under traction by threads from a retractor positioned above the abdomen facilitates approach to the peritoneal cavity, optimizes exposure of intra-abdominal organs, and prevents operative injury to the innervation and blood supply of abdominal wall musculature, a crucial step for subsequent hernia repair.

  4. Minimally Invasive Surgical Approach to Distal Fibula Fractures: A Technique Tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler A. Gonzalez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound complications following ankle fracture surgery are a major concern. Through the use of minimally invasive surgical techniques some of these complications can be mitigated. Recent investigations have reported on percutaneous fixation of distal fibula fractures demonstrating similar radiographic and functional outcomes to traditional open approaches. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe in detail the minimally invasive surgical approach for distal fibula fractures.

  5. Coblation versus other surgical techniques for tonsillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pynnonen, Melissa; Brinkmeier, Jennifer V; Thorne, Marc C; Chong, Lee Yee; Burton, Martin J

    2017-08-22

    Tonsillectomy is a very common operation and is performed using various surgical methods. Coblation is a popular method because it purportedly causes less pain than other surgical methods. However, the superiority of coblation is unproven. To compare the effects of coblation tonsillectomy for chronic tonsillitis or tonsillar hypertrophy with other surgical techniques, both hot and cold, on intraoperative morbidity, postoperative morbidity and procedural cost. The Cochrane ENT Information Specialist searched the ENT Trials Register; Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2017, Issue 3); PubMed; Ovid Embase; CINAHL; Web of Science; ClinicalTrials.gov; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 20 April 2017. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of children and adults undergoing tonsillectomy with coblation compared with any other surgical technique. This review is limited to trials of extracapsular (traditional) tonsillectomy and excludes trials of intracapsular tonsil removal (tonsillotomy). We used the standard Cochrane methods. Our primary outcomes were: patient-reported pain using a validated pain scale at postoperative days 1, 3 and 7; intraoperative blood loss; primary postoperative bleeding (within 24 hours) and secondary postoperative bleeding (more than 24 hours after surgery). Secondary outcomes were: time until resumption of normal diet, time until resumption of normal activity, duration of surgery and adverse effects including blood transfusion and the need for reoperation. We used GRADE to assess the quality of the evidence for each outcome; this is indicated in italics. We included 29 studies, with a total of 2561 participants. All studies had moderate or high risk of bias. Sixteen studies used an adequate randomisation technique, however the inability to mask the surgical teams and/or provide adequate methods to mitigate the risk of bias put nearly all studies at moderate or high risk of

  6. THD Doppler procedure for hemorrhoids: the surgical technique

    OpenAIRE

    Ratto, C.

    2013-01-01

    Transanal hemorrhoidal dearterialization (THD) is an effective treatment for hemorrhoidal disease. The ligation of hemorrhoidal arteries (called “dearterialization”) can provide a significant reduction of the arterial overflow to the hemorrhoidal piles. Plication of the redundant rectal mucosa/submucosa (called “mucopexy”) can provide a repositioning of prolapsing tissue to the anatomical site. In this paper, the surgical technique and perioperative patient management are illustrated. Followi...

  7. Iatrogenic Rectal Injury During Radical Prostatectomy: Is Colostomy Inevitable End?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Topaktas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Radical prostatectomy (RP is the gold standard treatment method for localized prostate cancer, because of its high oncological success. Iatrogenic rectal injury (IRI during RP is rarely seen, but it may causes serious complications because of the close anatomic relationship between the prostate and rectum. Aim is to present our series about management of IRI without colostomy. Material and Method: Between June 1999 and June 2013, radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP was performed to 372 patients by a single surgeon. 10 cases (%2,6 were complicated by a rectal injury during RRP. Instant rectal closure was performed in 3 layers without a diverting colostomy, at the time of surgery. Omental vascular flap was placed between rectum and vesicourethral anastomosis. Results: The clinical stages of IRI cases were T1c, T2a and T2c in 2, 3 and 5 patients, respectively. Their preoperative Gleason scores were 6, 7 and 8 in 3, 5 and 2 patient, respectively. None of the 10 had undergone previous prostatic or rectal surgery, or received preoperative radiotherapy or hormonal therapy. Discussion: Instant diagnosis and rectal wall closures by three layers are essential for successful repair. Our technique seems as a safe, minimal invasive and highly effective option for the management of IRI.

  8. Prostate cancer: 1.5 T endo-coil dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and MR spectroscopy-correlation with prostate biopsy and prostatectomy histopathological data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabanova, E.; Balslev, I.; Løgager, Vibeke Berg

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 43 patients, scheduled for radical...... techniques and histopathological findings on prostatectomy specimens. RESULTS: Prostate cancer was identified in all 43 patients by combination of the three MR techniques. The detection of prostate cancer on sextant-basis showed sensitivity and specificity: 50% and 91% for TRUS, 72% and 55% for T2WI, 49......% and 69% for DCEMRI, and 46% and 78% for CSI. CONCLUSION: T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI in combination can identify prostate cancer. Further development of MR technologies for these MR methods is necessary to improve the detection of the prostate cancer...

  9. Some Observations on Veterinary Undergraduate Training in Surgical Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittick, William G.

    1978-01-01

    The undergraduate surgery course of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Universiti Pertanian Malaysia, is described with focus on its experential method of teaching surgical techniques. Also discussed are the benefits of veterinary school cooperation with a large city Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA). (JMD)

  10. Return to work following robot-assisted laparoscopic and open retropubic radical prostatectomy: A single-center cohort study to compare duration of sick leave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mechow, Stefanie; Graefen, Markus; Haese, Alexander; Tennstedt, Pierre; Pehrke, Dirk; Friedersdorff, Frank; Beyer, Burkhard

    2018-06-01

    To compare the duration of sick leave in patients with localized prostate cancer after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and open retropubic RP (ORP) at a German high-volume prostate cancer center. The data of 1,415 patients treated with RP at Martini Klinik, Prostate Cancer Center between 2012 and 2016 were, retrospectively, analyzed. Information on employment status, monthly revenues and days of work missed due to sickness were assessed via online questionnaire. Additional data were retrieved from our institutional database. Medians and interquartile ranges (IQR) were reported for continuous data. Cox proportional hazard analysis was performed to compare both surgical techniques for return to work time after RP. Median time elapsed between surgery and return to work comprised 42 days in patients undergoing RARP (IQR: 21-70) and ORP (IQR: 28-84, P = 0.05). In Cox regression analysis, surgical approach showed no impact on return to work time (RARP vs. ORP hazard ratio = 1, 95% CI: 0.91-1.16, P = 0.69). Return to work time was significantly associated with employment status, physical workload and monthly income (all PLimitation of this study is the nonrandomized design in a single-center. As the surgical approach did not show any influence on the number of days missed from work in patients undergoing RP, no superiority of either RARP or ORP could be identified for return to work time in a German cohort. Both surgical approaches are safe options usually allowing the patients to resume normal activities including work after an appropriate convalescence period. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Finger replantation: surgical technique and indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbary, S; Dap, F; Dautel, G

    2013-12-01

    In this article, we discuss the surgical technique of finger replantation in detail, distinguishing particularities of technique in cases of thumb amputation, children fingertip replantation, ring finger avulsion, and very distal replantations. We emphasize the principles of bone shortening, the spare part concept, the special importance of nerve sutures and the use of vein graft in case of avulsion or crushing. However, even if finger replantation is now a routine procedure, a clear distinction should be made between revascularization and functional success. The indications for finger replantation are then detailed in the second part of this paper. The absolute indications for replantation are thumb, multiple fingers, transmetacarpal or hand, and any upper extremity amputation in a child whatever the level. Fingertip amputations distal to the insertion of the Flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) are also a good indication. Other cases are more controversial because of the poor functional outcome, especially for the index finger, which is often functionally excluded. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  12. Neglected Side Effects After Radical Prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Anders Ullmann; Sønksen, Jens; Fode, Mikkel

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A series of previously neglected sexually related side effects to radical prostatectomy (RP) has been identified over the recent years. These include orgasm-associated incontinence (OAI), urinary incontinence in relation to sexual stimulation (UISS), altered perception of orgasm, or...

  13. Does ethamsylate reduce haemorrhage in transurethral prostatectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyth, D R; Booth, C M

    1990-12-01

    A double-blind, randomised trial of 44 consecutive patients undergoing transurethral prostatectomy demonstrated that ethamsylate (Dicynene) did not reduce blood loss during either the operative or the post- operative periods.

  14. Comparative analysis of whole mount processing and systematic sampling of radical prostatectomy specimens: pathological outcomes and risk of biochemical recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Shady; Chang, Sam S; Clark, Peter E; Davis, Rodney; Herrell, S Duke; Kordan, Yakup; Wills, Marcia L; Shappell, Scott B; Baumgartner, Roxelyn; Phillips, Sharon; Smith, Joseph A; Cookson, Michael S; Barocas, Daniel A

    2010-10-01

    Whole mount processing is more resource intensive than routine systematic sampling of radical retropubic prostatectomy specimens. We compared whole mount and systematic sampling for detecting pathological outcomes, and compared the prognostic value of pathological findings across pathological methods. We included men (608 whole mount and 525 systematic sampling samples) with no prior treatment who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy at Vanderbilt University Medical Center between January 2000 and June 2008. We used univariate and multivariate analysis to compare the pathological outcome detection rate between pathological methods. Kaplan-Meier curves and the log rank test were used to compare the prognostic value of pathological findings across pathological methods. There were no significant differences between the whole mount and the systematic sampling groups in detecting extraprostatic extension (25% vs 30%), positive surgical margins (31% vs 31%), pathological Gleason score less than 7 (49% vs 43%), 7 (39% vs 43%) or greater than 7 (12% vs 13%), seminal vesicle invasion (8% vs 10%) or lymph node involvement (3% vs 5%). Tumor volume was higher in the systematic sampling group and whole mount detected more multiple surgical margins (each p systematic sampling yield similar pathological information. Each method stratifies patients into comparable risk groups for biochemical recurrence. Thus, while whole mount is more resource intensive, it does not appear to result in improved detection of clinically important pathological outcomes or prognostication. Copyright © 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Dynamic MRI evaluation of urethral hypermobility post-radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suskind, Anne M; DeLancey, John O L; Hussain, Hero K; Montgomery, Jeffrey S; Latini, Jerilyn M; Cameron, Anne P

    2014-03-01

    One postulated cause of post-prostatectomy incontinence is urethral and bladder neck hypermobility. The objective of this study was to determine the magnitude of anatomical differences of urethral and bladder neck position at rest and with valsalva in continent and incontinent men post-prostatectomy based on dynamic MRI. All subjects underwent a dynamic MRI protocol with valsalva and non-valsalva images and a standard urodynamic evaluation. MRI measurements were taken at rest and with valsalva, including (1) bladder neck to sacrococcygeal inferior pubic point line (SCIPP), (2) urethra to pubis, and (3) bulbar urethra to SCIPP. Data were analyzed in SAS using two-tailed t tests. A total of 21 subjects (13 incontinent and 8 continent) had complete data and were included in the final analysis. The two groups had similar demographic characteristics. On MRI, there were no statistically significant differences in anatomic position of the bladder neck or urethra either at rest or with valsalva. The amount of hypermobility ranged from 0.8 to 2 mm in all measures. There were also no differences in the amount of hypermobility (position at rest minus position at valsalva) between groups. We found no statistically significant differences in bladder neck and urethral position or mobility on dynamic MRI evaluation between continent and incontinent men status post-radical prostatectomy. A more complex mechanism for post-prostatectomy incontinence needs to be modeled in order to better understand the continence mechanism in this select group of men. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Rationale and development of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy post-prostatectomy: the present standard of care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray JR

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Julia R Murray,1,2 Helen A McNair,2 David P Dearnaley1,2 1Academic Urology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research, London, 2Department of Radiotherapy, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, UK Abstract: The indications for post-prostatectomy radiotherapy have evolved over the last decade, although the optimal timing, dose, and target volume remain to be well defined. The target volume is susceptible to anatomical variations with its borders interfacing with the rectum and bladder. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy has become the gold standard for radical prostate radiotherapy. Here we review the current evidence for image-guided techniques with intensity-modulated radiotherapy to the prostate bed and describe current strategies to reduce or account for interfraction and intrafraction motion. Keywords: radiotherapy, prostate cancer, post-prostatectomy, image-guided radiation therapy

  17. Surgical Anatomy and Microvascular Surgical Technique Relevant to Experimental Renal Transplant in Rat Employing Aortic and Inferior Venacaval Conduits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Badri Man; Haylor, John

    2017-11-15

    Rat models of renal transplant are used to investigate immunologic processes and responses to therapeutic agents before their translation into routine clinical practice. In this study, we have described details of rat surgical anatomy and our experiences with the microvascular surgical technique relevant to renal transplant by employing donor inferior vena cava and aortic conduits. For this study, 175 rats (151 Lewis and 24 Fisher) were used to establish the Fisher-Lewis rat model of chronic allograft injury at our institution. Anatomic and technical details were recorded during the period of training and establishment of the model. A final group of 12 transplanted rats were studied for an average duration of 51 weeks for the Lewis-to-Lewis isografts (5 rats) and 42 weeks for the Fisher-to-Lewis allografts (7 rats). Functional measurements and histology confirmed the diagnosis of chronic allograft injury. Mastering the anatomic details and microvascular surgical techniques can lead to the successful establishment of an experimental renal transplant model.

  18. Posterior Segment Intraocular Foreign Body: Extraction Surgical Techniques, Timing, and Indications for Vitrectomy

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    Dante A. Guevara-Villarreal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular penetrating injury with Intraocular Foreign Body (IOFB is a common form of ocular injury. Several techniques to remove IOFB have been reported by different authors. The aim of this publication is to review different timing and surgical techniques related to the extraction of IOFB. Material and Methods. A PubMed search on “Extraction of Intraocular Foreign Body,” “Timing for Surgery Intraocular Foreign Body,” and “Surgical Technique Intraocular Foreign Body” was made. Results. Potential advantages of immediate and delayed IOFB removal have been reported with different results. Several techniques to remove IOFB have been reported by different authors with good results. Conclusion. The most important factor at the time to perform IOFB extraction is the experience of the surgeon.

  19. Preoperative predictive model of recovery of urinary continence after radical prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Kazuhito; Kent, Matthew T.; Vickers, Andrew J.; von Bodman, Christian; Bernstein, Melanie; Touijer, Karim A.; Coleman, Jonathan; Laudone, Vincent; Scardino, Peter T.; Eastham, James A.; Akin, Oguz; Sandhu, Jaspreet S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective ● To build a predictive model of urinary continence recovery following radical prostatectomy that incorporates magnetic resonance imaging parameters and clinical data. Patients and Methods ● We conducted a retrospective review of data from 2,849 patients who underwent pelvic staging magnetic resonance imaging prior to radical prostatectomy from November 2001 to June 2010. ● We used logistic regression to evaluate the association between each MRI variable and continence at 6 or 12 months, adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score and then used multivariable logistic regression to create our model. ● A nomogram was constructed using the multivariable logistic regression models. Results ● In total, 68% (n=1,742/2,559) and 82% (n=2,205/2,689) regained function at 6 and 12 months, respectively. ● In the base model, age, BMI, and ASA score were significant predictors of continence at 6 or 12 months on univariate analysis (p <0.005). ● Among the preoperative magnetic resonance imaging measurements, membranous urethral length, which showed great significance, was incorporated into the base model to create the full model. ● For continence recovery at 6 months, the addition of membranous urethral length increased the AUC to 0.664 for the validation set, an increase of 0.064 over the base model. For continence recovery at 12 months, the AUC was 0.674, an increase of 0.085 over the base model. Conclusions ● Using our model, the likelihood of continence recovery increases with membranous urethral length and decreases with age, body mass index, and ASA score. ● This model could be used for patient counseling and for the identification of patients at high risk for urinary incontinence in whom to study changes in operative technique that improve urinary function after radical prostatectomy. PMID:25682782

  20. Adjustable perineal male sling using tissue expander as an effective treatment of post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melih Balci

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To report our intermediate experience in treating patients with severe incontinence using an adjustable perineal male sling with a tissue expander. Materials and Methods An adjustable male sling procedure was performed on 21 patients with severe incontinence. The underlying etiology of urinary incontinence was radical prostatectomy in 13 patients, open prostatectomy in 5 patients and transurethral prostate resection in 3 patients. The difference between the classical and the adjustable sling is that in the latter there is a 25 mL tissue expander between the two layers of polypropylene mesh with an injection port. Adjustment of the sling was performed with saline via an inflation port, in case of recurrence or persistence of incontinence. Results The mean age of the patients was 66.2±7.3 (50-79 years and mean pad usage was 6.4±0.6 per day. The mean follow-up time was 40.1±23.2 (6-74 months. The balloon was postoperatively inflated on average with 11.6±5.7 (5-25 mL. After the mean 40.1 months of follow-up, 16 of the 21 patients (76.2% were dry (11 patients, 0 pads; 5 patients using safety pads, 3 patients (14% had mild and 2 (9.8% had moderate degree post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence (PPI. The average maximum urine flow rate of the patients was 15.6±4.7 (10-31 mL/s. No residual urine was found. In 2 patients, all parts of the device were removed due to infection and discomfort, and in 3 patients only the inflation component was removed due to local scrotal infection. Conclusions Our results show that using an adjustable perineal male sling with a tissue expander seems to be an efficient, and safe surgical treatment option in patients with PPI.

  1. Outcome of Vaginoplasty in Male-to-Female Transgenders: A Systematic Review of Surgical Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horbach, Sophie E R; Bouman, Mark-Bram; Smit, Jan Maerten; Özer, Müjde; Buncamper, Marlon E; Mullender, Margriet G

    2015-06-01

    Gender reassignment surgery is the keystone of the treatment of transgender patients. For male-to-female transgenders, this involves the creation of a neovagina. Many surgical methods for vaginoplasty have been opted. The penile skin inversion technique is the method of choice for most gender surgeons. However, the optimal surgical technique for vaginoplasty in transgender women has not yet been identified, as outcomes of the different techniques have never been compared. With this systematic review, we aim to give a detailed overview of the published outcomes of all currently available techniques for vaginoplasty in male-to-female transgenders. A PubMed and EMBASE search for relevant publications (1995-present), which provided data on the outcome of techniques for vaginoplasty in male-to-female transgender patients. Main outcome measures are complications, neovaginal depth and width, sexual function, patient satisfaction, and improvement in quality of life (QoL). Twenty-six studies satisfied the inclusion criteria. The majority of these studies were retrospective case series of low to intermediate quality. Outcome of the penile skin inversion technique was reported in 1,461 patients, bowel vaginoplasty in 102 patients. Neovaginal stenosis was the most frequent complication in both techniques. Sexual function and patient satisfaction were overall acceptable, but many different outcome measures were used. QoL was only reported in one study. Comparison between techniques was difficult due to the lack of standardization. The penile skin inversion technique is the most researched surgical procedure. Outcome of bowel vaginoplasty has been reported less frequently but does not seem to be inferior. The available literature is heterogeneous in patient groups, surgical procedure, outcome measurement tools, and follow-up. Standardized protocols and prospective study designs are mandatory for correct interpretation and comparability of data. © 2015 International Society for

  2. Safe surgical technique: intramedullary nail fixation of tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelle, Boris A; Boni, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Statically locked, reamed intramedullary nailing remains the standard treatment for displaced tibial shaft fractures. Establishing an appropriate starting point is a crucial part of the surgical procedure. Recently, suprapatellar nailing in the semi-extended position has been suggested as a safe and effective surgical technique. Numerous reduction techiques are available to achieve an anatomic fracture alignment and the treating surgeon should be familiar with these maneuvers. Open reduction techniques should be considered if anatomic fracture alignment cannot be achieved by closed means. Favorable union rates above 90 % can be achieved by both reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing. Despite favorable union rates, patients continue to have functional long-term impairments. In particular, anterior knee pain remains a common complaint following intramedullary tibial nailing. Malrotation remains a commonly reported complication after tibial nailing. The effect of postoperative tibial malalignment on the clinical and radiographic outcome requires further investigation.

  3. Robotic Prostatectomy on the Web: A Cross-Sectional Qualitative Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgmann, Hendrik; Mager, René; Salem, Johannes; Bründl, Johannes; Kunath, Frank; Thomas, Christian; Haferkamp, Axel; Tsaur, Igor

    2016-08-01

    Many patients diagnosed with prostate cancer search for information on robotic prostatectomy (RobP) on the Web. We aimed to evaluate the qualitative characteristics of the mostly frequented Web sites on RobP with a particular emphasis on provider-dependent issues. Google was searched for the term "robotic prostatectomy" in Europe and North America. The mostly frequented Web sites were selected and classified as physician-provided and publically-provided. Quality was measured using Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) benchmark criteria, DISCERN score, and addressing of Trifecta surgical outcomes. Popularity was analyzed using Google PageRank and Alexa tool. Accessibility, usability, and reliability were investigated using the LIDA tool and readability was assessed using readability indices. Twenty-eight Web sites were physician-provided and 15 publically-provided. For all Web sites, 88% of JAMA benchmark criteria were fulfilled, DISCERN quality score was high, and 81% of Trifecta outcome measurements were addressed. Popularity was average according to Google PageRank (mean 2.9 ± 1.5) and Alexa Traffic Rank (median, 49,109; minimum, 7; maximum, 8,582,295). Accessibility (85 ± 7%), usability (92 ± 3%), and reliability scores (88 ± 8%) were moderate to high. Automated Readability Index was 7.2 ± 2.1 and Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level was 9 ± 2, rating the Web sites as difficult to read. Physician-provided Web sites had higher quality scores and lower readability compared with publically-provided Web sites. Websites providing information on RobP obtained medium to high ratings in all domains of quality in the current assessment. In contrast, readability needs to be significantly improved so that this content can become available for the populace. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Optimum slicing of radical prostatectomy specimens for correlation between histopathology and medical images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Li Hong; Ng, Wan Sing; Ho, Henry; Yuen, John; Cheng, Chris; Lazaro, Richie; Thng, Choon Hua

    2010-01-01

    There is a need for methods which enable precise correlation of histologic sections with in vivo prostate images. Such methods would allow direct comparison between imaging features and functional or histopathological heterogeneity of tumors. Correlation would be particularly useful for validating the accuracy of imaging modalities, developing imaging techniques, assessing image-guided therapy, etc. An optimum prostate slicing method for accurate correlation between the histopathological and medical imaging planes in terms of section angle, thickness and level was sought. Literature review (51 references from 1986-2009 were cited) was done on the various sectioning apparatus or techniques used to slice the prostate specimen for accurate correlation between histopathological data and medical imaging. Technology evaluation was performed with review and discussion of various methods used to section other organs and their possible applications for sectioning prostatectomy specimens. No consensus has been achieved on how the prostate should be dissected to achieve a good correlation. Various customized sectioning instruments and techniques working with different mechanism are used in different research institutes to improve the correlation. Some of the methods have convincingly shown significant potential for improving image-specimen correlation. However, the semisolid consistent property of prostate tissue and the lack of identifiable landmarks remain challenges to be overcome, especially for fresh prostate sectioning and microtomy without external fiducials. A standardized optimum protocol to dissect prostatectomy specimens is needed for the validation of medical imaging modalities by histologic correlation. These standards can enhance disease management by improving the comparability between different modalities. (orig.)

  5. Standard surgical treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia is safe for patients over 75 years: analysis of 100 cases from a high-volume urologic center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Marmiroli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: In this study, we aimed to determine the complications of standard surgical treatments among patients over 75 years in a high-volume urologic center. METHODS: We analyzed 100 consecutive patients older than 75 years who had undergone transurethral prostatic resection of the prostate or open prostatectomy for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia from January 2008 to March 2010. We analyzed patient age, prostate volume, prostate-specific antigen level, international prostatic symptom score, quality of life score, urinary retention, co-morbidities, surgical technique and satisfaction with treatment. RESULTS: Median age was 79 years. Forty-eight patients had undergone transurethral prostatic resection of the prostate, and 52 had undergone open prostatectomy. The median International Prostatic Symptom Score was 20, the median prostate volume was 83 g, 51% were using an indwelling bladder catheter, and the median prostatespecific antigen level was 5.0 ng/ml. The most common comorbidities were hypertension, diabetes and coronary disease. After a median follow-up period of 17 months, most patients were satisfied. Complications were present in 20% of cases. The most common urological complication was urethral stenosis, followed by bladder neck sclerosis, urinary fistula, late macroscopic hematuria and persistent urinary incontinence. The most common clinical complication was myocardial infarction, followed by acute renal failure requiring dialysis. Incidental carcinoma of the prostate was present in 6% of cases. One case had urothelial bladder cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Standard surgical treatments for benign prostatic hyperplasia are safe and satisfactory among the elderly. Complications are infrequent, and urethral stenosis is the most common. No clinical variable is associated with the occurrence of complications.

  6. PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING IN THE TREATMENT OF URINARY INCONTINENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. L. Demidko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy is 0.8 to 87%. This category of patients has pelvic floor muscle weakness and reduced perineal reflex. The treatment of these patients uses a pelvic floor exercise system that is to enhance muscle tone and to develop strong reflex contraction in response to a sudden rise in intraabdominal pressure. Pelvic floor muscle training belongs to first-line therapy for urinary incontinence occurring within 6 to 12 months after prostatectomy. The ability to control pelvic floor muscle knowingly and to train them allows one not only to increase the closing capability of sphincter mechanisms, but also to suppress involuntary detrusor contractions. We used this method in 9 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The duration of pelvic floor muscle training under control was up to 25 weeks. During this period, the symptoms of incontinence were relieved. No contraindications or adverse reactions have put this method in first-line therapy for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence.

  7. PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING IN THE TREATMENT OF URINARY INCONTINENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. L. Demidko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy is 0.8 to 87%. This category of patients has pelvic floor muscle weakness and reduced perineal reflex. The treatment of these patients uses a pelvic floor exercise system that is to enhance muscle tone and to develop strong reflex contraction in response to a sudden rise in intraabdominal pressure. Pelvic floor muscle training belongs to first-line therapy for urinary incontinence occurring within 6 to 12 months after prostatectomy. The ability to control pelvic floor muscle knowingly and to train them allows one not only to increase the closing capability of sphincter mechanisms, but also to suppress involuntary detrusor contractions. We used this method in 9 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The duration of pelvic floor muscle training under control was up to 25 weeks. During this period, the symptoms of incontinence were relieved. No contraindications or adverse reactions have put this method in first-line therapy for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence.

  8. Assessing the Impact of Surgeon Experience on Urinary Continence Recovery After Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Results of Four High-Volume Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossati, Nicola; Di Trapani, Ettore; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Dell'Oglio, Paolo; Umari, Paolo; Buffi, Nicolò Maria; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Mottrie, Alexander; Gaboardi, Franco; Montorsi, Francesco; Briganti, Alberto; Suardi, Nazareno

    2017-09-01

    To test the impact of surgeon experience on urinary continence (UC) recovery after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). The study included 1477 consecutive patients treated with RARP by four surgeons between 2006 and 2014. UC recovery was defined as being completely dry over a 24-hour period at follow-up. Surgeon experience was coded as the total number of RARP performed by the surgeon before the patient's operation. Multivariable analysis tested the association between surgeon experience and UC recovery. Covariates consisted of patient age, Charlson comorbidity index, preoperative International Index of Erectile Function-Erectile Function domain (IIEF-EF), nerve-sparing surgery (none vs unilateral vs bilateral), and preoperative risk groups (low- vs intermediate- vs high risk). The number of cases performed by each surgeon was 541, 413, 411, and 112, respectively. Median follow-up was 24 months (inter-quartile range: 18, 40). The UC recovery rate at 1 year after surgery was 82%. At multivariable analyses, surgeon experience represented an independent predictor of UC recovery (hazard ratio: 1.02, p < 0.001). The surgical learning curve was similar among surgeons, moving linearly from ∼60% of UC rate at the initial cases to almost 90% after more than 400 procedures. In patients undergoing RARP, surgeon experience is a significant predictor of UC recovery. The surgical learning curve of UC recovery does not reach a plateau even after more than 100 cases, suggesting a continuous improvement of the surgical technique. These findings deserve attention for patient counseling and future comparative studies evaluating functional outcomes after RARP.

  9. A novel surgical method for total nail ablation: Use of triple flap technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna Aksoy

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Total nail ablation for the treatment of onychodystrophies can be performed by using chemicals, surgical resection or laser ablation of nail matrix. A female patient with bilateral severe onychodystrophy as a result of inadvertent previous nail surgeries was treated surgically. Proximal complete nail matrix resection and distal 10 mm wide transverse strip partial nail bed resection were performed. A 5 mm wide transverse strip of nail bed was left intact proximally. Proximal nail matrix defect was closed by using the skin of proximal nail fold. The distal nail bed defect was reconstructed by using triple flap technique which was composed of a main central advancement flap containing ventral toe skin and two side flaps containing nail fold skin. The patient healed without any problem and her nail problem was treated successfully. The cosmetic appearance of her first toes was acceptable. Surgical nail ablation followed by volar skin coverage of dorsal surface of the distal phalanx bone by using triple flap technique is an effective surgical treatment method for the correction of advanced nail plate deformities requiring total nail ablation. 

  10. Management of erectile dysfunction post-radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh A

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Alan Saleh, Hamid Abboudi, MB Ghazal-Aswad, Erik K Mayer, Justin A Vale Division of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, St Mary's Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Radical prostatectomy is a commonly performed procedure for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. One of the long-term complications is erectile dysfunction. There is little consensus on the optimal management; however, it is agreed that treatment must be prompt to prevent fibrosis and increase oxygenation of penile tissue. It is vital that patient expectations are discussed, a realistic time frame of treatment provided, and treatment started as close to the prostatectomy as possible. Current treatment regimens rely on phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors as a first-line therapy, with vacuum erection devices and intraurethral suppositories of alprostadil as possible treatment combination options. With nonresponders to these therapies, intracavernosal injections are resorted to. As a final measure, patients undergo the highly invasive penile prosthesis implantation. There is no uniform, objective treatment program for erectile dysfunction post-radical prostatectomy. Management plans are based on poorly conducted and often underpowered studies in combination with physician and patient preferences. They involve the aforementioned drugs and treatment methods in different sequences and doses. Prospective treatments include dietary supplements and gene therapy, which have shown promise with there proposed mechanisms of improving erectile function but are yet to be applied successfully in human patients. Keywords: erectile dysfunction, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, vacuum erection devices, intraurethral suppositories, intracavernosal injections

  11. Techniques for Optimizing Surgical Scars, Part 2: Hypertrophic Scars and Keloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Kathryn; Konda, Sailesh; Ren, Vicky Zhen; Wang, Apphia Lihan; Srinivasan, Aditya; Chilukuri, Suneel

    2017-01-01

    Surgical management of benign or malignant cutaneous tumors may result in noticeable scars that are of great concern to patients, regardless of sex, age, or ethnicity. Techniques to optimize surgical scars are discussed in this three-part review. Part 2 focuses on scar revision for hypertrophic and keloids scars. Scar revision options for hypertrophic and keloid scars include corticosteroids, bleomycin, fluorouracil, verapamil, avotermin, hydrogel scaffold, nonablative fractional lasers, ablative and fractional ablative lasers, pulsed dye laser (PDL), flurandrenolide tape, imiquimod, onion extract, silicone, and scar massage.

  12. Comparative study of 2 surgical techniques for castration of guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilmette, Josée; Langlois, Isabelle; Hélie, Pierre; El Warrak, Alexander de Oliveira

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare 2 surgical approaches (scrotal or abdominal) for castration of guinea pigs and to investigate post-operative infection rates with either technique. Forty-eight guinea pigs were castrated by scrotal or abdominal technique after being randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups (n = 24). Individuals were either castrated by an experienced exotic animal surgeon (n = 12) or by an experienced small animal surgeon (n = 12). Surgical wounds were evaluated daily before euthanasia for histological evaluation 2 wks after surgery. Post-operative infection rate was significantly higher in the scrotal group than in the abdominal group, with a higher rate for the experienced small animal surgeon. Castration of guinea pigs with the abdominal technique is significantly faster and has a significantly lower post-operative infection rate than the scrotal technique.

  13. A modified surgical technique for reconstruction of an acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation

    OpenAIRE

    Marchie, Anthony; Kumar, Arun; Catre, Melanio

    2009-01-01

    We report a modified surgical technique for reconstruction of coracoclavicular and acromioclavicular ligaments after acute dislocation of acromioclavicular joint using suture anchors. We have repaired 3 consecutive type III acromioclavicular dislocations with good results. This technique is simple and safe and allows anatomical reconstruction of the ligaments in acute dislocations.

  14. CD147 expression predicts biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy independent of histologic and pathologic features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauman, Tyler M.; Ewald, Jonathan A.; Huang, Wei; Ricke, William A.

    2015-01-01

    CD147 is an MMP-inducing protein often implicated in cancer progression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of CD147 in prostate cancer (PCa) progression and the prognostic ability of CD147 in predicting biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy. Plasma membrane-localized CD147 protein expression was quantified in patient samples using immunohistochemistry and multispectral imaging, and expression was compared to clinico-pathological features (pathologic stage, Gleason score, tumor volume, preoperative PSA, lymph node status, surgical margins, biochemical recurrence status). CD147 specificity and expression were confirmed with immunoblotting of prostate cell lines, and CD147 mRNA expression was evaluated in public expression microarray datasets of patient prostate tumors. Expression of CD147 protein was significantly decreased in localized tumors (pT2; p = 0.02) and aggressive PCa (≥pT3; p = 0.004), and metastases (p = 0.001) compared to benign prostatic tissue. Decreased CD147 was associated with advanced pathologic stage (p = 0.009) and high Gleason score (p = 0.02), and low CD147 expression predicted biochemical recurrence (HR 0.55; 95 % CI 0.31–0.97; p = 0.04) independent of clinico-pathologic features. Immunoblot bands were detected at 44 kDa and 66 kDa, representing non-glycosylated and glycosylated forms of CD147 protein, and CD147 expression was lower in tumorigenic T10 cells than non-tumorigenic BPH-1 cells (p = 0.02). Decreased CD147 mRNA expression was associated with increased Gleason score and pathologic stage in patient tumors but is not associated with recurrence status. Membrane-associated CD147 expression is significantly decreased in PCa compared to non-malignant prostate tissue and is associated with tumor progression, and low CD147 expression predicts biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy independent of pathologic stage, Gleason score, lymph node status, surgical margins, and tumor volume in multivariable

  15. Lateral view dissection of the prostato-urethral junction to reduce positive apical margin in laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hiroshi; Miki, Jun; Kimura, Takahiro; Sanuki, Kunitaro; Miki, Kenta; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Egawa, Shin

    2009-08-01

    To assess the impact of lateral view apical dissection in laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) on the reduction of positive surgical margin rates and recovery of postoperative continence. One hundred and forty-four consecutive patients underwent LRP from October 2004 to March 2008. Lateral view dissection of the prostato-urethral junction was conducted in 76 of them (Group 2). Standard dissection was used in the remaining patients (Group 1). The effect of this technical modification on the reduction of positive surgical margin rates and postoperative recovery of urinary continence was assessed in the two groups. Overall, the incidence of positive margins decreased from 23 (35.9%) in Group 1 to 16 cases (21.9%) in Group 2 (P = 0.07). Positive margin rates in pT2 decreased from 30.6% to 6.5% (P = 0.006). Apical and dorso-apical margins were reduced from 26.5% to 4.3% (P = 0.009) and from 10.2% to 0% (P Lateral view dissection of the prostato-urethral junction is an easily applicable technical modification. It provides better visualization of apical anatomy substantially contributing to the reduction of positive surgical margin rates, especially at the level of prostatic apex.

  16. A modified surgical technique for reconstruction of an acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchie, Anthony; Kumar, Arun; Catre, Melanio

    2009-01-01

    We report a modified surgical technique for reconstruction of coracoclavicular and acromioclavicular ligaments after acute dislocation of acromioclavicular joint using suture anchors. We have repaired 3 consecutive type III acromioclavicular dislocations with good results. This technique is simple and safe and allows anatomical reconstruction of the ligaments in acute dislocations. PMID:20671868

  17. Robotic assisted radical prostatectomy: a different treatment for prostate cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Den Julio

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering the Health Care System in Brazil, a developing country,and public healthcare policies, robotic surgery is a reality to veryfew citizens. Therefore, robotic assisted radical prostatectomy isfar removed from the daily practice of the vast majority of Brazilianurologists. Scientific evidence of the superiority of robotic assistedradical prostatectomy does not presently justify public investmentsfor widespread development of robotic centers. Maybe over timeand with reductions in costs, robotic technology will become amore established practice, as observed in other countries, and morefeasible for the Brazilian urological community.

  18. Surgical treatment for progressive prostate cancer: A clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Veliev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of its existing standards, the treatment of patients with progressive prostate cancer (PC remains a matter of debate. Ensuring that the patients have good quality of life is also relevant. The paper describes a clinical case of a patient with progressive PC after hormone therapy, brachytherapy, salvage prostatectomy, enucleation of the testicular parenchyma, and salvage lymphadenectomy. A phallic prosthesis and an artificial urinary sphincter have been implanted to improve quality of life. The results of preoperative examination and the technological features of surgical interventions are given.

  19. Detour technique, Dipping technique, or IIeal bladder flap technique for surgical correction of uretero-ileal anastomotic stricture in orthotopic ileal neobladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Wishahi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBackground:Uretero-ileal anastomotic stricture (UIAS is a urological complication after ileal neobladder, the initial management being endourological intervention. If this fails or stricture recurs, surgical intervention will be indicated.Design and Participants:From 1994 to 2013, 129 patients were treated for UIAS after unsuccessful endourological intervention. Unilateral UIAS was present in 101 patients, and bilateral in 28 patients; total procedures were 157. The previous ileal neobladder techniques were Hautmann neobladder, detubularized U shape, or spherical shape neobladder.Surgical procedures:Dipping technique was performed in 74 UIAS. Detour technique was done in 60 renal units. Ileal Bladder flap was indicated in 23 renal units. Each procedure ended with insertion of double J, abdominal drain, and indwelling catheter.Results:Follow-up was done for 12 to 36 months. Patency of the anastomosis was found in 91.7 % of cases. Thirteen patients (8.3% underwent antegrade dilatation and insertion of double J.Conclusion:After endourological treatment for uretero-ileal anastomotic failure, basically three techniques may be indicated: dipping technique, detour technique, and ileal bladder flap. The indications are dependent on the length of the stenotic/dilated ureteral segment. Better results for long length of stenotic ureter are obtained with detour technique; for short length stenotic ureter dipping technique; when the stenotic segment is 5 cm or more with a short ureter, the ileal tube flap is indicated. The use of double J stent is mandatory in the majority of cases. Early intervention is the rule for protecting renal units from progressive loss of function.

  20. Robotic-assisted transperitoneal radical prostatectomy in a patient with pelvic kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabah, Danny M.; Alyami, Fahad A.

    2008-01-01

    Robots are increasingly utilized in urology, due to their favorable performance characteristics especially in prostatectomy and pyeloplasty. However, preoperative diagnosis of urogenital congenital anomalies and preoperative planning are important aspects to be considered. The presence of ectopic pelvic kidney is a challenge for the surgeon to perform robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) without injury to the pelvic kidney (PC) or its blood supply. We report our experience of performing RARP in a patient with a PK. (author)

  1. Surgical techniques and radiological findings of meniscus allograft transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoseok; Lee, Sang Yub; Na, Young Gon; Kim, Sung Kwan; Yi, Jae Hyuck; Lim, Jae Kwang; Lee, So Mi

    2016-08-01

    Meniscus allograft transplantation has been performed over the past 25 years to relieve knee pain and improve knee function in patients with an irreparable meniscus injury. The efficacy and safety of meniscus allograft transplantation have been established in numerous experimental and clinical researches. However, there is a lack of reviews to aid radiologists who are routinely interpreting images and evaluating the outcome of the procedures, and also meniscus allograft transplantation is not widely performed in most hospitals. This review focuses on the indications of the procedure, the different surgical techniques used for meniscus allograft transplantation according to the involvement of the lateral and medial meniscus, and the associated procedures. The postoperative radiological findings and surgical complications of the meniscus allograft transplantation are also described in detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Parameters of two-dimensional perineal ultrasonography for evaluation of urinary incontinence after Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa Cruz, Danilo Souza Lima da; D'Ancona, Carlos Arturo Levi; Baracat, Jamal; Alves, Marco Antonio Dionisio; Cartapatti, Marcelo; Damião, Ronaldo

    2014-01-01

    Urinary incontinence remains a major concern for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Its prevalence can reach 20% in the late postoperative period. This clinical study investigated the differences of a dynamic evaluation of the urethra and pelvic floor contraction using perineal ultrasound in men without prostate surgery and in men submitted to radical prostatectomy with and without stress urinary incontinence. Ninety two male patients were included, which 70% of them underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) for more than one year. Thirty one men with clinically post prostatectomy incontinence were compared by two-dimensional (2D) perineal ultrasound to 34 patients without post prostatectomy incontinence and to 27 men without surgery in two centers in Brazil. Our results showed that the continent group presented the urethral angle at rest significantly lower than the prostate group (p = 0.0002). We also observed that the incontinent group showed the displacement of the anterior bladder neck during contraction significantly lower than the continent group (p = 0.008). We found that the continent group presented the urethral angle at rest significantly lower than the prostate group. The incontinent group also showed the anterior bladder neck displacement during contraction significantly lower than the continent group. It was more evident when the severe incontinent group and the continent group were compared.

  3. Transurethral prostatectomy in human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 63-year old man was admitted to our Hospital with urethral catheter in situ and having failed medical therapy, he opted for transurethral prostatectomy (TURP) which was done without any post-operative complication. He was known to be afflicted with human immunodeficiency virus and on treatment for 3 years. He also ...

  4. The Suprameatal Approach: A Safe Alternative Surgical Technique for Cochlear Implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postelmans, Job T. F.; Tange, Rinze A.; Stokroos, Robert J.; Grolman, Wilko

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To report on surgical complications arising post-operatively in 104 patients undergoing cochlear implantation surgery using the suprameatal approach (SMA). Second, to examine the advantages and disadvantages of the SMA technique compared with the classic mastoidectomy using the posterior

  5. Robotic and open radical prostatectomy in the public health sector: cost comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Rohan Matthew; Linklater, Nicholas; Coughlin, Geoff

    2014-06-01

    During 2008, the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital became the first public hospital in Australia to have a da Vinci Surgical Robot purchased by government funding. The cost of performing robotic surgery in the public sector is a contentious issue. This study is a single centre, cost analysis comparing open radical prostatectomy (RRP) and robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RALP) based on the newly introduced pure case-mix funding model. A retrospective chart review was performed for the first 100 RALPs and the previous 100 RRPs. Estimates of tangible costing and funding were generated for each admission and readmission, using the Royal Brisbane Hospital Transition II database, based on pure case-mix funding. The average cost for admission for RRP was A$13 605, compared to A$17 582 for the RALP. The average funding received for a RRP was A$11 781 compared to A$5496 for a RALP based on the newly introduced case-mix model. The average length of stay for RRP was 4.4 days (2-14) and for RALP, 1.2 days (1-4). The total cost of readmissions for RRP patients was A$70 487, compared to that of the RALP patients, A$7160. These were funded at A$55 639 and A$7624, respectively. RALP has shown a significant advantage with respect to length of stay and readmission rate. Based on the case-mix funding model RALP is poorly funded compared to its open equivalent. Queensland Health needs to plan on how robotic surgery is implemented and assess whether this technology is truly affordable in the public sector. © 2013 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  6. Late-onset incontinence in a cohort of radical prostatectomy patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naselli, A.; Introini, C.; Andreatta, R.; Puppo, P.; Simone, G.; Papalia, R.; Gallucci, M.

    2011-01-01

    A cohort of 235 subjects, who underwent radical prostatectomy from 1994 to 2002, completely continent at the 2-year follow up and with the last follow-up visit in 2009, was examined to assess incidence and risk factors of late-onset incontinence. Median follow up was 100 months, range 84-176. At the last follow-up visit, 209 (89%) maintained continence, and 26 (11%) became incontinent. Specifically 14 out of 26 (6%) used one pad and 12 (5%) used two or more pads daily. Incidence of age ≥65 years at radical prostatectomy was greater in the subgroup who developed late incontinence, 109/209 (52%) vs 19/26 (73%). Incidence of adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy, of hormonal manipulation and of extraprostatic disease was similar in the two subgroups. Univariate and multivariate analysis did not disclose any difference. Late-onset incontinence is to be expected in about 10% of subjects who became completely continent after radical prostatectomy. The cause is likely to be related to ageing. Patients should be informed about the long-term risk of becoming incontinent. (author)

  7. Intraoperative registered transrectal ultrasound guidance for robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohareri, Omid; Ischia, Joseph; Black, Peter C; Schneider, Caitlin; Lobo, Julio; Goldenberg, Larry; Salcudean, Septimiu E

    2015-01-01

    To provide unencumbered real-time ultrasound image guidance during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, we developed a robotic transrectal ultrasound system that tracks the da Vinci® Surgical System instruments. We describe our initial clinical experience with this system. After an evaluation in a canine model, 20 patients were enrolled in the study. During each procedure the transrectal ultrasound transducer was manually positioned using a brachytherapy stabilizer to provide good imaging of the prostate. Then the transrectal ultrasound was registered to the da Vinci robot by a previously validated procedure. Finally, automatic rotation of the transrectal ultrasound was enabled such that the transrectal ultrasound imaging plane safely tracked the tip of the da Vinci instrument controlled by the surgeon, while real-time transrectal ultrasound images were relayed to the surgeon at the da Vinci console. Tracking was activated during all critical stages of the surgery. The transrectal ultrasound robot was easy to set up and use, adding 7 minutes (range 5 to 14) to the procedure. It did not require an assistant or additional control devices. Qualitative feedback was acquired from the surgeons, who found transrectal ultrasound useful in identifying the urethra while passing the dorsal venous complex suture, defining the prostate-bladder interface during bladder neck dissection, identifying the seminal vesicles and their location with respect to the rectal wall, and identifying the distal prostate boundary at the apex. Real-time, registered robotic transrectal ultrasound guidance with automatic instrument tracking during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy is feasible and potentially useful. The results justify further studies to establish whether the approach can improve procedure outcomes. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pigment dispersion syndrome associated with intraocular lens implantation: a new surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canut Jordana, M Isabel; Pérez Formigó, Daniel; Abreu González, Rodrigo; Nadal Reus, Jeroni

    2010-11-11

    We report the case of a myopic patient who, after intraocular lens transplant in the posterior chamber, suffered elevated intraocular pressure due to pigment dispersion, with recurrent episodes of blurred vision. The patient was treated with a new surgical technique that can avoid potential iridolenticular contact. Complete ophthalmologic examination and optical coherence tomography (OCT) of the anterior segment were performed. Contact between the pigmentary epithelium and the iris with an intraocular lens was revealed by utrasound biomicroscopy and OCT. In this case, Nd:YAG laser iridotomy and laser iridoplasty were not effective for iridolenticular separation and control of the pigment dispersion. We propose a new technique: stitches on the surface of the iris to obtain good iridolenticular separation and good intraocular pressure control. Stitches on the iris surface should be considered as optional therapy in pigmentary glaucoma secondary to intraocular lens implantation. This surgical technique can avoid potential iridolenticular contacts more definitively.

  9. A new plastic surgical technique for adult congenital webbed penis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yue-bing; Ding, Xian-fan; Luo, Chong; Yu, Shi-cheng; Yu, Yan-lan; Chen, Bi-de; Zhang, Zhi-gen; Li, Gong-hui

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To introduce a novel surgical technique for correction of adult congenital webbed penis. Methods: From March 2010 to December 2011, 12 patients (age range: 14–23 years old) were diagnosed as having a webbed penis and underwent a new surgical procedure designed by us. Results: All cases were treated successfully without severe complication. The operation time ranged from 20 min to 1 h. The average bleeding volume was less than 50 ml. All patients achieved satisfactory cosmetic results after surgery. The penile curvature disappeared in all cases and all patients remained well after 1 to 3 months of follow-up. Conclusions: Adult webbed penis with complaints of discomfort or psychological pressure due to a poor profile should be indicators for surgery. Good corrective surgery should expose the glans and coronal sulcus, match the penile skin length to the penile shaft length dorsally and ventrally, and provide a normal penoscrotal junction. Our new technique is a safe and effective method for the correction of adult webbed penis, which produces satisfactory results. PMID:22949367

  10. Orgasm-associated urinary incontinence and sexual life after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Andreas E; Carlsson, Stefan; Johansson, Eva; Jonsson, Martin N; Adding, Christofer; Nyberg, Tommy; Steineck, Gunnar; Wiklund, N Peter

    2011-09-01

    Involuntary release of urine during sexual climax, orgasm-associated urinary incontinence, occurs frequently after radical prostatectomy. We know little about its prevalence and its effect on sexual satisfaction. To determine the prevalence of orgasm-associated incontinence after radical prostatectomy and its effect on sexual satisfaction. Consecutive series, follow-up at one point in calendar time of men having undergone radical prostatectomy (open surgery or robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery) at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, 2002-2006. Of the 1,411 eligible men, 1,288 (91%) men completed a study-specific questionnaire. Prevalence rate of orgasm-associated incontinence. Of the 1,288 men providing information, 691 were sexually active. Altogether, 268 men reported orgasm-associated urinary incontinence, of whom 230 (86%) were otherwise continent. When comparing them with the 422 not reporting the symptom but being sexually active, we found a prevalence ratio (with 95% confidence interval) of 1.5 (1.2-1.8) for not being able to satisfy the partner, 2.1 (1.1-3.5) for avoiding sexual activity because of fear of failing, 1.5 (1.1-2.1) for low orgasmic satisfaction, and 1.4 (1.2-1.7) for having sexual intercourse infrequently. Prevalence ratios increase in prostate-cancer survivors with a higher frequency of orgasm-associated urinary incontinence. We found orgasm-associated urinary incontinence to occur among a fifth of prostate cancer survivors having undergone radical prostatectomy, most of whom are continent when not engaged in sexual activity. The symptom was associated with several aspects of sexual life. © 2011 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  11. Impact of metabolic syndrome on early recovery of continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Masatomo; Watanabe, Hiromitsu; Kurahashi, Toshifumi

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of metabolic syndrome on the early recovery of urinary continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. The present study included a total of 302 consecutive Japanese patients with clinically localized prostate cancer who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. In this study, postoperative urinary continence was defined as no leak or the use of a security pad. The continence status was assessed by interviews before and 1 and 3 months after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Metabolic syndrome was defined as follows: body mass index ≥25 kg/m 2 and two or more of the following: hypertension, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia. The effect of the presence of metabolic syndrome on the continence status of these patients was retrospectively examined. A total of 116 (38.4%) and 203 (67.2%) of the 302 patients were continent at 1 and 3 months after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, respectively. A total of 31 (10.3%) patients were judged to have metabolic syndrome. Despite the operative time being longer in patients with metabolic syndrome, no significant differences were observed in the remaining preoperative, intraoperative or postoperative variables between patients with or without metabolic syndrome. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, metabolic syndrome and the duration of hospitalization were significantly correlated with the 1-month continence status. Similarly, metabolic syndrome and estimated blood loss during surgery were independent predictors of continence rates at 3 months after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. These findings suggest that the presence of metabolic syndrome could have a significant impact on the early recovery of urinary continence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  12. CONTINENT RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sernyak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the impact of dissection of the dorsal venous complex without pre-ligation, suturing, or coagulation during radical prostatectomy (RPE in patients with localized prostate cancer (PC on the quality of surgery and the function of urinary retention.Subjects and methods. The data of 42 patients who had undergone posterior and anterior anatomical repair and vesicourethral anastomosis using a V-lock suture after prostatectomy were analyzed. All the patients were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 consisted of 22 patients in whom the dorsal venous complex was closed using a 3-0 vicryl suture before urethral dissection. Group 2 included 20 patients in whom the urethra was dissected without suturing the venous complex.Results. In group 1, complete urinary retention after catheter removal was noted in 9 (40.9 % and 15 (68 % patients within 24 hours and after 3 months, respectively. Following 12 months, two (9 % patients were observed to have partial mild urinary incontinence (as many as 2 pads per day. Group 2 patients showed complete urinary retention in 17 (85 % cases on the first day after catheter removal; all the patients retained urine 3 months later.Conclusion. In patients with localized PC, dissection of the dorsal venous complex without presuturing during laparoscopic RPE exerts a considerable impact on the preservation of urinary retention, namely 45% more of the patients reported complete urinary retention in early periods and 10 % more did this in later periods. At the same time, there was no statistically significant increase in intraoperative blood loss (p > 0.05, the number of positive edges, or biochemical recurrences.

  13. CONTINENT RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sernyak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the impact of dissection of the dorsal venous complex without pre-ligation, suturing, or coagulation during radical prostatectomy (RPE in patients with localized prostate cancer (PC on the quality of surgery and the function of urinary retention.Subjects and methods. The data of 42 patients who had undergone posterior and anterior anatomical repair and vesicourethral anastomosis using a V-lock suture after prostatectomy were analyzed. All the patients were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 consisted of 22 patients in whom the dorsal venous complex was closed using a 3-0 vicryl suture before urethral dissection. Group 2 included 20 patients in whom the urethra was dissected without suturing the venous complex.Results. In group 1, complete urinary retention after catheter removal was noted in 9 (40.9 % and 15 (68 % patients within 24 hours and after 3 months, respectively. Following 12 months, two (9 % patients were observed to have partial mild urinary incontinence (as many as 2 pads per day. Group 2 patients showed complete urinary retention in 17 (85 % cases on the first day after catheter removal; all the patients retained urine 3 months later.Conclusion. In patients with localized PC, dissection of the dorsal venous complex without presuturing during laparoscopic RPE exerts a considerable impact on the preservation of urinary retention, namely 45% more of the patients reported complete urinary retention in early periods and 10 % more did this in later periods. At the same time, there was no statistically significant increase in intraoperative blood loss (p > 0.05, the number of positive edges, or biochemical recurrences.

  14. Measurement of blood flow through surgical anastomosis using the radioactive microsphere technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummel, S.J.; Delgado, G.; Butterfield, A.; Dritschilo, A.; Harbert, J.

    1985-10-01

    Two different radioactive microspheres ( U Ce and UWSc) were used to measure blood flow to an area of the large intestine in dogs before and after a surgical resection was performed with surgical staples. The healing of an anastomosis is theoretically related to the blood flow to the anastomotic site. Blood flow studies were conducted in three dogs using this technique. The average blood flow preoperatively was 0.558 mL/minute per gram and 1.04 mL/minute per gram postoperatively. These results indicate a statistically significant increase in blood flow at the anastomotic site six days after anastomosis when compared with the blood flow to the same area before any surgical procedures.

  15. Measurement of blood flow through surgical anastomosis using the radioactive microsphere technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummel, S.J.; Delgado, G.; Butterfield, A.; Dritschilo, A.; Harbert, J.

    1985-01-01

    Two different radioactive microspheres ( 141 Ce and 46 Sc) were used to measure blood flow to an area of the large intestine in dogs before and after a surgical resection was performed with surgical staples. The healing of an anastomosis is theoretically related to the blood flow to the anastomotic site. Blood flow studies were conducted in three dogs using this technique. The average blood flow preoperatively was 0.558 mL/minute per gram and 1.04 mL/minute per gram postoperatively. These results indicate a statistically significant increase in blood flow at the anastomotic site six days after anastomosis when compared with the blood flow to the same area before any surgical procedures

  16. Predictors of prostate cancer specific mortality after radical prostatectomy: 10 year oncologic outcomes from the Victorian Radical Prostatectomy Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Damien M; Papa, Nathan; Ta, Anthony D; Millar, Jeremy; Davidson, Adee-Jonathan; Pedersen, John; Syme, Rodney; Patel, Manish I; Giles, Graham G

    2015-10-01

    To identify the ability of multiple variables to predict prostate cancer specific mortality (PCSM) in a whole of population series of all radical prostatectomies (RP) performed in Victoria, Australia. A total of 2154 open RPs were performed in Victoria between July 1995 and December 2000. Subjects without follow up data, Gleason grade, pathological stage were excluded as were those who had pT4 disease or received neoadjuvant treatment. 1967 cases (91.3% of total) met the inclusion criteria for this study. Tumour characteristics were collated via a central registry. We used competing hazards regression models to investigate associations. At median follow up of 10.3 years pT stage of RP (P pattern at RP in this whole of population study suggests a need to avoid understaging/grading in the process of cancer diagnosis and active surveillance protocols. Multi-modality therapy is likely to have a greater impact on PCSM in higher stage and Gleason grade disease. Identification of increased PCSM with rural residency and with involvement of a trainee urologist, and reduction in PCSM with higher surgeon volume all suggest potential for improved PC outcomes to be achieved with changes to surgical training and service delivery. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Outcome of Robotic Radical Prostatectomy in Men Over 74.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubrig, Burkhard; Boy, Anselm; Heiland, Markus; Roosen, Alexander

    2018-02-01

    We set out to evaluate outcomes in patients over 74 after robotic radical prostatectomy. Six hundred forty-seven patients over 74 (≥75) were analyzed for preoperative factors (body mass index [BMI], American Society of Anestesiologists classification [ASA], prostate-specific antigen [PSA], International prostate symptome score [IPSS], International index of erectile function [IIEF]), operative and perioperative characteristics (technique, erythrocyte conc., complications), and histopathological results. After 12 months, following items were assessed: PSA, frequency of urine loss, number of pads used (including safety), incontinence at night, and potency as quantified by IIEF-5. Mean age in the group Clavien-Dindo III) were found in 1.6% vs. 1.3% (≥75) of cases. Minor complications were encountered in 22.8% vs. 26.3% (≥75). There was a remarkably high percentage of locally advanced disease (73.3% vs. 71.0%) in both groups. Patients ≥75 showed a tendency toward more aggressive cancer and more frequent nodal involvement; we found a higher percentage of R1-resections (19.5% vs. 30.4%, p < 0.05) and PSA relapse after 1 year (12.3% vs. 22.8%, p < 0.05). Twelve months pad-free continence rate (69.9% vs. 63.2%) showed no statistically significant difference between both groups as did the preservation rate of erectile function. We could show that robotic prostatectomy can be carried out safely with good functional and histopathological results in patients ≥75. It is therefore questionable if elderly patients can be precluded from curative radical treatment solely because of their age.

  18. How do you tell whether a change in surgical technique leads to a change in outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Andrew J; Cronin, Angel M; Masterson, Timothy A; Eastham, James A

    2010-04-01

    Surgeons routinely evaluate and modify their surgical technique to improve patient outcome. It is also common for surgeons to analyze results before and after a change in technique to determine whether the change led to better results. Simple comparison of results before and after surgical modification may be confounded by the surgical learning curve. We developed a statistical method applicable to analyzing before/after surgical studies. We used simulation studies to compare different statistical analyses of before/after studies. We evaluated a simple 2-group comparison of results before and after the modification by the chi-square test and a novel bootstrap method that adjusts for the surgical learning curve. In the presence of the learning curve a simple 2-group comparison almost always showed an ineffective surgical modification to be of benefit. When the surgical modification was harmful, leading to a 10% decrease in the success rate, 2-group comparison nonetheless showed a statistically significant improvement in outcome about 80% of the time. The bootstrap method had only moderate power but did not show that ineffective surgical modifications were beneficial more than would be expected by chance. Simplistic approaches to the analysis of before/after surgical studies may lead to grossly erroneous results under the surgical learning curve. A straightforward alternative statistical method allows investigators to separate the effects of the learning curve from those of the surgical modification. Copyright (c) 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Parameters of two-dimensional perineal ultrasonography for evaluation of urinary incontinence after Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Souza Lima da Costa Cruz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Urinary incontinence remains a major concern for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Its prevalence can reach 20% in the late postoperative period. Materials and Methods This clinical study investigated the differences of a dynamic evaluation of the urethra and pelvic floor contraction using perineal ultrasound in men without prostate surgery and in men submitted to radical prostatectomy with and without stress urinary incontinence. Ninety two male patients were included, which 70% of them underwent radical prostatectomy (RP for more than one year. Thirty one men with clinically post prostatectomy incontinence were compared by two-dimensional (2D perineal ultrasound to 34 patients without post prostatectomy incontinence and to 27 men without surgery in two centers in Brazil. Results Our results showed that the continent group presented the urethral angle at rest significantly lower than the prostate group (p = 0.0002. We also observed that the incontinent group showed the displacement of the anterior bladder neck during contraction significantly lower than the continent group (p = 0.008. Conclusions We found that the continent group presented the urethral angle at rest significantly lower than the prostate group. The incontinent group also showed the anterior bladder neck displacement during contraction significantly lower than the continent group. It was more evident when the severe incontinent group and the continent group were compared.

  20. Skull reconstruction after resection of bone tumors in a single surgical time by the association of the techniques of rapid prototyping and surgical navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchieta, M V M; Salles, F A; Cassaro, B D; Quaresma, M M; Santos, B F O

    2016-10-01

    Presentation of a new cranioplasty technique employing a combination of two technologies: rapid prototyping and surgical navigation. This technique allows the reconstruction of the skull cap after the resection of a bone tumor in a single surgical time. The neurosurgeon plans the craniotomy previously on the EximiusMed software, compatible with the Eximius Surgical Navigator, both from the company Artis Tecnologia (Brazil). The navigator imports the planning and guides the surgeon during the craniotomy. The simulation of the bone fault allows the virtual reconstruction of the skull cap and the production of a personalized modelling mold using the Magics-Materialise (Belgium)-software. The mold and a replica of the bone fault are made by rapid prototyping by the company Artis Tecnologia (Brazil) and shipped under sterile conditions to the surgical center. The PMMA prosthesis is produced during the surgical act with the help of a hand press. The total time necessary for the planning and production of the modelling mold is four days. The precision of the mold is submillimetric and accurately reproduces the virtual reconstruction of the prosthesis. The production of the prosthesis during surgery takes until twenty minutes depending on the type of PMMA used. The modelling mold avoids contraction and dissipates the heat generated by the material's exothermic reaction in the polymerization phase. The craniectomy is performed with precision over the drawing made with the help of the Eximius Surgical Navigator, according to the planned measurements. The replica of the bone fault serves to evaluate the adaptation of the prosthesis as a support for the perforations and the placement of screws and fixation plates, as per the surgeon's discretion. This technique allows the adequate oncologic treatment associated with a satisfactory aesthetic result, with precision, in a single surgical time, reducing time and costs.

  1. Evolving Educational Techniques in Surgical Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Charity H; Schenarts, Kimberly D

    2016-02-01

    Training competent and professional surgeons efficiently and effectively requires innovation and modernization of educational methods. Today's medical learner is quite adept at using multiple platforms to gain information, providing surgical educators with numerous innovative avenues to promote learning. With the growth of technology, and the restriction of work hours in surgical education, there has been an increase in use of simulation, including virtual reality, robotics, telemedicine, and gaming. The use of simulation has shifted the learning of basic surgical skills to the laboratory, reserving limited time in the operating room for the acquisition of complex surgical skills". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Multiple colonic anastomoses in the surgical treatment of short bowel syndrome. A new technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo-Ogazón, Felipe; Becerril-Martínez, Guillermo; Hernández-Saldaña, Víctor; Zavala-Aznar, Marí Luisa; Bojalil-Durán, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Some surgical pathologies eventually require intestinal resection. This may lead to an extended procedure such as leaving 30 cm of proximal jejunum and left and sigmoid colon. One of the most important consequences of this type of resection is "intestinal failure" or short bowel syndrome. This complex syndrome leads to different metabolic and water and acid/base imbalances, as well as nutritional and immunological challenges along with the problem accompanying an abdomen subjected to many surgical procedures and high mortality. Many surgical techniques have been developed to improve quality of life of patients. We designed a non-transplant surgical approach and performed the procedure on two patients with postoperative short bowel syndrome with work can be performed by a large number of surgeons. The procedure has a low morbimortality rate and offers the opportunity for better control of metabolic and acid/base balance, intestinal transit and proper nutrition. We consider that this technique offers a new alternative for the complex management required by patients with short bowel syndrome and facilitates their long-term nutritional control.

  3. Adjuvant and salvage therapy following radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer: effect of combined transient androgen deprivation and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eulau, Stephen M.; Tate, David J.; Cox, Richard S.; Bagshaw, Malcolm A.; Hancock, Steven L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant and salvage irradiation have been shown to improve local control after radical prostatectomy for prostatic cancer in patients with high risk pathologic features, rising PSA, or evidence of local failure. Transient androgen deprivation combined with primary irradiation has resulted in improved local control and biochemical disease free survival in patients with locally advanced, unresected, prostate cancer. This retrospective study evaluates whether transient androgen blockade improves the outcome from post-prostatectomy irradiation given as either adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods: From August, 1985 to December, 1995, 105 patients were treated with radiotherapy to the prostatic fossa following radical prostatectomy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. No patient had clinically or radiographically evident distant disease. Median follow-up was 4.6 years from the date of surgery and 3.2 years from completion of radiotherapy. Findings at prostatectomy included capsular penetration in 38 patients, seminal vesicle involvement in 42 patients, lymph node involvement in 15 patients, and positive surgical margins in 70 patients. Treatment was administered as adjuvant therapy for high risk pathologic features in 39 patients, for persistent or rising PSA in 52 patients, or for clinically evident local recurrence in 14 patients. Of the 105 patients, 32 received combined androgen deprivation/radiotherapy and 73 received radiotherapy alone. Both groups received 60-70 Gy in 2 Gy daily fractions to the prostatic fossa. Selected patients with poor prognostic features received pelvic irradiation to a median dose of 50 Gy. Androgen deprivation typically consisted of Lupron and Flutamide for 4 to 6 months before, during, and in selected cases, after irradiation. No patients received maintenance androgen deprivation or underwent orchiectomy. Tumor stage, lymph node status, Gleason sum, and indications for treatment did not differ significantly between the two groups

  4. Prostate cancer-related anxiety in long-term survivors after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Valentin H; Herkommer, Kathleen; Marten-Mittag, Birgitt; Gschwend, Jürgen E; Dinkel, Andreas

    2017-12-01

    Knowledge of the psychological distress of long- and very long-term (>10 years) prostate cancer (PC) survivors is limited. This study intended to examine the parameters influencing anxiety related to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and PC in long-term survivors after radical prostatectomy. We surveyed 4719 PC survivors from the German multicenter prospective database "Familial Prostate Cancer." We evaluated the association of PC-related anxiety (MAX-PC) with sociodemographic characteristics, family history of PC, global health status/quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30), depression and anxiety (PHQ-2; GAD-2), latest PSA level, time since radical prostatectomy, and current therapy. The survey participants' mean age was 75.2 years (SD = 6.5). Median follow-up was 11.5 years, and 19.5% of participants had survived more than 15 years since the initial treatment. The final regression analysis found that younger age, lower global health status/quality of life, higher depression and anxiety scores, higher latest PSA level, and shorter time since radical prostatectomy predicted increased PSA-related anxiety and PC anxiety. Familial PC was predictive only of PSA anxiety (all p anxiety and 24% for PC anxiety. PC-related anxiety remained relevant many years after prostatectomy and was influenced by younger age, psychological status, rising PSA level, and shorter time since initial treatment. Survivors with these characteristics are at increased risk of PC-related anxieties, which should be considered by the treating physician during follow-up.

  5. Clinical and pathologic factors predictive of biochemical control following post-prostatectomy irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Ziaja, Ellen L.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Vicini, Frank A.; Brabbins, Donald S.; Dmuchowski, Carl F.; Gonzalez, Jose; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Indications for post-prostatectomy radiation therapy are not well defined. We reviewed our experience treating post-prostatectomy patients with external beam irradiation to assess clinical and pathologic factors predictive of biochemical control. Materials and Methods: Between 1/87 and 3/93, 61 patients received post-operative tumor bed irradiation with a median dose of 59.4 Gy (50.4 - 68 Gy). Median follow-up was 4.1 years (7.6 months - 8.3 years) from irradiation. Patients were treated for the following reasons: 1) adjuvantly, within 6 months of surgery for extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle involvement, or positive surgical margins (n=38); 2) persistently elevated PSA post-operatively (n=2); 3) rising PSA >6 months after surgery (n=9); and 4) biopsy proven local recurrence (n=12). No patients had known nodal or metastatic disease. All patients had post-radiation PSA data available. Biochemical control was the endpoint studied using Kaplan-Meier life table analysis. Biochemical control was defined as the ability to maintain an undetectable PSA ( 4 and ≤1 0, >10 and ≤20, and > 20 ng/ml. The 3 year actuarial rates of biochemical control were 100% for group 1, 66.7% for group 2, 61.5% for group 3, and 28.6% for group 4. Pre-RT PSA values were also evaluated. Univariate Cox models indicated lower presurgical and pre-RT PSA values were predictive of biochemical control (p=0.017, p 6 months after surgery (group 3), the 3 year actuarial rate of biochemical control was 55.6%. The 3 year actuarial rate of biochemical control for patients treated for a biopsy proven recurrence (group 4) was 8.3%. By pair-wise log rank test, the rates of biochemical control were significantly different between groups 1 and 3 (p=0.036), groups 1 and 4 (p<0.001), and groups 3 and 4 (p=0.009). Conclusion: Biochemical control was achieved in approximately half of the patients treated with post-operative prostatic fossa irradiation. Elevated presurgical and pre

  6. Prepubertal gonadectomy in cats: different surgical techniques and comparison with gonadectomy at traditional age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porters, N; Polis, I; Moons, C; Duchateau, L; Goethals, K; Huyghe, S; de Rooster, H

    2014-09-06

    Feasibility, surgical time and complications of different surgical techniques for prepubertal gonadectomy (PPG; 8-12 weeks of age) in cats were studied and compared to gonadectomy at traditional age (TAG; 6-8 months of age). Kittens were randomly assigned to PPG or TAG. Ovarian pedicle haemostasis for PPG was achieved by ligatures (n=47), vascular clips (n=50), bipolar electrocoagulation (n=50), or pedicle tie (n=50); for TAG (n=34) ligatures were used. In male cats, PPG consisted of closed castration by spermatic cord knot (n=92) or ligature (n=91) while TAG (n=34) was an open castration by spermatic cord knot. A linear (surgical time) and a logistic regression (complications) model were designed. Significance was set at 0.05. For female PPG, clips and coagulation were the fastest procedures; placement of ligatures was most time-consuming. In male PPG, knot placement was significantly faster than ligation. In both sexes, very few intraoperative or wound complications were observed, irrespective of the surgical technique used. Surgical times in females (ligatures) as well as in males (knot) were significantly shorter for PPG than for TAG. PPG was as safe as TAG, yet took less time to perform and did not result in a greater rate of postoperative complications. British Veterinary Association.

  7. Comparative evaluation of diode laser ablation and surgical stripping technique for gingival depigmentation: A clinical and immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakutra, Gaurav; Shankarapillai, Rajesh; Mathur, Lalit; Manohar, Balaji

    2017-01-01

    There are various treatment modalities to remove the black patches of melanin pigmentation. The aim of the study is to clinically compare the diode laser ablation and surgical stripping technique for gingival depigmentation and to evaluate their effect on the histological changes in melanocyte activity. A total of 40 sites of 20 patients with bilateral melanin hyperpigmentation were treated with the surgical stripping and diode laser ablation technique. Change in Hedin index score, change in area of pigmentation using image analyzing software, pain perception, patient preference of treatment were recorded. All 40 sites were selected for immunohistochemical analysis using HMB-45 immunohistochemical marker. At 12 months post-operative visit, in all sites, repigmentation was observed with different grades of Hedin index. Paired t -test, analysis of variance, and Chi-square tests were used for statistical analysis. Repigmentation in surgical stripping is significantly lesser compared to laser ablation. Lesser numbers of melanocytes were found on immunohistological examination at 12 months postoperatively. Comparison for patient preference and pain indices give statistically significant values for diode laser techniques. Gingival hyperpigmentation is effectively managed by diode laser ablation technique and surgical stripping method. In this study, surgical stripping technique found to be better compared to diode laser ablation.

  8. Does the Implant Surgical Technique Affect the Primary and/or Secondary Stability of Dental Implants? A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadid, Rola Muhammed; Sadaqah, Nasrin Rushdi; Othman, Sahar Abdo

    2014-01-01

    Background. A number of surgical techniques for implant site preparation have been advocated to enhance the implant of primary and secondary stability. However, there is insufficient scientific evidence to support the association between the surgical technique and implant stability. Purpose. This review aimed to investigate the influence of different surgical techniques including the undersized drilling, the osteotome, the piezosurgery, the flapless procedure, and the bone stimulation by low-level laser therapy on the primary and/or secondary stability of dental implants. Materials and methods. A search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and grey literature was performed. The inclusion criteria comprised observational clinical studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in patients who received dental implants for rehabilitation, studies that evaluated the association between the surgical technique and the implant primary and/or secondary stability. The articles selected were carefully read and classified as low, moderate, and high methodological quality and data of interest were tabulated. Results. Eight clinical studies were included then they were classified as moderate or high methodological quality and control of bias. Conclusions. There is a weak evidence suggesting that any of previously mentioned surgical techniques could influence the primary and/or secondary implant stability. PMID:25126094

  9. Does the Implant Surgical Technique Affect the Primary and/or Secondary Stability of Dental Implants? A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rola Muhammed Shadid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A number of surgical techniques for implant site preparation have been advocated to enhance the implant of primary and secondary stability. However, there is insufficient scientific evidence to support the association between the surgical technique and implant stability. Purpose. This review aimed to investigate the influence of different surgical techniques including the undersized drilling, the osteotome, the piezosurgery, the flapless procedure, and the bone stimulation by low-level laser therapy on the primary and/or secondary stability of dental implants. Materials and methods. A search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and grey literature was performed. The inclusion criteria comprised observational clinical studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs conducted in patients who received dental implants for rehabilitation, studies that evaluated the association between the surgical technique and the implant primary and/or secondary stability. The articles selected were carefully read and classified as low, moderate, and high methodological quality and data of interest were tabulated. Results. Eight clinical studies were included then they were classified as moderate or high methodological quality and control of bias. Conclusions. There is a weak evidence suggesting that any of previously mentioned surgical techniques could influence the primary and/or secondary implant stability.

  10. Reconstruction of radical prostatectomy-induced urethral damage using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Akio; Tamaki, Tetsuro; Tono, Kayoko; Okada, Yoshinori; Akatsuka, Akira; Usui, Yukio; Terachi, Toshiro

    2008-06-15

    Postoperative damage of the urethral rhabdosphincter (URS) and neurovascular bundle (NVB) is a major operative complication of radical prostatectomy. It is generally recognized to be caused by unavoidable surgical damage to the muscle-nerve-blood vessel units around the urethra. We attempted to treat this damage using skeletal muscle-derived stem cells, which are able to reconstitute muscle-nerve-blood vessel units. Cells were enzymatically extracted and sorted by flow cytometry as CD34/45 (Sk-34) and CD34/45 (Sk-DN) cells from green fluorescent protein transgenic mice and rats. URS-NVB damage was induced by manually removing one-third of the total URS and unilateral invasion of NVB in wild-type Sprague-Dawley and node rats. Freshly isolated Sk-34, Sk-34+Sk-DN cells, and cultured Sk-DN cells were directly transplanted into the damaged portion. At 4 and 12 weeks after transplantation, urethral pressure profile by electrical stimulation through the sacral surface (L6-S1) was evaluated as functional recovery. The recovery ratio in the control and transplanted groups was 37.6% and 72.9%, at 4 weeks, and 41.6% and 78.4% at 12 weeks, respectively (Pcells differentiated into numerous skeletal muscle fibers having neuromuscular junctions (innervation) and nerve bundle-related Schwann cells and perineurium, and blood vessel-related endothelial cells and pericyte around the urethra. Thus, we conclude that transplantation of skeletal muscle-derived multipotent Sk-34 and Sk-DN cells is potentially useful for the reconstitution of postoperative damage of URS and NVB after radical prostatectomy.

  11. Rehabilitation with 4 zygomatic implants with a new surgical protocol using ultrasonic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozzati, Marco; Mortellaro, Carmen; Arata, Valentina; Gallesio, Giorgia; Previgliano, Valter

    2015-05-01

    When the residual bone crest cannot allow the placement of standard implants, the treatment for complete arch rehabilitation of severely atrophic maxillae can be performed with 4 zygomatic implants (ZIs) and immediate function with predictable results in terms of aesthetics, function, and comfort for the patient. However, even if ZIs' rehabilitations showed a good success rate, this surgery is difficult and need a skillful operator. Complications in this kind of rehabilitation are not uncommon; the main difficulties can be related to the reduced surgical visibility and instrument control in a critical anatomic area. All the surgical protocols described in the literature used drilling techniques. Furthermore, the use of ultrasonic instruments in implant surgery compared with drilling instruments have shown advantages in many aspects of surgical procedures, tissues management, enhancement of control, surgical visualization, and healing. The aim of this study was to report on the preliminary experience using ultrasound technique for ZIs surgery in terms of safety and technical improvement. Ten consecutive patients with severely atrophic maxilla have been treated with 4 ZIs and immediate complete arch acrylic resin provisional prostheses. The patients were followed up from 30 to 32 months evaluating implant success, prosthetic success, and patient satisfaction with a questionnaire. No implants were lost during the study period, with a 100% implant and prosthetic success rate. Within the limitations of this preliminary study, these data indicate that ultrasonic implant site preparation for ZIs can be a good alternative to the drilling technique and an improvement for the surgeon.

  12. Congenital completely buried penis in boys: anatomical basis and surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing; He, Da-wei; Hua, Yi; Zhang, De-ying; Wei, Guang-hui

    2013-07-01

    WHAT'S KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? AND WHAT DOES THE STUDY ADD?: Surgical correction of the congenital completely buried penis (CCBP) is a difficult challenge and there is no unanimous consensus about the surgical 'gold standard' and patient eligibility for surgery. In the present study, dysgenetic fundiform ligaments were found to be attached to the distal or middle shaft of the penis. This abnormality can be successfully corrected by releasing the fundiform ligament and mobilising the scrotal skin to cover the length of the penile shaft. The study shows that the paucity and traction of the penile skin and an abnormal fundiform ligament are important anatomical defects in CCBP. Dorsal curve and severe shortage of penile skin in erectile conditions are the main indications for surgical correction. To present our experience of anatomical findings for congenital completely buried penis (CCBP), which has no unanimous consensus regarding the 'gold standard' for surgical correction and patient eligibility, by providing our surgical technique and illustrations. Between February 2006 and February 2011, 22 children with a median (range) age of 4.2 (2.5-5.8) years, with CCBP underwent surgical correction by one surgeon. Toilet training and photographs of morning erections by parents were advised before surgery. The abnormal anatomical structure of buried penis during the operation was observed. The technique consisted of the release of the fundiform ligament, fixation of the subcutaneous penile skin at the base of the degloved penis, penoscrotal Z-plasty and mobilisation of the penile and scrotal skin to cover the penile shaft. In reflex erectile conditions, CCBP presents varying degrees of dorsal curve and shortage of penile skin. Dysgenetic fundiform ligaments were found to be attached to the distal or middle shaft of the penis in all patients. All wounds healed well and the cosmetic outcome was good at 6-month follow-up after the repair. The appearance of the dorsal curve in

  13. Use of the 3D surgical modelling technique with open-source software for mandibular fibula free flap reconstruction and its surgical guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganry, L; Hersant, B; Quilichini, J; Leyder, P; Meningaud, J P

    2017-06-01

    Tridimensional (3D) surgical modelling is a necessary step to create 3D-printed surgical tools, and expensive professional software is generally needed. Open-source software are functional, reliable, updated, may be downloaded for free and used to produce 3D models. Few surgical teams have used free solutions for mastering 3D surgical modelling for reconstructive surgery with osseous free flaps. We described an Open-source software 3D surgical modelling protocol to perform a fast and nearly free mandibular reconstruction with microvascular fibula free flap and its surgical guides, with no need for engineering support. Four successive specialised Open-source software were used to perform our 3D modelling: OsiriX ® , Meshlab ® , Netfabb ® and Blender ® . Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data on patient skull and fibula, obtained with a computerised tomography (CT) scan, were needed. The 3D modelling of the reconstructed mandible and its surgical guides were created. This new strategy may improve surgical management in Oral and Craniomaxillofacial surgery. Further clinical studies are needed to demonstrate the feasibility, reproducibility, transfer of know how and benefits of this technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Pelvic lymph node dissection during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: efficacy, limitations, and complications-a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploussard, Guillaume; Briganti, Alberto; de la Taille, Alexandre; Haese, Alexander; Heidenreich, Axel; Menon, Mani; Sulser, Tullio; Tewari, Ashutosh K; Eastham, James A

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) in prostate cancer is the most effective method for detecting lymph node metastases. However, a decline in the rate of PLND during radical prostatectomy (RP) has been noted. This is likely the result of prostate cancer stage migration in the prostate-specific antigen-screening era, and the introduction of minimally invasive approaches such as robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). To assess the efficacy, limitations, and complications of PLND during RARP. A review of the literature was performed using the Medline, Scopus, and Web of Science databases with no restriction of language from January 1990 to December 2012. The literature search used the following terms: prostate cancer, radical prostatectomy, robot-assisted, and lymph node dissection. The median value of nodal yield at PLND during RARP ranged from 3 to 24 nodes. As seen in open and laparoscopic RP series, the lymph node positivity rate increased with the extent of dissection during RARP. Overall, PLND-only related complications are rare. The most frequent complication after PLND is symptomatic pelvic lymphocele, with occurrence ranging from 0% to 8% of cases. The rate of PLND-associated grade 3-4 complications ranged from 0% to 5%. PLND is associated with increased operative time. Available data suggest equivalence of PLND between RARP and other surgical approaches in terms of nodal yield, node positivity, and intraoperative and postoperative complications. PLND during RARP can be performed effectively and safely. The overall number of nodes removed, the likelihood of node positivity, and the types and rates of complications of PLND are similar to pure laparoscopic and open retropubic procedures. Copyright © 2013 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Triple-Tube-Ostomy: A Novel Technique for the Surgical Treatment of Iatrogenic Duodenal Perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuaki Fujikuni

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Although duodenal perforation is currently an infrequent complication of medical procedures, its incidence in the future predictably will increase as endoscopic treatment of duodenal neoplasms becomes more frequently used. In some cases, duodenal perforation is difficult to treat even surgically. We report here a novel technique called ‘triple-tube-ostomy’ for the treatment of iatrogenic duodenal perforation. Since November 2009, there have been three cases of iatrogenic perforation of the duodenum, due to various causes, which we have treated with our novel technique. The main principles of the technique are biliary diversion, decompression of the duodenum, and early enteral nutrition. All patients who underwent the triple-tube-ostomy procedure had good postoperative courses, with few complications. The novel surgical technique we describe in this report is safe, reliable, easy to learn and perform, and led to a good postoperative course in all cases where we performed it.

  16. Functional and anatomical differences between continent and incontinent men post radical prostatectomy on urodynamics and 3T MRI: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Anne P; Suskind, Anne M; Neer, Charlene; Hussain, Hero; Montgomery, Jeffrey; Latini, Jerilyn M; DeLancey, John O

    2015-08-01

    There are competing hypotheses about the etiology of post prostatectomy incontinence (PPI). The purpose of this study was to determine the anatomical and functional differences between men with and without PPI. Case-control study of continent and incontinent men after radical prostatectomy who underwent functional and anatomic studies with urodynamics and 3.0 Tesla MRI. All men were at least 12 months post prostatectomy and none had a history of pelvic radiation or any prior surgery for incontinence. Baseline demographics, surgical approach, and pathology were similar between incontinent (cases) (n = 14) and continent (controls) (n = 12) men. Among the cases, the average 24 hr pad weight was 400.0 ± 176.9 g with a mean of 2.4 ± 0.7 pads per day. Urethral pressure profiles at rest did not significantly differ between groups; however, with a Kegel maneuver the rise in urethral pressure was 2.6 fold higher in controls. On MRI, the urethral length was 31-35% shorter and the bladder neck was 28.9° more funneled in cases. There were no differences in levator ani muscle size between groups. There was distortion of the sphincter area in 85.7% of cases and in 16.7% of controls (P = 0.001). Men with PPI were not able to increase urethral pressure with a Kegel maneuver despite similar resting urethral pressure profiles. Additionally, incontinent men had shorter urethras and were more likely to have distortion of the sphincter area. All suggesting that the sphincter in men with PPI is both diminutive and poorly functional. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Surgical techniques and curative effect of carotid endarterectomy for carotid artery stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min HAN

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the surgical techniques of carotid endarterectomy (CEA for treating carotid artery stenosis, in order to improve the surgical efficacy and reduce intraoperative adverse events and complications after operation. Methods Retrospective analysis was carried out on surgical data of 53 cases who were performed CEA from October 2010 to October 2013 in Department of Neurosurgery in Tianjin Huanhu Hospital. There were 39 males and 14 females, aged from 40 to 78 years old and mean age (60.34 ± 8.92 years old; the course of disease was from 2 d to 4 years. Twenty-six cases were diagnosed as right carotid stenosis, 15 cases left carotid stenosis and 12 cases double-sided carotid stenosis. Among all of those cases, 35 cases were diagnosed as moderate stenosis (30%-69%, 16 cases severe stenosis (70%-99% , and 2 cases complete occlusion. Results Among 53 patients, 50 patients underwent CEA; 2 cases underwent CEA and aneurysm clipping; one case underwent stent removal surgery and CEA because restenosis was found after carotid artery stenting (CAS. Postoperative neck CTA and fMRI showed good morphology of carotid artery, fluent blood flow and improved cerebral perfusion after operation. All of those patients were followed up for 3 to 24 months. One case died of myocardial infarction; 2 cases appeared skin numbness on the operating side of the neck, and the symptom disappeared 3 months later; one case appeared hoarseness after operation; 3 cases experienced mild transient ischemic attack (TIA and the symptom disappeared 2 months later. No case of stroke was found. Conclusions CEA is a safe and effective surgical approach to treat carotid stenosis. Correct and reasonable choices of the surgical indications and skilled surgical technique are the key to ensure the success of operation and to improve efficacy of the therapy. doi:10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.02.006Video: http://www.cjcnn.org/index.php/cjcnn/pages/view/v14n2a6

  18. An innovative surgical technique for treating penile incarceration injury caused by heavy metallic ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S J Baruah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Penile incarceration injury by heavy metallic ring is a rare genital injury. A man may place metal object for erotic or autoerotic purposes, for masturbation or increasing erection, and due to psychiatric disturbances are some of the reasons for a penile incarceration injury. The incarcerating injury results in reduced blood flow distal to the injury, leading to edema, ischemia, and sometimes gangrene. These injuries are divided into five grades and their treatment options are divided into four groups. Surgical techniques are reserved for the advanced grades (Grades IV and V. We describe an innovative surgical technique, which can be adopted in Grades II and III injuries.

  19. Posterior muscolofascial reconstruction incorporated into urethrovescical anastomosis during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficarra, Vincenzo; Gan, Melanie; Borghesi, Marco; Zattoni, Fabio; Mottrie, Alexandre

    2012-12-01

    The rationale of posterior musculofascial plate reconstruction during radical prostatectomy is to shorten the time to reach urinary continence recovery and to reduce the risk of bleeding and anastomosis leakage. We describe our original technique incorporating the posterior muscolofascial reconstruction into urethrovesical anastomosis using robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). For this reconstructive step, we use a 30-cm V-Loc 90 3-0 barbed suture (V-20 tapered needle). Specifically, the free edge of the posterior layer of the Denonvilliers fascia is approximated to the posterior part of the sphincteric apparatus in a running fashion from left to right. The musculature of the urethral wall is incorporated in this first layer of the running suture. This suture is then continued back to the left in a second layer incorporating the anterior layer of the Denonvilliers fascia (or prostatovesical muscle), the bladder neck, and again the urethra, this time also with urethral mucosa. The urethrovesical anastomosis is completed using a second running barbed suture (15-cm V-Loc 90 3-0 barbed suture, V-20 tapered needle). No intraoperative complications were observed during this step of the procedure. Anastomotic leakages were observed only in 2% of cases. Only 12.5% showed urinary incontinence after catheter removal (1-2 pads). At mean follow-up of 9 months, the urinary continence recovery was 95%, and an anastomosis stricture necessitating an endoscopic incision developed in only three (1.5%) patients. Recent systematic reviews of the literature showed only a minimal advantage in favor of posterior musculofascial reconstruction in terms of urinary continence recovery within 1 month after radical prostatectomy. We support the use of this step of RARP because it is simple, reproducible, with a very limited increase in operative time, and with only a slight risk of potential harm to the patient. Moreover, it could improve hemostasis and provide greater support for a

  20. [Surgical closure of patent ductus arteriosus in premature neonates: Does the surgical technique affect the outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Alvarez, Alejandro; Serantes Lourido, Marta; Barriga Bujan, Rebeca; Blanco Rodriguez, Carolina; Portela-Torron, Francisco; Bautista-Hernandez, Victor

    2017-05-01

    Surgical closure of patent ductus arteriosus in premature neonates is an aggressive technique and is not free of complications. A study was designed with the aim of describing our experience with a less invasive technique, the extra-pleural approach via a posterior minithoracotomy, and to compare the results with the classic transpleural approach. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on premature neonates on whom surgical closure of the ductus was performed during a ten-year period (March 2005 to March 2015). A comparison was made of the acute complications, the outcomes on discharge, and follow-up, between the extra-pleural approach and the classic transpleural approach. The study included 48 patients, 30 in the classical approach and 18 in the extra-pleural group. The demographic and pre-operative characteristics were similar in both groups. No differences were found between the 2 groups in the incidence of acute post-operative complications (56.6 vs. 44.4%), on the dependence on oxygen at 36 weeks (33.3 vs. 55.5%), or in hospital mortality (10 vs. 16.6%). As regards the short-term progress, the extra-pleural group required fewer days until the withdrawal of supplementary oxygen (36.3 vs. 28.9) and until hospital discharge (67.5 vs. 53.2), although only the time until extubation achieved a statistically significant difference (11.5 vs. 2.7, P=.03). The extra-plural approach by posterior minithoracotomy for the surgical closure of ductus in the premature infant is viable and could bring some clinical benefits in the short-term. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. The Effect of Tumor-Prostate Ratio on Biochemical Recurrence after Radical Prostatectomy

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    Sung Yong Cho

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Prostate tumor volume calculated after surgery using pathologic tissue has been shown to be an independent risk factor for biochemical recurrence. Nonetheless, prostate size varies among individuals, regardless of the presence or absence of cancer. We assumed to be lower margin positive rate in the surgical operation, when the prostate volume is larger and the tumor lesion is same. Thus, we defined the tumor-prostate ratio in the ratio of tumor volume to prostate volume. In order to compensate the prostate tumor volume, the effect of tumor-prostate ratio on biochemical recurrence was examined. Materials and Methods: This study included 251 patients who underwent open retropubic radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer in a single hospital. We analyzed the effects of tumor volume and tumor-prostate ratio, as well as the effects of known risk factors for biochemical recurrence, on the duration of disease-free survival. Results: In the univariate analysis, the risk factors that significantly impacted disease-free survival time were found to be a prostate-specific antigen level ≥10 ng/mL, a tumor volume ≥5 mL, tumor-prostate ratio ≥10%, tumor capsular invasion, lymph node invasion, positive surgical margins, and seminal vesicle invasion. In the multivariate analysis performed to evaluate the risk factors found to be significant in the univariate analysis, positive surgical margins (hazard ratio=3.066 and a tumor density ≥10% (hazard ratio=1.991 were shown to be significant risk factors for biochemical recurrence. Conclusions: Tumor-prostate ratio, rather than tumor volume, should be regarded as a significant risk factor for biochemical recurrence.

  2. A new surgical technique for concealed penis using an advanced musculocutaneous scrotal flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong-Seok; Jang, Hoon; Youn, Chang-Shik; Yuk, Seung-Mo

    2015-06-19

    Until recently, no single, universally accepted surgical method has existed for all types of concealed penis repairs. We describe a new surgical technique for repairing concealed penis by using an advanced musculocutaneous scrotal flap. From January 2010 to June 2014, we evaluated 12 patients (12-40 years old) with concealed penises who were surgically treated with an advanced musculocutaneous scrotal flap technique after degloving through a ventral approach. All the patients were scheduled for regular follow-up at 6, 12, and 24 weeks postoperatively. The satisfaction grade for penile size, morphology, and voiding status were evaluated using a questionnaire preoperatively and at all of the follow-ups. Information regarding complications was obtained during the postoperative hospital stay and at all follow-ups. The patients' satisfaction grades, which included the penile size, morphology, and voiding status, improved postoperatively compared to those preoperatively. All patients had penile lymphedema postoperatively; however, this disappeared within 6 weeks. There were no complications such as skin necrosis and contracture, voiding difficulty, or erectile dysfunction. Our advanced musculocutaneous scrotal flap technique for concealed penis repair is technically easy and safe. In addition, it provides a good cosmetic appearance, functional outcomes and excellent postoperative satisfaction grades. Lastly, it seems applicable in any type of concealed penis, including cases in which the ventral skin defect is difficult to cover.

  3. Prostatectomy-based validation of combined urine and plasma test for predicting high grade prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albitar, Maher; Ma, Wanlong; Lund, Lars; Shahbaba, Babak; Uchio, Edward; Feddersen, Søren; Moylan, Donald; Wojno, Kirk; Shore, Neal

    2018-03-01

    Distinguishing between low- and high-grade prostate cancers (PCa) is important, but biopsy may underestimate the actual grade of cancer. We have previously shown that urine/plasma-based prostate-specific biomarkers can predict high grade PCa. Our objective was to determine the accuracy of a test using cell-free RNA levels of biomarkers in predicting prostatectomy results. This multicenter community-based prospective study was conducted using urine/blood samples collected from 306 patients. All recruited patients were treatment-naïve, without metastases, and had been biopsied, designated a Gleason Score (GS) based on biopsy, and assigned to prostatectomy prior to participation in the study. The primary outcome measure was the urine/plasma test accuracy in predicting high grade PCa on prostatectomy compared with biopsy findings. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated using standard formulas, while comparisons between groups were performed using the Wilcoxon Rank Sum, Kruskal-Wallis, Chi-Square, and Fisher's exact test. GS as assigned by standard 10-12 core biopsies was 3 + 3 in 90 (29.4%), 3 + 4 in 122 (39.8%), 4 + 3 in 50 (16.3%), and > 4 + 3 in 44 (14.4%) patients. The urine/plasma assay confirmed a previous validation and was highly accurate in predicting the presence of high-grade PCa (Gleason ≥3 + 4) with sensitivity between 88% and 95% as verified by prostatectomy findings. GS was upgraded after prostatectomy in 27% of patients and downgraded in 12% of patients. This plasma/urine biomarker test accurately predicts high grade cancer as determined by prostatectomy with a sensitivity at 92-97%, while the sensitivity of core biopsies was 78%. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Useful surgical techniques for facial nerve preservation in tumorous intra-temporal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin; Moon, In Seok; Lee, Jong Dae; Shim, Dae Bo; Lee, Won-Sang

    2010-02-01

    The management of the facial nerve in tumorous temporal lesions is particularly challenging due to its complex anatomic location and potential postoperative complications, including permanent facial paralysis. The most important concern regarding surgical treatment of a tumorous temporal lesion is the inevitable facial paralysis caused by nerve injury during the tumor removal, especially in patients with minimal to no preoperative facial nerve dysfunction. We describe successful four cases in which various surgical techniques were developed for the preservation of the facial nerve in treatment of intratemporal tumorous lesions. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. ACL Surgical Technique — Staying Out of Trouble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predescu Vlad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of ACL tear and reconstruction has increased over time, and failure of ACL reconstruction is not perfectly defined among surgeons. Atraumatic failure of ACL surgery represents approximately 70% of causes, and occurs in diagnostic errors, technical errors and problems of ACL graft integrations. Regarding surgical technique, we should answer certain questions about our choice of surgery, tunnel position, graft type, graft suture, tensioning the graft, and how we deal with certain incidents or intraoperative accidents. The purpose of this article is to review the current information and trends of ACL reconstruction, and presents some tips and tricks we use in our current practice.

  6. Phase 1 Trial of Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy Before Prostatectomy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, Bridget F.; Quaranta, Brian P.; Pura, John A.; Lee, W.R.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Gerber, Leah; Haake, Michael; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Robertson, Cary N.; Polascik, Thomas J.; Moul, Judd W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 1 study, the safety of neoadjuvant whole-pelvis radiation therapy (RT) administered immediately before radical prostatectomy in men with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Twelve men enrolled and completed a phase 1 single-institution trial between 2006 and 2010. Eligibility required a previously untreated diagnosis of localized but high-risk prostate cancer. Median follow-up was 46 months (range, 14-74 months). Radiation therapy was dose-escalated in a 3 × 3 design with dose levels of 39.6, 45, 50.4, and 54 Gy. The pelvic lymph nodes were treated up to 45 Gy with any additional dose given to the prostate and seminal vesicles. Radical prostatectomy was performed 4-8 weeks after RT completion. Primary outcome measure was intraoperative and postoperative day-30 morbidity. Secondary measures included late morbidity and oncologic outcomes. Results: No intraoperative morbidity was seen. Chronic urinary grade 2+ toxicity occurred in 42%; 2 patients (17%) developed a symptomatic urethral stricture requiring dilation. Two-year actuarial biochemical recurrence-free survival was 67% (95% confidence interval 34%-86%). Patients with pT3 or positive surgical margin treated with neoadjuvant RT had a trend for improved biochemical recurrence-free survival compared with a historical cohort with similar adverse factors. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant RT is feasible with moderate urinary morbidity. However, oncologic outcomes do not seem to be substantially different from those with selective postoperative RT. If this multimodal approach is further evaluated in a phase 2 setting, 54 Gy should be used in combination with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy to improve biochemical outcomes

  7. Phase 1 Trial of Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy Before Prostatectomy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koontz, Bridget F., E-mail: Bridget.Koontz@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke Prostate Center, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Quaranta, Brian P. [21st Century Oncology, Asheville, North Carolina (United States); Pura, John A. [Division of Biostatistics, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Lee, W.R.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke Prostate Center, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Gerber, Leah [Duke Prostate Center, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Haake, Michael [Southeast Radiation Oncology, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Anscher, Mitchell S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Robertson, Cary N.; Polascik, Thomas J.; Moul, Judd W. [Department of Surgery, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke Prostate Center, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 1 study, the safety of neoadjuvant whole-pelvis radiation therapy (RT) administered immediately before radical prostatectomy in men with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Twelve men enrolled and completed a phase 1 single-institution trial between 2006 and 2010. Eligibility required a previously untreated diagnosis of localized but high-risk prostate cancer. Median follow-up was 46 months (range, 14-74 months). Radiation therapy was dose-escalated in a 3 × 3 design with dose levels of 39.6, 45, 50.4, and 54 Gy. The pelvic lymph nodes were treated up to 45 Gy with any additional dose given to the prostate and seminal vesicles. Radical prostatectomy was performed 4-8 weeks after RT completion. Primary outcome measure was intraoperative and postoperative day-30 morbidity. Secondary measures included late morbidity and oncologic outcomes. Results: No intraoperative morbidity was seen. Chronic urinary grade 2+ toxicity occurred in 42%; 2 patients (17%) developed a symptomatic urethral stricture requiring dilation. Two-year actuarial biochemical recurrence-free survival was 67% (95% confidence interval 34%-86%). Patients with pT3 or positive surgical margin treated with neoadjuvant RT had a trend for improved biochemical recurrence-free survival compared with a historical cohort with similar adverse factors. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant RT is feasible with moderate urinary morbidity. However, oncologic outcomes do not seem to be substantially different from those with selective postoperative RT. If this multimodal approach is further evaluated in a phase 2 setting, 54 Gy should be used in combination with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy to improve biochemical outcomes.

  8. Phase II prospective randomized trial of weight loss prior to radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Susanne M; Galet, Colette; Gollapudi, Kiran; Byrd, Joshua B; Liang, Pei; Li, Zhaoping; Grogan, Tristan; Elashoff, David; Magyar, Clara E; Said, Jonathan; Cohen, Pinchas; Aronson, William J

    2017-12-04

    Obesity is associated with poorly differentiated and advanced prostate cancer and increased mortality. In preclinical models, caloric restriction delays prostate cancer progression and prolongs survival. We sought to determine if weight loss (WL) in men with prostate cancer prior to radical prostatectomy affects tumor apoptosis and proliferation, and if WL effects other metabolic biomarkers. In this Phase II prospective trial, overweight and obese men scheduled for radical prostatectomy were randomized to a 5-8 week WL program consisting of standard structured energy-restricted meal plans (1200-1500 Kcal/day) and physical activity or to a control group. The primary endpoint was apoptotic index in the radical prostatectomy malignant epithelium. Secondary endpoints were proliferation (Ki67) in the radical prostatectomy tissue, body weight, body mass index (BMI), waist to hip ratio, body composition, and serum PSA, insulin, triglyceride, cholesterol, testosterone, estradiol, leptin, adiponectin, interleukin 6, interleukin 8, insulin-like growth factor 1, and IGF binding protein 1. In total 23 patients were randomized to the WL intervention and 21 patients to the control group. Subjects in the intervention group had significantly more weight loss (WL:-3.7 ± 0.5 kg; Control:-1.6 ± 0.5 kg; p = 0.007) than the control group and total fat mass was significantly reduced (WL:-2.1 ± 0.4; Control: 0.1 ± 0.3; p = 0.015). There was no significant difference in apoptotic or proliferation index between the groups. Among the other biomarkers, triglyceride, and insulin levels were significantly decreased in the WL compared with the control group. In summary, this short-term WL program prior to radical prostatectomy resulted in significantly more WL in the intervention vs. the control group and was accompanied by significant reductions in body fat mass, circulating triglycerides, and insulin. However, no significant changes were observed in malignant

  9. Parameters of two-dimensional perineal ultrasonography for evaluation of urinary incontinence after Radical Prostatectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Danilo Souza Lima da Costa Cruz; Carlos Arturo Levi D’Ancona; Jamal Baracat; Marco Antonio Dionisio Alves; Marcelo Cartapatti; Ronaldo Damião

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Urinary incontinence remains a major concern for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Its prevalence can reach 20% in the late postoperative period. Materials and Methods This clinical study investigated the differences of a dynamic evaluation of the urethra and pelvic floor contraction using perineal ultrasound in men without prostate surgery and in men submitted to radical prostatectomy with and without stress urinary incontinence. Ninety two male patients were includ...

  10. Microscope-integrated intraoperative optical coherence tomography-guided small-incision lenticule extraction: New surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Namrata; Urkude, Jayanand; Chaniyara, Manthan; Titiyal, Jeewan S

    2017-10-01

    We describe the surgical technique of microscope-integrated intraoperative optical coherence tomography (OCT)-guided small-incision lenticule extraction. The technique enables manual tracking of surgical instruments and identification of the desired dissection plane. It also helps discern the relation between the dissector and the intrastromal lenticule. The dissection plane becomes hyperreflective on dissection, ensuring complete separation of the intrastromal lenticule from the overlying and underlying stroma. Inadvertent posterior plane entry, cap-lenticule adhesion, incomplete separation of the lenticule, creation of a false plane, and lenticule remnants may be recognized intraoperatively so corrective steps can be taken immediately. In cases with a hazy overlying cap, microscope-integrated intraoperative OCT enables localization and extraction of the lenticule. The technique is helpful for inexperienced surgeons, especially in cases with low amplitudes of refractive errors, ie, thin lenticules. Copyright © 2017 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Immediate or early delayed?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottke, D.; Bartkowiak, D.; Schrader, M.; Wiegel, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy (RP) is associated with risk indicators, including Gleason score, preoperative PSA level, tumor stage, seminal vesicle invasion, and positive surgical margins. The 5-year biochemical progression rate among predisposed patients is as high as 50-70%. Post-RP treatment options include adjuvant radiotherapy (ART, for men with undetectable PSA) or salvage radiotherapy (SRT, for PSA persisting or re-rising above detection threshold). Presently, there are no published randomized trials evaluating ART vs. SRT directly. Methods: Published data on ART and SRT were reviewed to allow a comparison of the two treatment approaches. Results: Three randomized phase III trials demonstrated an almost 20% absolute benefit for biochemical progression-free survival after ART (60-64 Gy) compared to a 'wait and see' policy. The greatest benefit was achieved in patients with positive margins and pT3 tumors. SRT can be offered to patients with elevated PSA after RP. In 30-70% of SRT patients, PSA will decrease to an undetectable level, thus giving a second curative chance. The rate of side effects for both treatments is comparably low. The role of irradiation of pelvic lymph nodes and the additional use of hormone therapy and radiation dose are discussed. Conclusion: It remains unclear whether early SRT initiated after PSA failure is equivalent to ART. Where SRT is indicated, it should be started as early as possible. (orig.)

  12. Real-time surgical simulation for deformable soft-tissue objects with a tumour using Boundary Element techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P.; Becker, A. A.; Jones, I. A.; Glover, A. T.; Benford, S. D.; Vloeberghs, M.

    2009-08-01

    A virtual-reality real-time simulation of surgical operations that incorporates the inclusion of a hard tumour is presented. The software is based on Boundary Element (BE) technique. A review of the BE formulation for real-time analysis of two-domain deformable objects, using the pre-solution technique, is presented. The two-domain BE software is incorporated into a surgical simulation system called VIRS to simulate the initiation of a cut on the surface of the soft tissue and extending the cut deeper until the tumour is reached.

  13. Real-time surgical simulation for deformable soft-tissue objects with a tumour using Boundary Element techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, P; Becker, A A; Jones, I A; Glover, A T; Benford, S D; Vloeberghs, M

    2009-01-01

    A virtual-reality real-time simulation of surgical operations that incorporates the inclusion of a hard tumour is presented. The software is based on Boundary Element (BE) technique. A review of the BE formulation for real-time analysis of two-domain deformable objects, using the pre-solution technique, is presented. The two-domain BE software is incorporated into a surgical simulation system called VIRS to simulate the initiation of a cut on the surface of the soft tissue and extending the cut deeper until the tumour is reached.

  14. Minimally invasive corticotomy in orthodontics: a new technique using a CAD/CAM surgical template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassetta, M; Pandolfi, S; Giansanti, M

    2015-07-01

    Accelerating orthodontic tooth movement is a topical issue. Despite the different techniques described in the literature, the corticotomy is the only effective and safe means of accelerating orthodontic tooth movement. Although effective, the corticotomy presents significant postoperative discomfort. The aggressive nature of these particular methods, related to the elevation of mucoperiosteal flaps and to the length of the surgery, has resulted in reluctance to proceed with this technique among both patients and the dental community. To overcome the disadvantages of the corticotomy, this technical note describes an innovative, minimally invasive, flapless procedure combining piezoelectric surgical cortical micro-incisions with the use of a 3D Printed CAD/CAM surgical guide. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Testing the assessment of new radiation oncology technology and treatments framework using the evaluation of post-prostatectomy radiotherapy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchesne, Gillian M.; Haworth, Annette; Hornby, Colin; Bone, Eric; Carter, Hannah; Martin, Andrew; Ebert, Martin A.; Gagliardi, Frank; Gibbs, Adrian; Sidhom, Mark; Wood, Maree; Jackson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We tested the ability of the Assessment of New Radiation Oncology Technology and Treatments framework to determine the clinical efficacy and safety of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compared with 3-dimensional radiation therapy (3DCRT) for post-prostatectomy radiation therapy (PPRT) to support its timely health economic evaluation. Treatment plans produced using FROGG guidelines provided dosimetry parameters for both techniques at 64 Gy and 70 Gy and were also used to model early and late outcome probabilities. Clinical parameters were derived from early toxicity and quality of life patient data, systematic literature review and expert opinion. Dosimetry parameters were correlated with the measures of clinical efficacy and safety. Data from two patient cohorts (29 and 27 respectively) were collected within the project timeframe, providing evidence for acute toxicity and quality of life, and dosimetric comparisons. Relative rates of tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue control probability (NTCP) modelling were readily derived from the planning exercise and demonstrated advantages in uncomplicated TCP for IMRT over 3DCRT, predominantly due to normal tissue sparing. The safety of IMRT delivery was demonstrated with TCP uncompromised by IMRT protocol violations, which achieved rectal sparing only by reducing minimum target dose and coverage. Sources of desk-top and patient-based evidence were successfully used to demonstrate potential improved clinical efficacy and safety of applying dose escalation using IMRT instead of 3DCRT in PPRT.

  16. Meta-analysis of comparison between brachytherapy and radical prostatectomy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Xiaodong; Jiang Qing; Yuan Gengbiao; Wang Jiawu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the therapeutic effect of brachytherapy and radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer using a Meta-analysis. Methods: The published data with randomized control trials (RCT) on comparison of brachytherapy and radical prostatectomy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer in PubMed, Wanfang database, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBMdisc), the Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Ovid and Cochrane library were searched and screened. The quality of the studies included was evaluated and the data with 5-year event free survival rate for comparison were extracted. Meta-analysis was performed by RevMan 5.0 (Cochrane reviews software). Results: From six trials, there were 5903 patients that were eligible for the analysis, in which 3323 patients were treated by brachytherapy and other 2580 by radical prostatectomy. The odds ratio of all trials was 1.00 (95% CI: 0.69-1.45, P=0.99) and there was no significant difference of 5-year event free survival rate between two treatment groups. Conclusion: This Meta analysis shows that brachytherapy may have comparable treatment effect than radical prostatectomy. (authors)

  17. Larger Maximum Tumor Diameter at Radical Prostatectomy Is Associated With Increased Biochemical Failure, Metastasis, and Death From Prostate Cancer After Salvage Radiation for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Skyler B.; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Jackson, William C.; Zhou, Jessica; Foster, Benjamin; Foster, Corey; Song, Yeohan; Li, Darren; Palapattu, Ganesh S.; Kunju, Lakshmi; Mehra, Rohit; Sandler, Howard; Feng, Felix Y.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the maximum tumor diameter (MTD) of the dominant prostate cancer nodule in the radical prostatectomy specimen as a prognostic factor for outcome in patients treated with salvage external beam radiation therapy (SRT) for a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: From an institutional cohort of 575 patients treated with SRT, data on MTD were retrospectively collected. The impact of MTD on biochemical failure (BF), metastasis, and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) was assessed on univariate and multivariate analysis using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models. Results: In the 173 patients with MTD data available, median follow-up was 77 months (interquartile range, 47-104 months) after SRT, and median MTD was 18 mm (interquartile range, 13-22 mm). Increasing MTD correlated with increasing pT stage, Gleason score, presence of seminal vesicle invasion, and lymph node invasion. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis identified MTD of >14 mm to be the optimal cut-point. On univariate analysis, MTD >14 mm was associated with an increased risk of BF (P=.02, hazard ratio [HR] 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-2.8), metastasis (P=.002, HR 4.0, 95% CI 2.1-7.5), and PCSM (P=.02, HR 8.0, 95% CI 2.9-21.8). On multivariate analysis MTD >14 mm remained associated with increased BF (P=.02, HR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.2), metastasis (P=.02, HR 3.4, 95% CI 1.2-9.2), and PCSM (P=.05, HR 9.7, 95% CI 1.0-92.4), independent of extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, positive surgical margins, pre-RT PSA value, Gleason score, and pre-RT PSA doubling time. Conclusions: For patients treated with SRT for a rising PSA value after prostatectomy, MTD at time of radical prostatectomy is independently associated with BF, metastasis, and PCSM. Maximum tumor diameter should be incorporated into clinical decision making and future clinical risk assessment tools for those patients

  18. Ability to Reach Orgasm in Patients with Prostate Cancer Treated with Robot-assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østby-Deglum, Marie; Axcrona, K; Brennhovd, B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To study the ability to reach orgasm after robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) in relation to demographic, cancer-related, and surgical variables, and the use of erectile aids. Methods In this cross-sectional study at a mean of 3 years after RALP at Oslo University Hospital......, 982 men were invited to complete a mailed questionnaire, and 777 responded. Respondents who reported postoperative radiotherapy or hormone treatment, or did not report on orgasm were omitted, leaving 609 patients for analysis. Ability to reach orgasm was rated on 1 question from The Expanded Prostate...... Cancer Index Composite 26-item version, and dichotomized into "good" or "poor." Results Overall, 27% of the men reported good ability to reach orgasm: 22% among those did not use erectile aids and 34% among those did (P =.001). Univariate analysis of men with good versus poor ability to reach orgasm...

  19. Anatomic Boundaries of the Clinical Target Volume (Prostate Bed) After Radical Prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiltshire, Kirsty L.; Brock, Kristy K.; Haider, Masoom A.; Zwahlen, Daniel; Kong, Vickie; Chan, Elisa; Moseley, Joanne; Bayley, Andrew; Catton, Charles; Chung, Peter W.M.; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Milosevic, Michael; Kneebone, Andrew; Warde, Padraig; Menard, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to derive and validate an interdisciplinary consensus definition for the anatomic boundaries of the postoperative clinical target volume (CTV, prostate bed). Methods and Materials: Thirty one patients who had planned for radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy were enrolled and underwent computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) simulation prior to radiotherapy. Through an iterative process of consultation and discussion, an interdisciplinary consensus definition was derived based on a review of published data, patterns of local failure, surgical practice, and radiologic anatomy. In validation, we analyzed the distribution of surgical clips in reference to the consensus CTV and measured spatial uncertainties in delineating the CTV and vesicourethral anastomosis. Clinical radiotherapy plans were retrospectively evaluated against the consensus CTV (prostate bed). Results: Anatomic boundaries of the consensus CTV (prostate bed) are described. Surgical clips (n = 339) were well distributed throughout the CTV. The vesicourethral anastomosis was accurately localized using central sagittal computed tomography reconstruction, with a mean ± standard deviation uncertainty of 1.8 ± 2.5 mm. Delineation uncertainties were small for both MRI and computed tomography (mean reproducibility, 0-3.8 mm; standard deviation, 1.0-2.3); they were most pronounced in the anteroposterior and superoinferior dimensions and at the superior/posterior-most aspect of the CTV. Retrospectively, the mean ± standard deviation CTV (prostate bed) percentage of volume receiving 100% of prescribed dose was only 77% ± 26%. Conclusions: We propose anatomic boundaries for the CTV (prostate bed) and present evidence supporting its validity. In the absence of gross recurrence, the role of MRI in delineating the CTV remains to be confirmed. The CTV is larger than historically practiced at our institution and should be encompassed by a microscopic tumoricidal dose

  20. Robotic-assisted partial nephrectomy: surgical technique using a 3-arm approach and sliding-clip renorrhaphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M. Cabello

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: For the treatment of renal tumors, minimally invasive nephron-sparing surgery has become increasingly performed due to proven efficiency and excellent functional and oncological outcomes. The introduction of robotics into urologic laparoscopic surgery has allowed surgeons to perform challenging procedures in a reliable and reproducible manner. We present our surgical technique for robotic assisted partial nephrectomy (RPN using a 3-arm approach, including a sliding-clip renorrhaphy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Our RPN technique is presented which describes the trocar positioning, hilar dissection, tumor identification using intraoperative ultrasound for margin determination, selective vascular clamping, tumor resection, and reconstruction using a sliding-clip technique. CONCLUSION: RPN using a sliding-clip renorrhaphy is a valid and reproducible surgical technique that reduces the challenge of the procedure by taking advantage of the enhanced visualization and control afforded by the robot. The renorrhaphy described is performed under complete control of the console surgeon, and has demonstrated a reduction in the warm ischemia times in our series.

  1. Pigment dispersion syndrome associated with intraocular lens implantation: a new surgical technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Isabel Canut Jordana

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available M Isabel Canut Jordana1, Daniel Pérez Formigó1, Rodrigo Abreu González2, Jeroni Nadal Reus11Barraquer Ophthalmology Centre, Barcelona, Spain; 2University Hospital of La Candelaria, Tenerife, SpainAims: We report the case of a myopic patient who, after intraocular lens transplant in the posterior chamber, suffered elevated intraocular pressure due to pigment dispersion, with recurrent episodes of blurred vision. The patient was treated with a new surgical technique that can avoid potential iridolenticular contact.Methods: Complete ophthalmologic examination and optical coherence tomography (OCT of the anterior segment were performed.Results: Contact between the pigmentary epithelium and the iris with an intraocular lens was revealed by utrasound biomicroscopy and OCT. In this case, Nd:YAG laser iridotomy and laser iridoplasty were not effective for iridolenticular separation and control of the pigment dispersion. We propose a new technique: stitches on the surface of the iris to obtain good iridolenticular separation and good intraocular pressure control.Conclusion: Stitches on the iris surface should be considered as optional therapy in pigmentary glaucoma secondary to intraocular lens implantation. This surgical technique can avoid potential iridolenticular contacts more definitively.Keywords: pigmentary glaucoma, intraocular lens, optical coherence tomography, laser

  2. Validation study of a web-based assessment of functional recovery after radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickers Andrew J

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Good clinical care of prostate cancer patients after radical prostatectomy depends on careful assessment of post-operative morbidities, yet physicians do not always judge patient symptoms accurately. Logistical problems associated with using paper questionnaire limit their use in the clinic. We have implemented a web-interface ("STAR" for patient-reported outcomes after radical prostatectomy. Methods We analyzed data on the first 9 months of clinical implementation to evaluate the validity of the STAR questionnaire to assess functional outcomes following radical prostatectomy. We assessed response rate, internal consistency within domains, and the association between survey responses and known predictors of sexual and urinary function, including age, time from surgery, nerve sparing status and co-morbidities. Results Of 1581 men sent an invitation to complete the instrument online, 1235 responded for a response rate of 78%. Cronbach's alpha was 0.84, 0.86 and 0.97 for bowel, urinary and sexual function respectively. All known predictors of sexual and urinary function were significantly associated with survey responses in the hypothesized direction. Conclusions We have found that web-based assessment of functional recovery after radical prostatectomy is practical and feasible. The instrument demonstrated excellent psychometric properties, suggested that validity is maintained when questions are transferred from paper to electronic format and when patients give responses that they know will be seen by their doctor and added to their clinic record. As such, our system allows ready implementation of patient-reported outcomes into routine clinical practice.

  3. [Endoscopic calcaneoplasty (ECP) in Haglund's syndrome. Indication, surgical technique, surgical findings and results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerosch, J; Sokkar, S; Dücker, M; Donner, A

    2012-06-01

    Posterior calcaneal exostosis treatment modalities have given rise to many controversial opinions. After failure of the conservative treatment, surgical bursectomy and resection of the calcaneal exostosis are indicated by many authors. But clinical studies also show a high rate of unsatisfactory results with a relative high incidence of complications. The minimally invasive surgical technique by an endoscopic calcaneoplasty (ECP) could be an option to overcome some of these problems. Between 1999 und 2010 we operated 164 patients with an age range between 16 and 67 years, 81 males and 83 females. The radiological examination prior to surgery documented in all cases a posterior superior calcaneal exostosis that showed friction to the Achilles tendon. All patients included in the study had no clinical varus of the hind foot, nor cavus deformities. All patients had undergone a trial of conservative treatment for at least 6 months and did not show a positive response. The average follow-up was 46.3 (range: 8-120) months. According to the Ogilvie-Harris score 71 patients presented good and 84 patients excellent results, while 5 patients showed fair results, and 4 patients only poor results. All the post-operative radiographs showed sufficient resection of the calcaneal spur. In 61 patients the preoperative MRI showed a partial rupture of the Achilles tendon close to the insertion side. In no case could we observe a complete tear at the time of follow-up. Only minor postoperative complications were observed. In many patients we could observe a chondral layer at the posterior aspect of the calcaneus. Close to the intersion the Achilles tendon showed also in many patients a chondroide metaplasia. ECP is an effective and minimally invasive procedure for the treatment of patients with calcaneal exostosis. After a short learning curve the endoscopic exposure is superior to the open technique, has less morbidity, less operating time, and nearly no complications. Moreover, the

  4. "Two-step" technique with OsiriXTM to evaluate feasibility of C2 pedicle for surgical fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miguel Sousa Marques

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical treatment of craniovertebral junction pathology has evolved considerably in recent decades with the implementation of short atlanto-axial fixation techniques, notwhithstanding increasing neurovascular risks. Also, there is strong evidence that fixation of C2 anatomical pedicle has the best biomechanical profile of the entire cervical spine. However, it is often difficult and misleading, to evaluate anatomical bony and vascular anomalies using the three orthogonal planes (axial, coronal, and sagittal of CT. Objectives: The authors describe an innovative and simple technique to evaluate the feasibility of C2 pedicle for surgical screw fixation using preoperative planning with the free DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine software OsiriX TM . Materials and Methods: The authors report the applicatin of this novel technique in 5 cases (3 traumatic, 1 Os Odontoideum, and 1 complex congenital malformation collected from our general case series of the Department in the last 5 years. Results: In this "proof of concept" study, the pre-operative analysis with the "two-step" tecnique was detrimental for choosing the surgical tecnique. Detailed post-operative analysis confirmed correct position of C2 screws without cortical breach. There were no complications or mortality reported. Conclusion: This "two-step" technique is an easy and reliable way to determine the feasibility of C2 pedicle for surgical fixation. The detailed tridimensional radiological preoperative evaluation of craniovertebral junction anatomy is critical to the sucess and safety of this surgeries, and can avoid, to certain degree, expensive intra-operative tridimensional imaging facilities.

  5. Intestinal vaginoplasty revisited: a review of surgical techniques, complications, and sexual function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouman, Mark-Bram; van Zeijl, Michiel C T; Buncamper, Marlon E; Meijerink, Wilhelmus J H J; van Bodegraven, Ad A; Mullender, Margriet G

    2014-07-01

    Vaginal (re)construction is essential for the psychological well-being of biological women with a dysfunctional vagina and male-to-female transgender women. However, the preferred method for vagina (re)construction with respect to functional as well as aesthetic outcomes is debated. Regarding intestinal vaginoplasty, despite the asserted advantages, the need for intestinal surgery and subsequent risk of diversion colitis are often-mentioned concerns. The outcomes of vaginal reconstructive surgery need to be appraised in order to improve understanding of pros and cons. To review literature on surgical techniques and clinical outcomes of intestinal vaginoplasty. Electronic databases and reference lists of published articles were searched for primary studies on intestinal vaginoplasty. Studies were included if these included at least five patients and had a minimal follow-up period of 1 year. No constraints were imposed with regard to patient age, indication for vaginoplasty, or applied surgical technique. Outcome measures were extracted and analyzed. Main outcome measures were surgical procedure, clinical outcomes, and outcomes concerning sexual health and quality of life. Twenty-one studies on intestinal vaginoplasty were included (including 894 patients in total). All studies had a retrospective design and were of low quality. Prevalence and severity of procedure-related complications were low. The main postoperative complication was introital stenosis, necessitating surgical correction in 4.1% of sigmoid-derived and 1.2% of ileum-derived vaginoplasties. Neither diversion colitis nor cancer was reported. Sexual satisfaction rate was high, but standardized questionnaires were rarely used. Quality of life was not reported. Based on evidence presently available, it seems that intestinal vaginoplasty is associated with low complication rates. To substantiate these findings and to obtain information about functional outcomes and quality of life, prospective studies

  6. One-Step Cartilage Repair Technique as a Next Generation of Cell Therapy for Cartilage Defects: Biological Characteristics, Preclinical Application, Surgical Techniques, and Clinical Developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Cai, You-Zhi; Lin, Xiang-Jin

    2016-07-01

    To provide a comprehensive overview of the basic science rationale, surgical technique, and clinical outcomes of 1-step cartilage repair technique used as a treatment strategy for cartilage defects. A systematic review was performed in the main medical databases to evaluate the several studies concerning 1-step procedures for cartilage repair. The characteristics of cell-seed scaffolds, behavior of cells seeded into scaffolds, and surgical techniques were also discussed. Clinical outcomes and quality of repaired tissue were assessed using several standardized outcome assessment tools, magnetic resonance imaging scans, and biopsy histology. One-step cartilage repair could be divided into 2 types: chondrocyte-matrix complex (CMC) and autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC), both of which allow a simplified surgical approach. Studies with Level IV evidence have shown that 1-step cartilage repair techniques could significantly relieve symptoms and improve functional assessment (P studies clearly showed hyaline-like cartilage tissue in biopsy tissues by second-look arthroscopy. The 1-step cartilage repair technique, with its potential for effective, homogeneous distribution of chondrocytes and multipotent stem cells on the surface of the cartilage defect, is able to regenerate hyaline-like cartilage tissue, and it could be applied to cartilage repair by arthroscopy. Level IV, systematic review of Level II and IV studies. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of different surgical techniques in the management of subluxated cataractous lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldakaf, A; Bakir, H; Almogahed, A; Carstocea, Benone

    2007-01-01

    To compare and evaluate the outcome of different surgical techniques in the management of subluxated cataractous lens. This retrospective study included 18 eyes of 18 patients with subluxated cataracts of varying etiology. Their preoperative examination maintain included: best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), thorough anterior segment examination, by slit -lamp especially for the degree and extent of subluxation and cataract, cornea, iris and the pupil for other abnormalities or other traumatic signs, presence or absence of vitreous in the anterior chamber, IOP and finally fundus examination. The patients were then divided into 3 groups each comprising 6 patients. The first group underwent ECCE with sulcus implantation PMMA IOL , the second and third groups underwent phacoemulsification with bag implanted Acrylic IOL but the third group underwent special techniques and precautions during surgery. Postoperatively, all patients were examined for BCVA, IOP, IOL positioning, pupil, fundus examination. Thirteen patients were males and five were females. The etiology of subluxation was traumatic in ten males and two female. The ages of the patients were between 11 and 62 years old the post operative follow up period ranged between 7 and 16 months. No major intraoperative complications were noted. In the 1st group 2 patients underwent AC automated vitrectomy, 3 in the 2nd group, 1 in the 3rd group. Three patients needed scleral fixation suture . Thirteen patients had well centered IOL and 4 had slight decentration not necessitating further intervention and one in the 2nd group had clinically significant decentration where IOL explanation, widening of the wound and re implantation of a wide 6.5mm optic PMMA IOL was done in the second post operative daily. Subluxated cataracts need special precautions in the chosen surgical technique to maintain a reasonable safety level intraoperatively and an acceptable surgical.

  8. The new era of minimally invasive interventions for prostate cancer: robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and focal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schatloff O

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Oscar Schatloff1, Alyssa S Louis2, Uri Lindner21Global Robotics Institute, Florida Hospital Celebration Health, Celebration, FL, USA; 2Division of Urology, Department of Surgical Oncology, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, CanadaAbstract: Prostate cancer remains a common but highly treatable disease. Innovations in prostate cancer treatment have allowed a transition toward minimally invasive approaches in an attempt to avoid treatment-related morbidities. In the middle of the treatment spectrum between radical open surgeries and active surveillance lies robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP and focal therapy (FT. This review sets out the most current information on RALP and FT (including laser ablation, cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, and irreversible electroporation.Keywords: PCa, RALP, FT, laser ablation, cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, irreversible electroporation

  9. Long-term decision regret after post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, Thomas P; Chin, Stephen; Manuel, Lucy; Wen, Shelly; Hoffman, Matthew; Wilcox, Shea W; Aherne, Noel J

    2017-02-01

    Decision regret (DR) may occur when a patient believes their outcome would have been better if they had decided differently about their management. Although some studies investigate DR after treatment for localised prostate cancer, none report DR in patients undergoing surgery and post-prostatectomy radiotherapy. We evaluated DR in this group of patients overall, and for specific components of therapy. We surveyed 83 patients, with minimum 5 years follow-up, treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) and post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) to 64-66 Gy following www.EviQ.org.au protocols. A validated questionnaire identified DR if men either indicated that they would have been better off had they chosen another treatment, or they wished they could change their mind about treatment. There was an 85.5% response rate, with median follow-up post-IMRT 78 months. Adjuvant IG-IMRT was used in 28% of patients, salvage in 72% and ADT in 48%. A total of 70% of patients remained disease-free. Overall, 16.9% of patients expressed DR for treatment, with fourfold more regret for the RP component of treatment compared to radiotherapy (16.9% vs 4.2%, P = 0.01). DR for androgen deprivation was 14.3%. Patients were regretful of surgery due to toxicity, not being adequately informed about radiotherapy as an alternative, positive margins and surgery costs (83%, 33%, 25% and 8% of regretful patients respectively). Toxicity caused DR in the three radiotherapy-regretful and four ADT-regretful patients. Patients were twice as regretful overall, and of surgery, for salvage vs adjuvant approaches (both 19.6% vs 10.0%). Decision regret after RP and post-prostatectomy IG-IMRT is uncommon, although patients regret RP more than post-operative IG-IMRT. This should reassure urologists referring patients for post-prostatectomy IG-IMRT, particularly in the immediate adjuvant setting. Other implications include appropriate patient selection for RP (and

  10. Monotherapy of androgen deprivation therapy versus radical prostatectomy among veterans with localized prostate cancer: comparative effectiveness analysis of retrospective cohorts

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    Liu J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Jinan Liu1,2, Lizheng Shi1,2,3, Oliver Sartor31Tulane University, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, 2Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System, Tulane University, 3School of Medicine and Tulane Cancer Center, New Orleans, LA, USABackground: This retrospective cohort study aimed to examine the comparative effectiveness of monotherapy of primary androgen deprivation therapy or radical prostatectomy.Methods: Male patients with localized prostate cancer (T1-T2, N0, M0 were identified in the Veterans Affairs Veterans Integrated Service Network 16 data warehouse (January 2003 to June 2006, with one-year baseline and at least three-year follow-up data (until June 2009. Patients were required to be 18–75 years old and without other recorded cancer history. The initiation of primary androgen deprivation therapy or monotherapy of radical prostatectomy within six months after the first diagnosis of prostate cancer was used as the index date. Primary androgen deprivation therapy patients were matched to the radical prostatectomy patients via propensity score, which was predicted from a logistic regression of treatment selection (primary androgen deprivation therapy versus radical prostatectomy on age, race, marital status, insurance type, cancer stage, Charlson comorbidity index, and alcohol and tobacco use. The overall survival from initiation of index treatment was then analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional hazards model.Results: The two cohorts were well matched at baseline (all P > 0.05. During a median follow-up of 4.3 years, the cumulative incidence of death was 13 (10.57% among 123 primary androgen deprivation therapy patients and four (3.25% among 123 radical prostatectomy patients (P < 0.05. The overall three-year survival rate was 92.68% for primary androgen deprivation therapy and 98.37% for radical prostatectomy (P < 0.05. Patients who received primary androgen deprivation therapy had almost three times as

  11. Is There a Concordance Between the Gleason Scores of Needle Biopsy and Radical Prostatectomy Specimens in Prostatic Carsinoma?

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    Faruk Özgör

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the concordance between the Gleason Scores (GS of prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimens. Methods: Prostate biopsy was performed in 1135 patients with the suspicion of prostate cancer in our clinic between 2008 and 2012. A total of 366 patients were diagnosed with prostate cancer. Radical prostatectomy was performed in 73 of these patients and GS of pathology specimens were included in this study for comparison. The patients were divided into three groups (low intermediate- and high-risk patients according to the D’amico risk classification for prostate cancer. Results: The median age of the patients was 64.2±6.1 years (54- 73. The mean prostate specific antigen level was 20.34 ng/mL and the mean biopsy core number was 12±0.58. A statistically significant concordance was detected between the GS of biopsy specimens and radical prostatectomy materials in 65.7% of patients (p<0.01. There were 40 patients in the low-risk group, however, 8 (20% of them were identified to be intermediate-risk patients and one (2.5% was found to be a high-risk patient after radical prostatectomy. Conclusion: Concordance between the GS of prostate biopsy and radical prostatectomy materials are important for selection of the appropriate treatment

  12. A new technique in the surgical treatment of Hangman's fractures: Neurospinal Academy (NSA) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbayrak, Sedat; Yaman, Onur; Yılmaz, Mesut

    2013-07-01

    Treatment of Hangman's fractures is still controversial. Hangman's fractures Type II and IIA are usually treated with surgical procedures. This study aims at describing the Neurospinal Academy (NSA) technique as an attempt to achieve an approximation of the fracture line to the axis body, which may be used for Type II and IIA patients with severe displacement and angulation. NSA technique both pars or pedicle screws are placed bicortically to ensure that anterior surface of C2 vertebral body will be crossed 1-2 mm. A rod is prepared in suitable length and curve to connect the two screws. For placing the rod, sufficient amount of bone is resected from the C2 spinous process. C2 vertebral body is pulled back by means of the screws that crossed the anterior surface of C2 vertebral body. Hangman II and IIA patient are treated with NSA technique. Angulated and tilted C2 vertebral body was pulled back and approximated to posterior elements. In Hangman's fractures Type II and IIA with severe vertebral body and pedicle displacement, NSA technique is an effective and reliable treatment alternative for the approximation of posterior elements to the C2 vertebral body, which is tilted, angulated, and dislocated.

  13. Reduction in PSA messenger-RNA expression and clinical recurrence in patients with prostatic cancer undergoing neoadjuvant therapy before radical prostatectomy

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    Baruffi Marco

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We assessed the incidence of micro-metastases at surgical margins (SM and pelvic lymph nodes (LN in patients submitted to radical retropubic prostatectomy (RP after neoadjuvant therapy (NT or to RP alone. We compared traditional staging to molecular detection of PSA using Taqman-based quantitative real-time PCR (qrt-PCR never used before for this purpose. Methods 29 patients were assigned to NT plus RP (arm A or RP alone (arm B. Pelvic LN were dissected for qrt-PCR analysis, together with right and left lateral SM. Results 64,3% patients of arm B and 26.6% of arm A had evidence of PSA mRNA expression in LN and/or SM. 17,2% patients, all of arm B, had biochemical recurrence. Conclusions Qrt-PCR may be more sensitive, compared to conventional histology, in identifying presence of viable prostate carcinoma cells in SM and LN. Gene expression of PSA in surgical periprostatic samples might be considered as a novel and reliable indicator of minimal residual disease after NT.

  14. Reduction in PSA messenger-RNA expression and clinical recurrence in patients with prostatic cancer undergoing neoadjuvant therapy before radical prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Marco; Lania, Caterina; Blanco, Salvatore; Baruffi, Marco; Mocellin, Simone

    2004-01-01

    Background We assessed the incidence of micro-metastases at surgical margins (SM) and pelvic lymph nodes (LN) in patients submitted to radical retropubic prostatectomy (RP) after neoadjuvant therapy (NT) or to RP alone. We compared traditional staging to molecular detection of PSA using Taqman-based quantitative real-time PCR (qrt-PCR) never used before for this purpose. Methods 29 patients were assigned to NT plus RP (arm A) or RP alone (arm B). Pelvic LN were dissected for qrt-PCR analysis, together with right and left lateral SM. Results 64,3% patients of arm B and 26.6% of arm A had evidence of PSA mRNA expression in LN and/or SM. 17,2% patients, all of arm B, had biochemical recurrence. Conclusions Qrt-PCR may be more sensitive, compared to conventional histology, in identifying presence of viable prostate carcinoma cells in SM and LN. Gene expression of PSA in surgical periprostatic samples might be considered as a novel and reliable indicator of minimal residual disease after NT. PMID:15104791

  15. A Novel Surgical Technique for Fixation of Recurrent Acromioclavicular Dislocations: AC Dog Bone Technique in Combination with Autogenous Semitendinosus Tendon Graft

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    Patrick Holweg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Various surgical techniques have been described for the fixation of acromioclavicular (AC dislocations. However, recurrent dislocation is one of the main complications associated with the majority of these techniques. We report a case of postoperative AC joint redislocation. In order to overcome recurrent dislocation after revision surgery, a reconstruction of the conoid and trapezoid ligament with the use of a free tendon graft in combination with a FiberTape was provided within a novel surgical technique. After 12 months, the patient was very satisfied with the functional outcome. The patient achieved excellent results in the Constant (98 points, SPADI (0 points, and QuickDASH score (0 points. The described technique results in an anatomic reconstruction of the AC joint. The nonrigid nature of the intervention seems to restore the normal arthrokinematics by reconstructing the coracoclavicular ligaments with an autograft which is then protected by the AC Dog Bone artificial ligaments during the healing period. The arthroscopic approach to the AC joint with minimal exposure reduces the risks and complications of the intervention. This is the first case in literature that utilizes the artificial dog bone ligament securing the autograft in an anatomic AC reconstruction.

  16. Pilot study: evaluation of the use of the convergent interview technique in understanding the perception of surgical design and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Heather; Wolfaardt, Johan; Boulanger, Pierre; Hodgetts, Bill; Seikaly, Hadi

    2013-06-19

    It is important to understand the perceived value of surgical design and simulation (SDS) amongst surgeons, as this will influence its implementation in clinical settings. The purpose of the present study was to examine the application of the convergent interview technique in the field of surgical design and simulation and evaluate whether the technique would uncover new perceptions of virtual surgical planning (VSP) and medical models not discovered by other qualitative case-based techniques. Five surgeons were asked to participate in the study. Each participant was interviewed following the convergent interview technique. After each interview, the interviewer interpreted the information by seeking agreements and disagreements among the interviewees in order to understand the key concepts in the field of SDS. Fifteen important issues were extracted from the convergent interviews. In general, the convergent interview was an effective technique in collecting information about the perception of clinicians. The study identified three areas where the technique could be improved upon for future studies in the SDS field.

  17. Evaluation of primary and secondary stability of titanium implants using different surgical techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabassum, A.; Meijer, G.J.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of different surgical techniques on the primary and secondary implant stability using trabecular bone of goats as an implantation model. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the iliac crest of eight goats, 48 cylindrical-screw-type implants with a diameter of 4.2 mm

  18. Salvage radiotherapy for prostate-specific antigen relapse after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer. A single-center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Takahiro; Nakayama, Masashi; Suzuki, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and prognostic factors of salvage radiotherapy for prostate-specific antigen relapse after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer at a single center in Japan. A retrospective review of the medical records of 51 patients who underwent salvage radiotherapy for prostate-specific antigen relapse after radical prostatectomy was carried out. Salvage radiotherapy was undergone for the single indication of at least two consecutive prostate-specific antigen elevations >0.1 ng/ml. Salvage radiotherapy was delivered to the prostatic bed at a total dose of 60 or 64 Gy. Late toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. A total dose of 60 and 64 Gy were administered to 26 and 25 patients, respectively. The median prostate-specific antigen level at the initiation of radiotherapy was 0.29 ng/ml (range, 0.11-1.10 ng/ml). With a median follow-up of 57.3 months (range, 9.9-134.0 months), the prostate-specific antigen relapse-free rate at 5 years was 50.7%. Multivariate analysis using Cox's proportional hazards regression model revealed that the Gleason score at radical prostatectomy ≥8 significantly predicted prostate-specific antigen relapse after salvage radiotherapy (hazard ratio 4.531; 95% confidence interval 1.413-14.535; P=0.011). The prostate-specific antigen relapse-free rate at 5 years in the Gleason score at radical prostatectomy ≤7 and at radical prostatectomy ≥8 was 62.7 and 15.4%, respectively. Salvage radiotherapy was effective for prostate-specific antigen relapse after radical prostatectomy with tolerable toxicities in Japanese patients. A high Gleason score seemed to be a poor prognostic factor. (author)

  19. "TuNa-saving" endoscopic medial maxillectomy: a surgical technique for maxillary inverted papilloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagella, Fabio; Pusateri, Alessandro; Matti, Elina; Avato, Irene; Zaccari, Dario; Emanuelli, Enzo; Volo, Tiziana; Cazzador, Diego; Citraro, Leonardo; Ricci, Giampiero; Tomacelli, Giovanni Leo

    2017-07-01

    The maxillary sinus is the most common site of sinonasal inverted papilloma. Endoscopic sinus surgery, in particular endoscopic medial maxillectomy, is currently the gold standard for treatment of maxillary sinus papilloma. Although a common technique, complications such as stenosis of the lacrimal pathway and consequent development of epiphora are still possible. To avoid these problems, we propose a modification of this surgical technique that preserves the head of the inferior turbinate and the nasolacrimal duct. A retrospective analysis was performed on patients treated for maxillary inverted papilloma in three tertiary medical centres between 2006 and 2014. Pedicle-oriented endoscopic surgery principles were applied and, in select cases where the tumour pedicle was located on the anterior wall, a modified endoscopic medial maxillectomy was carried out as described in this paper. From 2006 to 2014 a total of 84 patients were treated. A standard endoscopic medial maxillectomy was performed in 55 patients (65.4%), while the remaining 29 (34.6%) had a modified technique performed. Three recurrences (3/84; 3.6%) were observed after a minimum follow-up of 24 months. A new surgical approach for select cases of maxillary sinus inverted papilloma is proposed in this paper. In this technique, the endoscopic medial maxillectomy was performed while preserving the head of the inferior turbinate and the nasolacrimal duct ("TuNa-saving"). This technique allowed for good visualization of the maxillary sinus, good oncological control and a reduction in the rate of complications.

  20. Frequency of malignancy in clinically benign open transvesical prostatectomy-a study of 100 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, A.A.; Sohu, M.; Balouch, I.; Rind, G.H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Enlargement of prostate can be benign and malignant. Though differentiation between the two can be made on clinical grounds and surgery but still some cases can be missed if not subjected to histopathology. Objectives: To find out the frequency of malignancy in patients operated for clinically benign open transvesical prostatectomy. Study type settings and duration: It was a prospective observational study conducted in the Department of surgery (Surgical Unit-I), Ghulam Muhammad Mahar Medical College and Hospital, Sukkur from January 2011 to December 2011. Patients and Methods: Patients presented with the history of prostatic symptoms were evaluated in surgical out-patient's department using digital rectal examination and ultrasound. The findings were recorded in a proforma and those having enlarged prostate weighing above 40gm underwent prostate specific antigen testing. Patients having no malignant findings on history, digital rectal examination and whose prostate specific antigen levels were below 10 ng/dl underwent open transvesical prostatectomy and all specimens were sent for histopathology. Those with suspicion of malignancy either on history or digital rectal examination or high prostate specific antigen were excluded from the study, also the glands below 40 gm in volume were excluded and referred for transurethral resection.All specimens were sent for histopathology. Results: Out of 100 cases, 41 were between 56 to 65 years of age. The mean age was 58 years. Acute urinary retention requiring catheterization was seen in 36 cases while 18 patients had symptoms suggestive of inguinal hernia but on examination had enlarged prostate. Prostate specific antigen was done in 07 patients with suspicion of malignancy but its value was below 10 ng/dl therefore they were included in the study. On ultrasound the gland volume ranged from 40 to 85 gm and residual post-voidal urinary volume ranged from 100 to 450ml. On histology 06 patients were found to have

  1. THD Doppler procedure for hemorrhoids: the surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratto, C

    2014-03-01

    Transanal hemorrhoidal dearterialization (THD) is an effective treatment for hemorrhoidal disease. The ligation of hemorrhoidal arteries (called "dearterialization") can provide a significant reduction of the arterial overflow to the hemorrhoidal piles. Plication of the redundant rectal mucosa/submucosa (called "mucopexy") can provide a repositioning of prolapsing tissue to the anatomical site. In this paper, the surgical technique and perioperative patient management are illustrated. Following adequate clinical assessment, patients undergo THD under general or spinal anesthesia, in either the lithotomy or the prone position. In all patients, distal Doppler-guided dearterialization is performed, providing the selective ligation of hemorrhoidal arteries identified by Doppler. In patients with hemorrhoidal/muco-hemorrhoidal prolapse, the mucopexy is performed with a continuous suture including the redundant and prolapsing mucosa and submucosa. The description of the surgical procedure is complemented by an accompanying video (see supplementary material). In long-term follow-up, there is resolution of symptoms in the vast majority of patients. The most common complication is transient tenesmus, which sometimes can result in rectal discomfort or pain. Rectal bleeding occurs in a very limited number of patients. Neither fecal incontinence nor chronic pain should occur. Anorectal physiology parameters should be unaltered, and anal sphincters should not be injured by following this procedure. When accurately performed and for the correct indications, THD is a safe procedure and one of the most effective treatments for hemorrhoidal disease.

  2. Impact of benign prostatic hyperplasia surgical treatment on voiding and urinary bladder filling symptoms

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    Milićević Snježana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BHP is one of the most common diseases of elderly men. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of surgical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia to voiding and urinary bladder filling symptoms. Quantification of voiding and filling symptoms was done with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS. Method. The study included 80 patients with BHP, of whom 40 were treated with open prostatectomy (group A, and other 40 with transurethral resection of prostate gland (group B. All the patients were under 80 years old (average age in the group A was 70.23 years with a variation interval of 21 years, and in the group B 69.37 years with a variation interval of 22 years, with a value of IPSS > 19 points, quantity of residual urine higher than 150 mL, the weight of benign prostatic gland hyperplasia tissue over 30 grams for the method of prostate transurethral resection, and over 80 grams for the method of open prostatectomy. To all patients, for two times, the value of IPSS was determined, and then in a postoperative period in time intervals of 4 and 12 weeks. Results. Arithmetic mean of IPSS preoperatively was 32.05 points in the group A and 31.75 points in the group B. During the postoperative check-ups in time intervals of 4 and 12 weeks, arithmetic means of IPSS in the group A were 5.4 and 1.85 points, respectively, and in the group B 11.425 and 9.025 points, respectively. Surgical treatment had better effect on voiding symptoms than on urinary bladder filling ones. Conclusion. After the mentioned surgical procedures a significant reduction of the lower urinary tract symptoms quantified by the IPSS was observed. Surgical treatment of BHP had a more pronounced effect on the voiding symptoms in relation to filling ones.

  3. Robot-assisted surgery in a broader healthcare perspective: a difference-in-difference-based cost analysis of a national prostatectomy cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyldgård, Vibe Bolvig; Laursen, Karin Rosenkilde; Poulsen, Johan; Søgaard, Rikke

    2017-07-21

    To estimate costs attributable to robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) as compared with open prostatectomy (OP) and laparoscopic prostatectomies (LP) in a National Health Service perspective. Register-based cohort study of 4309 consecutive patients who underwent prostatectomy from 2006 to 2013 (2241 RALP, 1818 OP and 250 LP). Patients were followed from 12 months before to 12 months after prostatectomy with respect to service use in primary care (general practitioners, therapists, specialists etc) and hospitals (inpatient and outpatient activity related to prostatectomy and comorbidity). Tariffs of the activity-based remuneration system for primary care and the Diagnosis-Related Grouping case-mix system for hospital-based care were used to value service use. Costs attributable to RALP were estimated using a difference-in-difference analytical approach and adjusted for patient-level and hospital-level risk selection using multilevel regression. No significant effect of RALP on resource-use was observed except for a marginally lower use of primary care and fewer bed days as compared with OP (not LP). The overall cost consequence of RALP was estimated at an additional €2459 (95% CI 1377 to 3540, p=0.003) as compared with OP and an additional €3860 (95% CI 559 to 7160, p=0.031) as compared with LP, mainly due to higher cost intensity during the index admissions. In this study from the Danish context, the use of RALP generates a factor 1.3 additional cost when compared with OP and a factor 1.6 additional cost when compared with LP, on average, based on 12 months follow-up. The policy interpretation is that the use of robots for prostatectomy should be driven by clinical superiority and that formal effectiveness analysis is required to determine whether the current and eventual new purchasing of robot capacity is best used for prostatectomy. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights

  4. Surgical techniques for the treatment of ankyloglossia in children: a case series

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    Marina Azevedo JUNQUEIRA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a series of clinical cases of ankyloglossia in children, which were approached by different techniques: frenotomy and frenectomy with the use of one hemostat, two hemostats, a groove director or laser. Information on the indications, contraindications, advantages and disadvantages of the techniques was also presented. Children diagnosed with ankyloglossia were subjected to different surgical procedures. The choice of the techniques was based on the age of the patient, length of the frenulum and availability of the instruments and equipment. All the techniques presented are successful for the treatment of ankyloglossia and require a skilled professional. Laser may be considered a simple and safe alternative for children while reducing the amount of local anesthetics needed, the bleeding and the chances of infection, swelling and discomfort.

  5. Return to work and sick leave after radical prostatectomy: a prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Sigrun; Steinsvik, Eivind A S; Dahl, Alv A; Loge, Jon Håvard; Cvancarova, Milada; Fosså, Sophie D

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate work status at three months after radical prostatectomy (RP) in patients with prostate cancer (PCa) in relation to socio-demographics, urinary incontinence and bother, medical complications health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and surgical methods. To identify pre-RP available factors that can predict the duration of immediate post-RP sick leave. This prospective questionnaire-based study included 264 men with PCaPatients' work status was defined as either "stable/improved" or "declined" at three months compared to work status at baseline. Duration of immediate post-RP sick leave was considered as prolonged when lasting >6 weeks. Associations were analyzed using logistic regression analyses. Almost 30% of the patients had declined work status three months after RP. Change of physical HRQOL was the only factor remaining significantly associated with declined work status in the multivariate analysis. Half of the patients had prolonged immediate sick leave. Having physically strenuous work was the strongest predictor for this outcome. Long periods of sick leave and reduced workforce participation after RP should be considered potential adverse effects of this treatment.

  6. An evaluation of surgical outcome of bilateral cleft lip surgery using a modified Millard′s (Fork Flap technique

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    W L Adeyemo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The central third of the face is distorted by the bilateral cleft of the lip and palate and restoring the normal facial form is one of the primary goals for the reconstructive surgeons. The history of bilateral cleft lip repair has evolved from discarding the premaxilla and prolabium and approximating the lateral lip elements to a definitive lip and primary cleft nasal repair utilising the underlying musculature. The aim of this study was to review surgical outcome of bilateral cleft lip surgery (BCLS done at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital. Materials and Methods: A review of all cases of BCLS done between January 2007 and December 2012 at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital was done. Data analysis included age and sex of patients, type of cleft deformity and type of surgery (primary or secondary and whether the cleft deformity was syndromic and non-syndromic. Techniques of repair, surgical outcome and complications were also recorded. Results: A total of 39 cases of BCLS involving 21 males and 18 females were done during the period. This constituted 10% (39/390 of all cases of cleft surgery done during the period. There were 5 syndromic and 34 non-syndromic cases. Age of patients at time of surgery ranged between 3 months and 32 years. There were 24 bilateral cleft lip and palate deformities and 15 bilateral cleft lip deformities. Thirty-one of the cases were primary surgery, while 8 were secondary (revision surgery. The most common surgical technique employed was modified Fork flap (Millard technique, which was employed in 37 (95% cases. Conclusion: Bilateral cleft lip deformity is a common cleft deformity seen in clinical practice, surgical repair of which can be a challenge to an experienced surgeon. A modified Fork flap technique for repair of bilateral cleft lip is a reliable and versatile technique associated with excellent surgical outcome.

  7. Choice of a General Anesthesia Technique in the Surgical Treatment of Postinfarct Left Ventricular Aneurysms

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    N. A. Karpun

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To choose the optimum technique of general anesthesia in the surgical treatment of patients with postinfarct left ventricular aneurysms (PLVA.Materials and methods. Fifty-four patients operated on for PLVA were examined. They were divided into 4 groups according to the basic technique of general anesthesia: 1 intravenous anesthesia based on propofol and fentanyl; 2 inhalation sevoflurane anesthesia with fentanyl enhancement of the analgesic component; 3 inhalation isoflurane anesthesia with fentanyl enhancement of the analgesic component; 4 general anesthesia in combination with epidural blockade. Central hemodynamics was investigated by the thermodilution technique and the perioperative period was also studied.Results and discussion. None of the general anesthesia techniques affected the development of perioperative complications. However, with decreased myocardial reserves, high thoracic epidural anesthesia should be applied with caution as it causes a significant desympathization, which may lead to impairments of the autoregulatory mechanisms of coronary blood flow and aggravate existing contractile disorders. Intravenous and inhalation anesthesia techniques provide a fair hemodynamic stability at all stages of surgical treatment. Inhalation anesthesia has a number of advantages: less cost and the possibility of rapid activation of patients in the early postoperative period.

  8. The Incidence and Anatomy of Accessory Pudendal Arteries as Depicted on Multidetector-Row CT Angiography: Clinical Implications of Preoperative Evaluation for Laparoscopic and Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Beom Jin; Sung, Deuk Jae; Kim, Min Ju; Cho, Sung Bum; Kim, Yun Hwan; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Kang, Seok Ho; Cheon, Jun

    2009-01-01

    To help preserve accessory pudendal arteries (APAs) and to ensure optimal postoperative sexual function after a laparoscopic or robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, we have evaluated the incidence of APAs as detected on multidetector-row CT (MDCT) angiography and have provided a detailed anatomical description. The distribution of APAs was evaluated in 121 consecutive male patients between February 2006 and July 2007 who underwent 64- channel MDCT angiography of the lower extremities. We defined an APA as any artery located within the periprostatic region running parallel to the dorsal vascular complex. We also subclassified APAs into lateral and apical APAs. Two radiologists retrospectively evaluated the origin, course and number of APAs; the final APA subclassification based on MDCT angiography source data was determined by consensus. We identified 44 APAs in 36 of 121 patients (30%). Two distinct varieties of APAs were identified. Thirty-three APAs (75%) coursed near the anterolateral region of the prostatic apex, termed apical APAs. The remaining 11 APAs (25%) coursed along the lateral aspect of the prostate, termed lateral APAs. All APAs originated from the internal obturator artery and iliac artery or a branch of the iliac artery such as the inferior vesical artery. The majority of apical APAs arose from the internal obturator artery (84%). Seven patients (19%) had multiple APAs. APAs are more frequently detected by the use of MDCT angiography than as suggested by previous surgical studies. The identification of APAs on MDCT angiography may provide useful information for the surgical preservation of APAs during a laparoscopic or robot-assisted radical prostatectomy

  9. Patterns-of-care and health economic analysis of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in the Australian public health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basto, Marnique; Sathianathen, Niranjan; Te Marvelde, Luc; Ryan, Shane; Goad, Jeremy; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Costello, Anthony J; Moon, Daniel A; Heriot, Alexander G; Butler, Jim; Murphy, Declan G

    2016-06-01

    To compare patterns of care and peri-operative outcomes of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) with other surgical approaches, and to create an economic model to assess the viability of RARP in the public case-mix funding system. We retrospectively reviewed all radical prostatectomies (RPs) performed for localized prostate cancer in Victoria, Australia, from the Victorian Admitted Episode Dataset, a large administrative database that records all hospital inpatient episodes in Victoria. The first database, covering the period from July 2010 to April 2013 (n = 5 130), was used to compare length of hospital stay (LOS) and blood transfusion rates between surgical approaches. This was subsequently integrated into an economic model. A second database (n = 5 581) was extracted to cover the period between July 2010 and June 2013, three full financial years, to depict patterns of care and make future predictions for the 2014-2015 financial year, and to perform a hospital volume analysis. We then created an economic model to evaluate the incremental cost of RARP vs open RP (ORP) and laparoscopic RP (LRP), incorporating the cost-offset from differences in LOS and blood transfusion rate. The economic model constructs estimates of the diagnosis-related group (DRG) costs of ORP and LRP, adds the gross cost of the surgical robot (capital, consumables, maintenance and repairs), and manipulates these DRG costs to obtain a DRG cost per day, which can be used to estimate the cost-offset associated with RARP in comparison with ORP and LRP. Economic modelling was performed around a base-case scenario, assuming a 7-year robot lifespan and 124 RARPs performed per financial year. One- and two-way sensitivity analyses were performed for the four-arm da Vinci SHD, Si and Si dual surgical systems (Intuitive Surgical Ltd, Sunnyvale, CA, USA). We identified 5 581 patients who underwent RP in 20 hospitals in Victoria with an open, laparoscopic or robot-assisted surgical approach in the

  10. Predicting biochemical recurrence-free survival for patients with positive pelvic lymph nodes at radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bodman, Christian; Godoy, Guilherme; Chade, Daher C; Cronin, Angel; Tafe, Laura J; Fine, Samson W; Laudone, Vincent; Scardino, Peter T; Eastham, James A

    2010-07-01

    We evaluated predictors of freedom from biochemical recurrence in patients with pelvic lymph node metastasis at radical prostatectomy. Of 207 patients with lymph node metastasis treated with radical prostatectomy and bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection 45 received adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy and 162 did not. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to investigate predictors of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Recurrence probability was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A median of 13 lymph nodes were removed. Of the patients 122 had 1, 44 had 2 and 41 had 3 or greater positive lymph nodes. Of patients without androgen deprivation therapy 103 had 1, 35 had 2 and 24 had 3 or greater positive lymph nodes while 69 experienced biochemical recurrence. Median time to recurrence in patients with 1, 2 and 3 or greater lymph nodes was 59, 13 and 3 months, respectively. Only specimen Gleason score and the number of positive lymph nodes were independent predictors of biochemical recurrence. Recurrence-free probability 2 years after prostatectomy in men without androgen deprivation with 1 positive lymph node and a prostatectomy Gleason score of 7 or less was 79% vs 29% in those with Gleason score 8 or greater and 2 or more positive lymph nodes. Prognosis in patients with lymph node metastasis depends on the number of positive lymph nodes and primary tumor Gleason grade. Of all patients with lymph node metastasis 80% had 1 or 2 positive nodes. A large subset of those patients had a favorable prognosis. Full bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection should be done in patients with intermediate and high risk cancer to identify those likely to benefit from metastatic node removal. Copyright (c) 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hereditary spherocytosis and partial splenectomy in children: review of surgical technique and the role of imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollingsworth, Caroline L.; Rice, Henry E.

    2010-01-01

    The risks associated with total splenectomy, including overwhelming postsplenectomy infection, have led to an interest in the use of partial splenectomy as an alternative surgical option for children with congenital hemolytic anemias and hypersplenism. Partial splenectomy, a procedure designed to remove enough spleen to improve anemia and avoid complications of splenic sequestration while preserving splenic function, has shown promise in children. Radiologic imaging is essential for the preoperative evaluation and postoperative care for children undergoing partial splenectomy and offers a broad range of critical clinical information essential for care of these complex children. It is imperative for radiologists involved in the care of these children to be familiar with the surgical technique and imaging options for these procedures. This article reviews the surgical technique as well as the current status of various diagnostic imaging options used for children undergoing partial splenectomy, highlighting technical aspects and specific clinical information obtained by each modality. (orig.)

  12. Hereditary spherocytosis and partial splenectomy in children: review of surgical technique and the role of imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollingsworth, Caroline L. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Box 3808, Durham, NC (United States); Rice, Henry E. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Durham, NC (United States)

    2010-07-15

    The risks associated with total splenectomy, including overwhelming postsplenectomy infection, have led to an interest in the use of partial splenectomy as an alternative surgical option for children with congenital hemolytic anemias and hypersplenism. Partial splenectomy, a procedure designed to remove enough spleen to improve anemia and avoid complications of splenic sequestration while preserving splenic function, has shown promise in children. Radiologic imaging is essential for the preoperative evaluation and postoperative care for children undergoing partial splenectomy and offers a broad range of critical clinical information essential for care of these complex children. It is imperative for radiologists involved in the care of these children to be familiar with the surgical technique and imaging options for these procedures. This article reviews the surgical technique as well as the current status of various diagnostic imaging options used for children undergoing partial splenectomy, highlighting technical aspects and specific clinical information obtained by each modality. (orig.)

  13. Surgical extrusion: A reliable technique for saving compromised teeth. A 5-years follow-up case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenner Argueta

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To present a long term follow up clinical case in which a compromised anterior tooth was saved by a surgical extrusion procedure. Summary: Although different techniques have been suggested for clinical crown lengthening in the anterior zone, some of them have limitations in terms of aesthetics and procedural requirements. The current case report demonstrates how a simplified surgical extrusion procedure was successfully performed for saving a severely damaged anterior tooth; furthermore, it is possible to apply the technique described in this case using minimum and simple armamentarium like a scalpel, elevators, forceps and splinting flexible cord. Key-learning points: Saving severely compromised anterior teeth is possible by applying surgical extrusion techniques when crown-root ratio allows it. Risk of root resorption or ankylosis is minimum. Riassunto: Obiettivo: Presentare un caso clinico con controllo a 5 anni in cui un dente anteriore compromesso è stato recuperato con una procedura di estrusione chirurgica. Riassunto: Sebbene siano state suggerite diverse tecniche per l’allungamento della corona clinica nella zona anteriore, alcune di esse presentano limitazioni in termini di estetica e competenza nelle procedure. Il presente case report dimostra come una procedura di estrusione chirurgica semplificata sia stata eseguita con successo per salvare un dente anteriore gravemente danneggiato. Va sottolineato che la tecnica descritta in questo caso può essere portata a termine utilizzando un armamentario minimo e molto semplice come un bisturi, leve, pinze e uno splintaggio flessibile. Key learning points: E’ possibile salvare elementi dentari gravemente compromessi applicando tecniche di estrusione chirurgica quando il rapporto corona-radice lo consente. Il rischio di riassorbimento della radice o anchilosi è minimo. Keywords: Crown fracture, Crown lengthening, Surgical extrusion, Surgical repositioning, Biologic width, Parole

  14. Does penile rehabilitation have a role in the treatment of erectile dysfunction following radical prostatectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecher, Gideon; Almekaty, Khaled; Kalejaiye, Odunayo; Minhas, Suks

    2017-01-01

    In men undergoing radical treatment for prostate cancer, erectile function is one of the most important health-related quality-of-life outcomes influencing patient choice in treatment. Penile rehabilitation has emerged as a therapeutic measure to prevent erectile dysfunction and expedite return of erectile function after radical prostatectomy. Penile rehabilitation involves a program designed to increase the likelihood of return to baseline-level erectile function, as opposed to treatment, which implies the therapeutic treatment of symptoms, a key component of post-radical prostatectomy management. Several pathological theories form the basis for rehabilitation, and a plethora of treatments are currently in widespread use. However, whilst there is some evidence supporting the concept of penile rehabilitation from animal studies, randomised controlled trials are contradictory in outcomes. Similarly, urological guidelines are conflicted in terms of recommendations. Furthermore, it is clear that in spite of the lack of evidence for the role of penile rehabilitation, many urologists continue to employ some form of rehabilitation in their patients after radical prostatectomy. This is a significant burden to health resources in public-funded health economies, and no effective cost-benefit analysis has been undertaken to support this practice. Thus, further research is warranted to provide both scientific and clinical evidence for this contemporary practice and the development of preventative strategies in treating erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy.

  15. Fronto-orbital feminization technique. A surgical strategy using fronto-orbital burring with or without eggshell technique to optimize the risk/benefit ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villepelet, A; Jafari, A; Baujat, B

    2018-05-04

    The demand for facial feminization is increasing in transsexual patients. Masculine foreheads present extensive supraorbital bossing with a more acute glabellar angle, whereas female foreheads show softer features. The aim of this article is to describe our surgical technique for fronto-orbital feminization. The mask-lift technique is an upper face-lift. It provides rejuvenation by correcting collapsed features, and fronto-orbital feminization through burring of orbital rims and lateral canthopexies. Depending on the size of the frontal sinus and the thickness of its anterior wall, frontal remodeling is achieved using simple burring or by means of the eggshell technique. Orbital remodeling comprises a superolateral orbital opening, a reduction of ridges and a trough at the lateral orbital rim to support the lateral canthopexy. Frontal, corrugator and procerus myectomies, plus minimal scalp excision, complete the surgery. Our technique results in significant, natural-looking feminization. No complications were observed in our series of patients. The eggshell technique is an alternative to bone flap on over-pneumatized sinus. Fronto-orbital feminization fits into a wider surgical strategy. It can be associated to rhinoplasty, genioplasty, mandibular angle remodeling, face lift and laryngoplasty. Achieving facial feminization in 2 or 3 stages improves psychological and physiological tolerance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Selection of oncoplastic surgical technique in Asian breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eui Sun Shin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Oncoplastic surgery is being increasingly performed in Korean women; however, unlike Westerners, Korean women usually have small to moderate-sized breasts. To achieve better outcomes in reconstructed breasts, several factors should be considered to determine the optimal surgical method. Methods A total of 108 patients who underwent oncoplastic surgery from January 2013 to December 2016 were retrospectively investigated. We used various methods, including glandular tissue reshaping, latissimus dorsi (LD flap transposition, and reduction oncoplasty, to restore the breast volume and symmetry. Results The mean weight of the tumor specimens was 40.46 g, and the ratio of the tumor specimen weight to breast volume was 0.12 g/mL in the patients who underwent glandular tissue reshaping (n=59. The corresponding values were 101.47 g and 0.14 g/mL, respectively, in the patients who underwent reduction oncoplasty (n=17, and 82.54 g and 0.20 g/mL, respectively, in those treated with an LD flap (n=32. Glandular tissue reshaping was mostly performed in the upper outer quadrant, and LD flap transposition was mostly performed in the lower inner quadrant. No major complications were noted. Most patients were satisfied with the aesthetic results. Conclusions We report satisfactory outcomes of oncoplastic surgical procedures in Korean patients. The results regarding specimen weight and the tumor-to-breast ratio of Asian patients will be a helpful reference point for determining the most appropriate oncoplastic surgical technique.

  17. Effect of Nerve-Sparing Radical Prostatectomy on Urinary Continence in Patients With Preoperative Erectile Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Hyun Park

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We aimed to assess whether nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (nsRP is associated with improved recovery of urinary continence compared to non–nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (nnsRP in patients with localized prostate cancer and preoperative erectile dysfunction. Methods: A total of 360 patients with organ-confined prostate cancer and an International Index of Erectile Function score of less than 17 were treated with nsRP or nnsRP in Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital. Patients who received neoadjuvant or adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy or had a history of prostate-related surgery were excluded. Recovery of urinary continence was assessed at 0, 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Postoperative recovery of continence was defined as zero pad usage. The association between nerve-sparing status and urinary continence was assessed by using univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses after controlling for known predictive factors. Results: Urinary continence recovered in 279 patients (77.5% within the mean follow-up period of 22.5 months (range, 6–123 months. Recovery of urinary continence was reported in 74.6% and 86.4% of patients after nnsRP and nsRP, respectively, at 12 months (P=0.022. All groups had comparable perioperative criteria and had no significant preoperative morbidities. Age, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, and nerve-sparing status were significantly associated with recovery of urinary continence on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.254; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.002–1.478; P=0.026 and nerve-sparing status (HR, 0.713; 95% CI, 0.548–0.929; P=0.012 were independently associated with recovery of urinary continence. Conclusions: nsRP, as compared to nnsRP, improves recovery rates of urinary incontinence and decreases surgical morbidity without compromising pathologic outcomes.

  18. Re-implant of the right coronary artery: a surgical technique for the treatment of ostial lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongiovani Hércules Lisboa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously described surgical treatment for ostial coronary artery stenosis relied on either venous or arterial bypasses or ostial patch angioplasty. These surgical procedures are performed with bovine pericardium, saphenous vein or internal thoracic artery. We describe a technique of right coronary artery re-implantation into the aorta. The procedure was performed in four patients with right coronary artery ostial stenosis along with other left coronary artery lesions.

  19. Impact of a robotic surgical system on treatment choice for men with clinically organ-confined prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Kanao, Kent; Araki, Motoo; Terada, Naoki; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Sawada, Atsuro; Inoue, Takahiro; Ebara, Shin; Watanabe, Toyohiko; Kamba, Tomomi; Sumitomo, Makoto; Nasu, Yasutomo; Ogawa, Osamu

    2018-04-01

    Introducing a new surgical technology may affect behaviors and attitudes of patients and surgeons about clinical practice. Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) was approved in 2012 in Japan. We investigated whether the introduction of this system affected the treatment of organ-confined prostate cancer (PCa) and the use of radical prostatectomy (RP). We conducted a retrospective multicenter study on 718 patients with clinically determined organ-confined PCa treated at one of three Japanese academic institutions in 2011 (n = 338) or 2013 (n = 380). Two patient groups formed according to the treatment year were compared regarding the clinical characteristics of PCa, whether referred or screened at our hospital, comorbidities and surgical risk, and choice of primary treatment. Distribution of PCa risk was not changed by the introduction of RALP. Use of RP increased by 70% (from 127 to 221 cases, p accounted for 70% of the total RP increase, whereas the number of low- or very low-risk PCa patients with high comorbidity scores (Charlson Index ≥ 4) increased from 8 to 25 cases, accounting for 18%. Use of expectant management (active surveillance, watchful waiting) in very low-risk PCa patients was 15% in 2011 and 12% in 2013 (p = 0.791). Introduction of a robotic surgical system had little effect on the risk distribution of PCa. Use of RP increased, apparently due to increased indications in patients who are candidates for RP but have mild perioperative risk. Although small, there was an increase in the number of RPs performed on patients with severe comorbidities but with low-risk or very low-risk PCa.

  20. Outcome of Vaginoplasty in Male-to-Female Transgenders: A Systematic Review of Surgical Techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horbach, S.E.R.; Bouman, M.B.; Smit, J.M.; Özer, M.; Buncamper, M.E.; Mullender, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Gender reassignment surgery is the keystone of the treatment of transgender patients. For male-to-female transgenders, this involves the creation of a neovagina. Many surgical methods for vaginoplasty have been opted. The penile skin inversion technique is the method of choice for most

  1. Cystectomy with orthotopic reconstruction following radical retropubic prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Miotto Jr

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of infiltrative bladder carcinoma in patients previously treated with radical prostatectomy due to prostate adenocarcinoma represents a challenging perspective. Radical cystectomy remains the best option for invasive bladder cancer, however, there are few reports about the best approach to such individuals. Nevertheless, despite possible technical difficulties found during surgery, the orthotopic urinary shunt is a reasonable option in selected cases.

  2. Age as a prognostic variable in patients undergoing transurethral prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, J; Jensen, J S; Iversen, H G

    1993-01-01

    In a retrospective study the outcome of transurethral prostatectomy (TURP) for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in patients more than 80 years old was compared to a control group of patients with a mean age ten years younger. The elderly had significantly more tissue resected and presented...

  3. Worldwide trends in surgical techniques in the treatment of esophageal and gastroesophageal junction cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkamp, L.; Seesing, M. F J; Ruurda, J. P.; Boone, J.; van Hillegersberg, R.

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the worldwide trends in surgical techniques for esophageal cancer surgery by comparing it to our survey from 2007. In addition, new questions were added for gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. An international survey on surgery of esophageal and GEJ cancer

  4. Comparative biomarker expression and RNA integrity in biospecimens derived from radical retropubic and robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardelli, Carmela; Bianco-Miotto, Tina; Jindal, Shalini; Dodd, Thomas J; Cohen, Penelope A; Marshall, Villis R; Sutherland, Peter D; Samaratunga, Hemamali; Kench, James G; Dong, Ying; Wang, Hong; Clements, Judith A; Risbridger, Gail P; Sutherland, Robert L; Tilley, Wayne D; Horsfall, David J

    2010-07-01

    Knowledge of preanalytic conditions that biospecimens are subjected to is critically important because novel surgical procedures, tissue sampling, handling, and storage might affect biomarker expression or invalidate tissue samples as analytes for some technologies. We investigated differences in RNA quality, gene expression by quantitative real-time PCR, and immunoreactive protein expression of selected prostate cancer biomarkers between tissues from retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) and robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP). Sections of tissue microarray of 23 RALP and 22 RRP samples were stained with antibodies to androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) as intersite controls, and 14 other candidate biomarkers of research interest to three laboratories within the Australian Prostate Cancer BioResource tissue banking network. Quantitative real-time PCR was done for AR, PSA (KLK3), KLK2, KLK4, and HIF1A on RNA extracted from five RALP and five RRP frozen tissue cores. No histologic differences were observed between RALP and RRP tissue. Biomarker staining grouped these samples into those with increased (PSA, CK8/18, CKHMW, KLK4), decreased (KLK2, KLK14), or no change in expression (AR, ghrelin, Ki67, PCNA, VEGF-C, PAR2, YB1, p63, versican, and chondroitin 0-sulfate) in RALP compared with RRP tissue. No difference in RNA quality or gene expression was detected between RALP and RRP tissue. Changes in biomarker expression between RALP and RRP tissue exist at the immunoreactive protein level, but the etiology is unclear. Future studies should account for changes in biomarker expression when using RALP tissues, and mixed cohorts of RALP and RRP tissue should be avoided.

  5. Adjuvant radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy: A failure of marketing-based medicine?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakespeare, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy for high-risk patients after radical prostatectomy has been shown to reduce local and metastatic failure, improve overall survival and improve quality of life (QOL). The evidence, based on three randomised studies and a meta-analysis, is so compelling that the national and internatioanl professional bodies, representing urologists and radiation oncologist alike, recommend that high-risk patients be offered immediate adjuvant radiotherapy. Despite this being the standard of care, few patients fo on to recive it. This paper looks at the possibilities of why this is so, highlighting that it could possibly be related to poor marketing, communication and delivery of health information to patients and professional alike. It concludes that we need a more coordinated way to increase utilisation of the gold standard adjuvant radiotherapy post-radical prostatectomy, perhaps learning some valuable lessons from the business community.

  6. Morbidity of laparoscopic extraperitoneal versus transperitoneal radical prostatectomy verus open retropubic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remzi, M; Klingler, H C; Tinzl, M V; Fong, Y K; Lodde, M; Kiss, B; Marberger, M

    2005-07-01

    Morbidity and postoperative pain after extraperitoneal (E-LRPE) and transperitoneal (T-LRPE) laparoscopic radical prostatectomy was compared to open extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy (O-RPE). Between January 2002 and October 2003, we evaluated 41 E-LRPE, 39 T-LRPE and 41 O-RPE prospectively. All operations were performed as standard procedures by the same group of surgeons and perioperative results and complications were evaluated. Pain management was performed with tramadol 50-100 mg on demand, and no other form of anaesthesia was given. Postoperative pain was assessed daily in all patients quantifying analgesic requirement and evaluation of Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). All patients had at least a 12 month follow-up. Mean age, prostate volume, PSA and Gleason score were comparable between all three groups (p>0.05). Mean blood loss was lower with laparoscopy (189+/-140 and 290+/-254 ml), as compared to 385+/-410 ml for O-RPE (p=0.002). However, mean operating times were significantly longer in L-TRPE (279+/-70 min) as compared to E-LRPE (217+/-51 min) and O-RPE (195+/-72 min) (ppain (p=0.029) in all groups, especially for T-LRPE (p=0.007). Likewise, increased operating times (>240 min) were associated with increased post-operative pain (p=0.049). Full continence defined as no pads at one year was achieved in 36/41 (88%, E-LRPE) versus 33/39 (85%, T-LRPE) versus 33/41 (81%, O-RPE), respectively (p=0.2). E-LRPE resulted in a significant subjective (VAS Score, ppain reduction compared to T-LRPE, but only in VAS Score compared to O-RPE (p=0.008). Analgetic consumption during first postoperative week was equal in E-LRPE (290 mg) and O-RPE (300 mg) (p=0.550). Shorter operating times, lower urinary leakage rates, lower stricture rates and lower blood loss in E-LRPE compared to T-LRPE are mainly explained due to the long learning curve in LRPE, which we did not overcome yet, and not due to the approach (extraperitoneal versus transperitoneal).

  7. First report on joint use of a Da Vinci® surgical system with transfer of surgical know-how between two public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Agostino; Thoms, Michael; Ferrari, Matteo; La Croce, Giovanni; Danuser, Hansjörg; Schmid, Hans-Peter; Engeler, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The costs of a Da Vinci® device for robot- assisted surgery, in particular for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP), can be a considerable issue for hospitals with limited caseloads. Since January 2011 the cantonal hospitals of Lucerne and St. Gallen (Switzerland) have shared a four-arm Da Vinci® device, transferring the surgical know-how by a Lucerne teaching surgeon to a St. Gallen surgeon. Complete pre- and perioperative data, including 3-month surgical RARP outcomes, were prospectively documented. For statistical analysis, Wilcoxon, exact Poisson and χ(2) tests were used. During the first year, the two hospitals (61 RARP patients in Lucerne, 19 RARP patients in St. Gallen) did not differ significantly in preoperative, perioperative or oncological and functional results except for prostate volume (median 33 [interquartile range 24-40] vs. 40 [interquartile range 33-57] ml; p = 0.02), operation time (mean 252 ± 49 vs. 351 ± 50 min; p = 0.0001), number of lymph nodes removed (median 16 [interquartile range 13-21] vs. 15 [interquartile range 8-16] nodes; p = 0.02), biopsy (p = 0.04) and specimen Gleason scores (p = 0.03), and length of hospital stay (median 8 [interquartile range 7-14] vs. 9 [interquartile range 8-18] days; p < 0.01). Da Vinci® device sharing with transfer of surgical know-how can reduce the costs of RARP without compromising surgical outcomes, even at the beginning of the learning curve. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Ex vivo MRI evaluation of prostate cancer: Localization and margin status prediction of prostate cancer in fresh radical prostatectomy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidkamp, Jan; Hoogenboom, Martijn; Kovacs, Iringo E; Veltien, Andor; Maat, Arie; Sedelaar, J P Michiel; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, Christina A; Fütterer, Jurgen J

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the ability of high field ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to localize prostate cancer (PCa) and to predict the margin status in fresh radical prostatectomy (RP) specimens using histology as the reference standard. This Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved study had written informed consent. Patients with biopsy-proved PCa and a diagnostic multiparametric 3T MRI examination of the prostate prior to undergoing RP were prospectively included. A custom-made container provided reference between the 7T ex vivo MRI obtained from fresh RP specimens and histological slicing. On ex vivo MRI, PCa was localized and the presence of positive surgical margins was determined in a double-reading session. These findings were compared with histological findings obtained from completely cut, whole-mount embedded, prostate specimens. In 12 RP specimens, histopathology revealed 36 PCa lesions, of which 17 (47%) and 20 (56%) were correlated with the ex vivo MRI in the first and second reading session, respectively. Nine of 12 (75%) index lesions were localized in the first session, in the second 10 of 12 (83%). Seven and 8 lesions of 11 lesions with Gleason score >6 and >0.5 cc were localized in the first and second session, respectively. In the first session none of the four histologically positive surgical margins (sensitivity 0%) and 9 of 13 negative margins (specificity 69%) were detected. In second session the sensitivity and specificity were 25% and 88%, respectively. Ex vivo MRI enabled accurate localization of PCa in fresh RP specimens, and the technique provided information on the margin status with high specificity. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:439-448. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Surgical techniques for the atomic bomb survivors of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeichi, Nobuo; Dohi, Kiyohiko; Noso, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    As for proper surgical techniques for radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis, this paper explains with a focus on the Hiroshima University cases, with an addition of the cases of Radiation Effects Research Foundation and Takeichi Clinic. The definitive diagnosis of thyroid cancer is usually carried out by echo-guided aspiration biopsy cytology, but Takeichi Clinic faces the surgery by preparing 'thyroid - cervical lymph node map' by combining this technique with CT and MRI. As the surgery examples at Hiroshima University, 259 cases during 1955-1972 and 363 cases during 1965-1982 were taken up, and the survival rate and cancer death rate classified by tissue types for 10 years after the initial operations were shown in a table. Dead patients were mostly the surgery cases of senior persons of 60 years in age or older, and the death rate for surgery cases of the persons of 19 years old or younger was only 1.9% at 6 cases. Higher cancer death rate was seen in the cases of papillary cancer of more than 5 cm in size, where extra glandular infiltration could not be curated or cut out, and 64/318 cases of patients had a recurrence of cancer at thyroid gland. The mortality rate up to 20 years after the surgery of atomic bomb survivors was not significantly different from that of non-victims. Information on the multicentric cancerous focuses and microscopic cancer in the thyroid gland, as well as the tissue types and high risk of cancer death were described from the cases of Hiroshima University and Takeichi Clinic. The thyroid cancer of radiation exposure victims often results in papillary cancer, and the following are described related with this: (1) selection of ablation method, (2) method to protect the parathyroid tissue, and (3) method to prevent damage to the recurrent laryngeal nerve and superior laryngeal nerve. The surgical procedure to perform the neck outside area lymph node dissection due to the quasi-subtotal or quasi-complete removal of the thyroid gland is

  10. Surgical orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohl, Alexis M; Vitkus, Lauren

    2017-08-01

    The article reviews some commonly used orthodontic treatments as well as new strategies to assist in the correction of malocclusion. Many techniques are used in conjunction with surgical intervention and are a necessary compliment to orthognathic surgery. Basic knowledge of these practices will aid in the surgeon's ability to adequately treat the patient. Many orthodontists and surgeons are eliminating presurgical orthodontics to adopt a strategy of 'surgery first' orthodontics in orthognathic surgery. This has the benefit of immediate improvement in facial aesthetics and shorter treatment times. The advent of virtual surgical planning has helped facilitate the development of this new paradigm by making surgical planning faster and easier. Furthermore, using intraoperative surgical navigation is improving overall precision and outcomes. A variety of surgical and nonsurgical treatments may be employed in the treatment of malocclusion. It is important to be familiar with all options available and tailor the patient's treatment plan accordingly. Surgery-first orthodontics, intraoperative surgical navigation, virtual surgical planning, and 3D printing are evolving new techniques that are producing shorter treatment times and subsequently improving patient satisfaction without sacrificing long-term stability.

  11. Comparative effectiveness of laparoscopic versus open prostatectomy for men with low-risk prostate cancer: a matched case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Amil; Kim, Sinae; Kim, Isaac Yi; Goyal, Sharad

    2017-01-01

    Background: Little data exist on effect of undergoing laparoscopic prostatectomy(LP) versus open prostatectomy(OP) upon 30-day mortality rates among low-risk prostate cancer patients. Materials and methods: Using the National Cancer Database, we identified men (2004 to 2013) with biopsy-proven, low-risk prostate cancer who met the eligibility criteria: N0, M0, T-stage≤2A, PSA≤10 ng/mL, and Gleason score=6. We utilized a 1:N matched case-control study, with cases and controls matched by race, insurance status, Charlson-Deyo comorbidity score, surgical margin status, and facility type to investigate the short-term comparative effectiveness of LP versus OP. Results: Among the 448,773 patients in the National Cancer Database with low-risk prostate cancer, 116,359 patients met the above inclusion criteria. The target group was restricted to patients who received LP or OP, thus, leaving 44,720 patients for the study. The use of LP (compared with OP) was associated with patients with privately insured patients, treatment at an academic/research centers, high-volume hospitals, and white race (all Popen) was estimated at 0.31 (95% confidence interval, 0.135–0.701; P<0.05). Thus, the risk of death within 30 days was 69% lower with LP compared with OP. Conclusions: We found that the 30-day mortality rate among low-risk prostate cancer patients is significantly lower among patients who received LP when compared with OP, with various clinicopathologic parameters associated with its preferential use. PMID:29177226

  12. Dipyridamole reduces penile apoptosis in a rat model of post-prostatectomy erectile dysfunction

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    Omer Kutlu

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: Despite the nerve-sparing technique, many patients suffer from erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy (RP due to cavernous nerve injury. The aim of this study was to evaluate dipyridamole as a potential treatment agent of post-radical prostatectomy erectile dysfunction. Material and methods: A total of 18 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into three experimental Groups (SHAM+DMSO, BCNI+DMSO and BCNI+DIP. An animal model of bilateral cavernous nerve crush injury (BCNI was established to mimic the partial nerve damage during nerve-sparing RP. After creating of BCNI, dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO was administered transperitoneally as a vehicle to SHAM+DMSO and BCNI+DMSO Groups. BCNI+DIP Group received dipyiridamole (10mg/kg/day as a solution in DMSO for 15 days. Afterwards, rats were evaluated for in vivo erectile response to cavernous nerve stimulation. Penile tissues were also analyzed biochemically for transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 level. Penile corporal apoptosis was determined by TUNEL method. Results: Erectile response was decreased in rats with BCNI and there was no significant improvement with dipyridamole treatment. TGF-β1 levels were increased in rats with BCNI and decreased with dipyridamole treatment. Dipyridamole led to reduced penile apoptosis in rats with BCNI and there was no significant difference when compared to sham operated rats. Conclusions: Although fifteen-day dipyridamole treatment has failed to improve erectile function in rats with BCNI, the decline in both TGF-β1 levels and apoptotic indices with treatment may be helpful in protecting penile morphology after cavernous nerve injury.

  13. A Literature-Based Analysis of the Learning Curves of Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy

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    Daniel W. Good

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a trend for the increased adoption of minimally invasive techniques of radical prostatectomy (RP – laparoscopic (LRP and robotic assisted (RARP – from the traditional open radical retropubic prostatectomy (ORP, popularised by Partin et al. Recently there has been a dramatic expansion in the rates of RARP being performed, and there have been many early reports postulating that the learning curve for RARP is shorter than for LRP. The aim of this study was to review the literature and analyse the length of the LRP learning curves for the various outcome measures: perioperative, oncologic, and functional outcomes. A broad search of the literature was performed in November 2013 using the PubMed database. Only studies of real patients and those from 2004 until 2013 were included; those on simulators were excluded. In total, 239 studies were identified after which 13 were included. The learning curve is a heterogeneous entity, depending entirely on the criteria used to define it. There is evidence of multiple learning curves; however the length of these is dependent on the definitions used by the authors. Few studies use the more rigorous definition of plateauing of the curve. Perioperative learning curve takes approximately 150-200 cases to plateau, oncologic curve approximately 200 cases, and the functional learning curve up to 700 cases to plateau (700 for potency, 200 cases for continence. In this review, we have analysed the literature with respect to the learning curve for LRP. It is clear that the learning curve is long. This necessitates centralising LRP to high volume centres such that surgeons, trainees, and patients are able to utilise the benefits of LRP.

  14. Utilizing Machine Learning and Automated Performance Metrics to Evaluate Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy Performance and Predict Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Andrew J; Chen, Jian; Che, Zhengping; Nilanon, Tanachat; Jarc, Anthony; Titus, Micha; Oh, Paul J; Gill, Inderbir S; Liu, Yan

    2018-05-01

    Surgical performance is critical for clinical outcomes. We present a novel machine learning (ML) method of processing automated performance metrics (APMs) to evaluate surgical performance and predict clinical outcomes after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). We trained three ML algorithms utilizing APMs directly from robot system data (training material) and hospital length of stay (LOS; training label) (≤2 days and >2 days) from 78 RARP cases, and selected the algorithm with the best performance. The selected algorithm categorized the cases as "Predicted as expected LOS (pExp-LOS)" and "Predicted as extended LOS (pExt-LOS)." We compared postoperative outcomes of the two groups (Kruskal-Wallis/Fisher's exact tests). The algorithm then predicted individual clinical outcomes, which we compared with actual outcomes (Spearman's correlation/Fisher's exact tests). Finally, we identified five most relevant APMs adopted by the algorithm during predicting. The "Random Forest-50" (RF-50) algorithm had the best performance, reaching 87.2% accuracy in predicting LOS (73 cases as "pExp-LOS" and 5 cases as "pExt-LOS"). The "pExp-LOS" cases outperformed the "pExt-LOS" cases in surgery time (3.7 hours vs 4.6 hours, p = 0.007), LOS (2 days vs 4 days, p = 0.02), and Foley duration (9 days vs 14 days, p = 0.02). Patient outcomes predicted by the algorithm had significant association with the "ground truth" in surgery time (p algorithm in predicting, were largely related to camera manipulation. To our knowledge, ours is the first study to show that APMs and ML algorithms may help assess surgical RARP performance and predict clinical outcomes. With further accrual of clinical data (oncologic and functional data), this process will become increasingly relevant and valuable in surgical assessment and training.

  15. A new technique in the surgical treatment of Hangman′s fractures: Neurospinal Academy (NSA technique

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    Sedat Dalbayrak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Treatment of Hangman′s fractures is still controversial. Hangman′s fractures Type II and IIA are usually treated with surgical procedures. Aim: This study aims at describing the Neurospinal Academy (NSA technique as an attempt to achieve an approximation of the fracture line to the axis body, which may be used for Type II and IIA patients with severe displacement and angulation. Settings and Design: NSA technique both pars or pedicle screws are placed bicortically to ensure that anterior surface of C2 vertebral body will be crossed 1-2 mm. A rod is prepared in suitable length and curve to connect the two screws. For placing the rod, sufficient amount of bone is resected from the C2 spinous process. C2 vertebral body is pulled back by means of the screws that crossed the anterior surface of C2 vertebral body. Materials and Methods: Hangman II and IIA patient are treated with NSA technique. Result: Angulated and tilted C2 vertebral body was pulled back and approximated to posterior elements. Conclusions: In Hangman′s fractures Type II and IIA with severe vertebral body and pedicle displacement, NSA technique is an effective and reliable treatment alternative for the approximation of posterior elements to the C2 vertebral body, which is tilted, angulated, and dislocated.

  16. Patients undergoing radical prostatectomy have a better survival than the background population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreas Røder, Martin; Brasso, Klaus; Drimer Berg, Kasper

    2013-01-01

    underwent radical prostatectomy. Patients were followed prospectively per protocol. No patients were lost to follow-up. Overall and cause-specific survival were described using Kaplan-Meier plots. Standardized relative survival and mortality ratio were calculated based on expected survival in the age......INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to investigate standardised relative survival and mortality ratio for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer at our institution. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Between 1995 and 2010, a total of 1,350 consecutive patients......-matched Danish population using the methods and macros described by Dickmann. The country-specific population mortality rates used for calculation of the expected survival were based on data from The Human Mortality Database. RESULTS: The median follow-up was 3.4 years (range: 0-14.3 years). A total of 59 (4...

  17. The problem of early continence recovery after radical prostatectomy

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    A. A. Kachmazov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The highest rate of incontinence after radical prostatectomy (RP is observed in the first 2–6 months after surgery. In order  to decrease the period of incontinence, virous surgical methods aimed at preservation and reconstruction of structures participating  in the mechanism of urine retention has been developed and improved.The study objective is to evaluate effectiveness of an original method of formation of an urethral anastomosis in the early continence recovery.Materials and methods. Data on 126 patients who underwent retropubic RP were analyzed. Depending on the method of urethral anastomosis formation, patients were divided into 2 groups: in the 1st group (n = 52 the patients underwent PR with urethra suspension m. levator ani, in the 2nd (n = 74 – standard RP. In the 1st group, 6 ligatures were applied to the anterior and posterior urethra walls: at the 12 and 6 hour projections through the mucosa, submucosa, and smooth muscle; at the 10, 2, 4, and 8 hour projections – more laterally with capture of the m. levator ani medial margins. Continence recovery was evaluated on days 1, 7, and 14 after urinary catheter removal and then at days 30, 90, 180, and 365 after RP. The criteria of continence were absence of urine leakage at rest and during physical activity and a necessity of using a safety liner.Results. There weren’t any significant differences at day 1 after urinary catheter removal between the two groups (р > 0.05. In the 1st group, continence values at days 30, 90, and 180 after RP were significantly higher (57.7, 69.2, and 71.1 %, respectively compared to the 2nd group (35.1, 41.9, and 51.3 %, respectively (р <0.05.Conclusion. Results of this work show significant benefits of RP with urethra suspension m. levator ani compared to standard RP per continence recovery criteria at days 7, 14, 30, 90, and 180 after the surgery. The technique of urethra suspension m. levator ani is easy to perform and ensures

  18. An Unusual Trocar Site Hernia after Prostatectomy

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    Ryan K. Schmocker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Trocar site hernias are rare complications after laparoscopic surgery but most commonly occur at larger trocar sites placed at the umbilicus. With increased utilization of the laparoscopic approach the incidence of trocar site hernia is increasing. We report a case of a trocar site hernia following an otherwise uncomplicated robotic prostatectomy at a 12 mm right lower quadrant port. The vermiform appendix was incarcerated within the trocar site hernia. Subsequent appendectomy and primary repair of the hernia were performed without complication.

  19. Outcome of postoperative radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy: a single institutional experience

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    Lee, Sea Won; Chung, Mi Joo; Jeong, Song Mi; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Jong Hoon [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Tae Kon; Hong, Sung Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Jang, Hong Seok [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sei Chul [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Bucheon St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    This single institutional study is aimed to observe the outcome of patients who received postoperative radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. A total of 59 men with histologically identified prostate adenocarcinoma who had received postoperative radiation after radical prostatectomy from August 2005 to July 2011 in Seoul St. Mary's Hospital of the Catholic University of Korea, was included. They received 45-50 Gy to the pelvis and boost on the prostate bed was given up to total dose of 63-72 Gy (median, 64.8 Gy) in conventional fractionation. The proportion of patients given hormonal therapy and the pattern in which it was given were analyzed. Primary endpoint was biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) after radiotherapy completion. Secondary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Biochemical relapse was defined as a prostate-specific antigen level above 0.2 ng/mL. After median follow-up of 53 months (range, 0 to 104 months), the 5-year bRFS of all patients was estimated 80.4%. The 5-year OS was estimated 96.6%. Patients who were given androgen deprivation therapy had a 5-year bRFS of 95.1% while the ones who were not given any had that of 40.0% (p < 0.01). However, the statistical significance in survival difference did not persist in multivariate analysis. The 3-year actuarial grade 3 chronic toxicity was 1.7% and no grade 3 acute toxicity was observed. The biochemical and toxicity outcome of post-radical prostatectomy radiotherapy in our institution is favorable and comparable to those of other studies.

  20. Salvage conformal radiotherapy for biochemical recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy

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    Carlos R. Monti

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Assess the results of salvage conformal radiotherapy in patients with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy and identify prognostic factors for biochemical recurrence and toxicity of the treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From June 1998 to November 2001, 35 patients were submitted to conformal radiotherapy for PSA > 0.2 ng/mL in progression after radical prostatectomy and were retrospectively analyzed. The mean dose of radiation in prostatic bed was of 77.4 Gy (68-81. Variables related to the treatment and to tumor were assessed to identify prognostic factors for biochemical recurrence after salvage radiotherapy. RESULTS: The median follow-up was of 55 months (17-83. The actuarial survival rates free of biochemical recurrence and free of metastasis at a distance of 5 years were 79.7% e 84.7%, respectively. The actuarial global survival rate in 5 years was 96.1%.The actuarial survival rate free of biochemical recurrence in 5 years was 83.3% with PSA pre-radiotherapy 1 and 2 (p = 0.023. Dose > 70 Gy in 30% of the bladder volume implied in more acute urinary toxicity (p = 0.035. The mean time for the development of late urinary toxicity was 21 months (12-51. Dose > 55 Gy in 50% bladder volume implied in more late urinary toxicity (p = 0.018. A patient presented late rectal toxicity of 2nd grade. CONCLUSIONS: Conformal radiotherapy showed to be effective for the control of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Patients with pre-therapy PSA < 2 ng/mL have more biochemical control.

  1. Prognostic significance of lymphovascular invasion in radical prostatectomy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, David S; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Lowrance, William T; Maschino, Alexandra C; Savage, Caroline J; Cronin, Angel M; Scardino, Peter T; Eastham, James A

    2011-08-01

    Study Type - Prognosis (case series). 4. What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The reported incidence of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) in radical prostatectomy specimens ranges from 5% to 53%. Although LVI has a strong and significant association with adverse clinicopathologic features, it has almost uniformly not been found to be a predictor of biochemical recurrence (BR) on multivariate analysis. This study confirms that LVI is associated with features of aggressive disease and is an independent predictor of BCR. Given that LVI may play a role in the metastatic process, it may be useful in clinical decision-making regarding adjuvant therapy for patients treated with RP. To determine whether lymphovascular invasion (LVI) in radical prostatectomy (RP) specimens has prognostic significance. The study examined whether LVI is associated with clinicopathological characteristics and biochemical recurrence (BCR). LVI was evaluated based on routine pathology reports on 1298 patients treated with RP for clinically localized prostate cancer between 2004 and 2007. LVI was defined as the unequivocal presence of tumour cells within an endothelium-lined space. The association between LVI and clinicopathological features was assessed with univariate logistic regression. Cox regression was used to test the association between LVI and BCR. LVI was identified in 10% (129/1298) of patients. The presence of LVI increased with advancing pathological stage: 2% (20/820) in pT2N0 patients, 16% (58/363) in pT3N0 patients and 17% (2/12) in pT4N0 patients; and was highest in patients with pN1 disease (52%; 49/94). Univariate analysis showed an association between LVI and higher preoperative prostate-specific antigen levels and Gleason scores, and a greater likelihood of extraprostatic extension, seminal vesicle invasion, lymph node metastasis and positive surgical margins (all P < 0.001). With a median follow-up of 27 months, LVI was significantly associated with an

  2. Vaginal-sparing ventral buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty for female urethral stricture: A novel modification of surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoag, Nathan; Gani, Johan; Chee, Justin

    2016-07-01

    To present a novel modification of surgical technique to treat female urethral stricture (FUS) by a vaginal-sparing ventral buccal mucosal urethroplasty. Recurrent FUS represents an uncommon, though difficult clinical scenario to manage definitively. A variety of surgical techniques have been described to date, yet a lack of consensus on the optimal procedure persists. We present a 51-year-old female with urethral stricture involving the entire urethra. Suspected etiology was iatrogenic from cystoscopy 17 years prior. Since then, the patient had undergone at least 25 formal urethral dilations and periods of self-dilation. In lithotomy position, the urethra was dilated to accommodate forceps, and ventral urethrotomy carried out sharply, exposing a bed of periurethral tissue. Buccal mucosa was harvested, and a ventral inlay technique facilitated by a nasal speculum, was used to place the graft from the proximal urethra/bladder neck to urethral meatus without a vaginal incision. Graft was sutured into place, and urethral Foley catheter inserted. The vaginal-sparing ventral buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty was deemed successful as of last follow-up. Flexible cystoscopy demonstrated patency of the repair at 6 months. At 10 months of follow-up, the patient was voiding well, with no urinary incontinence. No further interventions have been required. This case describes a novel modification of surgical technique for performing buccal mucosal urethroplasty for FUS. By avoiding incision of the vaginal mucosa, benefits may include reduced: morbidity, urinary incontinence, and wound complications including urethro-vaginal fistula.

  3. Equivalent biochemical failure-free survival after external beam radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy in patients with a pretreatment prostate specific antigen of > 4-20 ng/ml

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amico, Anthony V.; Whittington, Richard; Kaplan, Irving; Beard, Clair; Jiroutek, Michael; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Wein, Alan; Coleman, C. Norman

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Biochemical failure-free survival stratified by the pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and biopsy Gleason score (bGl) is determined for prostate cancer patients managed definitively with external beam radiation therapy or radical retropubic prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: A Cox regression multivariable analysis evaluating the variables of PSA, bGl, and clinical stage was used to evaluate the end point of time to PSA failure in 867 and 757 consecutive prostate cancer patients managed definitively with external beam radiation therapy or radical retropubic prostatectomy, respectively. PSA failure-free survival was determined using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Comparisons were made using the log rank test. Results: The pretreatment PSA, bGl, and clinical stage (T3,4 vs. T1,T2) were found to be independent predictors of time to post-treatment PSA failure for both surgically and radiation managed patients using Cox regression multivariable analysis. Patients with a pretreatment PSA of > 4 ng/ml and ≤ 20 ng/ml could be classified into risk groups for time to post-therapy PSA failure: low = PSA > 4-10 ng/ml and bGl ≤ 4; intermediate = PSA > 4-10 and bGl 5-7; or PSA > 10-20 ng/ml and bGl ≤ 7; high = PSA > 4-20 ng/ml and bGl ≥ 8. Two-year PSA failure-free survival for surgically managed and radiation-managed patients, respectively, were 98% vs. 92% (p = 0.45), 77% vs. 81% (p = 0.86), and 51% vs. 53% (p = 0.48) for patients at low, intermediate, and high risk for post-therapy PSA failure. Conclusions: There was no statistical difference in the 2-year PSA failure-free survival for potentially curable patients managed definitively with surgery or radiation therapy when a retrospective comparison stratifying for the pretreatment PSA and bGl was performed

  4. Salvage radical prostatectomy after external radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Indications, morbidity and results. Review from CCAFU prostate section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paparel, P.; Soulie, M.; Mongiat-Artus, P.; Cornud, F.; Borgogno, C.; Les membres du sous-comite prostate du CCAFU

    2010-01-01

    Local recurrence after external radiotherapy for prostate cancer occurs in 30 to 50 % and is often diagnosed by a rising PSA. The absence of local control after radiotherapy is a risk factor of metastases and specific mortality. There are several therapeutic options to treat these patients: surveillance, hormonotherapy and salvage therapies (radical prostatectomy, cysto-prostatectomy, brachytherapy, high intensity focused ultrasound [HIFU] and cryotherapy). Hormonotherapy is not a curative treatment and after a couple of years, the disease will progress again. Local salvage therapies are the only treatment to have the potential to cure these patients with the condition of very strict inclusion criteria. Among these therapies, only radical prostatectomy demonstrated his efficacy with a follow-up of 10 years on specific survival and survival without biological progression respectively from 70 to 77 % and from 30 to 43 %. During last decade, morbidity of RP has strongly decreased with a percentage of rectal and ureteral injury at 3 %. Nevertheless, percentage of urinary incontinence remains high from 29 to 50 %. Salvage mini-invasive therapies (cryotherapy, HIFU and cryotherapy) are under constant evolution due to progress of technology. Functional and oncological results are better with last generation devices but need to be evaluated and compared with radical prostatectomy. (authors)

  5. [Management of spinal metastasis by minimal invasive surgery technique: Surgical principles, indications: A literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toquart, A; Graillon, T; Mansouri, N; Adetchessi, T; Blondel, B; Fuentes, S

    2016-06-01

    Spinal metastasis are getting more frequent. This raises the question of pain and neurological complications, which worsen the functional and survival prognosis of this oncological population patients. The surgical treatment must be the most complete as possible: to decompress and stabilize without delaying the management of the oncological disease. Minimal invasive surgery techniques are by definition, less harmful on musculocutaneous plan than opened ones, with a comparable efficiency demonstrated in degenerative and traumatic surgery. So they seem to be applicable and appropriate to this patient population. We detailed different minimal invasive techniques proposed in the management of spinal metastasis. For this, we used our experience developed in degenerative and traumatic pathologies, and we also referred to many authors, establishing a literature review thanks to Pubmed, Embase. Thirty eight articles were selected and allowed us to describe different techniques: percutaneous methods such as vertebro-/kyphoplasty and osteosynthesis, as well as mini-opened surgery, through a posterior or anterior way. We propose a surgical approach using these minimal invasive techniques, first according to the predominant symptom (pain or neurologic failure), then characteristics of the lesions (number, topography, type…) and the deformity degree. Whatever the technique, the main goal is to stabilize and decompress, in order to maintain a good quality of life for these fragile patients, without delaying the medical management of the oncological disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Predictors and rate of adjuvant radiation therapy following radical prostatectomy: A report from the Prostate Cancer Registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, Christopher P.; Millar, Jeremy L.; Spelman, Tim; Sengupta, Shomik; Evans, Sue M.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term data from three randomized trials have demonstrated that adjuvant radiation therapy (ART) reduces the rate of biochemical failure in high-risk men following radical prostatectomy (RP). One of these trials has shown a survival advantage. We investigated the rate of ART in Victoria and the predictors for this treatment. We analysed data from eligible patients who were notified to the Victorian Prostate Cancer Registry (PCR) by 37 Victorian hospitals between 1 August 2008 and 31 October 2011. We defined ART as radiation therapy (RT) delivered within 6 months of RP. Predictors of ART receipt were modelled using adjusted and unadjusted logistic regression. There were 4626 eligible cases from which 2018 underwent RP with recorded date of surgery. Of these eligible prostatectomy cases, a total of 89 received ART. A subgroup of 833 men had an adverse pathologic feature, of whom 78 received ART. In a multivariate model, pathologic tumour stage pT3a (odds ratio (OR) 2.64; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4–5.00; P = 0.003), pT3b (OR 4.58; 95% CI 2.12–9.89; P = 0.000), a positive surgical margin (OR 8.91; 95% CI 4.61–17.2; P = 0.000) and pathologic Gleason grade >7 (OR 7.18; 95% CI 1.54–33.6; P = 0.012) predicted receipt of ART. Adverse pathologic features and high pathologic Gleason score predict for receiving ART in Victorian men after RP, but overall, ART is not commonly prescribed. This finding is consistent with other published series and may reflect clinician scepticism regarding the benefit of ART over salvage RT and concern about toxicity and the risk of over treatment.

  7. Surgery confounds biology: the predictive value of stage-, grade- and prostate-specific antigen for recurrence after radical prostatectomy as a function of surgeon experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Andrew J; Savage, Caroline J; Bianco, Fernando J; Klein, Eric A; Kattan, Michael W; Secin, Fernando P; Guilloneau, Bertrand D; Scardino, Peter T

    2011-04-01

    Statistical models predicting cancer recurrence after surgery are based on biologic variables. We have shown previously that prostate cancer recurrence is related to both tumor biology and to surgical technique. Here, we evaluate the association between several biological predictors and biochemical recurrence across varying surgical experience. The study included two separate cohorts: 6,091 patients treated by open radical prostatectomy and an independent replication set of 2,298 patients treated laparoscopically. We calculated the odds ratios for biological predictors of biochemical recurrence-stage, Gleason grade and prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-and also the predictive accuracy (area under the curve, AUC) of a multivariable model, for subgroups of patients defined by the experience of their surgeon. In the open cohort, the odds ratio for Gleason score 8+ and advanced pathologic stage, though not PSA or Gleason score 7, increased dramatically when patients treated by surgeons with lower levels of experience were excluded (Gleason 8+: odds ratios 5.6 overall vs. 13.0 for patients treated by surgeons with 1,000+ prior cases; locally advanced disease: odds ratios of 6.6 vs. 12.2, respectively). The AUC of the multivariable model was 0.750 for patients treated by surgeons with 50 or fewer cases compared to 0.849 for patients treated by surgeons with 500 or more. Although predictiveness was lower overall for the independent replication set cohort, the main findings were replicated. Surgery confounds biology. Although our findings have no direct clinical implications, studies investigating biological variables as predictors of outcome after curative resection of cancer should consider the impact of surgeon-specific factors. Copyright © 2010 UICC.

  8. Robotic surgical education: a collaborative approach to training postgraduate urologists and endourology fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirheydar, Hossein; Jones, Marklyn; Koeneman, Kenneth S; Sweet, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    Currently, robotic training for inexperienced, practicing surgeons is primarily done vis-à-vis industry and/or society-sponsored day or weekend courses, with limited proctorship opportunities. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of an extended-proctorship program at up to 32 months of follow-up. An extended-proctorship program for robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy was established at our institution. The curriculum consisted of 3 phases: (1) completing an Intuitive Surgical 2-day robotic training course with company representatives; (2) serving as assistant to a trained proctor on 5 to 6 cases; and (3) performing proctored cases up to 1 year until confidence was achieved. Participants were surveyed and asked to evaluate on a 5-point Likert scale their operative experience in robotics and satisfaction regarding their training. Nine of 9 participants are currently performing robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) independently. Graduates of our program have performed 477 RALP cases. The mean number of cases performed within phase 3 was 20.1 (range, 5 to 40) prior to independent practice. The program received a rating of 4.2/5 for effectiveness in teaching robotic surgery skills. Our robotic program, with extended proctoring, has led to an outstanding take-rate for disseminating robotic skills in a metropolitan community.

  9. Pylorus-preserving Whipple pancreaticoduodenectomy: Postoperative evaluation of a new surgical technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trerotola, S.O.; Jones, B.; Crist, D.J.; Cameron, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    The pylorus-preserving Whipple pancreaticoduodenectomy is becoming an increasingly popular alternative to the standard Whipple operation in the surgical treatment of diseases of the periampullary region. Contrast radiography plays an important role in the postoperative evaluation of patients undergoing this operation. Although most radiologists are familiar with the postoperative anatomy and complications associated with the standard Whipple operation, the newer technique involves different postoperative anatomy and different complications and requires a different approach to examination. The procedure presents several new diagnostic pitfalls. These variables are presented from a described series of 50 patients undergoing this procedure for periampullary neoplasm or chronic pancreatitis

  10. Modular Training for Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Where to Begin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovegrove, Catherine; Ahmed, Kamran; Novara, Giacomo; Guru, Khurshid; Mottrie, Alex; Challacombe, Ben; der Poel, Henk Van; Peabody, James; Dasgupta, Prokar

    Effective training is paramount for patient safety. Modular training entails advancing through surgical steps of increasing difficulty. This study aimed to construct a modular training pathway for use in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). It aims to identify the sequence of procedural steps that are learnt before surgeons are able to perform a full procedure without an intervention from mentor. This is a multi-institutional, prospective, observational, longitudinal study. We used a validated training tool (RARP Score). Data regarding surgeons' stage of training and progress were collected for analysis. A modular training pathway was constructed with consensus on the level of difficulty and evaluation of individual steps. We identified and recorded the sequence of steps performed by fellows during their learning curves. We included 15 urology fellows from UK, Europe, and Australia. A total of 15 surgeons were assessed by mentors in 425 RARP cases over 8 months (range: 7-79) across 15 international centers. There were substantial differences in the sequence of RARP steps according to the chronology of the procedure, difficulty level, and the order in which surgeons actually learned steps. Steps were not attempted in chronological order. The greater the difficulty, the later the cohort first undertook the step (p = 0.021). The cohort undertook steps of difficulty level I at median case number 1. Steps of difficulty levels II, III, and IV showed more variation in median case number of the first attempt. We recommend that, in the operating theater, steps be learned in order of increasing difficulty. A new modular training route has been designed. This incorporates the steps of RARP with the following order of priority: difficulty level > median case number of first attempt > most frequently undertaken in surgical training. An evidence-based modular training pathway has been developed that facilitates a safe introduction to RARP for novice surgeons. Copyright

  11. Risk of urinary incontinence following prostatectomy: the role of physical activity and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolin, Kathleen Y; Luly, Jason; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Andriole, Gerald L; Kibel, Adam S

    2010-02-01

    Urinary incontinence is one of the most commonly reported and distressing side effects of radical prostatectomy for prostate carcinoma. Several studies have suggested that symptoms may be worse in obese men but to our knowledge no research has addressed the joint effects of obesity and a sedentary lifestyle. We evaluated the association of obesity and lack of physical activity with urinary incontinence in a sample of men who had undergone radical prostatectomy. Height and weight were abstracted from charts, and obesity was defined as body mass index 30 kg/m(2) or greater. Men completed a questionnaire before surgery that included self-report of vigorous physical activity. Men who reported 1 hour or more per week of vigorous activities were considered physically active. Men reported their incontinence to the surgeon at their urology visits. Information on incontinence was abstracted from charts at 6 and 58 weeks after surgery. At 6 weeks after surgery 59% (405) of men were incontinent, defined as any pad use. At 58 weeks after surgery 22% (165) of men were incontinent. At 58 weeks incontinence was more prevalent in men who were obese and physically inactive (59% incontinent). Physical activity may offset some of the negative consequences of being obese because the prevalence of incontinence at 58 weeks was similar in the obese and active (25% incontinent), and nonbese and inactive (24% incontinent) men. The best outcomes were in men who were nonobese and physically active (16% incontinent). Men who were not obese and were active were 26% less likely to be incontinent than men who were obese and inactive (RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.52-1.06). Pre-prostatectomy physical activity and obesity may be important factors in post-prostatectomy continence levels. Interventions aimed at increasing physical activity and decreasing weight in patients with prostate cancer may improve quality of life by offsetting the negative side effects of treatment. Copyright 2010 American Urological

  12. Salvage conformal radiotherapy for biochemical recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monti, Carlos R.; Nakamura, Ricardo A.; Ferrigno, Robson; Rossi Junior, Aristides; Kawakami, Neusa S.; Trevisan, Felipe A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Assess the results of salvage conformal radiotherapy in patients with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy and identify prognostic factors for biochemical recurrence and toxicity of the treatment. Materials and methods: From June 1998 to November 2001, 35 patients were submitted to conformal radiotherapy for PSA ≥ 0.2 ng/mL in progression after radical prostatectomy and were retrospectively analyzed. The mean dose of radiation in prostatic bed was of 77.4 Gy (68-81). Variables related to the treatment and to tumor were assessed to identify prognostic factors for biochemical recurrence after salvage radiotherapy. Results: The median follow-up was of 55 months (17-83). The actuarial survival rates free of biochemical recurrence and free of metastasis at a distance of 5 years were 79.7% e 84.7%, respectively. The actuarial global survival rate in 5 years was 96.1%.The actuarial survival rate free of biochemical recurrence in 5 years was 83.3% with PSA pre-radiotherapy ≤ 1, 100% when > 1 and ≤ 2, and 57.1% when > 2 (p = 0.023). Dose > 70 Gy in 30% of the bladder volume implied in more acute urinary toxicity (p = 0.035). The mean time for the development of late urinary toxicity was 21 months (12-51). Dose > 55 Gy in 50% bladder volume implied in more late urinary toxicity (p = 0.018). A patient presented late rectal toxicity of second grade. Conclusions: Conformal radiotherapy showed to be effective for the control of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Patients with pre-therapy PSA < 2 ng/mL have more biochemical control. (author)

  13. Vaginal-sparing ventral buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty for female urethral stricture: A novel modification of surgical technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Hoag

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To present a novel modification of surgical technique to treat female urethral stricture (FUS by a vaginal-sparing ventral buccal mucosal urethroplasty. Recurrent FUS represents an uncommon, though difficult clinical scenario to manage definitively. A variety of surgical techniques have been described to date, yet a lack of consensus on the optimal procedure persists. Materials and Methods: We present a 51-year-old female with urethral stricture involving the entire urethra. Suspected etiology was iatrogenic from cystoscopy 17 years prior. Since then, the patient had undergone at least 25 formal urethral dilations and periods of self-dilation. In lithotomy position, the urethra was dilated to accommodate forceps, and ventral urethrotomy carried out sharply, exposing a bed of periurethral tissue. Buccal mucosa was harvested, and a ventral inlay technique facilitated by a nasal speculum, was used to place the graft from the proximal urethra/bladder neck to urethral meatus without a vaginal incision. Graft was sutured into place, and urethral Foley catheter inserted. Results: The vaginal-sparing ventral buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty was deemed successful as of last follow-up. Flexible cystoscopy demonstrated patency of the repair at 6 months. At 10 months of follow-up, the patient was voiding well, with no urinary incontinence. No further interventions have been required. Conclusions: This case describes a novel modification of surgical technique for performing buccal mucosal urethroplasty for FUS. By avoiding incision of the vaginal mucosa, benefits may include reduced: morbidity, urinary incontinence, and wound complications including urethro-vaginal fistula.

  14. Surgical virtual reality - highlights in developing a high performance surgical haptic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custură-Crăciun, D; Cochior, D; Constantinoiu, S; Neagu, C

    2013-01-01

    Just like simulators are a standard in aviation and aerospace sciences, we expect for surgical simulators to soon become a standard in medical applications. These will correctly instruct future doctors in surgical techniques without there being a need for hands on patient instruction. Using virtual reality by digitally transposing surgical procedures changes surgery in are volutionary manner by offering possibilities for implementing new, much more efficient, learning methods, by allowing the practice of new surgical techniques and by improving surgeon abilities and skills. Perfecting haptic devices has opened the door to a series of opportunities in the fields of research,industry, nuclear science and medicine. Concepts purely theoretical at first, such as telerobotics, telepresence or telerepresentation,have become a practical reality as calculus techniques, telecommunications and haptic devices evolved,virtual reality taking a new leap. In the field of surgery barrier sand controversies still remain, regarding implementation and generalization of surgical virtual simulators. These obstacles remain connected to the high costs of this yet fully sufficiently developed technology, especially in the domain of haptic devices. Celsius.

  15. Reducing surgical levels by paraspinal mapping and diffusion tensor imaging techniques in lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua-Biao; Wan, Qi; Xu, Qi-Feng; Chen, Yi; Bai, Bo

    2016-04-25

    Correlating symptoms and physical examination findings with surgical levels based on common imaging results is not reliable. In patients who have no concordance between radiological and clinical symptoms, the surgical levels determined by conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neurogenic examination (NE) may lead to a more extensive surgery and significant complications. We aimed to confirm that whether the use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and paraspinal mapping (PM) techniques can further prevent the occurrence of false positives with conventional MRI, distinguish which are clinically relevant from levels of cauda equina and/or nerve root lesions based on MRI, and determine and reduce the decompression levels of lumbar spinal stenosis than MRI + NE, while ensuring or improving surgical outcomes. We compared the data between patients who underwent MRI + (PM or DTI) and patients who underwent conventional MRI + NE to determine levels of decompression for the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis. Outcome measures were assessed at 2 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months postoperatively. One hundred fourteen patients (59 in the control group, 54 in the experimental group) underwent decompression. The levels of decompression determined by MRI + (PM or DTI) in the experimental group were significantly less than that determined by MRI + NE in the control group (p = 0.000). The surgical time, blood loss, and surgical transfusion were significantly less in the experimental group (p = 0.001, p = 0.011, p = 0.001, respectively). There were no differences in improvement of the visual analog scale back and leg pain (VAS-BP, VAS-LP) scores and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores at 2 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months after operation between the experimental and control groups. MRI + (PM or DTI) showed clear benefits in determining decompression levels of lumbar spinal stenosis than MRI + NE. In patients with lumbar spinal

  16. Surgical navigation in urology: European perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassweiler, Jens; Rassweiler, Marie-Claire; Müller, Michael; Kenngott, Hannes; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Teber, Dogu

    2014-01-01

    Use of virtual reality to navigate open and endoscopic surgery has significantly evolved during the last decade. Current status of seven most interesting projects inside the European Association of Urology section of uro-technology is summarized with review of literature. Marker-based endoscopic tracking during laparoscopic radical prostatectomy using high-definition technology reduces positive margins. Marker-based endoscopic tracking during laparoscopic partial nephrectomy by mechanical overlay of three-dimensional-segmented virtual anatomy is helpful during planning of trocar placement and dissection of renal hilum. Marker-based, iPAD-assisted puncture of renal collecting system shows more benefit for trainees with reduction of radiation exposure. Three-dimensional laser-assisted puncture of renal collecting system using Uro-Dyna-CT realized in an ex-vivo model enables minimal radiation time. Electromagnetic tracking for puncture of renal collecting system using a sensor at the tip of ureteral catheter worked in an in-vivo model of porcine ureter and kidney. Attitude tracking for ultrasound-guided puncture of renal tumours by accelerometer reduces the puncture error from 4.7 to 1.8 mm. Feasibility of electromagnetic and optical tracking with the da Vinci telemanipulator was shown in vitro as well as using in-vivo model of oesophagectomy. Target registration error was 11.2 mm because of soft-tissue deformation. Intraoperative navigation is helpful during percutaneous puncture collecting system and biopsy of renal tumour using various tracking techniques. Early clinical studies demonstrate advantages of marker-based navigation during laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and partial nephrectomy. Combination of different tracking techniques may further improve this interesting addition to video-assisted surgery.

  17. Achieving a predictable 24-hour return to normal activities after breast augmentation: part II. Patient preparation, refined surgical techniques, and instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebbetts, John B

    2006-12-01

    The goal of this study was to develop practices that would allow patients undergoing subpectoral augmentation to predictably return to full normal activities within 24 hours after the operation, free of postoperative adjuncts. Part I of this study used motion and time study principles to reduce operative times, medication dosages, perioperative morbidity, and recovery times in augmentation mammaplasty. Part II of the study focuses on details of patient education, preoperative planning, instrumentation, and surgical technique modifications that were identified, modified, and implemented to achieve the results reported in part I. Two groups of 16 patients each (groups 1 and 2) were studied retrospectively for comparison to a third group of 627 patients (group 3) studied prospectively. Patients in group 1 had axillary partial retropectoral breast augmentations in 1982-1983, using dissociative anesthesia, blunt instrument implant pocket dissection, and Dow Corning, double-lumen implants containing 20 mg of methylprednisolone and 20 cc of saline in the outer lumen of the implants. Patients in group 2 (1990) had inframammary, retromammary augmentations by using a combination of blunt and electrocautery dissection, Surgitek Replicon polyurethane-covered, silicone gel-filled implants, and general endotracheal anesthesia. Patients in group 3 (1998 to 2001, n = 627) had inframammary partial retropectoral, inframammary retromammary, and axillary partial retropectoral augmentations under general endotracheal anesthesia. Refined practices and surgical techniques from studies of groups 1 and 2 were applied in group 3. Videotapes from operative procedures of groups 1 and 2 were analyzed with macromotion and micromotion study principles, and tables of events were formulated for each move during the operation for all personnel in the operating room. Extensive details of surgical technique were examined and reexamined in 13 different stages by using principles of motion and time

  18. Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation plus prostatectomy for stage T3 disease: lack of PSA-based benefit even among patients with negative lymphadenectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyslop, T; Corn, B; Werner-Wasik, M; Gomella, L

    1995-07-01

    Objective: Urologists have attempted to treat stage T3 prostate cancer by neoadjuvant total androgen deprivation (TAD) and prostatectomy. This approach has been disappointing because of the inability of ultrasonography to predict pathological disease status and frequent upstaging due to nodal positivity. Moreover, no reports give PSA-based outcome data among patients treated with TAD and prostatectomy. We therefore instituted a pilot study for T3 disease based on non-invasive staging (endorectal coil MRI), mandatory negative laparoscopic nodal dissections prior to hormonal manipulation, and prostatectomy followed by pathological and PSA-based outcome determinations. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients had negative laparoscopic lymphadenectomy followed by 4 months of neoadjuvant hormonal treatment (Lupron, Flutamide) prior to radical prostatectomy. Endorectal coil MRI was performed at the time of diagnosis and following hormonal treatment. Serum PSA was determined at 3 month intervals. Prostatectomy specimens were evaluated by 3 mm whole mount step sections. Results: Median age was 63 (range: 51-68). Karnofsky performance status was 90-100 in all patients. The median number of nodes sampled was 10 (range: 2-60). Prior to prostatectomy, downsizing was observed by MRI in 57% and biochemical response was documented in all patients. However, pathological downstaging to a lower state ({<=}T2c) was achieved in only 48%. The actuarial 3 year freedom from biochemical relapse was only 24%. Conclusion: Neither serum PSA response nor MRI downsizing predicted pathological disease status after pre-operative androgen deprivation. Even in the setting of pathologically negative lymph nodes, TAD decreased the pathological stage of disease in the minority of patients. The present approach appeared to offer no advantage when compared with PSA-based benchmarks achieved with conformal irradiation (Urology 45: 484, 1995) or TAD followed by external beam treatment (IJROBP 27: 246

  19. Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation plus prostatectomy for stage T3 disease: lack of PSA-based benefit even among patients with negative lymphadenectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyslop, T.; Corn, B.; Werner-Wasik, M.; Gomella, L.

    1995-01-01

    Objective: Urologists have attempted to treat stage T3 prostate cancer by neoadjuvant total androgen deprivation (TAD) and prostatectomy. This approach has been disappointing because of the inability of ultrasonography to predict pathological disease status and frequent upstaging due to nodal positivity. Moreover, no reports give PSA-based outcome data among patients treated with TAD and prostatectomy. We therefore instituted a pilot study for T3 disease based on non-invasive staging (endorectal coil MRI), mandatory negative laparoscopic nodal dissections prior to hormonal manipulation, and prostatectomy followed by pathological and PSA-based outcome determinations. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients had negative laparoscopic lymphadenectomy followed by 4 months of neoadjuvant hormonal treatment (Lupron, Flutamide) prior to radical prostatectomy. Endorectal coil MRI was performed at the time of diagnosis and following hormonal treatment. Serum PSA was determined at 3 month intervals. Prostatectomy specimens were evaluated by 3 mm whole mount step sections. Results: Median age was 63 (range: 51-68). Karnofsky performance status was 90-100 in all patients. The median number of nodes sampled was 10 (range: 2-60). Prior to prostatectomy, downsizing was observed by MRI in 57% and biochemical response was documented in all patients. However, pathological downstaging to a lower state (≤T2c) was achieved in only 48%. The actuarial 3 year freedom from biochemical relapse was only 24%. Conclusion: Neither serum PSA response nor MRI downsizing predicted pathological disease status after pre-operative androgen deprivation. Even in the setting of pathologically negative lymph nodes, TAD decreased the pathological stage of disease in the minority of patients. The present approach appeared to offer no advantage when compared with PSA-based benchmarks achieved with conformal irradiation (Urology 45: 484, 1995) or TAD followed by external beam treatment (IJROBP 27: 246

  20. A multi-institutional analysis comparing adjuvant and salvage radiation therapy for high-risk prostate cancer patients with undetectable PSA after prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budiharto, Tom; Perneel, Christiaan; Haustermans, Karin; Junius, Sara; Tombal, Bertrand; Scalliet, Pierre; Renard, Laurette; Lerut, Evelyne; Vekemans, Kris; Joniau, Steven; Poppel, Hendrik Van

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: In men with adverse pathology at the time of radical prostatectomy (RP), the most appropriate timing to administer radiotherapy (RT) remains a subject for debate. To determine whether salvage radiotherapy (SRT) upon early prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse is equivalent to immediate adjuvant radiotherapy (ART) post RP. Material and methods: 130 patients receiving ART and 89 receiving SRT were identified. All had an undetectable PSA after RP. Homogeneous subgroups were built based on the status (±) of lymphatic invasion (LVI) and surgical margins (SM), to allow a comparison of ART and SRT. Biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was calculated from the date of surgery and from the end of RT. The multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox Proportional hazard model. Results: In the SM-/LVI- and SM+/LVI- groups, SRT was a significant predictor of a decreased bDFS from the date of surgery, while in the SM+/LVI+ group, there was a trend towards significance. From the end of RT, SRT was also a significant predictor of a decreased bDFS in three patient groups: SM-/LVI-, SM+/LVI- and SM+/LVI+. Gleason score >7 showed to be another factor on multivariate analysis associated with decreased bDFS in the SM-/LVI- group, from the date of surgery and end of RT. Preoperative PSA was a significant predictor in the SM-/LVI- group from the date of RP only. Conclusions: Immediate ART post RP for patients with high risk features in the prostatectomy specimen significantly reduces bDFS after RP compared with early SRT upon PSA relapse.

  1. VACUUM THERAPY – PREVENTION OF HYPOXIA OF CAVERNOUS TISSUE PATIENTS AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Osadchinskii

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients, after radical prostatectomy with the use of nerve-sparing techniques, without carrying out penile rehabilitation, are at risk of forming cavernous fibrosis with the emergence of subsequent persistent erectile dysfunction. In order to minimize damage to cavernous tissue and early restoration of erectile function during the period of neuropraxia, it is necessary to ensure a sufficient level of oxygenation. The role of applying vacuum in penile rehabilitation for the prevention of hypoxia of cavernous tissue is not fully understood, due to the lack of data on the gaseous composition of the blood at the time of reaching the vacuum of erection. The purpose of this work was to review the scientific studies devoted to the study of vacuum induced penile erection in animals or humans, which indicates high results due to increased oxygenation of cavernous tissue.

  2. Single plus one port robotic radical prostatectomy (SPORP; Initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Tugcu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This article reports on patients with early stage prostate cancer treated with single plus one port robotic radical prostatectomy (SPORP. Materials and methods: Since January 2014, we performed SPORP in 8 patients with localized prostate cancer. Age of patients, clinical stage, operation time, intraoperative and postoperative complications, blood loss, histopathological evaluation, postoperative continence, serum level of PSA were evaluated. Results: Mean age of the 8 patients was 59.85 years. All operations were completed without conversion to standard robotic procedure or open surgery. No intra operative complications occurred. Mean operating time was 143 minutes; prostate excision 123 minutes and urethrovesical anastomosis 20 minutes. Mean blood loss was 45 ml. Preoperative Gleason scores were (3 + 4 in one patient and (3 + 3 in 7 patients. Postoperative Gleason scores were (3 + 4 in 2 patients, and (3 + 3 in 6 patients. All these 8 cases were in T1c clinical stage. Early postoperative complications were drain leakage (n = 1, atelectasis (n = 1, wound infection (n = 1 and fever (n = 1. There was no positive surgical margin. The serum level of PSA was less than 0.2 ng/ml and no other complications happened during the 4 to 12 months follow-up period. Postoperative continence and cosmetic results were excellent. Conclusions: It is relatively easy for urologists who are skilled in traditional laparoscopic and robotic surgeries to master SPORP. However long-term outcomes of this surgery need further investigations.

  3. Through Knee Amputation: Technique Modifications and Surgical Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank P Albino

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundKnee disarticulations (KD are most commonly employed following trauma or tumor resection but represent less than 2% of all lower extremity amputations performed in the United States annually. KDs provide enhanced proprioception, a long lever arm, preservation of adductor muscle insertion, decreased metabolic cost of ambulation, and an end weight-bearing stump. The role for KDs in the setting of arterial insufficiency or overwhelming infection is less clear. The purpose of this study is to describe technique modifications and report surgical outcomes following KDs at a high-volume Limb Salvage Center.MethodsA retrospective study of medical records for all patients who underwent a through-knee amputation performed by the senior author (C.E.A. between 2004 and 2012 was completed. Medical records were reviewed to collect demographic, operative, and postoperative information for each of the patients identified.ResultsBetween 2004 and 2012, 46 through-knee amputations for 41 patients were performed. The mean patient age was 68 and indications for surgery included infection (56%, arterial thrombosis (35%, and trauma (9%. Postoperative complications included superficial cellulitis (13%, soft tissue infection (4%, and flap ischemia (4% necessitating one case of surgical debridement (4% and four trans-femoral amputations (9%. 9 (22% patients went on to ambulate. Postoperative ambulation was greatest in the traumatic cohort and for patients less than 50 years of age, P<0.05. Alternatively, diabetes mellitus and infection reduced the likelihood of postoperative ambulation, P<0.01.ConclusionsKnee disarticulations are a safe and effective alternative to other lower extremity amputations when clinically feasible. For patient unlikely to ambulate, a through-knee amputation maximizes ease of transfers, promotes mobility by providing a counterbalance, and eliminates the potential for knee flexion contracture with subsequent skin breakdown.

  4. Postero-Inferior Pedicle Surgical Technique for the Treatment of Grade III Gynecomastia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiénot, Sophie; Bertheuil, Nicolas; Carloni, Raphaël; Méal, Cécile; Aillet, Sylvie; Herlin, Christian; Watier, Eric

    2017-06-01

    Surgical treatment of Grade III gynecomastia generally utilizes mastectomy techniques and free transplantation of the nipple-areola complex. Moreover, with rising obesity rates and the development of bariatric surgery, an increasing demand for correctional surgery for pseudogynecomastia has been observed, which is comparable to Grade III gynecomastia in terms of its surgical management. Here, we describe an innovative technique to deal with these new demands: fascio-cutaneous flap by postero-inferior pedicle. All patients in the Department of Plastic Surgery from our University Hospital suffering from Grade III gynecomastia or pseudogynecomastia underwent surgery via the postero-inferior pedicle flap technique. Briefly, we performed extensive liposuction of the infero-internal and infero-external mammary quadrants followed by liposuction of the deep tissues of the superior quadrants, except in the area of the pedicle. After removing the skin just above the dermis of the inferior quadrants and performing de-epithelialization of the postero-inferior pedicle flap, the thoracic flap was lowered and the areola transposed. Nine patients underwent surgery between March 2015 and March 2016, and their results were collected prospectively. The mean patient age was 46.6 years, the mean weight was 94.2 kg, and the mean body mass index was 30.8 kg/m 2 . In addition, the mean operative time was 132 min, the mean liposuction volume was 633 mL, the excised weight was 586 g, and the mean hospitalization and drainage durations were 3.8 days. No major complications occurred, no re-intervention was required, and no recurrence was found. We report a new operative technique using a postero-inferior pedicle. Its main advantage is preservation of neurovascular function, which makes this a promising technique for patients who wish to maintain nipple sensitivity. This surgery is reliable and reproducible. We recommend it as the first line treatment for Grade III gynecomastia because

  5. Direct surgical repair of spondylolysis in athletes: indications, techniques, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazin, Doniel; Shirzadi, Ali; Jeswani, Sunil; Ching, Harry; Rosner, Jack; Rasouli, Alexandre; Kim, Terrence; Pashman, Robert; Johnson, J Patrick

    2011-11-01

    Athletes present with back pain as a common symptom. Various sports involve repetitive hyperextension of the spine along with axial loading and appear to predispose athletes to the spinal pathology spondylolysis. Many athletes with acute back pain require nonsurgical treatment methods; however, persistent recurrent back pain may indicate degenerative disc disease or spondylolysis. Young athletes have a greater incidence of spondylolysis. Surgical solutions are many, and yet there are relatively few data in the literature on both the techniques and outcomes of spondylolytic repair in athletes. In this study, the authors undertook a review of the surgical techniques and outcomes in the treatment of symptomatic spondylolysis in athletes. A systematic review of the MEDLINE and PubMed databases was performed using the following key words to identify articles published between 1950 and 2011: "spondylolysis," "pars fracture," "repair," "athlete," and/or "sport." Papers on both athletes and nonathletes were included in the review. Articles were read for data on methodology (retrospective vs prospective), type of treatment, number of patients, mean patient age, and mean follow-up. Eighteen articles were included in the review. Eighty-four athletes and 279 nonathletes with a mean age of 20 and 21 years, respectively, composed the population under review. Most of the fractures occurred at L-5 in both patient groups, specifically 96% and 92%, respectively. The average follow-up period was 26 months for athletes and 86 months for nonathletes. According to the modified Henderson criteria, 84% (71 of 84) of the athletes returned to their sports activities. The time intervals until their return ranged from 5 to 12 months. For a young athlete with a symptomatic pars defect, any of the described techniques of repair would probably produce acceptable results. An appropriate preoperative workup is important. The ideal candidate is younger than 20 years with minimal or no listhesis and

  6. Surgical treatment of choanal atresia with transnasal endoscopic approach with stentless single side-hinged flap technique: 5 year retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Saraniti

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Choanal atresia is a rare congenital malformation of the nasal cavity characterized by the complete obliteration of the posterior choanae. In 67% of cases choanal atresia is unilateral, affecting mainly (71% the right nasal cavity. In contrast to the unilateral form, bilateral choanal atresia is a life-threatening condition often associated with respiratory distress with feeding and intermittent cyanosis exacerbated by crying. Surgical treatment remains the only therapeutic option. Objective: To report our experience in the use of a transnasal endoscopic approach with stentless single side-hinged flap technique for the surgical management of choanal atresia. Methods: A 5 year retrospective analysis of surgical outcomes of 18 patients treated for choanal atresia with a transnasal technique employing a single side-hinged flap without stent placement. All subjects were assessed preoperatively with a nasal endoscopy and a Maxillofacial computed tomography scan. Results: Ten males and eight females with a mean age at the time of surgery of 20.05 ± 11.32 years, underwent surgery for choanal atresia. Fifteen subjects (83.33% had a bony while 3 (26.77% a mixed bony-membranous atretic plate. Two and sixteen cases suffered from bilateral and unilateral choanal atresia respectively. No intra- and/or early postoperative complications were observed. Between 2 and 3 months after surgery two cases (11.11% of partial restenosis were found. Only one of these presented a relapse of the nasal obstruction and was subsequently successfully repaired with a second endoscopic procedure. Conclusion: The surgical technique described follows the basic requirements of corrective surgery and allows good visualization, evaluation and treatment of the atretic plate and the posterior third of the septum, in order to create the new choanal opening. We believe that the use of a stent is not necessary, as recommended in case of other surgical techniques

  7. Clinical role of pathological downgrading after radical prostatectomy in patients with biopsy-proven Gleason score 3+4 prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondo, Tatsuo; Poon, Bing Ying; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Bernstein, Melanie; Sjoberg, Daniel D.; Eastham, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify preoperative factors predicting Gleason score downgrading after radical prostatectomy in patients with biopsy Gleason score 3+4 prostate cancer. To determine if prediction of downgrading can identify potential candidates for active surveillance. Patients and Methods We identified 1317 patients with biopsy Gleason score 3+4 prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 2005 and 2013. Several preoperative and biopsy characteristics were evaluated by forward selection regression, and selected predictors of downgrading were analyzed by multivariable logistic regression. Decision curve analysis was performed to evaluate the clinical utility of the multivariate model. Results Gleason score was downgraded after radical prostatectomy in 115 patients (9%). We developed a multivariable model using age, prostate specific antigen density, percent of positive cores with Gleason 4 cancer out of all cores taken, and maximum percent of cancer involvement within a positive core with Gleason 4 cancer. The area under the curve for this model was 0.75 after ten-fold cross validation. However, decision curve analysis revealed that the model was not clinically helpful in identifying patients who will downgrade at radical prostatectomy for the purpose of reassigning them to active surveillance. Conclusion While patients with pathology Gleason score 3+3 with tertiary Gleason pattern 4 or lower at radical prostatectomy in patients with biopsy Gleason score 3+4 prostate cancer may be potential candidates for active surveillance, decision curve analysis showed limited utility of our model to identify such men. Future study is needed to identify new predictors to help identify potential candidates for active surveillance among patients with biopsy-proven Gleason score 3+4 prostate cancer. PMID:24725760

  8. Prevalence and Predicting Factors for Commonly Neglected Sexual Side Effects to Radical Prostatectomies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Anders; Sønksen, Jens; Jakobsen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Altered perception of orgasm, orgasm-associated pain, penile sensory changes, urinary incontinence (UI) during sexual activity, penile shortening (PS), and penile deformity following radical prostatectomy (RP) have received increasing attention from researchers. AIM: The aim...

  9. Correlation of Peripheral Vein Tumour Marker Levels, Internal Iliac Vein Tumour Marker Levels and Radical Prostatectomy Specimens in Patients with Prostate Cancer and Borderline High Prostate-Specific Antigen: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrelly, Cormac; Lal, Priti; Trerotola, Scott O; Nadolski, Gregory J; Watts, Micah M; Gorrian, Catherine Mc; Guzzo, Thomas J

    2016-05-01

    To correlate prostate-specific antigen (PSA), free to total PSA percentage (fPSA%) and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) levels from peripheral and pelvic venous samples with prostatectomy specimens in patients with prostate adenocarcinoma and borderline elevation of PSA. In this prospective institutional review board approved study, 7 patients with biopsy proven prostate cancer had a venous sampling procedure prior to prostatectomy (mean 3.2 days, range 1-7). Venous samples were taken from a peripheral vein (PVS), the right internal iliac vein, a deep right internal iliac vein branch, left internal iliac vein and a deep left internal iliac vein branch. Venous sampling results were compared to tumour volume, laterality, stage and grade in prostatectomy surgical specimens. Mean PVS PSA was 4.29, range 2.3-6 ng/ml. PSA and PAP values in PVS did not differ significantly from internal iliac or deep internal iliac vein samples (p > 0.05). fPSA% was significantly higher in internal iliac (p = 0.004) and deep internal iliac (p = 0.003) vein samples compared to PVS. One of 7 patients had unilateral tumour only. This patient, with left-sided tumour, had a fPSA% of 6, 6, 6, 14 and 12 in his peripheral, right internal iliac, deep right internal iliac branch, left internal iliac and deep left internal iliac branch samples respectively. There were no adverse events. fPSA%, unlike total PSA or PAP, is significantly higher in pelvic vein compared to peripheral vein samples when prostate cancer is present. Larger studies including patients with higher PSA values are warranted to further investigate this counterintuitive finding.

  10. Neoadjuvant treatment and adjuvant radiotherapy for patients with high risk prostate cancer and radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scorticati, Carlos; Aguilar, Jorge A.; Gonzalez Granda, Pablo; Mendez, Fernando; Montiel, Raul; Rege, Eduardo; Alvarez, Patricio; Lopez, Miguel A.; Rizzi, Alfredo; Mazza, Osvaldo

    2009-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives: To analyze the results of the treatment in patients with cancer of prostate of high risk. Material and Method: Retrospective and observational analysis of 130 patients operated by CAP of high risk (criteria of D'Amico) average 41,48 months, divided in form nonrandomized in three groups 1: radical prostatectomy, 2: neoadjuvant hormonoterapy (BAC) + PR, 3: BAC + PR + x-ray (RT). Statistical analysis: multivaried, test of curved Chi2 and p statistical and of Kaplan Meier. Results: Biochemical relapse 68 patients (52.3%), average 23,37 months. Without differences according to therapeutic modality (p: 0.043). In the multivaried analysis of the 3 factors of presurgical, single risk we found a statistically significant relation in the coexistence of the 3 factors with the presence of positive margin in the PR piece. (p: 0,002). The analysis to make or not, neoadjuvant BAC without significant difference (p: 0,403) evaluating in such the rate of M+, actuarial global survival according to curves of Kaplan Meier to 5 and 10 years (P: 0,5257) and survival 5 actuarial specific cancer to and 10a (P: 0,2165). Conclusions: Without significant differences in: RB, clinical progression, pathological relapse, global and specific survival, rate of positive surgical margins. The 3 criteria of D'Amico were predictive of positive surgical margins and RB, the patients with RB in group 2 presented/displayed greater risk of clinical progression, the PR demonstrated a global survival and specify actuarial to 10 years greater to 50%, considering it therapeutic an option been worth. (authors) [es

  11. A Unique Surgical Technique for Tracheostomy in Heterotopic Ossification: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Esther; Thorpe, Eric

    2016-11-01

    To describe a technique for tracheostomy in heterotopic ossification that has not yet been described in the literature. We report a case of difficult tracheostomy while using conventional techniques in a 68-year-old patient who underwent mitral valve replacement requiring warfarin therapy three months prior. Imaging revealed heterotopic ossification overlying the trachea. A literature review was performed to identify similar cases or techniques. Extensive surgical planning was pursued after the initial attempted tracheostomy failed, and the airway was eventually accessed using a lighted intubation stylet for guidance and a drill. Heterotopic ossification has been described after orthopedic and abdominal surgeries. We identified one case report in the literature of tracheostomy performed in the setting of heterotopic ossification by an unspecified mechanism. There are few reported cases of tracheobronchial calcification in cardiac patients receiving warfarin therapy; however, these patients had characteristic imaging findings that were not consistent with those of our patient. We illustrate a safe and effective technique for tracheostomy in heterotopic ossification that has not been reported. Coordination with the anesthesia service was paramount for a successful operation. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Prostate Cancer–Specific Mortality After Radical Prostatectomy for Patients Treated in the Prostate-Specific Antigen Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Andrew J.; Kattan, Michael W.; Eastham, James A.; Bianco, Fernando J.; Yossepowitch, Ofer; Vickers, Andrew J.; Klein, Eric A.; Wood, David P.; Scardino, Peter T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The long-term risk of prostate cancer–specific mortality (PCSM) after radical prostatectomy is poorly defined for patients treated in the era of widespread prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening. Models that predict the risk of PCSM are needed for patient counseling and clinical trial design. Methods A multi-institutional cohort of 12,677 patients treated with radical prostatectomy between 1987 and 2005 was analyzed for the risk of PCSM. Patient clinical information and treatment outcome was modeled using Fine and Gray competing risk regression analysis to predict PCSM. Results Fifteen-year PCSM and all-cause mortality were 12% and 38%, respectively. The estimated PCSM ranged from 5% to 38% for patients in the lowest and highest quartiles of predicted risk of PSA-defined recurrence, based on a popular nomogram. Biopsy Gleason grade, PSA, and year of surgery were associated with PCSM. A nomogram predicting the 15-year risk of PCSM was developed, and the externally validated concordance index was 0.82. Neither preoperative PSA velocity nor body mass index improved the model's accuracy. Only 4% of contemporary patients had a predicted 15-year PCSM of greater than 5%. Conclusion Few patients will die from prostate cancer within 15 years of radical prostatectomy, despite the presence of adverse clinical features. This favorable prognosis may be related to the effectiveness of radical prostatectomy (with or without secondary therapy) or the low lethality of screen-detected cancers. Given the limited ability to identify contemporary patients at substantially elevated risk of PCSM on the basis of clinical features alone, the need for novel markers specifically associated with the biology of lethal prostate cancer is evident. PMID:19636023

  13. Evaluating deviations in prostatectomy patients treated with IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Ana Cravo; Peres, Ana; Pereira, Mónica; Coelho, Carina Marques; Monsanto, Fátima; Macedo, Ana; Lamas, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the deviations in prostatectomy patients treated with IMRT in order to calculate appropriate margins to create the PTV. Defining inappropriate margins can lead to underdosing in target volumes and also overdosing in healthy tissues, increasing morbidity. 223 CBCT images used for alignment with the CT planning scan based on bony anatomy were analyzed in 12 patients treated with IMRT following prostatectomy. Shifts of CBCT images were recorded in three directions to calculate the required margin to create PTV. The mean and standard deviation (SD) values in millimetres were -0.05 ± 1.35 in the LR direction, -0.03 ± 0.65 in the SI direction and -0.02 ± 2.05 the AP direction. The systematic error measured in the LR, SI and AP direction were 1.35 mm, 0.65 mm, and 2.05 mm with a random error of 2.07 mm; 1.45 mm and 3.16 mm, resulting in a PTV margin of 4.82 mm; 2.64 mm, and 7.33 mm, respectively. With IGRT we suggest a margin of 5 mm, 3 mm and 8 mm in the LR, SI and AP direction, respectively, to PTV1 and PTV2. Therefore, this study supports an anisotropic margin expansion to the PTV being the largest expansion in the AP direction and lower in SI.

  14. Early catheter removal after radical retropubic prostatectomy: long-term followup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Michael O; Nayee, Anish H; Sloan, James; Gardner, Thomas; Wahle, Greg R; Bihrle, Richard; Foster, Richard S

    2003-06-01

    We examine the complication and continence rates with early catheter removal (day 3 or 4) after radical retropubic prostatectomy. A total of 365 patients with localized prostate cancer underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy at Indiana University Hospital with planned urethral catheter removal before discharge home. Low pressure cystograms were performed on postoperative day 3 or 4 to determine if catheter removal was possible. A subset of patients were analyzed using a validated prostate cancer specific questionnaire (University of California, Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Symptom Index) to determine quality of life outcomes. The catheter was removed on postoperative day 3 or 4 in 263 patients (72%). The reasons for leaving the catheter indwelling were significant leak on cystogram or excessive suprapubic drainage (21%), extensive bladder neck reconstruction (1%) and prolonged hospitalization because of an ileus or other complicating factor (6%). Thirteen patients (3.6%) were either unable to void after catheter removal or presented with retention (not associated with hematuria or clots) after hospital discharge, requiring reinsertion of the Foley catheter. A total of 41 patients (11%) had either an early or late complication (excluding incontinence). There were 3 complications (0.8%) that were considered major because they were potentially life threatening or required a return to the operating room. A pelvic abscess developed in 2 patients and a lymphocele in 1, which required percutaneous drainage. After at least 6 months (mean 20.9 months) 140 patients (89.2%) and 14 (8.9%) reported excellent and good continence, respectively. The patient questionnaire demonstrated bother scores to be minimal to no bother for 95% to 98% of patients at 6 and 12 months. This study confirms that it is safe to remove catheters in most patients 3 to 4 days after prostatectomy if a cystogram demonstrates no extravasation. Complication rates and continence rates with this approach

  15. Comparison of mortality outcomes after radical prostatectomy versus radiotherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer. A population-based analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdollah, F.; Schmitges, J.; Sun, M.

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the mortality outcomes of radical prostatectomy and radiotherapy as treatment modalities for patients with localized prostate cancer. Our cohort consisted of 68 665 patients with localized prostate cancer, treated with radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy, between 1992 and 2005. Propensity-score matching was used to minimize potential bias related to treatment assignment. Competing-risks analyses tested the effect of treatment type on cancer-specific mortality, after accounting for other-cause mortality. All analyses were stratified according to prostate cancer risk groups, baseline Charlson Comorbidity Index and age. For patients treated with radical prostatectomy versus radiotherapy, the 10-year cancer-specific mortality rates were 1.4 versus 3.9% in low-intermediate risk prostate cancer and 6.8 versus 11.5% in high-risk prostate cancer, respectively. Rates were 2.4 versus 5.9% in patients with Charlson Comorbidity Index of 0, 2.4 versus 5.1% in patients with Charlson Comorbidity Index of 1, and 2.9 versus 5.2% in patients with Charlson Comorbidity Index of ≥2. Rates were 2.1 versus 5.0% in patients aged 65-69 years, 2.8 versus 5.5% in patients aged 70-74 years, and 2.9 versus 7.6% in patients aged 75-80 years (all P<0.001). At multivariable analyses, radiotherapy was associated with less favorable cancer-specific mortality in all categories (all P<0.001). Patients treated with radical prostatectomy fare substantially better than those treated with radiotherapy. Patients with high-risk prostate cancer benefit the most from radical prostatectomy. Conversely, the lowest benefit was observed in patients with low-intermediate risk prostate cancer and/or multiple comorbidities. An intermediate benefit was observed in the other examined categories. (author)

  16. The zygomatic implant perforated (ZIP) flap: a new technique for combined surgical reconstruction and rapid fixed dental rehabilitation following low-level maxillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, C J; Rogers, S N

    2017-12-01

    This aim of this report is to describe the development and evolution of a new surgical technique for the immediate surgical reconstruction and rapid post-operative prosthodontic rehabilitation with a fixed dental prosthesis following low-level maxillectomy for malignant disease.The technique involves the use of a zygomatic oncology implant perforated micro-vascular soft tissue flap (ZIP flap) for the primary management of maxillary malignancy with surgical closure of the resultant maxillary defect and the installation of osseointegrated support for a zygomatic implant-supported maxillary fixed dental prosthesis.The use of this technique facilitates extremely rapid oral and dental rehabilitation within a few weeks of resective surgery, providing rapid return to function and restoring appearance following low-level maxillary resection, even in cases where radiotherapy is required as an adjuvant treatment post-operatively. The ZIP flap technique has been adopted as a standard procedure in the unit for the management of low-level maxillary malignancy, and this report provides a detailed step-by-step approach to treatment and discusses modifications developed over the treatment of an initial cohort of patients.

  17. Ultrasensitive prostate specific antigen assay following laparoscopic radical prostatectomy--an outcome measure for defining the learning curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viney, R; Gommersall, L; Zeif, J; Hayne, D; Shah, Z H; Doherty, A

    2009-07-01

    Radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) performed laparoscopically is a popular treatment with curative intent for organ-confined prostate cancer. After surgery, prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels drop to low levels which can be measured with ultrasensitive assays. This has been described in the literature for open RRP but not for laparoscopic RRP. This paper describes PSA changes in the first 300 consecutive patients undergoing non-robotic laparoscopic RRP by a single surgeon. To use ultrasensitive PSA (uPSA) assays to measure a PSA nadir in patients having laparoscopic radical prostatectomy below levels recorded by standard assays. The aim was to use uPSA nadir at 3 months' post-prostatectomy as an early surrogate end-point of oncological outcome. In so doing, laparoscopic oncological outcomes could then be compared with published results from other open radical prostatectomy series with similar end-points. Furthermore, this end-point could be used in the assessment of the surgeon's learning curve. Prospective, comprehensive, demographic, clinical, biochemical and operative data were collected from all patients undergoing non-robotic laparoscopic RRP. We present data from the first 300 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic RRP by a single surgeon. uPSA was measured every 3 months post surgery. Median follow-up was 29 months (minimum 3 months). The likelihood of reaching a uPSA of bench-marking performance. With experience, a surgeon can achieve in excess of an 80% chance of obtaining a uPSA nadir of < or = 0.01 ng/ml at 3 months after laparoscopic RRP for a British population. This is equivalent to most published open series.

  18. Prospective Study of the Surgical Techniques Used in Primary Rhinoplasty on the Caucasian Nose and Comparison of the Preoperative and Postoperative Anthropometric Nose Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Cezar Augusto Sarraf; Freitas, Renato da Silva; Malafaia, Osvaldo; Pinto, José Simão de Paula; Macedo Filho, Evaldo Dacheux; Mocellin, Marcos; Fagundes, Marina Serrato Coelho

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The knowledge and study of surgical techniques and anthropometric measurements of the nose make possible a qualitative and quantitative analysis of surgical results. Objective Study the main technique used in rhinoplasty on Caucasian noses and compare preoperative and postoperative anthropometric measurements of the nose. Methods A prospective study with 170 patients was performed at a private hospital. Data were collected using the Electronic System Integrated of Protocols software (Sistema Integrado de Protocolos Eletrônicos, SINPE©). The surgical techniques used in the nasal dorsum and tip were evaluated. Preoperative and 12-month follow-up photos as well as the measurements compared with the ideal aesthetic standard of a Caucasian nose were analyzed objectively. Student t test and standard deviation test were applied. Results There was a predominance of endonasal access (94.4%). The most common dorsum technique was hump removal (33.33%), and the predominance of sutures (24.76%) was observed on the nasal tip, with the lateral intercrural the most frequent (32.39%). Comparison between preoperative and postoperative photos found statistically significant alterations on the anthropometric measurements of the noses. Conclusion The main surgical techniques on Caucasian noses were evaluated, and a great variety was found. The evaluation of anthropometric measurements of the nose proved the efficiency of the performed procedures. PMID:25992149

  19. Reversible hydronephrosis in the rat: a new surgical technique assessed by radioisotopic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flam, T.; Venot, A.; Bariety, J.

    1984-01-01

    A new technique for experimental reversible hydronephrosis in the rat was developed. A noninvasive radioisotopic investigation, using Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid, permitted sequential assessment of the separate renal function at different stages of the study. After 1 week of unilateral ureteral obstruction, reversibility was obtained by the removal of the obstructive device. Ten days after the obstruction release, the ipsilateral kidney had returned to 71 per cent of its preligation uptake value. Histological findings demonstrated the reversibility of the surgical obstruction

  20. The impact of rectal and bladder variability on target coverage during post-prostatectomy intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, Linda J.; Cox, Jennifer; Eade, Thomas; Rinks, Marianne; Kneebone, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Accuracy when delivering post-prostatectomy intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is crucial. The aims of this study were to quantify prostate bed movement and determine what amount of bladder or rectum size variation creates the potential for geographic miss. Methods and materials: The Cone Beam CT (CBCT) images (n = 377) of forty patients who received post-prostatectomy IMRT with daily on-line alignment to bony anatomy were reviewed. Prostate bed movement was estimated using the location of surgical clips in the upper and lower sections of the PTV and correlated with rectal and bladder filling (defined as changes in the cross sectional diameter at defined levels). The number of potential geographic misses caused by bladder and rectum variation was calculated assuming a uniform CTV to PTV expansion of 1 cm except 0.5 cm posteriorly. Results: Variations in bladder filling of >2 cm larger, ±1 cm, or >2 cm smaller occurred in 3.4%, 56.2%, and 15.1% of images respectively with potential geographic misses in the upper prostate bed of 61.5%, 9.9% and 26.3% respectively. Variations in rectal filling in the upper prostate bed of >1.5 cm larger, 1.5 cm larger to 1 cm smaller, and >1 cm smaller occurred in 17.2%, 75.6%, and 7.2% of images respectively. These variations resulted in geographic misses in the upper prostate bed in 29.2%, 12.3%, and 63.0% of images respectively. Variations in bladder and rectal filling in the lower prostate bed region had minimal impact on geographic misses. Conclusions: Bladder and rectal size changes at treatment affect prostate bed coverage, especially in the upper aspect of the prostate bed. The greatest potential for geographic miss occurred when either the bladder increased in size or when the rectum became smaller. Ensuring a full bladder and empty rectum at simulation will minimise this risk. Our data also support anisotropic PTV margins with larger margins superiorly than inferiorly

  1. Surgical Management of Hemorrhoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbo, S. P.

    2011-01-01

    Hemorrhoids are common human afflictions known since the dawn of history. Surgical management of this condition has made tremendous progress from complex ligation and excision procedures in the past to simpler techniques that allow the patient to return to normal life within a short period. Newer techniques try to improve on the post-operative complications of older ones. The surgical options for the management of hemorrhoids today are many. Capturing all in a single article may be difficult if not impossible. The aim of this study therefore is to present in a concise form some of the common surgical options in current literature, highlighting some important post operative complications. Current literature is searched using MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane library. The conclusion is that even though there are many surgical options in the management of hemorrhoids today, most employ the ligature and excision technique with newer ones having reduced post operative pain and bleeding. PMID:22413048

  2. Toxicity after post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy using Australian guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Stephen; Aherne, Noel J; Last, Andrew; Assareh, Hassan; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2017-12-01

    We evaluated single institution toxicity outcomes after post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT) via image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) with implanted fiducial markers following national eviQ guidelines, for which late toxicity outcomes have not been published. Prospectively collected toxicity data were retrospectively reviewed for 293 men who underwent 64-66 Gy IG-IMRT to the prostate bed between 2007 and 2015. Median follow-up after PPRT was 39 months. Baseline grade ≥2 genitourinary (GU), gastrointestinal (GI) and sexual toxicities were 20.5%, 2.7% and 43.7%, respectively, reflecting ongoing toxicity after radical prostatectomy. Incidence of new (compared to baseline) acute grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity was 5.8% and 10.6%, respectively. New late grade ≥2 GU, GI and sexual toxicity occurred in 19.1%, 4.7% and 20.2%, respectively. However, many patients also experienced improvements in toxicities. For this reason, prevalence of grade ≥2 GU, GI and sexual toxicities 4 years after PPRT was similar to or lower than baseline (21.7%, 2.6% and 17.4%, respectively). There were no grade ≥4 toxicities. Post-prostatectomy IG-IMRT using Australian contouring guidelines appears to have tolerable acute and late toxicity. The 4-year prevalence of grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity was virtually unchanged compared to baseline, and sexual toxicity improved over baseline. This should reassure radiation oncologists following these guidelines. Late toxicity rates of surgery and PPRT are higher than following definitive IG-IMRT, and this should be taken into account if patients are considering surgery and likely to require PPRT. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  3. Diode laser prostatectomy (VLAP): initial canine evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopchok, George E.; Verbin, Chris; Ayres, Bruce; Peng, Shi-Kaung; White, Rodney A.

    1995-05-01

    This study evaluated the acute and chronic effects of diode laser (960 nm) prostatectomy using a Prolase II fiber in a canine model (n equals 5). The laser fiber consists of a 1000 um quartz fiber which reflects a cone of laser energy, at 45 degree(s) to the axis of the fiber, into the prostatic urethra (Visual Laser Ablation of Prostate). Perineal access was used to guide a 15.5 Fr cystoscope to the level of the prostate. Under visual guidance and continual saline irrigation, 60 watts of laser power was delivered for 60 seconds at 3, 9, and 12 o'clock and 30 seconds at the 6 o'clock (posterior) positions for a total energy fluence of 12,600 J. One prostate received an additional 60 second exposure at 3 and 9 o'clock for a total fluence of 19,800 J. The prostates were evaluated at one day (n equals 1) and 8 weeks (n equals 4). The histopathology of laser effects at one day show areas of necrosis with loss of glandular structures and stromal edema. Surrounding this area was a zone of degenerative glandular structures extending up to 17.5 mm (cross sectional diameter). The histopathology of the 8 week laser treated animals demonstrated dilated prostatic urethras with maximum cross- sectional diameter of 23.4 mm (mean equals 18.5 +/- 3.9 mm). This study demonstrates the effectiveness of diode laser energy for prostatic tissue coagulation and eventual sloughing. The results also demonstrate the safety of diode laser energy, with similar tissue response as seen with Nd:YAG laser, for laser prostatectomy.

  4. Testing of a new prototype surgical stapler that automates the rollover sleeve technique for venous anastomoses

    OpenAIRE

    PATRICIA B CARROLL; WERVISTON DEFARIA; CARLOS GANDIA; MARIANA BERHO; EVANGELOS MISIAKOS; ANDREAS G TZAKIS

    2006-01-01

    The creation of successful vascular anastomoses is of primary importance in many surgical fields. Numerous attempts to automate this process have been made. These techniques have slowly gained acceptance, but their use is still limited. This report details feasibility testing of a new prototype stapler that automates the rollover sleeve technique for venous vascular anastomoses. Male and female mongrel dogs (n=7) (25-32 kg) were used. A segment of the right (n=5) or left (n=2) iliac vein was ...

  5. The first successful laparoscopic Whipple procedure at Hat Yai Hospital: surgical technique and a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaimook, Araya; Borkird, Jumpot; Alapach, Sakda

    2010-09-01

    Whipple procedure is the most complex abdominal surgical procedure to treat periampullary carcinoma. With the benefit of minimally invasive approach, many institutes attempt to do Whipple procedure laparoscopically. However, only 146 cases of laparoscopic Whipple procedure have yet been reported in the literature worldwide between 1994 and 2008. The authors reported the first laparoscopic Whipple procedure at Hat Yai Hospital in December 2009. The patient was a 40-year-old, Thai-Muslim female, with the diagnosis of ampullary carcinoma. The operating time was 685 minutes. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 14 without serious complication. The surgical technique and postoperative progress of the patient were described.

  6. MRI-derived Restriction Spectrum Imaging Cellularity Index is Associated with High Grade Prostate Cancer on Radical Prostatectomy Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Andre Liss

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We evaluate a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI technique to improve detection of aggressive prostate cancer. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of presurgical prostate MRI scans using an advanced diffusion weighted imaging technique called Restriction Spectrum Imaging (RSI, which can be presented as a normalized z-score statistic (RSI z-score. Scans were acquired prior to radical prostatectomy. Prostatectomy specimens were processed using whole mount sectioning and regions of interest (ROIs were drawn around individual prostate cancer (PCa tumors. Corresponding ROIs were drawn on the MRI imaging and paired with ROIs in regions with no pathology. RSI z-score and conventional apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC values were recorded for each ROI. Paired t-test, ANOVA and logistic regression analyses were performed.Results: We evaluated 28 patients with 64 regions of interest (28 benign and 36 PCa. The mean difference in RSI z-score (PCa ROI – Benign ROI was 2.17 (SE = 0.11; p <0.001 and in ADC was 551 mm2/sec (SE = 80 mm2/sec; paired t-test, p <0.001. The differences in the means among all groups (benign, primary Gleason 3 and primary Gleason 4 was significant for both RSI z-score (F3,64 = 97.7, p <0.001 and ADC (F3,64 = 13.9, p <0.001. A t-test was performed on only PCa tumor ROIs (n=36 to determine prostate cancer aggressiveness (Gleason 3 vs. Gleason 4 revealing that RSI z-score was still significant (p = 0.03, whereas, ADC values were no longer significant (p = 0.08. In multivariable analysis adjusting for age and race, RSI z-score was associated with PCa aggressiveness (OR 10.3, 95%CI: 1.4-78.0, p=0.02 while ADC trended to significance (p=0.07. Conclusions: The RSI derived normalized cellularity index (RSI z-score is associated with aggressive prostate cancer as determined by pathologic Gleason scores. Further utilization of RSI techniques may serve to enhance standardized reporting systems.

  7. Comparison of a new hydro-surgical technique to traditional methods for the preparation of full-thickness skin grafts from canine cadaveric skin and report of a single clinical case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, F I; Ralphs, S C; Coronado, G; Sweet, D C; Ward, J; Bloch, C P

    2012-01-01

    To compare the hydro-surgical technique to traditional techniques for removal of subcutaneous tissue in the preparation of full-thickness skin grafts. Ex vivo experimental study and a single clinical case report. Four canine cadavers and a single clinical case. Four sections of skin were harvested from the lateral flank of recently euthanatized dogs. Traditional preparation methods used included both a blade or scissors technique, each of which were compared to the hydro-surgical technique individually. Preparation methods were compared based on length of time for removal of the subcutaneous tissue from the graft, histologic grading, and measurable thickness as compared to an untreated sample. The hydro-surgical technique had the shortest skin graft preparation time as compared to traditional techniques (p = 0.002). There was no significant difference in the histological grading or measurable subcutaneous thickness between skin specimens. The hydro-surgical technique provides a rapid, effective debridement of subcutaneous tissue in the preparation of full-thickness skin grafts. There were not any significant changes in histological grade and subcutaneous tissue remaining among all treatment types. Additionally the hydro-surgical technique was successfully used to prepare a full-thickness meshed free skin graft in the reconstruction of a traumatic medial tarsal wound in a dog.

  8. Serum PSA Evaluations during salvage radiotherapy for post-prostatectomy biochemical failures as prognosticators for treatment outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, Tri; Dave, Giatri; Parker, Robert; Kagan, A. Robert

    2001-01-01

    Introduction: Serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels have proved to be sensitive markers for the diagnosis of prostate cancer. In addition, PSA levels are useful for detecting and monitoring prostate cancer progression after radiotherapy. Serum PSA evaluations during radiotherapy, however, have not been well documented. In this study, we investigate the prognostic value of PSA evaluations during salvage radiotherapy for prostatectomy failures. Methods: Forty-one patients with biochemical failures after prostatectomy treated with salvage radiotherapy consented to have their serum PSA levels evaluated at 30 Gy and 45 Gy of irradiation. All 41 patients had negative metastatic workup and pathologically uninvolved pelvic lymph nodes at the time of referral for salvage radiotherapy. Radiation therapy was delivered with 10-25 MV photons, with doses of 59.4-66.6 Gy. No patients received hormonal ablation therapy before irradiation. Results: The mean follow-up for all patients was 30.9 months. At last follow-up, 28/41 patients (68.3%) were free from biochemical failure, with 20 of 41 patients (48.8%) expressing undetectable PSA levels. Serum PSA evaluations at 30 Gy did not significantly predict for either biochemical (p=0.0917) or clinical (p=0.106) disease-free outcome. However, serum PSA evaluations at 45 Gy significantly predicted for both biochemical (p=0.0043) and clinical (p=0.0244) disease-free outcomes, with PSA elevations at 45 Gy significantly associated with poor outcomes. On univariate analysis of prognosticators for biochemical failures, the following were significant: an elevation in serum PSA levels at 45 Gy, detectable serum PSA immediately after prostatectomy, Gleason score 7-10, and serum PSA level >1 ng/ml before salvage radiotherapy. Conclusion: Evaluation of serum PSA level at 45 Gy of salvage radiotherapy for biochemical relapses after prostatectomy may serve as a significant prognosticator for both biochemical and clinical disease-free outcomes

  9. [Minimally invasive surgical therapy of gynecomastia: liposuction and exeresis technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, M; Walgenbach, K J; Andree, C; Bannasch, H; Looden, Z; Stark, G B

    2001-10-01

    A number of techniques are available for the correction of gynecomastia. Nonscarring sparing methods are preferred, and the minimally invasive technique is to use liposuction for the gland and the fatty tissue exclusively. In this retrospective study we present our experience with a combination of liposuction and subsequent resection of the remaining gland. Sixty-two patients (112 breasts) were surgically treated for gynecomastia from January 1996 and September 2000. From 1996 to 1997 all patients suffering from gynecomastia grade Simon I-II were treated by the method described by Rosenberg and Stark, which is exclusively suction of the fatty and glandular tissue. In a retrospective chart study a high recurrence rate was found in these patients. Subsequently we changed our technique to liposuction of the fatty tissue followed by sharp excision of the glandular tissue through the incision made for the liposuction cannula in the submammary fold. Suction alone was not sufficient to remove the glandular tissue; the rate of recurrence after suction was 35%. When sharp resection of the glandular tissue was carried out after the liposuction the recurrence rate dropped to under 10%. In total our complication rate was 50% including minor sequelae. The most frequent complication was unacceptable scarring of the nipple-areola complex. Hypesthesia of the nipple-areola occurred in 13.4% of the patients. The combination of liposuction and resection of the glandular tissue is a minimally invasive correction that can be used in all cases of gynecomastia grade Simon I-II.

  10. Correlation of Peripheral Vein Tumour Marker Levels, Internal Iliac Vein Tumour Marker Levels and Radical Prostatectomy Specimens in Patients with Prostate Cancer and Borderline High Prostate-Specific Antigen: A Pilot Study

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    Farrelly, Cormac, E-mail: farrellycormac@gmail.com [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Lal, Priti [University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine (United States); Trerotola, Scott O.; Nadolski, Gregory J.; Watts, Micah M. [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Gorrian, Catherine Mc. [Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, University College Dublin School of Medicine & Medical Science (Ireland); Guzzo, Thomas J. [University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Department of Urology and Surgery (United States)

    2016-05-15

    PurposeTo correlate prostate-specific antigen (PSA), free to total PSA percentage (fPSA%) and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) levels from peripheral and pelvic venous samples with prostatectomy specimens in patients with prostate adenocarcinoma and borderline elevation of PSA.Materials and MethodsIn this prospective institutional review board approved study, 7 patients with biopsy proven prostate cancer had a venous sampling procedure prior to prostatectomy (mean 3.2 days, range 1–7). Venous samples were taken from a peripheral vein (PVS), the right internal iliac vein, a deep right internal iliac vein branch, left internal iliac vein and a deep left internal iliac vein branch. Venous sampling results were compared to tumour volume, laterality, stage and grade in prostatectomy surgical specimens.ResultsMean PVS PSA was 4.29, range 2.3–6 ng/ml. PSA and PAP values in PVS did not differ significantly from internal iliac or deep internal iliac vein samples (p > 0.05). fPSA% was significantly higher in internal iliac (p = 0.004) and deep internal iliac (p = 0.003) vein samples compared to PVS. One of 7 patients had unilateral tumour only. This patient, with left–sided tumour, had a fPSA% of 6, 6, 6, 14 and 12 in his peripheral, right internal iliac, deep right internal iliac branch, left internal iliac and deep left internal iliac branch samples respectively. There were no adverse events.ConclusionfPSA%, unlike total PSA or PAP, is significantly higher in pelvic vein compared to peripheral vein samples when prostate cancer is present. Larger studies including patients with higher PSA values are warranted to further investigate this counterintuitive finding.

  11. Correlation of Peripheral Vein Tumour Marker Levels, Internal Iliac Vein Tumour Marker Levels and Radical Prostatectomy Specimens in Patients with Prostate Cancer and Borderline High Prostate-Specific Antigen: A Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrelly, Cormac; Lal, Priti; Trerotola, Scott O.; Nadolski, Gregory J.; Watts, Micah M.; Gorrian, Catherine Mc.; Guzzo, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    PurposeTo correlate prostate-specific antigen (PSA), free to total PSA percentage (fPSA%) and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) levels from peripheral and pelvic venous samples with prostatectomy specimens in patients with prostate adenocarcinoma and borderline elevation of PSA.Materials and MethodsIn this prospective institutional review board approved study, 7 patients with biopsy proven prostate cancer had a venous sampling procedure prior to prostatectomy (mean 3.2 days, range 1–7). Venous samples were taken from a peripheral vein (PVS), the right internal iliac vein, a deep right internal iliac vein branch, left internal iliac vein and a deep left internal iliac vein branch. Venous sampling results were compared to tumour volume, laterality, stage and grade in prostatectomy surgical specimens.ResultsMean PVS PSA was 4.29, range 2.3–6 ng/ml. PSA and PAP values in PVS did not differ significantly from internal iliac or deep internal iliac vein samples (p > 0.05). fPSA% was significantly higher in internal iliac (p = 0.004) and deep internal iliac (p = 0.003) vein samples compared to PVS. One of 7 patients had unilateral tumour only. This patient, with left–sided tumour, had a fPSA% of 6, 6, 6, 14 and 12 in his peripheral, right internal iliac, deep right internal iliac branch, left internal iliac and deep left internal iliac branch samples respectively. There were no adverse events.ConclusionfPSA%, unlike total PSA or PAP, is significantly higher in pelvic vein compared to peripheral vein samples when prostate cancer is present. Larger studies including patients with higher PSA values are warranted to further investigate this counterintuitive finding.

  12. Ex vivo metabolic fingerprinting identifies biomarkers predictive of prostate cancer recurrence following radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braadland, Peder R; Giskeødegård, Guro; Sandsmark, Elise; Bertilsson, Helena; Euceda, Leslie R; Hansen, Ailin F; Guldvik, Ingrid J; Selnæs, Kirsten M; Grytli, Helene H; Katz, Betina; Svindland, Aud; Bathen, Tone F; Eri, Lars M; Nygård, Ståle; Berge, Viktor; Taskén, Kristin A; Tessem, May-Britt

    2017-11-21

    Robust biomarkers that identify prostate cancer patients with high risk of recurrence will improve personalised cancer care. In this study, we investigated whether tissue metabolites detectable by high-resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-MAS MRS) were associated with recurrence following radical prostatectomy. We performed a retrospective ex vivo study using HR-MAS MRS on tissue samples from 110 radical prostatectomy specimens obtained from three different Norwegian cohorts collected between 2002 and 2010. At the time of analysis, 50 patients had experienced prostate cancer recurrence. Associations between metabolites, clinicopathological variables, and recurrence-free survival were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression modelling, Kaplan-Meier survival analyses and concordance index (C-index). High intratumoural spermine and citrate concentrations were associated with longer recurrence-free survival, whereas high (total-choline+creatine)/spermine (tChoCre/Spm) and higher (total-choline+creatine)/citrate (tChoCre/Cit) ratios were associated with shorter time to recurrence. Spermine concentration and tChoCre/Spm were independently associated with recurrence in multivariate Cox proportional hazards modelling after adjusting for clinically relevant risk factors (C-index: 0.769; HR: 0.72; P=0.016 and C-index: 0.765; HR: 1.43; P=0.014, respectively). Spermine concentration and tChoCre/Spm ratio in prostatectomy specimens were independent prognostic markers of recurrence. These metabolites can be noninvasively measured in vivo and may thus offer predictive value to establish preoperative risk assessment nomograms.

  13. Satisfactory patient-based outcomes after surgical treatment for idiopathic clubfoot: includes surgeon's individualized technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Susan T; Spencer, Samantha A; Kasser, James R

    2014-09-01

    Treatment of idiopathic clubfoot has shifted towards Ponseti technique, but previously surgical management was standard. Outcomes of surgery have varied, with many authors reporting discouraging results. Our purpose was to evaluate a single surgeon's series of children with idiopathic clubfoot treated with a la carte posteromedial and lateral releases using the Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument (PODCI) with a minimum of 2-year follow-up. A total of 148 patients with idiopathic clubfoot treated surgically by a single surgeon over 15 years were identified, and mailed PODCI questionnaires. Fifty percent of the patients were located and responded, resulting in 74 complete questionnaires. Median age at surgery was 10 months (range, 5.3 to 84.7 mo), male sex 53/74 (71.6%), bilateral surgery 31/74 (41.9%), and average follow-up of 9.7 years. PODCI responses were compared with previously published normal healthy controls using t test for each separate category. Included in the methods is the individual surgeon's operative technique. In PODCIs where a parent reports for their child or adolescent, there was no difference between our data and the healthy controls in any of the 5 categories. In PODCI where an adolescent self-reports, there was no difference in 4 of 5 categories; significant difference was only found between our data (mean = 95.2; SD = 7.427) and normal controls (mean = 86.3; SD = 12.5) in Happiness Scale (P = 0.0031). In this group of idiopathic clubfoot patients, treated with judicious posteromedial release by a single surgeon, primarily when surgery was treatment of choice for clubfoot, patient-based outcomes are not different from their normal healthy peers through childhood and adolescence. While Ponseti treatment has since become the treatment of choice for clubfoot, surgical treatment, in some hands, has led to satisfactory results. Level III.

  14. LAPAROSCOPIC ADENOMECTOMY (PRELIMINARY RESULTS

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    A. Yu. Seroukhov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder outlet obstruction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH remains one of the most common problems of men in the advanced age group. Open prostatectomy for patients with large BPH is still the standard treatment recommended by the European Association of Urology and is performed quiet often. Disadvantages of this method of treatment are significant surgical trauma and high rate of perioperative complications . Laparoscopic modification of simple prostatectomy presents a worthy minimal invasive alternative to open surgical treatment of BPH. From November 2014 to December 2015, laparoscopic adenomectomy was performed for 16 patients. 7 (43.5% patients had transperitoneal (TP and 9 (56.25% patients had extraperitoneal (EP laparoscopic simple prostatectomy. None of the cases required conversion . All patients were discharged in satisfactory condition with complete restoration of free micturation. Laparoscopic prostatectomy as a method of surgical treatment for BPH can be easily reproducible. It can be adopted as a routine urological practice for large-sized BPH with the aim of minimizing operative trauma and achieving short hospital stay.

  15. Evaluation of the results from surgical treatment of fractures of the lateral extremity of the clavicle, using the double ligature technique

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    Alberto Naoki Miyazaki

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the incidence of consolidation in surgical treatment of fractures of the lateral extremity of the clavicle using the double subcoracoid ligature technique, with nonabsorbable No. 5 thread.METHODS: Between May 1993 and June 2013, the Shoulder and Elbow Group of our service surgically treated 116 patients (116 shoulders with fractures of the lateral extremity of the clavicle. Among these, we were able to reassess 65 cases. The surgical technique used consisted of double subcoracoid ligature with two nonabsorbable threads. In two patients classified as type III, we had to combine this technique with use of an interfragmentary screw for fixation of the intra-articular portion of the acromioclavicular joint.RESULTS: We achieved fracture consolidation in 90%. Fourteen cases (21% evolved with major complications: four cases of pseudarthrosis, five of adhesive capsulitis, two of delayed consolidation and three of loss of reduction. Two cases (3% evolved with minor complications of skin granuloma.CONCLUSION: The double ligature technique for fractures of the lateral extremity of the clavicle promotes the stabilization needed for consolidation to take place, without the need for synthesis using metal components. It avoids reoperation for the synthesis material to be removed. Moreover, it is a low-cost procedure with good reproducibility and preservation of the acromioclavicular joint.

  16. Prospective Study of the Surgical Techniques Used in Primary Rhinoplasty on the Caucasian Nose and Comparison of the Preoperative and Postoperative Anthropometric Nose Measurements

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    Berger, Cezar Augusto Sarraf

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The knowledge and study of surgical techniques and anthropometric measurements of the nose make possible a qualitative and quantitative analysis of surgical results. Objective Study the main technique used in rhinoplasty on Caucasian noses and compare preoperative and postoperative anthropometric measurements of the nose. Methods A prospective study with 170 patients was performed at a private hospital. Data were collected using the Electronic System Integrated of Protocols software (Sistema Integrado de Protocolos Eletrônicos, SINPE©. The surgical techniques used in the nasal dorsum and tip were evaluated. Preoperative and 12-month follow-up photos as well as the measurements compared with the ideal aesthetic standard of a Caucasian nose were analyzed objectively. Student t test and standard deviation test were applied. Results There was a predominance of endonasal access (94.4%. The most common dorsum technique was hump removal (33.33%, and the predominance of sutures (24.76% was observed on the nasal tip, with the lateral intercrural the most frequent (32.39%. Comparison between preoperative and postoperative photos found statistically significant alterations on the anthropometric measurements of the noses. Conclusion The main surgical techniques on Caucasian noses were evaluated, and a great variety was found. The evaluation of anthropometric measurements of the nose proved the efficiency of the performed procedures.

  17. Repair-oriented classification of aortic insufficiency: impact on surgical techniques and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boodhwani, Munir; de Kerchove, Laurent; Glineur, David; Poncelet, Alain; Rubay, Jean; Astarci, Parla; Verhelst, Robert; Noirhomme, Philippe; El Khoury, Gébrine

    2009-02-01

    Valve repair for aortic insufficiency requires a tailored surgical approach determined by the leaflet and aortic disease. Over the past decade, we have developed a functional classification of AI, which guides repair strategy and can predict outcome. In this study, we analyze our experience with a systematic approach to aortic valve repair. From 1996 to 2007, 264 patients underwent elective aortic valve repair for aortic insufficiency (mean age - 54 +/- 16 years; 79% male). AV was tricuspid in 171 patients bicuspid in 90 and quadricuspid in 3. One hundred fifty three patients had type I dysfunction (aortic dilatation), 134 had type II (cusp prolapse), and 40 had type III (restrictive). Thirty six percent (96/264) of the patients had more than one identified mechanism. In-hospital mortality was 1.1% (3/264). Six patients experienced early repair failure; 3 underwent re-repair. Functional classification predicted the necessary repair techniques in 82-100% of patients, with adjunctive techniques being employed in up to 35% of patients. Mid-term follow up (median [interquartile range]: 47 [29-73] months) revealed a late mortality rate of 4.2% (11/261, 10 cardiac). Five year overall survival was 95 +/- 3%. Ten patients underwent aortic valve reoperation (1 re-repair). Freedoms from recurrent Al (>2+) and from AV reoperation at 5 years was 88 +/- 3% and 92 +/- 4% respectively and patients with type I (82 +/- 9%; 93 +/- 5%) or II (95 +/- 5%; 94 +/- 6%) had better outcomes compared to type III (76 +/- 17%; 84 +/- 13%). Aortic valve repair is an acceptable therapeutic option for patients with aortic insufficiency. This functional classification allows a systematic approach to the repair of Al and can help to predict the surgical techniques required as well as the durability of repair. Restrictive cusp motion (type III), due to fibrosis or calcification, is an important predictor for recurrent Al following AV repair.

  18. Esophagogastric pathology in morbid obese patient: preoperative diagnosis and influence in the selection of surgical technique

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    Sergio Estévez-Fernández

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Given the difficulty in accessing to the excluded stomach after gastric bypass and the increase in gastroesophageal reflux after sleeve gastrectomy, it is justified to perform a preoperative fibrogastroscopy. The influence of the fibrogastroscopy (FGS findings in the therapeutic approach is analyzed. Patients and methods: A retrospective study of preoperative FGS findings is performed, from 04/06 to 12/12. The influence of the FGS results on the surgical technique selection, in the endoscopic or medical treatment and its relation to gastric fistula is analyzed by means of multivariate regression (confounding factors: Age, body mass index, arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, antiplatelet therapy, surgical technique (bariatric surgery, sleeve gastrectomy. Results: Three hundred thirty one patients are included: 32.6% biopsy of gastric lesion; 27% gastritis; 18.1% hiatal hernia; 3% metaplasia; 0.6% Barrett esophagus; 2.1% esophagitis; 0.3% dysplasia; 0.3 Schatzky's ring; 1.5% incompetent cardia; 2.4% duodenitis; 0.3% gastric erosions; 0.6% gastric xanthoma; 1.8%, gastric polyp; 1.6% duodenal ulcer; 0.6% papulo-erosive gastritis; 0.6% esophageal papilloma; 0.3% submucosal tumor. Helicobacter pylori+ 30.2% (triple therapy eradication in all patients. The FGS findings led to a variation in the surgical technique or to the completion of endoscopic treatment in 22.2% of cases. The gastric lesions did not influence the development of gastric fistula. Independent prognostic factors of fistula: Sleeve gastrectomy (7.9% vs. 2.7%; p = 0.02; OR: 1.38 IC95: 1.01-1.87 and the body mass index > 50 kg/m² (6.7% vs. 2.2%; p = 0.04; OR: 3.7 IC95: 1.12-12.4. Conclusions: The diagnosis of gastroesophageal disease through preoperative FGS motivated variations in the therapeutic approach in 52% of patients, so we consider essential to include the preoperative FGS in bariatric surgery.

  19. Utilization of two different surgical techniques in gingival recession treatment: A comparative study

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    Bajić Miljan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Gingival recession is a displacement of gingival margin apically to cementenamel junction. Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the results achieved with two different surgical procedures used in gingival recession treatment. Methods. Ten patients with bilateral buccal recession on maxillary canines or premolars were included in the study. Professional teeth cleaning was performed before surgery. Recession on the experimental side was treated with connective tissue graft in combination with coronally advanced, split thickness flap (tunnel technique. Control side recession was treated with connective tissue graft in combination with trapezoidal coronally advanced, full thickness flap. Coin toss was used for side decision. The following parameters were evaluated before surgery and 6 months post-op: Vertical Recession Dimension, Clinical Attachment Level, Apico-coronal width of the keratinized tissue, Healing index (Laundry, RES index, and Patient evaluation of esthetic results. Student’s t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results. Six months after surgery, mean root coverage was 91.5±14.1% and 90.1±14.6% on the experimental and on the control side, respectively. RES index, Healing index (Laundry and Patient Subjective evaluation of esthetic results showed significantly better results (p≤0.05. Conclusion. Both surgical procedures produce highly successful clinical results based on evaluated parameters, but this tunnel technique provides significantly better esthetic results. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 41008: Interakcija etiopatogenetskih mehanizama parodontopatije i periimplantitisa sa sistemskim bolestima današnjice

  20. Bilateral sacroiliac luxation fixation using a single transiliosacral pin: surgical technique and clinical outcomes in eight cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parslow, A; Simpson, D J

    2017-06-01

    A very limited safe anatomical window for transiliosacral implant placement exists in cats (sacroiliac fixation in cats using a single implant to minimise inadvertent iatrogenic damage to local structures and restore pelvic canal diameter. Eight cats underwent surgical fixation for traumatic bilateral sacroiliac luxation using a single smooth intramedullary pin. The pin spanned both ilial wings and sacrum. Implants were applied using a Universal C-guide. Pre- and postsurgery pelvic canal diameter ratios were calculated. Short-term follow-up was performed at 10 to 14 days postoperatively. Long-term follow-up was performed using the Feline Musculoskeletal Pain Index Questionnaire. Long-term radiographic assessment was available in two cases. The technique achieved safe and accurate implant position with precise sacroiliac joint reduction. Pelvic canal diameter ratios were restored to normal in all cases. Rapid return to normal hind leg function and excellent long-term clinical outcomes were achieved. This technique offers a simple, safe, repeatable and affordable technique for treating bilateral sacroiliac luxations in the cat without the aid of fluoroscopy. The procedure can be performed using surgical tools and inventory readily available in general small animal practices. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  1. Surgical technique for ambulatory management of airsacculitis in a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, L R; Lee, D R; Keeling, M E

    2001-02-01

    Bacterial infections of the air sac have been reported in many nonhuman primates. Approaches to the management of airsacculitis have included combinations of medical and surgical therapies. These strategies have often required repeated attempts to drain exudate from the affected air sac, as well as necessitating that the animal endure isolation or undergo intensive postoperative care before returning to its social group. A stoma was created via deliberate apposition of the air sac lining and skin to allow continuous drainage. Antibiotic therapy based on culture and antimicrobial susceptibility of the air sac contents was administered while the chimpanzee remained in its social group. We were able to attain complete resolution of the infection after a course of oral antibiotic therapy. The stoma closed gradually over a three-week period, and the chimpanzee has remained free of infection since that time. Despite the severity of the air sac infection in this chimpanzee, we were able to resolve the infection easily, using a simple surgical technique. This method allowed treatment without interfering with social standing or subjection to repeated anesthetic and treatment episodes. This method could be a simple, useful alternative for managing airsacculitis in nonhuman primates.

  2. Does penile rehabilitation have a role in the treatment of erectile dysfunction following radical prostatectomy? [version 1; referees: 2 approved

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    Gideon Blecher

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In men undergoing radical treatment for prostate cancer, erectile function is one of the most important health-related quality-of-life outcomes influencing patient choice in treatment. Penile rehabilitation has emerged as a therapeutic measure to prevent erectile dysfunction and expedite return of erectile function after radical prostatectomy. Penile rehabilitation involves a program designed to increase the likelihood of return to baseline-level erectile function, as opposed to treatment, which implies the therapeutic treatment of symptoms, a key component of post–radical prostatectomy management. Several pathological theories form the basis for rehabilitation, and a plethora of treatments are currently in widespread use. However, whilst there is some evidence supporting the concept of penile rehabilitation from animal studies, randomised controlled trials are contradictory in outcomes. Similarly, urological guidelines are conflicted in terms of recommendations. Furthermore, it is clear that in spite of the lack of evidence for the role of penile rehabilitation, many urologists continue to employ some form of rehabilitation in their patients after radical prostatectomy. This is a significant burden to health resources in public-funded health economies, and no effective cost-benefit analysis has been undertaken to support this practice. Thus, further research is warranted to provide both scientific and clinical evidence for this contemporary practice and the development of preventative strategies in treating erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy.

  3. Combined Surgical Treatment of Gynecomastia

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    Yordanov Y.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Surgical treatment of gynecomastia could present unique challenges for the plastic surgeon. Achieving a good balance between effectiveness of the selected approach and the satisfactory aesthetic outcome often is a difficult endeavor. Optimal surgical treatment involves a combination of liposuction and direct excision. In the present study the charts of 11 patients treated with suction-assisted liposuction and direct surgical excision were retrospectively reviewed; a special emphasis is placed on the surgical technique. The mean follow-up period of the patients was 11.6 months. No infection, hematoma, nipple-areola complex necrosis and nipple retraction was encountered in this series. The combined surgical treatment of gynecomastia has shown to be a reliable technique in both small and moderate breast enlargement including those with skin excess.

  4. Open vs Laparoscopic Simple Prostatectomy: A Comparison of Initial Outcomes and Cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Aslan; Günseren, Kadir Ömür; Kordan, Yakup; Yavaşçaoğlu, İsmet; Vuruşkan, Berna Aytaç; Vuruşkan, Hakan

    2016-08-01

    We compared the cost-effectiveness of laparoscopic simple prostatectomy (LSP) vs open prostatectomy (OP). A total of 73 men treated for benign prostatic hyperplasia were enrolled for OP and LSP in groups 1 and 2, respectively. The findings were recorded perioperative, including operation time (OT), blood lost, transfusion rate, conversion to the open surgery, and the complications according to the Clavien Classification. The postoperative findings, including catheterization and drainage time, the amount of analgesic used, hospitalization time, postoperative complications, international prostate symptom score (IPSS) and International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) scores, the extracted prostate weight, the uroflowmeter, as well as postvoiding residual (PVR) and quality of life (QoL) score at the postoperative third month, were analyzed. The cost of both techniques was also compared statistically. No statistical differences were found in the preoperative parameters, including age, IPSS and QoL score, maximum flow rate (Qmax), PVR, IIEF score, and prostate volumes, as measured by transabdominal ultrasonography. No statistical differences were established in terms of the OT and the weight of the extracted prostate. No differences were established with regard to complications according to Clavien's classification in groups. However, the bleeding rate was significantly lower in group 2. The drainage, catheterization, and hospitalization times and the amount of analgesics were significantly lower in the second group. The postoperative third month findings were not different statistically. Only the Qmax values were significantly greater in group 2. While there was only a $52 difference between groups with regard to operation cost, this difference was significantly different. The use of LSP for the prostates over 80 g is more effective than the OP in terms of OT, bleeding amount, transfusion rates, catheterization time, drain removal time, hospitalization time

  5. Frequency of lingual nerve injury in mandibular third molar extraction: A comparison of two surgical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shad, S.; Abbasi, M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molar is associated with a number of complications including postoperative bleeding, dry socket, postoperative infection, and injury to regional nerves. Lingual nerve damage is one of the main complications. To prevent this complication different techniques had been used. Lingual flap reflection is one of these procedures in which lingual soft tissue is reflected and retracted deliberately, the nerve is identified and is kept out of the surgical field. The objective of this study was to evaluate a surgical technique for third molar removal which is associated with minimum frequency of lingual nerve damage. Method: A randomized controlled trial was performed. A total of 380 patients with impacted mandibular third molars were included in this study. Each patient was allotted randomly by blocked randomization to group A where procedure was performed by reflection and retraction of lingual flap in addition to buccal flap and group B where procedure was performed by retraction of buccal flap only. Results: Lingual nerve damage occurred in 8.94 percentage in Group A in which lingual flap retraction was performed but damage was reversible. In group B, 2.63 percentage lingual nerve damage was observed and nature of damage was permanent. The difference was statistically significant (p=0.008). Conclusions: Lingual flap retraction poses 3.4 times increased risk of lingual nerve damage during extraction of mandibular third molar when lingual flap is retracted but the nature of damage is reversible. (author)

  6. Virtual Surgical Planning for Correction of Delayed Presentation Scaphocephaly Using a Modified Melbourne Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macmillan, Alexandra; Lopez, Joseph; Mundinger, Gerhard S; Major, Melanie; Medina, Miguel A; Dorafshar, Amir H

    2018-02-23

    Late treatment of scaphocephaly presents challenges including need for more complex surgery to achieve desired head shape. Virtual surgical planning for total vault reconstruction may mitigate some of these challenges, but has not been studied in this unique and complex clinical setting. A retrospective chart review was conducted for patients with scaphocephaly who presented to our institution between 2000 and 2014. Patients presenting aged 12 months or older who underwent virtual surgical planning-assisted cranial vault reconstruction were included. Patient demographic, intraoperative data, and postoperative outcomes were recorded. Pre- and postoperative anthropometric measurements were obtained to document the fronto-occipital (FO) and biparietal (BP) distance and calculate cephalic index (CI). Virtual surgical planning predicted, and actual postoperative anthropometric measurements were compared. Five patients were identified who fulfilled inclusion criteria. The mean age was 50.6 months. One patient demonstrated signs of elevated intracranial pressure preoperatively. Postoperatively, all but one needed no revisional surgery (Whitaker score of 1). No patient demonstrated postoperative evidence of bony defects, bossing, or suture restenosis. The mean preoperative, simulated, and actual postoperative FO length was 190.3, 182, and 184.3 mm, respectively. The mean preoperative, simulated, and actual postoperative BP length was 129, 130.7, and 131 mm, respectively. The mean preoperative, simulated, and actual postoperative CI was 66, 72, and 71.3, respectively. Based on our early experience, virtual surgical planning using a modified Melbourne technique for total vault remodeling achieves good results in the management of late presenting scaphocephaly.

  7. Robotic-assisted transperitoneal nephron-sparing surgery for small renal masses with associated surgical procedures: surgical technique and preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccarelli, Graziano; Codacci-Pisanelli, Massimo; Patriti, Alberto; Ceribelli, Cecilia; Biancafarina, Alessia; Casciola, Luciano

    2013-09-01

    Small renal masses (T1a) are commonly diagnosed incidentally and can be treated with nephron-sparing surgery, preserving renal function and obtaining the same oncological results as radical surgery. Bigger lesions (T1b) may be treated in particular situations with a conservative approach too. We present our surgical technique based on robotic assistance for nephron-sparing surgery. We retrospectively analysed our series of 32 consecutive patients (two with 2 tumours and one with 4 bilateral tumours), for a total of 37 robotic nephron-sparing surgery (RNSS) performed between June 2008 and July 2012 by a single surgeon (G.C.). The technique differs depending on tumour site and size. The mean tumour size was 3.6 cm; according to the R.E.N.A.L. Nephrometry Score 9 procedures were considered of low, 14 of moderate and 9 of hight complexity with no conversion in open surgery. Vascular clamping was performed in 22 cases with a mean warm ischemia time of 21.5 min and the mean total procedure time was 149.2 min. Mean estimated blood loss was 187.1 ml. Mean hospital stay was 4.4 days. Histopathological evaluation confirmed 19 cases of clear cell carcinoma (all the multiple tumours were of this nature), 3 chromophobe tumours, 1 collecting duct carcinoma, 5 oncocytomas, 1 leiomyoma, 1 cavernous haemangioma and 2 benign cysts. Associated surgical procedures were performed in 10 cases (4 cholecystectomies, 3 important lyses of peritoneal adhesions, 1 adnexectomy, 1 right hemicolectomy, 1 hepatic resection). The mean follow-up time was 28.1 months ± 12.3 (range 6-54). Intraoperative complications were 3 cases of important bleeding not requiring conversion to open or transfusions. Regarding post-operative complications, there were a bowel occlusion, 1 pleural effusion, 2 pararenal hematoma, 3 asymptomatic DVT (deep vein thrombosis) and 1 transient increase in creatinine level. There was no evidence of tumour recurrence in the follow-up. RNSS is a safe and feasible technique

  8. A novel single-step surgical technique for vestibular deepening using laser in conjunction with periodontal flap surgery

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    Ashu Bhardwaj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis results in clinical loss of attachment, reduced width of attached gingiva (AG, periodontal pockets beyond mucogingival junction (MGJ, gingival recession, loss of alveolar bone, and decreased vestibular depth (VD. The encroachment of frenal and muscle attachments on marginal gingiva increases the rate of progression of periodontal pockets, prevents healing, and causes their recurrence after therapy. Loss of VD and AG associated with continuous progression of pocket formation and bone loss requires two-stage surgical procedures. In this article, one-stage surgical procedure is being described for the first time, to treat the periodontal pockets extending beyond the MGJ by periodontal flap surgery along with vestibular deepening with diode laser to increase the AG. One-step surgical technique is illustrated whereby pocket therapy with reconstruction of lost periodontal tissues can be done along with gingival augmentation by vestibular deepening.

  9. Accelerating orthodontic tooth movement: A new, minimally-invasive corticotomy technique using a 3D-printed surgical template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giansanti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Background A reduction in orthodontic treatment time can be attained using corticotomies. The aggressive nature of corticotomy due to the elevation of muco-periosteal flaps and to the duration of the surgery raised reluctance for its employ among patients and dental community. This study aims to provide detailed information on the design and manufacture of a 3D-printed CAD-CAM (computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing) surgical guide which can aid the clinician in achieving a minimally-invasive, flapless corticotomy. Material and Methods An impression of dental arches was created; the models were digitally-acquired using a 3D scanner and saved as STereoLithography ( STL ) files. The patient underwent cone beam computed tomography (CBCT): images of jaws and teeth were transformed into 3D models and saved as an STL file. An acrylic template with the design of a surgical guide was manufactured and scanned. The STLs of jaws, scanned casts, and acrylic templates were matched. 3D modeling software allowed the view of the 3D models from different perspectives and planes with perfect rendering. The 3D model of the acrylic template was transformed into a surgical guide with slots designed to guide, at first, a scalpel blade and then a piezoelectric cutting insert. The 3D STL model of the surgical guide was printed. Results This procedure allowed the manufacturing of a 3D-printed CAD/CAM surgical guide, which overcomes the disadvantages of the corticotomy, removing the need for flap elevation. No discomfort, early surgical complications or unexpected events were observed. Conclusions The effectiveness of this minimally-invasive surgical technique can offer the clinician a valid alternative to other methods currently in use. Key words:Corticotomy, orthodontics, CAD/CAM, minimally invasive, surgical template, 3D printer. PMID:27031067

  10. Transumbilical laparoendoscopic single-site radical prostatectomy and cystectomy with the aid of a transurethral port: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jian; Zhu, Qingyi; Yuan, Lin; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Qingling; Wei, Yunfei

    2018-01-01

    To describe the surgical technique and report early outcomes of transurethral assisted laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) radical prostatectomy (RP) and LESS radical cystectomy (RC) in a single institution. Between December 2014 and March 2016, a total of 114 LESS RPs and RCs were performed, comprising 68 LESS RPs, 38 LESS RCs with cutaneous ureterostomy (CU) and eight LESS RCs with orthotopic ileal neobladder (OIN). Access was achieved via a single-port, with four channels placed through a transumblical incision. After the apex of prostate was separated from the urethra, a self-developed port ('Zhu's port') was inserted through the urethra to facilitate resection of prostate and urethrovesical anastomosis. The peri-operative and postoperative data were collected and analysed retrospectively. Patients were followed up postoperatively for evidence of long-term side effects. All the procedures were completed successfully. No conversion to conventional laparoscopic surgery was necessary. For LESS RP, the average operating time was 152 min. Estimated blood loss was 117 mL. The mean hospital stay was 16.4 days after surgery. For LESS RC with CU and LESS RC with OIN, the mean operating times were 215 and 328 min, mean estimated blood loss was 175 and 252 mL, and mean hospital stay was 9.4 and 18.2 days, respectively. Six patients required blood transfusion (5.26%). Intra-operative complications occurred in two patients (1.75%), and postoperative complications in nine (7.89%). Fourteen out of 68 (20.6%) patients who underwent LESS RP had positive surgical margins. Follow-up ranged from 10 to 30.6 months. In the prostate cancer cases, good urinary control was observed in 35.3%, 97.1% and 100% of patients at 1, 6 and 12 months after the operation, respectively, while biochemical recurrence was observed in 11.8% patients. In the bladder cancer cases, two patients had local recurrence and two patients had distant metastasis. Our results showed that LESS RP and LESS RC

  11. Capping of the radicular exposed surface (part II). Surgical and not surgical treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Grados Pomarino, Sixto; Estrada, Andrew Alejandro; Maetahara Rubio, Denis Miguel; Guzmán Vera, Yanina Sara; Tello Barbarán, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The gingival recession treatment can be made surgical1y with a high predictability of success due to the great advance during the last ones of the mucogingival surgical techniques. The use of connective grafts in coverage of recessions has obtained high rates of success reason why these procedures are common within the modern periodontal surgical practice. Knowing that all patients do not accept the surgical treatment, many investigators have come studying the possibility of treating non-surg...

  12. Cost-Effectiveness of a Locally Organized Surgical Outreach Mission: Making a Case for Strengthening Local Non-Governmental Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyedu, Adam; Gaskill, Cameron; Boakye, Godfred; Abantanga, Francis

    2017-12-01

    Many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) have a high prevalence of unmet surgical need. Provision of operations through surgical outreach missions, mostly led by foreign organizations, offers a way to address the problem. We sought to assess the cost-effectiveness of surgical outreach missions provided by a wholly local organization in Ghana to highlight the role local groups might play in reducing the unmet surgical need of their communities. We calculated the disability-adjusted life years (DALY) averted by surgical outreach mission activities of ApriDec Medical Outreach Group (AMOG), a Ghanaian non-governmental organization. The total cost of their activities was also calculated. Conclusions about cost-effectiveness were made according to World Health Organization (WHO)-suggested parameters. We analyzed 2008 patients who had been operated upon by AMOG since December 2011. Operations performed included hernia repairs (824 patients, 41%) and excision biopsy of soft tissue masses (364 patients, 18%). More specialized operations included thyroidectomy (103 patients, 5.1%), urological procedures (including prostatectomy) (71 patients, 3.5%), and plastic surgery (26 patients, 1.3%). Total cost of the outreach trips was $283,762, and 2079 DALY were averted; cost per DALY averted was 136.49 USD. The mission trips were "very cost-effective" per WHO parameters. There was a trend toward a lower cost per DALY averted with subsequent outreach trips organized by AMOG. Our findings suggest that providing surgical services through wholly local surgical mission trips to underserved LMIC communities might represent a cost-effective and viable option for countries seeking to reduce the growing unmet surgical needs of their populations.

  13. A Novel Surgical Pre-suturing Technique for the Management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cannot be protruded beyond lower incisor teeth because of a short lingual ... suggests that surgical interventions are absolutely safe at any age including ... Surgical procedures indicated for ankyloglossia are highly predictable but shows poor ...

  14. Surgical complications in 2,840 cases of hemorrhoidectomy by Milligan-Morgan, Ferguson and combined techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme de Almeida Santos

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of 2,840 cases of hemorrhoidectomy by open techniques of Milligan-Morgan (2,189 cases, Ferguson (341 cases and mixed (310 cases in 11,043 patients with hemorrhoidal disease (HD allowed the following conclusions. The patients' acceptance of surgical indication for hemorrhoidectomy was 25.7%. Hemorrhoidectomy was more common among women (53.8% than men (46.2%, and more accepted by women (26.5% than men (24.8%. Hemorrhoidectomy was more common in patients of the fourth (27.7%, fifth (21.9% and third (21.0% decades of age. Most patients who agreed to undergo hemorrhoidectomy were those of the second (38.2%, eighth (35.9% and ninth (34.5% decades of age. The overall incidence of surgical complications was 3.0% (87 cases: anal stenosis (1.8%, bleeding (0.8%, worsening of anal hypotonia (0.2%, sepsis (0.1% and systemic complications (0.1%, with no difference among the techniques used. The incidence of surgical complications by Milligan-Morgan technique was 3.0% - stenosis (1.9%, bleeding (1.9%, worsening of anal hypotonia (0.2% and systemic complications (0.04%. The incidence of surgical complications by Ferguson's technique was 3.5% - stenosis (1.7%, bleeding (0.6%, worsening of anal hypotonia (0.6% and sepsis (0.6%. And the incidence of surgical complications by mixed techniques was 2.5% - stenosis (1.0%, bleeding (0.3%, worsening of anal hypotonia (0.3%, sepsis (0.3% and systemic complications (0.3%. The incidence of surgical complications according to gender was 3.0% among women and 3.2% among men, with higher incidence of stenosis in women (2.0% and hemorrhage in men (1.1%. Surgical complications were more observed in the eighth (5.1% and seventh (3.8% decades of age. The incidence of anal stenosis was 1.8%, being 64.0% without hypotonia and 66.0% without anal fissure (66.0%, with annular stenosis as the most common anatomical shape (70.0%. Anal stenosis was more common among women (2.0% presenting mean age of 38.2 years, with no

  15. The Cost-Effectiveness of Conventional Discectomy Compared to Other Surgical Techniques for Lumbar Disk Herniation. A Systematic Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, May Tone; Ødegaard-Olsen, Øystein; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    Background: The current study reviews the literature on the cost-effectiveness of conventional diskectomy compared to other surgical techniques, by assessing studies with economical evaluation and studies using proxy measures of cost-effectiveness. Methods: In April 2016, a comprehensive search w...... studies. The available evidence, however, suggests that any cost-effectiveness difference between conventional diskectomy and the alternatives is unlikely to be great.......Background: The current study reviews the literature on the cost-effectiveness of conventional diskectomy compared to other surgical techniques, by assessing studies with economical evaluation and studies using proxy measures of cost-effectiveness. Methods: In April 2016, a comprehensive search......-four articles were included in the review, 9 retrieved from the original search, and an additional 15 from reference lists. Four studies included an economical evaluation and 20 reported proxy measures of cost-effectiveness. The quality of studies varied considerably and results were ambiguous; the four...

  16. Do high-volume hospitals and surgeons provide better care in urologic oncology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, James A

    2009-01-01

    Studies focusing primarily on hospital or surgical volume as a surrogate for surgical experience have found substantial variations in outcomes. Increasing surgical experience has been shown to improve outcomes after multiple procedures, including esophagectomy, pancreatectomy, and primary surgery for colon and breast cancer. More recently, evidence has been presented that surgical volume/experience affects quality of life and cancer control outcomes after urologic oncology procedures. Although most of these data pertain to radical prostatectomy, similar conclusions have been reached for radical cystectomy, retroperitoneal lymph node dissection, and management of renal cell carcinoma. This review highlights data indicating that high-volume surgeons and hospitals provide better care for radical prostatectomy.

  17. TECHNICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY FOR EARLY CONTINENCE RECOVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Perepechay

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the technical characteristics of radical prostatectomy (RPE for early continence recovery in patients with prostate cancer. Restoration of the fascial structures of the small pelvis after RPE has been found to promote early urinary continence recovery. A method for total restoration of the fascial structures of the small pelvis (an operation after A. Tewari and a procedure for performing posterior suspension of urethrocystic neoanastomosis in Denonvilliers’ fascia length deficit are considered, which show the similar results in the time of continence recovery.

  18. Quality of life in patients submitted to radical prostatectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Débora Moura Miranda Goluart; Mário Alfredo Silveira Miranzi; Paulo Eduardo Nunes Goulart

    2014-01-01

    A cross-sectional study with a descriptive analysis of 81 patients submitted to radical prostatectomy (RP). Our objective was to correlate quality of life (QL) according to the EORTC-QLQ C30 with age group and time after surgery. Mean age was 65.7 years. Most sought the care of urology, asymptomatic. Some referred former smoking (49.9%) and high blood pressure (53.1%). Mean preoperative SBP was 8.4 ng/ml. Most participants were in stages T2c to T3, Gleason ?6 and over a year after surgery. Er...

  19. Robotic kidney transplantation with regional hypothermia: evolution of a novel procedure utilizing the IDEAL guidelines (IDEAL phase 0 and 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Mani; Abaza, Ronney; Sood, Akshay; Ahlawat, Rajesh; Ghani, Khurshid R; Jeong, Wooju; Kher, Vijay; Kumar, Ramesh K; Bhandari, Mahendra

    2014-05-01

    Surgical innovation is essential for progress of surgical science, but its implementation comes with potential harms during the learning phase. The Balliol Collaboration has recommended a set of guidelines (Innovation, Development, Exploration, Assessment, Long-term study [IDEAL]) that permit innovation while minimizing complications. To utilize the IDEAL model of surgical innovation in the development of a novel surgical technique, robotic kidney transplantation (RKT) with regional hypothermia, and describe the process of discovery and development. Phase 0 (simulation) studies included the establishment of techniques for pelvic cooling, graft placement in a robotic prostatectomy model, and simulation of the RKT procedure in a cadaveric model. Phase 1 (innovation) studies began in January 2013 and involved treatment of a highly selective small group of patients (n=7), using the principles utilized in the phase 0 studies, at a tertiary referral center. IDEAL model implementation in the development of RKT with regional hypothermia. For phase 0 studies, the outcomes evaluated included pelvic and body temperature measurements, and technical feasibility assessment. The primary outcome during phase 1 was post-transplant graft function. Other outcomes measured were operative and ischemic times, perioperative complications, and intracorporeal graft surface temperature. Phase 0 (simulation phase): Pelvic cooling to 15-20(o)C was achieved reproducibly. Using the surgical approach developed for robotic radical prostatectomy, vascular and ureterovesical anastomoses could be done without redocking the robot. Phase 1 (innovation phase): All patients underwent live-donor RKT in the lithotomy position. All grafts functioned immediately. Mean console, anastomotic, and warm ischemia times were 154 min, 29 min, and 2 min, respectively. One patient was re-explored on postoperative day 1. Adherence to the IDEAL guidelines put forth by the Balliol Collaboration provided a practical

  20. Surgical treatment of an acquired posterior urethral diverticulum with cystoscopy assisted robotic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guneri, Cagri; Kirac, Mustafa; Biri, Hasan

    2017-03-01

    A 42-year-old man with a history of recurrent urethral stenosis, recurrent urinary tract infection and macroscopic hematuria has referred to our clinic. He underwent several internal urethrotomies and currently using clean intermittent self-catheterization. During the internal urethrotomy, we noted a large posterior urethral diverticulum (UD) between verumontanum and bladder neck. His obstructive symptoms were resolved after the catheter removal. But perineal discomfort, urgency and dysuria were prolonged about 3-4 weeks. Urinalysis and urine culture confirmed recurrent urinary tract infections. Due to this conditions and symptoms, we planned a surgical approach which was planned as transperitoneal robotic-assisted laparoscopic approach. This technique is still applied for the diverticulectomy of the bladder. In addition to this we utilized the cystoscopy equipments for assistance. During this process, cystoscope was placed in the UD to help the identification of UD from adjacent tissues like seminal vesicles by its movement and translumination. Operating time was 185 min. On the post-operative third day he was discharged. Foley catheter was removed after 2 weeks. Urination was quite satisfactory. His perineal discomfort was resolved. The pathology report confirmed epidermoid (tailgut) cyst of the prostate. Urethrogram showed no radiologic signs of UD after 4 weeks. Irritative and obstructive symptoms were completely resolved after 3 months. No urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction or retrograde ejaculation was noted. While posterior UD is an extremely rare situation, surgical treatment of posterior UD remains uncertain. To our knowledge, no above-mentioned cystoscopy assisted robotic technique for the treatment was described in the literature.

  1. Surgical Approaches to Chronic Pancreatitis: Indications and Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dua, Monica M; Visser, Brendan C

    2017-07-01

    There are a number of surgical strategies for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis. The optimal intervention should provide effective pain relief, improve/maintain quality of life, preserve exocrine and endocrine function, and manage local complications. Pancreaticoduodenectomy was once the standard operation for patients with chronic pancreatitis; however, other procedures such as the duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resections and its variants have been introduced with good long-term results. Pancreatic duct drainage via a lateral pancreaticojejunostomy continues to be effective in ameliorating symptoms and expediting return to normal lifestyle in many patients. This review summarizes operative indications and gives an overview of the different surgical strategies in treating chronic pancreatitis.

  2. Comparison of Biochemical Recurrence-Free Survival after Radical Prostatectomy Triggered by Grade Reclassification during Active Surveillance and in Men Newly Diagnosed with Similar Grade Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Clarissa P; Landis, Patricia; Carter, H Ballentine; Epstein, Jonathan I; Mamawala, Mufaddal

    2017-09-01

    We compared biochemical recurrence between men on active surveillance who underwent radical prostatectomy triggered by grade reclassification and men diagnosed with similar grade disease treated with immediate radical prostatectomy. We retrospectively analyzed the records of men who underwent surgery from 1995 to 2015 at our institution. We identified 4 groups, including 94 and 56 men on active surveillance who underwent radical prostatectomy following reclassification to Gleason 7 (3 + 4) or greater (grade groups 2 or greater) and Gleason 7 (3 + 4) (grade group 2), and 3,504 and 1,979 in the immediate prostatectomy group diagnosed with grade group 2 or greater and 2, respectively. Biochemical recurrence was assessed by Kaplan-Meir analysis and a multivariable Cox model. Men on active surveillance had a lower incidence of biochemical recurrence than men in the immediate radical prostatectomy groups for biopsy grade groups 2 or greater and 2 (each p <0.05). One, 5 and 10-year biochemical recurrence-free survival for men in the active surveillance group vs the immediate radical prostatectomy group was 97.9% vs 85.5%, 76.6% vs 65.1% and 69.0% vs 54.2% in biopsy grade groups 2 or greater (p = 0.009) and 96.4% vs 91.2%, 89.6% vs 74.0% and 89.6% vs 63.9%, respectively, in biopsy grade group 2 (p = 0.071). For biopsy grade groups 2 or greater there was no significant difference in the risk of biochemical recurrence between the groups after adjusting for age, biopsy extent of cancer and prostate specific antigen density. Patients on active surveillance reclassified to grade groups 2 or greater are at no greater risk for treatment failure than men newly diagnosed with similar grades. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prostatectomy-based validation of combined urine and plasma test for predicting high grade prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albitar, Maher; Ma, Wanlong; Lund, Lars

    2018-01-01

    standard formulas, while comparisons between groups were performed using the Wilcoxon Rank Sum, Kruskal-Wallis, Chi-Square, and Fisher's exact test. RESULTS: GS as assigned by standard 10-12 core biopsies was 3 + 3 in 90 (29.4%), 3 + 4 in 122 (39.8%), 4 + 3 in 50 (16.3%), and > 4 + 3 in 44 (14.4%) patients....... CONCLUSIONS: This plasma/urine biomarker test accurately predicts high grade cancer as determined by prostatectomy with a sensitivity at 92-97%, while the sensitivity of core biopsies was 78%....... of a test using cell-free RNA levels of biomarkers in predicting prostatectomy results. METHODS: This multicenter community-based prospective study was conducted using urine/blood samples collected from 306 patients. All recruited patients were treatment-naïve, without metastases, and had been biopsied...

  4. Agent Orange and long-term outcomes after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovadia, Aaron E; Terris, Martha K; Aronson, William J; Kane, Christopher J; Amling, Christopher L; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Freedland, Stephen J; Abern, Michael R

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the association between Agent Orange (AO) exposure and long-term prostate cancer (PC) outcomes. Data from 1,882 men undergoing radical prostatectomy for PC between 1988 and 2011 at Veterans Affairs Health Care Facilities were analyzed from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database. Men were stratified by AO exposure (binary). Associations between AO exposure and biopsy and pathologic Gleason sum (GS) and pathologic stage were determined by logistic regression models adjusted for preoperative characteristics. Hazard ratios for biochemical recurrence (BCR), secondary treatment, metastases, and PC-specific mortality were determined by Cox models adjusted for preoperative characteristics. There were 333 (17.7%) men with AO exposure. AO-exposed men were younger (median 59 vs. 62 y), had lower preoperative prostate-specific antigen levels (5.8 vs. 6.7 ng/ml), lower clinical category (25% vs. 38% palpable), and higher body mass index (28.2 vs. 27.6 kg/m(2)), all P<0.01. Biopsy GS, pathologic GS, positive surgical margins, lymph node positivity, and extracapsular extension did not differ with AO exposure. At a median follow-up of 85 months, 702 (37.4%) patients had BCR, 603 (32.2%) patients received secondary treatment, 78 (4.1%) had metastases, and 39 (2.1%) died of PC. On multivariable analysis, AO exposure was not associated with BCR, secondary treatment, metastases, or PC mortality. AO exposure was not associated with worse preoperative characteristics such as elevated prostate-specific antigen levels or biopsy GS nor with BCR, secondary treatment, metastases, or PC death. Thus, as data on AO-exposed men mature, possible differences in PC outcomes observed previously are no longer apparent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: omitting a pelvic drain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Canes

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Our goal was to assess outcomes of a selective drain placement strategy during laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP with a running urethrovesical anastomosis (RUVA using cystographic imaging in all patients. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed for all patients undergoing LRP between January 2003 and December 2004. The anastomosis was performed using a modified van Velthoven technique. A drain was placed at the discretion of the senior surgeon when a urinary leak was demonstrated with bladder irrigation, clinical suspicion for a urinary leak was high, or a complex bladder neck reconstruction was performed. Routine postoperative cystograms were obtained. RESULTS: 208 patients underwent LRP with a RUVA. Data including cystogram was available for 206 patients. The overall rate of cystographic urine leak was 5.8%. A drain was placed in 51 patients. Of these, 8 (15.6% had a postoperative leak on cystogram. Of the 157 undrained patients, urine leak was radiographically visible in 4 (2.5%. The higher leak rate in the drained vs. undrained cohort was statistically significant (p = 0.002. Twenty-four patients underwent pe